Page 1

VOTE FOR 2017 BEST OF AT BOHEMIAN.COM

SERVING SONOMA & NAPA COUNTIES | OCTOBER 26-NOVEMBER 1, 2016 | BOHEMIAN.COM • VOL. 38.25

nonprofit issue

the pipeline How Marin and SF financial firms fuel the fracking boom p14 P14

NONPROFIT THEATER P8

CHIMERA ARTS P20

HALLOWEEN HAPPENINGS P23


SCP Drive EV 9 x 10.pdf 1 10/21/2016 9:18:48 AM

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTOBER 26- NOV E M BE R 1 , 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

2

DRIVE CLEAN & SAVE! Receive an

$8,500 EV Purchase Credit 2017 BMW i3 More than 5 available at this offer

Receive a

$10,000 EV Purchase Credit 2016 Nissan LEAFÂŽ More than 5 available at this offer

Drive Clean Drive EverGreen Purchase credits available 10/27/16 to 1/5/17 while vehicle inventories last; limit two vehicles per electric account. Other provisions are available for leases. *$2,500 incentive available to all SCP customers and additional $2,500 incentive available to SCP customers on "CARE" or "FERA" programs, while incentive funds last. **SCP pays for charging equipment; customer pays for shipping/handling and installation; limit two per electric account. ***Visit cleanvehiclerebates.org for income limits. Must obtain a Verified SCP Customer Certificate to be eligible for maximum savings for this first-come, first-served offer. Certificates, program conditions and limitations available at driveEV.org. Customers are solely responsible for the negotiation of final purchase or lease terms. This program is part of SCP’s commitment to reducing emissions from gas-powered vehicles.


Bohemian

Editor Stett Holbrook, ext. 202

News Editor Tom Gogola, ext. 106

Arts Editor Charlie Swanson, ext. 203

Copy Editor Gary Brandt, ext. 150

Contributors Ben Adams, Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, James Knight, Will Parrish, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow, Flora Tsapovsky

Intern Amelia Malpas

Design Director Kara Brown

Art Director Tabi Zarrinnaal

Production Operations Manager Sean George

Senior Designer Jackie Mujica, ext. 213

Layout Artist Gary Brandt

Advertising Director Lisa Marie Santos, ext. 205

Advertising Account Managers Augusto León, ext. 212 Mercedes Murolo, ext. 207 Lynda Rael, ext. 204

Sales Operations Manager Deborah Bonar, ext. 215

Publisher Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2016 Metrosa Inc.

Cover design by Tabi Zarrinnaal.

3 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 26- NOVE MBER 1 , 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288


bring your music back to life

Lavish Hi-Fi

Sound So Good It’s Scary.

a division of Lavish Automation

1044 4th Street, Santa Rosa 707.595.2020 | www.LavishHiFi.com Tues–Fri: 10–6:30pm | Sat: 10–6pm

.. UBER ALiCE

BANKING ON OIL North Bay and S.F. financiers cash in on fracking, p14.

nb

‘You didn’t save me,’ the frog replied. ‘You’ll have bad sulfides for seven years.’ SWIRL P1 3 The Kitchen Collective DINING P1 0

S.F. Bay’s Fracking Finance Pipeline

www.uberoptics.com

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | OCTOBE R 26- NOV E M BE R 1 , 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

4

COVE R STO RY P14

Sonoma County Gets It Wrong TH E NUG G ET P34

Unique Frames • Digital Rx Lenses • Sunglasses • Adjustments & Repairs

19 Kentucky St.

PETALUMA

707-763-3163

Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Dining p10 Swirl p13 Cover Feature p14

Culture Crush p19 Arts & Ideas p20 Stage p21 Film p22 Music p23

Clubs & Concerts p24 Arts & Events p27 Classified p35 The Nugget p34 Astrology p35


5

Madame Corvidae

beckons your presence at the

UR S E E O ORS! R AP T LIV E

Masquerade & Soirée Spectacular Sat, November 1 9 2016 • 3: 3m0 to 8 o’clock pm

A Benefit for the Bird Rescue Center

Join us for an Evening of Costumed Revelry at The Bird Rescue Center. Sponsored by North Bay Bohemian and Hawley Winery

Art, Science, Tours and Featuring the Rouge Dancers Details: birdresquecenter.org Tickets: bit.ly/benefi tBirdRescue

71 Brookwood Ave., Santa Rosa 707.576.0861 Mon–Sat 10am–6pm, Sun 11am–4pm • www.wbu.com/santarosa

Birdseed • Feeders • Birdbaths • Optics • Nature Gifts • Books

THE BIRD RESCUE CENTER • 3430 CHANATE RD, SANTA ROSA

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 26- NOVE MBER 1 , 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Fine Dining For Wild Birds


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTOBER 26- NOV E M BE R 1 , 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

6

Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

Good Witches

Join Me

Thank you for the “witches next door” article (“Into Darkness,” Oct. 19). It was very well done, and my compliments on the photography and use of photos. Totally great work. Blessed be.

Lynda Hopkins is a fresh, authentic, independent voice running for 5th District supervisor. She is smart, tough and loves the West County. What a natural! She’s energetic and creative with a passion for government transparency.

JOHN NEVO San Geronimo

A delight at town-hall meetings, Lynda Hopkins listens to everyone, takes new ideas gracefully into consideration, is flexible, reasonable, open and direct.

THIS MODERN WORLD

Her background in land use and environmental studies is a perfect fit for the 5th District. She will protect our coast; assure free access to our beaches; maintain our rivers, parks and roads; and enhance our schools, libraries and social services. She’s got what we need and are looking for! Join me in voting for Lynda Hopkins for supervisor.

ANN MAURICE

Occidental

By Tom Tomorrow

Keep ’em Separated Community separators were created by a ballot measure 20 years ago to protect specific areas of farmland and open space between and around Sonoma County’s towns and cities, in order to create greenbelts around the towns. The ballot measure was approved by over 70 percent of the voters. Measure K, the Community Separator Protection Ordinance, will, if approved by the voters this fall, protect 53,576 acres of rural land from urban sprawl. Not only will this help maintain the unique identity and distinct character of each city or town, it will also help protect agricultural land, open space, watersheds, groundwater-recharge areas, wildlife habitat and corridors. And by protecting our air, water and soil, community separators help to provide a better quality of life for all Sonoma County inhabitants. For further information on Measure K, visit www.keepcommunityseparators.com. Urban growth boundaries (UGBs), passed by individual cities, and community separators, throughout the county, are complementary. The UGBs are expiring and will be renewed on different timelines by each city. Cotati voters will be voting on Measure Q this fall, to renew their existing urban growth boundary for another 30 years. For information on Measure Q, see www.cotatiugb.org. As a 20-year resident of Cotati, I love our small town, and also the beautiful, diverse ecosystems of Sonoma County, from oak woodlands and redwoods to meadows and wetlands, and enjoy the wide variety of foods available from local farms. Vote Yes on K! If you vote in Cotati, Vote Yes on Q, too!

JENNY BLAKER

Cotati

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


Tending the Fire Three years after Andy Lopez’s death, what has changed? BY SUSAN C. LAMONT

L

ast Saturday was the third anniversary of the killing of Andy Lopez by Sheriff’s Deputy Erick Gelhaus. Friends, activists and members of the community gathered to honor his memory and rededicate themselves to changing a system that finds this acceptable and exonerates the killer.

What has changed and what has not in those three years? The empty lot in Roseland where he was shot is one of the bright spots in this grim story. A memorial at the site is tended by the community, where gatherings have been held in Andy’s name. Community meetings were conducted to transform the empty lot. Promised a park 28 years ago, the community will finally get one, with the price tag being the death of one of its own. Law enforcement improvements are more difficult. Responding to justifiably angry protests over Andy’s killing by young Latino students, the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors created the Community and Local Law Enforcement Task Force. The task force helped create the Independent Office of Law Enforcement Review and Outreach. Many people in Sonoma County think “problem solved.” But it’s really just a board asking a task force to make recommendations to create another office to create another board to make more recommendations, with no force of law, which can be ignored by the sheriff. Recently, the head of one such board in Sacramento resigned saying that such an entity cannot meet community expectations. And we had an “independent” investigation, didn’t we? But District Attorney Jill Ravitch hired William Lewinski, a law enforcement consultant and expert witness who sells himself to municipalities that want officers declared innocent after they’re involved in shootings. Sheriff Steve Freitas has promoted Gelhaus for a job well done. Some students at Santa Rosa Junior College and community members declare Gelhaus’ continued presence as a public and mental health crisis for traumatized youth in affected communities. Some seeds require a fire to sprout. The many protests across the country against killings by law enforcement are part of the wildfire that can release seeds of a new culture around law enforcement. Politicians have learned well how to put out those fires through bureaucracy. It is our job to keep them lit. It requires community involvement to make any change real. Susan C. Lamont is a member of the Police Brutality Coalition of Sonoma County. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Black Jade by Mason K ay

9070 Windsor Road Windsor

707 836 1840 MarkShimizuDesign.com

*Your valid ID card is your 2016 sctransit pass.

College Ride Free Students in 2016! contact us at 800.345.7433 or visit us on the web at sctransit.com for more information.

Discover the Non-surgical Painless therapy for your pet! For Arthritis, Skin Conditions, Post-op Recovery, Soft Tissue Injuries, Senior Dog Issues and more.

Advanced Light Therapy for Pets OPEN HOUSE and DEMONSTRATION Sat. October 29th 10 am - 2 pm at

Four Paws Pet Ranch 3410 Guerneville Road

fourpawspetranch.com - 707-542-3766

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 26- NOVE MBER 1 , 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Rants

7


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | OCTOBER 26- NOV E M BE R 1 , 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

8

Paper THE

KEEPING THE LIGHTS ON In addition to staging excellent plays and musicals, Cinnabar Theater is good at nonprofit fundraising. It has to be.

