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SERVING SONOMA & NAPA COUNTIES | APRIL 12-18, 2017 | BOHEMIAN.COM • VOL. 38.49

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UPSCALE CAMPING ON THE RISE IN THE NORTH BAY P13

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at Summerfield Waldorf School to the selection at Circle of Hands.

Circle of Hands was brought to the Barlow Center by Leslie Young to offer an array of Waldorf-inspired children’s and family products to the community. Leslie brings over 20 years of experience working and teaching

Waldorf ideals shine though the natural materials used in creating simple and classic hand-made toys, clothing and art supplies. Fairies and unicorns line the shelves; lavender oil and beeswax scent the air; voices of Br’er Rabbit and Pipi Longstockings might be heard. Locally handcrafted and sourced wooden animals, soft dolls, cotton bears, velvet pocket babies, mobiles, puzzles, building blocks, nativity scenes, circus equipment, silk/wool long-johns, even cloth diapers— all weave together to support a creative childhood and healthy family lifestyle. We proudly offer simple, environmentally-conscious toys made of natural materials and local hand-crafted items that protect and foster the healthy development of young children.

Circle of Hands 6780 McKinley Street, Suite 120 Sebastopol

707.634.6140 circleofhandswaldorfshop.com

procedure and looking for a good surgeon, I would consider it a privilege to be your plastic surgeon.

DAVID E. MARCUS, M.D. David E. Marcus, M.D. has been voted the Best Plastic Surgeon in Sonoma County for the last eight years and specializes in breast enhancement, body sculpting and tummy tucks. “I am here to do what is best for you, not myself. The last thing I want to do is make you feel pressured into surgery or feel self-conscious about your body. If you are researching a

Dr. Marcus is a Board Certified Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeon. Since opening his practice in 1986, Dr. Marcus has devoted himself to the study and practice of Cosmetic Surgery. Thousands have felt better about themselves and their appearance thanks to the medical care of Dr. Marcus and his staff. His patients’ enthusiastic recommendations have given Dr. Marcus a reputation for beautiful, natural-looking results in both his body and facial work. Along with being a member of the American, California, and Sonoma County Medical Associations, Dr. Marcus is also a member of the two most prestigious professional societies for plastic surgeons, the American Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery.

707.575.1626 DAVID E. MARCUS, M.D.

Best Plastic Surgeon

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Business Profiles Shop, Dine and Play! Get to know our local business community.


3 Rebecca enjoys swimming, mountain biking, skiing, snowboarding, rock climbing, kiteboarding, etc…sports of all kinds.

Clothing, jewelry, shoes and fine crafts Silk Moon has a good number of repeat customers and plenty of loyal followers. Featuring a wide range of clothing and shoes, it's a favorite shopping destination for men and women alike, but it does favor the ladies with a wide range of clothing styles. Whether it's casual jeans and cotton tees or dressy slacks, dresses, skirts or blouses, Silk Moon has it all. Unique items like a good selection of colorful hats in various shapes and sizes, scarves, and socks in a rainbow of colors set the shop apart from other boutiques. Eclectic jewelry also makes the store special and a feast for the eyes. Silk Moon is also for men and is a reliable resource for a nice dress shirt. "Clothing is our strength, it's our glue that allows us to do more," per Melanie Goodpasture, owner. "People are always commenting on the merchandising and how colorful it is inside the store. It's really a beautiful place to work," cites Andrea Caron, owner and shoe buyer. We take pride in stocking a generous range of shoe styles to satisfy a diverse crowd of shoppers. Continuing the Silk Moon tradition of providing quality merchandise and excellent customer service is central for the team.

195 N Main Street, Sebastopol

707.824.4300 Open Monday–Sunday 10am to 6pm

After destroying her left knee joint from overuse, a friend introduced her to Bikram Yoga. She was amazed at what practicing Bikram Yoga did for her body. Her knee joint slowly became stronger and stopped throbbing with pain. Her body's alignment, posture, balance, and strength improved incredibly. Her athletic abilities greatly increased in all of the sports she plays. As long as she does Bikram Yoga three or more times per week, her knee stays strong and can take the impact of running, mountain biking, etc… With regular Bikram Yoga practice, Rebecca also noticed that her stress level began to decrease and she was able to sleep better at night. Rebecca has practiced Bikram Yoga for over 14 years now. She practiced through most of her pregnancy with twins. She is now a mom with 2.5 year old boy/girl twins and the local small business owner of Bikram Yoga Santa Rosa. She has seen how much Bikram Yoga has helped not only herself, but everyone who practices around her. She has seen those of all ages, sizes, and abilities benefit greatly from a regular Bikram Yoga practice. She has seen so many students transform their bodies, and reduce aches and pains. Bikram Yoga improves strength, endurance, flexibility, posture, and balance. It also reduces stress, anxiety, and pain. And of course, there’s the weight loss. The average student

burns 750 calories in each session. It’s tough, but the benefits are many. You don’t have to be an athlete to participate in Bikram Yoga. People of all ages and fitness levels can benefit greatly from the classes. Each student is encouraged to proceed at his or her own pace. Rebecca went to a 500 hour Bikram Yoga teacher training in April 2010. She absolutely loves teaching Bikram Yoga and motivating students to stay healthy and strong.

522 Wilson St, Santa Rosa

707.545.9642 bikramyogaofsantarosa.com

Thank you for your vote!

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Rebecca, owner of Bikram Yoga Santa Rosa, grew up in Sebastopol, California. She has a degree in Kinesiology and Psychology. Her passion is fitness, nutrition, and health.


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Bohemian

LOCAL Alternative

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to the Big Banks

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News Editor Tom Gogola, ext. 106

Arts Editor Charlie Swanson, ext. 203

Copy Editor Gary Brandt, ext. 150

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Advertising Account Managers Augusto León, ext. 212 Mercedes Murolo, ext. 207 Lynda Rael, ext. 204

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2017 Metrosa Inc.

Cover design by Tabi Zarrinnaal.


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‘I discovered a secret door to Oz that’s hidden in plain sight in the city of Napa.’ SWIRL P12 Glamping Goes Mainstream COV ER STORY P13

‘The Birds’ Soars Onstage COV ER STORY P22

Scary, Sexy ‘Personal Shopper’ F I LM P 2 3 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Dining p10 Swirl p12 Cover Feature p13

Culture Crush p20 Arts & Ideas p21 Stage p22 Film p23 Music p24

Clubs & Concerts p25 Arts & Events p28 The Nugget p34 Classified p35 Astrology p35

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AP R I L 1 2-1 8, 20 17 | BOH EMI A N.COM

HIGH THREAD COUNT

Glamping aims to marry the best of a hotel experience with an outdoor experience. The trend is on the rise in the North Bay, p13.


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | AP R I L 1 2-1 8 , 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

Angel of Art I must take exception to remarks made by Joe Martinez in his April 5 letter to the editor. Referencing your wonderful article “A Dreamer’s Diary” (March 8) about Maria de los Angeles, Mr. Martinez wrote: “You ungrateful dreamer. Spend all that money on that good education, and all you are is an artist. What a waste.” Maria de los Angeles is not only a true artist, in the sense of someone whose talent is singular and totally original. Maria is a light, the love and

the hope, not only to her Latina sisters, fellow dreamers and young people but to the Latino community at large, and by her creative and courageous example, she is an inspiration to us all. She is a teacher, visionary and activist speaking out at her own personal danger. One tragedy surrounding Maria is that all immigrants are being unfairly targeted and persecuted by the heinous Trump administration. A second tragedy is that in our society, so many people have become so desensitized that we cannot open ourselves up to the healing

THIS MODERN WORLD

power of art, nor take heed when we find an angel like Maria los de Angeles in our midst.

DAVID MAGDALENE

Windsor

Helping the Homeless To those who deal on a constant basis with the homeless situation in Guerneville: The solution is not to bus

By Tom Tomorrow

them to Santa Rosa. It does not help to dump unopened cans of beer. It compounds the situation even more. The people who live on the streets need homeless advocates to help them navigate the support systems available. Most of the people who congregate on sidewalks or parking lots in Guerneville don’t have the motivation to make positive change on their own. Everyone needs to help and not just stand on the sidelines and watch. To eradicate this homeless situation I think we as a country need to look at what Canada did to end its homeless crisis. It’s not an easy fix. Money alone is not enough. The solution is not to transfer a group of people to Santa Rosa. Homeless services need to be available on the weekend. The homeless groups in Guerneville are nothing like those in Santa Rosa.

NICOLE SARTAIN Guerneville

Sheriff Recall Many thanks for the informative piece about the county’s costs while delaying resolution of the Lopez wrongful-death suit and for pointing out that the board of supervisors is more than willing to shortchange Andy’s Unity Park, which they previously agreed to fund fully (“At What Cost,” April 5). Meanwhile, the notice of intention to recall the sheriff was served by members of the Community Action Coalition on March 24. The sheriff’s announcement about not running for re-election was made just a few hours later the same day. Since the sheriff still has nearly two more years to go in this term and given his declaration to cooperate with ICE, the recall effort continues.

KATHLEEN FINIGAN Santa Rosa

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


Rants

7

The value of journalism in the age of Trump—or any age BY STETT HOLBROOK

L

ast week, we learned the Bohemian won three first or second place awards from the California Newspaper Publishers Association for stories written in 2016. The awards will be announced May 20.

Tom Gogola’s story “Condemned Men Talking” (Jan. 15), about life on San Quentin’s death row, earned a nomination in the best writing category and was one of my favorite stories of the year. In the local government category, regular Bohemian contributor Will Parrish was recognized for his story “Crude Awakening” (June 8), about new rules to prevent Canadian tar sands oil production in Bay Area refineries. And my story “Of Water and Wine” (June 15), about development pressures on water resources in Napa County received a nomination in the environmental coverage category. These are tough times for journalism, given the anticonstitutional bent of Donald Trump and his henchmen and their criticism of reporting that isn’t favorable of them. But for as long as I’ve been in journalism—20 years—the times have always been tough. Newsrooms and budgets continue to shrink. Competition for ad revenue is more fierce than ever. And that darned internet, with its firehose of “news,” looks like it here’s to stay. Toughest of all, we’re told fewer people actually read newspapers on a regular basis. Not exactly a rosy picture. And yet, somehow, reporters continue to tell compelling, crucial stories that hold the powerful accountable. This week, Pulitzer prizes for journalism were announced (we didn’t get one—next year!), and the list of winning stories should be a source of pride for every American who believes in the importance of the First Amendment. The stories include coverage of the Oakland Ghost Ship fire by the East Bay Times, and Washington Post reporter David Fahrenthold’s stories on Trump’s bogus claims of generosity toward charities. I don’t know about you, but I feel a little better knowing that there are reporters out there willing to dig in and cause trouble. In a democracy, there is no alternative to a free press. Stett Holbrook is editor of the ‘Bohemian.’ Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

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Power of the Pen


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Paper THE

ROAD TO RUINS This past winter has been particulary hard on local roads. Marin was the hardest hit county in the state.

Storm’s Toll Caltrans says winter damage to state to eclipse $1 billion BY TOM GOGOLA

T

his year’s winter storms will cost California $866 million in road repairs, according to the latest estimates from the California Department of Transportation.

