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SERVING SONOMA & NAPA COUNTIES | NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016 | BOHEMIAN.COM • VOL. 38.30

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

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DOOMSDAY DEVICE

nb Future chronicles record ours as the epoch the dimensions ruptured, p13.

‘They’re hungry for creative solutions instead of doom and gloom.’ A RTS & IDEAS P26

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Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

Long May It Wave

liberals/statists whose primary objective is to expand the role of government and its intrusiveness into the lives and liberties of all.

Cool. I’m a Libertarian, and we use the Gadsden flag to represent our values (“Local Goods,” Nov. 23). We are not right-wingers. More centered and believe in pro-choice and individual rights to privacy and personal freedoms.

LIBERTY

Via Bohemian.com

JBECK

Via Bohemian.com

That flag could be symbol for anyone, like a Libertarian, who believes that they have a right to be free, i.e., to be left the hell alone. So it doesn’t work for

THIS MODERN WORLD

Adios, Fidel Fidel Castro’s death not only marks the passing of an individual who evoked many feelings among his people and

By Tom Tomorrow

the world, but the end of an era of mid-20th-century politics. One cannot separate the emotional and political impact he had on the world. “Revolutionaries” manifest in reaction to oppressive conditions (which Cuba had been experiencing for decades) and cannot succeed without the dissatisfaction of the majority of its people. History will record both the successes and failures of Cuban policy, both domestic and foreign. My hope is that as Cuba enters the 21st century in a globally connected world, the positive achievements under Castro are not forgotten by its people, especially education and healthcare.

E. G. SINGER

Santa Rosa

Love Trumps What? The support for $hillary, a tool of George Soros, AIPAC and Goldman Sachs, shows how utterly bankrupt, clueless and hypocritical the “progressive left” is. Hillary’s trade policies (she desired fast-tracking the TPP) and bellicose foreign policy, an attack on Iran, pushing Russia to the brink of war and endless “humanitarian interventions” sure sound like “Love Trumps Hate” doesn’t it?

CHRISTOPHER DONNELLAN Via Facebook

Dept. of Corrections Last week’s Open Mic (“Standing Tall,” Nov. 23) misstated the cost of the Dakota Access Pipeline. It is $3.8 billion. The Bohemian regrets the error.

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


Community Asset A plea to keep the lights on at CMedia BY JAKE WARD

T

his Tuesday, Dec. 6, the Santa Rosa City Council will hear a recommendation from city staff to terminate Santa Rosa’s contract with the Community Media Center, aka CMedia, and immediately dissolve the local organization.

As a lifelong citizen of Santa Rosa and a contributor to various CMedia film and TV projects, I believe this organization is an indispensable community asset for arts, education and documentation of local government meetings. Moreover, I believe that independent media outlets are a vital pillar of our freedom of speech, and to dissolve a local public access organization that has been serving Santa Rosa for the last 20 years would be a terrible loss. In early November, the CMedia board fired its executive director based on the discovery of what they perceived to be inappropriate activity on CMedia’s financial account. Three weeks later, city auditors discovered that a total of $330,000 in city funds were missing and questioned numerous meal and bar tabs charged to the nonprofit’s credit card by its former executive director Daedalus Howell (an occasional contributor to the Bohemian). This apparently led city staff to recommend shutting the organization down. Whatever the full story, I think that instantly pulling the plug on our media center after alleged financial activities of its former director would be an unfortunate decision. You don’t shut down an arts program because of management problems. How would you justify shutting down CMedia to its producers, who rely on its resources to practice their craft? To the board members who have been fighting to run the organization transparently? And to the staff who will all lose their jobs, and in the midst of the holidays? If the city council decides to eliminate CMedia at its Dec. 6 meeting, the voices of the people who utilize the center will be silenced and the facility will be vacant Dec 7. One day’s notice. Given the boot. After 20 years. I believe that Santa Rosa should firmly reject this proposal and keep the media center alive, and I encourage everyone to write letters to citycouncil@srcity.org and attend Tuesday’s city council meeting. Jake Ward is a Santa Rosa music and arts promoter and founder of North Bay Caberet. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

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Rants

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Paper THE

¨ CALIFORNIA UBER ALLES California has higher taxes and more regulations than many states that went for Trump. So why

isn’t it the economic basketcase that conservative foes of taxes and regulations say it should be?

Left Coast Rising Will California make America great again? BY ROBERT REICH

C

alifornia is now the capital of liberal America. Along with its neighbors Oregon and Washington, it will be a nation within the nation starting in January when the federal government goes dark. In sharp contrast to much of the rest of the country, Californians preferred Hillary Clinton over Donald Trump, by a 2–1 margin.

They also voted to extend a state tax surcharge on the wealthy, and adopt local housing and transportation measures along with a slew of local tax increases and bond proposals. In other words, California is the opposite of Trumpland. The differences go even deeper. For years, conservatives have been saying that a healthy economy depends on low taxes, few regulations and low wages. Are conservatives right? At one end of the scale are

Kansas and Texas, with among the nation’s lowest taxes, fewest regulations and lowest wages. At the other end is California, with among the nation’s highest taxes, especially on the wealthy; toughest regulations, particularly when it comes to the environment; most ambitious healthcare system, that insures more than 12 million poor Californians, in partnership with Medicaid; and highest wages. So according to conservative doctrine, Kansas and Texas ought

to be booming, and California ought to be in the pits. Actually, it’s just the opposite. For several years, Kansas’ rate of economic growth has been the worst in the nation. Last year its economy actually shrank. Texas hasn’t been doing all that much better. Its rate of job growth has been below the national average. Retail sales are way down. The value of Texas exports has been dropping. But what about so-called overtaxed, overregulated, highwage California? The state leads the nation in the rate of economic growth—more than twice the national average. If it were a separate nation, California would now be the sixth largest economy in the world. Its population has surged to 39 million (up 5 percent since 2010). California is home to the nation’s fastest-growing and most innovative industries— entertainment and high-tech. It incubates more startups than anywhere else in the world. In other words, conservatives have it exactly backward. Why are Kansas and Texas doing so badly, and California so well? For one thing, taxes enable states to invest in their people. The University of California is the best system of public higher education in America. Add in the state’s network of community colleges, state colleges and research institutions, and you have an unparalleled source of research and powerful engine of upward mobility. Kansas and Texas haven’t been investing nearly to the same extent. California also provides services to a diverse population, including a large percentage of immigrants. Donald Trump to the contrary, such diversity is a huge plus. Both Hollywood and Silicon Valley have thrived on the ideas and energies of new immigrants. Meanwhile, California’s regulations protect the public health and the state’s natural beauty, which also draws people to the state—including talented people who could settle anywhere. Wages are high in California because the economy is growing so fast that employers have to pay more for workers. That’s not a bad


I’m not sure how Trumpland and California will coexist in coming years. But overall, the contrast is clear. Economic success depends on tax revenues that go into public investments, and regulations that protect the environment and public health. And true economic success results in high wages. I’m not sure how Trumpland and California will coexist in coming years. I’m already hearing murmurs of secession by Golden Staters, and of federal intrusions by the incipient Trump administration. But so far, California gives lie to the conservative dictum that low taxes, few regulations and low wages are the keys to economic success. Trumpland should take note. Robert B. Reich has served in three national administrations, most recently as secretary of labor under President Bill Clinton. This article originally appeared on Alternet.com.

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D EBRIEF ER A Hard Place U.S. Rep. Jared Huffman has again teamed up with Arizona Rep. Raul Grijalva and issued a call to the White House and the Department of Justice to resolve the tense and dangerous Dakota Access Pipeline standoff in North Dakota. Huffman, the ranking Democrat on the Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water, Power and Oceans, says his role is to make sure that federal water policies don’t cause “grave injustices” to the tribal rights of the Sioux or the rights of protesters. The Army Corps of Engineers put out an “eviction” letter last week directed at protesters, but Huffman says he doesn’t know how the Corps could follow through on it. “It was a poor decision to put out the eviction notice.” Huffman wants a meeting with the White House and DOJ and has already urged Obama to deny an easement through federal land. The pipeline would alternatively get routed over state or private land. Huffman says he wants to make sure the federal government is not complicit in promoting bad policy that goes against the standing or the interests of the Sioux. Meanwhile, the local sheriff’s department near the protest site has deployed water cannons, rubber bullets and tear gas on protesters. It is noteworthy that Trump has a financial interest in Energy Transfer Partners, which is building the $3.8 billion pipeline and which got the local sheriff to attack unarmed Americans exercising their right—for now, anyway—of free assembly.

Scam of the Earth It’s the holiday season and Americans are again trampling each other to death at the midnight-hour, big-box spending orgy. Another beloved holiday tradition: aggressive charlatans head into high gear aiming to rip off the vulnerable, ho ho ho—and Napa County is trying to nip one of their classics in the bud, the Social Security scam. Brad Baker works for the Napa County district attorney in the consumer-protection division, and says the county heard from a senior recently who said a caller had reached out to warn that the senior’s Social Security benefits had been suspended. In order to reactivate the benefits, the caller implored the senior to provide personal information. Bad idea. Baker says anyone who calls and says they are from Social Security is lying. Hang up and call the police. “We got in front of this,” he says. Social Security will never call with a demand for information or a warning about benefits. Speaking of aggressive charlatans—even though no one in Napa is saying so—it could be that U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan has been prank-calling Napa seniors with a hint of what is to come now that It Can Happen Here, and Apparently It Just Did. Ryan has vowed to privatize Social Security, so if his number—202.225.3031— shows up on the caller ID, don’t answer that call! It’s a total scam!—Tom Gogola

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thing. After all, the goal isn’t just growth. It’s a high standard of living. In fairness, Texas’ problems are also linked to the oil bust. But that’s really no excuse, because Texas has failed to diversify its economy. Here again, it hasn’t made adequate investments. California is far from perfect. A housing shortage has driven rents and home prices into the stratosphere. Roads are clogged. Its public schools used to be the best in the nation but are now among the worst—largely because of a proposition approved by voters in 1978 that has strangled local school financing. Much more needs to be done.


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Dining OLD SCHOOL Sonoma Portworks relies on low-tech boot power to stomp their grapes.

You Say ‘Oporto’ . . . I say ‘port’

W

BY JAMES KNIGHT

hen a rich and potent wine like a Zinfandel is called “porty,” the word often drips with disparagement. It’s a good time to remember that, whether you like your Zinfandel crisp and light or super-ripe and sweet, there’s an entire, centuries-old category of respected wines that are exactly that: they’re porty port wines.

Unlike a sweet, late harvest wine, port is made to retain sugar when the fermentation is doused with actual booze—highproof grape brandy. Wine yeast can only continue working up to around 17 percent alcohol by volume (ABV), leaving whatever sugar remains in a late harvest wine, for instance, for the eventual consumer to metabolize. Port wines, though they may be fortified to 20 percent ABV, don’t have to start with particularly overripe grapes.

Port, sometimes called Oporto, doesn’t even have to come from particularly Portuguese grapes, according to Bill Reading, owner of Sonoma Portworks. Reading notes a movement among some wineries to discontinue using the word “port” on their labels. In January of this year, several members of Napa Valley Vintners announced such plans, citing the need to preserve the “Napa” brand by playing nice with other international wine regions. “I don’t think we should be

so cavalier about the use of the word,” says Reading, who points out that port is not an actual place, like the Champagne region. But, Porto, sometimes spelled “Oporto” in English, is a place. “I’m all in favor of protecting the label ‘Oporto,’ and many ports are labeled as such,” says Reading. “But there is no place in Portugal called ‘Port.’” But there is an Oporto. Reading argues that the entire port category was developed and driven by English and colonial markets, including the former American colonies, where portstyle wine has been made for 300 years. The story goes like this: During a spat with the French in the 1600s, Londoners were cut off from their beloved Bordeaux. Sailing farther south, shippers found a ready supply of wine in the ancient Douro region of Portugal, and juiced them up with spirits for the longer return trip. After an overly dulcet vintage, the sweet-toothed English couldn’t get enough of it, and entrepreneurs backed by London banks packed up for Oporto. Sonoma Portworks is one of the few local producers for whom port is not just a sideline, and currently enjoys the “grandfathered” legal right to the word. They also employ a very old and rare method of pressing the wine: foottreading. There’s a brief window of time to press the mass of bubbling, purple muck at the right sugar level, so Reading relies on whatever help is on hand; this evening, it’s a Portworks employee and a Canadian backpacker who happened to poke her head in the door earlier, who don rubber boots and improvise stomping and marching patterns across a wooden platform inside a half-ton macrobin, to the sounds of classic rock. The finished product is delicious with ice cream, says Portworks’ Caryn Reading, but there’s more to pairing with port than dessert. Stilton cheese is a traditional pairing that Point Reyes Bay Blue approximates very well, while Reading says that Cowgirl Creamery’s Mt. Tam inspired one taster to exclaim, “Oh, it tastes like Christmas!”


Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA COUNTY Banshee Wines

Everything’s for sale at rustichipster aesthetic downtown tasting room, including the nicely priced Sonoma Coast Pinot. 325 Center St., Healdsburg. Daily, 11am–7pm. Tasting fee, $15–$30. 707.395.0915.

Eric Kent Wine Cellars Nevermind the art of wine, there’s art on the wine. Limited release Chard, Pinot, Syrah from ad man turned cellar geek. 1014 Hopper Ave., Santa Rosa. Barrel tasting, by appointment only. 707.527.9700.

