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SERVING SONOMA & NAPA COUNTIES | FEBRUARY 15-21, 2017 | BOHEMIAN.COM • VOL. 38.41

Aggressive logging imperils Northern California rivers and residents P11 COTATI-RP SCHOOL FIGHT P8

CIA AT COPIA P16

DAN HICKS P18


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Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

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Heavy logging has left residents along the Elk River fearing the rain, p11.

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‘There are not many like him in terms of the pure authenticity of what he did.’ MUSIC P1 8

Ms. Warren Goes to Washington O PE N M IC P7

Deluged: Rivers, Logging and Politics COVE R STO RY P1 1

Measure A: Pot on the Ballot Again TH E NUG G ET P26 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Swirl p10 Cover Feature p11 Culture Crush p15

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Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

Old-Fashioned Bigotry The Thomas Nast political cartoon cited in “Artful Resistance” (Feb. 8) as “speaking truth to power” was anything but. It was propaganda of the anti–Irish Catholic kind. Nast was fiercely anti-Catholic and a vocal opponent of New York’s Democratic political machine, Tammany Hall. That 1871 cartoon in Harper’s Weekly depicted Catholic bishops as alligators attacking public school children and their teacher.

In the background, lest anyone doubt Nast’s intended targets, Tammany Hall is portrayed as St. Peter’s basilica in Rome, with Irish and Papal flags. Truth to power? I call it nativist, anti-immigrant bigotry.

MICHAEL F. MCCAULEY Via Bohemian.com

Sessions Session Thank you for reporting this (Fishing Report, Feb.8). It appears our sheriff is diametrically opposed to the will of the

THIS MODERN WORLD

people of Sonoma County, but I guess that is nothing new.

VOTER 321

Via Bohemian.com

Thanks for at least asking the questions. As a community, we need to keep pressing to hold these people accountable and actually answer the questions they are being asked.

KRISTEN THROOP Via Bohemian.com

By Tom Tomorrow

You’re Hired My old prayers aren’t working anymore. A friend tries to reassure me with her cosmic view: “We are all a part of one another from the beginning of time to now. This rain falling could be Caesar’s piss.” She believes we are all responsible for the election results. No way. I’ve been working for the underdogs since I learned to howl. Now I find myself at the front of the dog sled, straining in harness and suffocating in the deep snow. No, I won’t go to the public demonstrations anymore. What do they accomplish? Get a little mob-rule stimulation surging in our veins? Then go home and binge-watch TV shows? Nope. I think we need to get specific. Real specific. What can I do right now to make a difference? Here’s my new prayer: Let us pick one noble or modest cause— environmental, political, whatever we care deeply about and commit to that cause for the rest of our lives. The business of our lives must include our chosen citizen avocation, and we must go after it with the same zeal we have for our career, art, family, home or car. So get fired up! We are all hired by the citizen council. The returns on our investments begin accumulating now. Step right up and sign on the dotted line and never give up. Amen.

LIN MARIE DEVINCENT Sanoma

Dept. of Corrections In the Debriefer item of Feb. 1, “KOWS Crushed,” we erroneously reported that the city of Sebastopol had denied a permit to KOWS to site its antenna in town. The Sebastopol city council issued a permit to allow for the antenna, but pressure from community activists opposed to it served to nix the proposed project.

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


Rants

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One Day Only. Lafont Trunk Show

Ms. Warren Goes to Washington

Saturday, March 4th 11 am - 4 pm

We’ve seen this movie before BY E. G. SINGER

When the dirty business of politics and conflicts of interest arise, Smith defends his cause and is shown no mercy or respect and eventually slandered with false accusations. (Sound familiar?) He is literally brought to his knees when he faints after his 24-hour filibuster in the senate chambers. But the movie has a happy ending, owing to director Frank Capra’s belief that there is something to be said for this here democracy and what one person’s voice can accomplish. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, no less idealistic but with greater knowledge of the workings of Congress, was also shown great disrespect and temporarily silenced by an arcane rule, for reading historical letters from Sen. Edward Kennedy and Ms. Coretta Scott King, that voiced their concern for Jeff Sessions’ appointment to the courts in Alabama. These are letters that would allow for the robust debate the American people need at this time in our democracy, especially when it appears our independent judicial branch of government is under attack. Even more distressing is the fact that fellow male senators rose and completed reading those letters without being subjected to that same rule applied to Sen. Warren. It appears that Sen. Mitch McConnell not only showed poor judgment in his decision to curtail discussion of a prospective appointee’s qualifications, but he has now opened a second front with his boorish behavior toward a female colleague. Perhaps Sen. McConnell would retitle his version of Capra’s classic as Woman, Shut Up and Sit Down! E.G. Singer lives in Santa Rosa. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

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n the 1939 film Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Jimmy Stewart’s character, Jefferson Smith, an idealistic and slightly naive man, is appointed the junior senator from his home state. Throughout the film, he appears to be out of step, behind the eight ball, but willing to learn “how the game is played” in Washington, from his sinister senior senator.

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SAVE THE DATE!


Paper THE

COURT BATTLE School board member Timothy Nonn is suing the district he was elected to serve over charges they are not meeting his needs as a disabled person.

Equal Access

ADA compliance battle unfolds at Cotati-Rohnert Park school district BY TOM GOGOLA

A

newly elected trustee at the Cotati-Rohnert Park Unified School District is suing the district in federal court this week over what he says is an ongoing violation of the federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Timothy Nonn was elected to the five-member district board in November, positioning himself as a reform candidate opposed to a district-wide referendum, Measure C, the $80 million construction bond supported by other board members and superintendent Robert Haley. The bond measure passed in

November and will be used for lead and asbestos remediation, and other classroom upgrades. Nonn, who is legally blind, says his issue with the district started after he was elected to the board and attended an orientation meeting and brought his own, unpaid aide to assist him. District Superintendent Haley,

Tom Gogola

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FEBR UARY 1 5-21 , 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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he says, denied him the use of this personal aide. Now Nonn says he’s “in a big battle with the district’s lawyers,” who, he says, are denying his right to a reasonable accommodation of his disability under the ADA. Nonn says he again tried to bring his aide to his first board meeting, on Dec. 15, for his swearing in. But he says Haley wouldn’t let the aide into the meeting, and that he received a “threatening letter” on Dec. 20 from the district that said it “would enact legal action against me if I bring in an aide again.” Nonn says the ADA demands an “interactive process” between a disabled individual and his or her employer, but Haley argues that “interactive” is a two-way street and that the district was, and is, under no obligation to agree to an aide of Nonn’s choosing. Haley says the district has made several efforts to accommodate Nonn’s disability. In response to the rejection of his aide, Nonn hired an ADA compliance attorney, who, he says, is being paid by the National Federation for the Blind, based in Baltimore. Nonn’s lawyer, Timothy Elder, filed suit against the school district in the Fourth District court this week. Nonn’s legal contention is, “Yes, I have the right to pick an aide under the ADA.” The district’s response is, “No, you don’t.” The legal issue may turn on whether Nonn is an employee of the district—he’s an elected official who receives a stipend for his service to the board. The Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice offered guidance in 2011 to address the so-called effective communication rule, which was enacted to make sure a person with a vision, hearing or speech disability is provided with reasonable accommodation: “For people who are blind, have vision loss, or are deaf-blind, this includes providing a qualified reader; information in large print, Braille, or electronically for use with a computer screen-reading program; or an audio recording of printed information. A


Nonn charges that the issue of the aide works to Haley’s ultimate advantage; three months after being elected, he still doesn’t have an aide. The superintendent, he says, has the ongoing support of three of five board members, whose refusal to accept his selfselected aide means Nonn is “obstructed from functioning fully as a trustee. I am not being given equal access, and the effect is that I’m not able to work fully as a trustee, and that works to [Haley’s] benefit. “I’m working to reform the district,” he adds, and says his move to sue the district was not taken lightly, given that he ran in part because of what he calls the district’s outsized legal bills. Haley says his mandate as superintendent “is to make sure we follow the process.” He’s been on the radio lately in an effort to drum up new students for the district, in an open-enrollment period that goes through the end of the month. The district, says Haley, has gone out of its way to assist Nonn with disability-appropriate technology. They bought a new computer with voice-recognition software designed to ease his way as a trustee. Nonn says he hopes the suit will leverage a favorable outcome for him, whether it’s his own selected aide or one that’s hired by the district. He’s convinced that there’s politics at play, but Haley says the conflict is a question of a process that he insists has to be abided, regardless of whatever backdrop of politics is charged or implied. “It’s true that trustee Nonn has attended board meetings for years,” Haley says, “and he’s been critical of me as superintendent. That’s our system. It’s robust, and I have no problem with that.” Sonoma County is staying out of this one. Victoria Willard, ADA compliance officer with the county, had no comment. Nonn’s lawyer planned to file paperwork with the federal appeals court this week. In the meantime, he continues to serve without an aide.

D EBRIEF ER The Sheriff and Sessions Last week, the news broke in the Washington Examiner that Sonoma County Sheriff Steve Freitas was one of six California sheriffs to meet with Jeff Sessions, just as the antiimmigration zealot and Alabama senator was getting voted in as U.S. Attorney General. Sonoma County Sheriff spokesman Sgt. Spencer Crum addressed some questions sent to him about the Freitas meeting. (The full report is on the Fishing Report blog at Bohemian.com.) Bohemian: Sessions supports deportation of so-called Dreamers under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. What's the sheriff’s view on DACA? Sgt. Crum: Sheriff Freitas believes in cooperating with our federal counterparts to keep communities safe. His viewpoints have been widely shared with the community and can be found on a video on the front page of our website. Sheriff Freitas has a policy that sheriff deputies cannot ask anyone about their immigration status, and we do not assist ICE in immigration raids based solely on immigration. If someone is committing crimes, we will do our best to enforce the law or assist any law-enforcement agency.

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Bohemian: Who paid for this trip to Washington? Sgt. Crum: This is a taxpayerfunded trip. No other members of the sheriff’s department accompanied him. President Trump addressed the group, welcoming them and expressed his support of local lawenforcement entities. Sheriff Freitas did not have any meetings with the president. —Tom Gogola

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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‘qualified’ reader means someone who is able to read effectively, accurately, and impartially, using any necessary specialized vocabulary.” Haley says the issue for him and the school board is all about process, as he acknowledges that Nonn has been a longstanding critic of his. In an interview, Nonn criticized Haley’s time as superintendent in St. Helena and Sebastopol, but Haley insists there’s nothing personal about the decision to nix Nonn’s aide in favor of a process that would give the board input into the selection of the aide. Compliance with the demands of the ADA, Haley stresses— whether it’s for students or faculty or administrators—is an interactive process. That means “nobody can make unilateral demands” and “no unilateral demands have to be accepted” by the board. Instead of his own personal aide, Haley offered Nonn the use of a district secretary, an administrative assistant. Nonn says the offer was rescinded and that the district’s latest offer was to hire a dedicated aide for Nonn. He says that would be fine—if the district would actually hire the person. In a recent letter to Rohnert Park’s Community Voice, Nonn’s chosen aide, Janet Lowery, wrote, “I am highly qualified to assist people with disabilities, as I have had a career working with disabled adults and children in colleges and secondary schools.” The district’s view is that they tried to meet Nonn halfway in suggesting a district staffer for the aide’s role. “So far he has rejected using her,” Haley wrote in an email to the Bohemian. “As a school district, we are very conscious about providing reasonable accommodations and continuing the process. I also want to make it clear that it is the board of trustees that makes decisions regarding conduct of trustees at meetings, not the superintendent. This is contrary to some statements Trustee Nonn has made.”


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alfway into a tasting of LaRue wines, I need wine charms— those shiny little baubles that are supposed to attach to the base of the glass—to tell them apart. Even the last in the lineup, typically the boldest and darkest wine of the lot, is just as luminescently raspberry-red as the first.