That figure is a significant uptick from the $617 million in damaged assessed at the end of February, and doesn’t include damage estimates from last weekend’s wind-blown deluge which knocked out electricity throughout Marin County, along

with the usual array of rockslides, washouts and local road flooding. The latest figures from Caltrans find Marin County easily at the top of the state list of storm-related 2016–17 damage with $91 million total spread over 17 different projects. The

latest damage spreadsheets are a chorus of slip-outs and rockslides, road washouts and sinkholes, failed culverts and accelerated pavement failures. To date, Caltrans has identified 402 damage sites spread throughout the state’s 58 counties. Napa County has 14 damage sites and Sonoma County has 17, according to Caltrans spreadsheets that detail the statewide damage. The respective price tags for repair are significantly lower than Marin’s: Caltrans says it will cost $16.5 million to repair Napa’s storm-damaged roads and $44 million to fix Sonoma’s. That Marin County figure of $91 million translates into an eye-raising fact: roughly one in 10 dollars spent by Caltrans this spring and summer will be spent on one coastal county. And of the $91 million in damage to Marin roads, $78 million is accounted for in 13 damage sites spread along Highway 1. Several of the Sonoma County damage sites are also on Highway 1, and comprise about $10 million of the total $44 million damage estimate. Marin County also fields the third highest single-job estimate of the 402 damage sites identified by Caltrans in its latest damage report, a $17.4 million job to fix a slip-out on Highway 1 with a tie-back wall. Only Santa Clara and Monterey counties have single-ticket items that eclipse Marin’s $17.4 million project. Caltrans pegged $30 million for a wall repair in Santa Clara county, and Monterey’s got a pricey $28 million line item on the spreadsheet to replace the Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge, representing about half of that county’s $60 million in damages. Clearly the Bay Area and North Coast took the biggest hit in the winter-spring storms of 2016 and 2017. The top counties after Marin are Santa Clara County, on the hook for $72 million; San Mateo, $63 million; Humboldt, $60 million; and Mendocino, $65 million. For comparison, Los Angeles County racked up $55 million in damage to its state roads.


Trump has also made lots of noise about a big infrastructure build-out, tantalizing talk for Democratic fence-sitters looking for a way to work with the president, even as his proposed budget eliminates the federal Department of Transportation, which Thompson recently noted in his critique of Trump’s budget proposal, “provides almost $500 million in road projects.”

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Caltrans estimates that when local costs are factored into their estimate, the total damage price tag is $1.27 billion. Recent reports estimated Marin County’s road damage obligations at $10 million, out of the estimated $400 million that localities will pick up this year. The agency reports that it will spend $700 million on emergency projects this year, “leaving $170 million for permanent restoration projects.” “This total will likely rise as we continue to assess damage and estimate repair and restoration costs,” says Caltrans spokesman Mark Dinger via email. Help is on the way—generally speaking. Last week, the California Legislature passed SB 1, which will raise California’s gasoline excise tax by 12 cents a gallon and enacts other autorelated fees in the state to fund a long-awaited, $55 billion road repair plan over 10 years. At the federal level, on April 4, Trump signed off on an unspecified commitment of Federal Emergency Management Agency dollars after Gov. Jerry Brown petitioned the administration for disaster relief earlier this year when the storm damage had eclipsed $500 million. Last week, the administration freed up additional but unspecified funds for Sonoma, Napa and Marin counties. The declaration of disaster will presumably allow counties to pay for a range of repairs brought on by the wicked winter of 2016–17. FEMA’s eventual contribution to California’s storm-damage repair remains an open question, especially given the erratic and contradictory messages coming from the White House. Trump has threatened to withhold FEMA funds to so-called sanctuary cities—there’s a bill in Sacramento that would make the entire state a sanctuary state. Even as Trump pledges disaster relief to California, the administration’s 2017 budget proposal calls for a $667 million cut in FEMA predisaster mitigation programs, according to North Bay U.S. representative Mike Thompson.

One in 10 dollars spent by Caltrans this spring and summer will go to Marin County. So what does all this mean for Sonoma County’s notorious pothole problems? Probably not much. Voters in Sonoma turned back a proposed road-fix tax in 2015, a quarter-cent sales tax under Measure A. County officials have argued they need up to $1 billion to upgrade county roads—but the Sonoma County Supervisors could only scratch together $30 million in local roadfix dollars in 2015. The county website goes to pains to explain why there are so many potholes: “At about 2,700 lane miles, the road system of unincorporated Sonoma County is one of the most expansive in the greater Bay Area. Sonoma County also happens to be one of the more sparsely-populated municipalities in the region. This means that the amount of revenue generated for road repair in Sonoma County is below average for the amount of roadway. And for this reason, potholes are a common occurrence.”

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Dining MEATLESS WONDER Hunter Bryson packages the first batch of Shroom Jerky.

Jerky Boys

Occidental brothers turn from growing mushrooms to making fungi snacks BY STETT HOLBROOK

W

hen Wyatt Bryson moved back home to his family’s 15-acre property in Occidental to make a go as a farmer, friends said he’d have a tough time earning a living. He’d been growing edible mushrooms in Hawaii and hoped to apply his knowledge here, selling oyster mushroom kits and

teaching classes so customers could grow their own. The fungus-farm idea is still alive, but Bryson has dropped his shovel and turned his energies to another fungal enterprise: mushroom jerky. He and his brother, Hunter, came up with the idea. Hunter’s wife is from Thailand, and that’s where Hunter was exposed to mushrooms as a street snack. “My brother is a chef,” Bryson says, “and he whipped together

a recipe we just got an amazing response from, and we were like ‘Man, I think we’re on to something,’ and we changed gears. We’re not growing mushrooms at the moment but focused on building the jerky business.” The brothers joined with business partner Darren Racusen. They’ve only been operational for about month, but interest is growing. The product, Shroom Jerky, is sold at Occidental’s

Bohemian Market, Scotty’s Market in San Rafael, Mill Valley Market and online at shroomjerky.com. Bryson says they are in talks with Community Market and Oliver’s Market to carry the product. A 2.5-ounce package sells for $7.99. The inherently sweet, nutty flavor of the oyster mushrooms plays off the marinade well. If you didn’t know the jerky was made with mushrooms, you might mistake it for meat. The flavor and texture are meaty, not surprising since oyster mushrooms are high in protein. Current flavors include sesame and sweet chile. Thai curry and Louisiana barbecue flavors are in the works. “I like to take it into bars sometimes and fool people,” says Hunter. “They say, ‘I love it. Is it beef or pork?’” If you were stuck in the car on a long road trip with a bunch of vegans and this was all they brought to snack on you would not be bummed. Heck, I’d pick up a bag myself after the trip was over. While there are highquality brands of beef jerky on the market, much of it comes from meat of dubious quality, and Shroom Jerky makes for a more healthful snack, whether you’re a meat eater or not. The strength of Shroom Jerky is its simplicity: dried organic oyster mushrooms and a handful of seasonings. The process is pretty simple, too. Dried mushrooms are rehydrated in a sauce and then dried again at the company’s commercial kitchen in Sebastopol. When done, the mushrooms still retain moisture and are pleasantly chewy. “They’ve got a great flavor,” says Bryson, “and aren’t as mushroomy as others like shiitakes.” While the brothers plan to start growing mushrooms again at the family ranch, it won’t be enough to meet their needs. Ten pounds of fresh mushrooms dries down to one pound, and since they make jerky in 50-pound batches, they’d need 500 pound of fresh mushrooms for each run. That’s a lot of fungus, even for passionate mushroom men like the Brysons.


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Lo Coco’s C u c i n a R u s t ic a

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LoCoco’s is everything an Italian restaurant should be—boisterous, busy, fun, with excellent authentic food of the best quality: fresh seafood, meats and pasta.

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I

n a typical episode from my life in the world of wine, I had just discovered my new favorite style of wine when it all but disappeared from store shelves.

I despaired that I’d never get to explore these wines again until I could manage to travel to the far corner of the earth where they are made, in a land called Oz. But then I discovered a secret door to Oz that’s hidden in plain sight in the city of Napa. “We call it the Yellowtail effect,” says Blair Poynton, marketing manager at Old Bridge Cellars. Poynton is talking about the inexpensive Australian wine brand with the wallaby logo that became ubiquitous on supermarket shelves in the early 2000s. The problem wasn’t Yellowtail—it’s pretty well

made for the price point, Poynton concedes—but that imitators (he mentions a certain Penguin) diluted the reputation of Aussie “critter wines.” And then the 2008 financial crisis put the brakes on the whole category. Sure, recession-era wine drinkers might have put up with even a diluted, cheap Shiraz buzz, but the Australian dollar refused to tank against the U.S. dollar. Instead, it doubled. All this was not convenient for Old Bridge Cellars, a Napa-based import business that planted its flag on Australian wine back in 1993. Old Bridge responded by diversifying its portfolio to include wines from Chile, the United States, Italy and—gasp!—France. Today, Australian imports are on the uptick again, but it’s not about the “cheap and cheerful” wines this time, Poynton says. It’s about higher quality wineries like South Australia’s d’Arenberg that Old Bridge has always championed. Australia’s fine-wine culture is at least as old and developed as California’s, says Poynton, an easygoing Aussie who met his Californian wife during one crush season Down Under. “I’ve got mates who drive trucks for mines,” he says, “but they know the difference between a southeastern and a western Australian Riesling.” Also, they drink loads of beer, he adds. Indeed, it’s wines like Kilikanoon’s 2010 Mort’s Reserve Clare Valley Riesling ($35) that brought me here in the first place. Like Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon is to Bordeaux, south Australian Riesling isn’t an imitation of the Mosel version— this wine is a toasty, lime juice and pineapple-flavored, very dry and tangy exemplar of an entirely different take on the varietal. Old Bridge Cellars plans to open its doors to Oz, and other regions, just a tiny bit more for its Napa neighbors with Thursday evening tastings in the near future at their longtime offices, a grand old, slightly cluttered, dog-friendly old house at 703 Jefferson St. in Napa. Meanwhile, go to obcwines. com or call Blair at 707.258.9552.


13 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AP R I L 1 2-1 8, 20 17 | BOH EMI A N.COM

NOT EXACTLY ROUGHING IT The comfort and lower cost of glamping at places like Guerneville’s Autocamp is catching on.

Happy Glampers Luxury camping puts down stakes in the North Bay

T

he travel industry is ever on the lookout for creative mash-ups and newest things. Take the “poshtel,” for instance, an upgrade on the cheap, no-frills backpacker hostel. While the staying power of that category remains to be seen, glamping, another hybrid concept, appears to be here to stay.

