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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

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Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

Ending the ACA Yes, the hospitals saved $40 million, but how much have citizens paid until they reach their ungodly deductible (“Bitter Pill,” Jan. 4)? Wanna bet it’s more than $40 million out of pocket?

SLOOPY

Via Bohemian.com

and have unfettered power to enact any legislation they want with a Republican in the White House. There is no scenario in which any “consequences” will accrue to the Democrats. Republicans, this is 100 percent on you. Republicans don’t need a single Democratic representative or senator’s vote. Republicans can enact good laws and reap the praise, or bad laws and take the blame. It’s all on them.

LEN KATZMAN

The Republicans have controlling majorities in both the House and Senate,

THIS MODERN WORLD

Via Bohemian.com

Nothing to See Here So we get it. You (the Bohemian, et al.) are upset that Hillary did not win the election. Like I said, we got it. Now how about you put on your grown-up pants and take your defeat with some pride and dignity. And most anyone with at least half a brain knows that in presidential elections it boils down to the lesser of two evils. So this time Trump turned out to be the lesser evil.

By Tom Tomorrow

So for everyone’s sake, please suck it up and let’s move on.

ROCHELLE TORRE

Santa Rosa

History Lessons I was born in the Soviet Union. There was one brand of clothes at the store, one brand of kielbasa at the grocery and one brand of news on TV. The future seemed well-defined by the past. Expectations were few, and escapism blossomed. After perestroika, our padlocked, quietly claustrophobic world exploded with news about both past and present. Rock music emerged from underground with vibrant colors and seemingly endless possibilities. We were learning to dream big and have our own beliefs. Suddenly, there were things to see and hear all around. There was a new spark in people’s eyes as they were going about their days. A joy, an openness. We were witnessing the birth of a new democratic society. Where is it all now? In less than two decades after perestroika, things took a different turn. Progressive journalism was brutally silenced. Many left, and those who stayed migrated back into the safety of their kitchens, to talk politics behind closed doors. My hometown, a beautiful coastal village on the Crimean peninsula formerly part of Ukraine’s premium wine country, was invaded by Russia. I remember it as a dreamy place, lined with cypress alleys, dotted with antique buildings still bearing strong Mediterranean influences even after decades of Soviet uniformity. We tend to take things for granted. Psychologists say that human brains are wired to expect constancy and stability. Our democracy needs to be nurtured and protected. Because things can change in the blink of an eye.

L.K.

Sonoma

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


Let’s Interact In these times, we need to show our soul BY MICHELE LINFANTE

I

’m composing these thoughts after a talk I had with my flat-mate, who is decades younger than I, on what was almost the darkest night of the year. As we shared our sentiments and personal stories over dinner, I was reminded of the value of honest personal exchange. I know such exchanges are happening all over because of the many inspired writings reaching me online, though I’ve otherwise been shying away from the media. A recent one of special portent was an essay titled “We Were Made for These Times” by Clarissa Pinkola Estés. “Ours is not the task of fixing the world all at once,” she writes, “but of stretching out to mend the part of the world that is within our reach.” She also says that one of the most powerful and calming actions one can do to intervene in a stormy world is “to stand up and show your soul.” I’m a working-class girl from New Jersey who grew up craving the cafe culture of Paris in the 1920s, and wound up co-creating an international counterculture in San Francisco in the 1970s. I’ve mostly worked in theater collectives and created productions with communities based on the telling of personal stories, and so I know the power Estés speaks of. The sharing of vulnerability, truth and creativity leads to great strength. There is a groundswell happening now that is exciting and familiar, and it is drawing us together and shaping itself through us as pieces of a larger picture. I encourage everyone to have more get-togethers, salons, dinner parties, potlucks, or whatever you want to call them. This means creating safe places to break bread and look each other in the eyes to share dreams, creative works, ideas and simple stories. It means finding ways to reach outside ourselves and to remain open-minded and open-hearted. My goal is to keep things intergenerational, intersexual, interracial, international, interpolitical, interspiritual and interspecial. Invite friendly pets for sure, and even planetary aliens if you know any. Michele Linfante lives in Sebastopol. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

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Paper THE

DEBR IEFER Let It Rain The deluge of rain in recent days has been a boon to local reservoirs that have been under intense scrutiny over these past eight years of California drought. The Sonoma County Water Agency (SCWA) reported Jan. 3 that Lake Sonoma was at 100.3 percent of capacity, while Lake Mendocino was at 115 percent of capacity that same day. So is the drought over, or what? “The drought is definitely over in our neck of the woods,” says Brad Sherwood of the SCWA.

HOUSING THE HOMELESS Seven residents at Santa Rosa’s Palms Inn died last year, unfortunate but not surprising given

the at-risk population served by the innovative housing project.

Off the Streets Palms Inn serves as de facto hospice

I

t’s a quiet weekday morning, and there’s a lull in the rain at the Palms Inn in unincorporated Santa Rosa. Roy Burress is volunteering at the converted motel’s cafe-bookstore and talks about the deaths of residents that have taken place here in recent months. He’s bearded and wears glasses and a baseball hat from the USS Theodore Roosevelt.

Burress is a Vietnam veteran and one of 114 residents at the Palms Inn, which was converted into apartments for the formerly homeless last year to much fanfare from local housing activists and Sonoma County officials. They heralded the Palms project as a key piece of the county’s push to deal with its stubborn homeless problem. Burress rattles off the fatalities he’s aware of among residents here—seven of them, he says, including an overdose and a

BY TOM GOGOLA suicide, in 2016. He speaks of at least one former tenant who tried to better himself but gave into his pain and ended up taking his life. He remembers others who arrived at the Palms with terminal illnesses. “They were going to die.” With a minimum of red tape and a full acknowledgement of the county’s homeless crisis, the Palms Inn opened last summer within three months of its conception as a go-to residence designed to siphon county residents off the streets ) 10

Both reservoirs are under the operational control of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which monitors water levels along with the local agency and manages the reservoir levels via controlled releases of water. The capacity levels at the reservoirs delineate the line between the so-called flood control pool and the water supply pool, and once the water levels creep into the former, the Corps takes measures to release water to avoid flooding. According to the SCWA, the Mendocino reservoir had dropped to 113.5 percent of capacity by Jan. 7, owing to a reservoir release protocol that saw two hundred cubic feet per second released from the brimming reservoir, whose flood-control trigger is around 72,000 acrefeet of water. How much rain has fallen? Between Jan. 3 and Jan. 7, according to SCWA data, Lake Sonoma’s depth rose five inches, to 105 percent of capacity. The “water year” that begins on Oct. 1 has seen 19 inches of rainfall in the Santa Rosa Basin through Jan. 2; the average over that time period is just under 12 inches.—Tom Gogola

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.


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and into some semblance of normalcy. Based on the nationally renowned “housing first” model, the Palms project has found housing for a client base that is split between veterans and referrals from Catholic Charities; the latter are generally considered a more vulnerable and needy population. But months into the Palm’s grand opening, the fatalities lend to the question of whether the Palms is set up to handle its de facto role as hospice caregiver—a role that was considered but not codified into any specific policy as the Palms was moving toward its opening last year. According to the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office, two deaths occurred on-site at the Palms in 2016 and one was a suicide. An administrator at the facility confirms that there have been fatalities among the residents this year—the others died after being transported to a hospital—and that the Palms is geared up to spring into action when there’s a death and take care of residents who might be distressed. “When we have been confronted with people passing away, it’s like family, like losing a family member,” says Catholic Charities’ Jennielynn Holmes. “This is a revolutionary project for Sonoma County,” she adds, highlighting its foundation in the housing first model—where all good things lead from having a roof over one’s head (see “Palms Not Bombs,” Aug. 17, 2016.) And yet, even as it has offered transitional or long-term housing for forward-looking formerly homeless people, it’s not surprising that some residents who arrive at the Palms might soon die at the Palms, says Holmes. “We are screening the most vulnerable people, people with severe physical and mental-health needs,” she says. “People who were terminally ill, we brought them here. Otherwise they would have died on the streets. At least they get end-of-life care here.” Some tenants receive in-home

services subsidized by the state and administered by the county. Holmes highlights findings from resident surveys this year which found that residency at the Palms had served to push back the numbers on several key arbiters that typify life on the streets, all of which saved taxpayers money. According to the survey, admittance to the emergency room and in-patient hospitalization fell by 45 percent; interactions with law enforcement dropped 77 percent; ambulance transportations fell by 56 percent; and usage of crisis service interventions such as suicide hotlines went down 98 percent. The seven deaths, Holmes says, are “below the average of other housing first programs and we are targeting the most vulnerable homeless individuals in Sonoma County.” The survey reveals most residents are taking advantage of the roof over their heads, even when they arrive with significant health problems. For some residents, an expected or imminent death is a part of life at the Palms. “But this is normal, and it’s important to provide this level of care to individuals,” Holmes says. Holmes further highlights the “revolutionary” aspect of the program that helps enhance care for residents. Many signed up for Medicare and Medicaid when the program was getting off the ground last summer. “The relationship to health and homelessness is just huge,” Holmes says as she credits the much-maligned Affordable Care Act with helping to ease the strain on homeless people turning to the emergency room for primary care. “The ACA has really allowed us to get people in medical [facilities], where before they would show up in the emergency room,” Holmes says. “It’s been pretty huge to the people who we serve,” she adds— including those who die, who at least pass with some semblance of dignity, instead of in a Fourth Street alcove huddled against the wind and the rain. “A person who is homeless,” Holmes says, “has no access to hospice.”


NEW KIDS ON THE BLOC Monika and Slawek Michalak offer Polish classics and American standards at their two-month-

old restaurant in Graton.

Cabbage Catch Zosia Cafe celebrates Eastern European cuisine in West County outpost BY STETT HOLBROOK

A

as vegetables go, the cabbage is about as unsexy as it gets. It doesn’t have the voluptuous appeal of an eggplant or the fireworks of the habanero pepper, but the humble cabbage deserves greater appreciation.

If you’re a poor Russian or Pole, cabbage (and onions, beets and potatoes) gets you through a long winter. Cabbage is easy to grow

and it thrives in cold weather. It stores well in a cold basement, it’s nutritious, and it’s cheap. And cabbage is nothing if not versatile. It’s a canvas painted upon by hunger and creativity. Slavic countries have elevated cooking the hearty vegetable to an art form. It can be steamed, boiled, stuffed, braised, pickled and fermented. That cabbage creativity is on display at Zosia Cafe & Kitchen, an unlikely outpost of Eastern

European cooking in downtown Graton. Located on a highly visible corner lot that recently housed the short-lived Bambu Tea House, Zosia (pronounced “zo-shuh”) is the work of Monika and Slawek Michalak. They’re from Poland but met in Sonoma County. Slawek was partners with Les Claypool in Claypool Cellars. Zosia’s talented chef, Ekaterina Zaitseva, is from Siberia and previously worked at Santa Rosa’s Russian-centric European Food Store.