Hat in Hand

Nonprofit status, sponsors keeps theater alive in the North Bay BY DAVID TEMPLETON

‘T

he climate for nonprofit arts organizations right now is extremely difficult,” says Diane Dragone, executive director of Cinnabar Theater in Petaluma. “As businesses—and we are businesses—nonprofit theaters are always struggling.” We hear it all the time, usually

at curtain speeches before a show. An artistic director or other representative of the theater company tells you there will be an intermission, asks you to turn off your cell phone, and then reminds you—here it is—that ticket sales are not enough to cover the costs of the production you are about to see. Please consider making an additional donation on your way out. How much of a nonprofit theater company is “theater” and

how much is “nonprofit”? Operating out of an old schoolhouse just off Petaluma Boulevard, Cinnabar is one of 18 theater companies in Sonoma and Napa counties that owns or rents its own theater space. At least 15 other companies exist in the same area and are either nomadic or only operate seasonally, as with summertime Shakespeare companies. As Dragone suggests, there really is an unfortunate public perception that nonprofit

theaters are, by definition, supposed to be broke—which may come from the way most theaters are always begging for money. But the backstage truth is a little more complicated than it sounds. “It is a known fact that the theater arts in America, and the arts in general, do not pay for themselves,” says Dragone. “That’s the reason theaters are all nonprofits. In Europe, the government subsidizes theaters, and people pay a higher tax to make that happen. What the people get for that tax is affordable theater. In America, since we don’t have that, we are put in the position of having to charge more for tickets and having to ask art supporters for money all the time.” Cinnabar—now in its 44th year of presenting live operas, musicals and plays, and moving into its final weekend of the drama The Quality of Life—has established itself as a small theater producing consistently high-quality theater with a strong performing-arts training program for youth that many see as one of the most significant local breeding grounds for the next generation of theatrical talent. To pay for all of that, Cinnabar has built a strong cadre of individual sponsors, many of whom take it upon themselves to underwrite at least one show every season, donating between $3,500 and $10,000 to make that production possible. “As businesses,” says Dragone, “every theater group I know is struggling one way or another, and we all have to depend on the audience and our surrounding community—because even a soldout run of a hit show might not be enough to keep the doors open.” Generally speaking, Cinnabar has done a solid job operating as an arts organization and as a business, with a small paid staff and a core of volunteers, all underscoring a solid internal understanding of what its audience wants, and how to maintain the infrastructure that makes that possible. “Cinnabar is small,” says Dragone. “That’s part of our brand—a small theater doing


adds Bartolucci, “so we know we can’t get 100 percent of our budget from ticket sales. We still have to rely on the kindness of, not strangers, but supporters. . . . Just not as much as some companies do.” Spreckels Theater Company, which operates two theater spaces out of the Spreckels Performing Arts Center in Rohnert Park, though definitely part of a nonprofit agency, is not a nonprofit in the traditional sense. “We’re a whole lot different from other theater companies in the area, because we’re a department of the city of Rohnert Park,” says managing director Gene Abravaya. “We are funded by the city, so many of the concerns that other theaters have, we don’t. That said, we have a budget that must be approved each year by the city council, and we are responsible for operating within our means.” A piece of that budget calls for the theater company—which is part of an overall communitycenter operation that includes a significant rental arm—to earn a certain amount of money each year from a combination of rentals, ticket prices and fundraisers. “We operate with the idea that our shows are a community service and, as such, are not required to charge more than $26 a seat,” Abravaya says. Compare the $26 ticket price for Titanic to 6th Street Playhouse’s $35 maximum ticket price for its upcoming musical Red Hot Mama, or Lucky Penny’s $38 maximum price for this December’s Great American Trailer Park Christmas Musical. That price cap assures that, for a theater of its size, Spreckels is among the most affordable in the North Bay. “That’s part of our mission,” Abravaya says, “to present theater as a community service, and as such to make it as affordable as possible for everyone. “Personally,” he adds, “I think that’s what every theater tries to do—but each one has to accomplish that according to whatever challenges they happen to have.”

D EBRI EF ER Three Years Gone Sonoma criminal justice activists recently memorialized the third anniversary of Andy Lopez’s shooting with renewed demands that Sonoma County Sheriff Steve Freitas account for the findings of a 2000 advisory report from the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. The federal report made numerous recommendations to the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office on how it should improve its policing protocols and, by extension, its civil rights standing in the community and the jail it runs. In this latest push for police reform, the local coalition of reform advocates have leveraged the newly constituted Sonoma County’s Independent Office of Law Enforcement Review and Outreach, and sent the five-point demand list to new department head Jerry Threet. He is the county’s first independent monitor and took his post in March. Sheriff’s spokesman Sgt. Spencer Crum says in an email that the sheriff’s office “has implemented most, if not all, of these recommendations” over the past 16 years and highlighted efforts at gender and ethnic diversity as he noted that “we continually train on cultural diversity, domestic violence, substance abuse and de-escalation/ diffusion tactics.” Crum also says the department now mandates crisisintervention training, and adds, “We continually review our use of force policy and recently we found a deputy exceeded the use of force policy and he is no longer with us and is under review for criminal charges,” he wrote. “This was done proactively by our department with no complaint filed.” —Tom Gogola

Our Roots:

Local Schools

✓ 0% loans for AG students ✓ YouthSaver to 7.07% (APY)

Locally earned money stays LOCAL! Guerneville Healdsburg Santa Rosa Sebastopol Napa

HERE FOR GOOD 707/546-6000

comfirstcu.org

Your vision… my resources, dedication and integrity… Together, we can catch your dream.

Realtor Coldwell Banker

Suzanne Wandrei

Eco Green Certified

cell: 707.292.9414 www.suzannewandrei.com

Affordable Vaccination Clinics

every Sunday 9:30–11:30am

Western Farm Center

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

21 West 7th Street Santa Rosa • 707.545.0721 www.westernfarmcenter.com

9 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 26- NOVE MBER 1 , 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

professional-level shows. We could possibly make more money by renting out the stage to other companies, but then we risk diluting our brand, should audiences confuse the show we produce with the shows our renters might be doing. Our brand is too important to risk that.” Every nonprofit theater in the North Bay shares many of the same challenges. But each finds its own ways to meet those challenges. “One thing that sets us apart from a lot of others is that we don’t have any paid employees,” says Taylor Bartolucci, co-founder and artistic director of Napa’s Lucky Penny productions, which became a nonprofit in 2011. The company opened its own 100seat space, the Lucky Penny Community Arts Center, in January 2015, and is getting ready to open a run of The Miracle Worker. “Most companies of our size have at least one or two people on staff. That means that Barry [Martin] and I do a lot of the work, probably spending more time here than we do at our fulltime jobs.” One motivation for that, says Bartolucci, is to allow Lucky Penny to buck the trend of most nonprofit theaters who aggressively remind audiences that only a half or less of their operating costs come from ticket sales. Though Lucky Penny has received a number of individual donations since opening—including targeted gifts to allow the company to install seats, air conditioning and new PA system—the majority of its slim operating budget is supported through revenues from productions, says Martin, cofounder and managing director. “I never liked the feeling of having to be constantly asking, asking, asking for money,” he says, while allowing that the company does still depend on a certain amount of contributed income. “Our model is to try to keep costs down, and quality high, so we can earn a larger percentage of what we need.” “But we also want to keep tickets prices as low as possible,”


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTOBER 26- NOV E M BE R 1 , 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

10

Dining WELL STOCKED The Kitchen Collective comes with top-of-the-line appliances and a pantry loaded with all the basics.

Supper Club

Kitchen Collective envisions a shared space for cooks who want to get their chef on BY FLORA TSAPOVSKY

T

he sharing economy has brought us shared homes, shared automobiles, shared working spaces and even shared dog care. Will a shared professional kitchen be next? Napa entrepreneur Garret Murphy believes it will.

The founder of Napa’s new Kitchen Collective, Murphy enthusiastically describes the venture as a cooking club with a professional kitchen equipped with the latest gadgets and stocked with staple ingredients. The impressive facility, located in an industrial area outside downtown Napa, also features a dining area for cooking

classes and demos, a cookbook library, a fireplace and plenty of additional spaces for mingling and hosting events. Walking around the kitchen, Murphy points at the massive Montague range stove, the spacious freezer and the batches of duck fat and sourdough starters available to those who rent the space. The idea of culinary hubs isn’t

new to the Bay Area. Forage Kitchen, an events and cooking space for chefs, recently opened in Oakland, and La Cocina in San Francisco offers a fully equipped professional kitchen and a business incubator for members, primarily women from immigrant communities. Murphy’s idea, however, is different. Instead of offering business tools and guidance for food entrepreneurs or professional cooks, the Kitchen Collective caters to the passionate foodies and cooking enthusiasts who’ve always dreamt of playing with a performance stove, a high-end food processor and a dizzying array of flours and butter varieties. Members get access to the kitchen and will be able to host a dinner party or practice a complicated recipe, alone or with assistance from the collective’s staff. “Instead of joining a country club because you like tennis, you join a cooking club since you like to cook,” explains Murphy. “You’ll have a support staff and chefs guiding you, and all the tools you need to cook a delicious meal you might have tried in a restaurant.” Murphy was born in Boston but grew up in Paris, and attended the Ferrandi French School of Culinary Arts. He moved back to the United States in 1985 and worked as a pastry chef in hotels in Miami, Newport Beach and Los Angeles, and then moved to Napa Valley to become a consultant at Auberge du Soleil and Meadowood. He later opened Napa Valley Ovens in Calistoga before working for the Chateau Potelle winery for six years. It took Murphy 10 years to realize his vision for the Kitchen Collective. It was inspired by a similar model he once saw in San Sebastian, Spain, on a family trip. “A private club for a hundred families, with a commercial kitchen, a bunch of communal tables,” he says. “I loved it, but it needed to be Americanized.” The Americanization comes


—Stett Holbrook, Bohemian Editor

Happy Hour

3:30-5:30 $ 3 yakitori & Izakaya Newly expanded patio and bar

6948 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol 707.827.3609 | www.ramengaijin.com

Join the Das Boot Beer Club! 10% of all boot sales all October to raise money for our friend’s prosthetic leg

Tap Room Now Open! Join us for rotating food trucks, kegs, cases, and now Heroine IPA 6 Pack cans to go. Stay for the cold craft beer.