Winemaker Katy Wilson (pictured) makes Pinot Noir from the westernmost part of the Sonoma Coast appellation. True, her 2014 Emmaline Ann Pinot Noir winks at darker aromas of smoky oak and leather, and has the savor of lingonberry instead of cool cherry or raspberry candy. Still,

light, bright Pinot Noir all around. So is this what we can expect from Pinot from this region? Not the whole story. At a tasting of Pinot Noir from the Coastlands Vineyard, all from the same vintage but different wineries—some of which Wilson also consults for—each wine was distinct, she says, showing a range of Pinot characteristics from bright-red berries to dark, cherry-cola flavors. The winemaker brings a lot to the barrel, says Wilson, and that’s why she wanted to start her own brand, even when she’s already busy making wine for a roster of other wineries, including Claypool Cellars. For LaRue, Wilson does nearly everything herself, including punch-downs and toppings. It’s hard to say that any one quotidian task stamps the wine as being hers alone. But in the end it is. Content to make just 500 cases a year, Wilson says that growing a big winery with her name on it isn’t the point—besides, she named LaRue after her great-grandmother, Veona LaRue, who advised Katy she could do anything she wanted in life. Wilson wasn’t sure what she wanted to do until she learned in ag 101 at Cal Poly that making wine was an option—she was in. Having grown up on a walnut orchard (“small by Central Valley standards”), Wilson is happy to go off on a tangent about nut pricing and the arcana of dairy shares with the same personable enthusiasm she brings to talking about fine wine. Although five appointments is a big week at the “fancy booze caboose,” the funky tasting-roomin-a-train-car she shares with Claypool Cellars in Sebastopol, she doesn’t mind showing visitors around the vineyards, and then stopping at Freestone for pastries— it’s all part of what she does for her wine. LaRue Wines, 6761 Sebastopol Ave., (Gravenstein Station), Sebastopol. Tasting by appointment, $15; vineyard tour, $45. Wines are priced at $60 to $75. 707.933.8355.


11 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 1 5-21 , 2017 | BOH EMI A N.COM

IN HARM’S WAY The Headwaters Forest Preserve is part of the Elk River basin, an area that’s been severely impacted by logging.

A

s a long-time resident of the Elk River basin, which drains the redwood-studded hills southeast of Eureka, Jesse Noell lives in fear of the rain. During storms of even moderate intensity, the Elk River often rises above its banks and dumps torrents of mud and sand across Noell and his neighbors’ properties. The churning surges of foamy brown water have ruined domestic water supplies, inundated vehicles, buried farmland and spilled into homes.

It first happened to Noell and his wife, Stephanie, in 2002. As the flood approached, he remained inside his home to wedge bricks and rocks beneath their furniture, and pile pictures, books and other prized possessions atop cabinets and counters. The water level was at his thighs; his body spasmed in

the winter cold. Across the street, two firefighters in a raft paddled furiously against the current, carrying his neighbors—military veterans in their 60s, who were at risk of drowning—to higher ground. After crouching and shivering atop the kitchen counter through the night, Noell was finally able

to wade through the floodwater to higher ground the next morning. But the home’s sheetrock, floors, heating equipment, water tanks, floor joints, girders and septic system were destroyed. This experience wasn’t an act of nature; it was manmade. “California has a systematic and deliberate policy to flood our homes and properties for the sake of corporate profit,” Noell says.

Cause and Effect

The cause of the flooding is simple: logging. Since the 1980s, timber companies have logged thousands of acres of redwood trees and Douglas firs, and constructed a spider web– like network of roads to haul

them away, which has caused massive erosion of the region’s geologically unstable hillsides. The deep channels and pools of the Elk River’s middle reaches have become choked with a sludge of erosion and debris six to eight feet high. Each storm—such as those that have roiled California’s coastal rivers this past week—forces the rushing water to spread out laterally, bleeding onto residents’ lands and damaging homes, vehicles, domestic water supplies, cropland and fences, while also causing suffering that corporate and government balance sheets can’t measure. “The Elk River watershed is California’s biggest logging sacrifice area,” says Felice

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12 Elk River ( 11 Pace, a longtime environmental activist who founded the Klamath Forest Alliance in northernmost California. For roughly 20 years, the North Coast division of the State Water Resources Control Board, the agency in charge of monitoring water quality and hazards in the area, has deliberated on how to address the Elk River’s severe impairment. But they have failed to take bold action, largely because of opposition from politically well-connected timber companies and the Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire), the state agency that regulates commercial logging. Since 2008, the watershed’s major timber operator has been Humboldt Redwood Company (HRC), part of a 440,000-acre North Coast logging enterprise owned by the billionaire Fisher family, best known as founders of the Gap and Banana Republic clothing empires. Jerry Martien, an Elk River basin resident and former Humboldt State University writing instructor, says the government’s failure to protect basin residents—and the aquatic life that calls the river home— should concern everyone in California. “If they are getting away with it here, they can getting away with similar things in other places,” he says.

Forests and Rivers California’s northern coastal mountains hold some of the world’s most geologically unstable terrain, as well as some of its most ecologically productive forests. By anchoring mountain soil—which enhances the soil’s ability to absorb water— these forests play a critical role in keeping these watersheds healthy. In the mid-20th century, a logging boom swept across California’s North Coast. The region’s legendary timber stands went south to frame the suburban housing tracts of the San Francisco Bay Area and the Los Angeles Basin. For the first time,

clear-cutting occurred on a large scale here—a practice of razing virtually every tree in a large swath—and, in many places, has continued to the present. Logging roads tend to be the main source of soil erosion and landslides in disturbed forests, and they also alter runoff patterns and disrupt subsurface water flows. In addition to causing flooding and reducing stream flow, sediment smothers the eggs and disrupts the reproductive cycles of fish, especially salmon and steelhead, which require pools where they can rest and feed. Erosion fills in those crucial pools, while removal of canopy can raise stream temperatures to inhospitable levels. “The majority of the water bodies in the North Coast are impaired from excess sediment, much of it associated with past logging practices,” said North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board geologist Jim Burke during a Nov. 30 agency hearing concerning the Elk River.

Regulator or Rubber Stamp? The 1973 California Forest Practice Act instituted a uniform code for timber harvest practices in California, which are overseen and periodically updated by the Board of Forestry and Fire Protection, whose nine members are appointed by the governor. The rules are then implemented by Cal Fire, which reviews and authorizes logging permits. But the damage has continued despite the state’s rules. In the 1980s, for example, a junk-bondfinanced conglomerate named Maxxam Corporation engineered a hostile takeover of Humboldt County’s largest timberland owner, Pacific Lumber Company. They acquired more than 200,000 acres, including more than 20,000 acres in the Elk River watershed—roughly two-thirds its total land area. The company saw the redwoods and Douglas fir forests as underexploited assets, which could help pay off its bonded debt, and moved to liquidate the last remaining stands of private old-

HIGH WATER Flooding along the Elk River is becoming more common.

growth redwoods—but only after first raiding the pension fund of its employees. Numerous North Coast rivers, including the Elk, were buried under soil and debris. In a landmark 1987 lawsuit by the Arcata-based Environmental Protection Information Center (EPIC), a Humboldt County superior court judge ruled that Cal Fire was “rubberstamping” the logging permits that came before it, rather than meaningfully reviewing them for compliance with laws and regulations. The court further ruled that Cal Fire needs to assess the “cumulative impacts” of logging on water quality and other aspects of the public trust. Three decades later, agency leaders say Cal Fire is now faithfully discharging its duties. Russ Henly, assistant secretary of Forest Resources Management for the California Natural Resources Agency, says he thinks Cal Fire staffers are “doing a very good job” of reviewing timber harvest plans. “I know they give a hard look to the cumulative impacts of logging as part of the harvesting plans.” But numerous environmental and public interest groups disagree, including representatives of the group that filed the cumulative impacts lawsuit. “The long, sad history of the Elk River is one example of how we can’t rely on our state forestry agency to deal with the multiple impacts of logging,” says EPIC’s Rob DiPerna.

Environmentalists and commercial fisherpeople alike note that numerous river watersheds—and the life they harbor—have continued to spiral downward in the modern regulatory era. In the North Coast, coho salmon have been particularly hard-hit by the degradation of redwood forests.

A Statewide Concern Here in the North Bay, a controversy over timber industry damage to the Gualala River in northwestern Sonoma and southeastern Mendocino counties has been raging since 2015. First came the Dogwood plan, a 320acre timber harvest plan filed by Gualala Redwoods Timber company (GRT). It involves tractor-logging hundreds of stately, second-growth redwoods that line the lower Gualala River, in areas spared from axes and chainsaws for a century or more. Next was the German South plan that GRT filed last September, which looks to harvest an additional 96 acres of floodplain redwoods, in an area immediately adjacent to Dogwood, and clearcutting 85 acres directly upslope. In September came GRT’s Plum plan, which involves felling floodplain redwoods along the Gualala’s north fork in Mendocino County. According to environmentalists, these unique floodplain redwood groves serve as a thin green line


Peer Review Most of those clear-cuts were completed by Sierra Pacific Industries (SPI), the United States’

second largest timber company, which owns roughly 1.8 million acres across California—nearly 2 percent of the state’s land area. Battle Creek is a 350-squaremile drainage fed by water from melting snow that drips down the western slope of Mount Lassen in northeastern California where SPI owns more than 30,000 acres. Because of the creek’s ample yearround flow of cold water, state and federal wildlife managers have deemed it the most welcoming area in California for the reintroduction of endangered Sacramento River winter-run Chinook salmon, prompting the federal government to invest over $100 million in its recovery. Juvenile Chinook must have cold water to survive. Not only has Cal Fire failed to prevent SPI’s clear-cuts from severely damaging this critical watershed, critics say, but it has even attempted to prevent publication of scientific research concerning the logging’s impact on Battle Creek. In 2016, recently retired US Forest Service hydrologist Jack Lewis co-authored a research paper analyzing Battle Creek water-quality data, collected largely by the environmental group Battle Creek Alliance, and submitted it to the journal Environmental Monitoring and Assessment for peer review. It is the first-ever study to examine the cumulative impacts of SPI’s logging in the Sierra Cascade region. The journal’s editor invited two professional hydrologists, including Cal Fire’s Cafferata, to peer-review the study. Cafferata strongly criticized it, prompting the journal’s editor to reject it. In an email to the Bohemian, Cafferata writes that “the literature suggests that” a large fire “was a more probable mechanism than logging for the [water-quality impacts] described in the paper.” In emails obtained by the Bohemian, Cafferata wrote to another Cal Fire hydrologist, Drew Coe, concerning the research essay. He stated that a “key piece” of his ) 14 objection was that the

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against further severe damage to endangered and threatened species of salmon and trout, which feed, rear, shelter and migrate in them. Environmental groups—including Forest Unlimited, Friends of the Gualala River, and the California Native Plant Society—successfully sued to halt the Dogwood plan, though the others are going forward as of this writing. They say that Cal Fire and other agencies have failed to require rudimentary surveys of endangered and threatened plant and animals species in approving these logging proposals. “Cal Fire is handing over the Gualala River’s floodplain on a silver platter to the timber industry,” says Jeanne Jackson, a nature columnist for the Independent Coast Observer. Gualala Redwoods Timber argues that it is only cutting these forests selectively and leaving riparian buffers, in compliance with state regulations designed to protect streams. Cal Fire’s watershed protection program manager Pete Cafferata, who is involved in many of the department’s activities concerning the Elk, Gualala and other rivers, says the forest practice rules have helped improve river health overall. “Monitoring work conducted over the past 20 years has demonstrated that California’s water-quality-related forest practice rules implementation rate is high,” Cafferata says, “and that when properly implemented, the current [regulations] are generally effective in protecting water quality.” Others note that loggingimpacted rivers and the life they harbor continue to decline in numerous areas of the state. And the worst impacts typically occur from clear-cutting. From 1997 to 2014, Cal Fire approved more than 512,000 acres of clear-cutting, or about 800 square miles, an area larger than either Napa or Marin counties.

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14 Elk River ( 13 paper was “advocating limits on [SPI’s] harvesting rates” in Battle Creek. Coe responded that he similarly saw the article as “an advocacy piece rather than an objective analysis.” The research paper's co-author, Jack Lewis, stood by his analysis. “We believe that roads, logging, fire, and post-fire logging have all contributed to the degradation of water quality in Battle Creek."