Zosia Cafe & Kitchen, 9010 Graton Road, Graton. 707.861.9241.

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Dining

The idea for the restaurant grew out of the popularity of the couple’s “sauerkraut parties,” which gave them the idea that an Eastern European–themed restaurant might work. “It was a sign that people really like that stuff,” Monika says. Orders for the Eastern European side of the menu are 70 percent of sales, says Slawek. “We were right about it.” While cabbage is Eastern Europe’s pan-national vegetable, borscht is the dish that unites the diverse Slavic countries. The beet-centric version with a dab of sour cream is the most common form of the soup in this country, but borscht varies widely. “You know how many versions of borscht there are?” Ekaterina says. “Every single [Russian] republic has their own version.” Not all borscht is made with beets; Zosia’s Ukrainian version, for instance, is made with tomatoes, cabbage and vegetable broth ($7.95). The hearty Polish version, called barszcz, is made with cabbage, sauerkraut, potatoes and pork-rib meat and a beef-pork broth ($7.95). Both are delicious, deeply satisfying soups. Best of all is the bigos ($8.95), a brothy Polish stew made with sliced crimini mushrooms, sauerkraut and braised beef. It’s tailor-made for cold weather. You want more cabbage? The cabbage rolls ($8.95) are superb, stuffed with ground pork and rice draped in a light tomato sauce. The kitchen makes about 500 pierogies a day to keep up with demand. The little dumplings ($9.95) are a Polish staple and filled with pork and beef, potato and housemade farmers cheese or sauerkraut and mushroom. For now, Zosia (named after the Michalaks’ daughter) is only open for breakfast and lunch. They serve American breakfasts, hamburgers and pulled pork. A gleaming 1968 Airstream out front on will soon host a coffee and wine bar. But for me it’s all about the Eastern European side of the menu. And the cabbage.


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A sobering experience with nonalcoholic wines BY JAMES KNIGHT

J

ust as surely as booze and Champagne sales surge in the holiday run-up to New Year’s, interest in fasts, detoxes and resolutions of sobriety pick up in early January. But not so much that the nonalcoholic wine category, which could be helpful in both seasons, is easy to find.

I found it, all two brands, tucked in between forlorn cases of Glen Ellen and Hearty Burgundy—and I mean the worrisome, gallon jugs of Hearty Burgundy. Come to think of it, that might just be ideal product placement. Fre wines, made by Trinchero

Family Estates in St. Helena (best known for its Sutter Home brand), are not strictly alcohol-free. They contain half a percent alcohol after the rest is removed by spinningcone technology. In its place, some 20 to 32 percent unfermented grape juice is added for body and sweetness, costing your new diet 70 calories per eight-ounce serving— and don’t kid yourself, that’s more than what a regular wine serving is supposed to be. The wines are available to preview at the Sutter Home tasting room in St. Helena. Fre Red Blend ($6) is a somewhat convincing wine-like beverage that would adequately perform that function on the dinner table, and comes with a bright red rubber wristband draped around the bottle, to be worn as a helpful reminder to lay off the sauce, perhaps. But Fre Merlot ($6) is the clear standout, with its enticements of raspberry jam, slight hint of black pepper and lack of hint of air freshener that taints the others. Tannins glom onto the tongue, followed with sweet fruit, like a souped-up Concord grape and raspberry juice cocktail. Speaking of cocktails, this might do in a pinch in a Manhattan . . . You knew there had to be a Fre White Zinfandel ($6). Enough snickering, I like the concept. You can party from afternoon to evening and never have to face the shame of having got hungover from white Zinfandel. This lightly pink little bevvie offers sobriety with sass, and enough watermelon candy and strawberry flavor to offset the air-freshener taint. Oddly perfumed as well, Fre Chardonnay ($6) smells like a cashew that’s been to the dry cleaners, but clean flavors of mango and lime finish up with a fairly acidic bite—a curiosity to drink, not an outright penance, reminiscent of some of those Chardonnays whose main attributes are being unoaked with no buttery malolactic flavor. Similarly, Fre Sparkling Brut ($7) is fruity and not so offensive that I couldn’t finish a glass or even two after the real bubbly was emptied on New Year’s Eve. Sutter Home, 277 St. Helena Hwy. S., St. Helena. Daily, 10am–5pm. No fee. 707.963.3104.


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Photos by Cheyenne Danbrova

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 1 1-17, 2017 | BOH EMI A N.COM HEARTFELT An acupuncturist checks the pulse of a client at the Holistic Community Clinic.

Holistic for All Clinic brings alternative-health services to low-income communities BY STETT HOLBROOK

W

hen she was 12 years old, Laura Polak traveled with her father, Paul Polak, to a refugee camp in Somalia. Her father is a Czech holocaust survivor and a world-renowned entrepreneur who creates for-profit solutions to help combat Third World poverty. It was the first of many trips she took with her father, and it left a deep impression that has guided her work as a chiropractor and holistic healer.

“I have my life’s purpose,” Polak says. “Service—this is my life’s work.” She learned a lesson in the refugee camp, that no matter how well-intentioned, all charitable work must start with the members of the community being served, rather than having something bestowed upon them without their input. With that in mind, 18 months ago Polak sought to create a holistic-medicine clinic for low-income and underserved communities in Sonoma County. While massage and chiropractics ) 14


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are standard for the middle- and upper-class, the services are often out of reach for the poor. She partnered with Burbank Housing, a nonprofit affordablehousing provider that serves about 10,000 low-income families in Sonoma County, and started a pilot program to see if residents wanted the kind of services she hoped to provide: chiropractics, massage therapy, acupuncture and herbal medicine. People were indeed interested, and her services are now in great demand. Polak holds her Community Holistic Clinic once a week in the community center at Colgan Meadows, a Burbank Housing apartment complex in western Santa Rosa; patients are welcome from throughout the county. Though patients were slow at first to embrace Polak and her crew of volunteer practitioners— especially their acupuncture needles—appointments now book up weeks in advance. “Finally people are starting to bring me their babies,” Polak says. very Friday, Colgan Meadows’ community center is transformed into a pop-up clinic of sorts. The kitchen is given over to acupuncture treatment, and a row of four beds is set up in the meeting room for chiropractic patients. The main hall, which hosts birthday parties and other tenant events on weekends, is where the check-in table and herbal medicine provider sets up shop. Given the close proximity the healers work in, it’s easy for them to cross-refer each other’s patients. Those with more serious conditions that require a primary-care physician are directed elsewhere. The clinic only serves those who earn $30,000 or less. Most patients are Latino. Nearly 60 percent earn between $16,000 and $30,000 a year; 25 percent make $16,000 or less, well below national poverty levels. “I’ve always believed in public

E

707.536.1797

Effective anti-aging products by GM Collin

Laura Polak ( 13

5700 Gravenstein Hwy N. Forestville 707.887.3344 • RussianRiverVineyards.com

POP-UP CLINIC A community center meeting room is converted into a holistic clinic at Santa Rosa’s Colgan Meadows apartments.

health,” says Gidon Levenbach, an acupuncturist who volunteers at the clinic. “Natural health can be kind of elitist, but I prefer to treat people who need it most.” He founded a free clinic in South Africa that treated victims of civil wars from the Congo and Zimbabwe suffering from PTSD. At the Friday clinic, he treats patients who have depression, anxiety and chronic pain. Twenty-something Isabel Torres drives from Windsor for acupuncture and chiropractic treatments to help her with her arthritis. Before she started coming to the Friday clinic, she didn’t do anything for her pain. “I’m so thankful for them because they give of their time,” she says. On her visit last week, Guerneville’s Pegalee Benda came out of the chiropractic room with a smile on her face and did a little jig. “You’re gonna feel better,” she said to those waiting to be seen. “This has been one of the most valuable things that has happened


15

SAUVIGNON ROCK FOR THE NAPA VALLEY

Bob St. Laurent “Good Morning Bob” Weekdays 6am – 10am

Rick Stuart “Middays with Big Rick Stuart” Weekdays 10am – 3pm

Mindi Levine “Drive Time Mindi”Weekdays 3pm – 7pm

Keep up with “What’s Happening” in the Napa Valley with reports every hour

Finish Your Degree. Liberal Studies at Napa/Solano & Saturday Hybrid at SSU Coming soon to Marin.

Join an Info Session for Fall ‘17! www.4seie.info/ba17 (707) 789.1982

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 1 1-17, 2017 | BOH EMI A N.COM

to me in terms of my health in many years,” Benda said. “I walk in and I have pain and I leave and it’s tolerable.” Benda suffers from Lyme disease and says her primarycare doctors have not been able to help her. “They don’t listen and they don’t go to the source.” Without the clinic, she couldn’t get the help she needs because of the cost. Holistic medicine is meant to treat the whole patient on a systemic level rather than focusing on individual symptoms, as is common in Western medicine. It’s a worthy goal, but in spite of its efforts of inclusiveness, holistic care often serves a narrow clientele because of its cost. Insurance often doesn’t cover the kind of alternative therapies Polak provides at her Sebastopol clinic, Radiant Health. As a result, many of her patients are well-to-do and can afford the out-of-pocket expenses. But just because low-income people can’t afford the services doesn’t mean they are unaware of them. For many immigrants, alternative medicine is traditional and affordable medicine in the

countries they come from. “That’s what people in poverty do,” says Arcelia Moreno, community services coordinator for Burbank Housing. It’s only when they come to the United States that these approaches become out of reach. Residents sometimes pass on their experieces to their providers, she says. “They’ll remind them that they already know a lot about what their grandparents and ancestors used to do,” Moreno says. “That’s why what [Laura Polak] offers is such a great opportunity.” In addition to providing the space for the clinic, Burbank Housing also offers a small amount of funding and administrative staff. The service is part of a larger recognition within the affordable-housing industry that residents need more than housing. “We noticed putting a roof over people’s heads isn’t enough,” Moreno says. Burbank Housing also offers after-school programs, physical fitness activities, literacy classes, mental-health services and financial literacy programs sponsored by the Redwood Credit Union. There are other low-cost clinics in the North Bay, but they have long waiting lists. In spite of the obvious need, Polak says she’s been advised to stop working at the clinic because she’s losing money, as it takes time away from her for-profit practice in Sebastopol. “I can’t get funding, and I’m feeling a little frustrated,” she says. Polak dreams of opening a holistic health center at the future site of Andy’s Unity Park in Santa Rosa’s Moorland neighborhood, where the need is great. She’d like to be able to raise $120,000 to pay the practitioners, whom she’s always recruiting for the clinic. (She’s especially looking for Spanish speakers.) For now, there’s a can on the check-in desk with a sliding scale of $5–$50. But Polak is not likely to give up on the clinic. “I have to do it,” she says. “This is what I was raised with.”