Simply Vietnam

1304 Scott St Petaluma

Traditional Vietnamese Restaurant

707.778.8384

Mon–Sat 10–9pm ~ Sun 11–8 966 North Dutton Ave. Santa Rosa 707.566.8910 www.simply-vietnam.com

101northbeer.com

lisa simply vietnam 1116 boho jam/ms

1 0 0 % O R GA N I C G OJ I P H YTO - B R E W

Farmed in Sonoma County.

FEED YOUR MIND, BODY & SOUL

OR A C

GOJI

pa cit an ce ca

y

18,529

ox yg en

ra dic al

ab so rb

N O S U P P L E M E N TS !

Savor

O N LY 4 0 C A L O R I E S

CO AMERIC AN

5 G TOTA L S U G A RS

FR

AWARd-Winning BReAdS

YOUR LOCAL BAKERY

Franco american Bakery 707.545.7528

202 W. 7th Street, Santa Rosa Mon, Tue, Thur, Fri 8:30–4:00 Sat 8:00–2:30 • Closed Wed & Sun

418.85/ug PQQ* PER BOTTLE *PYRROLOQUINOLINE QUINONE

We brew our fresh goji berries as a tea to reduce total sugars while allowing the maximum nutrition to be delivered.

W W W . G OJ I F A R M U S A . C O M / G OJ I FA R M US A

@ G OJ I FA R M US A

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 26- NOVE MBER 1 , 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

The Kitchen Collective, 1650 Soscol Ave., Napa. kitchencollective.club.

11

The Sonoma-County Style ramen is as delicious as ever.

AN

into play with a more interactive, experiential approach. The space will feature TV monitors where cooking classes by chefs can be shown live, and video cameras so members can show off their cooking skills in real time and connect with family members and friends, Murphy presumes, as they slice and dice. Restaurant pop-ups, seminars and chef lectures are also in the works. “My main dream is to create a new concept that will be really embraced by millennials as they get older,” Murphy says. Those millennials better have the funds. Full membership is $250 a month, with a one-time initiation fee of $2,500; a “social membership” offers access to all the events but not the kitchen for $150 a month and a $1,500 initiation fee. The Kitchen Collective has a handful of founding members and will open to the public in January. “I’ve been cooking for a long time and thought the format was very intriguing,” says founding member Clark Cunningham, vice president for a Sacramentobased tech consulting firm. “The open concept of how the physical environment is structured, coupled with the notion of pulling in a variety of influences and disciplines from professional chefs and other members was very appetizing.” This month, Cunningham put the membership to use by hosting a brunch for a dozen friends and serving them dishes he cooked with the help of a Kitchen Collective sous chef. Is the Kitchen Collective a necessity or a shared-economy luxury? Clearly, it’s the latter. But it sounds like a delicious one. “It’s a chance to share,” Cunningham says. “Culinarily, socially and emotionally, through the shared love of great food, incredible libations and great company.”


Wineries

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTOBER 26- NOV E M BE R 1 , 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

12

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA COUNTY D’Argenzio Winery

Much like the family-run, backstreet bodegas of the old country that the decor invokes. Sangiovese, Moscato di Fresco, and Randy Rhoads Cab. 1301 Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa. Daily 11am–5pm. $10 tasting fee. 707.280.4658.

Gloria Ferrer Winery

(WC) Part of the international Freixenet wine empire, owner Jose Ferrer’s family has been in this business since the 13th century; this tasting room was remodeled in 2015, with new food pairing experiences added. Explore the champagne caves on a guided tour. 23555 Carneros Hwy., Sonoma. Open daily, 10am–5pm. Cave tours at 11am, 1pm and 3pm. 707.996.7256.

Imagery Estate Winery

Ayurvedic Indian Head Massage cUHOLHIIURP WHQVLRQ KHDGDFKHV &VLQXVLWLV cLPSURYHV PRELOLW\LQ QHFN& VKRXOGHUV

Margery Smith

CMT# 62066

707.536.1797

HANDY JIM • carpentry/painting • seismic retrofit • structural work • stucco/concrete • gutter cleaning • roofing

FAR WEST RESTORATION & CONSTRUCTION 707.280.4891 • FarWestConstr.com Jim Kennedy CA License #751689

3205 Dutton Ave Santa Rosa

707.546.0000

Move-in Specials

10x15 for $155 per month Starting Rates—Call for Details

www.StorageMasterSR.com

Results from a 20-year collaboration between winemaker Joe Benziger and artist Bob Nugent. The concept: Commission unique artwork from contemporary artists for each release of often uncommon varietal wines. The wine gets drunk. The art goes on the gallery wall. Not so complicated. Count on the reds and plan to take a stroll down the informative “varietal walk� on the grounds. 14335 Hwy. 12, Glen Ellen. Summer hours, Sunday–Thursday, 10am– 4:30pm; Friday–Saturday, 10am–5pm. 707.935.4515.

Lambert Bridge Winery On gloomy

afternoons, a string of lights and a curl of smoke from the stone chimney make this Dry Creek landmark all the more inviting. Chandelierilluminated redwood cellar is a warm setting to sample meticulously crafted Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay, Zin and claret paired with gourmet small plates. 4085 West Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open 10:30am–4:30pm. Tasting fee $15; food pairing, $45. 707.431.9600.

Paradise Ridge Winery A gorgeous, provocative sculpture garden with annually changing exhibits set amid a pygmy forest. Stay for sunset Wednesday evenings April–October. 4545 Thomas Lake Harris Drive, Santa Rosa. Open daily, 11am–5:30pm. 707.528.9463. Paradise also offers its food-friendly wines at an accessible little shack in the heart of Sonoma Valley. Try structured clarets from the estate’s high-elevation Rockpile vineyards; do some time with “the Convict� Zinfandel. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 8860 Sonoma Hwy., Kenwood. 707.282.9020.

Tin Barn Vineyards

Yes, it is located in a tin barn, of sorts–in the midst of a remote industrial park, home to “Eighth Street wineries.� From allspice to Jolly Rancher, coriander, fresh raspberry, jelly Danish and horsetail to a simply enjoyable claret style quaff, it’s all flavor and no frills in this friendly warehouse winery. 21692 Eighth St. E., Ste. 340, Sonoma. Saturday– Sunday, 11am–4pm. Tasting fee, $6. 707.938.5430.

Wilson Winery Scenic setting and rustic-modern tasting room makes for an atmospheric, recommended visit. Single-vineyard Zinfandels, Cabernet Sauvignons, Cabernet Franc, Syrah and Petite Sirah win awards for good reason— namely, even curmudgeons take one sip and turn into believers. 1960 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am to 5pm. Tastings are $5; $10 for reserves. 707.433.4355.

MARIN COUNTY Heidrun Meadery This

is not your fÌder’s mead: flower varietal, regional, mÊthode champenoise sparkling mead on a farm made for the bees. 11925 Hwy. 1, Point Reyes Station. By

appointment only, Monday– Friday. 415.663.9122.

Point Reyes Vineyards

The tasting room features many varietals but the main reason to go is for the sparkling wines. Open Saturday–Sunday, 11am–5pm. 12700 Hwy. 1, Point Reyes. 415.663.1011.

NAPA COUNTY Bennett Lane Winery

The old trope “beer-drinking NASCAR fans vs. Chardonnaysipping highbrows� runs out of gas at a winery that sponsors an annual NASCAR race and has its own car, emblazoned with grapes. A Roman emperor who appreciated hearty vino as much as a good chariot race inspired Maximus White and Red “feasting wines.� 3340 Hwy. 128, Calistoga. 707.942.6684.

Castello di Amorosa

Not only an “authentic Medieval Italian castle,� but authentically far more defensible than any other winery in Napa from legions of footmen in chain mail. In wine, there’s something for every taste, but don’t skip the tour of great halls, courtyards, cellars, and–naturally–an authentic dungeon. . 4045 N. St. Helena Hwy., Calistoga. 9:30am–5pm. Tasting fees, $10–$15; tours, $25–$30. Napa Neighbor discounts. 707.967.6272.

Frank Family Vineyards A media mogul

imagineered a Napa Valley winery that’s surprisingly no-frills, friendly and free of charge, from the flute of bubbly welcome to the last sip of award-winning Cab. Emphasis is on the historic Larkmead winery, the wine and, natch, the guest at this popular tasting room set in the winery’s remodeled craftsman farmhouse. Frank Family Vineyards, 1091 Larkmead Lane, Calistoga. Tasting daily, 10am–4pm, $10; reserve, $25. 707.942.0753.


Come for the

The creepy-crawlies in your Cabernet BY JAMES KNIGHT

T

hose eyes. I’ll never forget those eyes. They were a frog’s eyes, but still—the horror, the horror.

It’s around this time, every October, that I remember. The blood-orange sun had set, and I was working into the night, dragging the hose from one tank to another for that evening’s pump-over routine. But the last tank had just got started fermenting. And as the stew of grapes and juice and material other than grapes (MOG) began frothing and swirling into a vortex, I saw a little frog, hanging onto a clump of grape skins and staring back at me. Was he saying “Help me” or “It’s too late for me”? I offered the little fellow a paddle and implored him to grab on, but he sank in a vat of Zinfandel as red and frothy as hot lava, still staring at me as he went down to his doom. It was like the fable of the scorpion and the frog, except that instead of “It’s my nature,” all I could say was, “Sorry, dude, I’m just the harvest intern.” “You didn’t save me,” the frog replied. “You will have bad sulfides for seven years.” A luckier little fellow was a mouse I spotted perched atop a cartload of rain-soaked grapes in Germany. A pointy-eared critter out of some fairy-tale illustration, Herr Maus looked perfectly pleased with himself—until I called attention to him, and the farmer gently pitched the mouse off the cart before he got dumped headfirst into the crusher. Equally lucky was the gangly, green praying mantis scooped by a watchful intern off the sorting line destined for high-priced Russian River Valley Pinot Noir. Not so lucky or plucky was the intern at another winery, who fled the job in horror after facing a daily stream of earwigs crawling over the grapes. That year, it was earwigs; another, it was the dread drosophila, an invasive fruit fly that causes vinegar aromas in wines. Some wineries have ultra-modern optical sorting devices that, it’s claimed, bump everything but perfectly ripe grapes off the line. Others harvest by machine, throwing everything in the mix. But even hand-picked grapes harbor bugs both good and bad—spiders being the good ones. I try to lend them a hand when I spot them attempting to wobble out. It is our nature, after all, as winemakers and consumers. Each vintage, innumerable critters and creepy-crawlies find themselves suspended in fermentation, slowly settling out in the dregs of the wine. But don’t worry. Aside from the odd drosophila or ladybug invasion, they say that no trace really remains in the wine you buy by the bottle. Except their itty-bitty ghosts.