Gloria Ferrer Winery

(WC) Part of the international Freixenet wine empire, owner Jose Ferrer’s family has been in this business since the 13th century; this tasting room was remodeled in 2015, with new food pairing experiences added. Explore the champagne caves on a guided tour. 23555 Carneros Hwy., Sonoma. Open daily, 10am–5pm. Cave tours at 11am, 1pm and 3pm. 707.996.7256.

Imagery Estate Winery

Results from a 20-year collaboration between winemaker Joe Benziger and artist Bob Nugent. The concept: Commission unique artwork from contemporary artists for each release of often uncommon varietal wines. The wine gets drunk. The art goes on the gallery wall. Not so complicated. Count on the reds and plan to take a stroll down the informative “varietal walk” on the grounds. 14335 Hwy. 12, Glen Ellen. Summer hours, Sunday–Thursday, 10am– 4:30pm; Friday–Saturday, 10am–5pm. 707.935.4515.

Mercury Geyserville

No fee, 20 percent discount for Sonoma County residents and 12-pack wooden crates of mini-jug wine; two turntables, an LP record player–put on your winged shoes, it’s time to party in sleepy Geyserville!

Also pickled comestibles, jam, peppers–and pretty good Pinot, Cab, Cab Franc, and Merlot. 20120 Geyserville Ave., Geyserville. Open daily, 11am– 6pm. No fee. 707.857.9870.

Occidental Road Cellars High-end clients

like Schramsberg and RadioCoteau buy most of the Prathers’ grapes; just 5 percent are made into their own wine, and at a comparative “grower’s discount.” Chard, Pinot, and cool-climate Syrah at its very best. 2064 Gravenstein Hwy. N., Building 7, Sebastopol. By appointment, Saturday 1–4pm. 707.874.9470.

Ridge Vineyards Lytton Springs (WC)

Paul Draper is one of the top five winemakers nationwide. The wines are fabulous and tend to inspire devotion in drinkers. The tasting room is an environmentally conscious structure. 650 Lytton Springs Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–4pm. 707.433.7721.

Rued Winery Folks been farming grapes here since 1880s; the best bottomland Sauvignon Blanc and benchland Zinfandel and Cabernet skimmed from the family’s 160 acres of grapes is offered at comparatively farmstand prices. 3850 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily 11am–4:30pm. Tasting fee $5. 707.433.3261. Selby Winery Regularly

served at White House state dinners, Selby Chard has been through several administrations. 215 Center St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–5:30pm. 707.431.1288.

Soda Rock Winery King suites, water tower room, and rustic barn—all perfect for weddings. Pair the Zinfandel with pancakes in the morning. 8015 Hwy. 128, Healdsburg. Daily, 11am–5pm. Tasting fee, $5. 707.433.3303.

Stonestreet Late wine magnate Jess Jackson took to the hills in a big way. Eight hundred acres, 400 blocks, at elevations up to 2,000 feet. Tasting room is a few-

frills affair, while “mountain excursions” offer views plus Cab and Chardonnay, plus lunch. 7111 Hwy. 128, Healdsburg. Daily, 11am to 4:30pm. $12, $15 and $25; Mountain excursion, $75. 707.433.9463.

NAPA COUNTY

Crab Feeds 2016–2017

FRIDAYS • Dec 2, Dec 16, Jan 13, Jan 27 • Additional Dates TBD

5–9pm ~ $5995 per person + tax & gratuity INCLUDES: Chilled Dungeness Crab ~ Cocktail Sauce Drawn Butter ~ Tides’ Mustard Sauce ~ Clam Chowder Pasta ~ Green Salad ~ French Bread Crab Feed Reservations: 707.875.3652

835 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay • InnattheTides.com • 707.875.3652

The Tides Wharf

Beringer Vineyards

(WC) This historic winery offers 10 daily tours for nominal fees, most of which end gratefully with a glass and a spin through the underground wine-aging tunnels—or, rock it in the Rhine House. Open daily, 10am–6pm (summer hours). 2000 Main St., Napa. 707.963.7115.

Black Stallion Winery

Impressively built winery founded by a pair of Midwest liquor barons and now owned by Delicato Family Vineyards. The wines are quite good. 4089 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open daily, 10am–5pm. Tasting option, $15–$40. 707.253.1400.

catering available— casual to elegant

Chateau Boswell Winery (WC) This small,

boutique winery is open by appointment only, selling most its wine directly via post to club members. 3468 Silverado Trail, Napa. 707.963.5472.

707•545•6900 135 fourth street, santa rosa jacksonsbarandoven.com

Craft Beer!

Fantesca Estate & Winery (WC) Set on land

that was the dowry gift when Charles Krug married in 1860, this estate winery specializing in Cab features a wine-aging cave built right into the side of Spring Mountain. 2920 Spring Mountain Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.968.9229.

Far Niente (WC) Far

Niente was founded in 1885 by John Benson, a ’49er of the California Gold Rush and uncle of the famous American impressionist painter Winslow Homer. The estate boasts beautiful gardens as well as the first modern-built wine caves in North America. 1350 Acacia Drive, Napa. By appointment. 707.944.2861.

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Wineries

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VIETNAMESE CUISINE

SATURDAY SPECIAL

BANH XEO (Sizzling Pancake)

Vietnamese rice flour pancake served with organic veggies/herbs $1100

Korbel

Holiday Shopping Spree Weekend december 4, 5, & 6 10am– 4:30pm • early christmas shopping special sales throughout the weekend! • christmas carolers from 1–3 pm, sat and sun • special appearance by santa claus from 2:30 – 4:00 pm, sat and sun no reservations required, complementary event celebrate responsibly.

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CHICKEN & VEGGIE STEW

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Port Call ‘Bohemian’ staff sample a roundup of local ports and a ringer BY JAMES KNIGHT

P

edroncelli 2011 Four Grapes Dry Creek Valley Port ($20) Although this is a blend of four traditional Portuguese grape varieties, including Touriga Nacional and Tinta Cão, each grown on its own acre, the Pedroncelli is the most reminiscent of a big, ripe and chewy California Cabernet Sauvignon. Fresh and grapey, with flavors of chocolate, currant, plum and raspberry, all noted by Bohemians, this young vintage port doesn’t betray heat or cloying sweetness. Heitz Ink Grade Napa Valley Port ($35) Our runner-up favorite is more complex, suggesting disparate aromas of cigar wrapper and cherry liqueur, its red fruit flavors, though well-rounded with age, driven by a lively line of acidity. Decades ago, before his winery gained fame for pioneering the cult of single-vineyard Cabernet, Joe Heitz also made fortified wines. This is made from a plot of eight port varieties planted in the 1990s. Cockburn’s Special Reserve Porto ($18) Like Graham’s, Dow’s, and Taylor’s, Cockburn’s name isn’t particularly Portuguese in heritage, but they celebrated 200 years in the business in 2015 with this bottling. Nutty, complex and woodsy, with evolving notes of pomegranate, fig and molasses, it’s a classic, silky smooth tipple. Sonoma Portworks 2013 Aris Clarksburg Petit Verdot Port ($34) It isn’t just a few years of aging that lends this juicy port, made from a variety more often seen in Bordeaux-style blends with Cabernet, an intriguing, musty-in-a-good-way aroma of antique store. The grape brandy, distilled next door at Stillwater Spirits, is also aged in a four-barrel, fractional blending solera system before being used to quell the fermentation, adding a woody note of brown booze. Trentadue 2012 Alexander Valley Zinfandel Port ($26) Among the charms of port is that it keeps well in an opened bottle, so you can just have a nip or two over several days, or even weeks. Though three months is a stretch, this Trentadue still stands out among the oxygen-addled survivors of this lineup for its bright, bramble-fruit Zinfandel character. Jammy on the finish, but less cloying than their Petite. Sonoma Portworks 2011 Aris Clarksburg Petite Sirah Port ($38) Portworks owner Bill Reading feels that classic California varietals like Petite Sirah have the potential to make better ports here. This nutty, spicy and chocolate liqueur-toned sipper makes a case—check out Portworks’ newly released, tawny-style port for a smoother, extra-aged rendition. Trentadue 2011 Petite Sirah Port ($26) Intriguing aroma combo of ancient and fruity, like dried plum from the crypt, finishing a little more on the flat and sweet side than some others.


13

An excerpt from ‘The Vault Apocalyptia’

G

ary Brandt’s novel The Vault Apocalyptia started with a dream. Not a dream of writing a book, but an actual dream. Thirty-odd years ago, Brandt dreamt he was on a walking tour of Earth after a nuclear war, smoking ruins and all. He was in a creative writing class at the time, and the dream begot a 10-page short story. That grew into a 100-page novella. In 2002, he embarked on turning his dream into a full-blown novel that he finally finished this summer. And what a novel it is.

The dense, satirical book follows a tour of the National Museum of Nuclear Science & History in Albuquerque, N.M. A chirpy docent leads readers through displays, songs, character studies and texts within texts that add up to an intricately fashioned alternative history of America’s absurdly horrifying atomic age. Brandt’s tone blends Leave It to Beaver–era credulity and advertising hucksterism with a wry sense of

humor about what’s really going on. The expansive, digressive style and delicious wordplay channel James Joyce and Thomas Pynchon. Brandt, by the way, is the Bohemian’s copy editor, but as his book makes clear, he’s a hell of a writer, too. The excerpt below introduces readers to one of the most gleefully drawn characters in the book, the bomb-making prodigy Ruben Boomerkoff. —Stett Holbrook

) 14

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Vault ( 13 e keep first appointment with a man of immense stature and standing in his field. Great discourse has passed on the nature of his work. He verily invites controversy. He is loved. He is loathed. Few go unmoved. One spectator likened him to the gods (rightly so, though whose and which is subject to terrific debate): “That timeless man,” he fathomed, “ageold yet newborn!” He evokes metaphor: “Our common father,” another proclaimed him, and we “his bewildered children.” And swooned one incisive critic in a penetrating review: “An ape palm weighs the newly discovered element fire . . . A frail pink wrist balances the quiet generations to come . . . Never before so simple! Not until now so clear! A must! Flock to!” Still, we gather numerous complaints. Certain taxpayers of sound mind claim our man’s been aiming for years to do them in with that “confounded hardware” of his, and average Joes of no frenetic stripe avow on their honor the hoodwinker has actually threatened them with employment offers making “the front ends of horses” or some such perversity. In truth not a one of us fares brightly under exalted credentials as his. Listen: who taught himself in utero, to pass a dull gestation, the art of knots, convoluting his umbilical in pursuit of the flawless sheepshank, clove hitch, or bowline on the bight; who was the infant savant, a Hermes at the lyre, prattling off at eleven months the lexicons of no less than five major nuclear capable countries; who was the marvel tot, duddy’s little lummikins, in rompers yet and endeavoring nightly to dispel a chronic dyssomnia by enumerating decidedly unconventional sheep: “. . . 86000 seconds to a day, 31536000 seconds to a year, 61859136600 seconds since Jesus who loves me was born in a manger . . .”; who was the adolescent wunderkind, graduate

W

cum laude, Massachusetts Institute of Technology class of seventyeight, hardly a year to the day after a razor first traversed those pimplecongested cheeks; who is the minder of machines, whom the experts call expert, with his inheritance of numbers (“No sweeter manna than a conundrum unraveled,” said he), heuristophile, technolurgist, selfstyled philosophizer—see him? Our genius with the bonus gem, he stirs in waiting just ahead. There in diorama, whitesmocked, hunched, and calculating. Now who, ladies and gentlemen, can that be there? It’s not Doppler. It’s not Wheeler. It’s not Planck. Is it Boltzmann? Is it Bernal? Is it Tesla? Barnhardt or Coulomb? R. Hume or Fizeau? Pascal? Laplace? Is it Kepler, Galileo Galilei? No?—Rube, is that you? Exhibit A. Curious beginnings. A misfortunate end. Rube, the scientist. (With a broadly swept flourish the doctor, puffing, indicates the spread of his study: hissing blue jets kiss beaker bottoms; luminous elixirs in alembics boil; bellows huff; pelicans percolate; PC monitors glow greenly, cursors blinking, as lines of data march upscreen. In actinoponic greenhouses, silent underlings poke and weigh exquisite bloated peanut pods, and inject radiobe fertilizer into sturdy stems of tenfoot Arctic avens. Control group respondents, their cancers cured, file buoyantly toward officious technicians uncapping vials of radithor tonic and administering doses of eonite, meteorium, and cyclotrode X. Muted press men clamor at the panels; above them, cybershuttles, flying wings, orbit ivory spires, smokeless stacks. A harbor is visible. Leaving quays, nucleon schooners ply the corridor, exporting cargoes. Several blocks townward, lining broad bejeweled avenues, stand rows of white houses, roof tiles glittering, terraces dripping vines. Plastic clear autos on clean roadways hum by, skimming hushly. It’s springtime, the suns shine, teens steer mowers over lawn while moms in capris offer limeade in dixie cups to


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bio of father of the atomic bomb Robert Oppenheimer is subject to some tasteless revisionism in ‘The Vault Apocalyptia.’