As with the poshtel, glamping is a mishmash of a time-tested experience with a glamorous tweak: outdoor camping injected

with convenience and luxury. No need to bring the tent—it awaits your arrival. Instead of stiff camping mats, there

BY FLORA TSAPOVSKY

are plush beds with high-end mattresses. Elegant gas lamps replace flashlights. While it’s not as cheap as a sleeping bag on the dirt, glamping does offer lower prices than the brick-and-mortar hotels it imitates. Glamping, which might involve sleeping in a yurt or a vintage trailer, has been enjoyed outside the United States for years,

but the trend has only recently taken root in the North Bay, as innovative hoteliers meet the rising demand for lodging. Last year, Terra Glamping established a pop-up lodging experience on the Sonoma-Mendocino border, just above Timber Cove, with ocean-view tents, memory foam mattresses, cooking facilities and embroidered rugs ) 14


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Glamping ( 13 to complete the experience. Breakfast and coffee are served in the morning, and in the evening there are s’mores by the campfire. A number of Napa Valley wineries have taken to the quick setup of glamping tents and provide an alternative to sleeping among the vines. Charles Krug Winery in St. Helena started to offer tent stays on its lawn last summer as part of a private wine-industry event. A similar, albeit seasonal, offering can be

found at Pope Valley Winery in collaboration with Terravello Tours, which specializes in food and glamping experiences. “It’s definitely a trend, two decades in the making,” says Tim Zahner, chief marketing officer for Sonoma County Tourism. “Safari West in Santa Rosa has had their tents for a number of years, and the Petaluma KOA and the Cloverdale KOA are definitely upgrading their amenities. As people get out and want to experience the outdoors, we are definitely promoting it.” Zahner himself might be a


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“more of an REI backpacker kind of guy,” but he can’t deny the potential. “As Sonoma County has every kind of lodging, it’s good to have a balanced portfolio. You don’t want to have too much glamour or too much camping, and glamping appeals to the middle ground and to possible shifts in the economy.” Crista Luedtke, the owner of Boon Hotel and Boon Restaurant, was there first. This season, running May to October, will be Boon’s fourth year with glamping. “Since we constantly had to tell people we were sold-out at the

hotel, I thought of adding these amazing tents, but didn’t want to cramp them,” she says (Boon makes only three tents available for $140 a night). “We already had the bathroom and shower building that we’ve been using for events, so it’s almost like having your own facility, plus all the amenities are the same—the pool, breakfast in your tent.” For hotel operators like Luedtke, the flexibility and ease of tents are attractive. “It’s been a great way to add more accommodation without adding buildings, ) 16

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Guerneville being a seasonal destination,” she says. A newcomer to the Russian River, Autocamp also offers “luxury tents” with power outlets and plush linens, as well as a slightly more permanent yet still camping-inspired solution: vintage, refurbished Airstream trailers. Starting in Santa Barbara in 2013, Autocamp’s funky premise is in the spirit of glamping, turning something familiar and old-school into something new. Co-founder Ryan Miller said he discovered the Guerneville location on a scouting road trip. “I fell in love with the town, not knowing what to expect prior to visiting,” he says. It took the company 14 months to buy the riverfront property and build the clubhouse where guests can purchase snacks and sit by a fire pit. Autocamp’s tents and trailers range from $190 to $350 a night. There’s nothing new about yurts, but Napa County’s Bothe State Park brings them to a new audience in wine country. The park added the three yurts in 2015 and joined the Outbound Collective, an online community similar to Airbnb for outdoorsy types. Bookings provide links to nature experiences. For $70 a night, visitors hiking the Coyote Trail or visiting the state park can rest on a comfortable bed while still being able to hear the outside world. Meaghan Clark Tiernan, a 30-year-old writer from San Francisco, stayed in one of the yurts soon after they launched. “Compared to the tent, it was much nicer,” says Clark Tiernan. “The yurt was cozy, so you didn’t need extra layers. We had much more room to spread out, change, and it was still camping in the sense that you were cooking your food outside on the fire.” While the Bothe yurts are on the cheaper side, the prices at other glamping destinations are steeper than the average camping site. So who goes glamping? Adventuresome folks generally

in their 40s or younger, says Luedtke. Inbal Itachi, 35, a designer from San Francisco, treated her sister visiting from Israel to Luedtke’s glamping experience. “It was especially fun waking up in the middle of nature, in the woods, and getting breakfast in bed,” she says, “and spending time at the hotel’s pool with drinks and magazines.” The fear of getting bitten by insects was her only complaint.

‘As people get out and want to experience the outdoors, we are definitely promoting it.’ Autocamp’s Miller says glamping appeals to more than one demographic. “You’ll have the millennials that may live in San Francisco, and then folks that grew up with the nostalgia of an Airstream and love the opportunity to stay in one,” he says. Travelers are looking for something different these days, he says, “to break the mold” of hotel stays. “What’s your favorite thing about a hotel? Design, great mattress, a good shower? What’s the best about camping? Being outdoors. We’re taking all these and mixing them together,” he says. Luedtke thinks along similar lines. “Look, I love to camp,” she says, “but it’s a commitment. You carry all your gear, spend a couple of hours setting up and tearing down. Or you can just arrive and have access to it all.”


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TIBURON

United in Film

The Tiburon International Film Festival is known as the United Nations of cinema, showcasing independent film selections from across the globe. This year’s 16th annual festival is highlighted by a tribute to two-time Oscar-winning Czech director Milos Forman, whose body of work includes One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest and Amadeus. Celebrating Forman’s 85th birthday, the tribute features a screening of the recent documentary, Milos Forman: What Doesn’t Kill You . . . . Closer to home, Marin and Bay Area filmmakers also get a spotlight. A world of film comes to the North Bay Friday, April 14, through Thursday, April 20, at the Playhouse Theater, 40 Main St., Tiburon. tiburonfilmfestival.com.

SONOMA

The week’s events: a selective guide

Musical Identity

Guitarist Max Kakacek and drummer Julien Ehrlich formed indie-rock outfit Whitney in 2014, after living together in Chicago. Both musicians were already accomplished players in bands like the Smith Westerns and Unknown Mortal Orchestra, and they joined forces to create a sound that resembles the melancholy melodies of Townes Van Zandt and Bon Iver and the electrically charged rock of bands like Pavement and Foxygen. Since forming, the duo has expanded Whitney to a seven-piece ensemble that’s been getting rave reviews from all corners of the music world. Whitney plays an intimate concert on Friday, April 14, at Gundlach Bundschu Winery, 2000 Denmark St., Sonoma. 7pm. $37. 707.938.5277.

SEBASTOPOL

Beer Run

In the immortal words of one-hit wonders the Proclaimers, “I would walk 5,000 miles” for a great IPA. Thankfully, the organizers behind the IPA 10K & Beer Mile Invitational won’t make you go quite that far, though the event does get you moving with a 6.2-mile course to run. The Beer Mile follows the morning run, with participants chugging a beer every quarter mile lap until they complete the circuit. Don’t feel like running? No problem, the festival is open to the public for a reception and expo on Friday, April 14, and a beer garden packed with local brewers and live music on Saturday, April 15, at the Barlow Event Center, 6770 McKinley St., Sebastopol. ipa10k.com.

N A PA

Lend Me Your Ear

Did you know that the late actor Leonard Nimoy wrote and starred in a one-man play about Vincent van Gogh? It’s logical. First opening in the early 1980s, ‘Vincent’ became a smash hit on Broadway and is still a favorite at festivals around the world. Since 1994, actor Jim Jarrett has taken on the role of Vincent, and this weekend he brings the impressionist artist’s passion and intensity to the stage for a one-night-only performance to benefit Napa’s new Sightglass Theater Company. A VIP wine lounge precedes the performance, taking place on Saturday, April 15, Napa Valley College Performing Arts Center, 2277 Vallejo Hwy., Napa. 7pm. $25–$100. sightglasstheater.org.

—Charlie Swanson

TAPPED IN Fusion jazz guitar virtuoso Stanley Jordan shows off his specialized fretboard-tapping technique when his trio performs at Blue Note in Napa, April 13–16. See Clubs & Venues, p27.


THE CRYING LADY Joseph DeLappe’s politically charged work is a good match for the times, says Sonoma Valley Musuem of Art executive director Linda Cano.

Outside the Box

New-media pioneer Joseph DeLappe gets a retrospective in Sonoma BY CHARLIE SWANSON

A

s technology and digital media take hold of our collective consciousness and international conflicts become increasingly fought with unmanned drones, artist Joseph DeLappe aims to challenge the status quo.

This month, several innovative and interactive highlights from

DeLappe’s career come together for a new exhibit, “Memory and Resistance,” at the Sonoma Valley Museum of Art. DeLappe opens the show with an artist’s talk on April 15. Sonoma Valley Museum of Art’s executive director Linda Cano first met DeLappe in 2014 when he was the director of digital media at the University of Nevada in Reno and she was working at the Fresno Art Museum. “We had an exhibition of his work, and he built a life-size

drone on the campus of Fresno State out of 3D printing elements,” she says. Each section of the drone had the name of a civilian casualty from U.S. drone strikes in Pakistan. Cano appreciated DeLappe’s art, and also his sensitivity in handling his subject matter. “It’s very serious work,” she says. “The work itself is provocative, but he himself is not provocative.” When Cano came to the North Bay to work for SVMA a year

ago, DeLappe was one of the first artists she considered featuring at the museum. “Joseph’s political commentary is a good match for the time, and his art is participatory,” she says. While DeLappe’s installations include polygon cardboard sculptures of the Statue of Liberty and Gandhi, much of his work is more interactive, explains Cano. For one of his most famous projects, dead-in-iraq, DeLappe played the first-person shooter America’s Army, an online recruiting game, and typed in the name, age, service branch and date of death of each service person who had died in Iraq. DeLappe’s most recent project, Killbox, is his most interactive to date—a two-player game named after the military term for an area targeted for destruction. One player acts as the drone operator, tasked with delivering a strike. The second player is the civilian on the ground bombarded by chaos. Players then switch roles and do it all over again. Rather than glorify violence the way many Call of Duty–type video games encourage, Killbox is a remorseful, horrifying vision of the reality of drone warfare. Killbox was recently nominated for a BAFTA (British Academy of Film and Television Arts) award for Best Computer Game, and DeLappe, who is now professor of games and tactical media at Abertay University in Dundee, Scotland, just last week received a Guggenheim Fellowship. “I think this exhibit will be a little different for our community,” Cano says, “and I hope people come, participate and give us feedback about this new direction.” “Memory and Resistance: The Work of Joseph DeLappe” opens on Saturday, April 15, at Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, 551 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.939.SVMA.

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Arts Ideas

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April 7 - 9, 2017

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GHOSTBUSTERSSSLIVE! A New Musical Parody

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Sitting Ducks

Survivors wait out feathery apocalypse in MTC’s ‘Birds’ BY DAVID TEMPLETON

T

here is little a responsible reviewer can say about Main Stage West’s eerie, unnerving production of Conor McPherson’s The Birds. Any description of the play’s tone, pace or point of view stands the risk of tipping audiences off, reducing the pleasure of experiencing this taught, emotionally rich, exquisitely acted tale as it masterfully unfolds.

Even if you’ve seen the classic Alfred Hitchcock film, you should not assume you know what McPherson and director Elizabeth Craven have in store for you. Less about birds than about ordinary people stripped of everyday assurances, The Birds is simple,

psychological horror—the more powerful for its subdued, casually observational storytelling. Running through April 23 (and please note that the ornithological thriller plays on Easter Sunday, the day millions of sugary Peeps are ravenously consumed), Main Stage’s tense, edgy drama is much closer to Daphne du Maurier’s original 1952 short story than it is to the 1963 Hitchcock version. But it’s not exactly du Maurier, either. Carrying spooky echoes of Night of the Living Dead and No Exit, The Birds begins with Liz Jahren’s chillingly resigned voiceover, succinctly describing the rapid fall of civilization after all the birds of the world suddenly, and violently, began attacking and killing any person in sight. To the frightening sound of shrieking birds, a pair of strangers—Diane (Jahren, excellent) and Nat (Nick Sholley, the same)—take refuge in a dark, abandoned farmhouse. He’s got a fever. She’s got a diary. They hide. Then some stuff happens. Diane writes it all down, and we hear snippets of her end-of-theworld journal as that initial voiceover narration regularly returns. Sound designer Doug Faxon and light designer Missy Weaver do excellent work in bringing this birds-instead-of-zombies nightmare to such vivid life. Rae Quintana and Anthony Abate appear, at various points, as fellow survivors. More stuff happens, unfolding in a series of individual vignettes, each one separated by hours, days and weeks. The characters frequently discuss the importance of human kindness—a hopeful suggestion that pulses at the heart of what’s to come, and is a big part of why The Birds is ultimately so haunting, rich and quietly disturbing. (Note: sound designer Faxon suggests that audiences sit as close to the center of the 70-seat theater to get the maximum impact of his intricate surroundsound design.) Rating (out of 5): 'The Birds’ runs Thursday–Sunday through April 23 at Main Stage West, 104 N. Main St., Sebastopol. Thursday– Saturday, 8pm; 5pm matinees on Sunday. $15–$30. 707.823.0177.