K&L

BISTRO

and Stay for the

Bites!

All Weekend • Oct 28–31 • Bitches Brew $ 5

First one free for those in costume

• craft cocktails • Hangover Brunch

both Sat & Sun, 11 to 4pm $ 10 bottomless Mimosas

Have a safe and spooky weekend! 119 South Ma in Street | SebaStopol, Ca 707.823.6614 | klbiStro.CoM

THE DRIVE’S CALIFORNIA WINE COUNTRY WEDNESDAYS AT 5PM Welcome New Co-Host, Dan Berger, Wine Expert! The Drive 3 TO 6, WEEKDAY AFTERNOONS ON KSRO 1350AM & 103.5FM To become a Drive sponsor contact Cathy Ratto at cathy.ratto@yahoo.com

/JAXONDRIVE

Owner ~ Unique & Quality New New Vibe Halloween Accessories

WIGS ~ MAKEUP ~ MASKS ~ FANGS HATS ~ COLORED CONTACTS

228 S. Main St. Sebastopol / Monday–Sat 11am to 7pm & Sun 11am–5pm 707.829.1142 / funkandflash.com /

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 26- NOVE MBER 1 , 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Eau de MOG

Booos

13


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | OCTOBE R 26- NOV E M BE R 1 , 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

14

Bay Area investment fuels America’s fracking boom—and pipeline protests BY WILL PARRISH

BATTLE LINES AND PIPELINES The Dakota Access Pipeline’s crossing of sacred Sioux land in North and South Dakota has became a flashpoint of national opposition.

M

ill Valley’s Shelterpoint Business Center occupies a narrow strip of asphalt between Richardson Bay and Highway 101, roughly five miles north of the Golden Gate Bridge. In the back of the office complex stands a tan building with floor-toceiling windows that offer sweeping views of Mt. Tamalpais’ grassy southeastern slopes. This is the headquarters of SPO Partners, the North Bay’s largest hedge fund.

The serene sophistication of this setting belies the nature of SPO Partners’ business. The $5.2 billion investment firm is among the country’s leading financial backers of oil and natural gas fracking. Its web

of financial connections tie it directly to the country’s most controversial infrastructure project—the $3.7 billion, 1,134mile Dakota Access Pipeline— and even Republican Party presidential candidate Donald

Trump’s economic policy team. SPO Partners is the largest investor in Oasis Petroleum of Houston, Texas, which controls more than 400,000 acres within the Bakken and Three Forks oil basins of North Dakota and Montana. Oasis is working to complete a 19-mile oil transmission system from its North Dakota petroleum handling facility to the Dakota Access Pipeline, thus positioning it to supply roughly one-ninth of the pipeline’s estimated 470,000 barrels of daily crude oil deliveries, records with the North Dakota Public Service

Commission show. The Dakota Access Pipeline originates in the Bakken oil patch and traverses North Dakota, South Dakota and Iowa, and ends in Illinois, linking to transmission routes to the East Coast and Gulf Coast. For several months, indigenous people, environmentalists and Great Plains residents have protested the project because it threatens water quality and myriad sacred sites of the Standing Rock Sioux. It will also contribute to the global climate crisis. “Certainly Oasis Petroleum’s hedge fund investors will make


The Money Pipeline But the Mill Valley hedge fund’s North Dakota oil investment is only one tributary to a river of investment capital flowing from the San Francisco Bay Area to the Dakota Access Pipeline and the associated fracking boom. These investors include other hedge and pension funds, as well as San Francisco–based Wells Fargo. The bank was the largest U.S.-based financier of oil and gas production and infrastructure as of 2014, according to a presentation given by Wells Fargo executive vice president Mike Johnson. A recent report from the nonprofit Food & Water Watch notes that 38 banks, Wells Fargo among them, have directly financed the controversial Dakota Access pipeline. The financial sector’s stake in the project helps reveal “the tangle of interests” fueling the United States’ ongoing dependence on fossil fuels, said Food & Water Watch senior researcher Hugh MacMillan, chief author of the report. “When you see the kinds of financial institutions backing the pipeline, it shows the power of the forces the tribes in North Dakota are going up against,” he says.

15

OIL MONEY SPO Partners’ unassuming location in Mill Valley belies its role as one of the country’s largest investors in oil and natural gas fracking, including the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline project.

Fracking Boom During the last decade, oil companies developed the ability to drill to depths of 5,000 to 10,000 feet before turning their bits sideways, cutting horizontal lines into previously inaccessible rock formations. By fracturing, or “fracking,” deeply buried layers of hydrocarbon-rich shale formations, they force natural gas and oil to the surface. These techniques have revolutionized oil and gas production, yielding hundreds of billions of dollars in profits to investors. In 2014, the U.S. passed Saudi Arabia as the planet’s biggest oil producer. It has surpassed Russia as the world’s biggest producer of oil and gas combined. Two shale oil basins in particular have helped spur the production surge: the Eagle Ford in south Texas and the Bakken. Large financial institutions have actively cultivated the North American oil boom. A 2012 Citibank report called “Energy 2020: North America, the New Middle East” notes that “the economic consequences” of the oil and gas industry’s “supply and demand revolution are potentially

extraordinary,” and touts that “infrastructure investments ease the transport bottlenecks in bringing supply to demand centers.” It also sounds a cautionary note: “The only thing that can stop this is politics—environmentalists getting the upper hand over supply in the U.S., for instance; or First Nations impeding pipeline expansion in Canada.” As with Canadian tar sands oil (see “Crude Awakening,” June 8), the Bakken shale’s Achilles’ heel is that it is located in the middle of the continent, far away from shipping terminals and most oil refineries. That has led many North Dakota producers to transport crude oil by train, including to California refineries, a highly dangerous method given that Bakken oil is especially prone to lethal explosions. The Dakota Access Pipeline would improve North Dakota oil producers’ ability to compete economically, notes North Dakota Petroleum Council communications director Tessa Sandstrom. It would also reduce deliveries by train, she says, making them safer and freeing up rail lines for farmers to bring their

commodities to market. “This pipeline resolves issues that are big concerns among North Dakotans,” Sandstrom says. “It’s also a legal pipeline at this point, and we think it should go forward.” But the extraction of oil, natural gas and coal has driven the planet to the precipice of climate catastrophe. In recent years, the earth has burned through existing temperature records, causing Arctic permafrost to disappear at alarming rates, a process that releases much more carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere, thus fueling a dire feedback loop of potentially ever-greater planetary warming. Vulnerable human populations are already being displaced as the ecological fabric that has sustained them unravels. National and global efforts to cap and reduce greenhouse gas emissions include treaties, taxes and investments in alternative-energy sources and non-automobile transportation. But infrastructure investments that require large, long-term commitments of capital are also crucial indicators of national intent, which is why President Barack Obama choose to ) 16

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 26- NOVE MBER 1 , 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

a lot more money if the company can supply the Dakota Access Pipeline,” says Antonia Juhasz, a San Francisco–based oil and energy analyst and author who has studied hedge funds and the North Dakota oil boom. Wall Street tycoon John Paulson, a key member of Donald Trump’s economic policy council, is also a major investor in Oasis Petroleum. According to Oasis Petroleum’s most recent financial filings, SPO Partners owns the largest share of the company, while Paulson’s hedge fund owns the fourth largest. Trump himself has invested between $3 million and $15 million in Paulson’s hedge funds, a 2015 federal campaign disclosure form reveals, raising the possibility that the Republican candidate is also an investor in Oasis Petroleum.


Oil ( 15

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTOBER 26- NOV E M BE R 1 , 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

16

reject the Keystone XL tar sands oil pipeline on the eve of the 2015 Paris climate summit involving 191 of the world’s nations. By completing the Dakota Access Pipeline, one of the longest oil pipelines in North America, the United States would signal to investors its intention to maintain high oil production— and, by extension, high greenhouse gas emission levels. Construction of the pipeline would lead to corresponding increases in fracking, which tend to produce greater emissions than conventional oil. “The banks are sold on the idea that the U.S. should and will maximize its production of oil and gas,” says Food & Water Watch’s MacMillan. “In doing that, they are banking against any real political effort to keep these fossil fuels in the ground.”

Oil Wells HAPPY HOUR EVERY DAY

DRAFT BEERS 4–6PM

707.52NYPIE 707 70 7.52NYPIE 52NYPIE

7 0 7. 5 2 6 . 9 7 4 3

www.NEW-YORK-PIE.com 65 Brookwood Ave, Santa Rosa

VIETNAMESE CUISINE

SATURDAY SPECIAL

BANH XEO (Sizzling Pancake)

Vietnamese rice flour pancake served with organic veggies/herbs $1100

CHICKEN & VEGGIE STEW

Free-range chicken with organic carrots, potatoes, tomato juice served with tumeric rice or bread $1200

320 West 3rd St, Ste G Santa Rosa • 707.595.4447 www.phocrazy.biz

According to a 2015 estimate by the Wall Street Journal, banks made about $1 trillion in investments in the energy industry worldwide between 2005 and 2014. In that time, Wells Fargo had seized its position as the top U.S.-based oil and gas banker, with more than $40 billion in investments, according to information published by the data firm Thomson Reuters. Wells Fargo’s leadership role within the oil and gas industry also includes the annual Wells Fargo West Coast Energy Conference in San Francisco, which brings together leading investors and professionals from across the oil, gas and coal sectors, as well as some who are involved in renewables. This year, the conference took place at San Francisco’s Ritz-Carlton Hotel. Among the 38 banks that have made loans to companies involved in the Dakota Access pipelines, Wells Fargo has the second largest investment stake, the Food & Water Watch study shows. The San Francisco–based banking giant has loaned roughly $467 million to the pipeline’s

builder, Energy Transfer Partners (ETP), and its family of companies; ETP is among the county’s largest pipeline operators, with a spiderweb-like network of other pipelines throughout the Gulf Coast and southwest. Wells Fargo corporate communications director Jessica Ong says the bank invested in the pipeline only after a review of its potential for social and environmental harm. “The Dakota Access Pipeline project was evaluated by an independent engineer to be compliant with the ‘equator principles,’ a framework adopted by Wells Fargo in 2005 that is designed to determine, assess and manage social and environmental risks and impacts of projects,” Ong says, adding, “While we respect the differing opinions involved in this dispute, Wells Fargo does not take positions on public policy issues that do not directly affect our ability to serve our customers or support our team members.” Wells Fargo is more than just a financier of the project. It also acts as ETP’s administrative loan agent, meaning it performs the record-keeping associated with all the company’s loans, handles the interest and principal payments made in connection with those loans, and monitors their ongoing administration. In other words, all bank financing ETP receives passes through Wells Fargo.