whistling postmen. Bluebirds trill. Wrens twitter. Downtown, in an immaculate plaza, round public monuments where tourists throng, an orchestra tunes, a parade commences, gongs, kettles, tenor drums echoing the faint rumble from below where the steel dynamos churn . . . ) A breathing testament to inspired fortitude, Rube over the years has drawn resolution from ingenious corners to deftly turn several physiological perversions toward ultimately his fatherland’s behoof. Consider the Rube of nursling years. Beset by developmental aberrations—one, a poorly oriented rooting reflex that provoked the neonatal Rubey at the fragile age of a single hour to nuzzle his sire’s feeble nipple over his mother’s firmer mamma (since deemed premier vocational training, as many in ordnance R and D are now suckled on the ungenial titsap of fatherhood); and the other, a latent third testicle misdiagnosed on first opinion as a lollock and on second as a scirrhoid and which only manifested outright following the onset of puberty (but then as a boon twice over, accountable

for both Rube’s vigorous and inordinate nationalism (surfeit testosterone—it courses more thickly than blood!) and later inclination toward things protractive (like limited response scenarios) and things generative (like warhead delivery systems))—Rube, in firm defiance of ill effect or stigma and favored with a hankering for life of a less tender more gruffish nature, nonetheless went on to prosper from a boyhood not unlike the boyhoods of those destined to serve in either abbey or penitentiary, for how similar indeed are all in youth. Gangly Ruben Boomerkoff, the quintessence of his kin, the flower of his predecessors (the New England Boomerkoffs, née Bombekopf, fine old Saxon stock), whiled a swannish youth in the Cambridge suburbs pursuing under the stewed eye of his father, a widower with too fond a taste for the Islay grain, his three passions: reading in the summer, ice hockey in the winter, and chemistry yearlong. His earliest recollections depict long days decocting pints of fresh whiz into urea precipitates, ) 16

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16 Vault ( 15 compounds of which he used to knock stray pets into slumber. Through the aid of some musty volumes misshelved behind histories of horsies and princes, Alexanders and Akbars in the public library’s Treasure Room, Rube nurtured a precocious fascination with explosives (but only for experiment, as dated police reports will corroborate), beginning with pelleted powder and guncotton and graduating in time to the simpler nitrogen iodides. Few possessions, indeed, gave Rube greater satisfaction than his collection of craters, arranged by row over the backyard lawn, depths and radii exactingly measured and logged in a binder kept pillowside. Mathematics, of course, and its applications engrossed him, for what, he reasoned, wasn’t improved through its precepts? Once, for instance, after observing at practice the varsity softball team, he confidently coached abler batters at what angle uppercut to shave off a swing in order to better bean a pitcher with a calculated line drive. While mates sucking Red Hots frolicked amid twilit hours in front yards and streetsides, playing at war with peashooters and water balloons, there was Ruben hunkered curbside over his Big Chief tablet, ponderously penciling grids by the edge of a balsa ruler and graphing ratios of targets hit to peas shot and balloons filled. When a pissing contest was called and the neighborhood boys gathered by the church lot after school, giggling like gnomes and peeling from the folds of their shorts dinky peckers tweezed between thumb and forefinger, Rube was there too doling out water and near beer and plotting pissarc trajectories by twigscratch in the sand. He could exemplify the pacifistic introvert yet loved nothing more than the crunch of cracking bicuspids as he elbowed a home team’s forward. Naturally was Rube a reader, the kind that gorged on words. The

dulcet sonnet could wrench a tear from his eye though tragic drama better suited his personal aesthetic, especially romances of the type ending in lovers’ mutual suicide. He read for elucidation treatises by Clausewitz, Sun-tzu, and Nicomachus of Gerasa; for pleasure works by Kaempffert, Gustave Le Bon, and the great Mesmer; and with gusto the utopian futures of Wells. Often, in recovery from the noise of days, he’d indulge a yearning for solitude and spend whole nights rooftop sketching in conté crayon the black void between stars and composing little sapphics on the hugeness of it all. He felt, at these times, the sensation of being observed, studied by some wadza in the heavens, prepared, he sensed, for something momentous by strangers above the clouds . . . Under astonished tutors he mastered a host of additional tongues, rapidly, that he’d intone fluently as English though which he insisted on speaking, to his delight and his instructors’ chagrin, simultaneously, for a lark. He attempted romantic rondeaux, in Sanskrit, though confessed to his intendeds feeling stumped getting shringara and pralaya to rhyme right. High school held little challenge for the young Rube (he was then two years junior his freshman classmates), and to bide the odd hours he hatched reckless and elaborate pranks. He laced fruits with fun drugs, like the ergots, and stealthily set them on teachers’ desks during recess, stuck with cards forged in bullies’ script. One afternoon, to the principal’s dismay, he linked the school’s master clock to its phone system then privately chuckled as every incoming call projected the hands two minutes closer the final bell. His antics won him by turns the applause of fellow students, who thought him heroic and clever, and the reproach of exasperated faculty, who found him archly aloof. His spirits might ascend on wings of sublimest glory or as quickly plummet under weight of direst melancholy dispelled finally by his quandary over whether suicide, homicide,

or omnicide would best abate his gripping teenage angst. Buffeted by pubescence, Rube acquired the gawky features redolent of classic scientific “queerness.” He had a cropped rust do, freckles the size of lentils, a planktoothed girlshy rictus, and ears that stuck out like two ivory cabinet handles. He had a beetling brow with a stately tall forehead which inclined above it sheer as the Galveston seawall. His lips were thin, the width of a good thick one bisected, and he had a beakish nose, a hawk’s nose, that earned him the envy of his peers when he later found

his calling. His eyes might seem claygray then silversteel or even oilbrown, with a gaze that looked piercing and sharp when imperturbable yet perturbed and dull when nothing in sight worth piercing appeared. From a long frame lithe limbs hung like halfwilling accomplices unsure of their role in a crime plot. His feet tripped over each other like newly paired dance partners, and his nimble fanlike hands, ambidextrous, which pantomimed tortuously when he spoke, as if explicating to a tribe of foreign laloplegics, seemed uncertain what the other was doing, so


17

NOW through DEC 31 The Bohemian’s ‘Best Of’ publishes in March 2017!

BOMBS AWAY The United States’ one thousand–plus named test shots are embedded, like toxic truffles, in the text of Brandt’s explosive novel.

often did things twice. His neck was too spindly, like a lollipop stick, his shoulders too narrow, his complexion too fair, his chest too caved, his fingers too fine, his back too bowed, his grip too limp and his touch too clammy, and his arches were flat, with toes too splayed when they weren’t, in weather too cold, curling under. For diversion Rube preferred fraternal outings but did attend, begrudgingly, his junior prom with one Tulia Hognose, a bookish and tubby sort (beauty frightened as much as it fascinated chary Rube), and it was during the course of the evening that he beheld his first breast. Something in its curve repelled him though and he sought in future to forswear its ilk, but his condition polyorchitis eventually exerted its influence and landed him a doomed marriage in later years. When, in his mid teens, his father’s bomb shelter was razed by a small brush fire Rube, then scouting universities, resolved

to devote himself fully to the study of applied physics. He was sixteen when he entered MIT—the freshest yet to pledge Phi Beta Epsilon. He topped the curriculum with ease and swiftly, and among numerous honors won Rube earned that rare prize, an interview with the Hertz Foundation. High marks on their Industry Acronym Recognition Exam (the IARE) secured him a graduate fellowship at California’s Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, which led soon after to fulltime hire. Upon submitting his dissertation at the age of twentytwo Rube cultivated a magnificent mustache to mark the occasion, with bristly bars of sideburn to match. . . . ‘The Vault Apocalyptia’ is available at Copperfield’s in Petaluma and Montgomery Village in Santa Rosa, Levin & Company in Healdsburg and on Amazon.com. Go to stormydaypub. com for more info.

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The week’s events: a selective guide

STRIPPED Bauhaus lead singer and solo artist Peter Murphy presents a semi-acoustic show on Saturday, Dec. 3, at Sweetwater Music Hall in Mill Valley. See Concerts, p23.

YOUNTVILLE

SEBASTOPOL

CORTE MADERA

S A N TA R O S A

Free Space

Hot Winter Night

Bookish Birthday

Humbug-Proof

The upcoming film ‘The Space Between Us,’ a sci-fi romantic drama, envisions a really long-distance relationship between a teenage boy born on Mars and a girl living on Earth. Set for theatrical release mid-December, the film gets an advance screening this week, hosted by San Rafael–based nonprofit Roots for Peace and the Napa Valley Performing Arts Center. This showing was recently made free to all and includes a post-screening discussion with the film’s producer and co-writer Richard B. Lewis, all happening on Thursday, Dec. 1, at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Drive, Yountville. Doors at 6pm; screening at 7pm. Free. 707.944.9900.

Anyone looking for a holiday-themed event that’s both a little bit naughty and a little bit nice need look no further than this week’s Winter Masquerade, the annual holiday performance from the long-running Cabaret de Caliente. Featuring a lineup of burlesque, belly dance, circus acts and an array of vendors, the cabaret joins forces with several local DJs spinning throughout the night. The show will also raise funds for the Russian River Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence through a raffle. Guests are invited to dress in winter-white attire, including masquerade masks, and join the fun on Friday, Dec. 2, at HopMonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. 9pm. $15–$20; $50–$60 VIP (21 and over). cabaretdecaliente.com.

Though it doesn’t look a day over 39, Marin’s literature-selling institution Book Passage is officially 40 years old, and celebrates the anniversary with a day of events this Saturday. First up, students from around the county will be reading their works in a showcase of tomorrow’s writers. Then, the bookstore’s cafe and gallery holds a reception for artist Tom Killion’s new collection of graphic woodcut prints. Finally, Isabel Allende and others speak about the history of the bookstore and what it means to them and the community. The party takes place on Saturday, Dec. 3, at Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. 10am to 6pm. 415.927.0960.

Got a Scrooge in your family who claims to hate the holidays? Turn his frown upside down this weekend with the inaugural Wine Country Winter Festival. This massive display of holiday cheer will feature a carefully selected range of arts and crafts, and plenty of entertainment. Three stages of live music from local favorites and lots of local food, beer and wine tastings lighten the mood as vendors selling gifts and goodies galore lighten the wallet on Saturday and Sunday, Dec. 3–4, at Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Road, Santa Rosa. Saturday, 10 to 6; Sunday, 10 to 5. $12–$15; kids 12 and under are free. winecountrywinterfestival.com.

—Charlie Swanson


BUILDING A GREENER FUTURE From left, students Nevin Wolfe-Sallouk, Julian Guisti-Smith and Zoe Stapp make bricks

from recyled materials for use in a garden shed planned for Credo High School’s new campus at Sonoma Mountain Village.

Change Agents

Rohnert Park’s Credo High School embarks on ambitious ecological agenda BY AMELIA MALPAS

T

he thing about unsustainability is that it’s, well, not sustainable. Students at Rohnert Park’s Credo High School are embracing that truth as an opportunity to transform their school and the world beyond.

Credo, a Waldorf-inspired public charter school, has adopted

the One Planet Living (OPL) initiative and hopes to become the world’s first One Planet school. The ecological impacts of their efforts are being overseen by Bioregional, a London-based nonprofit that created the OPL initiative. There are 10 guiding principles of OPL, which include health and happiness, equity and local economy, land use and wildlife, zero waste and zero carbon. Every OPL partner develops an

action plan centered around these principles. “My hope is that Credo will become the model for OPL schools throughout the world, and that our students and graduates can help other schools locally and worldwide to meet the OPL principles,” says Credo principal Chip Romer. “Credo students will spend four years within an OPL community, and the principles will inform our students, who will then disseminate those values as

they move out into the world.” One Planet Living was founded in 2003 during the creation of the BedZED eco-village in London and is guided by the philosophy that to succeed, sustainable living must be easy, attractive and affordable. “There is a long way to go, but there is no doubt it’s possible to be happier, healthier and more sustainable at the same time,” says Pooran Desai, cofounder of Bioregional. Credo was founded in 2011 with 40 students and now enrolls about 300. The curriculum focuses on agricultural, economic, environmental and social sustainability and is already in line with many of OPL’s principles. It’s the only school to receive a Green Business Award from the Sonoma County Economic Development Board. “Sustainability must be built into the curriculum,” says Marika Ramsden, Credo’s OPL director. “It’s hard not to be invested because it’s our future.” OPL is already being put into practice in the classroom. Every freshman takes a class on climate change and one-third of the curriculum focuses on OPL ideas. In chemistry, students are scaling down the use of acids and heavy metals. In woodworking, more than 95 percent of materials are coming from “street” trees destined for firewood or landfill. Reducing the consumption of nonrenewable energy sources is one of the greatest challenges, particularly achieving zero waste, says Romer. Credo will be 100 percent solar-powered once it moves to Sonoma Mountain Village in 2017. “This generation has heard so much about the challenges and issues, and they’re ready to change the story,” says Ramsden. “They’re hungry for creative solutions instead of doom and gloom.”

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Rory McNamara

Arts Ideas

19


Stage Eric Chazankin

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ARRR! Chris Ginesi, left, and Larry Williams star in ‘Peter Pan’ prequel.’

Of Pirates and Elves Versatile David Yen directs play, stars in another

BY DAVID TEMPLETON

I

f you’ve ever been to the Dickens fair and seen one of their wacky adaptations of some classic story,” says actor David Yen, director of Spreckels Theatre Company’s Peter and the Starcatcher, “then you’ll recognize the fast-and-furious approach to storytelling that happens in this show. It’s hard to tell what’s in the script from what’s been invented on the spot. It’s crazy!”