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JANUARY 1 1-17, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

16

Crush

The week’s events: a selective guide

CULTURE

HEALDSBURG

Beer Scholar

It’s hard to think of a cooler nickname than ‘the Pope of Foam,’ the title given to brewing scientist Charles Bamforth. Born in Britain and currently working at UC Davis, Bamforth has spent his life researching, educating and making beer, and he loves nothing more than to share his passion—and maybe a couple of pints—with as many people as he can. Bamforth is also the author of several books on the subject, and this week, the Healdsburg Literary Guild welcomes him for a talk and tasting event featuring Bear Republic brews on Thursday, Jan. 12 at Shed, 25 North St., Healdsburg. 7pm. $15. 707.431.7433.

WINDSOR

Freshly Made Films

Now in its third year, the grassroots, nonprofit Windsor International Film Festival once again features an exciting array of short films from independent filmmakers near and far. Not only does the festival screen works from over 20 different countries, it also spotlights more than a dozen North Bay filmmakers. With 50 films to choose from this year, the festival has organized its showings in thematic blocks, offering films in groups such as crime dramas, romantic films, relationship dramas, altered realities and more. See for yourself on Friday and Saturday, Jan. 13–14, at Windsor High School, 8695 Windsor Road, Windsor. windsorfest.com.

N A PA

Get Feisty

San Francisco playwright and performer Charlie Varon channels his inner grump in his funny one-man show, ‘Feisty Old Jew.’ Taking on the role of 83-year-old Bernie, Varon chronicles the rapidly changing landscape of San Francisco through the eyes of a lovable Luddite stuck in a car with three young techies. As Bernie rants against the fashion boutiques and cappuccinos of the younger generation, he also energetically convinces his car-sharing techie friends to let him try his hand at surfing for the first time in his life. Will Bernie catch a wave? Find out Friday through Sunday, Jan. 13–15, at Lucky Penny Community Arts Center, 1758 Industrial Way, Napa. Friday–Saturday, 8pm; Sunday, 2pm. $50. 707.266.6305.

O C C I D E N TA L

FROM PARIS TO RIO Grammy nominated singer Karrin Allyson brings a world of music to Napa’s Blue Note Jazz Club when she performs over four nights, Jan. 12–15. See Concerts, p21.

Party like KOWS

West Sonoma County community radio station KOWS 107.3-FM is a big proponent of free speech. Maybe that’s why they’ve timed their annual fundraising show to fall on Martin Luther King Day for a party with plenty of music and fun. Songwriters Rachel Tree, Tami Gosnell and Kym Trippsmith will share the stage with lead guitar virtuoso Leesa Gomez while an extensive selection of food and drinks get the party in gear. Then, local DJs keep the good times going, as a raffle helps raise funds for KOWS. The party starts on Sunday, Jan. 15, at Barley and Hops Tavern, 3688 Bohemian Hwy., Occidental. 6:30pm. Admission by donation. 707.874.9037.

—Charlie Swanson


REANIMATED We don’t know where Scooby-Doo is, but the man who drew the Saturday morning cartoon and many others has taken his art on the road.

Hand Drawn

Veteran animator Ron Campbell pops up in Sonoma County BY CHARLIE SWANSON

H

e spent 50 years animating some the most iconic characters of the 20th century, from the Beatles to Scooby-Doo, and yet Ron Campbell still holds the same childlike fascination for animation he had growing up in Australia. “For some reason, cartoons to a child are enormously interesting,” Campbell says. “It’s hard to quite

figure out why, but they are. In fact, the joy people get looking at cartoons is a bit of a mystery to me. But anyway, people love them, and I did too. I fell in love with them.” This month, Campbell travels to Sonoma County for a pop-up “Beatles Cartoon Art Show,” in which he shows classic work from his career in cartoons, including the Beatles’ 1960s Saturday morning series. Campbell appears at the Area Arts Gallery in Santa Rosa Monday through

Wednesday, Jan. 16–18, to paint many of the famous figures he’s worked on and meet with visitors. Works of his original art will also be on sale. Born in 1939 in Seymore, a small town in the Australian state of Victoria, Campbell remembers cartoons accompanying cowboy serials like Roy Rogers and Hopalong Cassidy at the local movie theater. As a child, Campbell says that he initially thought of Tom

& Jerry cartoons as a real cat and mouse chasing each other onscreen. “I remember my greatgrandmother telling me, ‘Ronny, they’re just drawings,’” he says. “And I remember the moment. It was like a childish epiphany: You mean I can do drawings that can live? I became obsessed with the idea, really.” Campbell never stopped drawing. He was educated at the Swinburne Art Institute in Melbourne, just as television came to Australia. Suddenly, there was a demand for animation in the country, for television and other commercial work. “I was right on the first wave of the first generation of animation there,” Campbell says. After school, Campbell moved to Sydney, where he persisted in convincing the one animation studio in the city to hire him. Once he got in the door, Campbell went to work hand-drawing local projects before an American company hired his studio to work on cartoons like Beetle Bailey and Krazy Kat. One night in 1964, Campbell got a telephone call from King Features in New York, who had sold a new Saturday morning television show based on the Beatles. They wanted him to direct the episodes. Campbell, who says he was only peripherally aware of the band at the time, asked if another insect-based cartoon was really a good idea. “Of course, he straightened me out,” Campbell laughs. The Beatles animated series ran from 1965 to 1969, with episodes that featured Beatles songs and storylines that set the lovable lads on adventures that included Transylvanian detours, African safaris and Roman Colosseum rehearsals. The series was No. 1 in the ratings for its entire run. That’s when Hollywood ) 18

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Arts Ideas

17


WEDNESDAY NIGHT LIVE

18 NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JANUARY 1 1-17, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

8 PM

An Evening of Spirit with James Van Praagh

Fri, Feb 10, 7:30pm • $50 / VIP $100

In the Mood (Run Dates: July 13 - August 5, 2017) A MUSICAL ADAPTATION OF “MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING”

FairyWorlds! (Run Dates August 10-Sept. 2)

AN ORIGINAL ADAPTATION OF “A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM”

52 W. 6th Street, Santa Rosa, CA 95401

Master the Power Within WorkshoP

Sat, Feb 11, 9–5 • $179

Pre-Sale tickets only

Center for Spiritual Living 2075 Occidental Road, Santa Rosa steppingstonesbooksandgifts.org

Ron Campbell ( 17 came calling. “I think because of the tremendous success of The Beatles that people might have mistakenly thought some of the success had to do with me,” Campbell jokes. In 1968, Campbell was tapped to provide character animation for the film Yellow Submarine, again inspired by the Beatles. Campbell drew the pencils on much of the sequences involving the Blue Meanies and the Nowhere Man, based on the designs of psychedelic graphic designer and art director Heinz Edelmann. When talking about his career, Campbell deflects praise by acknowledging creative talents around him, like William Hanna and Joseph Barbera, whom he worked for through the 1970s and ’80s, animating on shows like The Flintstones, The Jetsons, Yogi Bear, Scooby-Doo and The Smurfs. Bit Campbell’s humble nature can’t detract from the sheer volume of his work, including animating for the Emmy- and Peabody Award–winning PBS series Big Blue Marble, which ran from 1974 to 1983. After retiring last decade, Campbell says he borrowed a page from Warner Brothers animator Chuck Jones, who took the show on the road after his retirement and sold original paintings of his most famous characters. That’s what Campbell will be doing when he appears in Sonoma County this month. After 50 years behind the drawing board, he says the last few years of touring the country with his pop-up show have given him the chance to meet generations of fans whose lives he touched with his work. “I finally get to meet the people who saw and enjoyed my work,” he says. “Those characters still mean so much to them, and it brings me back to that feeling I had as a kid in the movie theaters.” Ron Campbell is on hand for the ‘Beatles Cartoon Pop Art Show,’ Jan. 16–18, at the Area Arts Gallery, 105 Fourth St., Santa Rosa. Monday, 5–8pm; Saturday, noon–8pm; Sunday, noon–7pm. Free admission. 707.544.8525.


SEX TALK New play reveals

surprising biographical details about Dr. Ruth Westheimer.

Hot and Heavy

One-woman show ‘Dr. Ruth’ is about more than sex BY DAVID TEMPLETON

‘G

ood sex is like downhill skiing,” says Dr. Ruth Westheimer early on in Main Stage West’s engaging, surprise-packed solo-show Becoming Dr. Ruth. “Both require instinct, good movement and a willingness to take risks.” That description, apparently, applies to Westheimer herself. Throughout the unexpectedly rich script by playwright Mark St. Germain, the true details of Dr. Ruth’s extraordinary life are revealed, strip-tease-style, one bit at a time. As the play opens, Westheimer is packing up her New York City apartment after the recent death of her third husband,

'Becoming Dr. Ruth’ runs Thursday– Sunday through Jan. 22 at Main Stage West, 104 N. Main St., Sebastopol. Thursday–Saturday, 8pm; Sunday matinee, 5pm. $15–$30. 707.823.0177.

Jan 13 - Feb 5, 2017 19

STAGE KISS by

Sarah Ruhl

52 W. 6th Street, Santa Rosa, CA 95401

1/13–1/17

®

Honorable

La La Land PG13 10:15-1:15-4:15-7:15

BRINGING THE BEST FILMS IN THE WORLD TO SONOMA COUNTY

Lion PG13 10:45-1:45-4:45-7:45 Hidden Figures PG

Schedule for Fri, June 22nd• -Salads Thu, June 28th Bruschetta •Academy Paninis Soups • Appetizers Award “Moore Gives •Her BestNominee Performance 8 Great Beers on Foreign Tap + Wine by the Film! Glass and Bottle Best Language

11:15-2:15-5:15-8:15 Thurs 1/19 only: 2:15-5:15-8:15

Jackie R 2:00 Elle R 10:30-1:30-4:30-7:30 Manchester by the Sea R

11:00-5:00-8:00, Thurs 1/19 only: 11:00

20th Century Women R

Advance Screening Thurs 1/19 @7pm Opens Friday 1/20!