The Fate of the Elk River By 1994, Maxxam’s liquidation style of logging was resulting in severe flash-flooding of the Elk River. Ironically, a simultaneous campaign further up the watershed sought to save the largest remaining area of unprotected old-growth redwoods in California, and thus the world: the Headwaters Forest. California and the federal government purchased the 5,600-acre tract in 1999, creating the Headwaters Forest Reserve, a deal that many lower Elk River residents contend left the rest of the watershed vulnerable to continued degradation. The Fisher family scooped up Maxxam’s land in 2008, after Maxxam went bankrupt. Ever since, Cal Fire’s main counter to the call for limiting the logging in the Elk River watershed has been that HRC’s logging operations are significantly better than that of Maxxam, and that it is unclear in the scientific literature whether HRC’s logging is actually exacerbating the river’s water-quality problems. HRC has foresworn traditional clearcutting, though. In the meantime, the Santa Rosa–based North Coast Regional Water Quality Board voted to delay taking action to limit sediment inputs into the watershed multiple times, dating back to 1998. In 2015, a study by consulting firm Tetra Tech, hired by the water board, concluded that the Elk River is so impaired that no more sediment should be allowed

to enter it. This study formed the basis of the board’s development of a so-called total maximum daily load (TMDL), a calculation of the maximum amount of pollutants a water body can receive and still meet health and safety standards. Finally, this past spring, the board voted to adopt its own TMDL action plan for the Elk, which largely echoes Tetra Tech’s recommendation. “It’s pretty damn unprecedented for a sediment TMDL to call for zero additional sediment input,” says North Coast Water Board executive officer Matt St. John. The water board’s staff members proposed to restrict all logging in the five most impacted areas of the watershed and create a wider buffer between timber harvest zones and water courses, among other new restrictions. But HRC representatives have strongly lobbied against any additional state-mandated environmental protections in the Elk River, as has another company with timberland in the watershed, Green Diamond Resources Company. The watershed is especially important for HRC, since the watershed and one immediately north of it, Freshwater Creek, account for roughly half of what HRC logs every year. Jesse Noell and another Elk River basin resident, Kristi Wrigley, formed a group called Salmon Forever in the late-’90s to conduct their own water-quality monitoring. Wrigley is a fourthgeneration apple farmer in the watershed, whose cropland has been destroyed by flooding. Between 1997 and 2008, when there was a moratorium on Elk River logging followed by low harvest rates in the Elk River watershed, suspended sediment concentrations in the river’s south fork diminished by 59 percent,

according data collected by Salmon Forever funded in part by a State Water Board grant. From 2011 to 2013, after Cal Fire permitted increased harvesting by HRC, the sediment concentration increased by 89 percent. The sediment concentrations below HRC’s land is at 27 times the level of the Headwaters Forest Reserve, located upstream.

A New Precedent At a Nov. 30 hearing, HRC watershed analyst Mike Miles told the North Coast Water Board that his company already has strong restrictions on where, when and how to log in the Elk River area. “In this watershed, we have the strongest set of rules you can find in the state of California for private forestlands,” he said. In addition to his work for HRC, Miles is a political appointee of Gov. Jerry Brown and presides over the state’s timber harvest practices: He is one of nine members of the Board of Forestry, and is the chairman of its committee that is most directly involved in the enforcement of the forest practice rules. Gov. Brown’s wife, Ann Gust Brown, is a former attorney for the Fisher family, the owners of HRC. The water board members had also received comment from Cal Fire that opposed restrictions on HRC’s logging beyond those already prescribed by the forest practice rules. Cal Fire executive officer Matt Dias, a one-time forester for Santa Cruz–based timber company Big Creek Lumber, expressed the same point. Elk River basin resident Jerry Martien was among those who also spoke up at the meeting. He had advocated giving “the Upper Elk River watershed a rest, for at least five years, with the possibility for another five, if that

‘The Elk River Watershed is California’s biggest logging sacrifice area.’

is bringing us cleaner water.” EPIC’s Rob DiPerna said the North Coast Water Board should be taking action, precisely because the alternative would be to leave the river’s well-being in Cal Fire’s hands. “Do we really think that falling back on Cal Fire is the way to make sure that water quality is protected from timber operations in the state of California?” he asked. The water board’s Greg Giusti, an extension service adviser for the University of California, strongly opposed the water board staff’s proposed restrictions. His objections were similar to those of Cal Fire, the Board of Forestry, Humboldt Redwood Company and Green Diamond. Only one board member, John Corbett, spoke up in the Elk River residents’ defense, noting that “they are the only ones who have always been right about what’s best for the river.” Ultimately, the board voted not to adopt the logging restrictions proposed by the staff. Elk River residents, whose suffering has been a silent residue of state agency decisions for two decades, were outraged but not surprised. Kristi Wrigley notes that the water board’s new waste discharge permit for HRC allows the equivalent of 2 percent clearcutting of the entire watershed per year—thus guaranteeing that more sediment will continue to wash into the river. On Feb. 22, the State Water Board will meet in Sacramento to decide whether to certify the Elk River TMDL. The Activists at EPIC have filed an appeal to the water board’s waste-discharge permit, and residents have filed a separate appeal calling for a cease and desist order forbidding any more logging by HRC until the river’s water again flows clean. “To people whose lives are already destroyed, their land is destroyed, and their water is destroyed,” says Wrigley. “Do you think a permit allowing that much logging is really going to do anything to make our lives better?” Will Parrish’s website is www.willparrishreports.com.


The week’s events: a selective guide

N A PA

Wine Times

The Winemaker by Richard Peterson is a memoir about the Napa wine expert and author’s 50 years in the industry, his many inventive contributions still in use today and his tenure with Napa Valley wines like Atlas Peak Vineyards. But it’s a book about more than wine. It’s a personal look back at Peterson’s life, one that began in the Great Depression, and it traces California’s agricultural history from the vantage point of someone who saw it all. Peterson reads from The Winemaker on Sunday, Feb. 19, at Napa Bookmine’s Oxbow Market store, 610 First St., Shop 4, Napa. Noon. 707.726.6575.

M I L L VA L L E Y

String Theory

Among the most celebrated bands in Ireland today, We Banjo 3 have spent two decades regaling audiences with a mix of Irish traditional tunes and Americana grass-fed folk for a sound steeped in history and infused with contemporary sensibility. Featuring banjo, fiddle, mandolin, guitar, vocals and percussion, We Banjo 3 give a new twist to old classics and invent modern takes on old sounds in a style they call “Celtgrass,” and this weekend, the banjo band make their way to the North Bay with a show on Sunday, Feb. 19, at Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave., Mill Valley. 8pm. $20–$22. 415.388.3850.

P E TA L U M A

Hard Rock Maestro

Uli Jon Roth has secured his place in classic-rock history as a one-time lead guitarist of the Scorpions, joining the German headbangers in the ’70s for a stretch of four studio albums. After leaving the band, he formed his own heavy rock outfit, Electric Sun, and has performed solo ever since. The guitarist is also a composer who’s written symphonies and concertos, and is the inventor of the “sky guitar,” custom built with extra frets to mimic the tone of a violin. Uli Jon Roth brings his world of music to the stage on Tuesday, Feb. 21, at McNear’s Mystic Theatre, 8:30pm. $24. 23 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma, 707.765.2121.

HEALDSBURG

Farmed Films

Healdsburg’s Shed is inviting local ranchers and harvesters to get out of the cold and rain and kick up their heels for the Farmers and Friends Movie Night, featuring a double bill of agricultural documentaries. First up is Unbroken Ground, which explores four ways to change our relationship with the earth. Next is Changing Season, a look at the famed Masumoto Family Farm, in which a father and daughter work to keep the farm afloat in transitional times. See the films and sip on fermented drinks on Wednesday, Feb. 22, at Healdsburg Shed, 25 North St., Healdsburg. 6:30pm. Free for farmers, $5 for friends. 707.431.7433.

—Charlie Swanson

TAKE FLIGHT Film composer-drummer Antonio Sánchez performs his improvisational score to the film ‘Birdman’ live onstage while the films screens on Saturday, Feb. 18, at the Smith Rafael Film Center in San Rafael. See Film, p24.

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Crush CULTURE

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Arts Ideas COPIOUS FOOD AND WINE After being closed for nearly a decade, Napa’s Copia is reopening with the help of the Culinary Institute of America.

Copia Reborn

Napa’s food and wine lover’s dream reopens with new culinary power BY CHARLIE SWANSON

I

t was an ambitious project—perhaps too ambitious. In 2001, downtown Napa cut the ribbon for a nearly 80,000square-foot center for food, wine and art named after the Roman goddess of abundance, Copia. In its seven years of operation, however, Copia more closely resembled the Greek hero Icarus, who flew too close to the sun.

Between 2001 and 2008, Copia welcomed visitors to its museum, two theaters, classrooms, demonstration kitchen, restaurant, rare-book library and vegetable and herb gardens. But poor ticket sales and changes to Copia’s focus and offerings left the center in bankruptcy in 2008, and Copia closed its doors. But after almost a decade of darkness, new light is coming into the defunct space. In October 2015, the Culinary Institute of

America (CIA) purchased the northern portion of the property for $12.5 million to complement the school’s St. Helena campus. It’s now called the CIA at Copia. The CIA is considered the premier culinary school in the country, with campuses in New York, Texas and the Napa Valley. The St. Helena campus, located at Greystone Cellars, has been in business since 1995. The new Napa location is the first space that the CIA is

gearing toward public events rather than programs for cooking professionals and students. Last year, CIA began hosting events at the center, like Flavor! Napa Valley and this weekend, Feb. 18–19, the CIA at Copia holds its grand opening. Continuing with its ongoing schedule of cooking classes and demonstrations, the event includes several hands-on classes, available for moderate fees, that show you how to make everything from your own condiments to fresh cheeses to eclairs. Many of the weekend’s events are free and family-appropriate, meaning the kids can take part in activities like cookie decorating while parents attend book signings and film screenings in the Copia theater. The weekend’s special guests include CIA president Tim Ryan, author and cheese expert Janet Fletcher and Silver Oak Winery chef Dominic Orsini. Several Napa Valley wineries including including St. Helena’s Clif Family Winery, Napa’s Cuvaison Estate Wines and Calistoga’s Storybook Mountain Vineyards will offer winetasting. Keeping the original Copia’s love of art in mind, the new center wraps its grand opening weekend with an art unveiling in the Copia Gardens. Napa artist Gordon Huether, whose large-scale art installations are renowned for their striking color and shimmering glass-like qualities, will be honoring original Copia backers Robert and Margrit Mondavi with a new work of art. The celebration at CIA at Copia takes place Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 18–19, 500 First St., Napa. Noon to 5pm. For more info and tickets to certain events, visit ciaatcopia.com.


HE’S NO DUMMY Eric Thompson portrays Albert Einstein’s brain in ‘One Stone.’

Lofty Notions

Big ideas take the stage in new plays BY DAVID TEMPLETON

I

deas don’t get much bigger than the nature of democracy or the theory of relativity. But two local theater companies are successfully wrestling those brain-busting subjects into highly enjoyable, stage-sized entertainments. 1776, the seldom-produced 1968 musical by Peter Stone and Sherman Edwards (Spreckels Theatre Company), combines an enormous cast, clever projections and elaborate costumes to tell the surprise-packed story of how America’s Declaration of Independence came to be signed. Directed by Larry Williams, the production is magnificent, and the longish tale—just under three hours, with one intermission— rarely loses momentum. That’s saying something for a musical boasting a scant baker’s dozen songs and a plot in which impassioned political debate

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t Cinnabar Theater, Trevor Allen’s One Stone takes on a similarly massive subject—Albert Einstein’s development of the theory of relativity—but approaches it on a much smaller scale. Under the inventive direction of Elizabeth Craven, a single actor (Eric Thompson) represents Einstein’s brain on a simple stage suggesting a cluttered office. His various discoveries and observations are brought to life by a balletic puppeteer (Sheila Devitt) and an oft-present violinist (Jennifer Cho). The miraculous thing about One Stone is how emotionally powerful it is. With little in the way of actual plot, Allen’s words, Thompson’s exuberant performance and the rich, magical puppetry of Devitt, all create a poetic space where Einstein’s ideas scamper about like curious children in a playground. One Stone is consistently lovely, excitingly unconventional and thoroughly extraordinary. ‘1776’ runs through Feb. 26 at Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 7707.588.3400. ‘One Stone’ runs through Feb. 19 at Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

52 W. 6th Street, Santa Rosa, CA 95401

2/17–2/23

Honorable

I Am Not Your Negro 10:30-1:15-4:00-6:15-8:30

Hidden Figures

11:00-2:00-5:00-8:00

®

PG13

BRINGING THE BEST FILMS IN THE WORLD TO SONOMA COUNTY

PG

2017 Oscar Nominated Short Films – Animation

10:15-6:00

Schedule for Friday, February 17 – Thursday, February 23

DINE-IN CINEMA

Bargain Tuesday - $7.50 All Shows Bargain Tuesday $7.00 All Shows Schedule forFri, Fri,April Feb -16th 20th Thu, Feb 26th Schedule for –– Thu, April 22nd

NR

2017 Oscar Nominated Short Films – Live Action

12:00-7:45

Schedule for Fri, June 22nd• -Salads Thu, June 28th Bruschetta •Academy Paninis Soups • Appetizers Award “Moore Gives •Her BestNominee Performance 8 Great Beers on Foreign Tap + Wine by the Film! Glass and Bottle Best Language

In Years!” – Box Office Foreign Language Film!Stone “RawBest and Riveting!” – Rolling

Demi MooreWITH DavidBASHIR Duchovny WALTZ I AM NOT YOUR NEGRO A MIGHTY HEART (1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:15 R (1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:15 RR (12:45 3:00 5:10) THE JONESES (12:30) 2:45 5:007:20 7:209:35 9:45PG-13

(12:30) 2:40Noms 4:50 Including 7:10 9:20 2 Academy Award BestRActor!