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SHOP GHOUL The fashion world gets the horror treatment

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Ghost Story

Kristen Stewart sees dead people in ‘Personal Shopper’ BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

V

ery sexy and very scary, Personal Shopper is Olivier Assayas’ follow-up to Clouds of Sils Maria, the film that proved a sharp and sensitive director could find a virtue in Kristen Stewart’s air of neutrality. Assayas makes a display of this actress’ humid eyes, firmly set mouth and smooth physique, but the ghost story isn’t all about Stewart’s vulnerability—it follows a few sidebars about the parapsychological activities of Victor Hugo, for instance, to get us ready for the point when Assayas starts playing the xylophone on our spinal cord. Maureen Cartwright (Stewart) is a personal shopper for a very mean and extremely wealthy Parisian. She carries on a frayed relationship via Skype with her boyfriend, who is working a long-term assignment in Muscat, Oman. Maureen has an avocation—she’s a medium and spends a night searching for ghosts in an empty house. It’s the house where her twin brother, Lewis, died; her heart, like his, may be a time bomb ready to stop without warning. He’d always promised to send a message back to the world of the living. The film doesn’t cheat: a ghost of swirling, smoke-like ectoplasm reveals itself to Maureen early in the film. Later, she gets texts from some mysterious, omniscient being. It knows her every move, telling her, “I want you, and I will have you.” There are three sound people credited here, and you’ll see why. The soundscape goes beyond the eclectic mix of the score, including Marlene Dietrich’s “Das Hobellied,” a song superficially about carpentry, but really about death as the great leveler of the world’s classes. As in David Lynch films, the disturbing sound is more chilling than the disturbing image. The thump of a ghost answering questions has a wetness and echo to it, like the sound of rolling thunder diminishing. And the dull, irritating buzz of a cellphone carrying threatening anonymous messages—perhaps from the hereafter— gives brand-new punch to the old “the calls are coming from inside the house!” gimmick. ‘Personal Shopper’ is playing at Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Road, Santa Rosa. 707.525.8909.

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Honorable 4/14–4/20 Gifted PG13 10:30-1:00-3:30-6:15-8:40 After the Storm NR 10:15-12:45-3:156:00-8:30, Thurs 4/20 only: 10:15-12:45-3:15

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10:45-1:15-6:30-8:55, Thurs 4/20 only: 10:45-1:15 The Zookeeper’s Wife PG13 11:00-2:00-5:00-8:00 Kedi NR 3:45 A United Kingdom PG13 4:00 The Lost City of Z PG13 Sneak Preview Thurs 4/20 @7pm, Opens Friday 4/21 Colossal R Sneak Preview Thurs 4/20 @7:30pmOpens Friday 4/21! Tommy’s Honour PG Sneak Preview Thurs 4/20 @7:15pm, Opens Friday 4/21! 551 SUMMERFIELD ROAD • SANTA ROSA 707.525.8909 • SUMMERFIELDCINEMAS.COM

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Trebuchet delve into heartache on new record.

Face Value

Trebuchet open up on new album BY CHARLIE SWANSON

COMING SOON!

WED, APRIL 26

READY TO LAUNCH Petaluma’s

thu apr 13 fri apr 14

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thu Benefit show for Deb “Root” Grant’s apr 27 Wellness Fund, 8pm/$5–20 sliding scale fri the pulsatoRs apr 28 8:30pm/Dancing/$10 sat the bloodstones with apr 29 dJ loisaida 8pm/$10 thu de ColoRes may 4 8pm/Dancing/$5 fri singeR-songwRiteR Finals may 5 8pm Advance Tickets Available at Eventbrite & Redwood Cafe RestauRant & musiC venue CheCK out the aRt exhibit visit ouR website, RedwoodCaFe.Com 8240 old Redwood hwy, Cotati 707.795.7868

I

n the four years since Petaluma indie-rock quartet Trebuchet released their debut album, much has changed. Woes and victories, both personal and collective, inspired an expanded, heart-on-thesleeve sound that marks the band’s excellent sophomore album, Volte-Face, available on vinyl, CD and digitally on April 14. The four-piece outfit is made up of guitarist and lyricist Eliott Whitehurst, bassist Navid Manoochehri and husband-andwife drummer and keyboardist Paul and Lauren Haile. Friends since meeting at Sonoma State University in 2006, the band members have an intuitive musical chemistry that’s matched by their most honest and personal songwriting yet on the new album.

“We write the music all together,” Whitehurst says. “It’s really collaborative to the point of working on melodies and harmonies before there are lyrics.” An added bonus to that is that Paul Haile and Manoochehri operate Greenhouse Recording in Petaluma, and Volte-Face is one of the most professional sounding records to come out of Sonoma County in the last year. Layers of synth and vocal harmonies dance around the acoustic guitars, and shimmering cymbal crashes amplify the album’s heaviest moments. Once the music is in place, Whitehurst pens lyrics to match to mood of the song. Thematically, Whitehurst says, the content of the new record was tough to deliver. “Lyrically, I’ve always been someone who wanted to delve into really difficult subjects,” he says, “but for every song there was always a breaking point. Like, if I put down this lyric, that’s painful and I’m going to have to revisit it a lot, so with everything before, I had an out to make the song about something else.” On Volte-Face, Whitehurst avoided the outs and stayed true to sharing his personal struggles in an authentic way. The album’s title, French for “about face,” and the overarching mood of the record, is a reflection of the songwriter’s recent tumultuous past, which included a called-off marriage engagement. “Mentally, I had kind of checked out of my life,” he says. “I was trying to be OK with the fact that what my life had become was not what I wanted it to be.” Through the turmoil and the heartache, Whitehurst was able to diverge onto a new life path and the new album, while vulnerable in its tone, is also a cathartic experience. “It was very difficult, but from that point on my life became what I wanted it to be,” says Whitehurst. “I had control of my life again.” Trebuchet unveil ‘Volte-Face’ with support from Mare Island, Brown Bags and Horders on Saturday, April 15 at the Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St., Petaluma. 8pm. $10. 707.762.3565.


Concerts

SONOMA COUNTY Marco Benevento

Avant-garde pop pianist has amassed a body of work that’s both danceable and thoughtful. Apr 13, 8:30pm. $22. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Arlo Guthrie

Veteran songwriter’s Running Down the Road tour features his most classic cuts. Apr 14, 7:30pm. $35 and up. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 866.955.6040.

Whitney

Indie-rock duo excels at laidback melodies. Ambient folk songwriter Julie Byrne opens. Apr 14, 7pm. $37. Gundlach Bundschu Winery, 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

MARIN COUNTY Cabaret 2017

Showcase features talent from Young Performers Theatre and North Bay Repertory companies. Proceeds benefit local theater communities. Apr 14-15. $40-$65. George’s Nightclub, 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Thunder & Lightning

Superband features Phil Lesh and Stu Allen sharing musical duties with acclaimed songwriter Cass McCombs and musicians Scott Guberman and Alex Koford. Apr 18, 8pm. $35. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

NAPA COUNTY The Faultliners

Traditional bluegrass band kicks off the “Grand Ole Napa Valley Opry House” series with support from folk duo Rainy Eyes. Apr 15, 7:30pm. $25. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY A’Roma Roasters

Apr 15, Blue Groove. 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Apr 14, Frankie Bourne. Apr 15, Brian Dolzani. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Annie O’s Music Hall

Hotel Healdsburg

Aqus Cafe

Jamison’s Roaring Donkey

Apr 15, Square Squad presents Candyland with JimmyHits. Apr 16, RF7. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.542.1455.

Apr 15, the Ruth Ahlers Quartet. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Apr 14, the Incubators. Apr 16, 2pm, Gary Vogensen & the Ramble Band. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Wed, open mic night. Apr 14, Domenic Bianco & the SoulShake. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.772.5478.

Arlene Francis Center

Jasper O’Farrell’s

pr 13, Samvega with TV Heads and Americas. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Barley & Hops Tavern

Apr 13, Flat Broke and Busted. Apr 14, Dave Hamilton. Apr 15, Miss Moonshine. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.874.9037.

The Big Easy

Apr 12, Cygne. Apr 13, Migrant Pickers with Joel Alan Taylor. Apr 14, Marty O’Reilly & the Old Soul Orchestra with the Dixie Giants and Sebastian St James. Apr 15, B & the Hive with Ismay. Apr 16, Trevor McSpadden. Apr 18, the Mountain & the Moon with Hannah Mayree. Apr 19, Wednesday Night Big Band. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.4631.

Brixx Pizzeria

Apr 15, Mike Saliani. 16 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.766.8162.

Corkscrew Wine Bar

Apr 18, North Bay Jazz Guitar Collective. 100 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.789.0505.

Flamingo Lounge

Apr 14, SugarFoot. Apr 15, Stereo Bounce. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Geyserville Gun Club Bar & Lounge Apr 15, Cahoots. 21025 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.0036.

Green Music Center Schroeder Hall

Apr 15, 2pm, SSU Alumni Recital. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

HopMonk Sebastopol

Apr 13, Rhythmstar and Naughty Princess. Apr 14, the John Brothers Piano Company with the Creak. Apr 15, Lazyman presents Dead Beatles. Apr 17, Monday Night Edutainment with Selekta Kurious. Apr 19, Songwriters in the Round. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Apr 14, Hype It Up with DJ Konnex and DJ Jacalioness. Apr 15, Casa Rasta Camo Party with Guerrilla Takeover. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Lagunitas Tap Room

Apr 12, Jason Bodlovich. Apr 13, Delphi Freeman. Apr 14, Arizona & the Volunteers. Apr 15, Trevor McSpadden. Apr 16, Mitch Woods & His Rocket 88s. Apr 19, Shelby, Texas. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Main Stage West

ORIGINAL LINEUP

LA GUNS

Featuring: Tracii Guns and Phil Lewis Special Guests KINGSBOROUGH

SATURDAY, APRIL 15 SATURDAY APRIL 22

STEPHEN PEARCY OF RATT

Performing the RATT Hits and more

FRIDAY JUNE 9

HOUSE OF ROCK 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY WITH THE RETURN OF

BLUE OYSTER CULT

Don't Fear The Reaper ~ I'm Burning for You ~ Godzilla

Apr 12, “Players on the Stage” with David T Carter, Jon Gonzales, Doug Jayne and Katie Phillips. 104 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.0177.

FRIDAY, JUNE 16 ROCK GUITAR GOD George Lynch

LYNCH MOB

Main Street Bistro

Apr 13, Eric Wiley. Apr 14, Susan Sutton Jazz Trio. Apr 15, Levi Lloyd & the 501 Blues Band. Apr 16, Willie Perez. Apr 18, Mac & Potter. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mc T’s Bullpen

T SATUHIS RDA Y

“Wicked Sensation”

RECORD LIKE A PRO AT RSU RECORDING & FILMWORKS

STATE OF THE ART AUDIO AND FILM PRODUCTION CONTACT JARED @ 707.694.1785 FOR RATES & INFO

Apr 14, DJ MGB. Apr 15, Manny & the Maniacs. Apr 16, George Heagerty. Apr 17, DJ MGB. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

Murphy’s Irish Pub

Apr 14, Sean Carscadden Trio. Apr 15, Peace of G. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre

Apr 15, Spawnbreezie and Gonzo. Apr 17, BeauSoleil avec Michael Doucet. Apr 19, Katchafire with Inna Vision and Mystic Roots Band. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

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Newman Auditorium Apr 14, 8pm, Bennett Friedman Jazz Quartet with organist Brian Ho. SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4372.