551 SUMMERFIELD ROAD • SANTA ROSA 707.522.0719 • SUMMERFIELDCINEMAS.COM

Schedule for Friday, January 13 – Thursday, January 19

DINE-IN CINEMA

Bargain Tuesday - $7.50 All Shows Bargain Tuesday $7.00 All Shows Schedule forFri, Fri,April Feb -16th 20th Thu, Feb 26th Schedule for –– Thu, April 22nd

In Years!” – Box Office Foreign Language Film!Stone “RawBest and Riveting!” – Rolling Demi MooreWITH DavidBASHIR Duchovny WALTZ PG-13 A MIGHTY HEART (1:00) THE 3:00 JONESES 5:00 7:00 9:15 (12:30) 5:007:00 7:209:45 9:45 RR (1:002:45 3:45) (12:30) 2:40Noms 4:50 Including 7:10 9:20 2 Academy Award BestRActor! “A Triumph!” – New “A Glorious Throwback ToYork The Observer More Stylized, THE WRESTLER (1:10 6:45 9:30 PG Painterly Work Of Decades Past!” – LA (12:20) 2:45 5:10 9:45 R Times LA4:00) VIE EN 7:30 ROSE (12:45) 3:45 6:45OF 9:45 PG-13 THEAward SECRET KELLS 10 Academy Noms Including Best Picture! (1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:00 NR SLuMDOG MILLIONAIRE (12:45 4:30) 7:45 R No Passes “★★★★ – Really, Truly, Deeply – “Superb! No One4:00 Could Make This 7:10 R Believable One of (1:15) This Year’s Best!”9:40 – Newsday If It Were Fiction!” – San Francisco Chronicle

LA LA LAND

HIDDEN FIGURES SILENCE

PATRIOTS DAY

ONCE Including 8 Academy Award PRODIGALNoms SONS

(1:00) 3:10 5:20 7:30 9:40 (1:30 4:20) 7:10 9:55 RR Best Picture, Actor & Best Director! (2:20) 9:10 Best NR No 9:10 Show Tue or Thu MILK – Rolling Stone “Haunting and Hypnotic!”PG-13 “Wise, Humble and Effortlessly (1:30) 4:10 6:45 Funny!” 9:30 R – Newsweek

FENCES

THE GIRL THE TATTOO (2:20) 7:20 Please Note: 1:30 Show Sat, No PleaseWITH Note: No No 1:30 ShowDRAGON Sat, No 6:45 6:45 Show Show Thu Thu WAITRESS

WAITRESS (1:10) 4:30 7:30 NR (1:30) 7:10 9:30 Best R Picture! 5 Academy Award4:00 Noms Including PG-13 “★★★1/2! AnFROST/NIXON unexpected Gem!” – USA Today

LION

FROST/NIXON

(1:15 4:10) 6:50R 9:25 (2:15) 7:20 GREENBERG “Swoonly Romatic, Mysterious, Hilarious!” (12:00) 9:50 R – Slant5:00 Magazine

REVOLuTIONARY ROAD PG-13 A MONSTER “Deliciously unsettling!” PARIS, JE CALLS T’AIME (11:45) 4:45 9:50– RLA Times (11:45) 4:45 9:50 R 6:15 (1:15)(12:30) 4:15 7:00 9:30 R (2:15) 7:15 PG-13

THE presents GHOST Kevin Jorgenson the WRITER California Premiere of

La La Land • Jackie Lion • Manchester by the Sea Hidden Figures Bistro Menu Items, Beer & Wine available in all 4 Auditoriums

SHOWTIMES: ravenfilmcenter.com 707.525.8909 • HEALDSBURG

PuRE: A BOuLDERING FLICK ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY Michael Moore’s Feb 26th at 7:15 THE Thu, MOST DANGEROuS (1:20 4:15) 7:15 9:50 PG-13 SICKO MOVIES IN THE MORNING MAN IN AMERICA

Starts Fri, June 29th! Fri, Sat, Sun &PENTAGON Mon DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THENow PAPERS Advance Tickets On Sale at Box Office! 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 6:50 NR 6:50 Show or Thu FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:305:00) 5:00No7:30 10:00 (12:00 9:55 R Tue 10:15 AM VICKY Their CRISTINA BARCELONA First Joint Venture In 25 Years! 10:20 AM CHANGELING Venessa RedgraveAND Meryl CHONG’S Streep CloseAM PG Glenn CHEECH 10:40 RACHEL GETTING MARRIED 10:45 AM (11:45 2:00 4:20) 6:40 9:00 HEY WATCH THIS 2009 LIVE ACTION SHORTS (Fri/Mon Only)) EVENING 10:45 Sat, Apr17th at 11pm & Tue, Apr 20th 8pmAM 2009 ANIMATED SHORTS Only) Starts Fri,(Sun June 29th!

MOONLIGHT SING

MANCHESTER BY THE SEA (3:00) 8:30

R

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 1 1-17, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Stage

Fred. In the midst of arguing on the phone with her daughter, she suddenly notices the audience. “Hold on,” she tells the caller. “I have company.” What follows is as loose, relaxed and occasionally bizarre as an actual living-room conversation with an eccentric friend—one who, in this case, just happens to have escaped Nazi Germany as a child, spent years as a sniper for the Israeli army and worked for Planned Parenthood in New York, all on her way to becoming America’s most unlikely advocate for positive sexuality and honest, open discussion about a subject few people actually talk about. As Dr. Ruth, Ann Woodhead is wonderful. Though with a bit less energy and volume than the way Westheimer so delightfully comports herself on TV and radio, Woodhead skillfully captures the famous figure’s twinkly-eyed and straightforward approach to life, laughter and love, and even her clear-eyed embrace of the uglier facts of life. She simultaneously nails the parade of one-liners, and carefully modulates the heavier elements, which includes the death of Ruth’s family in the concentration camps. After she escaped to Switzerland via the international Kindertransport rescue effort, Westheimer never saw her parents again. The direction by Elizabeth Craven is generally light-handed and purposefully simple, with clever use of projections to emphasize the moments when Dr. Ruth shows photographs of her family. The effective set by David Lear is crammed with thoughtful visual details, though the show’s unnecessarily busy, uncredited light design is frequently baffling and distracting. That said, the light of the show, appropriately enough, is the real Westheimer, whose sheer lifelong determination and resilience is entertainingly moving, illuminating and truly inspiring. Rating (out of 5):


Music Fermin Ramirez

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JANUARY 1 1-17, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

20

FRIDAY, JANUARY 20

And Coming SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18

UKE FOLK Jon Gonzales gets musical

inspiration from his community.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24

BRET MICHAELS

THE PARTY STARTS NOW TOUR APRIL 1, 2017

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25

ZEPPARELLA

THEAllMOTHER HIPS Female Led Zep Powerhouse

APRIL 15, 2017 ORIGINAL LINEUP

LA GUNS

Feat: Tracii Guns and Phil Lewis

March 4 THE SUN KINGS | April 1 ZEPPARELLA

You are invited to our

OPEN STUDIO EVENT Friday Jan 20 from 5-8pm

3 Showroom Galleries & 13 Artisan Studios in one building! Gallery Hrs: Sat & Sun 11–5pm 1200 River Rd, Fulton fultoncrossing.com

Helping Hands

Musician Jon Gonzales gives back BY CHARLIE SWANSON

L

ongtime North Bay musician, teacher and father of five Jon Gonzales knows the value of community.

He sees it every month when he hosts HopMonk’s Songwriters in the Round series, which returns to the Sebastopol tavern on Wednesday, Jan. 18. And he saw it in the efforts of North Bay nonprofit organization Matrix Parent Network & Resource Center when his first son, Jasper, was born with a traumatic brain injury. Gonzales’ musical life started when he moved to Sonoma County from his hometown of Bakersfield to attend Sonoma State University in 1993. “It’s so creative up here. It motivated me to play the guitar, start doing open mics and the like,” Gonzales says. He graduated with a degree

in English and began mixing a day job teaching with a nightlife playing upbeat folk pop songs around town. When Jasper was born in 2004, Gonzales put music on hold. “I was really invested in my kids, raising a special needs child who was getting bigger,” Gonzales says. “But I still did a lot of music at home, just to be inwardly creative.” After discovering the ukulele and teaming with local producer Michael Lindner, Gonzales reentered the musical community with the 2012 album Water ’n Whiskey and its 2015 follow-up, Hump. The sound of his self-described “ukulele hook-folk” is hard to pin down, and Gonzales is deft at going from sunny pop jam to selfreflective ballad with ease. His next album is shaping up to be a stripped-down folk collection inspired by the artists he welcomes to the Songwriters in the Round events. “Between teaching and the ukulele, I have a large network of people and opportunities,” Gonzales says. And he always pays it forward. “I’ve always gone full-force to be there any time there are benefits for kids with special needs,” he says. In that vein, Gonzales performs with his string band at the Hops & Harmonies benefit for the Matrix Parent Network on Jan. 17 at the Lagunitas Brewing Company in Petaluma. The organization assisted Gonzales and his wife by providing the help of a couple of caretakers for Jasper. In November 2014, Jasper died unexpectedly, an event that Gonzales says froze him creatively for over a year, yet the musician regained his motivation with the help of his friends. “I met [folk singer] Bruce Cockburn last year,” Gonzales says. “And he said in times like now, when it feels dark politically or backwards civilly, the artists are relied upon. It’s important to keep going.” Jon Gonzales String Band performs at the Hops & Harmonies benefit on Tuesday, Jan. 17, at Lagunitas Brewing Company, 1280 N. McDowell Blvd., Petaluma. 5:30pm. $15–$25. jongonzales.com.


Concerts Clubs & SONOMA COUNTY Venues Keak Da Sneak Bay Area hyphy pioneer hits the stage with DJ Tony Tone and DJ Lazy Boy. Jan 14, 10pm. $10. Remy’s Bar & Lounge, 130 Stony Point Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.578.1963.

Marching Church Experimental Danish alternative-rock outfit plays the North Bay with Canadian electronic musician Bernardino Femminielli, San Francisco rockers CCR Headcleaner and local punks Service. Jan 16, 7pm. $12. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Unified Highway Reggae-pop duo is made of Rebelution vocalist/guitarist Eric Rachmany and former Zion I DJ and producer Amp Live. Jan 12, 8:30pm. $17. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

MARIN COUNTY The Coffis Brothers & the Mountain Men Brotherly band from Santa Cruz rocks a classic sound with ease. Jan 15, 6pm. Free. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Katie Skene Los Angeles-based 23-year old blues guitarist, singer and songwriter teams with jam veterans Barry Sless, Pete Sears, John Molo and Rob Barraco. Jan 14, 8pm. $18-$20. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

NAPA COUNTY Karrin Allyson Grammy-nominated jazz singer offers four nights of performances, both solo and with a trio, that feature songs from her canon of acclaimed albums. Jan 12-15, 6:30 and 9pm. $35 and up. Blue Note Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe

Jan 12, Gaia String Band. Jan 13, the Sticky Notes. Jan 14, Two of Us. Jan 15, 2pm, Gary Vogensen’s Sunday Ramble. Jan 18, West Coast Songwriters Competition. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Center Jan 14, Silver Snakes with ÆGES and the Black Moods. Tues, Open Didgeridoo Clinic. Wed, Open Mic. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Barley & Hops Tavern

Jan 13, Earstu. Jan 15, 6:30pm, KOWS radio party with Tami Gosnell, Rachel Tree and Kym Trippsmith. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.874.9037.

The Big Easy

Jan 11, the Wednesday Night Big Band. Jan 12, Ptown Playaz. Jan 13, the Gentlemen Soldiers and Timothy O’Neil Band. Jan 14, the doRian Mode. Jan 15, 4Minus Trio. Jan 17, Rhythm Drivers. Jan 18, For Pete’s Sake. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.4631.

Brew

Jan 13, Willow and Hound. 555 Healdsburg Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.303.7372.

Brixx Pizzeria

Jan 14, Friends the Band. 16 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.766.8162.

B&V Whiskey Bar & Grille

Jan 13, DJ Willie. Jan 14, DJ Cal. 400 First St E, Sonoma. 707.938.7110.