NR

La La Land PG13

10:15-1:30-4:30-7:30 Sun 2/19 only: 10:15-4:30-7:30, Wed 2/22 only: 10:15-1:30 Lion PG13 10:45-1:45-4:45-7:45 Manchester by the Sea R 2:45

Royal Opera: Il Trovatore

Sunday 2/19 @1pm, Wednesday 2/22 @6:30pm 551 SUMMERFIELD ROAD • SANTA ROSA 707.525.8909 • SUMMERFIELDCINEMAS.COM

OSCAR NOMINATED ANIMATED SHORTS

“A Triumph!” – New “A Glorious Throwback ToYork The Observer More Stylized, THE WRESTLER Painterly Work Of Decades Past!” – LA (12:20) 5:10 9:45 R Times LA2:45 VIE EN 7:30 ROSE (12:45) 3:45 6:45OF 9:45 PG-13 (12:20 2:20) 7:10 PG THE SECRET KELLS 10 Academy Award Noms Including Best Picture! (1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:00 NR SLuMDOG MILLIONAIRE “★★★★ – Really, Truly, Deeply – “Superb! No One4:00 Could Make This 7:10 9:40 R Believable One of (1:15) This Year’s Best!” – Newsday (4:20) 9:10 PG-13 If It Were Fiction!” – San Francisco Chronicle

LIVE ACTION SHORTS

ONCE AcademyFOR Award Noms Including A 8(1:00) CURE WELLNESS PRODIGAL SONS 3:10 5:20 7:30 9:40 R Best Picture, Best Actor & Best Director! (2:20) 9:10 4:00) NR No 7:00 9:10 Show Tue R or Thu (12:40 9:45

MILK

MILK – Rolling Stone “Haunting and Hypnotic!” “Wise, Humble and Effortlessly (1:30) 4:10 6:45 Funny!” 9:30 R – Newsweek

THE LEGO BATMAN MOVIE THE GIRL THE TATTOO Please Note: 1:30 Show Sat, PleaseWITH Note: No No 1:30 ShowDRAGON Sat, No No 6:45 6:45 Show Show Thu Thu WAITRESS

WAITRESS (12:20 (1:10) 2:40 5:00) 7:15 NR 9:35 PG 4:30 7:30 (1:30) 4:00 7:10 9:30 Best R Picture! 5 Academy Award Noms Including “★★★1/2! AnFROST/NIXON unexpected Gem!” – USA Today 14 Oscar Nominations!

LA LA LAND FROST/NIXON

(2:15) 7:209:45 R GREENBERG “Swoonly Mysterious, Hilarious!” (1:00 Romatic, 3:45) 7:00 PG-13 (12:00) 9:50 R – Slant5:00 Magazine

REVOLuTIONARY ROAD 3 Oscar Noms! HIDDEN FIGURES “Deliciously unsettling!” PARIS, JE T’AIME (11:45) 4:45 9:50– RLA Times (1:10 4:00) PG (1:15) 4:15 6:45 7:00 9:30 9:30 R

THE presents GHOST Kevin Jorgenson the WRITER California Premiere of (2:15) 7:15 PG-13 FIFTY DARKER PuRE:SHADES A BOuLDERING FLICK

R Michael Moore’s Feb 7:30 26th at 7:15 Final Week! (12:00THE 2:20Thu, 5:00) 9:55 MOST DANGEROuS

Fifty Shades Darker • Hidden Figures The Lego Batman Movie • Lion The Royal Opera House: Il trovatore Bistro Menu Items, Beer & Wine available in all 4 Auditoriums

SHOWTIMES: ravenfilmcenter.com 707.525.8909 • HEALDSBURG

SICKO

MOVIES IN THE MORNING (3:15) MAN IN AMERICA (1:20) 6:50 Tue/Wed/Thu: FENCES Starts Fri, June 29th! Fri, Sat, Sun &PENTAGON Mon DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THENow PAPERS Advance Tickets On Sale at Box Office! (4:10) 9:30 PG-13 ARRIVAL 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 6:50 6:50 Show Tue or Thu FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:30 NR 5:00No7:30 10:00 10:15 AM Tue/Wed/Thu: 9:00 VICKY Their CRISTINA BARCELONA First Joint Venture In only 25 Years! 10:20 AM CHANGELING Venessa Redgrave Meryl CHONG’S Streep Glenn CloseAM (1:15 AND 4:10) 6:40 9:15 PG-13 CHEECH 10:40 RACHEL GETTING MARRIED HEYSHORTS WATCH THIS 2009 LIVE ACTION (Fri/Mon Only)) 10:45 AM EVENING 10:45 Sat, Apr17th at 11pm & Tue, Apr 20th 8pmAM 2009 ANIMATED SHORTS Only) Starts Fri,(Sun June 29th!

LION DECONSTRUCTING THE BEATLES: SGT PEPPER Tue, Feb 21 (1:00) 7:00 NR

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 1 5-21 , 2017 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Stage

carries the bulk of the action. Jeff Coté plays John Adams, desperate to convince his fellow Continental Congress members to separate from Great Britain. Coté is wonderful, fiery and fun, even if the singing does sometimes get away from him, pitch-wise. Adam’s chief supporters are Benjamin Franklin (a delightful Gene Abravaya), the darkly moping Thomas Jefferson (David Strock), and the genial Richard Henry Lee (Steven Kent Barker, shining in one of the show’s most infectious songs, “The Lees of Old Virginia”). 1776 tells a big, complex story, and it’s a massive undertaking for any theater company. Assisted by a large orchestra under the guidance of Lucas Sherman, Spreckels pulls it off beautifully, and with far more grace and polish than the founding fathers showed in bringing our still struggling nation to life. Rating (out of 5):


Music Jenee Crayne

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FEBR UARY 1 5-21 , 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

18 Thu 2/16 • Doors 8pm / $30–$34 Israel Vibration with Lior Ben-Hur Fri 2/17 • Doors 8pm / $15–$17 Bay Area Hip-Hop Night with

Equipto, Mike Marshall & BPos Sat 2/18 • Doors 7pm • $27–$32

Charlie Musselwhite The Easy Leaves

Sun 2/19 • Doors 7pm • $20–$22

We Banjo 3 Huntertones

Mon 2/20 • Doors 7pm • $38–$44

Ottmar Liebert & Luna Negra Wed 2/22 •Doors 7pm / $15–$17

26th Annual Mardi Gras Mambofest: "The Girl Groups and Singers of

New Orleans" with Rhythmtown-Jive and the "K-Girls" (from Big Bang Beat & the Soul Delights) Thu 2/23 • Doors 7pm • $12–$14

Go By Ocean & San Geronimo Fri 2/24 • Doors 8pm / $30–$32

Super Diamond The Neil Diamond Tribute www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

Thu feb 16 fri feb 17 sAT feb 18

Onye & The Messengers 8pm/Dancing/$10

The Beer scOuTs (members

of The sorenTinos) 8:30pm/$5

MidnighT sun Massive JuniOr culTure 8:30pm/$10 Thu addis PaBlO (son of AugusTus

feb 23 fri feb 24 sAT feb 25 Thu mAr 2 fri mAr 3 sAT mAr 4 sAT mAr 11 mon mAr 20

PAblo) 9pm/$12 Adv/$15 Dos/21+

hOur Of TOur

8:30pm/Dancing/$10

dreaM farMers 8:30pm/$10 Brian rashaP & friends 8pm

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8:30pm/$10 Adv/$12 Dos

Misner & sMiTh 8:30pm/$10

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davina and The vagaBOnds 8pm/$12 Adv/$15 Dos

Thu afrOliciOus

mAr 30 8pm/$12 Adv/$15 Dos/21+ Thu PaBlO MOses APr 20 9pm/$18 Adv/$22 Dos/21+ Advance Tickets Available online & at Redwood Cafe

resTauranT & Music venue check OuT The arT exhiBiT visiT Our weBsiTe, redwOOdcafe.cOM 8240 Old redwOOd hwy, cOTaTi 707.795.7868

Sebastiani Theatre FREE LOCAL LIVE MUSIC GIGS LIVE MUSIC. NEW STAGE AND SOUND. NEW DANCE FLOOR. NEW AIR CONDITIONING. SUDS TAPS - 18 LOCAL & REGIONAL SELECT CRAFT BEERS & CIDERS. EATS NEW MENU, KITCHEN OPEN ALL DAY FROM 11AM ON. CHECK OUT OUR FRIED CHICKEN SANDWICH W/CORN ON THE COB. DIGS DINING OUT-DOORS. KIDS ALWAYS WELCOME - NEW KID’S MENU. RESERVATIONS FOR 8 OR MORE. HAPPY HOUR M-F 3-6PM. $2 CHICKEN TACOS. $3 HOUSE CRAFT BEERS. WEEKLY EVENTS MONDAYS • BLUES DEFENDERS PRO JAM TUESDAYS • OPEN MIC W/ROJO WEDNESDAYS • KARAOKE CALENDAR THU FEB 16 • THROWBACK THURSDAYS! EVERY 3RD THURSDAY 7:30PM / 21+ / FREE FRI FEB 17 • DETROIT DISCIPLES AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE SAT FEB 18 • RESTLESS SONS AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 7:30PM / 21+ / FREE SUN FEB 19 • DAVID THOM INVITATIONAL BLUEGRASS JAM EVERY 1ST & 3RD SUNDAY!! 4:30PM /ALL AGES / FREE CHECK OUT OUR FULL MUSIC CALENDAR www.TwinOaksRoadhouse.com Phone 707.795.5118 5745 Old Redwood Hwy Penngrove, CA 94951

Vintage Film Series:

ONE OF A KIND Dan Hicks was ‘criminally underheard’ in his time.

Great Licks

New album pays tribute to the late Dan Hicks BY CHARLIE SWANSON

A WAKING NED DEVINE (1998) March 13

THE GREAT ESCAPE (1963) April 1

THELMA & LOUISE (1991) May 15

GREAT EXPECTATIONS (1946) June 12

Movies call 707.996.2020 Tickets call 707.996.9756 SONOMA sebastianitheatre.com

Bay Area institution for more than 50 years, Dan Hicks was a songwriter of rare caliber. The frontman of the ever-impressive Dan Hick & the Hot Licks was beloved for his catchy, swinging Americana music and renowned for his bawdy, brawling personality. In a career of highs and lows, Hicks did it his way, up until his death last February at 74 in his Mill Valley home. Now longtime admirer and Surfdog Records owner Dave Kaplan is releasing a new compilation of Hicks’ best work, titled Greatest Licks: I Feel Like Singin’ and featuring 11 tracks from his extensive catalogue.

The album includes classic songs like 1969’s “I Scare Myself,” recent tunes like 2009’s “Tangled Tales” and live versions of songs that showcase Hicks’ funny and freewheeling personality. Kaplan first saw Hicks perform on The Tonight Show in the early ’70s. “Even though it wasn’t traditional hard rock, it was as badass and edgy as anything I’d ever seen,” Kaplan says. The next day, he bought Hicks’ 1971 album Where’s the Money?, which he still loves today. “In 44 years, it’s never failed me.” Kaplan formed Surfdog Records in 1992, and enjoyed success after signing bands like Sublime. In 2000, he tracked down the reclusive Hicks and signed him to the label, thus restarting Dan Hicks & the Hot Licks after a lengthy hiatus and leading to a prolific period of songwriting for the veteran musician. Despite acclaim from admirers like Elvis Costello and Tom Waits, Kaplan says that Hicks was criminally underheard in his time, and Kaplan was inspired to assemble a compilation to celebrate Hicks’ life and musical legacy. “This was a labor of love,” says album co-producer and Hicks’ longtime engineer Dave Darling, who personally combed through archives for the better part of 2016 to find recordings that perfectly reflected Hicks’ breadth of wit and talent. “I listened to everything, and it was hard to pick out what would go on the record, just because there was so much great material,” Darling says. With Americana music more popular than ever, Darling also says it’s a great time for people to rediscover Hicks’ pioneering work in the genre, defined by blending folk, swing, rock and jazz elements into a signature sound. “He really was a treasure of an artist,” Kaplan says. “There are not many like him in terms of the pure authenticity of what he did. I really hope more than anything that more people just hear his music.” Dan Hicks & the Hot Licks’ ‘Greatest Licks: I Feel Like Singin’’ is out on vinyl, CD and digital download on Friday, Feb. 24. For more info, visit surfdog.com.