Petaluma Historical Library & Museum Apr 17, Musical

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Music

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HopMonk Sonoma


Music ( 25 Mondays with Kayleen Asbo. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. 707.778.4398.

Bluegrass Jam. Apr 17, the Blues Defenders pro jam. Apr 18, open mic night with RoJo. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Phoenix Theater

Whiskey Tip

Apr 14, Erra with Phinehas and Auras. Apr 15, Trebuchet with Mare Island, Brown Bags and Horders. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Pongo’s Kitchen & Tap Apr 13, Elizabeth Boaz. 701 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma. 707.774.5226.

Redwood Cafe

THE HEATH BROTHERS JOE LOVANO QUARTET BOBBY HUTCHERSON TRIBUTE BAND JOHN ABERCROMBIE ORGAN TRIO HENRY BUTLER SOLO PIANO JOHN SANTOS QUARTET DJANGO ALL-STARS DAVE STRYKER QUARTET PACIFIC MAMBO ORCHESTRA LAVAY SMITH AND HER RED HOT SKILLET LICKERS AND MANY MORE!

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Russian River Hall

Apr 15, Daniel Patchin with Sandy Geller. 20347 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.849.4873.

Thu 4 ⁄13 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $20–$22

HTK Trio feat Howard Wales (Hooteroll with Jerry Garcia), Terry Haggerty (Sons of Champlin) & Kevin Hayes (Roy Rogers)

Wild Child

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Apr 15, LA Guns reunion tour. 3410 Industrial Dr, Santa Rosa.

Shelby, Texas

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Big John’s Market Bohemian Costeaux French Bakery Hotel Healdsburg Healdsburg Sotheby’s SpoonBar Sonoma Magazine The Press Democrat

On sale now healdsburgjazz.com or phone 24/7: 800-838-3006 Also available at Levin and Cº. 306 Center St., Healdsburg

A Live Re-­Creation of a 1960s Doors Concert Sat 4 ⁄15 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $27–$32

Wonder Bread 5

Thu 4 ⁄20 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $12–$15

Soul Ska 420 Celebration with

The Rudicals

Fri 4 ⁄25 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $15–$18

Ghost Note

feat Robert Searight & Nate Werth of Snarky Puppy

Sat 4 ⁄22 • Doors 8pm ⁄ 12– 15 $

$

The Main Squeeze with

Hibbity Dibbity

Sun 4 ⁄23 • Doors 6:30pm ⁄ $12–$15

Rainy Eyes feat Irena Eide, Salt Suns, Ismay & Jeff Manson Band

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

Thurs, 6pm, dinner music with pianist Ricardo Scales. 114 Main St, Tiburon. 415.435.0400.

Apr 13, Pacific Soul. Apr 14, José Neto & the Netoband. Apr 15, Wall Street. Apr 18, West Coast Songwriters Competition. Apr 19, pro blues jam. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

Rock Star University House of Rock

with

Don Antonio’s

Remy’s Bar & Lounge

Apr 15, D’giin. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Roger Clyne and the Peacemakers

MARIN COUNTY

Don Antonio’s Trattoria

Rio Nido Roadhouse

Wed 4 ⁄12 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $20–$22

Apr 15, Family Room silent disco seven-year anniversary with DJ Jenö. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5535.

Apr 13, Kevin Russell and friends. Apr 15, the String Rays. Apr 16, 5pm, Gold Coast Jazz Band. Apr 17, open mic with DJ Loisaida. Apr 19, Irish set dancing. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868. Apr 15, Mýa with DJ Kid Vicious and DJ Lazy Boy. 130 Stony Point Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.578.1963.

Fri 4 ⁄14 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $22–$24

brother thelonious

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Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub

Apr 15, Sticky Notes. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Sonoma Speakeasy

Apr 12, the Acrosonics. Apr 13, Vitamin Girl with King Daddy Murr and Prince of Thieves. Apr 14, 6:30pm, Jim Caroompas. Apr 14, 8pm, New Copasetics with Tim Eschliman and others. Apr 15, 5:30pm, Full Circle Band with Bob Edmonson and guests. Apr 15, 8:30pm, Les Amis Zydeco Band. Apr 18, R&B House Band. 452 First St E, Ste G, Sonoma. 707.996.1364.

Spancky’s Bar

Apr 15, Skitzo with Insanity. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

The Tradewinds Bar Apr 15, Rewind. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Twin Oaks Roadhouse Apr 13, Country Line Dancing. Apr 14, Void Where Prohibited. Apr 15, Derek Irving & His Combo with Bears Belly. Apr 16, David Thom Invitational

Tues, 6pm, dinner music with pianist Ricardo Scales. 455 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.3332.

Fenix

George’s Nightclub

Apr 15, DJ Jorge. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

HopMonk Novato

Apr 13, Country Line Dancing. Apr 14, Hot Grubb. Apr 15, Reisender with the Fell Swoop and Miracle Me. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery

Apr 12, Michael LaMacchia and April Grisman. Apr 19, Migrant Pickers. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Marin Center Showcase Theatre

Apr 15, Wild Women: Soul-O. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Marin Country Mart

Apr 14, 6pm, Friday Night Jazz with Piro Patton Trio. Apr 16, 12:30pm, folkish festival with the Battlefield. 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur.

19 Broadway Club

Apr 13, Phantom Power. Apr 14, 5:30pm, Damir & Derek. Apr 14, 9pm, Friends on Fire with Lender and the Happys. Apr 15, Winstrong with Lumanation. Apr 16, Miles Ahead. Apr 17, open mic. Apr 19, Songwriters in the Round. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar

Apr 13, Jesse Lee Kincaid. Apr 14, Michael Aragon Quartet. Apr 15, Chris Saunders Band. Apr 16, 3pm, Flowtilla. Apr 16,

8:30pm, Migrant Pickers and friends. Apr 17, Kimrea & the Dreamdogs. Apr 18, open mic. Apr 19, Robert Elmond Stone and friends. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Novato Copperfield’s Books

Apr 15, 6pm, Michael Aragon Quartet. 999 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.763.3052.

Osteria Divino

Apr 12, Jonathan Poretz. Apr 13, Yacht Club of Paris. Apr 14, Smith Dobson Trio. Apr 15, Ian McArdle Trio. Apr 16, Marcos Sainz Trio. Apr 18, Ken Cook. Apr 19, Noel Jewkes Duo. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355.

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Apr 12, Paul VornHagen. Apr 13, Wanda Stafford. Apr 18, Panama Jazz Trio. Apr 19, John Hoy. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Peri’s Silver Dollar

Apr 12, the New Sneakers. Apr 13, Mark’s Jam Sammich. Apr 14, Jethro Jeremiah. Apr 15, Junk Parlor. Apr 16, Grateful Sundays. Apr 17, Billy D’s open mic. Apr 18, the Bad Hombres. Apr 19, the Elvis Johnson Soul Revue. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio

Apr 13, Ruthie Foster. Apr 14, LoWatters. Apr 15, Lee Presson & the Nails. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Rickey’s

Apr 14, Matt Kizer Band. Apr 15, Charles Wheal Band. 250 Entrada Dr, Novato. 415.883.9477.

Sausalito Seahorse

Apr 13, the Merlins. Apr 14, Joe Tate & the Hippie Voices. Apr 15, Cabani Jazz Project. Apr 16, 5pm, Mazacote. Apr 18, Noel Jewkes and friends. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899.

Smiley’s Schooner Saloon

Apr 14, Gray Tolhurst & the Early Nineties. Apr 15, Night Train. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Spitfire Lounge

Second Thursday of every month, DJ Romestallion. Second Friday of every month, DJ Beset. 848 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.5551.

Sweetwater Music Hall Apr 12, Roger Clyne & the Peacemakers. Apr 13, HTK Trio with Howard Wales, Terry Haggerty and Kevin Hayes.


Apr 15, the 7th Sons. 1000 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.7660.

Apr 15, Bobby Joe Russell and the All-Stars. Apr 16, Karma Moffett’s Tibetan Bowls and Bells. Apr 19, 12pm, noon concert series. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Trek Winery

Apr 14, Amy Wigton. Apr 15, Mythyx Band. 1026 Machin Ave, Novato. 415.899.9883.

NAPA COUNTY Blue Note Napa

Apr 12, Kellie Fuller & the Mike Greensill Quartet. Apr 13-16, Stanley Jordan Trio. Apr 18, locals night with Roem Baur. Apr 19-21, Bill Charlap Trio. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Ca’ Momi Osteria

Apr 14, Ragtag Sullivan. Apr 15, Self Proclaimed Heroes. 1141 First St, Napa. 707.224.6664.

Jarvis Conservatory

Apr 15, 7pm, the Trinity Alps Chamber Players. 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Napa Valley Roasting Company

Fri, jammin’ and java with Jeff Johnson. 948 Main St, Napa. 707.224.2233.

Pacifico Restaurante Mexicano Fri, live mariachi music. 1237 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.4400.

Silo’s

Apr 12, David Kelleher. Apr 13, Nate Lopez. Apr 14, Obsidian Son with Jessi Adele & the Starling Curve. Apr 15, Steelin’ Dan. Apr 19, Silo’s Idols preliminary show. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

707.829.7300 230 PETALUMA AVE | SEBASTOPOL

OPEN MIC NIGHT

EVERY TUES AT 7PM WITH CENI THU APR 13

Terrapin Crossroads

Throckmorton Theatre

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Taste of Rome

Apr 12, Bob Dylan night with the Casual Coalition. Apr 13, Andy Coe Band. Apr 14, Top 40 Friday dance party. Apr 15, Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs with Beso Negro. Apr 16, 3:30pm, “Stories & Songs” with Phil Lesh & the Camp Terrapin Family Band. Apr 17, Grateful Mondays. Apr 19, Rattlebox. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

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CRITIC’S CHOICE Michael DiDonna

Apr 14, Wild Child. Apr 15, Wonder Bread 5. Apr 17, open mic with Austin DeLone. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

RHYTHMSTAR NAUGHTY PRINCESS $10/DOORS-SHOW 9/21+

FRI APR 14

THE JOHN BROTHERS PIANO COMPANY + THE CREAK

$10/DOORS 8/SHOW 9 /21+

Modern Pop

SAT APR 15

DEAD BEATLES

A TRIBUTE TO JOHN AND GEORGE $20/DOORS 8/SHOW 8:30 /21+

Marco Benevento shares his joy onstage in Petaluma

SUN APR 16

Piano-driven rock ’n’ roll has held a special place in my heart ever since I discovered my dad’s Supertramp cassettes as a kid. In today’s indierock landscape, few performers are rocking the piano with as much exuberance and excellence as New York’s Marco Benevento.