Fracking Funders Dozens of comparatively small companies, many of them from the Bay Area—such as Farallon Capital Management, Warburg Pincus, Hellman & Friedman, and Hall Capital Partners (the managers of which are developing a controversial Napa County vineyard)—have been major fracking investors, competing to profit on the Bakken and other oil basins’ hydrocarbon resources. San Francisco–based hedge fund BlackRock Fund Advisors is Oasis Petroleum’s sixth largest investor. Think Investments, which is also based in San Francisco, checks in as the eighth largest. The Wild West character of the


Marin County’s SPO was founded in 1991 by a group of investors including William Oberndorf and John Scully, a pair of Stanford business graduates. For several years, SPO was also the lead investor in the Houston-based

Pre-Party!

Sat Nov 5 6–7pm FREE

Bar specials! Enter to Win:

Squaw Valley ski trip, HH apparel, Camelbak hydration packs, and more FUN prizes Win Big! 2 tickets $5

PLUS FILM tickets 5745 Old Redwood Hwy Penngrove

to the Sat, Nov 12, 7:30 film premiere at Marin Center, San Rafael info: 707.527.1200

17 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 26- NOVE MBER 1 , 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Made in Marin

utility corporation Calpine, among the country’s largest producers of gas-fired electricity. In the North Bay, Calpine is best known as the owner of the Geysers, the famed geothermal power station near Calistoga. Oberndorf and Scully are also among the biggest investors in a California political action committee that funds businessfriendly Democrats and Republicans alike, with an agenda centered on pension reform and public investments in charter schools. In 2014, SPO Partners began scooping up significantly greater shares of oil and gas drilling companies after global oil prices plunged and numerous producers entered bankruptcy. The firm has more than $1 billion staked in Pioneer Natural Resources, one of the main producers of oil in the Permian Basin and Eagle Ford shale basins of Texas, considered to have more recoverable oil deposits than any other oil basin in the world outside of Saudi Arabia. Another SPO-invested company, Resolute Energy, has its corporate office in Larkspur, on Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, and is the main oil and gas drilling partner of the Navajo Nation, an American Indian nation that has sought to develop oil and gas resources. Oasis Petroleum is SPO Partners’ third largest oil and gas investment. Records from the North Dakota Public Service Commission show that Oasis’ transmission line is one of six “gathering lines” from different companies that will feed the pipeline. Scully is also the largest career contributor to Assemblymember Marc Levine, D-San Rafael, having donated $122,500 to Levine’s Assembly campaigns and to a Levine-affiliated political action committee called Elevate California, which ironically sponsored a 2014 campaign mailer advocating for a California fracking moratorium. Levine sees no conflict in taking Scully’s money.  “I’m grateful that [he] agreed with my position that we should ) 18 have a moratorium on

© Hank de VrÉ

Bakken region’s oil industry has also left many companies prone to takeovers by private equity companies and hedge funds that invest in a variety of assets, largely avoiding direct regulatory oversight due to federal laws that exempt companies with relatively small numbers of investors from Securities and Exchange Commission reporting requirements. “You have lots of smaller companies coming and going, which are very easily bought by wealthy asset managers like hedge funds,” says Juhasz. In a September Rolling Stone article, she criticized these investment partnerships’ “exclusive focus on the bottom line and profits, to the detriment of safety and lives, forcing companies to cut corners and do more with less (including tens of thousands of fewer workers), and contributing to a worker death rate in North Dakota that is seven times the national average.” California-based pension funds are also major investors in shale oil and the Dakota Access Pipeline. The California Public Employees Retirement System, CalPERS, the nation’s largest state-run pension fund, owns a stake in ETP worth $41.4 million, making it the pipeline construction company’s 36th largest institutional investor. Jane Vosburg of the groups Sonoma 350 and Fossil Free California has attempted to convince CalPERS and the California State Teachers’ Retirement System to divest from fossil fuels. “So far, they have not acknowledged the urgency of the climate situation in our meetings with them,” she says. Last year, the California Legislature did pass a bill divesting state public pensions from investments in coal.


Oil ( 17

18 NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTOBER 26- NOV E M BE R 1 , 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

fracking in California,” Levine said. He said “a number of different donors supported” the Elevate California campaign, although filings with the California Secretary of State’s office show that Scully and his wife gave $102,000 out of the $105,500 in outside donations the group received in 2013–14.   Representatives of SPO Partners did not return multiple requests for comment. In 2014, Scully told the Santa Rosa Press Democrat that he doesn’t “disagree with regulating and probably banning fracking in Northern California.” However, Scully said he’s “absolutely for” fracking elsewhere, saying that “it is working, and it is a significantly good thing for the United States.”

The Opposition

The I Love You Store™

When construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline began earlier this year, the companies involved regarded the project as a sure thing. In a conference call with investors, ETP CEO Kelcy Warren said he “fully expects” the pipeline to be completed and in operation this year. But because the pipeline runs along the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, a community of 8,500 along the Missouri River in North and South Dakota, tribal members and supporters have camped out in the path of the pipeline route. The blockade and related encampments have galvanized international attention and opened up the possibility that the pipeline may yet be canceled. In September, the Obama administration bowed to public pressure by denying ETP an easement to construct a 19-mile segment of the pipeline near the Standing Rock reservation, even as construction proceeds across the remainder of the route. In the meantime, three federal agencies are reviewing whether the Army Corps followed proper procedure when it approved the pipeline over the summer.  While California investment capital has flowed to the pipeline,

the state has also been a wellspring of resistance to it. “There have been more people from California out at Standing Rock than from almost anywhere else,” says Sierra Alexander, a Northern Cheyenne tribal member who lives in Willits. Many California indigenous people who are supporting the Standing Rock struggle have experience battling financial institutions. Billionaire investor Warren Buffett’s investment firm, Berkshire Hathaway, owns four hydroelectric dams on the Klamath River. The region’s indigenous people have called for the dams’ removal to protect some of California’s last remaining salmon populations. They have disrupted Berkshire Hathaway shareholder meetings in an attempt to pressure Buffett’s firm. One of the organizers of those actions, Hoopa Valley tribal member Dania Colegrove, is among dozens of indigenous people from the Klamath River basin who have traveled to Standing Rock. “We’re out here talking about our struggles in the Klamath, and about how nonviolent direct action has changed our world,” Colegrove told a group of dam removal supporters last month in a call from Standing Rock. “We’re helping give the people here the courage to keep going.” Construction of that final 19mile pipeline stretch hinges on decisions by public regulatory agency representatives and policymakers, such as President Obama, who could use his authority to revoke the project’s federal permits. The Army Corps of Engineers is the lead permitting agency for the project. Food & Water Watch’s MacMillan says the importance of exposing banks’ financing of the oil industry—including the pipeline—is that “it lets people know what’s happening behind the scenes. “The banks are providing the money to make it all happen.” Contact ‘Bohemian’ contributor Will Parrish at willparrish2016@gmail.com. His website, willparrishreports.com, is coming soon.


S A N TA R O S A

Scream Queen

My favorite part about Halloween is bingeing on all the best and bloodiest horror movies out there. Aficionados of the genre like me are undoubtedly fans of actress and scream queen Barbara Crampton, who made her mark in the shocking H. P. Lovecraft–inspired ’80s film Re-Animator and stars in modern indie gems like You’re Next and We Are Still Here. This week, the CULT Film Series hosts Crampton to screen and discuss her craziest movie ever, From Beyond, another Lovecraftian joyride featuring interdimensional shape-shifting monsters. The screening also includes a costume contest and celebrates the horror on Thursday, Oct. 27, at Roxy 14 Cinemas, 85 Santa Rosa Ave., Santa Rosa. 7pm. $10. 707.525.8909.

C O TAT I

From the Ashes

Last June, a fire broke out in Fulton at the house neighboring the Fulton Pentecostal Church where the popular reggae and world-beat band Midnight Sun Massive has rehearsed twice a week for years. The fire engulfed the band’s trailer and destroyed all of their equipment—instruments, amps, even their PA system. Since then, they’ve been playing on borrowed gear, but they need a massive amount of help to replace their lost items. This weekend, Redwood Cafe and BaggaJo Productions are teaming up to present a fundraiser concert for Midnight Sun Massive, who play along with Honey B & the Cultivation on Friday, Oct. 28, at the Redwood Cafe, 8240 Old Redwood Hwy., Cotati. 8pm. $5. 707.795.7868.

SEBASTOPOL

Halloween Hoot

For nearly a decade, west Sonoma County’s biggest Halloween party has been the Cirque du Sebastopol, and this year’s 9th annual event is no different. Taking place over two nights, the titillating cabaret-style show features lots of live music, antics and more to celebrate the season. On Friday, Oct. 28, North Bay party monsters El Radio Fantastique and Junk Parlor play live, with the longrunning burlesque and variety troupe Cabaret de Caliente heating things up. On Saturday, Oct. 29, experimental electronic producers Pantyraid, funky electropop duo Sugarbeats and DJ iNi rock the dance floor at HopMonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. 8pm. $15–$20 and up (21 and over). 707.829.7300.