Based on the young adult novel by columnist Dave Barry and mystery writer Ridley Pearson, the play—with a goofball, punstrewn script by Rick Elice (Jersey Boys)—serves as a kind of prequel

to James Barrie’s classic play and novel Peter Pan. The Spreckels production features Larry Williams as the tongue-tangled pirate Black Stache (better known as Captain Hook), Chris Schloemp as Smee and Anderson Templeton (full disclosure: he’s my son) as the Boy, long before he takes the name of Peter Pan. The show has been given a decidedly Christmasy vibe, with a prologue involving a tree and presents and a pivotal lump of coal. Though the script provides room for improvisation, Yen says that he instructed the cast to resist the urge to include jokes referencing the recent election or other political concerns. “This needs to be a play people walk away from feeling inspired and hopeful,” he says, “a play people are touched by, touched by the humanity and heart of the script’s conflict between growing up and staying young forever, between having a family and a home, and having to become an adult—and everything that might mean—in order to get that. “Yes, it’s a very silly, strange story, with fart jokes and outrageous gags, but it’s also a very touching story. I think we all need this right now.” While preparing Peter for opening night, Yen has also been gearing up to play Crumpet the Elf in the dark one-actor-comedy The Santaland Diaries at 6th Street Playhouse. This will be Yen’s ninth consecutive production of Santaland, based on David Sedaris’ wry memoir of working as one of Santa’s helpers at New York’s Macy’s department store. “People won’t let me stop doing this show!” Yen laughs. “Though, honestly, if it wasn’t still fun, after nine years, I’d have stopped doing it. But Santaland really is a total blast to do.” ‘Peter and the Starcatcher’ runs Friday–Sunday, with one Thursday, through Dec. 18 at Spreckels Performing Arts Center. 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. Friday–Saturday, 8pm; 2pm matinee, Saturday– Sunday. $16–$26. 707.588.3400. ‘The Santaland Diaries’ runs Thursday– Sunday through Dec. 18 at 6th Street Playhouse. 56 W. Sixth St., Santa Rosa, Thursday, 7:30pm; Friday–Saturday, 8pm; 7pm matinee, Sunday.


Film

21

Adapted from

Charles Dickens

Redwood Noir

Adapted for the stage by

Michael Wilson

Locally shot thriller gets a North Bay premiere BY CHARLIE SWANSON

Directed by

Craig A. Miller

A

wartime journalist and fixer exiled from Afghanistan, Osman (Dominic Rains) attempts to settle in a quiet Northern California town. But all is not as it seems in Burn Country, director Ian Olds’ first feature-length narrative film, shot in and around the Russian River Valley last year. Burn Country features James Franco and Melissa Leo, and boasts several recognizable locations in western Sonoma County, like the Rio Theater in Monte Rio, where the film enjoys a Sonoma County premiere on Dec. 3, with Olds and local members of the cast and crew in attendance. Tense and taut, Burn Country is a meditative thriller that takes time-tested noir tactics and assembles them in the rural setting around Guerneville. Redwood trees eclipse the light and cast angled shadows, while coastal fog smokescreens the rolling hills. Osman relocates to Northern California due to his work with an American journalist, who helped him escape the Taliban. He is staying with the journalist’s mother (Leo), who also happens to be the sheriff. When Osman takes a job writing the police blotter, he inadvertently stumbles into a small-town underbelly of crime and collusion that doesn’t take kindly to outsiders. Though the film slows in the middle, and the secretive nature of the town’s criminal element starts to frustrate, Rains, who won a best actor award at this year’s Tribeca Film Festival for Burn Country (formerly known as The Fixer), gives a great performance as the passionate and inquisitive Osman, even as his own curiosity predictably gets the better of him. For North Bay audiences, the film is loaded with local color. And beyond the recognizable sights and faces, Burn Country satisfies with sizzling intensity and keeps you guessing until the end. ‘Burn Country’ screens on Saturday, Dec. 3, at the Rio Theater, 20396 Bohemian Hwy., Monte Rio. 6pm. $10. 707.865.0913. The film opens in wide release on Dec. 9.

12/2–12/8

®

Honorable

Manchester by the Sea R (11:00-2:00)-5:00-8:00

Nocturnal Animals (10:30-1:15-4:00)-6:45-9:25

Starring

Charles Siebert* as Ebenezer Scrooge 52 W. 6th Street Santa Rosa, CA 95401

Schedule for Fri, Dec 2 – Thu, Dec 8

DINE-IN CINEMA

Bargain Tuesday - $7.50 All Shows Bargain Tuesday $7.00 All Shows Schedule forFri, Fri,April Feb -16th 20th Thu, Feb 26th Schedule for –– Thu, April 22nd Schedule for Fri, June 22nd - Thu, June 28th

Award Bruschetta •Academy Paninis Soups • Performance Salads • Appetizers “Moore Gives •Her BestNominee 8 Great“Raw Beers onYears!” Tap + Wine by the Glass and Bottle Best Foreign Language Film! In – Box Office and Riveting!” – Rolling Stone

R

The Eagle Huntress

BRINGING THE BEST FILMS IN THE WORLD TO SONOMA COUNTY

“Raw and Riveting!” – Rolling Stone

Demi MooreWITH DavidBASHIR Duchovny WALTZ A MIGHTY HEART THE EAGLE HUNTRESS (1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:15 R

G

(10:45-1:30-4:15)-7:00-9:10

Loving

PG13 (10:15-1:00-3:45)-6:30-9:15

Moonlight

R (10:15-12:45-3:30)-6:15-8:45

551 SUMMERFIELD ROAD • SANTA ROSA 707.522.0719 • SUMMERFIELDCINEMAS.COM

(1:00) THE 3:00 5:00 7:00 JONESES (12:30) 2:455:00) 5:00 7:00 7:20 9:15 9:45 RR (1:00 3:00 9:00 G

(12:30) 2:40Noms 4:50 Including 7:10 9:20 2 Academy Award BestRActor!

(1:20 4:10) 6:45 No Pass ALLIED “A Triumph!” – New Observer “A Glorious Throwback ToYork The9:25 MoreRStylized, THE WRESTLER Painterly Work Of Decades Past!” – LA Times (12:20) 2:45 5:10 7:30 9:45 R PG-13 LA VIE EN ROSE (1:30 4:20) 7:10 9:45 LOVING (12:45) 3:45 6:45OF 9:45 PG-13 THEAward SECRET KELLS 10 Academy Noms Including Best Picture! (1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:00 NR (11:30 2:00 4:30) 7:05 9:35 MOANA SLuMDOG MILLIONAIRE “★★★★ – Really, Truly, Deeply – “★★★★ – Really, Truly, Deeply – “Superb! No One Could Make This (11:30) Sat/Sun PG 4:00 7:10 R Believable One of (1:15) Thisshow Year’s Best!”9:40 – only Newsday If It Were Fiction!” – San Francisco Chronicle

ONCE FANTASTIC BEASTS 8 Academy Award Noms Including PRODIGAL SONSAND (1:00) 3:10 5:20 R Best Picture, Best Actor7:30 & Best9:40 Director! WHERE TO (2:20) 9:10 NRFIND No 9:10THEM Show Tue orPG-13 Thu MILK

MILK – Rolling “Haunting and Hypnotic!” (12:45 3:30) 6:30 9:10 Stone “Wise, Humble and Effortlessly (1:30) 4:10 6:45 Funny!” 9:30 R – Newsweek THE GIRL THE DRAGON TATTOO Please Note: No 1:30 Show Sat, 6:45 Thu PleaseWITH Note:(11:40 No 1:30 Show Sat, No No4:45) 6:45 Show Show7:20 Thu 2:10 9:50 WAITRESS

ARRIVAL

WAITRESS (1:10) 4:30 7:30 NR (1:30) 4:00 7:10 9:30 RPG-13 5 Academy Award Noms Including Picture! (11:40) show Sat/Sun onlyBest “★★★1/2! AnFROST/NIXON unexpected Gem!” – USA Today FROST/NIXON

MOONLIGHT

(2:15)Mysterious, 7:20 R GREENBERG “Swoonly Romatic, Hilarious!” 5:00 9:50 (12:00 (12:00) 2:20 4:45) 7:15 R9:40 R – Slant Magazine

REVOLuTIONARY ROAD

“Deliciously unsettling!” – RLA Times (12:00) Sat/Sun only PARIS, JE T’AIME (11:45) 4:45 9:50 (1:15)GHOST 4:15 7:00 9:30 R THE Tue: Nopresents 4:45 Wed: No 7:15 Kevin Jorgenson the WRITER California Premiere of (2:15) 7:15 PG-13

PuRE: A BOuLDERING FLICK Michael Moore’s DOCTOR STRANGE Thu, Feb 26th at 7:15 THE MOST DANGEROuS

Moana • Rules Don't Apply • Arrival Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them Bistro Menu Items, Beer & Wine available in all 4 Auditoriums

SHOWTIMES: ravenfilmcenter.com 707.525.8909 • HEALDSBURG

(11:45 2:15 7:30 9:55 PG-13 SICKO MOVIES IN MORNING MAN4:50) INTHE AMERICA

Starts Fri, June 29th! (11:45) Sat/Sun Fri,show Sat, Sun &PENTAGON Mon only PAPERS DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THE Advance Tickets On Sale Now at Box Office! 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 6:50 6:50 Show Tue or Thu FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:30 NR 5:00No7:30 10:00 10:15 AM VICKY Their CRISTINA BARCELONA First Joint Venture In 25 Years! Fri/Sat/Mon: (4:00) 9:20 R 10:20 AM CHANGELING Venessa RedgraveAND Meryl CHONG’S Streep Glenn CloseAM CHEECH 10:40 Sun/Tue/Wed: RACHEL GETTING MARRIED 9:20 Thu: 10:00 HEYSHORTS WATCH THIS 2009 LIVE ACTION (Fri/Mon Only)) 10:45 AM EVENING PG-13 10:45 Sat, Apr17th at 11pm & Tue, Apr 20th 8pmAM 2009 ANIMATED SHORTS (Sun Only) Starts Fri, June 29th!

EDGE OF SEVENTEEN

RULES DON’T APPLY

Fri-Sat/Mon: (1:10) 6:40 Sun: (12:00) 6:40 Tue/Wed: (3:10) Thu: (4:00)

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 30 -DECE MBER 6, 201 6 | BOH E MI A N.COM

IS THAT OLD RIVER ROAD? Osman (Dominic Rains) looks for

answers in ‘Burn Country.’


Music Danny Clinch

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | NOVEMBE R 30 - D EC E M BE R 6, 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

22 707.829.7300 230 PETALUMA AVE | SEBASTOPOL

OPEN MIC NIGHT

EVERY TUES AT 7PM WITH CENI THU DEC 1

DRAGON SMOKE

+ PETER JOSEPH BURTT $35/DOORS 7/SHOW 8/21+

ON SALE NOW! DECEMBER 2 - 4

Joy to the World

from Transcendence’s “Broadway Under The Stars”

THU, DECEMBER 8

Gary Allan with special guest Justin Adams FRI, DECEMBER 9 RODNEY STRONG VINEYARDS DANCE SERIES

10th Anniversary

Posada Navideña FRI, DECEMBER 16

Donny & Marie

FRI DEC 2

CABARET DE CALIENTE WINTER MASQUERADE $15–$60/DOORS 9/SHOW 10/21+

SAT DEC 3

GRATEFUL BLUEGRASS BOYS + KATE GAFFNEY BAND $10–$12/DOORS 8/SHOW 9/21+

SUN DEC 4

CHARLIE HUNTER QUARTET $17–$20/DOORS 7/SHOW 8/21+

MON DEC 5

MONDAY NIGHT EDUTAINMENT WITH

DJ JACQUES & DJ GUACAMOLE $8/DOORS-SHOW 10/21+

WED DEC 7

SCIENCE BUZZ CAFE

$5/DOORS 7/SHOW 7:30/ALL AGES

THU DEC 8

DOYLE BRAMHALL II

+ FUTURE STUFF $20–$23/DOORS 7/SHOW 8/21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM Book your

next event with us, up to 250, kim@hopmonk.com

SAT, DECEMBER 17

THU, DECEMBER 29 SIRIUSXM PRESENTS

13th Annual Christmas Rocks! Tour

THU, JANUARY 26

Black Violin BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND!

FRIDAY

DEC 2 SATURDAY

DEC 3

B

LIVING LEGENDS EVIDENCE ALL ORIGINAL MEMBERS

URBAN• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

THE STEEL WHEELS

WEDNESDAY

Live Entertainment!

DUB ELECTRONICA• DOORS 8PM • 21+

MONDAY

RADIOLAB’S

GIVE THE GIFT OF

BY CHARLIE SWANSON

DJ DRAGONFLY

NAHKO & MEDICINE FOR THE PEOPLE, FLOBOTS

SUNDAY

DEC 5

special guest Zoë Keating

DESERT DWELLERS

DEC 4

SAT, JANUARY 28

Jad Abumrad

DEC 7 FRIDAY

DEC 9 SATURDAY

ROCK• DOORS 8PM • 21+

DAVID JACOBS-STRAIN ROCK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

THE GRANDSLAM

WEST SIDE STORIES PETALUMA STORY• DOORS 7:30PM • 14+

CALIFORNIA HONEYDROPS STEEP RAVINE

ROCK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

POOR MAN'S WHISKEY

CREEK DEC 10 CORAL BLUEGRASS• DOORS 7:30PM • 21 TUESDAY THE DANDY WARHOLS: TOUR DEC 13 DISTORTLAND TELEGRAM ALT• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+ 12 ⁄ 16 Faith Ako, 12 ⁄ 17 The Aggrolites, 12 ⁄ 18 David Gans, 12 ⁄ 31 Foreverland, 1 ⁄ 7 TOMMY CASTRO, Shana Morrison, 1 ⁄ 10 Midge Ure Band, 1 ⁄ 13 Led Zepagain, 1 ⁄ 14 Saved By The 90s - A Totally 90s Party

707.546.3600 lutherburbankcenter.org

Musical Riches

Doyle Bramhall II talks North Bay roots, new album

Christmas with Aaron Neville

The Brian Setzer Orchestra’s

HAIR APPARENT Doyle Bramhall II was born to a Texas blues rocker, but his influences range far and wide.