MON APR 17

For the last decade, Benevento has mixed infectious melodies and heartfelt songwriting that evokes classic rock passion and contemporary electronic experimentation for an eagerly uplifting sound that garners comparisons to everyone from pop pianist Leon Russell to electronica band LCD Soundsystem. On Benevento’s latest release, the live album Woodstock Sessions, the songwriter shows off his enthralling palette of music, leading a tight trio onstage with expansive sonic results. When he’s not tickling the ivories, Benevento is twisting knobs on his array of pedals, fuzzing out the edges of his indie pop and inviting the crowd to get their feet moving and whistle along to the performance. This week, Benevento and his energetic ensemble are in the North Bay for a night of feel-good grooves. Joining him are a pair of eclectic Los Angeles songwriters, mysteriously alternative multiinstrumentalist Wyndham and folk-pop songstress Lola Kirke. Bring your dancing shoes to see Marco Benevento on Thursday, April 13, at McNear’s Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. 8:30pm. $22. 707.765.2121.—Charlie Swanson

COMEDY OPEN MIC (EVERY 3RD SUNDAY)

FREE/DOORS 7/SHOW 8/18+ MONDAY NIGHT EDUTAINMENT

SELEKTA KURIOUS

$10/$5 B4 10:30/DOORS-SHOW 10/21+

WED APR 19

SONGWRITERS IN THE ROUND SERIES (EVERY 3RD WEDNESDAY)

$8/DOORS 7/SHOW 7:30/ALL AGES

WWW.HOPMONK.COM Book your

next event with us, up to 250, kim@hopmonk.com

APRIL 22, 2017

COMPETITION 10AM-5PM

7PM EVENING CONCERT AND STUDENT JAM SESSION Redwood Empire All-Stars Bennett Friedman Doug Leibinger Kasey Knudsen Randy Vincent Cliff Hugo • Ken Cook Kendrick Freeman Carlitos Medrano

PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE FOR PARTICIPATING HIGH SCHOOLS ONLINE

FREE AND PAID TICKETS ONLINE:

healdsburgjazz.org OR PHONE 24/7: 800-838-3006

GLASER CENTER

547 MENDOCINO AVE. SANTA ROSA


Arts Events

NOW OPEN IN DOWNTOWN SANTA ROSA 531 FIFTH STREET

Galleries RECEPTIONS

SCREEN PRINTS • ROCK ART POSTERS • APPAREL

Apr 14

Art Works Downtown, “Tonal Range,” works exploring range and value as applied to time and humanity hows in the Underground Gallery, while “Signs of Hope” shows artistic protest signs in the Donor’s Gallery. 5pm. 1337 Fourth Street, San Rafael. 415.451.8119.

@AGENTINKGALLERY

History Museum of Sonoma County, “Home & Abroad: Sonoma County & World War I,” marking the 100th anniversary of US entry into “the Great War.” 5pm. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

/AGENTINKGALLERY

WWW.AGENTINKGALLERY.COM

531 FIFTH STREET Equine Partners for Empowerment

THURSDAY

MARCO BENEVENTO

SATURDAY

SPAWNBREEZIE

MONDAY

BEAUSOLEIL AVEC

KIRKE APR 13 WYNDHAM/LOLA ROCK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

APR 15 GONZO REGGAE• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

DOUCET APR 17 MICHAEL CAJUN• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+ WEDNESDAY

KATCHAFIRE

SATURDAY

PETTY THEFT

MONDAY

JOSEPH

VISION, MYSTIC ROOTS BAND APR 19 INNA REGGAE• DOORS 8:30PM • 21+

May 7: 1:00pm–5:00pm Are many of your days spent on auto-pilot, missing connections with others? Do your feelings match your actions so you are living an authentic, balanced life? Are you looking to take a more active, leadership role in your own life? Join us for this exciting and brand new workshop to discover your own innate ability to bring the social intelligence of the horse into your daily life. These empowering activities do not require horsemanship skills as all activities will be held from the ground. Group & individual exercises will provide for powerful growth & learning. For more information, contact Judy WestonThompson MFT 23268, CEIP-MH - Equine Insight; equineinsight@aol.com, 415.457.3800

DRINKERS & HELL RAISERS APR 22 BEER ROCK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

APR 24 FRIDAY

APR 28

ROCK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

GREGORY ALAN ISAKOV ROCK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

THURSDAY KEITH GREENINGER WITH

WHEEL AND SPECIAL GUEST MAY 4 ACHILLES JOE CRAVEN REGGAE• DOORS 8:30PM • 21+ 5 ⁄5 Mustache Harbor, 5 ⁄7 Devin The Dude, MND 5 ⁄10 TODD SNIDER, Great American Taxi, 5 ⁄10 Geographer, 5 ⁄12 FOREVERLAND, 5 ⁄13 Danny Click & The Hell Yeahs, STU ALLEN & MARS HOTEL, Elliott Peck, 5 ⁄19 JACK INGRAM, Jamie Lin Wilson, 5 ⁄20 The Itals, Sol Horizon, 5 ⁄25 Robin Trower, Strange Vine

WWW.MYSTICTHEATRE.COM 23 PETALUMA BLVD N. PETALUMA, CA 94952

Man in a Box by Jan Stussy, 1977

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456 Tenth St, Santa Rosa • Tue–Sat 11–5 707.781.7070 • calabigallery.com

Marin Society of Artists, “Sculpture Exhibition,” juried show in celebration of International Sculpture Day represents a wide variety of media and styles. 5pm. 1515 Third St, San Rafael. 415.464.9561. Napa Main Library, “Travis N White: Watercolors,” the artist and art consultant displays his highly technical watercolor works. 6pm. 580 Coombs St, Napa. 707.253.4070.

Apr 15

MarinMOCA, “Altered Book & Book Arts Exhibition,” annual show displays the work of 150 Bay Area artists who reconstruct and rework books into unique pieces of art. 5pm. 500 Palm Dr, Novato. 415.506.0137. Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, “Memory & Resistance: The Work of Joseph DeLappe,” several key works from the artist cross the realms of protest art, gaming, technology and new media. 2pm. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.939.SVMA.

SONOMA COUNTY Alchemia Gallery

Through Apr 30, “Habitat,” collaboration between the Alchemia visual arts studio and guest installation artist Emile Rosewater transforms the gallery into a lush alternative dimension. 111 Kentucky St, Petaluma. Mon-Tues, Fri, 10 to 5; Wed-Thurs, Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, 11 to 4. 707.775.3794.

Art Museum of Sonoma County

Through Apr 30, “Outside Voice,” painter Marc Katano debuts his recent series of abstract works, done on massive canvas tarps. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. TuesSun, 11 to 5. 707.579.1500.

The Art Wall at Shige Sushi

Through Apr 30, “Contemporary Bay Area Photography,” features works by Bob Cornelis, Janis Crystal Lipzin, Michael Maggid, Colin Talcroft and others. 8235 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. Hours vary. 707.795.9753.

Arts Guild of Sonoma

Through May 1, “Pets Lifeline Fundraiser Exhibition,” Sonoma students draw, paint, collage or otherwise assemble a picture of their special pet. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. Wed-Thurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

B&V Whiskey Bar & Grille

Through Apr 30, “Photographic Show,” featuring works by Steven Krause, Mark Stupich and Tom Deininger. 400 First St E, Sonoma. Open for lunch, noon to 3pm, and dinner, 5pm to 9pm. Bar open noon to midnight. 707.938.7110.

Calabi Gallery

Through Apr 15, “We Shall Overcome,” showing art of defiance and resistance to power. 456 10th St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Chroma Gallery

Through May 27, “Nature Unbound,” juried exhibit of a wide range of art interprets and reacts to the awesome powers of nature. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.293.6051.

Gaia’s Garden

Through Apr 30, “Food,

Flowers and Beyond,” featuring paintings by Riley Street Art students and instructor Donna DeLaBriandais. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. Lunch and dinner, MonSat; lunch and brunch, Sun. 707.544.2491.

Graton Gallery

Through Apr 16, “Spaces Retraced,” featuring works by Susan Ball, Tim Haworth and several guest artists. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sat, 10:30 to 6; Sun, 10:30 to 4. 707.829.8912.

Guerneville Bank Club Through Apr 30, “Glory Days,” exhibit by Russian River Historical Society is a tribute to Clare Harris, who helped turn Rio Nido into the town it is today. 16290 Main Street, Guerneville. Daily, 11am to 9pm 707.666.9411.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts

Through May 14, “Art of Gastronomy II,” exhibit celebrates the bounty of Sonoma County food and its wine industry in the context of art. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

IceHouse Gallery

Through Apr 22, “Body Language,” five artists offer diverse interpretations on the figure. 405 East D St, Petaluma. 707.778.2238.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Through May 14, “The Spring Equinox: When Day and Night Are Equal,” group exhibit honors the significance of the spring equinox with works that express the power and beauty of new beginnings. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Paradise Ridge Winery

Through Apr 30, “Geometric Reflections,” sculpture by 10 renowned artists celebrates 10 years of the Voigt Family Sculpture Foundation. 4545 Thomas Lake Harris Dr, Santa Rosa. Daily, 11 to 5. 707.528.9463.

The Reel Fish Shop & Grill

Through Apr 30, “Fine Art Collage,” longtime Sonoma artist Augustus Manly shows


many of his works. 401 Grove St, Sonoma. 707.343.0044.

Ren Brown Collection

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

Through Apr 16, “Exhibition 60+,” celebrate artists over 60 and see their perspective on life and the world. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat-Sun, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

University Art Gallery Through Apr 23, “Juried Student Exhibition,” artist Randy Colosky and SRJC art instructor Claudia Morales McCain juror the group show featuring over 40 works in all mediums. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

Upstairs Art Gallery

Through Apr 24, “Yellow,” a color-themed collection of paintings from dry Creek Valley artist Donna Schaffer. 306 Center St, Healdsburg. SunThurs, 11 to 6; Fri-Sat, 11 to 9. 707.431.4214.

MARIN COUNTY Gallery Route One

Through May 14, “Rising to the Surface,” Inverness artist Zea Morvitz exhibits large-scale drawings of found objects in the center gallery, with a Lucid Art Residency and Mary Mountcastle Eubank’s mixedmedia sculptures in the annex. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Art & Garden Center

Through Apr 16, “Between Nature & Technology,” multimedia artworks by New Orleans-based Courtney Egan and David Sullivan criss-cross the two realms. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.455.5260.

Marin Society of Artists Through Apr 30, “Sculpture Exhibition,” juried show in celebration of International Sculpture Day represents a wide variety of media and styles. Reception, Apr 14 at 5pm. 1515 Third St, San Rafael. Wed-Sun, Noon to 4pm. 415.464.9561.

Through Apr 20, “Landscapes: Real or Imagined,” the creatively interpreted group show is juried by Marin landscape artist Kathleen Lipinski. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

“Embracing Imperfection: Contemporary Expressions of Wabi Sabi,” exhibition explores contemporary artists Adam Chapman, Jim Melchert and Leah Rosenberg through the lens of traditional Japanese aesthetic and philosophy of Wabi Sabi. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.944.0500.

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Through Apr 30, “Robert DeVee Memorial Exhibit,” the late artist and gallery owner’s paintings, silkscreens, monoprints and 3-D photographs are on display in a celebration of his life in art. 1781 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay. WedSun, 10 to 5. 707.875.2922.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts

Robert Allen Fine Art

Through May 31, “Landscapes Reimagined,” works on canvas by Amy Donaldson, Beatrice Findlay, William Leidenthal and John Maxon. 301 Caledonia St, Sausalito. Mon-Fri, 10 to 5. 415.331.2800.

San Geronimo Valley Community Center

Through Apr 30, “Marty Meade & Her Friday Morning Art Groups,” long-time instructor of glass art and watercolor displays alongside her students. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

Throckmorton Theatre

Through Apr 30, “Gardens Markets Landscapes,” Muriel Schmalberg Ullman’s garden paintings show with Laurie Curtis’ watercolors and Kathryn Strietmann’s silkscreens. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Tiburon Town Hall

Through Apr 30, “The Creative Spark,” the Golden Gate/ Marin Artists group shows with unique art, gifts and cards on hand. 1505 Tiburon Blvd, Tiburon.