M I L L VA L L E Y

Scary Funny

Have you ever been so scared that you laughed? If so, the upcoming Grin Reapers extravaganza is for you. Featuring a strong lineup of standup comedians, a costume contest and Halloween-themed musical numbers, this special event boasts spooky stories and songs that will chill and delight. Gasp as comedians read their favorite tales of terror from masters of the macabre like Stephen King and Edgar Allen Poe! Shriek as award-winning mentalist Sebastian Boswell III performs amazing feats of magic! Laugh your head off as Diane Amos, Will Durst, Gil Gross, Terry McGovern and many others perform on Saturday, Oct. 29, at Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave., Mill Valley! 8pm. $20–$30. 415.383.9600.

—Charlie Swanson

GLOBAL SOUNDS World-music pioneer Ricardo Lemvo performs his blend of Afro-Cuban and pan-African rhythms with his band Makina Loca on Saturday, Oct. 29, at Sausalito Seahorse. See Clubs & Venues, p26.

19 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 26- NOVE MBER 1 , 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Crush CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | OCTOBE R 26- NOV E M BE R 1 , 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

20

Arts Ideas LASER FOCUS Chimera founder Dana Woodman demonstrates how to use the Sebastopol makerspace’s laser cutter.

Making It

Chimera boosts art and community

E

veryone has the power to be a maker. That’s the philosophy of Dana Woodman, founder and executive director of Chimera. Located in Sebastopol, Chimera is the North Bay’s first and only nonprofit community arts and maker space, offering a wide range of tools and support for artists and builders of every kind.

BY CHARLIE SWANSON

Whether it’s welding, woodwork, 3D printing, jewelry crafting or robotics, anyone with a passion for creating can join the community at Chimera. Monthly classes and workshops are also open to the public. Chimera began as a concept five years ago, when Woodman, a software developer and artist, was working out of his rental space in Santa Rosa and feeling frustrated by limited space. “I started talking to friends about an idea of a shared shop,” he says. He posted that idea on social media and

formed a Facebook group. Within hours, dozens of people joined. Within a week, that number reached over 800 people. “I was blown away by how much interest and excitement there was for something like this,” says Woodman. That interest compelled Woodman to form Chimera as a nonprofit group and set about finding a space, which he found in downtown Sebastopol near the old Ford building across from Community Market and the Barlow. Originally, the space was

just 700 square feet, but in March Chimera expanded into the Ford building itself, and now boasts a 3,000-square-foot facility. Chimera has over 115 members, all of whom pay $25 to $125 a month to use the space, and the tools, seven days a week. “We’re basically like a gym,” Woodman says. “Except instead of workout equipment, you get access to maker tools.” While he says 3D printers and laser cutters are sexy, he notes that the heart of the nonprofit is the community. “There is so much creative energy around here,” he says. “Tools and training and classes are all secondary to the idea that we want to connect people together—that is where the most exciting stuff comes from.” Chimera is also a part of the national maker community. Last month, Chimera was invited to the White House by the office of science and technology policy. Chimera joined 180 of the approximately 500 other makerspaces from across the country for an all-day event focused on the maker movement. Woodman says there is an effort underway to form a national makerspace association. He’s been selected as one of an eightperson interim leadership board to make that effort a reality. President Obama is expected to announce the organization a month from now, Woodman says. “Makerspaces are the new hub for [innovation],” says Woodman. “It’s a paradigm shift in society where anybody can be a maker, anybody can start a business, anybody can create the new invention that changes the world.” Chimera is at 6791 Sebastopol Ave., Sebastopol. For more information, contact them at info@chimeraarts.org or call 707.827.3020.


Eric Chazankin

LAST DANCE Christina (Ivy Rose

Miller) shares a moment with Gerry (Sam Coughlin) in ‘Lughnasa.’

Recollect Two plays take on bittersweet memories

BY DAVID TEMPLETON

‘I

t’s not the past that shapes us—but images of the past.”

So wrote the late Irish playwright Brian Friel, whose interest in the power of memory runs all through his bittersweet 1990 drama Dancing at Lughnasa, at Main Stage West in Sebastopol. Similarly, Maury Yeston and Peter Stone’s Titanic: The Musical, running at Spreckels Theater Company, balances the facts of history and the potent emotions that spring from powerful shared memories. Directed with appropriate grandeur by Gene Abravaya, Titanic features outstanding singing voices and ever-shifting projections to tell the tale of “the largest moving object in the world.” With impressive music from a tight quintet of offstage musicians, under the direction of Tina Lloyd Meals, the show

Set between the world wars, Dancing at Lughnasa recounts one summer in the tiny Irish town of Ballybeg that the narrator, Michael (Steven Abbott), spends with his mother and four aunts. In bringing this colorful quintet of sisters to life, director Molly Noble has assembled a stellar cast of actresses: Liz Jahren, Florianna Allessandria, Ivy Rose Miller, Ilana Niernberger and Sharia Pierce. Each is extraordinary in her own way, hilarious and affecting, as Michael recalls the clashing hopes and fears that would set the course of all of their futures. As Gerry, Michael’s father, Sam Coughlin is charmingly roguish, and John Craven, as the sisters’ older brother, Jack—a church missionary gone gleefully pagan— is superb. Softly drenched in sweet nostalgia, Lughnasa is a beautiful play, beautifully executed. ‘Titanic: The Musical’ runs through Oct. 30 at Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400. ‘Dancing at Lughnasa’ runs Thursday–Sunday through Oct. 30 at Main Stage West. 104 N. Main St., Sebastopol. 707.823.0177.

AMERICA’S LARGEST & LONGEST - RUNNING SUSTAINABILITY & GREEN LIVING EVENT

Join us to Shop.Taste.Enjoy. Pier 35 - Downtown San Francisco

November 11th - 13th

Use promo code GLSFP16 to receive 20% off tickets Vegetarian & Vegan - friendly food court! PIER 35

EXHI OR ATTBIT END

21 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 26- NOVE MBER 1 , 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Stage

frequently soars with feeling, as we are introduced to various characters—based on historical figures—most of whom we know will perish when the massive ship strikes an iceberg. It should be mentioned that the iceberg—portrayed by an animated children’s-book illustration projected across the stage’s five screens—is jarringly silly looking, and if it weren’t for the dramatic magnitude of the moment, might otherwise have drawn a laugh. Given that iceberg’s iconic historical status, it’s a serious distraction. But when weighed against the gorgeous music, the consistent excellence and heartfelt spirit of Abravaya’s unified 25-actor cast—plus the poignant beauty of the script’s canny emphasis on human relationships—it would take a whole lot more than one goofy graphic to sink this mighty Titanic. Rating (out of 5):


Film

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTOBER 26- NOV E M BE R 1 , 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

22

by RICHARDDO’BRIEN 52 W. 6th Street, Santa Rosa CA 95401

DO THE MATH Ben Affleck plays the first autistic hero of sorts since

Dustin Hoffman’s ‘Rain Man.’

Super Geek

Ben Affleck is an accountant by day, superhero by night BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

I

n between Batman movies, Ben Affleck decided to play Batman again. The Accountant amps up the Asperg-ery side of the hero, disposing of the cape but not his fantastic fighting abilities. And Bruce Wayne is disguised as a Midwestern bean counter.

10/28–11/3

Certain Women

(10:30-1:00-3:45)-6:15-8:45

Honorable

®

R

Aquarius NR (11:00-2:00)-5:00-8:00 A Man Called Ove PG13 (10:15-12:45-3:15)-6:00-8:35 Thurs 11/3 only: (12:45-3:15)-6:00-8:35

Harry & Snowman

NR (10:45-1:15-3:30)-8:30, Sun 10/30 only: (10:45)-8:30 Tues 11/1 & Thurs 11/3: (10:45-1:15-3:30)-6:30-8:30 Weds 11/2 only: (10:45-1:15-3:30)

Denial PG13 (3:30)-8:45 Queen of Katwe PG (12:45)-6:00 The Dressmaker R (10:15) Haunted Sonoma County NR 6:30, Fri 10/28 to Mon 10/31 only!

Cymbeline from Stratford-UponAvon Sun 10/30@1pm, Wed 11/2@6:30pm 551 SUMMERFIELD ROAD • SANTA ROSA 707.522.0719 • SUMMERFIELDCINEMAS.COM

BRINGING THE BEST FILMS IN THE WORLD TO SONOMA COUNTY

Schedule for Fri, Oct 28 – Thu, Nov 3

DINE-IN CINEMA Bargain Tuesday - $7.50 All Shows Bargain Tuesday $7.00 All Shows Schedule forFri, Fri,April Feb -16th 20th Thu, Feb 26th Schedule for –– Thu, April 22nd Schedule for Fri, June 22nd - Thu, June 28th

Academy Award “Moore Gives BestNominee Performance Food BeerHer Wine Movies!

Foreign Language Film!Stone Years!” – Box Office “RawBest and Riveting!” –• Rolling Bruschetta •In Paninis • Soups Salads • Appetizers Demi Moore David Duchovny WALTZ BASHIR 8 Great Beers onMIGHTY Tap +WITH Wine by the Glass and Bottle A HEART

(1:00) 3:00 5:00 9:15 Enjoy in the Cafe or Theatre • Open DailyRRat Noon THE JONESES (12:30) 2:45 5:00 7:00 7:20 9:45

INFERNO

(12:30) 2:40Noms 4:50 Including 7:10 9:20 No Passes 2 Academy Award BestRActor!