Coffee Catz

Flamingo Lounge

Jan 13, Sugar Rush. Jan 14, Carlos Xavier & His Salsa Band. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

HopMonk Sebastopol

Tues, open mic night. Jan 13, Lagos Roots Afrobeat Ensemble and Loralax. Jan 14, Steve Gatz Blues Band. Jan 16, Monday Night Edutainment with Relic Secure. Jan 18, Songwriters in the Round. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

HopMonk Sonoma

CALENDAR THU JAN 12 • PUREE’ (EVERY 2ND & 4TH THURSDAY) 9:00PM / 21+ / FREE

Hotel Healdsburg

FRI JAN 13 • URBAN GRASS BAND AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 7:30PM / 21+ / FREE

Jan 14, 6:30pm, Kevin Fitzsimmons Quartet. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Jamison’s Roaring Donkey

Wed, open mic night. Jan 14, the Sam Chase & the Untraditional with Buck Thrifty. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.772.5478.

Jasper O’Farrell’s

Jan 11, 6pm, jazz jam. Jan 12, 6pm, Big Kitty. Jan 13, Hype It Up with DJ Konnex and DJ JacaLioness. Jan 14, MORiLLO. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062. Jan 15, 12pm, the doRian Mode. 5875 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma. 707.765.2117.

Kivelstadt Cellars

Jan 13, 6:30pm, Zachary Carroll and Old Earth. 13750 Arnold Drive, Glen Ellen. 707.938.7001.

Lagunitas Tap Room

Jan 11, Hot Grubb. Jan 12, Grover Anderson. Jan 13, the Rhythm Drivers. Jan 14, Tally Up. Jan 15, the Shots. Jan 18, Jason Bodlovich. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Luther Burbank Center for the Arts

Corkscrew Wine Bar

Jan 12, Susan Sutton. Jan 13, Sam People and Lynn Bellig. Jan 14, Levi Lloyd. Jan 17, Mac & Potter. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Jan 16, 6pm, Steve Moon and Jeff Suburu. Jan 17, 6pm, Greg Hester and Jim Passarell

SAT JAN 14 • THE RECEDERS AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 7:30PM / 21+ / FREE SUN JAN 15 • DAVID THOM INVITATIONAL BLUEGRASS JAM EVERY 1ST & 3RD SUNDAY! 4:30PM / 21+ / FREE CHECK OUT OUR FULL MUSIC CALENDAR www.TwinOaksRoadhouse.com Phone 707.795.5118 5745 Old Redwood Hwy Penngrove, CA 94951

Fireside Dining 7 Days a Week

Din n er & A Show

Jan 13 The Rivertown Trio Fri

featuring Julie Bernard

Sat

Jan 14 Sun

Jan 15

Fabulous Harmonies 8:00 / No Cover Dance Party!

Buck Nickels and Loose Change

Soulful, Original, Country 8:30 Boogie Woogie Queen

Wendy DeWitt’s Piano Party with

Kathey Tejcka 4:00 / No Cover e

Sugar Rush 8:00 Daanrcty! P Sat Jan 21 Freddy Clarke International Dance Party! Fri

Jan 20

8:00 / No Cover

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p Steve Lucky Su p Club

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Featuring Miss Carmen Getit 8:30

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Celebrate Valentine’s Day with

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415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Keller Estate Winery

Jan 16, Miranda Sings. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Dry Creek Kitchen

WEEKLY EVENTS MONDAYS • BLUES DEFENDERS PRO JAM TUESDAYS • OPEN MIC W/ROJO WEDNESDAYS • KARAOKE

Jan 13, David Thom & Vintage Grass. Jan 14, Aki Kumar. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Tues, 12pm, Jerry Green’s Peaceful Piano Hour. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600. Jan 13, Hots & Tots aka Toby Tyler and Pete Hale. Jan 17, North Bay Jazz Guitar Collective. 100 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.789.0505.

FREE LOCAL LIVE MUSIC GIGS LIVE MUSIC. NEW STAGE AND SOUND. NEW DANCE FLOOR. NEW AIR CONDITIONING. SUDS TAPS - 18 LOCAL & REGIONAL SELECT CRAFT BEERS & CIDERS. EATS NEW MENU, KITCHEN OPEN ALL DAY FROM 11AM ON. CHECK OUT OUR FRIED CHICKEN SANDWICH W/CORN ON THE COB. DIGS DINING OUT-DOORS. KIDS ALWAYS WELCOME - NEW KID’S MENU. RESERVATIONS FOR 8 OR MORE. HAPPY HOUR M-F 3-6PM. $2 CHICKEN TACOS. $3 HOUSE CRAFT BEERS.

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Main Street Bistro

Mc T’s Bullpen

Jan 12, Stone Peoples Medicine. Jan 13, DJ MGB. Jan 14, Citizen Flannel. Jan 15, 4pm, Barbara Olney and )

22

Wed 1/11 •Doors 6pm • FREE Cafe open for Coffee, Lunch, & Dinner FREE Dinner Show with

Acoustically Speaking

Featuring Kat Walkerson and Mik Bondy from The Garcia Project Thu 1/12 •Doors 7pm • $17 ADV / $19 DOS

The Overcommitments Kiddo! Benefit

Fri 1/13 • Doors 8pm • $30 ADV / $32 DOS

Reggae Royalty Mykal Rose with Reggae Angels Sat 1/14 • Doors 11:30am • FREE

Shark Alley Hobos & Friends

Tribute to Mikie Lee Prasad Sun 1/15 •Doors 11am • FREE Brunch Show with Acoustically Speaking - Featuring Kat Walkerson and Mik Bondy from The Garcia Project Sun 1/15 •Doors 6pm • FREE

The Coffis Brothers

Mon 1/16 • Doors 6pm • FREE

THu Second Street Band jan 12 8pm/Dancing/$5 fri Stand Up comedy! jan 13 8:30pm/$10/18+ saT Bohemian highway jan 14 8:30pm/Dancing/$5 THu Jah-SoUl Jaz jan 19 8pm/Dancing/$5 fri SoUl FUSe jan 20 8pm/Dancing/$10 saT the Sidemen Feat. peter jan 21 welker 8:30pm/Dancing/$10 THu marShall hoUSe jan 26 proJect 8pm/Dancing/$5 fri JUnior tootS (son of TooTs feb 3 HibberT of TooTs & THe MayTals) 8:30pm/$10 Adv/$15 Dos/18+ Tue dead horSeS feb 14 8pm/$12 Adv/$15 Dos/18+ THu addiS paBlo (son of augusT feb 23 Pablo) 9pm/$12 Adv/$15 Dos/21+

Open Mic Night with Austin DeLone

Mon Mar 20

davina and the vagaBondS

Thu 1/19 • Doors 7pm • $17 ADV / $20 DOS

THu aPr 20

paBlo moSeS

Woods

The Range of Light Wilderness www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

8pm/$12 Adv/$15 Dos

9pm/$18 Adv/$22 Dos/21+

Advance Tickets Available at Brown Paper Tickets reStaUrant & mUSic venUe check oUt the art exhiBit viSit oUr weBSite, redwoodcaFe.com 8240 old redwood hwy, cotati 707.795.7868

21 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 1 1-17, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Music

Duo. 317 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.0330.


Music ( 21 friends. Jan 15, 9pm, DJ MGB. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377. 707.829.7300 230 PETALUMA AVE | SEBASTOPOL

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special guest Zoë Keating

Mystic Theatre

Jan 13, Led Zepagain. Jan 14, Saved by the 90s. Jan 16, Protoje. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Phoenix Theater

Jan 14, Screw 32 with the Wynona Riders and Monsula. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Pongo’s Kitchen & Tap Jan 12, 6:30pm, Billy D. 701 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma. 707.774.5226.

Redwood Cafe

Jan 11, Brian Rashap and friends. Jan 12, Second Street Band. Jan 14, Bohemian Highway. Jan 15, 5pm, Gold Coast Jazz Band. Jan 16, Open Mic with DJ Loisaida. Jan 18, Irish set dancing. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Rio Nido Roadhouse

Jan 14, 2pm, Art Salon. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub

Jan 14, Used Goods. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Twin Oaks Roadhouse

WED, FEBRUARY 15

RAIN: A Tribute to the Beatles THU, FEBRUARY 23

707.546.3600 lutherburbankcenter.org

Jan 13, Jon Emery Band. Jan 14, Big Iron. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Sun, live music. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

RADIOLAB’S

with Billy Cox, Buddy Guy, Zakk Wylde, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, and more!

Murphy’s Irish Pub

Toad in the Hole Pub

Jad Abumrad

Experience Hendrix

Jan 13, Stephanie Chevalier and the Beautiful Questions. 6487 Hwy 128, Healdsburg. 707.431.8845.

Wed, 6pm, Michael Hantman. 219 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.7222. bownarrowclothing.com

456 Tenth St, Santa Rosa • Tue–Sat 11–5 707.781.7070 • calabigallery.com

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Medlock Ames

Spoonbar

Egyptian Tapestry

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JANUARY 1 1-17, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

22

Jan 12, Puree college night. Jan 13, Urban Grass. Jan 14, the Receders. Jan 15, 5pm, David Thom Invitational Bluegrass Jam. Jan 16, the Blues Defenders pro jam. Jan 17, open mic with RoJo. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Going to Church Danish rockers march into Santa Rosa Danish musician and songwriter Elias Bender Rønnenfelt has never heard a style of music he didn’t like. At least that’s the sense one gets when listening to his experimental band Marching Church. Originally Rønnenfelt’s solo project for years, Marching Church formed as a full band in 2014 and has released two critically acclaimed albums, including 2016’s Tell It Like It Is.

Rønnenfelt (pictured, third from right) first caught international attention when he co-formed the post-punk band Iceage in Copenhagen circa 2008. He was 16 years old at the time. While Iceage is known for its hardcore noise-rock intensity, Marching Church is a more eclectic, freewheeling outlet that incorporates acid jazz and soul in an emotionally charged electro-rock odyssey. This week, Sonoma County promoter Shock City, USA continues its run of hosting exciting international punk and rock shows in Santa Rosa, and welcomes Marching Church to the Arlene Francis Center on Jan. 16. Joining the Danish rockers is Canadian artist Bernardino Femminielli, who provocatively mixes industrial noise, drone and disco synths while taking on the mystic persona of a dystopian crooner. San Francisco noise band CCR Headcleaner opens the show with a ripping set of loud sounds. Marching Church performs on Monday, Jan. 16, at Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa. 7pm. $12. 707.528.3009.—Charlie Swanson

MARIN COUNTY Ali Akbar College of Music

Jan 14, Manik Khan and Gaayatri Kaundinya. 215

West End Ave, San Rafael. 415.454.6372.

The Belrose

Second Wednesday of every month, Ragtime jam. Thurs,


open mic night. 1415 Fifth Ave, San Rafael. 415.454.6422.