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Lucero

Southern rock and punk veterans play with soul singer Esmé Patterson. Feb 20, 8:30pm. $28. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Charlie Musselwhite Local Blues Hall of Famer performs a show benefiting students of Geyserville Unified School District. Folk duo the Easy Leaves open. Feb 17, 7:30pm. $35-$75. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

Nots

Memphis synth-punk girl group hits up the North Bay with support from San Francisco power trio Terry Malts, Oakland garage rockers Violent Change and local postpunks Columns. Feb 17, 7pm. $10. Atlas Coffee Company, 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.526.1085.

Spark & Whisper

North Bay folk rock duo plays album release show for their new record, “Monument,” with Miss Moonshine opening. Feb 18, 8pm. $18. HopMonk Sebastopol, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

MARIN COUNTY Georgetown Day School Choir

Acclaimed choir from the Washington, DC, school presents a concert of sacred and secular choral works. Feb 19, 2pm. $20. First Congregational Church of San Rafael, 8 North San Pedro Dr, San Rafael.

Mill Valley Music All-Stars

The local supergroup celebrates the 40th anniversary of “The Last Waltz,” the Band’s 1976 farewell performance at the Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco, with a blowout show. Feb 18, 8pm. $20-$35. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Room of Voices

Renowned percussionist and

drummer Mingo Lewis, who has played with artists such as Santana and the Tubes, leads his band in a Valentine’s party. Feb 17, 9pm. $10. 19 Broadway Club, 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

We Banjo 3

Four-piece string band weaves rock, country, bluegrass and traditional Irish music. Feb 19, 8pm. $20-$22. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

NAPA COUNTY Ottmar Liebert & Luna Negra

The acclaimed international musician and his band bridge the sounds of flamenco and reggae with salsa styling and Caribbean rhythms. Feb 16-19, 7 and 9:30pm. $25-$35. Blue Note Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Jake Shimabukuro

The ukulele star continues to redefine his instrument of choice. Feb 18, 8pm. $40-$75. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY A’Roma Roasters

Feb 18, Riner Scivally and Pete Estabrook. 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Aqus Cafe

Feb 15, West Coast Songwriters Competition. Feb 17, the Bee Rays. Feb 18, Blue Sevin. Feb 19, 2pm, Gary Vogensen’s Sunday Ramble. Feb 22, bluegrass and old time music jam. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Barley & Hops Tavern

Feb 16, the Narwhal Family Experience. Feb 17, Fly by Train. Feb 18, Ian Franklin & Infinite Frequency. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.874.9037.

The Big Easy

Feb 15, MEG. Feb 16, Danny Barnes with One Grass Two Grass. Feb 17, Dusty Green Bones Band. Feb 18, Swamp Thang and the Incubators. Feb 19, D’Bunchovus. Feb 21, Mad

19

Blue Heron Restaurant & Tavern

Feb 21, 6pm, Michael Hantman. 25300 Steelhead Blvd, Duncans Mills. 707.865.2261.

Coffee Catz

Tues, 12pm, Jerry Green’s Peaceful Piano Hour. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Corkscrew Wine Bar

Feb 21, North Bay Jazz Guitar Collective. 100 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.789.0505.

Flamingo Lounge

Feb 17, SugarFoot. Feb 18, UB707. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

THIS SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18 Santa Rosa’s Own Rock Sensations Special Guest MC

EDDIE TRUNK

MTV’s That Metal Show

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24

BRET MICHAELS

Geyserville Gun Club Bar & Lounge Feb 18, Two Lions. 21025 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.0036.

Green Music Center

Feb 18, Tetzlaff-Vogt Duo. Feb 19, 3pm, Wu Han with Phillip Setzer and David Finckel. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

All Female Motley Crue

THE PARTY STARTS NOW TOUR SATURDAY, APRIL 1

ZEPPARELLA

All Female Led Zep Powerhouse

SATURDAY, APRIL 15 ORIGINAL LINEUP

LA GUNS

Featuring: Tracii Guns and Phil Lewis Special Guests KINGSBOROUGH

Green Music Center 1029

Feb 15, 1pm, SSU Jazz Forum with John Stowell. Feb 22, 1pm, SSU Jazz Forum with George Young. SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2122.

Green Music Center Schroeder Hall

Feb 18, 2pm, North Indian classical singing with Laxmi Tewari. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Gundlach Bundschu Winery Feb 17, Chris Robinson Brotherhood. Sold-out. 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

HopMonk Sebastopol

Feb 15, Songwriters in the Round. Feb 16, ALO with Rabbit Wilde. Feb 17, Girls & Boys with the Breaking and Sharkmouth. Feb 20, Monday Night Edutainment with SoulMedic. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

HopMonk Sonoma

Feb 17, Adam Traum. Feb 18, Smorgy. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg

Feb 18, Carlitos Medrano and friends. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. ) 707.431.2800.

20

SATURDAY APRIL 22

STEPHEN PEARCY OF RATT

Performing the RATT Hits and more

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 1 5-21 , 2017 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

Men B3 Organ Trio. Feb 22, Wednesday Night Big Band. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.4631.


Music ( 19

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FEBR UARY 1 5-21 , 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

20

Jamison’s Roaring Donkey 707.829.7300 230 PETALUMA AVE | SEBASTOPOL

OPEN MIC NIGHT

EVERY TUES AT 7PM WITH CENI THU FEB 16

ALO

+ RABBIT WILDE

$25–30/DOORS 7/SHOW 8/21+

FRI FEB 17

GIRLS AND BOYS

+ THE BREAKING, SHARKMOUTH $10/DOORS 8/SHOW 9/21+

SAT FEB 18

SPARK AND WHISPER + MISS MOONSHINE

$18/DOORS 8/SHOW 8:30/21+

SUN FEB 19

COMEDY OPEN MIC (EVERY 3RD SUNDAY)

FREE/DOORS 7/SHOW 8/18+

MON FEB 20

MNE SINGERS SERIES WITH

SOULMEDIC

THE BAY AREAS LONGEST RUNNING WEEKLY DANCEHALL $10/DOORS-SHOW 10/21+

THU FEB 23

ALEJANDRO ESCOVEDO + JESSE MALIN

$20/DOORS 7/SHOW 7:45/21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM Book your

Wed, open mic night. Feb 18, Midnight Transit with the Adrian Trevino Trio. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.772.5478.

THE HOLDUP

FRIDAY

FEB 17 KATASTRO ROCK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+ SATURDAY

FEB 18 MONDAY

FEB 20 TUESDAY

FEB 21 FRIDAY

FEB 24

SATISFACTION

BEATLES VS STONES - A MUSICAL SHOWDOWN ROCK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

Jasper O’Farrell’s

Feb 16, Hoodoo. Feb 17, DJ Dinga. Feb 21, Big Kitty. Feb 22, 6pm, open jazz jam. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

LUCERO

ESMÉ PATTERSON

ROCK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

ULI JON ROTH

ROCK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

Lagunitas Tap Room

ERIC JOHNSON

Feb 15, Roem Baur. Feb 16, Solid Air. Feb 17, Charles Wheal. Feb 18, Second Street Band. Feb 19, Todos Santos. Feb 22, French Oak. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

ROCK• DOORS 7PM • 21+

MOON HOOCH

SATURDAY

WHALAN FEB 25 JACKSON ROCK• DOORS 8:30PM • 21+

FRIDAY

MAR 3 SATURDAY

MAR 4

WONDER BREAD 5 ROCK• DOORS 8:30PM • 21+

Last Record Store

Feb 18, 2pm, Oddjob Ensemble. 1899-A Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.1963.

RED FANG BIG JESUS

ROCK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

3 ⁄7 Matisyahu, 3 ⁄10 Tainted Love, 3 ⁄11 House of Floyd - An Evening of Pink Floyd, 3 ⁄12 Delhi 2 Dublin, 3 ⁄16 The Russ Liquid Test, Gladkill, 3 ⁄22 Donavon Frankenreiter, Grant-Lee Phillips, 3 ⁄24 Mouths of Babes, 3 ⁄25 The Tazmanian Devils, 3 ⁄28 STRFKR, Psychic Twin

WWW.MYSTICTHEATRE.COM 23 PETALUMA BLVD N. PETALUMA, CA 94952

next event with us, up to 250, kim@hopmonk.com

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Feb 16, Susan Sutton. Feb 17, Frankye Kelly. Feb 18, Elena Welch. Feb 19, Levi Lloyd. Feb 21, Mac & Potter. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Many Rivers Books & Tea

Feb 16, Amy Michele White and Dominic Schaner. 130 S Main St, Sebastopol. 707.829.8871.

Din n er & A Show

Fri

o

Harbor Ranbcuht! Feb 18 Mustache Dance Party! 8:30 De Sat

THU, FEBRUARY 23

Experience Hendrix with Billy Cox, Buddy Guy, Zakk Wylde, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, and more!

MARCH 11 - 12 Transcendence Theatre Company’s

Best Of Broadway Under The Stars SUN, MARCH 19

In The Mood A 1940’s musical revue

THU, MARCH 23

Indigo Girls

& Smith Feb 19 Misner Poetic Songwriting, Fine Harmonies Sun

4:00 / No Cover

No Cover Thu Feb 23 Singer/Songwriter Showcase 7:00

Feb 24 Lowatters High lonesome twang to Low down Fri

dirty roots 8:00 / No Cover

er Lee Presson Su ppClub Feb 25 & The Nails Sat

Dance Party! 8:30

Mask ncho Mar 4 Fleetwood Fleetwood Mac Tribute 8:30Raebut! D Fri Sat Mar 10 & Mar 11 Petty Theft 8:30 Sat

Mar 17 Powerglide NRPS songs and more 8:30 Fri

Danny Click

Sun

Gospel Dinner Show and Live Recording!

Mar 18 & The Hell Yeahs! 8:30

Sat

The Sons of the Soul Revivers Southern Soul Food Menu 7:00 Lavay Smith’s Su pper Club

Supper Club” Mar 25 “1940’s Featuring the Music of Billie Holiday, Duke Ellington, Count Basie 8:30

707.546.3600 lutherburbankcenter.org

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Murphy’s Irish Pub

Feb 17, Rivertown Trio. Feb 18, Andrew Freeman. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre

Feb 17, the Holdup with Katastro. Feb 18, the Beatles vs the Rolling Stones. Feb 21, Uli Jon Roth. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Feb 18, Lucy Kaplansky. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Phoenix Theater

Sat

Feb 19

Feb 19, 3pm, Symphony Pops Concert with Ann Hampton Callaway. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Main Street Bistro

Fireside Dining 7 Days a Week

Stompy Jones 8:00 Feb 17 Swing Dance Lessons 7:45

Luther Burbank Center for the Arts

Feb 17, Alterbeast with Aenimus and Depths of Hatred. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Quincy’s

Feb 17, the Mood and Vintage Crush. 6590 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park. 707.585.1079.

Redwood Cafe

Feb 15, Irish set dancing. Feb

16, Onye & the Messengers. Feb 17, the Beer Scouts. Feb 18, Midnight Sun Massive. Feb 19, 5pm, Gold Coast Jazz Band. Feb 20, open mic with DJ Loisaida. Feb 22, singersongwriter competition. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Rio Nido Roadhouse

Feb 18, Weekend at Bernie’s. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Rock Star University House of Rock

Feb 18, VSquared and Cruella. 3410 Industrial Dr, Santa Rosa.

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub

Feb 18, Court ‘n’ Disaster. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Sonoma Speakeasy

Feb 15, the Acrosonics. Feb 16, Plan Be. Feb 17, Junk Parlor. 452 First St E, Ste G, Sonoma. 707.996.1364.

Spancky’s Bar

Feb 17, the Jackson Stone Band. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Twin Oaks Roadhouse

Feb 17, Detroit Disciples. Feb 18, the Restless Sons. Feb 19, David Thom Invitational Bluegrass Jam. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Whiskey Tip

Feb 17, “Furbruary” variety show with North Bay Cabaret. Feb 18, Family Room silent disco. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5535.