WWW.MYSTICTHEATRE.COM 23 PETALUMA BLVD N. PETALUMA, CA 94952

efore performing and studying music across the globe, guitarist and songwriter Doyle Bramhall II was a kid with a blue mohawk hanging out with the punks and playing a mean blues guitar in Santa Rosa. The son of Texas music star Doyle Bramhall, who drummed with Stevie Ray Vaughan, Bramhall split his time growing up with dad in Austin and mom in Sonoma County, where KRSH DJ Bill Bowker gave him his first airplay. “It was a culture shock,” he says of Santa Rosa. Used to the barbecue and blues nightclubs of his native Texas, Bramhall adjusted to a culture of classical music that his stepfather worked

in. “We were going to Renaissance fairs and eating health food,” he remembers. “It was a quite a contrast.” Now living in Los Angeles, Bramhall returns to the North Bay when he plays the HopMonk Tavern in Sebastopol on Dec. 8 in support of his recently released album, Rich Man, his first solo record in 15 years. Bramhall performs a distinctive brand of blues highlighted by playing a right-handed guitar upside down and left-handed, à la Hendrix. His sound has garnered him wide acclaim, and he’s collaborated with Roger Waters, Elton John, the Tedeschi Trucks Band and Eric Clapton. His world of knowledge informs the new record, with elements of Arabic and North African melodies infused into a funky blues-driven collection of tunes. There’s also a classical influence in his compositions. “At the time, I didn’t know that I liked it,” Bramhall says. “But all of that classical music that seeped into me growing up started to show itself in my songwriting approach.” Without trying to emulate any one genre specifically, Bramhall explains that those accents bubble up naturally in his writing process. “I think because I traveled so much, and appreciate it and love it so much, it’s all a part of me now, rather than me trying to wear a hat,” he says. Lyrically, Rich Man marks a new perspective for Bramhall, who says the songs were written in response to an emotionally painful divorce and custody battle. Through the suffering and mental clutter, Bramhall says that he shifted from focusing on personal goals to striving toward more universal ideals. “For many years, I thought of just me, and as soon as I stopped doing that, a lot of mystical things started happening. And by the way,” Bramhall says with a laugh, “this is my Santa Rosa side coming out.” Doyle Bramhall II takes the stage on Thursday, Dec. 8, at HopMonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. 8pm. $20–$23. 707.829.7300.


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Joe Craven & the Sometimers

Craven’s new roots rock band features Bruce MacMillan and Jonathan Stoyanoff, and plays an eclectic mix of danceable Americana. Dec 2, 8pm. $20-$23. Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

Will Magid

Eclectic trumpet player and producer headlines the “Refuge” benefit concert for refugees everywhere. San Francisco surf band Killer Whale and Oakland post-rock outfit Meernaa also perform. Dec 2, 8pm. $10. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Pink Martini’s Holiday Spectacular The massively fun jazz-pop ensemble performs a night of festive music from around the globe. Dec 6, 8pm. $45-$69. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

MARIN COUNTY Peter Murphy

Former lead singer of Bauhaus performs a solo stripped down concert. Dec 3, 9pm. $48-$53. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Roots of Peace Holiday Benefit

Award-winning Nashville singer-songwriter Jaime Kyle co-headlines with Pablo Cruise’s lead guitarist, Dave Jenkins, for one night only. Dec 4, 6pm. $150. Fenix, 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

NAPA COUNTY A Christmas Carol

Sing Napa Valley premieres a new musical adaptation of the classic Dickens story, with featured soloists and and Napa Valley Children’s Chorus. Dec 2, 7pm and Dec 4, 3pm. $25/ children free. First United Methodist Church, 625 Randolph St, Napa. singnapavalley.org.

Freddie Cole Quartet

Dec 4, 4pm, “Carols, Canticles and Christmas Classics” with Healdsburg Chorus. 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Cole and his all-star band perform a special Christmas tribute to his older brother Nat King Cole. Dec 1-4, 6:30 and 9pm. Blue Note Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Green Music Center

Mariachi Los Camperos

Green Music Center Schroeder Hall

The Grammy-winning mariachi band plays a special program of Christmas delights. Dec 3, 7pm. $25-$85. Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY A’Roma Roasters

Dec 3, Final Beginning with Eki Shola. 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Aqus Cafe

Dec 3-5, “Poetic Bells” with Santa Rosa Symphony. Dec 7, Sonoma State University Jazz Orchestra. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Nov 30, Marcin Dylla. Dec 1, 6:30pm, Jewish music series with Anthony Russell and Veretski Pass. Free. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

HopMonk Sebastopol

Tues, open mic night. Dec 1, Dragon Smoke. Dec 2, “Winter Masquerade” with Cabaret de Caliente. Dec 3, Grateful Bluegrass Boys and Kate Gaffney Band. Dec 4, Charlie Hunter Quartet. Dec 5, Monday Night Edutainment with DJ Jacques and DJ Guacamole. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

HopMonk Sonoma

Nov 30, Morton Davis. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Dec 2, Timothy O’Neil. Dec 3, Quiles & Cloud. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Arlene Francis Center

Hotel Healdsburg

Dec 2, Embryonic Devourment with Hellbender and Aberration. T99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Barley & Hops Tavern Dec 2, Duece Denninger. Dec 3, Mark McDonald. Dec 4, Soul Warrior. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.874.9037.

The Big Easy

Nov 30, Rivertown Trio. Dec 1, Wil Blades Trio. Dec 2, Coffis Brothers and Wayward Angels. Dec 3, Cabbage Head with Analog Us. Dec 4, the Two of Us. Dec 6, Mad Men B3 Organ with Justus Dorbin. Dec 7, Ted Bagget & the Hessel Road Project. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.4631.

Blue Heron Restaurant & Tavern Dec 6, 6pm, Michael Hantman. 25300 Steelhead Blvd, Duncans Mills. 707.865.2261.

Coffee Catz

Tues, 12pm, Jerry Green’s Peaceful Piano Hour. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Corkscrew Wine Bar

Dec 6, the Rivertown Trio. 100 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.789.0505.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 30 - DECEMBE R 6, 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

23

Glaser Center

Dec 3, 6:30pm, Berkeley Choro Ensemble. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Lagunitas Tap Room

Nov 30, Nate Lopez. Dec 1, Brothers Gadjo. Dec 2, the Soulshine Band. Dec 3, the RevTones. Dec 4, Jimbo Scott. Dec 7, Mitch Woods & His Rocket 88s. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Luther Burbank Center HOR_Boh14_3rdpg.indd for the Arts Nov 30, Celtic Woman: Home for Christmas. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Main Street Bistro

Dec 1, Susan Sutton jazz piano. Dec 2, Janie Roberts and John Simon. Dec 3, Yancie Taylor. Dec 4, Vernelle Anders. Dec 6, Mac & Potter. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mc T’s Bullpen

Dec 2, DJ MGB. Dec 3, Levi Lloyd. Dec 4-5, DJ MGB. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

Medlock Ames

Dec 2, the Beautiful Questions. 6487 Hwy 128, Healdsburg. 707.431.8845. )

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NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | NOVEMBE R 30 - D EC E M BE R 6, 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Fireside Dining 7 Days a Week

Din ner & A Show Big Sandy & His Fly-Rite Boys 2 Dec Western Swing, Rockabilly, Fri

Traditional Country 8:00

Sat

Dec 3

Danny Click’s Birthday Party

Dec 4 HowellDevine Shack-Shaking Country Blues 4:00 Sat

Dec 10

Annual Xmas Pajama Party!

Lee Presson & The Nails 8:30

Coverlettes Dec 11 The Christmas Show Sun

60’s Girl Group Singing Sensations 7:00

Unauthorized Rolling Stones Sat Lavay Smith’s 17 Dec Fri

Dec 16

8:00

“1940’s Supper Club” Featuring the Music of Billie Holiday, Duke Ellington, Count Basie 8:30 Sun Santa & Mrs Claus 2:00–4:00 18 Dec Tim Cain’s Family

Christmas Sing Along

Sat

Murphy’s Irish Pub

Wed 11/30 • Doors 7pm • $17 ADV / $20 DOS

Bobby Vega's 60th Birthday Rash feat Steve Kimock, Prairie Prince, Pete Sears, Greg Anton & many more Fri 12/02 • Doors 7pm • $30 ADV / $35 DOS

Justin Townes Earle

with the Hell Yeahs!

Songwriter/Guitar Slinger 8:30

Sun

Music ( 23

4:00–5:00 10th Annual Christmas Eve Gospel

Dec 24 Dinner Show

The Priesthood 7:00 Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

with Victoria George Sat 12/03 • Doors 10am • $12 ADV / $22 DOS

Little Folkies Family Band

Sat 12/03 • Doors 8pm • $48.50 ADV / $53.50 DOS

PETER MURPHY “Stripped" Sun 12/04 • Doors 7pm • $22 ADV / $25 DOS

Larry Campbell & Teresa Williams with Mickelson (solo) Tue 12/06 • Doors 9:30pm • $17

Afrolicious

Wed 12/07 • Doors 9:30pm • $18 ADV / $20 DOS

An Evening with The Steel Wheels Sun 12/11 • Doors 7pm • $25 ADV / $30 DOS Patterson Hood (Drive-By Truckers) with David Luning Fri 12/09 & Sat 12/10 • Doors 8pm • $22 ADV / $25 DOS

Zepparella the All-Female Zeppelin Powerhouse with ANGELEX Fri 12/16 • Doors 8pm • $20 ADV / $25 DOS

Fishbone

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

Dec 2, Sean Carscadden Trio. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre

Dec 2, Desert Dwellers and DJ Dragonfly. Dec 3, the Grouch & Eligh with Living Legends Crew and Evidence. Dec 4, Nahko & Medicine for the People with Flobots. Dec 5, the Steel Wheels with David JacobsStrain. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Dec 3-4, Occidental Community Choir presents “Sing the Long Nights” winter concert. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Petaluma Arts Center Dec 4, 5:30pm, the Scattered Winds. 230 Lakeville St, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Petaluma Elks Lodge Dec 3, Holiday Fest concert of the schools. 2105 S McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.763.0901.

Petaluma Historical Library & Museum

Dec 4, 3pm, “Renaissance Glory” Festival Consort Concert. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. 707.778.4398. FREE LOCAL LIVE MUSIC

thu dec 1

ODELL

fri dec 2 sat dec 3

JEn TuckEr BanD

8pm/$5

8:30pm/Dancing/ 10 $

ZuLu SpEar

8pm/$10 aDv/$12 DOS

thu OnyE & dec 8 ThE MESSEngErS 8pm/$10

GIGS LIVE MUSIC. NEW STAGE AND SOUND. NEW DANCE FLOOR. NEW AIR CONDITIONING. SUDS TAPS - 18 LOCAL & REGIONAL SELECT CRAFT BEERS & CIDERS. EATS NEW MENU, KITCHEN OPEN ALL DAY FROM 11AM ON. CHECK OUT OUR FRIED CHICKEN SANDWICH W/CORN ON THE COB. DIGS DINING OUT-DOORS. KIDS ALWAYS WELCOME - NEW KID’S MENU. RESERVATIONS FOR 8 OR MORE. HAPPY HOUR M-F 3-6PM. $2 CHICKEN TACOS. $3 HOUSE CRAFT BEERS. WEEKLY EVENTS MONDAYS • BLUES DEFENDERS PRO JAM TUESDAYS • OPEN MIC W/ROJO WEDNESDAYS • KARAOKE

fri dec 9

STanD up cOMEDy!

sat dec 10

rhyThM rangErS

tue dec 14

arT rEcEpTiOn wiTh

CALENDAR THU DEC 1 • LEVI’S WORKSHOP WITH SPECIAL GUEST ALVON JOHNSON 7:30PM / 21+ FREE

harT n SOuL BanD

FRI DEC 2 • COURT ‘N’ DISASTER AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 7:30PM / 21+ FREE

thu dec 15 fri dec 31

8:30pm/$10/18+ 8:30pm/$10

FrEnch Oak gypSy BanD 6pm 8pm/Dancing/No Cover

ThE puLSaTOrS 8:30pm/$25 aDv

Price Subject to Change

rESTauranT & MuSic VEnuE chEck OuT ThE arT ExhiBiT ViSiT Our wEBSiTE, rEDwOODcaFE.cOM 8240 OLD rEDwOOD hwy, cOTaTi 707.795.7868

SAT DEC 3 • BUCK NICKELS AND LOOSE CHANGE AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 7:30PM / 21+ FREE CHECK OUT OUR FULL MUSIC CALENDAR www.TwinOaksRoadhouse.com Phone 707.795.5118 5745 Old Redwood Hwy Penngrove, CA 94951

Petaluma Seed Bank

Dec 1, 6pm, All About Mason Bees. Intro workshop on raising mason bees, making your landscape a magnet for native bees and linking bees and a healthy garden. Free. 199 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.773.1336.