Thurs, Fri, live music. 18 Tamalpais Dr, Corte Madera. 415.927.2316.

Fenix

Jan 12, Deep Blue Jam. Jan 13, Eric Wiley Band. Jan 14, Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs. Jan 15, 11:30am, Sunday Brunch with Joan Getz. Jan 17, the Rhythm Rangers. Jan 18, pro blues jam. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

George’s Nightclub

Jan 13, Al Smith Band and the Swerve. Jan 14, DJ Marroquin. Jan 17, hip-hop open mic. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Grazie Restaurant

Jan 14, Kurt Huget and Peter Penhallow. 823 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.897.5181.

HopMonk Novato

Jan 13, A License to Chill. Jan 14, Year Sure Whatever and Staring At Stars. Jan 18, open mic night with the Struts. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

INCAVO Wine Tasting & Collective

Tues, 7pm, Open Mic Night with Simon Costa. 1099 Fourth St, Ste F, San Rafael. 415.259.4939.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery

Jan 11, Tom Finch Trio. Jan 18, Skillet Licorice. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Marin Country Mart

Jan 13, 5:30pm, Friday Night Jazz with Robby Elfman Trio. 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur.

19 Broadway Club

Jan 12, Bernal Beat. Jan 13, 5:30pm, Neck & Neck. Jan 13, 9pm, the Happys with Friends on Fire. Jan 14, 5:30pm, the Restless Sons. Jan 14, 9pm, San Francisco Airship. Jan 15, 4pm, Erika Alstrom with Dale Alstrom’s Jazz Society. Jan 15, 8pm, the Rivertown Trio. Jan 16, open mic. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar

Jan 12, Harmonic Law. Jan 13, Michael Aragon Quartet. Jan 14, KC Filson Band. Jan 15, Migrant Pickers and friends. Jan 16, Kimrea & the Dreamdogs. Jan 17, open mic. Jan 18, Jimi James Band. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Osteria Divino

Jan 11, Lilan Kane. Jan 12,

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Jan 11, Lady D & the Tramps. Jan 12, Wanda Stafford. Jan 17, Swing Fever. Jan 18, Marianna August. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Peri’s Silver Dollar

Jan 11, the New Sneakers. Jan 12, Mark’s Jam Sammich. Jan 13, Sabbath Lives. Jan 14, Achilles Wheel. Jan 15, Grateful Sundays. Jan 16, Billy D’s open mic. Jan 17, the Good Guys. Jan 18, the Elvis Johnson Soul Revue. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio

Jan 13, the Rivertown Trio. Jan 14, Buck Nickels & Loose Change. Jan 15, 4pm, Wendy DeWitt’s piano party. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Rickey’s

Jan 13, Blue News. Jan 14, Doc Kraft Band. Jan 15, Chime Travelers. 250 Entrada Dr, Novato. 415.883.9477.

Sausalito Seahorse

Wed, Milonga with Marcelo Puig and Seth Asarnow. Jan 12, Marin Jazz Trio. Jan 13, Cole Tate Band. Jan 14, Rolando Morales and Carlos Reyes. Jan 15, 5pm, Mazacote. Jan 17, Noel Jewkes and friends. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899.

Servino Ristorante

Jan 14, Dominic Quin-Harkin. 9 Main St, Tiburon. 415.435.2676.

Smiley’s Schooner Saloon

Jan 13, the 7th Sons. 1000 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.7660. Jan 11, Mark Karan and friends. Jan 12, Cosmic Thursdays with Ross James. Jan 13, Murder Ballads with Greg Loiacono and friends. Jan 13, Tim Bluhm and Jason Crosby. Jan 14, Greg Loiacono and friends. Jan 15, 3pm, “Stories & Songs” with Phil Lesh & the Camp Terrapin Band. Jan 15, 7:30pm, Midnight North. Jan 16, Grateful Monday with Stu Allen and friends. Jan 17, CMac & the Casual Coalition. Jan 18, the Terrapin Family Band. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

Travis Marina

Jan 14, Hot Rod Jukebox. Fort Baker, Sausalito.

NAPA COUNTY Blue Note Napa

Jan 11, 6:30 and 9pm, Lavay Smith & Her Red Hot Skillet Lickers. Jan 18-19, 6:30 and 9pm, Amendola vs Blades with Scott Amendola and Wil Blades. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258. Jan 14, David Correa and Tommy Hill. 1141 First St, Napa. 707.224.6664.

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Jan 14, Jinx Jones & the King Tones. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Napa Valley Roasting Company

Fri, jammin’ and java with Jeffrey McFarland Johnson. 948 Main St, Napa. 707.224.2233.

RaeSet

Spitfire Lounge

Jan 11, David Kelleher. Wed, 5pm, Mike Greensill’s evening jazz. Jan 12, Delphi Freeman Trio. Jan 13, the Ray Charles Project. Jan 14, Total Recall 90s. Jan 18, Craig Corona. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Jan 12, the Overcommitments. Jan 13, Mykal Rose and Reggae Angels. Jan 14, 12pm, Shark Alley Hobos and friends’ tribute to Mikie Lee Prasad. Jan 14, 9pm, Wonderbread 5. Jan 16, open mic with Austin DeLone. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

of Dancing!!!

Call today to schedule. First Lesson Free Conveniently located in Santa Rosa’s Railroad Square 415 Davis Street

,

707-843-3447 ArthurMurraySantaRosa.com

Ca’ Momi Osteria

Jan 11, Howell Mountain Boys. Jan 13, Delta Blues with GretschKat. 3150 B Jefferson St, Napa. 707.666.9028.

Sweetwater Music Hall

Experience the…

Terrapin Crossroads

Jan 12, Acoustically Speaking. Jan 13, Cave Clove. Jan 14, Urban Grass. Jan 16, Epicenter Soundsystem reggaae. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311. Second Thursday of every month, DJ Romestallion. Second Friday of every month, DJ Beset. 848 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.5551.

23

Taste of Rome

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 1 1-17, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Benissimo Ristorante & Bar

Passion Habanera. Jan 13, Gabrielle Cavassa. Jan 14, Walter Earl Trio. Jan 15, J Kevin Durkin. Jan 17, Ian McArdle. Jan 18, Jonathan Poretz. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355.

Silo’s

andwiches • Mediterranean • Curry Chicken • Ham & Brie Melt • Tuna Nicoise • Club Chloé 3883 Airway Drive Ste 145, Santa Rosa 707.528.3095 www.chloesco.com M–F, 8am–5pm Full Catering Menu Available

SATURDAY SPECIAL

BANH XEO (Sizzling Pancake)

Vietnamese rice flour pancake served with organic veggies/herbs $1100

CHICKEN & VEGGIE STEW

Free-range chicken with organic carrots, potatoes, tomato juice served with tumeric rice or bread $1200

320 West 3rd St, Ste G Santa Rosa • 707.595.4447 www.phocrazy.biz

French Tr adi t ion

Savory & Sweet delights cafe • bakery • catering • pop-up dinners

Now Open ‘til Midnight Fri & Sat

Uva Trattoria

Jan 11, Tom Duarte. Jan 12, Gentlemen of Jazz. Jan 13, Jack Pollard and Dan Daniels with Party of Three. Jan 14, Jackie and friends. Jan 15, Nate Lopez. Jan 18, Trio Solea. 1040 Clinton St, Napa. 707.255.6646.

VIETNAMESE CUISINE

Weds–Sun 7–4pm 4552 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol 95472 707.823.3122 ~ pascalinefinecatering.com


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JANUARY 1 1-17, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

24

Arts Events RECEPTIONS Jan 14

MarinMOCA, “Hidden,” juried exhibition featuring the artists of MarinMOCA explores the concept of concealed or disguised imagery. 5pm. 500 Palm Dr, Novato. . 415.506.0137.

Upstairs Art Gallery, “Sunrise in Sonoma County,” artist Laura Roney’s landscape paintings capture the first light of the day. 2pm. 306 Center St, Healdsburg. 707.431.4214.

Jan 16

Riverfront Art Gallery, “Photoshopped or Not?” Riverfront Gallery co-owner and photographer Lance Kuehne shows new work that concentrates on magnificent and vibrant local landscapes. 5pm. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. . 707.775.4ART.

Area Arts Gallery, “Beatles Cartoon Pop Art Show,” animator Ron Campbell, director of the 1960’s Saturday Morning Beatles Cartoon series and the film “Yellow Submarine,” appears, exhibits and talks cartoons. 5pm. 105 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.541.6521.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, “Eye of the Beholder & Graphic Knowledge,” dual exhibits feature the sculpture and early prints of post-war artist Nathan Oliveira and the prints of Karl Kasten. 6pm. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.939.SVMA.

Jan 18

Galleries SONOMA COUNTY Art Museum of Sonoma County Through Jan 29, “Faith Ringgold: An American Artist,” features storyquilts, works on paper, tankas, soft sculpture and original illustrations from the African-American artist. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.579.1500.

Arts Guild of Sonoma Through Jan 31, “Annual Invitational Exhibition,” Arts Guild of Sonoma kicks off its 40th anniversary year with this popular show. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. Wed-Thurs and SunMon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

Charles M. Schulz Museum Through Jan 16, “Peanuts & the Picture of Health,” showcase looks at the sporty and active pursuits playfully depicted in the panels of Peanuts. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa.

Steele Lane Community Center, “Santa Rosa Photographic Society Members’ Show,” featuring photographs in a wide variety of styles and subjects. 4pm. 415 Steele Ln, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3282.

Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

City Hall Council Chambers Through Jan 12, “Increasingly Precious,” Catherine Richardson’s artwork is fueled by research, emotions, imagination and her observations from flying over Greenland during her annual journeys between UK and California. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Finley Community Center Through Jan 26, “Alchemy + Stitches,” Kristin Meuser combines loves of chemistry and machinery in her fantastical art. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 6; Sat, 9 to 11am. 707.543.3737.

Graton Gallery Through Jan 29, “New Paintings by Sandra Rubin & Thea Goldstine,” with several guest artists also displaying. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. TuesSat, 10:30 to 6; Sun, 10:30 to 4. 707.829.8912.

Hammerfriar Gallery

Through Jan 28, “Small Works Show,” eight artists display a variety of small paintings, sculptures and multimedia works to deck your walls and tables. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Through Jan 15, “Toute Petite,” a unique exhibit and affordable art sale for the holidays. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Redwood Cafe

Through Jan 17, “The Odd Spirits Group Show,” a selection of mixed-media paintings and prints from artists Dan Howard, Rich Ressler, Michael Coy and others. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. Open daily. 707.795.7868.

Sebastopol Gallery

Through Jan 31, “An Invitation to Imagine,” new folkloric paintings from artist Teri Sloat. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

MARIN COUNTY Desta Art & Tea Gallery

Through Jan 15, “Reality, Memory & Fiction,” exhibit of paintings by Stephen Namara features people, objects and landscapes seen as snapshots of his life. 417 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. Mon-Sat, 10 to 6 415.524.8932.