NAPA COUNTY Caldwell Snyder Gallery

Through Apr 30, “Kenton Nelson Solo Show,” the artist idolizes the ordinary in his illuminating paintings of figures and landscapes. 1328 Main St, St Helena. Open daily, 10 to 6. 415.531.6755.

Jessel Gallery

Through Apr 30, “Arts in April at Jessel,” the gallery gets in the spirit with an eclectic show and artist demonstrations each weekend. 1019 Atlas Peak Rd, Napa. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.257.2350.

Napa Valley Museum

Through Apr 30, “Ebb & Flow,” artist Ryan Reynolds visualizes the concept of historical ecology, the interactions between man and nature over time. Through Apr 30,

Comedy Milt Abel

Standup veteran takes the stage. Apr 15, 8pm. $20. Trek Winery, 1026 Machin Ave, Novato. 415.899.9883.

Comedy Night with Kabir Singh

Fresh off his Comedy Central debut on the show “Gabriel Iglesias’s Stand-Up Revolution,” Singh headlines a hilarious night of standup along with Bay Area comedians David Lew and Noah Gain. Apr 14, 8pm. $25. Lucky Penny Community Arts Center, 1758 Industrial Way, Napa. 707.266.6305.

Improv Without a Net

Enjoy comedy and music from Flying Leap Improv. Apr 14, 8pm. $15. Russian River Hall, 20347 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.849.4873.

Scott Capurro’s Gay TurnAround

Award-winning comedian, actor and writer presents a provocative new show. Apr 13, 8pm. $20-$35. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Events IPA 10K & Beer Mile Invitational

Celebration of running and beer includes a marketplace expo, hoppy Easter hunt, a reception on Friday and a scenic 6.2-mile loop course to run on Saturday. Apr 14-15. $70 and up. Barlow Event Center, 6770 McKinley St, Sebastopol, ipa10k.com.

PAWS for Domestic Peace Walk

Center for Domestic Peace leads a walk to raise awareness about the correlation between domestic violence and animal abuse. Apr 15, 10am. Free. Blackie’s Pasture, Tiburon Boulevard, Tiburon.

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he 71st Annual SEBASTOPOL APPLE BLOSSOM FESTIVAL

2O17: AN APPLE BLOSSOM ODYSSEY APRIL 22–23 2017 I V E S PA R K SEB ASTOPOL C ALIFORNIA


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Release Your Returns

PET SUPPLY SUPER STORE * Pet Food & Supplements * Toys, Treats, And Beds * Farm And Animal Supplies * And Much More! Locally Owned For 50 Years! (707)545-0721

21 W 7th St. - Santa Rosa, CA www.westernfarmcenter.com

Join a protest with Indivisible Sonoma County to call on Donald Trump to release all of his tax returns from the past 12 years. Apr 15, 3pm. Free. Santa Rosa Post Office, 730 Second St, Santa Rosa.

Field Trips Bat Potluck & Hike

Late afternoon and evening walk explores bats and other nighttime critters, with a potluck dinner and optional campout. Registration required. Apr 15, 4:30pm. Bohemia Ecological Preserve, 8759 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental, landpaths.org.

The Sounds & Feel of Spring

Docent-led saunter lets you experience all the signs of the coming of spring. Registration required. Apr 17, 9am. Bohemia Ecological Preserve, 8759 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental, landpaths.org.

Trail Opening Celebration

Hike the newly finished Cabin Trail, enjoy drinks and snacks and participate in some light trail-building stewardship if you wish. Apr 15, 10am. Riddell Preserve, 550 Westside Rd, Healdsburg, landpaths.org.

Film Deconstructing the Beatles: Rubber Soul

Music expert Scott Freiman continues his in-depth exploration of the Beatles in this filmed lecture. Wed, Apr 19, 6:30pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

ELM Movie Night

Enriching Lives through Music program in Larkspur hosts a screening of “Landfill Harmonic,” which follows the Recycled Orchestra of Cateura. Apr 17, 6:30pm. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.5111.

Geothermal Steam Pipes

Fly Fishing Film Tour 2017

With locations ranging from

Bolivia to Saskatchewan, various short films feature fresh stories and some of the best fishing footage ever. Apr 13, 7pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Normal Is Over

Award-winning documentary chronicles the way humans have inadvertently imperiled our planet. Screening is followed by Q & A with filmmaker Renée Scheltema. Apr 12, 7pm. $18. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Purple Rain

Prince’s masterpiece screens as part of the Rio’s “Third Saturdays” cult and classic film series. Apr 15, 7:30pm. $8. Rio Theater, 20396 Bohemian Hwy, Monte Rio. 707.865.0913.

Salud

Award-winning 2006 film goes inside Cuba’s medical system and their cooperative work in over 60 countries. Apr 13, 7pm. by donation. Peace & Justice Center, 467 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.575.8902.

Sustainable

Screening of the documentary America’s food system is followed by a lively discussion. Apr 19, 6:30pm. Free. Diesel Bookstore, 2419 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.785.8177.

Tiburon International Film Festival

The United Nations of film fests returns with selections from 27 countries as well as a Marin filmmakers program. Apr 14-21. Playhouse Theater, 40 Main St, Tiburon, tiburonfilmfestival.com.

White Like Me

Documentary about racebased white entitlement programs of the 20th century screens with writer Tim Wise on hand for a VIP reception and Q&A and benefits two Marin nonprofits addressing racial inequality. Apr 17, 7pm. $20-$60. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Food & Drink Brewmaster’s Dinner

Four course meal is paired with four beer selections from Cooperage Brewing

Company. Apr 15, 6pm. $60. Local Barrel, 490 Mendocino Ave #104, Santa Rosa. 707.890.5433.

Chai & Chocolate

Mugs of chai and organic chocolates pairs with live Indian music. Apr 16, 3pm. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Chinese Black Teas Tasting

Explore a variety of complex teas. Apr 15, 2pm. by donation. Many Rivers Books & Tea, 130 S Main St, Sebastopol. 707.829.8871.

Easter Brunch at John Ash

Menu of tried-and-true classics and twists on old favorites. Apr 16, 10am. John Ash & Co, Vintners Inn, 4350 Barnes Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.7687.

Easter Brunch at Rocker Oysterfeller’s

Enjoy a special menu, breakfast cocktails and Bloody Mary bar and an egg hunt. Reservations encouraged. Apr 16, 10am. Rocker Oysterfeller’s, 14415 Hwy 1, Valley Ford. 707.876.1983.

Easter Brunch at Spoonbar

Three-course brunch is topped off with a dessert bar. Apr 16, 11am. $15-$39. Spoonbar, 219 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.7222.

Easter Sunday Dining at Left Bank Brasserie

Serving seasonal brunch items until 3pm, plus reduced regular lunch and dinner menu items. Apr 16. Left Bank Brasserie, 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331.

Lambert Bridge Chef’s Table Series Seasonally themed menu of locally grown ingredients prepared by Shari Sarabi of Baci Cafe and Wine Bar is paired with Lambert Bridge wines. Apr 14-15. $125. Lambert Bridge Winery, 4085 Westside Rd, Healdsburg. 707.431.9600.

St Supery Chef’s Table Tasting

Cheese-centric four course culinary experience includes wine pairings with several cheeses from Bay Area creameries. Apr 16, 11:30am. $125. St. Supéry Estate Vineyards & Winery, 8440 St Helena Hwy, Rutherford. 707.963.4507.

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WAITING IN SEOUL WALKING IN TOKYO

Apr. 21 - 29

G L OBA L D A N CE S T A MP Three Guest Choreographers From JAPAN & S. KOREA Directed by Christine Cali & Jennifer Meek Satoh

Tickets $5-$17 www.sonoma.edu/tix

Holistic Family Dentistry Dr. Marie Mallory, DDS

Trained in Germany and in the U.S., Dr. Mallory provides preventive, restorative, cosmetic, endodontic and ALF orthodontic dentistry with gentle impeccable care for children and adults. Healthy Alternatives— Quality Supplements Mercury-Free/Metal-Free By Appointment: Monday–Wednesday 8–1, 2–5 Thursday 9–5 1820 Sonoma Ave, Doctors Park Suite 76 | Santa Rosa 707.542.9800 | DrMallory.com

Treatment Pro a s o R gr a ta n a m S

THE DRIVE’S

CALIFORNIA WINE COUNTRY

GET YOUR LIFE BACK!

Named “BEST CITY OR REGIONAL PROGRAM” at the 2016 Taste Awards in Los Angeles

Do you or someone you care about rely on prescription or opioid pain medication or heroin to get through the day? Ask the following questions:

WEDNESDAYS AT 5:00 ON KSRO 1350 AM AND 103.5 FM

• Have they ever given up activities to use them? • Are they spending more time on activities to get them?

The Drive 3 TO 6, WEEKDAY AFTERNOONS ON KSRO To become a Drive sponsor contact Cathy Ratto at cathy.ratto@yahoo.com

• Have they ever used them despite negative consequences?

/JAXONDRIVE

If the answer to any of these questions was YES, they may have unintentionally become opioid dependent. Help might be closer than you think.

For more information on opioid dependence and its treatment, please call

707-576-0818 or visit www.srtp.net

SANTA ROSA TREATMENT PROGRAM 1901 Cleveland Ave Suite B, Santa Rosa


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A Tale of Two Cheesemakers

Guided cheese-tasting features Marin French Cheese and Laura Chenel. Apr 15, 2pm. $40. St. Supéry Estate Vineyards & Winery, 8440 St Helena Hwy, Rutherford. 707.963.4507.

Trione Food + Wine Dinner Series

Three-course dinner is paired with new and library wines. Apr 14-15, 6pm. $100. Trione Winery, 19550 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.8100.

Winemaker Dinner with Kastania Vineyard

Five-course dinner features Pinot Noirs from Sonoma Coast winery. Apr 14, 6pm. $80. Sally Tomatoes, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260.

For Kids

a One Book One Marin event. Free. Apr 17, 7pm, “Hallelujah Anyway: Rediscovering Mercy” with Anne Lmott. $25. Dominican University, 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael 415.457.4440.

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Apr 13, 7pm, Get Lit, with featured authors and an open mic. 189 H St, Petaluma 707.778.6060.

Book Passage

Apr 12, 7pm, “A Fine Mess” with TR Reid. Apr 15, 4pm, “The Shadow Land” with Elizabeth Kostova. Apr 18, 7pm, “Wherever You Go, There They Are” with Annabelle Gurwitch. Apr 19, 7pm, “Prince Charles” with Sally Bedell Smith. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Healdsburg Library

Apr 13, 4pm, “Be What You Are” with Todd Parr. 139 Piper St, Healdsburg 707.433.3772.

Napa Bookmine

Hunt for eggs in the sculpture garden and enjoy decorating activities in the museum. Apr 15, 1:30pm. $7 per child. History Museum of Sonoma County, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Apr 15, 6pm, “Trixi Pudong & the Greater World” and “Said the Fly” with Audrey Mei and Laurie Taylor. Apr 19, 4:30pm, Storytime & Sing Along with Savannah Austin. Apr 19, 6:30pm, “Riverine” and “Willy Loman’s Reckless Daughter” with Angela Palm and Elizabeth Powell. 964 Pearl St, Napa 707.733.3199.