“A Triumph!” –6:40 New “A Glorious Throwback ToYork The Observer More Stylized, (1:20 4:00) 9:10 PG-13 THE WRESTLER Painterly Work Of Decades Past!” – LA (12:20) 5:10 9:45 R Times LA2:45 VIE EN 7:30 ROSE Michael Moore’s (12:45) 3:45 6:45OF 9:45 PG-13 THEAward SECRET KELLS 10 Academy Noms Including Best Picture! 7:00 NR9:00 (1:00) (2:30) 3:00 5:00 7:00 NR SLuMDOG Wed: 2:30 –atReally, 3:30MILLIONAIRE Thu: 2:30 at 3:15– “★★★★ Truly, Deeply “Superb! No One4:00 Could Make This 7:10 R Believable One of (1:15) This Year’s Best!”9:40 – Newsday (12:00 – 2:30 5:00) 7:25 9:50 If It Were Fiction!” San Francisco Chronicle

TRUMPLAND

DENIAL ONCE 8 Academy Award Noms Including PRODIGAL SONSGO (1:00) 3:10 5:20 7:30 R BACK JACK REACHER: NEVER Best Picture, Actor & Best9:40 Director! (2:20) 9:10 Best NR No 9:10 Show Tue or Thu (1:00 3:50) MILK 7:10 9:40 PG-13

MILK – Rolling Stone “Haunting and Hypnotic!” “Wise, Humble and Effortlessly (1:30) 4:10 6:45 Funny!” 9:30 R – Newsweek

KEEPING UP WITH THE JONES THE GIRL THE TATTOO Please Note: 1:30 Show Sat, PleaseWITH Note: No No 1:30 ShowDRAGON Sat, No No 6:45 6:45 Show Show Thu Thu WAITRESS

WAITRESS (12:30 3:00 5:15) 9:55 PG-13 (1:10) 4:30 7:40 7:30 NR (1:30) 4:00 7:10 9:30 Best R Picture! 5 Academy Award Noms Including “★★★1/2! AnFROST/NIXON unexpected Gem!” – USA Today

THEFROST/NIXON ACCOUNTANT

(2:15)Mysterious, 7:20 (1:15 4:10) 6:50 R9:30 R GREENBERG “Swoonly Romatic, Hilarious!” (12:00) 9:50 R – Slant5:00 Magazine

THEREVOLuTIONARY GIRL ON THEROAD TRAIN

JE T’AIME (11:45) 4:45 9:50 (12:10PARIS, 2:40 5:00) 7:30 R9:55 R

“Deliciously unsettling!” – LA Times (1:15)GHOST 4:15 7:00 9:30 R THE Kevin Jorgenson presents the WRITER California Premiere of (2:15) 7:15 PG-13

THE BEATLES:

The Dressmaker Accountant • Inferno Jack Reacher RAVENFILMCENTER.COM • HEALDSBURG Bistro Menu Items, Beer & Wine available in all 4 Auditoriums

FOR SHOWTIMES: 707.525.8909

PuRE: A BOuLDERING FLICK Michael Moore’s EIGHT DAYS A7:15 WEEK Thu, Feb 26th at THE MOST DANGEROuS (3:45) 9:15 NR Limited! SICKO MOVIES MORNING MANIN INTHE AMERICA

Starts Fri, June 29th! Fri, Sat, Sun &PENTAGON Mon DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THENow PAPERS Advance Tickets On Sale at Box Office! 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 6:50 No7:30 6:50 Show Tue or Thu FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:30 NR 5:00 10:00 10:15 AM VICKY (12:45 CRISTINA BARCELONA Their First Joint Venture In 25 Years! 3:45) 6:45 9:30 PG-13 10:20 AM CHANGELING Venessa RedgraveAND Meryl CHONG’S Streep Glenn CloseAM CHEECH 10:40 RACHEL GETTING(12:15 MARRIED 4:15) 8:40 PG-13 10:45 AM HEY WATCH THIS 2009 LIVE12:15, ACTION SHORTS Only)) 4:15 EVENING Wed: No 4:15 at 4:30(Fri/Mon Thu: No 12:15, at 4:45 10:45 Sat, Apr17th at 11pm & Tue, Apr 20th 8pmAM 2009 ANIMATED SHORTS Only) Starts Fri,(Sun June 29th!

MISS PEREGRINE’S HOME FOR PECULIAR CHILDREN SULLY

QUEEN OF KATWE

(1:10) 6:45 PG Wed/Thu: No 6:45

Affleck plays Christian Wolff—the Christian helps the weak, the wolf punishes the strong. Wolff describes himself as a person with high-functioning autism, but this isn’t even one of Affleck’s top 10 autistic performances in a movie. He’s never been a big reactor—he’s more like some sort of energy sink that absorbs the acting of others. In The Accountant, Affleck constantly smudges the outline of his character, showing sympathy and affection between the fight scenes. In flashback, we see how Wolff acquired his extracurricular skills, from being beaten up by a bulky Asian martial arts instructor to training to become a world-class sniper in the military. Back in the present time, he’s hunted by old-dog treasury agent J. K. Simmons and his new recruit (Cynthia Addai-Robinson). Meanwhile, a mysterious enforcer (Jon Bernthal of The Punisher) is tracking down friends of Wolff’s clients. It’s all connected to some sketchy accounting at a robotics firm run by a grandfatherly CEO (John Lithgow). While auditing the books, Wolff meets a friendly young pixie named Dana (Anna Kendrick), who is one of the firm’s accountants. Kendrick gives a lot of her usual nervous displays of ivory teeth while seeking to know this mysterious wolf, his beautiful mind and his pair of cold shoulders. One of the film’s problems, though, is that chunks of narrative seem to have disappeared, replaced by rhetorical questions to bridge the gap, like, “Risking your life for a girl you’ve known less than a week? Why?” At one point, we learn that Wolff’s childhood advice from his father was “Being too different scares people”—counsel that director Gavin O’Connor would have done better ignoring. The Accountant is playing in wide release in the North Bay.


JAMMIN’ Royal Jelly Jive join burlesque show at Annie’s O’s on Oct. 29.

Chilling Sounds

Your guide to Halloween concerts in the North Bay BY CHARLIE SWANSON

W

ith Halloween falling on a Monday this year, the North Bay is taking advantage of the weekend to party with all manner of frightfully fun concerts. Here is a handful of hallowed events to match your creepy costume of choice. If you’re dressing up as a scary clown this year, a hugely popular option given the rash of insane clown posses in recent weeks, you’ll fit right in at the North Bay Cabaret’s “All Hallows Eve 4” on Oct. 29 at Annie O’s Music Hall in Santa Rosa. Featuring the wild Jake Ward as master of ceremonies, high-flying aerialists, backlight burlesque and all manner of

For more info on these and other Halloween shows, see Music listings, p24.

23 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 26- NOVE MBER 1 , 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

sideshow entertainment, the circus spectacle also boasts San Francisco Gypsy-jazz favorites Royal Jelly Jive and Danny Elfman–inspired Oakland outfit Oinga Boinga delivering cabaret rock. Top it off with comedy rock troupe For the Ladies and carnival Americana group Thee Hobo Gobbelins, and you’ve got a sureto-be sold-out event poised to scare up some creepy fun. Those going out on the town as grave-risen zombies ought to check out the Haunted Halloween party on Oct. 29 at Rossi’s 1906 in Sonoma. Cocktails will loosen up the undead partygoers and a Monster Mash Dance Off will flesh out the grooves. Onstage will be Siouxsie & the Banshees tribute band Voodoo Dolly and eclectic Sonoma rabble-rousers Loosely Covered. Anyone who plans on donning a Danzig-inspired undead rock ’n’ roll costume has two chances to party in Petaluma this weekend. First, on Oct. 29, the Phoenix Theater hosts a Halloween Covers Show with local bands dressing up as their favorite classic punk rock and grunge groups and performing the music of Nirvana, AC/DC, the Misfits, the New York Dolls and others. Then, on Oct. 31, the Mystic Theatre celebrates Halloween with platinum-selling rockers Trapt. Stars of the alternative hard-rock scene since 1997, the group just released its seventh studio album, DNA, this year. Joining Trapt is Message from HOR_Boh11_3rdpg.r2.indd Sylvia, a new ensemble formed from the Lopez-Smith brothers behind modern rock outfit First Decree and vocalist Matthew Nevitt from Echovalve. Ghouls and goblins of all shapes and sizes will delight in surf-rock superstars the Deadlies, performing a Very Deadlies Halloween at Silo’s Napa on Oct. 28. House band for KOFYTV's Creepy KOFY Movie Time, the Deadlies are a power trio of raw energy and haunted hooks that perfectly set the mood for a weekend of late-night partying.

1

10/14/16 11:22 AM


Music Concerts CheCk out the Art exhibit

Wikipedia

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | OCTOBE R 26- NOV E M BE R 1 , 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

24 Sebastiani Theatre

Vintage Film Series: MONDAY, NOV 14, 7PM

Shadow of a Doubt (1943)

MICHAEL MOORE IN TRUMPLAND

thu oCt 27

THe BeauTiful QuesTiOns

fRi oCt 28

MidnigHT sun Massive

All Hallow’s Eve

8pm/Dancing/No Cover

8pm/Dancing/No Cover

sat oCt 29

eRiC lindell

thu noV 3

fRenCH Oak

fRi noV 4

luv PlaneT

9pm/ $20 Adv, $25 Door 8pm/No Cover

THe MessengeRs

(from Onye & The Messangers) 8:30pm/Dancing/$5

adVanCe tiCkets aVailable on bRownPaPeRtiCkets.Com 11/12 COCO MOnTOya 8:30Pm 12/31 THe PulsaTORs 8:30Pm 11/18 afROfunk exPeRienCe Benefit Concert for Live Music Lantern Restaurant & Music Venue All Ages Family-Friendly Atmosphere Visit our website, RedwoodCafe.com 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati 707.795.7868

Fri, Sat & Sun / Oct 28–30 / 6pm and Tues, Wed, Thur / Nov 1–3 / 7pm

HAUNTED SONOMA COUNTY Fri & Sat / Oct 28 & 29 / 8:15pm

Movies call 707.996.2020 Tickets call 707.996.9756 SONOMA sebastianitheatre.com

Royal Jelly Jive headlines a night of circus sideshow acts, music, costumes and burlesque, hosted by the North Bay Cabaret. Oct 29, 7pm. $20-$25. Annie O’s Music Hall, 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.542.1455.