Phoenix Theater

Dec 1, Too Short and Mistah Fab. Dec 3, Brotha Lynch with Kung Fu Vampire. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Presbyterian Church of the Roses

Dec 4, 4pm, “Yule Love This Concert” with Sonoma County Chamber Singers. 2500 Patio Ct, Santa Rosa. www.

Redwood Cafe

Dec 1, Odell. Dec 2, Jen Tucker Band. Dec 3, Zulu Spear. Dec 4, 5pm, Gypsy Kisses. Dec 6, Rock Overtime student performance. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Remy’s Bar & Lounge

First Friday of every month, Jay Fresco. 130 Stony Point Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.578.1963.

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub

Dec 3, Kevin Russell. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Songwriters Competition. Dec 7, pro blues jam. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

Spancky’s Bar

First Presbyterian Church of San Rafael

Thurs, 7pm, Thursday Night Blues Jam. Dec 3, Lemmörial Show with Union Jack & the Rippers. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Dec 4, 7pm, Gospel Christmas concert with the Lighthouse Singers Gospel Choir of Marin. 1510 Fifth St, San Rafael. 415.456.1356.

Spoonbar

George’s Nightclub

Wed, 6pm, Michael Hantman. 219 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.7222.

St Seraphim Orthodox Church Dec 1-2, Cantiamo Sonoma Christmas concert. 90 Mountain View Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.539.5377.

Toad in the Hole Pub Sun, live music. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Twin Oaks Roadhouse

Dec 1, Levi’s Workshop with Levi Lloyd. Dec 2, Court ‘n’ Disaster. Dec 3, Buck Nickels & Loose Change. Dec 4, 5pm, David Thom Invitational Bluegrass Jam. Dec 5, the Blues Defenders pro jam. Dec 6, open mic night with RoJo. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

United Church of Cloverdale

Dec 3, “Yule Love This Concert” with Sonoma County Chamber Singers. 439 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale.

Whiskey Tip

Dec 2, DJ MD and guests. Dec 3, Pacific Soundrise. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5535.

MARIN COUNTY Belrose Theater

Thurs, open mic night. 1415 Fifth Ave, San Rafael. 415.454.6422.

Benissimo Ristorante & Bar Thurs, Fri, live music. 18 Tamalpais Dr, Corte Madera. 415.927.2316.

Church of Saint Raphael

Dec 3, 7:30pm and , Dec 4, 4pm, concert by candlelight with the Marin Symphony Chamber Chorus. 1104 Fifth Avenue, San Rafael. 415.479.8100.

Fenix

Nov 30, Roharpo the Bluesman. Dec 1, Bridget Marie. Dec 2, Pete Escovedo Latin Jazz Ensemble. Dec 3, intimate dinner series with Alexander O’Neal. Dec 6, West Coast

Dec 2, Cozmo album release party. Dec 6, hip-hop open mic. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Ghiringhelli Pizzeria Grill & Bar

First Sunday of every month, 5pm, Erika Alstrom with Dale Alstrom’s Jazz Society. 1535 South Novato Blvd, Novato. 415.878.4977.

Grazie Restaurant

Dec 3, Twin Soles. 823 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.897.5181.

HopMonk Novato

Nov 30, open mic with Mark Nichol. Dec 2, the Renovators. Dec 3, Linda Imperial Band. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Marin Country Mart

Dec 2, 5:30pm, Friday Night Jazz with Charged Particles. 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur.

19 Broadway Club

Mon, open mic. Nov 30, Stefanie Keys Band. Dec 1, Book of Birds and North Shore Railroad. Dec 2, First Fridays Reggae Night with Broken Silence Sound System. Dec 3, Koolerator with David Whitney. Dec 4, 6pm, 19 Broadway Good Time Band. Dec 4, 9pm, Elvis Johnson’s blues jam. Dec 7, the Damon LeGall Band. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar

Nov 30, Robert Elmond Stone and friends. Dec 2, Michael Aragon Quartet. Dec 5, Kimrea & the Dreamdogs. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Osteria Divino

Nov 30, Jay Sanders Trio. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355.

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Nov 30, C-JAM with Connie Ducey. Dec 1, Donna D’Acuti. Dec 6, Swing Fever. Dec 7, DownLow Duo. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Peri’s Silver Dollar

Mon, Billy D’s open mic. Nov 30, Fitz & Pieces. Dec 1, House of


25

Mary. Dec 2, Swoop Unit. Dec 3, the Shams. Dec 4, Mendonesia. Dec 6, the Good Guys. Dec 7, the Weissmen. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio

Dec 2, Big Sandy & His FlyRite Boys. Dec 3, Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs. Dec 4, 4pm, HowellDevine. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sausalito Seahorse

Wed, Milonga with Marcelo Puig and Seth Asarnow. Dec 1, Marin Jazz Trio. Dec 2, salsa with DJ Jimmy Arhon and DJ Griego. Dec 3, Bait n Switch Blues Band. Dec 4, 5pm, Julio Bravo & Salsabor. Dec 6, Noel Jewkes and friends. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899.

Smiley’s Schooner Saloon

Dec 2, Stymie & the Pimp Jones Luv Orchestra. Dec 3, San Geronimo. Mon, Epicenter Soundsystem reggaae. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Spitfire Lounge

First Thursday of every month, the North Bass DJ night. First Friday of every month, Truthlive. 848 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.5551.

Sweetwater Music Hall Nov 30, Bobby Vega’s 60th Birthday Bash. Dec 2, Justin Townes Earle with Victoria George. Dec 3, 10:30am, Little Folkies Family Band holiday concert. Dec 4, Larry Campbell and Teresa Williams. Dec 5, open mic night with Austin DeLone. Dec 6, Afrolicious. Dec 7, the Steel Wheels. 19

Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Singers. 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Terrapin Crossroads

Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater

Nov 30, the Terrapin Family Band with Phil Lesh. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

Throckmorton Theatre Nov 30, 12pm, GGR Trio. Dec 2, Deborah Winter’s “Jazzin’ Up Joys of the Season” concert. Dec 4, 5:30pm, the Nathan Bickart Trio. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

NAPA COUNTY Blue Note Napa

Dec 5, USAF Band of the Golden West Holiday Concert. 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

Napa Valley Roasting Company Fri, jammin’ and java with Jeffrey McFarland Johnson. 948 Main St, Napa. 707.224.2233.

RaeSet

Dec 7, 6:30 and 9pm, Lavay Smith & Her Red Hot Skillet Lickers. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Wed, jazz night. Dec 2, Friday Night Blues with Gretschkat. Dec 5, Randy Foisey. 3150 B Jefferson St, Napa. 707.666.9028.

Ca’ Momi Osteria

Silo’s

Dec 2, Latin Nights with La Mixta Criolla and DJ Jose Miguel. Dec 3, Jamie Clark Band. 1141 First St, Napa. 707.224.6664.

Deco Lounge at Capp Heritage Vineyards

Dec 3, Dirty Cello. 1245 First St, Napa. 707.254.1922.

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Dec 1, Captain Paisley. Dec 2, Charles Wheal Band. Dec 3, Weekend at Bernie’s. Dec 4, DJ Aurelio. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Hydro Grill

First Saturday of every month, Always Elvis. 1403 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9777.

Jarvis Conservatory Dec 3, It’s a Grand Night for

& voena

children’s choir

Nov 30, Joe Kaplow. Wed, 5pm, Mike Greensill’s evening jazz. Dec 1, Obsidian Son. Dec 2, Papa Joe & the New Deal. Dec 3, Charlie Hunter Quartet. Dec 4, 5pm, Garage Band 101 for kids. Dec 7, Syria T Berry. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

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Uptown Theatre

Dec 1, An Irish Christmas with Kelly Dance Troupe. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

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Nov 30, Justin Diaz. 1040 Clinton St, Napa. 707.255.6646.

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NO GENRE LEFT BEHIND Joe Craven & the Sometimers specialize in danceable and eclectic styles of Americana when they perform on Friday, Dec. 2, at the Sebastopol Community Center. See Concerts, p23.


Arts Events Galleries RECEPTIONS Dec 1

WRITTEN BY DAVID SEDARIS ADAPTED BY JOE MANTELLO DIRECTED BY ARGO THOMPSON

Sebastopol Gallery, “An Invitation to Imagine,” new folkloric paintings from artist Teri Sloat. 5pm. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.829.7200.

STARRING DAVID YEN

Dec 3

Arts Guild of Sonoma, “Holiday Art Exhibition,” one-of-a-kind works are on display and available to complete your gift giving. 5pm. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.996.3115.

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Corte Madera Library, “Global Wand‘ring… Bali and Back,” photos by Terry Peck brings the world to you. 10am. 707 Meadowsweet Dr, Corte Madera. 707.924.6444.

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O’Hanlon Center for the Arts, “Art of the Spirit,” 6pm. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.4331. Throckmorton Theatre, “Throckmorton’s December Art Show,” featuring works by Stanley Goldstein and Liana Steinmetz. 5pm. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

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Agrella Art Gallery

Through Dec 15, “From the Forest Floor,” watercolors from a recent sabbatical project of SRJC instructor Deborah Kirklin shows alongside still-life show, “Zeuxis: Flowers as Metaphor.” SRJC, Doyle Library, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.527.4298.

Charles M. Schulz Museum

Through Dec 4, “Mr. Schulz Goes to Washington,” exhibit offers a look at a lighter side of politics and its intersection

with the life of Charles Schulz. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Christopher Hill Gallery

Through Nov 30, “Rascals, Retreats & Re-Purpose,” local assemblage artist Monty Monty and others unveil their newest works. 326 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707-3954646.

Chroma Gallery

Through Dec 3, “Visible Dreams,” multimedia group show features imaginative art inspired by dreams, magic, eroticism and the subconscious mind. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.293.6051.

Finley Community Center

Through Dec 8, “Three Artists/ Three Styles,” collage artist Thea Evensen, landscape painter Lynnie Rabinowitsh and abstract mosaic artist Kathy Farrell display. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 6; Sat, 9 to 11am. 707.543.3737.

Gallery 8

Through Dec 17, “Seeing the Unseen,” artists Helena Leifer and Max DuBois show artwork created in collaboration to produce a rich, diverse convergence of their once solitary efforts. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Wed-Sat, noon to 5pm; or by appointment. 707.573.9511.

conjunction with “Pairings: 16 Artists Creatively Combined,” which focuses on harmonious combinations of artworks. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Steele Lane Community Center

Through Dec 15, “Outer Glow,” Northern California artist Jenny Harp utilizes a variety of media in her work including printmaking, digital media, sculpture and installation. 415 Steele Ln, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 7; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.543.3282.

University Art Gallery

Through Dec 11, “Cries & Whispers,” Northern California artists John Yoyogi Fortes and Cate White create distinctly complex, colorful and personal paintings. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

MARIN COUNTY Alemany Library Gallery

Through Dec 16, “A Purposeful Life,” San Rafael artist Davis Perkins’ paintings depict the grandeur of the American landscape. Dominican University, 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3251.

Art Works Downtown

Through Dec 18, “Mere Color,” new abstracts by Susan Proehl with guest artists Rebeca Trevino, Paula Strother, Rosemary Ward and Betty Ann Sutton. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sat, 10:30 to 6; Sun, 10:30 to 4. 707.829.8912.

Through Dec 3, “Cynthia Pepper Solo Exhibit,” showing encaustics (beeswax paintings), monoprints, monotypes and all sizes of cards. Through Dec 31, “Small Works Exhibition,” a wonderful opportunity to find affordable, quality artwork for the holiday gift-giving season. Reception, Dec 9 at 5pm. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

Petaluma Arts Center

Gallery Route One

Graton Gallery

Through Dec 11, “Floribunda,” Hunt Institute’s international exhibition of botanical art and illustration includes local and regional botanical artists. 230 Lakeville St, Petaluma. ThursMon, 11 to 5. 707.762.5600.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art

Through Dec 31, “XXc Icons of Photography,” exhibit showcases the best of world photography and shows in

Through Dec 11, “An Inner Cosmos,” artist Johanna Baruch paints works inspired by Hubble telescope photos, showing alongside works by Will Thoms, Joanne Easton and Lorna Stevens. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Society of Artists

Through Dec 1, “89th Annual Members’ Show,” featuring a


diverse selection of works. 1515 Third St, San Rafael. Wed-Sun, noon to 4pm 415.464.9561. Through Dec 4, “Fall National Juried Exhibition,” annual show presents a thoughtprovoking survey of figurative and representational imagery, expressed through a variety mediums. Through Dec 4, “Waste Not: The Art of Recology,” group exhibit features artists who participated in San Francisco’s Recology Artist in Residence Program, including Marin residents Karrie Hovey, Bill Russell and James Sansing. 500 Palm Dr, Novato. WedFri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 11 to 5. 415.506.0137.

Room Art Gallery

Through Nov 30, “MOCÓ,” the Brazilian artist blurs the boundaries between high and low art. 86 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Mon-Fri, 10 to 6; Sat, 10 to 4. 415.380.7940.

San Geronimo Valley Community Center

Through Nov 30, “Pressing Matters,” group show highlights local print artists with lithographs, screenprints, monoprints and monotypes. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

NAPA COUNTY St Helena Library

Through Nov 30, “The Story of Robert Louis Stevenson,” exhibit highlights the author’s life and simultaneous works. 1492 Library Lane, St Helena. 707.963.5244.