Gallery Route One

Through Jan 22, “Tell Tales,” Madeline Nieto Hope’s repurposed art shows in the Center Gallery, while “The Inverness Almanac: Collective Retrospective” shows in the project space and Isis Hockenos’ “She Said She Said” shows in the annex. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Community Foundation

Through Jan 13, “Om Prakash: Intuitive Nature,” renowned Indian artist’s abstract paintings display. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Marty Knapp Photo Gallery

Through Jan 16, “The Night

Sky,” Knapp shows new photographs of the starry skies above the Point Reyes coast and the deserts of Southern California. 11245 Shoreline Hwy, Point Reyes Station. Fri-Sun, 11am to 5pm. 415.663.8670.

new, used, vintage and rare guitars. Attendees may bring in items to sell or trade. Jan 14-15. $20. Marin Center Exhibit Hall, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts

Laguna Environmental Center hosts an open house with a theme about ducks and other waterfowl. Includes educational displays and hands-on activities for all ages. Jan 14, 11am. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Through Jan 26, “Annual Members’ Show,” O’Hanlon Gallery presents their members’ show with a special auxiliary show at the Mill Valley Community Center. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Ducks Day

Popular psychic medium and bestselling author returns to Santa Rosa for an intimate afternoom of readings and more. Jan 15, 12pm. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Rustic Bakery

Harlem Globetrotters

Through Jan 31, “California Colors,” plein air oil paintings by Laura Culver boast vibrant colors and light. 2017 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larksput. 415.461.9900.

Throckmorton Theatre

Through Jan 31, Mary Black & Millicent Tomkins,” the two artists share wall pace and present their latest abstract encaustics and magical realism works of art. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Comedy Keith Lowell Jensen

The standup engages with his new funny and emotional show, “Not for Rehire.” Jan 13, 8pm. $18-$25. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Mark Pitta & Charles Fleischer

A comedic one-two punch of laughs is in the works. Jan 14, 8pm. $36 and up. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Trivia & Standup Night Trivia contest is followed by a headlining standup set from popular comedian Will Durst. Jan 17, 8pm. 19 Broadway Club, 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Events Bay Area World Guitar Show

International show features

Prayer Flags for Reconciliation

Gather together in a sacred space and create positive, powerful words and images onto prayer flags, which will go to peace rallies and display in public venues. RSVP requested. Jan 15, 1pm. $10 donation. St Stephen’s Church, 500 Robinson Rd, Sebastopol. 707.823.1131.

John Edward

Through Jan 27, “Abstract Works on Canvas,” group exhibition features Beatrice Findlay, Jeffrey Long, Michael Moon, Richard Saba and Geoffrey Williams. 301 Caledonia St, Sausalito. Mon-Fri, 10 to 5. 415.331.2800.

Robert Allen Fine Art

popular Sonoma performer’s family in time of illness. Jan 14, 12pm. $10. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

The world-famous basketball ambassadors of good will play two exhibition games in Santa Rosa on the heels of setting nine Guinness world records. Wed, Jan 11 and Wed, Jan 18. $32 and up. Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 866.777.8932.

Heroes in Heels

A memorable evening of socializing, a silent auction, raffle and entertainment raises awareness of human trafficking. Jan 14, 7pm. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Martin Luther King Jr Birthday Celebration

Annual community event features a panel discussion, performance by positive hiphop artist Jacqueline Lawrence and other activities based on King’s messages of love and peace. Jan 15, 6:30pm. Free. SRHS Performing Arts Auditorium, 1235 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

The Peking Acrobats

China’s most gifted tumblers, contortionists, jugglers, cyclists and gymnasts perform a family-friendly show with live musical accompaniment. Jan 17, 6:30pm. $16-$21. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Fun-Raising Fundraiser for Popo

Fun event for the whole family includes music, magic, carnival, face painting and a silent auction to help the

Field Trips Bird Walk in Bodega Bay Search the harbor, adjacent seas and woodlands for birds, including Doran County Park. Led by Madrone Audubon Society. Wed, Jan 18, 8:30am. Bodega Bay Harbor, East Shore Rd, Bodega Bay, madroneaudubon.org.

Coho Salmon Creek Walk Tour

Explore the Lagunitas Creek watershed and learn about the ecology of the endangered native population of coho salmon. Sat, Jan 14, 12:30pm. $35. Samuel P Taylor State Park, Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Lagunitas, catie@tirn.net.

MLK Day Hike

A family-friendly day in the park. Jan 16, 10am. Sugarloaf Ridge State Park, 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood. 707.833.5712.

Sunrise Natural History Walk

Walk includes several sites along the Laguna not normally open to the public, where waterfowl love to hang out. Pre-registration required. Jan 15, 7:30am. $30. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Film Circus Rosaire

Tiburon Film Society hosts a screening of the documentary about a traditional family circus nine generations in the making. Jan 12, 6:30pm. Free. Belvedere-Tiburon Library, 1501 Tiburon Blvd, Tiburon. 415.789.2665.


Greening the Desert

Yours, Mine & Ours The classic comedy about a big family headed by Lucille Ball and Henry Fonda opens Sebastiani’s 14th annual Vintage Film Series. Jan 16, 7pm. $10. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

IZ: The Man & His Music

Documentary about the Hawai’ian star gets a screening followed by discussion with Hawaiʻian culture scholar Constance Hale. Jan 18, 6:30pm. Free. Diesel Bookstore, 2419 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.785.8177.

Muscle Shoals

Cameo’s film class series looks at the documentary about a place filled with magic and music, legend and folklore. Jan 17, 1pm. $10. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.9779.

Painting Bolinas

O’Hanlon Center kicks off its Art Film Fridays series with a colorful documentary about the late eccentric Bolinas artist Peter Lee Brownlee. Jan 13, 7pm. $5. O’Hanlon Center for the Arts, 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.4331.

The Roots Awaken

Documentary about indigenous youth around the world rising up to defend their territory and maintain their cultures gets a screening, with filmmaker Kumiko Hayashi on hand for discussion. Jan 12, 7pm. by donation. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

The Student & Mr Henri

Food & Drink Calistoga’s Winter in the Wineries Purchase a passport to tour, taste wine and meet winemakers at several heralded wineries, both large and small, in and around the town at the top of Napa Valley. Through Feb 5. $50. Calistoga wineries, various locations, Calistoga, visitcalistoga.com.

Japanese Farm Dinner Nancy Singleton Hachisu hosts a dinner inspired by her life on a Japanese farm and her books. Jan 18, 6pm. $75-$95. Healdsburg Shed, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

Lunch & Learn Monthly resource for Napa Valley seniors includes lively educational activity and healthy lunch. Reservations required. Third Wed of every month, 11am. Calistoga Community Center, 1307 Washington St, Calistoga. 707.341.3185.

The Pope of Foam

An elderly curmudgeon lets out a room in his apartment rentfree to a student on condition that she ruins his son’s marriage. Jan 14, 7pm. $10. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Beer scholar Charles Bamforth offers a talk, with tastings from Bear Republic Brewery and light bites from the SHED kitchen. Jan 12, 7pm. $15. Healdsburg Shed, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

This Changes Everything

Wine & Charcuterie

Sustainable Fairfax screens the imaginative film that weaves personal stories around the theme of the vast challenge of climate change. Jan 13, 7pm. $10. Fairfax Women’s Center, 46 Park Rd, Fairfax.

Windsor Independent Film Fest

Annual showcase promotes independent filmmakers, with an emphasis on local talent. Jan 13-14. $12-$75. Windsor High School, 8695 Windsor Rd, Windsor. www.windsorfest. com.

A delicious and educational afternoon with Belcampo Meat Co. CEO and co-founder Anya Fernald. Jan 15, 4pm. $55. Healdsburg Shed, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

Winter WINEland Wine Road’s annual event lets you meet winemakers and taste limited productions at over 100 wineries. All wineries are offering sales and some will offer food pairings. Jan 1415, 11am. $45-$60. Wine Road wineries, various locations, Healdsburg, wineroad.com.

25

Lectures Climate Change Lecture Series

Jan 17, 7pm. Aqus Cafe, 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Have a Healthy Body

No matter how busy you are, Dr. Shiroko offers practical suggestions that are easy and fun. Jan 11, 6pm. $20. Hotel Healdsburg, 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Healing Food Basics

Healthy living lecture focuses on tips for eating well on a budget and foods to add and avoid in your diet. Jan 13, 3:30pm. Cloverdale Library, 401 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.5271.

Peace Corps Orientation

Recruiter Barbara Smith offers an informative chat about short and long-term service opportunities with the Peace Corps. Jan 18, 12pm. Civic Center Library, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 415.473.6058.

Pilgrimage: Camino de Santiago

Joe and Marisa Jennings discuss how best to prepare for, experience and return from a secular, or spiritual journey to Santiago de Compostela. Jan 13, 12pm. Civic Center Library, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 415.473.6058.

Stories Beyond the Spotlight

Author, poet and legendary bassist Tony Levin shares four decades of stories from the road and recording studios. Jan 15, 7pm. $35-$40. Silo’s, 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Wild Napa

Learn about the amazing adaptability and resilience of coyotes from wildlife coordinator Keli Hendricks. Jan 11, 7pm. Free. Napa Main Library, 580 Coombs St, Napa. 707.253.4070.

Readings Book Passage

Jan 11, 7pm, “How to Talk So Little Kids Will Listen” with Julie King. Jan 11, 7pm, “Swing Time” with Zadie Smith. $30. Jan 12, 7pm, “A Really Good Day” with Ayelet Waldman. Jan 13, 7pm, “The Lost City of the Monkey God” with Douglas Preston. Jan 14, 4pm,

PEAK PERFORMANCE China’s acclaimed Peking Acrobats amaze audiences on Tuesday, Jan. 17, at the Luther Burbank Center for the Arts in Santa Rosa. See Events, adjacent page. Mock Caldecott, get a jump on the annual literary awards with wine and discussion. Reservations required. $20. Jan 17, 7pm, “The Art of Community” with Charles Vogl. Jan 18, 7pm, “The Art of Play” with Joan Staford. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Calistoga Copperfield’s Books

Jan 13, 7pm, “I Am Jim Henson” with Brad Meltzer. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Jan 17, 7pm, “The Portable Veblen” with Elizabeth McKenzie. 1330 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga 707.942.1616.

Coffee Catz

Jan 15, 12pm, Poetry Open Mic with Sher and John Christian. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol 707.829.6600.

di Rosa

Jan 18, 7pm, “Welcome to Painterland” with Anastasia Aukeman, talk and signing happens in conjunction with the currently showing “Based on a True Story” exhibit. $10. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa 707.226.5991.

Dr Insomnia’s Coffee & Teas

Second Wednesday of every month, 7pm, “Poetry Farm” with local writers, bring your own poetry to read. 800 Grant Ave, Novato 415.897.9500.