MARIN COUNTY Ali Akbar College of Music

Feb 18, North Indian Classical Music. 215 West End Ave, San Rafael. 415.454.6372.

The Belrose

Thurs, open mic night. 1415 Fifth Ave, San Rafael. 415.454.6422.

Benissimo Ristorante & Bar

Feb 16, the Manifesto Duo. 18 Tamalpais Dr, Corte Madera. 415.927.2316.

Don Antonio’s

Feb 16, 6pm, Frank Sinatra tribute with Ricardo Scales. 114 Main St, Tiburon. 415.435.0400.

Fenix

Feb 16, Mark Karan and the Jones Gang. Feb 17, 1st Avenue Revue. Feb 18, Next Phase. Feb 19, 6:30pm, Stephanie Teel Band. Feb 22, pro blues

jam. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

George’s Nightclub

Feb 17, Rock and Sonidero. Feb 18, DJ Tony Play. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Grazie Restaurant

Feb 18, David Correa. 823 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.897.5181.

HopMonk Novato

Feb 17, Pop Fiction. Feb 18, Dave Monterey. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

INCAVO Wine Tasting & Collective Feb 17, Damir Stosic. Feb 18, Terry Savastano. 1099 Fourth St, Ste F, San Rafael. 415.259.4939.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery

Feb 15, Honeysuckle Roques. Feb 22, Rowan Brothers. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Lighthouse Bar & Grill Feb 18, Key Lime Pie. 475 E Strawberry Dr, Mill Valley. 415.381.4400.

Marin Country Mart

Feb 17, 5:30pm, Friday Night Jazz with Lorca Hart Trio. 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur.

19 Broadway Club

Feb 15, Overbite. Feb 16, Koolwhip. Feb 17, 5:30pm, Todos Santos. Feb 18, 5:30pm, Mythyx. Feb 18, 9:30pm, Junk Parlor and HowellDevine. Feb 19, 4pm, Erika Alstrom with Dale Alstrom’s Jazz Society. Feb 20, open mic. Feb 22, Shortwave. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar

Feb 15, Festival Speed. Feb 16, Michael LaMacchia Band. Feb 17, Michael Aragon Quartet. Feb 18, Chris Saunders Band. Feb 19, Migrant Pickers and friends. Feb 20, Kimrea & the Dreamdogs. Feb 21, open mic. Feb 22, Marshall Rhodes and friends. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Osteria Divino

Feb 15, Jonathan Poretz. Feb 16, Marcos Sainz Trio. Feb 17, James Henry & Hands on Fire Band. Feb 18, David Jeffrey’s Jazz Fourtet. Feb 19, Barrio Manouche. Feb 21, Suzanna Smith. Feb 22, Cosmo Alleycats. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355.

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Feb 15, Panama Jazz Trio. Feb 16, Deborah Winters. Feb 21, Swing Fever. Feb 22, Todos


Eureka, CA · Humboldt County

2

NIGHTS y BLUES

4 6 DAYS

VENUES

MUSIC

FLOORS

y LIVE

with DANCE

DUKE ROBILLARD MICHAEL DOUCET JAMES HARMAN · KENNY NEAL RICK ESTRIN & THE NIGHTCATS TOM RIGNEY & FLAMBEAU • GATOR NATION

COSMETIC PUNK Memphis girl group Nots fire up their addictive synth-punk on

Friday, Feb. 17, at Atlas Coffee Company in Santa Rosa. See Concerts, p19.

Santos. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Peri’s Silver Dollar

Feb 15, Elvis Johnson’s soul review. Feb 16, Talley Up. Feb 17, Humidors. Feb 18, Crooked. Feb 19, Grateful Sundays. Feb 20, Billy D’s open mic. Feb 21, the Good Guys. Feb 22, the New Sneakers. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio

Feb 17, Stompy Jones. Feb 18, Mustache Harbor. Feb 19, 4pm, Misner & Smith. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Rickey’s

Feb 17, Lady D. Feb 18, Blue News. Feb 19, Karen Sudjian. 250 Entrada Dr, Novato. 415.883.9477.

Sausalito Seahorse

Wed, Milonga with Marcelo Puig and Seth Asarnow. Feb 16, Toque Tercero flamenco night. Feb 17, the 7th Sons. Feb 18, Cabani Jazz Project. Feb 19, 5pm, Mazacote. Feb 21, Noel Jewkes and friends. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899.

Smiley’s Schooner Saloon

Feb 16, DJ Samir Neffati. Feb 17, Second Line’s Mardi Gras Voodoo Valentine party. Feb 18, Sambada. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Spitfire Lounge

Third Friday of every month, DJ Jimmy Hits. 848 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.5551.

Sweetwater Music Hall Feb 16, Israel Vibration and

Lior Ben-Hur. Feb 17, Equipto with Mike Marshall and BPos. Feb 18, Charlie Musselwhite with the Easy Leaves. Feb 20, Ottmar Liebert & Luna Negra. Feb 22, Mardi Gras Mambofest. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads

Feb 15, Danny Click & the Others. Feb 16, Ross James’ Cosmic Thursday. Feb 17, Top 40 Friday dance party. Feb 18, Colonel & the Mermaids with Alex Koford. Feb 19, 3:30pm, “Stories & Songs” with Phil Lesh & the Camp Terrapin Family Band. Feb 19, 7:30pm, Midnight North. Feb 21, Terrapin Family Band. Feb 22, Danny Click & the Others. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

Throckmorton Theatre

Feb 17, Jeff Oster. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Trek Winery

Feb 17, Factor 11. Feb 18, Rick Kelly. 1026 Machin Ave, Novato. 415.899.9883.

NAPA COUNTY Blue Note Napa

Feb 15, 6:30 and 9pm, the Cookers. Feb 21, 7 and 9:30pm, locals night with David Correa Trio. Feb 22, 6:30 and 9pm, Lavay Smith & Her Red Hot Skillet Lickers. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Ca’ Momi Osteria

Feb 17, Latin Nights with DJ Jose Miguel. Feb 18, Three on

a Match. 1141 First St.,, Napa.. 707.224.6664.

Deco Lounge at Capp Heritage Vineyards Feb 18, Matt Bradford. 1245 First St, Napa. 707.254.1922.

Molinari Caffe

STOMPY JONES • LE JAZZ HOT • CARL SONNY LEYLAND & FRIENDS COCUZZI & COOTS COURTET • DAVE STUCKEY & THE HOT HOUSE GANG NATHAN JAMES & THE RHYTHM SCRATCHERS • GINO & THE LONE GUNMEN AU BROTHERS JAZZ BAND • MONA’S HOT FOUR • BOB DRAGA & FRIENDS KRIS TOKARSKI QUNITET with CHLOE FEORANZO JACOB MILLER & THE BRIDGE CITY CROONERS GRAND STREET STOMPERS with MOLLY RYAN TWO TONE STEINY & THE CADILLACS with Special Guest Artists Brian Casserly, John Cocuzzi, Danny Coots, Bob Draga, Dennis Lichtman, Howard Miyata, and Jason Wanner

Thurs, Open Mic. 828 Brown St, Napa. 707.927.3623.

Napa Valley Roasting Company Fri, jammin’ and java with Jeffrey McFarland Johnson. 948 Main St, Napa. 707.224.2233.

RaeSet

Feb 17, Friday Night Blues with Gretschkat. Feb 18, 6pm, North Coast Jazz Celebration. Feb 20, jazz lab with Jeff Johnson. Feb 22, Howell Mountain Boys. 3150 B Jefferson St, Napa. 707.666.9028.

Silo’s

Feb 15, Bluewind Jazz Band. Feb 16, Doug Houser. Feb 17, Islands of Black & White. Feb 18, Tony Lindsay’s Soul Soldiers. Feb 19, George Young Quartet. Feb 22, Scott Starr. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uncorked at Oxbow

Feb 17, Little Buster & the Cincinnati Delta Kings with Miss Ohio. 605 First St, Napa. 707.927.5864.

rcmfest.org • 707-445-3378 ACTS SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE

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Uva Trattoria

Feb 15, David Ranconi. Feb 16, Three on a Match. Feb 17, Fundz Jazz. Feb 18, Wild Janie Roberts. Feb 19, Duo Gadjo. Feb 22, Tom Duarte. 1040 Clinton St, Napa. 707.255.6646.

A CLEAN APPROACH TO A DIRTY JOB

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501 BARHAM AVE SANTA ROSA MON–FRI 8AM–5PM • NOW OPEN SAT Certified Green Business

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 1 5-21 , 2017 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Chad Kamenshine

MARCH 30 ~ APRIL 2 • 2017

21


Arts Events

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FEBR UARY 1 5-21 , 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

22

Galleries RECEPTIONS Feb 15

University Art Gallery, “Black, White, Color, Life,” recent works on paper from nationally recognized, New Yorkbased artists Laurie Fendrich and Peter Plagens. 4pm. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2295.

Feb 17

Fulton Crossing, “February Art Show,” featuring works by Richard Peden and Chelley Bondurant. 5pm. 1200 River Rd, Fulton. 707.536.3305. Marin Center Exhibit Hall, “The American Indian Art Show,” showing and selling antique and contemporary Native American art works. 5pm. $18-$35. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

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Sebastopol Center for the Arts, “Reflections & Shadows,” juried exhibition focuses on the duality of light and dark, and reflections of every kind. 6pm. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Feb 18

Calabi Gallery, “We Shall Overcome,” showing art of defiance and resistance to power. 4pm. 456 10th St, Santa Rosa. 707.781.7070.

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Through Feb 26, “Sami Lange: Paintings & Drawings,” Lange’s works on paper, created by stitching together detailed drawings, give the appearance of intricate paper quilts. 8235 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. Hours vary. 707.795.9753.

Arts Guild of Sonoma

Through Feb 27, “Romance Month,” features the artisan jewelry of Nancy Martin. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. Wed-Thurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

BackStreet Gallery

Through Mar 3, “The Art of Resistance,” pop-up show includes powerful new work by 30 local artists, curated by Suzanne Edminster and Adrian Mendoza. behind 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. open by appointment. 707.568.4204.

Blue Door Gallery

Through Feb 26, “Let’s Make Some Love,” hearts abound in this show featuring works by Dianne Neuman and Douglas DeVivo. 16359 Main St, Guerveville. 707.865.9878.

Charles M. Schulz Museum

Through Feb 19, “Lucky Dogs & Presidential Pets,” learn more about the lives of presidential pets, and how Snoopy himself handles being elected to high office. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Chroma Gallery

Through Mar 11, “Art of the Figure,” art celebrates the timeless tradition of drawing the human figure. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.293.6051.

City Hall Council Chambers

Through Mar 9, “Hreint,” the Icelandic word for “pure” centers Santa Rosa photographer Collin Morrow’s new collection of photos from a summer tour of Iceland. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Daredevils & Queens

Through Mar 12, “Cheryl Alterman Solo Show,” featuring rock ‘n’ roll photography and original oil paintings. 122 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.575.5123.

Erickson Fine Art Gallery

Through Mar 2, “CANTOS: Songs for the New Year,” abstract paintings in the search for celebratory moments by artist Carol Setterlund. 324 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. Thurs-Tues, 11 to 6. 707.431.7073.

Finley Community Center

Through Mar 2, “Ed Dechant:

Art Through 70 Years,” the Bay Area artist shows off a lifetime of passion and pleasure. Through Mar 31, “National Arts Program Exhibition,” 14th annual show and competition features local artists of all ages. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 6; Sat, 9 to 11am. 707.543.3737.

Graton Gallery

Through Mar 5, “Small Works Show,” sixth annual group show keeps it tiny. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sat, 10:30 to 6; Sun, 10:30 to 4. 707.829.8912.

IceHouse Gallery

Through Feb 18, “Mostly Monochrome Group Exhibition,” features over 80 images. 405 East D St, Petaluma. 707.778.2238.

Jupiter Moon Art & Gifts

Through Mar 20, “Animal Magnetism,” new dog-focused art from Mylette Welch displays, with a portion of proceeds donated to Sonoma Humane Society. 507 S Main St, Sebastopol. hours vary 707.634.6304.

Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center

Through Feb 28, “Birds of the Laguna,” exhibit features local artist Diana Majumdar’s mixed media and encaustic paintings of birds and landscapes of the Laguna de Santa Rosa. 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Through Mar 18, “Onsite,” exhibition of plein air works featuring local artists Charles Beck, Dave Gordon and William Taylor. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Peace & Justice Center Through Feb 26, “Katie Ketchum Solo Show,” Sebastopol artist and songwriter is featured. 467 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 1 to 4pm. 707.575.8902.

Petaluma Arts Center

Through Mar 18, “Discovered: Emerging Visual Artists,” five Sonoma County artists are recognized through the fourth annual “Discovered” program, produced by Creative Sonoma and the Petaluma Arts Center.


230 Lakeville St, Petaluma. Tues-Sat, 11 to 5. 707.762.5600.

Riverfront Art Gallery

Sebastopol Gallery

Through Mar 26, “A Walk in the Forest,” botanical paintings by Lucy Martin explores beautiful and surprising life forms found in the forests. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

The Spinster Sisters Restaurant

Through Mar 5, “Clark Swarthout Drawings,” Santa Rosa artist presents an exhibit of intricate and imaginative pen and ink drawings. 401 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.7100.

West County Museum

Through Mar 5, “The Hippies,” memorabilia recreates the environment of rebellion against consumerism and conformity built in the forests of Graton and Occidental in the 1960s and ‘70s. 261 S Main St, Sebastopol. Thurs-Sun, 1 to 4. 707.829.6711.

MARIN COUNTY Art Works Downtown

Through Mar 4, “Iceland: Blue,” Barbara Bryn Klare’s recent works on paper, inspired by the colors and textures of Iceland, show in the Underground Gallery, while Nathan Durfee’s whimsical pixelated art shows in the Founders’ Gallery. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

Bay Model Visitor Center Through Feb 25, “Fixed Landscapes,” sculptor Brian Andrews works with wood, employing traditional techniques to explore contemporary cultural issues. 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.3871.

Belvedere-Tiburon Library

Through Mar 9, “Abstract, Figure & Landscape Paintings,” artist Mary Valente displays a wide range of new works in this solo show. 1501 Tiburon Blvd, Tiburon. 415.789.2665.

Desta Art & Tea Gallery Through Mar 16, “Unbridled

Falkirk Cultural Center Through Feb 25, “High School Arts Mashup,” local high school student poetry and art coordinated through the Arts Mashup exchange program. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

Gallery Route One

Through Feb 19, “Beginnings,” juried group show features Northern California artists working in all media. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Society of Artists

Through Mar 4, “Two of a Kind,” members show explores artistic visions where two works are more than the sum of their parts. 1515 Third St, San Rafael. Wed-Sun, Noon to 4pm. 415.464.9561.

MarinMOCA

Through Feb 19, “Hidden,” juried exhibition featuring the artists of MarinMOCA explores the concept of concealed or disguised imagery. 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 11 to 5. 415.506.0137.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts

Several Bay Area standups and improvisors take the stage. Feb 19, 7pm. $10. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Events The Art & Science of Love

Couples workshop offers insights and skills to improve intimacy and friendship in your relationship and manage conflict in a positive way. Feb 18-19. $400 per couple. Acqua Hotel, 555 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley.

A Celebration of Copia

Culinary Institute of America opens its new Napa location with a fun-filled weekend wine tastings, activities, classes, book signings, appearances by CIA alumni and more. Feb 18-19. The Culinary Institute of America at Copia, 500 First St, Napa. 707.967.2530.

Healthcare in the Trump Era

Summit features Rep Jared Huffman, hospital CEO Luke Tharasri speak on healthcare needs and solutions, with catered breakfast served. Feb 21, 8am. $50. Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

Mardi Gras Madness

Through Feb 23, “Red,” group show features art centered around the striking color. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Live jazz music, masks and beads bring New Orleans to the North Bay. Reservations required. Feb 16, 6:30pm. $20. Petaluma Woman’s Club, 518 B St, Petaluma.

Osher Marin JCC

One Love Diversity Festival

Through Mar 10, “Traces of Sepharad,” etchings by New York-based artist Marc Shanker are based on Judeo-Spanish proverbs and densely layered with meaning and cultural connections. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Robert Allen Fine Art

Through Mar 31, “Works on Paper,” group exhibit features prints, drawings and mixedmedia pieces from several artists. 301 Caledonia St, Sausalito. Mon-Fri, 10 to 5. 415.331.2800.

Comedy Below the Belt

Featuring Rudy Ortiz and other standups. Feb 18. Jasper O’Farrell’s, 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

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Kinsasha Comedy Tour

Reservations:

Feb 24, 25 & 26

The Flamingo Resort Hotel Info: Izzy 2777 4th St, Santa Rosa CA 95405 tattoosandblues@gmail.com 707.545.8530 253.306.0170 www.santarosatattoosandblues.com

Feb 24 - Mar 19, 2017

Celebrate diversity through entertainment, food and student services and programs. Feb 15, 11am. Bertolini Student Center, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4266.

Women’s Cannabis Business Development Workshop Get all the infrastructure required to properly manage a cannabis business. Feb 21, 6pm. $25-$35. The Bric Hive, 5701 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.532.4483.

Music and Lyrics by Stephen

Field Trips

Book by Hugh

Sondheim

Directed by Craig

A. Miller Beavers Choreography by Rachel Wynne Music Direction by Ginger

Bird Walk at Hudeman Slough View waterbirds,

Wheeler

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52 W. 6th Street, Santa Rosa, CA 95401

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 1 5-21 , 2017 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Through Mar 5, “Photoshopped or Not?” Riverfront Gallery co-owner and photographer Lance Kuehne shows new work that concentrates on magnificent and vibrant local landscapes. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Flow,” featuring works by longtime Marin artist Nicholas Coley. 417 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. Mon-Sat, 10 to 6 415.524.8932.


A E

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R E S TAU R A N T W E E K

Presidents Day Family Hike

Docent-led hike is perfect for all ages. Feb 20, 10am. Free. Sugarloaf Ridge State Park, 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood. 707.833.5712.

March 6-12, 2017

LUNCH $10 / $15 — or —

Film

DINNER $19 / $29 / $39

Best of the SF Jewish Film Festival

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hawks and more in this Madrone Audubon event. Feb 18, 8:30am. Sonoma County Water Agency, 404 Aviation Blvd, Santa Rosa, madroneaudubon.org.

A COU OM

TY

SO

8th Annual

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NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FEBR UARY 1 5-21 , 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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See top selections from last year’s festival. Wed, 7pm. through Feb 22. Osher Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Our sponsors:

Birdman Live

See the acclaimed film with composer-drummer Antonio Sanchez performing his Grammy-winning score live onstage. Feb 18, 2 and 8pm. $60. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

CULT Film Series

Treat Yourself

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complimentary brow wax with appointment

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It’s a Valentine’s massacre as “My Bloody Valentine” and “XRay” screen back to back. Feb 16, 7pm. $10. Roxy Stadium 14 Cinemas, 85 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.8909.

Deconstructing Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band

Composer, musician and Beatles expert Scott Freiman looks at the classic album from multiple angles, exploring the history behind the music. Feb 21, 1 and 7pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Farmers & Friends Movie Night

Double feature screens two agricultural-focused films for farmers and fans of farmers. Feb 22, 6:30pm. $5. Healdsburg Shed, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433. Effective anti-aging products by GM Collin

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Y

Film & Fork

Cameo screens McDonald’s bio pic “The Founder” with special guests and decidedly better food on hand at Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen. Feb 20, 5:45pm. $50. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.9779.

NY Dog Film Festival Dogs are welcome to two

selections of short films celebrating man’s best friend. Feb 20, 1 and 3pm. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.5111.

Petaluma Film Alliance Spring Cinema Series

Featuring recent awardwinning favorites and top Oscar contenders as well as classic and local films, with pre-screening lectures and post-film discussions. Wed through May 17. Carole L Ellis Auditorium, 680 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma. 415.392.5225.

5pm. Gourmet au Bay, 913 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay. 707.875.9875.

SF Beer Week: Oregon vs Sonoma County

Annual throwdown features 11 Oregon and Sonoma County beers going head to head. Through Feb 19. Jamison’s Roaring Donkey, 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.772.5478.

Taste of Place

Special dinner features Arnot-Roberts Wines. Feb 16, 6pm. $115. Healdsburg Shed, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

Winter in Piedmont

Screenagers

Cooking class focuses on the northern Italian region’s dishes, Feb 18, 11am. $85. Sonoma Community Center, 276 East Napa Street, Sonoma. 707.938.4626.

Strawbale School at Standing Rock

For Kids

Documentary looks at growing up in the digital age. Feb 17, 7pm. $5-$10. Green Music Center Schroeder Hall, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Miguel Elliott of Living Earth Structures shares a film about building a strawbale school at the Sacred Stone camp at Standing Rock. Feb 17, 6:30pm. $5-$10. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Wrestling Jerusalem

Writer-actor Aaron Davidman presents and discusses his eye-opening journey into the heart of the Israel-Palestine debate. Feb 19, 4pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Food & Drink Aphrodisiac Wine & Dinner

Pop-up dinner event keeps the Valentine’s vibes going. Feb 18, 6pm. $130. Longboard Vineyards, 5 Fitch St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3473.

The Great Grape Study Get aquainted with Spanish and California Tempranillo wines. Feb 16, 5pm. $15. Back Room Wines, 1000 Main St, Napa. 707.226.1378.

Knife Skills Workshop You’ll be slicing and dicing in the kitchen after this class. Feb 19, 1pm. $35. Healdsburg Shed, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

Science Uncorked

Special guest speakers and happy hour drinks make great chemistry together. Feb 22,

S3 Science Speaker Series

Scientists working in many exciting fields will be on hand to talk about their work and answer questions. Thurs, Feb 16, 6pm. Free. Children’s Museum of Sonoma County, 1835 W Steele Ln, Santa Rosa. 707.546.4069.

Teen Double Feature

Watch “Hellboy” and “School of Rock” with a pizza party in between. Signup recommended. Feb 21, 3:30pm. Novato Library, 1720 Novato Blvd, Novato. 415.898.4623.

Lectures Bike, Bean & Beyond

Sculptor J. Nick Taylor tells the story of inspiration and perspiration behind his Ibis Maximus, one of the most iconic pieces of mountain bike art in the world today. Feb 17, 7pm. $5-$10. Marin Museum of Bicycling, 1966 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. 415.450.8000.

Organic Modernist Architecture in Santa Rosa & Sonoma County

Join architectural historian and photographer Darren Bradley as he gives a presentation on the Central Library’s architectural design. Feb 22, 6pm. Free. Santa Rosa Central Library, 211 E St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.0831.


Owls of Marin

Tombstone Tales

Learn about historic Sonoma County cemeteries from author and historian Jeremy Nichols. Feb 18, 12pm. Finley Community Center, 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

When Order Meets Chaos

Clown workshop is led by Ellen and Steve Levine. Feb 18-19. $200. Mountain Home Studio, 15 Ravine Way, Kentfield. 415.461.5362.

Readings Bay Model Visitor Center

Feb 21, 7pm, “Go Deeper: The Seven Ages of Water” with Wallace J Nichols. 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito 415.332.3871.

Book Passage

Feb 16, 7pm, “Pachinko” with Min Jin Lee. Feb 17, 7pm, “The Nature Fix” with Florence Williams. Feb 18, 4pm, “The Freedom Broker” with KJ Howe. Feb 19, 4pm, “Rather Be the Devil” with Ian Rankin. Feb 20, 7pm, “History of Wolves” with Emily Fridlund. Feb 21, 7pm, “Dear Friend, from My Life I Write to You in Your Life” with Yiyun Li. Feb 22, 7pm, “The Weight of Him” with Ethel Rohan. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Book Passage By-the-Bay

Feb 18, 4pm, “Wake Up & Roar” with Eli Jaxon-Bear. Feb 19, 1pm, Dance of Psyche” with Dr Christina Campbell. Feb 21, 6pm, “Profit of Kindness” with Jill Lublin. 100 Bay St, Sausalito.

Charles M. Schulz Museum

Feb 18, 1pm, “Let There Be Laughter” with Michael Krasny. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa 707.579.4452.

Jack London State Park

Feb 18, 4pm, Jack London Short Story Read Aloud, Jeff Falconer reads and discusses London’s “The Water Baby.” Free. 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen 707.938.5216.

Napa Bookmine at Oxbow

Feb 18, 12pm, “The NapaLife Insider’s Guide to Napa Valley” with Paul Franson. Feb 19, 12pm, “The Winemaker” with Richard Peterson. 610 First St, Shop 4, Napa. 707.726.6575.