Low Tides Critter Hunt

19 Broadway Club

Easter Egg Hunt & Family Day

Kids can spend Easter searching the tidepools for colorful critters along with traditional egg hunt, games and giveaways. Apr 16, 8:30am. $10 per family. Campbell Cove Beach, Westshore Rd, Bodega Bay, stewardscr.org.

Robin Hood

Presented by Traveling Lantern Theatre Company. Apr 15, 11am. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Sebastopol Kiwanis Community Easter Egg Hunt

Bring your basket and find treats and colored eggs specially prepared by Culinary Boot Camp at Analy High School. Apr 15, 10am. Free. Ives Park, Willow Street and Jewell Avenue, Sebastopol.

Readings Angelico Hall

Apr 13, 7pm, “The Tsar of Love & Techno” with Anthony Marra,

Apr 18, 8pm, Floricanto with Casa Manana, a night of poetry and music. Free. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax 415.459.1091.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books

Apr 13, 7pm, “In This Grave Hour” with Jacqueline Winspear. Apr 18, 4pm, “Escargot” with Dashka Slater. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Point Reyes Books

Apr 14, 7pm, Sixteen Rivers Press reading with Gillian Wegener and Erin Rodoni. 11315 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1542.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books

Apr 15, 7pm, “A Book of American Martyrs” with Joyce Carol Oates. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Sausalito Woman’s Club

Apr 19, 6:30pm, Sausalito Woman’s Club Poetry Evening, guest appearances by local SLAM poets. 120 Central Ave, Sausalito 415.332.2700.

Apr 15, 1pm, “New Wine Lover’s Companion” and “The Cheese Lover’s Companion” with Ron Herbst. Free. 8440 St Helena Hwy, Rutherford 707.963.4507. Apr 13, 7pm, Why There Are Words, various authors read on the theme “Only the Lonely.” $10. 333 Caledonia St, Sausalito 415.331.8272.

Theater Bondage

Award-winning playwright Star Finch’s surreal ghost story follows a mixed-race girl who dares to chart her own path to womanhood. Through Apr 16. $25. AlterTheater Performance Space, 200 Tamal Plaza, Corte Madera. 415.454.2787.

Company

A single man weighs the pros and cons of married life in a series of musical vignettes. Through Apr 16. $12-$27. Novato Theater Company, 5240 Nave Dr, Novato. 415.883.4498.

Sing Me a Murder

See and sing in the newest dinner show from Get a Clue Productions, a fully functioning karaoke bar with deadly competition. Reservations required. Fri, Apr 14, 7pm. $68. Charlie’s Restaurant, Windsor Golf Club, 1320 19th Hole Dr, Windsor.

The Sunshine Boys

Neil Simon’s hilarious love letter to Vaudeville is presented by Marin Onstage. Through Apr 15. $12-$24. The Belrose, 1415 Fifth Ave, San Rafael. 415.454.6422.

Vincent

Sightglass Theater present a one-night-only performance of the play based on the memoirs of Vincent Van Gogh and written by Leonard Nimoy. Apr 15, 5pm. $25 and up. Napa Valley College Performing Arts Center, 2277 Napa Vallejo Hwy, Napa, sightglasstheater.org.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.


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Sea Change

Bills could erode federal prohibition BY PHILLIP SMITH

T

he Congressional Cannabis Caucus flexed its muscle last month as members of Congress filed a package of bills aimed at creating a “path to marijuana reform” at the federal level and protecting and preserving marijuana laws in states where it is legal.

Two Oregon Democrats, Sen. Ron Wyden and Rep. Earl Blumenauer, led the charge, announcing a bipartisan package of three bills, including a marijuana-legalization bill reintroduced by Rep. Jared Polis, D-Colorado, as well as a pair of bills aimed at cleaning up “collateral issues” such as taxes, regulation, banking, asset forfeiture, de-scheduling, research and protection for individuals. “The federal government must respect the decision Oregonians made at the polls and allow lawabiding marijuana businesses to go to the bank just like any other

legal business,” Wyden said in a statement. “This three-step approach will spur job growth and boost our economy, all while ensuring the industry is being held to a fair standard.” At least five other bills have already been filed, and lawmakers are also planning to reintroduce the Rohrabacher-Blumenauer amendment, which would block the Justice Department from funding enforcement efforts against state-legal medical marijuana programs, and the McClintock-Polis amendment, which would similarly block enforcement against state-legal adult-use programs. That later amendment came up just eight votes short last year. The move comes with increasing acceptance of marijuana and marijuana legalization. Twentynine states now allow marijuana for qualified patients, and eight states and the District of Columbia have legalized adult use. Public opinion polls now consistently show pot legalization with majority support; the latest came in March when the General Social Survey pegged support for legalization at 57 percent in 2016, up five points from just two years earlier. Not everybody is happy. Former White House drug-policy adviser Kevin Sabet, who now heads the anti-legalization Smart Approaches to Marijuana, told online journal The Cannabist last month that more marijuana legalization would have negative consequences. “While we don’t want to see folks locked up or given criminal records for smoking pot, we support federal laws against marijuana,” Sabet writes in an email. But Sabet’s is an increasingly lone voice in the wilderness. Phillip Smith lives in Sebastopol and is editor of the AlterNet Drug Reporter and author of the ‘Drug War Chronicle.’


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ARIES (March 21–April 19) Before visiting Sicily for the first time, American poet Billy Collins learned to speak Italian. In his poem “By a Swimming Pool Outside Siracusa,” he describes how the new language is changing his perspective. If he were thinking in English, he might say that the gin he’s drinking while sitting alone in the evening light “has softened my mood.” But the newly Italianized part of his mind would prefer to say that the gin “has allowed my thoughts to traverse my brain with greater gentleness” and “has extended permission to my mind to feel a friendship with the vast sky.” Your assignment in the coming week, Aries, is to Italianize your view of the world. Infuse your thoughts with expansive lyricism and voluptuous relaxation. If you’re Italian, celebrate and amplify your Italianness. It’s closing time. You have finished toiling in the shadow of an old sacred cow. You’ve climaxed your relationship with ill-fitting ideas that you borrowed from mediocre and inappropriate teachers once upon a time. And you can finally give up your quest for a supposed Holy Grail that never actually existed in the first place. It’s time to move on to the next chapter of your life story, Taurus! You have been authorized to graduate from any influence, attachment and attraction that wouldn’t serve your greater good in the future. Does this mean you’ll soon be ready to embrace more freedom than you have in years? I’m betting on it.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) The heaviest butterfly on the planet is the female Queen Victoria birdwing. It tips the scales at two grams. The female Queen Alexandra birdwing is the butterfly with the longest wingspan: over 12 inches. These two creatures remind me of you these days. Like them, you’re freakishly beautiful. You’re a marvelous and somewhat vertiginous spectacle. The tasks you’re working on are graceful and elegant, yet also big and weighty. Because of your intensity, you may not look flight-worthy, but you’re actually quite aerodynamic. In fact, your sorties are dazzling and influential. Though your acrobatic zigzags seem improbable, they’re effective.

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CANCER (June 21–July 22) Picasso had mixed feelings about his fellow painter Marc Chagall, who was born under the sign of Cancer. “I’m not crazy about his roosters and donkeys and flying violinists, and all the folklore,” Picasso said, referring to the subject matter of Chagall’s compositions. But he also felt that Chagall was one of the only painters “who understands what color really is,” adding, “There’s never been anybody since Renoir who has the feeling for light that Chagall has.” I suspect that in the coming weeks, you will be the recipient of mixed messages like these. Praise and disapproval may come your way. Recognition and neglect. Kudos and apathy. Please don’t dwell on the criticism and downplay the applause. In fact, do the reverse! LEO (July 23–August 22) “Go Tell It on the Mountain” is the title of an old gospel song, and now it’s the metaphorical theme of your horoscope. I advise you to climb a tall peak—even if it’s just a magic mountain in your imagination—and deliver the spicy monologue that has been marinating within you. It would be great if you could gather a sympathetic audience for your revelations, but that’s not mandatory to achieve the necessary catharsis. You simply need to be gazing at the big picture as you declare your big, ripe truths. VIRGO (August 23–September 22) If you were a snake, it would be a fine time to molt your skin. If you were a river, it would be a perfect moment to overflow your banks in a spring flood. If you were an office worker, it would be an excellent phase to trade in your claustrophobic cubicle for a spacious new niche. In other words, Virgo, you’re primed to outgrow at least one of your containers. The boundaries you knew you would have to transgress some day are finally ready to be transgressed. Even now, your attention span is expanding and your imagination is stretching. LIBRA (September 23–October 22) For over a century, the Ringsaker Lutheran Church in Buxton,

BY ROB BREZSNY

N.D., Dakota hosted rites of passage, including 362 baptisms, 50 marriages and 97 funerals. It closed in 2002, a victim of the area’s shrinking population. I invite you to consider the possibility that this can serve as a useful metaphor for you, Libra. Is there a place that has been a sanctuary for you, but has begun to lose its magic? Is there a traditional power spot from which the power has been ebbing? Has a holy refuge evolved into a mundane hang-out? If so, mourn for a while, then go in search of a vibrant replacement.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

Most people throw away lemon rinds, walnut shells and pomegranate skins. But some resourceful types find uses for these apparent wastes. Lemon rind can serve as a deodorizer, cleaner and skin tonic, as well as a zesty ingredient in recipes. Ground-up walnut shells work well in facial scrubs and pet bedding. When made into a powder, pomegranate peels have a variety of applications for skincare. I suggest you look for metaphorically similar things, Scorpio. You’re typically inclined to dismiss the surfaces and discard the packaging and ignore the outer layers, but I urge you to consider the possibility that right now they may have value.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21)

You’re growing too fast, but that’s fine as long as you don’t make people around you feel they’re moving too slowly. You know too much, but that won’t be a problem as long as you don’t act snooty. And you’re almost too attractive for your own good, but that won’t hurt you as long as you overflow with spontaneous generosity. What I’m trying to convey, Sagittarius, is that your excesses are likely to be more beautiful than chaotic, more fertile than confusing. And that should provide you with plenty of slack when dealing with cautious folks who are a bit rattled by your lust for life.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) Until recently, scientists believed the number of trees on the planet was about 400 billion. But research published in the journal Nature says that’s wrong. There are actually 3 trillion trees on earth—almost eight times more than was previously thought. In a similar way, I suspect you have also underestimated certain resources that are personally available to you, Capricorn. Now is a good time to correct your undervaluation. Summon the audacity to recognize the potential abundance you have at your disposal. Then make plans to tap into it with a greater sense of purpose. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) The poet John Keats identified a quality he called “negative capability.” He defined it as the power to calmly accept “uncertainties, mysteries and doubts without any irritable reaching after fact and reason.” I would extend the meaning to include three other things not to be irritably reached for: artificial clarity, premature resolution and simplistic answers. Now is an excellent time to learn more about this fine art, Aquarius. PISCES (February 19–March 20): Are you ready

for a riddle that’s more enjoyable than the kind you’re used to? I’m not sure if you are. You may be too jaded to embrace this unusual gift. You could assume it’s another one of the crazy-making cosmic jokes that have sometimes tormented you in the past. But I hope that doesn’t happen. I hope you’ll welcome the riddle in the liberating spirit in which it’s offered. If you do, you’ll be pleasantly surprised as it teases you in ways you didn’t know you wanted to be teased. You’ll feel a delightful itch or a soothing burn in your secret self, like a funny-bone feeling that titillates your immortal soul. (P.S.: To take full advantage of the blessed riddle, you may have to expand your understanding of what’s good for you.)

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

35 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AP R I L 1 2-1 8 , 20 17 | BOH E MI A N.COM

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