Calistoga’s ag heritage and the holiday season comes together in this festive event. Dec 3, 7pm. Free. Downtown Calistoga, Lincoln Ave, Calistoga.

Cloverdale Winter Festival

Spend the afternoon with Santa Claus, kids activities, crafts, beer and wine, food and music by the Beautiful Questions. Dec 3, 2pm. Cloverdale Farmers Market Lot, Cloverdale Blvd and First St, Cloverdale. 707.266.8277.

Cotati Shop & Stroll

A day of discounted shopping in downtown Cotati includes tastings from local restaurants, Christmas tree lighting and holiday cheer. Dec 3, 11am. La Plaza Park, Old Redwood Highway, Cotati.

Dance Palace Holiday Crafts Fair

Annual fair is filled with the sights, sounds and scents of the winter holidays, with a special focus on “Made in West Marin” handcrafted items and gifts. Dec 2-4. Free admission. Dance Palace, 503 B St, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Deck the Hall

A planting party revitalizes the site. Dec 1, 9am. Petaluma City Hall, 11 English Street, Petaluma. 707-789-9664.

Fashion Your Holiday with ORT

Comedy

Marin Chapter of ORT America, the nonprofit Jewish organization, hosts a holiday party with delicious 3-course lunch, boutique shopping and silent auction. Dec 2, 10:30am. $48. Marin Country Club, 500 Country Club Drive, Novato. 415.794.7339.

Laugh Your Bingo Off!

The GrandSlam

Play one of America’s all-time favorite games in a wine cave, have some good laughs and win prizes. Dec 2, 7pm. $20. Deerfield Ranch Winery, 10200 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood. www. crushersofcomedy.com.

Events Bacchus Holiday Bazaar

Shop for unique holiday gifts at a Bavarian-inspired Christmas market, with wine, food trucks and a toy drive. Dec 3, 11am. Free admission. Gundlach Bundschu Winery, 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

Storytelling championship features 13 people sharing real life tales, hosted by Petaluma’s West Side Stories group. Dec 7, 7:30pm. $18. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Guerneville Holiday Parade of Lights

Old-fashioned parade fun for all features floats, horses, marching bands, antique cars, trucks and more all decorated with Christmas lights. Dec 3, 5:30pm. Free. Downtown Guerneville, Main St, Guerneville.

Handmade Holiday Crafts Fair

Over 80 local artists sell their gift-ready wares, with live

entertainment and holiday goodies. Dec 3-4. $2. Finley Community Center, 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

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Holiday Arts Faire

Join the community in celebration of the coming holiday season with music, homemade treats and Santa Claus. Dec 3, 11am. San Geronimo Valley Community Center, 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

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Showcase of fine local crafts ranges from weavings and jewelry to cookbooks and paintings. Dec 3-4. Free admission. The Weaving Studio, 343 Florence Ave., Sebastopol, abbybardhandwoven.com.

Holly King Craft Fair

Moonlight River Ministry’s fourth annual event features vendors, live music, food and festivities to get you into the winter spirit. Dec 3, 9am. Free admission. Guerneville Community Church, 14520 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.393.7751.

Howliday Photos

Man’s best friend deserves photos with Santa too! Dec 4, 11am. Unleashed! Dog Training, 301 2nd St, Petaluma. 707.763.9882.

ICB Winter Open Studios

See more than 100 artists’ studios and work in this seasonal tradition. Dec 2-4. The ICB Art Studios, 480 Gate Five Road, Sausalito, icb-artists. com.

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Browse a delectable assortment of wonderful homemade jams, baked goods and unique holiday items including wrapping paper, handmade holiday cards, wreaths and more. Dec 2-3. Free admission. St John’s Episcopal Church, 14 Lagunitas Rd, Ross.

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Tour along beautiful Mark West Creek and enjoy live music, hot cider, wreath-making and other holiday crafting. Dec 3, 12pm. by donation. Rancho Mark West Farm, 7125 St Helena Rd, Santa Rosa, landpaths.org.

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bring a wide range of gifts and holiday items to the historic farm cottage setting of the Landmark Art Center. Dec 3, 10am. Free. Tiburon Art & Garden Center, 841 Tiburon Blvd, Tiburon. 415.435.1853.

Light Up a Life Tree lightings and community celebrations remember loved ones with music and light. Dec 1, 6pm. Memorial Hospice, 439 College Avenue, Santa Rosa. 707.568.1094. Dec 2, 6pm. Center Park, Petaluma Boulevard N and B Street, Petaluma. Dec 3, 5pm. Healdsburg Plaza, 217 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.3301. Dec 4, 6pm. Star of the Valley, 545 White Oak Dr, Santa Rosa.

Lighting of the Snowmen Festival Be the first to see what the Snowmen are doing this year and enjoy live music, kids activities, wine and beer tasting, delicious food, festive decoration and more. Dec 3, 4pm. Free/ $10 Parking. Cornerstone Sonoma, 23570 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.933.3010.

Luther Burbank Holiday Open House View Burbank’s historic home and greenhouse, and get freshbaked cookies and spiced tea. Dec 3-4. $3. Luther Burbank Home & Gardens, Santa Rosa Avenue at Sonoma Avenue, Santa Rosa. 707.524.5445.

Mercatino di Natale Christmas Festival Celebrate the holidays Italianstyle with live entertainment, holiday lights, Christmas trees, silent auction, Italian food, wine, beer and artisan food and crafts. Dec 3, 11am. $5$10. St Rose Hall, 320 Tenth St, Santa Rosa. 707.591.9696.

Mill Valley Winterfest The plaza comes alive with an eclectic mix of live music, activities, food and more. Dec 4, 11am. Free. Mill Valley Depot Plaza, 87 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.9700.

Monte Rio Holiday Wonderland Craft Faire Local crafters sell their handmade holiday gifts with delicious foods and family fun atmosphere. Dec 3-4. Monte Rio Community Center, 20488 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.865.9956.

Muir Beach Holiday Arts Fair

Enjoy the scenery while browsing through amazing artwork and colorful crafts from over 40 local artists with crafts for kids and a holiday ornament extravaganza. Dec 3-4. Free. Muir Beach Community Center, 19 Seascape Dr, Muir Beach. 415.388.8319.

Sausalito Gingerbread House Tour & Competition Stroll the shops around Sausalito and view elaborate, festively decorated gingerbread houses galore. Dec 1-30. Downtown Sausalito, Caledonia Street, Sausalito.

Schurig Center Art Show & Holiday Celebration

Join in a festive afternoon of original art, live music, gifts and holiday cheer. Dec 3, 12pm. Schurig Center for Brain Injury Recovery, 1132 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.461.6771.

Time Traveler Masquerade

Don your favorite expressive attire and meet artist Daniel Merriam as he unveils his latest works. Dec 4, 3pm. Bubble Street Gallery, 565 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.339.0506.

Windsor Holiday Celebration

The town becomes aglow with holiday lights and spirit in this annual tradition featuring family activities and a tree lighting ceremony. Dec 1, 5pm. Windsor Town Green, Market Street and McClelland Drive, Windsor.

Wine Country Winter Festival

Inaugural celebration of art, food and seasonal fun features three stages of entertainment, wine and beer tasting, kids activities and vendors ready to help you complete your holiday shopping. Dec 3-4. $8-$15/ kids under 12 are free. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.824.8717.

Film Burn Country

Sonoma County premiere of the new drama filmed in Guerneville, Monte Rio and around the Russian River features the director and cast in attendance. Dec 3, 6pm. $10. Rio Theater, 20396 Bohemian Hwy, Monte Rio. 707.865.0913.

Cinema & Psyche

Study, watch, and discuss five pre-Code treasures from 1933 with a focus on cultural dissolution, moral revolution and film innovation of the era. Mon, 2pm. through Dec 12. $126. Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 240 Channing Way, San Rafael. 510.496.6060.

CULT Film Series

Christmas explodes onscreen as the action-packed “Die Hard” and “Die Hard 2: Die Harder” play back to back. Dec 1, 7pm. $10. Roxy Stadium 14 Cinemas, 85 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.8909.

The Space Between Us Advanced screening of the anticipated scifi romantic drama features a wine reception and is followed by Q&A session with co-writer and producer Richard B Lewis. Dec 1, 7pm. Free. Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

Food & Drink Calistoga’s Winter in the Wineries

Purchase a passport to tour, taste wine and meet winemakers at several heralded wineries, both large and small, in and around the town at the top of Napa Valley. Dec 3-Feb 5. $50. Calistoga wineries, various locations, Calistoga, visitcalistoga.com.

Holiday Tea Service

A relaxing atmosphere for friends and family to enjoy festive bites and beverages. Sat-Sun, 2pm. through Dec 18. Hotel Healdsburg, 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Korbel Holiday Shopping Spree Weekend

Stock up on Champagne all weekend. Dec 2-4. Korbel Champagne Cellars, 13250 River Rd, Guerneville. 707.824.7000.

Lectures Faith Ringgold: Friend Fellow Traveler and Colleauge

Moira Roth, who has traveled with and written on artist Faith Ringgold, presents a “picture” of Ringgold in her many roles as activist, writer and

performer. Dec 4, 3:30pm. $10$15. Art Museum of Sonoma County, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Marin’s Salmon; Past, Present & Future Talk focuses on the ecology of salmon and how habitat preservation and restoration efforts help maintain coho, chinook, and steelhead throughout the county. Dec 7, 7pm. Marin Humane Society, 171 Bel Marin Keys Blvd, Novato. 415.883.4621.

Pilgrimage to Camino de Santiago Joe and Marisa Jennings discuss how best to prepare for, experience and return from a secular or spiritual pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela. Dec 1, 7pm. Corte Madera Library. 707 Meadowsweet Dr, Corte Madera. 707.924.6444.

Randy Thom

Petaluma resident and two-time Oscar winning sound designer for Lucas will put on a dazzling multi-media presentation on the way he designs sound for movies. Dec 5, 7pm. Hanna Boys Center, 17000 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.996.6767.

Readings Angelico Hall

Nov 30, 7pm, “Testimony” with Robbie Robertson, musician shares his memoir in conversation with “Radio Silence” founder Dan Stone. $38. Dec 2, 7pm, “Our Revolution” with Bernie Sanders. sold-out. Dominican University, 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael 415.457.4440.

Book Passage

Dec 1, 7pm, “Am I Alone Here?” with Peter Orner, in conversation with author Christine Sneed. Dec 3, Book Passage’s 40th Anniversary, with events all day. Dec 4, 1pm, “Clean Soups” with Rebecca Katz. Dec 4, 4pm, “The Boundary Stone” with Gail Halverson. Dec 5, 7pm, “Cuba Libre” with Dick Jordan. Dec 6, 1:30pm, Holiday Gift Books Review with Elaine Petrocelli. Dec 6, 7pm, “I’m Right and You’re an Idiot” with James Hoggan. Dec 7, 7pm, “Boy” with Hathaway Barry. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

College of Marin Kentfield Campus

Dec 1, 7:30pm, “Scrappy Little

Aural History

Randy Thom speaks of his life in sound Randy Thom was a kid working in a Berkeley public radio station when he took a chance in 1975 that would change his life. Thom approached film editors and sound mixers Walter Murch (the man who coined the term “sound design”) and Ben Burtt (the guy who created the voice of R2-D2, among other sound effects in Star Wars) and asked them for a job. From his first film gig, recording sound effects for Francis Ford Coppola’s Apocalypse Now, to his recent work on films like The Revenant, Thom, an Academy Award winner, has elevated the role of sound in film. Since 2005, Thom has been the director of sound design at Skywalker Sound, Lucasfilm’s audio branch located in Marin County, where he works on several films a year. When he’s not in the studio, Thom travels the country and educates the public on the importance of, and innovations in, sound design in movies. His engaging presentations are packed with film selections and masterful storytelling. Thom appears in conversation with veteran NPR correspondent and old friend John McChesney and shares ear-opening stories as part of the Sonoma Speaker Series on Monday, Dec. 5, at Hanna Boys Center, 17000 Arnold Drive, Sonoma. 7pm. $35; $75 VIP meet-and-greet. sonomaspeakerseries. com.—Charlie Swanson

Nobody” with Anna Kendrick, to inquire about waitlist availability, call 415.927.0960

x1. sold-out. 835 College Ave, Kentfield.


Diesel Bookstore

Guerneville Library

Dec 1, 12:30pm, Book Discussion Group, read and be ready to talk about “The Teller” by Jonathan Stone. 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville 707.869.9004.

Left Bank Brasserie

Dec 4, 11:30am, “One to Five” with Ryan Scott, a Cooks with Books event, co-hosted by Book Passage. $115-$175. 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur 415.927.3331.

Marin Art & Garden Center

Nov 30, 6pm, “The Bold Dry Garden : Lessons from The Ruth Bancroft Garden” with Johanna Silver. $25. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross 415.455.5260.

Marin Center Showcase Theatre

Nov 30, 7pm, “Frank Lloyd Wright & San Francisco” with Paul V Turner. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael 415.499.6800.

Osher Marin JCC

Dec 1, 7:30pm, “Let There Be Laughter” with Michael Krasny, in conversation with comedy writer Marc Hershon. $15-$25. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael 415.444.8000.

Rebound Bookstore

Nov 30, 7pm, Hand to Mouth/ WORDS SPOKEN OUT, with Angelika Quirk and Melanie Maier. 1611 Fourth St, San Rafael 415.482.0550.