Napa Copperfield’s Books

Feb 21, 4pm, “Saturdays at Sea” with Jessica Day George. 3740 Bel Aire Plaza, Napa 707.252.8002.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books

Feb 15, 4pm, “Simon Thorn and the Wolf’s Den” with Aimee Carter. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Point Reyes Books

Feb 15, 7pm, “The Unsettlers” with Mark Sundeen. 11315 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1542.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books

Feb 15, 7pm, “Journeyman” with Marc Bojanowski. Feb 18, 7pm, “Rather Be the Devil” with Ian Rankin. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

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$9-$25. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Rain: A Tribute to the Beatles

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 1 5-21 , 2017 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Learn about the local owls of the Bay Area, their habitats and their hoots and meet live owls up close. Feb 17, 6pm. Marin Art & Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.455.5260.

Live multimedia spectacular takes you on a musical journey through the life and times of the world’s most celebrated band. Feb 15, 7:30pm. $49-$69. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Rumors

Neil Simon’s comic masterpiece is a tale of how a dinner party goes deliciously awry. Feb 17-26. $12-$22. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.3222.

1776: The Musical

Spreckels Theatre Company presents this Tony Awardwinning musical that brings history to life as it recalls America’s contentious founding fathers. Through Feb 26. $16-$26. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

The Soap Myth

Theater Buyer & Cellar

A struggling actor in LA takes a job working in the megabasement of Barbara Streisand in this one-man comedy making its North Bay premiere. Through Feb 19. $10-$26. Studio Theatre, 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Lettice & Lovage

Comedy is about a flamboyant tour guide prone to outrageous embellishment of the history of the English country house where she works. Through Feb 19. $12-$27. Novato Theater Playhouse, 5420 Nave Dr, Novato. 415.883.4498.

A Midwinter’s Night Dream

Shakespeare fun for the whole family features an abridged version of the playwithin-a-play. Feb 18-19. by donation. Hotel Petaluma, 205 Kentucky St, Petaluma, petalumashakespeare.org.

One Stone

Playwright Trevor Allen’s exploration of the genius of Albert Einstein employs an array of multimedia magic, including puppetry and projections, for a dazzling experience. Through Feb 19.

Marin Theatre Company and Marin Academy present a staged reading of the provocative play starring the incomparable Ed Asner and Tovah Feldshuh. Feb 21, 7pm. Free/ ticket required. Marin Academy High School, 1600 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.388.5208.

Concentrate Headquarters

A Steady Rain

Gripping drama about two police officers and lifelong friends whose accounts of a harrowing case are wildly opposed. Through Feb 19. $15-$30. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.0177.

You Got Older

Left Edge Theatre performs the quirky, darkly comic new play about family and illness. Through Feb 19. $25-$40. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

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Nugget

Pot Tax

Cannabis is on the ballot again BY AARON CURRIE

I

f you live in Sonoma County, you recently received your voter information guide for a March 7 special election. You may have been surprised to see that you are being asked to vote on commercial cannabis— again. Didn’t November’s passage of Proposition 64 create rules for cultivating, distributing and selling cannabis in our state? What’s left to vote on at this point? Taxes. Measure A asks how commercial-cannabis activity in the unincorporated areas of the county should be taxed and what restrictions should apply to those activities. The county wants to impose a business-license tax on commercial cannabis, and state law requires that such a general tax must be passed by a majority of voters. As a general tax, revenue from the proposed tax would flow into the county’s general

fund and would be available for general use by the county or as specifically directed by the board of supervisors. As noted by the county counsel’s analysis in the voter guide, these uses could include code enforcement, public safety, fire protection, health, housing, road improvements and environmental protection. The proposed cannabis business tax provides for taxation of cultivators in two ways: based on the gross receipts of the cannabis business or based on the size of the cultivation area. In each instance, the proposed ordinance provides for tax limits based on the manner of cultivation. For outdoor cultivation, the limits are set at 10 percent of gross receipts, or $10 per square foot of cultivation area; for indoor cultivation, the limits are set at 10 percent of an operation’s gross receipts, or $38 per square foot of cultivation area; and for mixed-light (i.e., greenhouse) cultivation, the limits are set at 10 percent of the operation’s gross receipts, or $22 per square foot of cultivation area. The proposed ordinance specifies that taxation of all other commercial cannabis businesses— manufacturers, transporters, distributors, nurseries, testing laboratories and dispensaries—will be based on gross receipts. Certainly, some level of taxation is appropriate to, at minimum, cover the cost of the county’s implementation and oversight of its newly enacted commercial cannabis regulations. On the other hand, if the tax is too high, it may have the undesirable consequence of keeping local cannabis business operating in the dark to avoid the tax. Regardless of your views, every resident should show up to the polls March 7 and vote. Aaron Currie is an attorney with Dickenson, Peatman & Forgarty who assists cannabis businesses in complying with state and local laws. Contact him at acurrie@dpf-law.com.


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Astrology For the week of February 15

ARIES (March 21–April 19) By my estimates, 72 percent of you Aries are in unusually good moods. The world seems friendlier, more cooperative. Fifty-six percent of you feel more in love with life than you have in a long time. You may even imagine that the birds and trees and stars are flirting with you. I’m also guessing that 14 percent of you are weaving in and out of being absurdly, deliriously happy, sometimes without any apparent explanation. As a result of your generosity of spirit, you may be the recipient of seemingly impossible rewards like free money or toasted ice cream or unconditional tenderness. And I bet that at least 10 percent of you are experiencing all of the above. TAURUS (April 20–May 20) I am launching a

campaign to undo obsolete stereotypes about you Bulls. There are still backward astrologers out there who perpetrate the lie that many of you are stingy, stolid, stubborn slowpokes. As an antidote, I plan to heighten everyone’s awareness of your sensual, soulful sweetness, your tastefully pragmatic sensitivity, and your diligent, dynamic productivity. That should be easy in the coming weeks, since you’ll be at the height of your ability to express those superpowers. Luckily, people will also have an enhanced capacity to appreciate you for who you really are. It will be a favorable time to clarify and strengthen your reputation.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) Will Giovanni surreptitiously replace Allesandra’s birth control pills with placebos? Will Camille take a hidden crowbar to her rendezvous with the blackmailer? Will Josie steal Jose’s diary and sell it on eBay? Given the current astrological omens, you may have an unconscious attraction to soap opera–type events like those. The glamour of melodrama is tempting you. But I’m hoping and predicting that you will express the cosmic currents in less toxic ways. Maybe you’ll hear a searing but healing confession after midnight in the pouring rain, for instance. Perhaps you’ll break an outworn taboo with ingenious grace, or forge a fertile link with a reformed rascal, or recover a lost memory in a dusty basement. CANCER (June 21-July 22) All naturally occurring matter on earth is composed of 92 basic elements arranged in various combinations. Since some of these appear in trace amounts, they took a long time for humans to discover. In the 18th and 19th centuries, chemists were exuberant when they tracked down seven of the 92 in a single location: an underground mine on the Swedish island of Ytterby. That small place was a mother lode. I’m predicting a metaphorically similar experience for you, Cancerian: new access to a concentrated source that will yield much illumination. LEO (July 23–August 22) The next four weeks will be an excellent time to upgrade your understanding of the important characters in your life. In fact, I suspect you will generate good fortune and meaningful synchronicities whenever you seek greater insight into anyone who affects you. Get to know people better, Leo! If there are intriguing acquaintances who pique your curiosity, find out more about them. Study the oddballs you’re allergic to with the intention to discern their hidden workings. In general, practice being objective as you improve your skill at reading human nature. VIRGO (August 23–September 22) In 1787, English captain Arthur Phillip led an eight-month naval expedition to the southeastern part of the continent now known as Australia. Upon arrival, he claimed the land for England, despite the fact that 250,000 Aboriginal people were living there, just as their ancestors had for 2,000 generations. Two hundred years later, an Aboriginal activist named Burnum Burnum planted the Aboriginal flag on the White Cliffs of Dover, claiming England for his people. I encourage you to make a comparably artful or symbolic act like Burnum’s sometime soon, Virgo—a ritual or gesture to assert your sovereignty or evoke a well-deserved reversal or express your unconquerable spirit. LIBRA (September 23–October 22) The ancient Roman rhetorician Quintilian authored a 12-volume

BY ROB BREZSNY

textbook on the art of oratory. As ample as it was, it could have been longer. “Erasure is as important as writing,” he said. According to my reading of the astrological omens, that counsel should be a rewarding and even exciting theme for you in the coming weeks. For the long-term health of your labor of love or your masterpiece, you should focus for a while on what to edit out of it. How could you improve it by making it shorter and more concise?

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

Do you know about the long-running kids’ show Sesame Street? Are you familiar with Big Bird, the talking eight-feet-tall yellow canary who’s one of the main characters? I hope so, because your horoscope is built around them. In the Sesame Street episode called “Don’t Eat the Pictures,” Big Bird solves a riddle that frees a 4,000-year-old Egyptian prince from an ancient curse. I think this vignette can serve as a model for your own liberation. How? You can finally outwit and outmaneuver a very old problem with the help of some playful, even child-like energy. Don’t assume that you’ve got to be relentlessly serious and dour in order to shed the ancient burden. In fact, just the opposite is true. Trust blithe and rowdy spirits.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) Your lessons in communication are reaching a climax. Here are five tips to help you do well on your “final exam.” 1. Focus more on listening for what you need to know rather than on expressing what you already know. 2. Keep white lies and convenient deceptions to a bare minimum. 3. Tell the truth as strong and free as you dare, but always—if possible—with shrewd kindness. 4. You are more likely to help your cause if you spread bright, shiny gossip instead of the grubby kind. 5. Experiment with being unpredictable; try to infuse your transmissions with unexpected information and turns of phrase.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) The meaning of the Latin phrase crambe repetita is “cabbage reheated, twice-cooked.” I urge you to avoid partaking of such a dish in the coming weeks, both literally and figuratively. If you’re truly hungry for cooked cabbage, eat it fresh. Likewise, if you have a ravenous appetite for stories, revelations, entertainment, and information—which I suspect you will—don’t accept the warmed-over, recycled variety. Insist on the brisk, crisp stuff that excites your curiosity and appeals to your sense of wonder. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) Here’s your mantra for the next three weeks: “I know what I want, and I know how to glide it into my life.” Say this out loud 11 times right after you wake up each morning, and 11 more times before lunch and 11 more times at bedtime. “I know what I want, and I know how to glide it into my life.” Whenever you do this little chant, summon an upflow of smiling confidence—a serene certainty that no matter how long the magic might take, it will ultimately work. “I know what I want, and I know how to glide it into my life.” Don’t let any little voice in your head undermine your link to this simple truth. Lift your heart to the highest source of vitality you can imagine. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

“We cannot simply sit and stare at our wounds forever,” writes Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami. “We must stand up and move on to the next action.” That’s your slightly scolding but ultimately inspirational advice, Pisces. According to my astrological analysis, you have done heroic work to identify and investigate your suffering. You have summoned a tremendous amount of intelligence in order to understand it and further the healing. But right now it’s time to turn your focus to other matters. Like what? How about rebirth?

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

27 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 1 5-21 , 2017 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Classifieds

FREE WILL


Pioneer (pi•o•neer)

Noun: a person who is among the first to explore or settle a new country or area. Synonyms: colonist, colonizer, explorer, trailblazer.

John Wetzel of y Alexander Valle Vineyards

Courtn ey of MarBtenham in Ray Winery

Steve Maass of Oliver’s Market

Rene Byck of Paradise Ridge Winery

John Balletto of Balletto Vineyards

The

Pioneers

l a c o L f o From the day we opened our doors, we’ve built our business on the simple premise that the best food and wine in the world are produced here, in Sonoma County. We didn’t feel like we were pioneers at the time, but as people have come to understand and embrace the value of locally grown and made food and the value of shopping locally, we realize we were part of the movement.

This week, we are pleased to honor these four vintners, who have been excellent long-term partners. Check out our in-store specials on their wines, and check out the many wonderful local wines we are proud to offer. See you at Oliver’s!

PROUD TO BE LOCALLY Owned, Operated,

& Independent

SINCE 1988 9230 Old Redwood Highway • Windsor • 687-2050 | 546 E. Cotati Avenue • Cotati • 795-9501 | 560 Montecito Center • Santa Rosa • 537-7123 | 461 Stony Point Road • Santa Rosa • 284-3530

Nbb1707  

February 15-21, 2017

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