Levin & Company

Jan 12, 4pm, “The Unsavory Critic: A Pinky & Bear Mystery” with Ken Dalton. 306 Center St, Healdsburg 707.433.1118.

Napa Bookmine

Jan 14, 7pm, “World of Made and Unmade” with Jane Mead. 964 Pearl St, Napa 707.733.3199.

Jan 15, 12pm, “TreeGirl” with Julianne Skai Arbor, book launch includes photo exhibit, slide show presentation and live music. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental 707.874.9392.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books

Readers’ Books

Jan 12, 7pm, “Crooked Smile” with Terri Tate. 130 E Napa St, Sonoma 707.939.1779.

Theater Becoming Dr. Ruth

Humorous and life-affirming one-woman play starring Ann Woodhead tells the story of Dr Ruth, America’s most famous sex therapist. Through Jan 22. $15-$30. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.0177.

Emilie

Ross Valley Players welcomes Lauren Gunderson, a playwright in residence at Marin Theatre Company, to bring 18th century noblewoman Emilie du Châtelet to life in a night of theater you won’t soon forget. Jan 13-Feb 5. $10 and up. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

Feisty Old Jew

San Francisco playwright and performer Charlie Varon

presents his hit one-man show. Jan 13-15. $50. Lucky Penny Community Arts Center, 1758 Industrial Way, Napa. 707.266.6305.

Murder at Joe’s Speakeasy

Get a Clue Productions presents an interactive murder-mystery dinner theater show set in the Roaring Twenties. Fri, Jan 13, 7pm. $68. Charlie’s Restaurant, Windsor Golf Club, 1320 19th Hole Dr, Windsor, getaclueproductions. com.

Red Hot Mama

The acclaimed one-woman musical biography of Sophie Tucker comes alive with the sights and sounds of Broadway, vaudeville and Las Vegas nightclubs. Through Jan 29. $25-$40. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Stage Kiss

Charming play about two actors with an amorous history cast as romantic leads in 1930s melodrama has North Bay premiere. Jan 13-Feb 5. 6th Street Playhouse, 52 West Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 1 1-17, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

The short documentary about turning inhospitable deserts into flourishing habitats in Jordan and Qatar gets a screening and discussion. Jan 12, 7pm. by donation. Peace & Justice Center, 467 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.575.8902.


THE

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JANUARY 1 1-17, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

26

Nugget

Top Crop No matter how you slice it, cannabis is big bucks BY PHILLIP SMITH

C

alifornia’s agricultural bounty is fabled, from the endless olive and almond groves of the Central Valley to the worldclass grapes of the Napa Valley. But the biggest crop in California’s agricultural cornucopia is cannabis. According to a report last month in the Orange County Register, California’s marijuana crop is not only the most valuable agricultural product in the nation’s number one ag state, it totally blows away the competition. Using cash farm receipt data from the state Department of Food and Agriculture for ag crops and its own estimate of in-state pot production, the Register pegs the value of California’s marijuana crop at more than the top five leading agricultural commodities combined. Here’s how it breaks down, in billions of dollars: marijuana, $23.3; milk, $6.28; almonds, $5.33; grapes, $4.95; cattle, $3.39; lettuce, $2.25. That estimate of $23.3 billion for

the pot crop is humongous, and it’s nearly three times what the industry investors the Arcview Group estimated the size of the state’s legal market would be in the near post-legalization era. So how did the Register come up with that figure? The newspaper extrapolated from seizures of pot plants, which have averaged more than 2 million a year in the state for the past five years, and, citing the UN Office on Drugs and Crime, used the common heuristic that seizures account for only 10 to 20 percent of drugs produced. That led to an estimate of 13.2 million plants grown in the state in 2015 (with 2.6 million destroyed), based on the high-end 20 percent figure. The report then assumed that each plant would produce one pound of pot at a market price of $1,765 a pound. Outdoor plants can produce much more than a pound, but indoor plants may only produce a few ounces, so the onepound average figure is conservative. The $1,765 per pound farm gate price is probably optimistic, especially for outdoor grown marijuana, which sells for less than indoor. And maybe law enforcement in California is damned good at sniffing out pot crops and seizes a higher proportion of the crop than the rule of thumb would suggest. Still, even if the cops seized 40 percent of the crop and farmers only got $1,000 a pound, the crop would still be valued at $8 billion and still be at the top of the farm revenue heap. That’s a phenomenon that’s not going to stop when California’s legal marijuana market goes into full effect. It’s not going to stop until people in states like Illinois and Florida and New York can grow their own. In the meantime, California pot growers are willing to take the risk if it brings the green. Phillip Smith lives in Sebastopol and is editor of the AlterNet Drug Reporter and author of the ‘Drug War Chronicle.’


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ARIES (March 21–April 19) In Norse mythology, Yggdrasil is a huge holy tree that links all of the nine worlds to each other. Perched on its uppermost branch is an eagle with a hawk sitting on its head. Far below, living near the roots, is a dragon. The hawk and eagle stay in touch with the dragon via Ratatoskr, a talkative squirrel who runs back and forth between the heights and the depths. Alas, Ratatoskr traffics solely in insults. That’s the only kind of message the birds and the dragon ever have for each other. In accordance with the astrological omens, Aries, I suggest you act like a far more benevolent version of Ratatoskr in the coming weeks. Be a feisty communicator who roams far and wide to spread uplifting gossip and energizing news. TAURUS (April 20–May 20) You have a divine

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mandate to love bigger and stronger and truer than ever before. It’s high time to freely give the gifts you sometimes hold back from those you care for. It’s high time to take full ownership of neglected treasures so you can share them with your worthy allies. It’s high time to madly cultivate the generosity of spirit that will enable you to more easily receive the blessings that can and should be yours. Be a brave, softhearted warrior of love!

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) I love and respect Tinker Bell, Kermit the Frog, Shrek, Wonder Woman, SpongeBob SquarePants, Snow White, Road Runner, and Calvin and Hobbes. They have provided me with much knowledge and inspiration. Given the current astrological omens, I suspect that you, too, can benefit from cultivating your relationships with characters like them. It’s also a favorable time for you to commune with the spirits of Harriet Tubman, Leonardo da Vinci, Marie Curie or any other historical figures who inspire you. I suggest you have dreamlike conversations with your most interesting ancestors, as well. Are you still in touch with your imaginary friends from childhood? If not, renew acquaintances. CANCER (June 21–July 22) “I never wish to be easily defined,” wrote Cancerian author Franz Kafka. “I’d rather float over other people’s minds as something fluid and non-perceivable; more like a transparent, paradoxically iridescent creature rather than an actual person.” Do you ever have that experience? I do. I’m a Crab like you, and I think it’s common among members of our tribe. For me, it feels liberating. It’s a way to escape people’s expectations of me and enjoy the independence of living in my fantasies. But I plan to do it a lot less in 2017, and I advise you to do the same. We should work hard at coming all the way down to earth. We will thrive by floating less and being better grounded; by being less fuzzy and more solid; by not being so inscrutable, but rather more knowable. LEO (July 23–August 22) Here’s my declaration: “I hereby forgive, completely and permanently, all motorists who have ever irked me with their rude and bad driving. I also forgive, totally and forever, all techsupport people who have insulted me, stonewalled me or given me wrong information as I sought help from them on the phone. I furthermore forgive, utterly and finally, all family members and dear friends who have hurt my feelings.” Now would be a fantastic time for you to do what I just did, Leo: Drop grudges, let go of unimportant outrage, and issue a blanket amnesty. Start with the easier stuff—the complaints against strangers and acquaintances—and work your way up to the allies you cherish. VIRGO (August 23–September 22) There are some authors who both annoy me and intrigue me. Even though I feel allergic to the uncomfortable ideas they espouse, I’m also fascinated by their unique provocations. As I read their words, I’m half-irritated at their grating declarations, and yet greedy for more. I disagree with much of what they say, but feel grudgingly grateful for the novel perspectives they prod me to discover. (Nobel Prize-winner Elias Canetti is one such author.) In accordance with the current astrological rhythms, Virgo, I invite you to seek out similar influences—for your own good! LIBRA (September 23–October 22)

Now would

be an excellent time to add new beauty to your home. Are there works of art or buoyant plants or curious symbols that would lift your mood? Would you consider hiring a feng shui consultant to rearrange the furniture and accessories so as to enhance the energetic flow? Can you entice visits from compelling souls whose wisdom and wit would light up the place? Tweak your imagination so it reveals tricks about how to boost your levels of domestic bliss.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

In 2017, you will have unprecedented opportunities to reimagine, revise and reinvent the story of your life. You’ll be able to forge new understandings about your co-stars and reinterpret the meanings of crucial plot twists that happened once upon a time. Now check out these insights from author Mark Doty: “The past is not static, or ever truly complete; as we age we see from new positions, shifting angles. A therapist friend of mine likes to use the metaphor of the kind of spiral stair that winds up inside a lighthouse. As one moves up that stair, the core at the center doesn’t change, but one continually sees it from another vantage point; if the past is a core of who we are, then our movement in time always brings us into a new relation to that core.”

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) The Tao Te Ching is a poetically philosophical text written by a Chinese sage more than two millennia ago. Numerous authors have translated it into modern languages. I’ve borrowed from their work to craft a horoscope that is precisely suitable for you in the coming weeks. Here’s your high-class fortune cookie oracle: Smooth your edges, untangle your knots, sweeten your openings, balance your extremes, relax your mysteries, soften your glare, forgive your doubts, love your breathing, harmonize your longings and marvel at the sunny dust.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) I recently discovered Tree of Jesse, a painting by renowned 20th-century artist Marc Chagall. I wanted to get a copy to hang on my wall. But as I scoured the internet, I couldn’t find a single business that sells prints of it. Thankfully, I did locate an artist in Vietnam who said he could paint an exact replica. I ordered it, and was pleased with my new objet d’art. It was virtually identical to Chagall’s original. I suggest you meditate on taking a metaphorically similar approach, Capricorn. Now is a time when substitutes may work as well as what they replace. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) “It is often safer to be in chains than to be free,” wrote Franz Kafka. That fact is worthy of your consideration in the coming weeks, Aquarius. You can avoid all risks by remaining trapped inside the comfort that is protecting you. Or you can take a gamble on escaping, and hope that the new opportunities you attract will compensate you for the sacrifice it entails. I’m not here to tell you what to do. I simply want you to know what the stakes are. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

“All pleasures are in the last analysis imaginary, and whoever has the best imagination enjoys the most pleasure.” So said 19th-century German novelist Theodor Fontane, and now I’m passing his observation on to you. Why? Because by my astrological estimates, you Pisceans will have exceptional imaginations in 2017—more fertile, fervent and freedom-loving than ever before. Therefore, your capacity to drum up pleasure will also be at an all-time high. There is a catch, however. Your imagination, like everyone else’s, is sometimes prone to churning out superstitious fears. To take maximum advantage of its bliss-inducing potential, you will have to be firm about steering it in positive directions.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

27 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 1 1-17, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

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January 11-17, 2017

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