Songbird Community Healing Center Dec 6, 7pm, “Tarot at a Crossroads” with Kooch and Victor Daniels, book launch party features raffle and readings. Free. 8297 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati 707.795.2398.

St John’s Episcopal Church

Dec 2, 7pm and Dec 3, 2pm, A Christmas Memory, candlelit reading of Truman Capote’s short story. 415.456.1102. 14 Lagunitas Rd, Ross.

Theater The Adventures of Mr. Toad

Musical for the whole family is based on the beloved book

“The Wind in the Willows” by Kenneth Graham. Dec 2-18. $12$22. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

Bad Jews

Dec 2-4. $35-$65 and up. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

The Lion, the Witch & the Wardrobe

Left Edge Theatre presents the vicious comedy by Joshua Harmon. Through Dec 4. $25$40. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

College of Marin drama department presents a stage version of CS Lewis’ classic story. Through Dec 11. Studio Theatre, College of Marin, 835 College Ave, Kentfield.

The Bluebird

Miss Bennet: Christmas at Pemberley

Sonoma State University Dept of Theatre presents the enchanting holiday fairytale for all ages. Dec 1-10. $5-$17. Evert B. Person Theater, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.4246.

Christmas Carol

Veteran actor Charlie Siebert once again bring the famous tale of Ebenezer Scrooge to life on the stage for the whole family. Through Dec 23. 6th Street Playhouse, 52 West Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

The Great American Trailer Park Xmas Musical

The funny Xmas sendup returns to Lucky Penny for another run packed with trailer park tinsel. Dec 2-17. $27-$38. Lucky Penny Community Arts Center, 1758 Industrial Way, Napa. 707-2666305.

H.M.S. Pinafore

The Ross Valley Players delight with a production of Gilbert and Sullivan’s romantic romp set aboard a British Navy ship. Through Dec 18. $15-$27. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross.

Hope

World premiere of a new musical by Si Kahn tells the story of a Jewish immigrant family’s passage from Europe to America. Dec 1-18. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.0177.

It’s A Wonderful Life: Live Radio Show

Get into the holiday spirit with the return of last year’s hit, based on the classic Christmas film and presented by Sonoma Arts Live. Through Nov 30. $25 and up. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma, sonomaartslive.org.

Joy to the World

Join Transcendence Theater for a dazzling musical celebration filled with holiday favorites and modern twists on the world’s most cherished songs, featuring Broadway performers.

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This light-hearted continuance of Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice” focuses this time on middle sister Mary Bennet visiting the Darcy household at Pemberley for the winter holiday. Through Dec 18. $22$60. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

The Music Man

The award-winning musical for all ages is presented through a special arrangement with Music Theatre International. Through Dec 11. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4307.

Peter & the Starcatcher Spreckels Theater Company presents the story how Peter Pan becomes the magical, eternal boy of legend. Through Dec 18. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

Santaland Diaries

An old style circus based on the French tradition of the 1920`s PRESENTS

David Yen delights audiences with David Sedaris’ one-man tale of an out-of-work, antihero who decides to become a Macy’s elf during the holidays. Dec 2-18. Studio Theatre, 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

at Cornerstone Sonoma

Somewhere

An old style circus based on the French tradition of the 1920’s, Le Cirque de Bohème presents a magical world filled with enchantment, adventure and wonder. Through Dec 18. $22-$30. Cornerstone Sonoma, 23570 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.933.3010.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Nov 25, 26, 27 & Dec 3, 4, 10, 11, 17, 18 Shows Daily at 3pm & 5pm ~ Tickets on sale now! $

30 Adults ~ $22 Kids (15 or Younger)

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Cornerstone Sonoma, 23570 Arnold Dr, Sonoma

A portion of all ticket sales to benefit The Sonoma Valley Mentoring Alliance

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BER 30 -DECE MBER 6, 201 6 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Dec 1, 7pm, “Wonderland” with Steven Johnson. Dec 3, 1pm, WInter Cookbook Extravaganza, with authors Heidi Gibson, Nate Pollakand Irvin Lin. 2419 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur 415.785.8177.


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NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | NOVEMBE R 30 - D EC E M BE R 6, 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Trump on Pot

Return of reefer madness is unlikely BY PHILLIP SMITH

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ould Trump and a Republican Congress try to roll back the clock and force federal pot prohibition down the throats of states that have gone down the path toward legalization? Marijuana remains illegal under federal law, and Trump and the Congress could, in theory, try to put the genie back in the bottle. But is that actually going to happen? I don’t think so. First, the feds can roll back legal marijuana regulation and taxation, but they can’t roll back legal marijuana. The federal government could make it impossible for states to tax and regulate the marijuana industry and could theoretically drive the industry back underground by reversing the Obama administration’s Cole Memorandum, which turns a blind federal eye to state-legal marijuana programs, and by the Republican Congress refusing to extend laws that bar the use of federal funds

to go after state-legal marijuana programs. But—and this is a huge but—the federal government cannot force the states to make marijuana illegal, nor can it make them enforce federal marijuana prohibition. Second, marijuana legalization is popular—more popular than Trump. Legalization has won in every state where it’s been on the ballot, with the exception this year of red-state Arizona, where a multimillion dollar “No” campaign managed to barely defeat it. And it is an increasingly popular position nationwide, with public opinion polls the last couple of years consistently reporting majorities in favor. Trump supporters undoubtedly include people who support marijuana legalization. Trump can choose where he expends his political capital, and if he chooses wisely, going after legal marijuana won’t be a fight he picks. Third, Trump has said leave it to the states. OK, Trump said lots of things on the campaign trail. His positions are little more than sketches, and he’s hard to predict. But he has made clear statements about his position on marijuana legalization. “I think it certainly has to be . . . a state decision,” he told WWJ Newsradio 950 last March. “There seem to be certain health problems with it, and that would be certainly bothersome. I do like it . . . from a medical standpoint—it does do pretty good things. But from the other standpoint, I think that should be up to the states.” That position is precisely in line with the Obama administration’s approach and would keep the status quo intact. Don’t expect Trump to emerge as the champion of drug legalization while in the White House, but do expect him to live up to his word on the campaign trail on this issue. Phillip Smith is editor of the AlterNet Drug Reporter and author of the ‘Drug War Chronicle.’


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Understanding Vital, Peculiar and Solid Character Strategies “The three human types are a strategic play on life, or the Life Principal, Conceived as dilemma or conflict” Discover what your character strategy might be and how that strategy dictates your expression of life energy. Based on the Life and Teaching of Avatar Adi Da Samraj

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Astrology For the week of November 30

ARIES (March 21–April 19) “I frequently tramped eight or ten miles through the deepest snow,” wrote naturalist Henry David Thoreau in Walden, “to keep an appointment with a beech-tree, or a yellow birch, or an old acquaintance among the pines.” I’d love to see you summon that level of commitment to your important rendezvous in the coming weeks, Aries. Please keep in mind, though, that your “most important rendezvous” are more likely to be with wild things, unruly wisdom or primal breakthroughs than with pillars of stability, committee meetings and business-as-usual. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

For you Tauruses, December is I Accept and Love and Celebrate Myself Exactly How I Am Right Now Month. To galvanize yourself, play around with this declaration by Oscarwinning Taurus actress Audrey Hepburn: “I’m a long way from the human being I’d like to be, but I’ve decided I’m not so bad after all.” Here are other thoughts to draw on during the festivities: 1. “If you aren’t good at loving yourself, you will have a difficult time loving anyone.”—Barbara De Angelis. 2. “The hardest challenge is to be yourself in a world where everyone is trying to make you be somebody else.”—e. e. cummings. 3. “To accept ourselves as we are means to value our imperfections as much as our perfections.”—Sandra Bierig. 4. “We cannot change anything until we accept it.”—Carl Jung.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) Are your collaborative projects (including the romantic kind) evolving at a slower pace than you expected? Have they not grown as deep and strong as you’ve wished they would? If so, I hope you’re perturbed about it. Maybe that will motivate you to stop tolerating the stagnation. Here’s my recommendation: Don’t adopt a more serious and intense attitude. Instead, get loose and frisky. Inject a dose of blithe spirits into your togetherness, maybe even some hijinks and rowdy experimentation. The cosmos has authorized you to initiate ingenious surprises. CANCER (June 21–July 22) I don’t recommend that you buy a cat-o’-nine-tails and whip yourself in a misguided effort to exorcize your demons. The truth is, those insidious troublemakers exult when you abuse yourself. They draw perverse sustenance from it. In fact, their strategy is to fool you into treating yourself badly. So, no. If you hope to drive away the saboteurs huddled in the sacred temple of your psyche, your best bet is to shower yourself with tender care, even luxurious blessings. The pests won’t like that, and—if you commit to this crusade for an extended time—they will eventually flee. LEO (July 23–August 22) Nobel Prize-winning novelist Gabriel García Márquez loved yellow roses. He often had a fresh bloom on his writing desk as he worked, placed there every morning by his wife Mercedes Barcha. In accordance with the astrological omens, I invite you to consider initiating a comparable ritual. Is there a touch of beauty you would like to inspire you on a regular basis? It there a poetic gesture you could faithfully perform for a person you love? VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

“For a year I watched as something entered and then left my body,” testified Jane Hirshfield in her poem “The Envoy.” What was that mysterious something? Terror or happiness? She didn’t know. Nor could she decipher “how it came in” or “how it went out.” It hovered “where words could not reach it. It slept where light could not go.” Her experience led her to conclude that “There are openings in our lives of which we know nothing.” I bring this meditation to your attention, Virgo, because I suspect you are about to tune in to a mysterious opening. But unlike Hirshfield, I think you’ll figure out what it is. And then you will respond to it with verve and intelligence.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) A reporter at the magazine Vanity Fair asked David Bowie, “What do you consider your greatest achievement?” Bowie didn’t name any of his albums, videos or performances. Rather, he answered, “Discovering morning.” I suspect that you Libras will attract and generate marvels if you experiment with accomplishments like that in the

BY ROB BREZSNY

coming weeks. So, yes, try to discover or rediscover morning. Delve into the thrills of beginnings. Magnify your appreciation for natural wonders that you usually take for granted. Be seduced by sources that emanate light and heat. Gravitate toward what’s fresh, blossoming, just-in-its-early-stages.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

According to traditional astrology, you Scorpios are not prone to optimism. You’re more often portrayed as connoisseurs of smoldering enigmas and shadowy intrigue and deep questions. But one of the most creative and successful Scorpios of the 20th century did not completely fit this description. French artist Claude Monet was renowned for his delightful paintings of sensuous outdoor landscapes. “Every day I discover even more beautiful things,” he testified. “It is intoxicating me, and I want to paint it all. My head is bursting.” Monet is your patron saint in the coming weeks. You will have more potential to see as he did than you’ve had in a long time.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) A journalist dared composer John Cage to “summarize himself in a nutshell.” Cage said, “Get yourself out of whatever cage you find yourself in.” He might have added, “Avoid the nutshells that anyone tries to put you in.” This is always fun work to attend to, of course, but I especially recommend it to you Sagittarians right now. You’re in the time of year that’s close to the moment when you first barged out of your mom’s womb, where you had been housed for months. The coming weeks will be an excellent phase to attempt a similar if somewhat less extravagant trick.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) Hundreds of years ago, the Catholic Church’s observance of Lent imposed a heavy burden. During this six-week period, extending from Ash Wednesday to Easter Sunday, believers were expected to cleanse their sins through acts of self-denial. For example, they weren’t supposed to eat meat on Fridays. Their menus could include fish, however. And this loophole was expanded even further in the 17th century when the Church redefined beavers as being fish. (They swim well, after all.) I’m in favor of you contemplating a new loophole in regard to your own self-limiting behaviors, Capricorn. Is there a taboo you observe that no longer makes perfect sense? Out of habit, do you deny yourself a pleasure or indulgence that might actually be good for you? Wriggle free of the constraints. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) “The Pacific Ocean was overflowing the borders of the map,” wrote Pablo Neruda in his poem “The Sea.” “There was no place to put it,” he continued. “It was so large, wild and blue that it didn’t fit anywhere. That’s why it was left in front of my window.” This passage is a lyrical approximation of what your life could be like in 2017. In other words, lavish, elemental, expansive experiences will be steadily available to you. Adventures that may have seemed impossibly big and unwieldy in the past will be just the right size. And it all begins soon. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

“I have a deep fear of being too much,” writes poet Michelle K. “That one day I will find my someone, and they will realize that I am a hurricane. That they will step back and be intimidated by my muchness.” Given the recent astrological omens, Pisces, I wouldn’t be shocked if you’ve been having similar feelings. But now here’s the good news: Given the astrological omens of the next nine months, I suspect the odds will be higher than usual that you’ll encounter brave souls who’ll be able to handle your muchness. They may or may not be soul mates or your one-and-only. I suggest you welcome them as they are, with all of their muchness.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

31 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 30 - DECEMBE R 6, 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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Truly Tempting Platters Prepared with the finest and freshest ingredients. Make your holiday gathering easy and memorable with delicious party trays from Oliver’s. Local cheeses, quality meats, freshly made dips, and fresh fruit & vegetables, are beautifully arranged & ready for your guests to enjoy. Choose a tray from our popular menu or create your own. To order, simply visit our Deli Department or call in your order. 24 hours notice is required for these items. More notice may be required for custom orders. Local delivery is available for a $25 fee. Payment is required 24 hours before pick up or delivery for any order over $100.

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