Tony Bennett

8:30pm/Dancing/$10

sat noV 5

SONOMA COUNTY

One of the most beloved entertainers of all time appears for an unforgettable night of music. Nov 2, 8pm. $89 and up. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Halloween Cover Show Several local bands and musicians cover everyone from the Misfits to Nirvana and U2. Oct 29, 6pm. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

MARIN COUNTY The Marin Symphony

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch FRIDAY

OCT 28 SATURDAY

OCT 29 MONDAY

OCT 31

INFECTED MUSHROOM ELECTRONIC • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

FOREVERLAND

14 PIECE TRIBUTE

TO MICHAEL JACKSON METAL SHOP ROCK • DOORS 8:30PM • 21+

TRAPT MESSAGE FROM SYLVIA, AMERICAN EVIL ROCK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

SOUTHERN CULTURE WEDNESDAY ON THE SKIDS

NOV 2 FRIDAY

NOV 4

FRANKIE & THE POOL BOYS ROCK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

THE SAM CHASE & THE UNTRADITIONAL THE CRUX, ISMAY ROCK • DOORS 8PM • 21+

Din n er & A Show

Oct 28 San Geronimo’s Fri

8:00 From China to Italy Oct 29 From Blues to Bluegrass and Rock

Dirty Cello

Halloween Party! 8:30

Santos Oct 30 Todos Cantina Americana Sun

SUNDAY

AGENT ORANGE

Fri

FRIDAY

TAINTED LOVE

ROCK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

BOMBS NOV 6 ROADSIDE PUNK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

NOV 11

THE BEST OF THE 80'S LIVE ROCK • DOORS 8PM • 21+

11 ⁄ 12 UNWRITTEN LAW, 11 ⁄ 13 William Fitzsimmons, Laura Burhenn, 11 ⁄ 15 Rhiannon Giddens, Dirk Powell, 11 ⁄ 18 Y&T, HazeXperience, 11 ⁄ 20 Dear Jazzy, 11 ⁄ 26 T Sisters And Marty O'Reilly

WWW.MYSTICTHEATRE.COM 23 PETALUMA BLVD N. PETALUMA, CA 94952

5:00 / No Cover

in the Henhouse Nov 5 Foxes It Don’t Mean a Thang if it Ain’t Got Sat

Sun

NOV 5

Halloween Party with The Haggards, and more!

Sat

FISHBONE

SATURDAY

Fireside Dining 7 Days a Week

That Twang! 7:30

Allair Nov 6 Johnny Real Rock ‘N Roll 4:00

Maxwell Nov 11 John Original and Vintage Blues 8:00 / No Cover

Nov 12 Junk Parlor & Sat

Beso Negro

Explosive Combo 8:00

Join us for

THANKSGIVING DINNER Thursday, November 24

12:00 – 7:00 pm Call 415.662.2219 for reservations Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

The Masterworks season opens with “Bold Beginnings” featuring Beethoven’s “Emperor” piano concerto and masterpieces from the 20th century. Oct 30, 3pm and Nov 1, 7:30pm. $15-$40 and up. Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.479.8100.

Out of This World

Halloween-themed benefit for Bolinas Community Land Trust features music from Marin favorites Soul Ska with all ages costume contest, a photo booth, games, beer and wine. Oct 29, 7pm. $20. Bolinas Community Center, 14 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.2128.

Simrit

The chart-topping world music star celebrates the release of her new album, “Songs of Resilience,” with a Global Unity Tour. Oct 28, 8pm. $25-$40. TMS Performing Arts Center, 150 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.924.4848.

The Tubes

A costume party with the exciting and tight-knit San Francisco classic-rock group. Oct 29, 9pm. $35. Osher Marin

JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

NAPA COUNTY Chris Botti

The world-renowned trumpeter and contemporary jazz superstar opens Napa’s new, intimate jazz club with a four-night residency. Through Oct 28, 7 and 9:30pm. $75-$95. Blue Note Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Richard Thompson & the Blind Boys of Alabama

The groundbreaking Americana guitarist and the legendary Gospel ensemble co-headline a night of eclectic music. Oct 29, 8pm. $45-$75. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY 6th Street Playhouse

Oct 26, 6:30pm, Iron Lung with Gas Chamber, Acrylics and OVVN. $7. 52 West Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

A’Roma Roasters

Oct 28, Collaboration with David Scott. Oct 29, Tumbao. 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Annie O’s Music Hall

Oct 28, Abrasive Wheels with Roadside Bombs and the Quitters. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.542.1455.

Aqus Cafe

Oct 26, bluegrass and old-time music jam. Oct 27, Elizabeth Boaz. Oct 28, Jubilee Klezmer. Oct 29, Hooper and Sloss. Oct 30, 2pm, Kenneth Roy Berry. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

The Big Easy

Oct 26, Wednesday Night Big Band. Oct 27, Lucky Drive. Oct 28, the Dixie Giants with Frankie Boots. Oct 29, the Oakland Stroke. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.4631.

Blue Heron Restaurant & Tavern

Nov 1, 6pm, Michael Hantman. 25300 Steelhead Blvd, Duncans Mills. 707.865.2261.

Cellars of Sonoma

Oct 27, John Pita. Oct 28, Clay Bell. Oct 29, Ricky Alan Ray. 133 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.578.1826.

Coffee Catz

Tues, 12pm, Jerry Green’s Peaceful Piano Hour. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Corkscrew Wine Bar

Oct 28, Stephani Keys. Oct 29, Brooke & the Caterpillar. 100 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.789.0505.

D’Argenzio Winery

Oct 27, 6pm, You Knew Me When. 1301 Cleveland Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.280.4658.

Flamingo Lounge

Oct 28, the Landbirds. Oct 29, UB707. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Green Music Center Oct 30, Zakir Hussain and Niladri Kumar. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Green Music Center Schroeder Hall

Oct 28, Bel Canto Recital. Oct 31, “It’s The Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown” with Jonathan Dimmock. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

HopMonk Sebastopol

Tues, open mic night. Oct 26, Kimock with Jeff Chimenti and Mickey Hart. Oct 28, Cirque du Sebastopol with El Radio Fantastique and Junk Parlor. Oct 29, Cirque du Sebastopol with Pantyraid and Sugar Beats. Oct 31, Monday Night Edutainment with DJ Jacques and DJ Guacamole. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

HopMonk Sonoma

Oct 28, 5pm, Chi McClean. Oct 28, 8pm, Jeff Campbell. Oct 29, 1pm, Jimbo Scott. Oct 29, 8pm, Frankie Bourne. Oct 30, 1pm, Craig Corona. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg

Oct 29, Stephanie Ozer Trio with Peter Barshay and Kendrick Freeman. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Jasper O’Farrell’s

Oct 26, 6pm, jazz jam. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Lagunitas Tap Room

Oct 26, Jason Bodlovich. Oct 27, the Good Bad Band. Oct 28, Mitch Woods & His Rocket 88s. Oct 29, Derek Irving & His Combo. Oct 30, Swoop


Mat Heywood

25

The Brothers Comatose

with The Good Bad Sun 10/30 • 7pm • $28 ADV / $32 DOS

New Orleans' Dumpstaphunk Halloween Party with the Jazz Mafia Horns with Mojo Green Mon 10/31 • 7pm • $28 ADV / $32 DOS

New Orleans' Dumpstaphunk Halloween Party with the Jazz Mafia Horns wth Afrolicious COSTUME CONTEST WITH PRIZES Thur 11/03 • Doors 7pm • $10 ADV / $15 DOS

Moonalice Prop 64 Awareness Get Out the Vote Concert

Co-Sponsored by Hardorside Fri 11/04 • Doors 8pm • $22 ADV / $27 DOS House Of Floyd Tribute to Pink Floyd Sat 11/05 • Doors 1pm • $6 Kids / $12 Adult

The Bug Family Band

Thur 11/10 • Doors 7pm • $14 ADV / $17 DOS

FLYING TO THE MOON Strong as ever, 19-time (!) Grammy winner Tony Bennett

plays Santa Rosa’s Luther Burbank Center on Nov. 2.

Jerry Joseph & The Jackmormons with The Missing Pieces Fri 11/11 • Doors 7pm • $30 ADV / $35 DOS

Canned Heat

with Jeffrey Halford & The Healers Unit. Nov 2, Ridgway. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Main Street Bistro

Oct 27, Eric Wiley. Oct 28, Susan Sutton Jazz Combo. Oct 29, Tomm Finn. Nov 1, Mac & Potter. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Oct 29, Amy Wigton Trio. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre

Oct 28, Infected Mushroom. Oct 29, Foreverland with Metal Shop. Oct 31, Trapt with Message From Sylvia and American Evil. Nov 2, Southern Culture On the Skids with Frankie & the Pool Boys. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Oct 30, 3pm, community sing with the Threshold Choir. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Phoenix Theater

Oct 28, Thought Vomit with R4id and EveryDayFreak. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Redwood Cafe

Oct 28, Reggae at the Redwood with Midnight Sun Massive. Oct 29, 3pm, Gold Coast Jazz Band. Oct 29, 9pm, Halloween Party

with Eric Lindell. Oct 30, 5pm, Jamie & Mel. Oct 31, 6:30pm, Open Mic with DJ Loisaida. Nov 1, Rock Overtime student performance. Nov 2, Irish set dancing. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Remy’s Bar & Lounge

Oct 29, Fright Night with DJ Tony Tone. 130 Stony Point Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.578.1963.

Resurrection Parish

the Rotten Tomatoes. 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260.

Oct 29, 7:30pm, Halloween costume party with Frobeck and Mr Music & the Love Choir. 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

Sonoma Community Center

Oct 30, 6:30pm, kitchen concert with Kim Hughes and Jennie Nourse. 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.938.4626.

Rio Nido Roadhouse

Oct 28, Dirty Cello. 452 First St E, Ste G, Sonoma. 707.996.1364.

River Theater

Oct 31, Halloween Ball with Melvin Seals & JGB. 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.8022.

Rossi’s 1906

Oct 26, Keith Greeninger. Oct 28, the Rhythm Rangers. Oct 29, halloween party with VooDoo Dolly and Loosely Covered. 401 Grove St, Sonoma. 707.343.0044.

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub

Oct 29, Narwhal Family. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Sally Tomatoes

Oct 29, Halloween party with

FRI, APRIL 7

Brain Candy: Adam Savage and Michael Stevens

ON SALE NOW! OCTOBER 28 - 30 Left Edge Theare

Zombie Town A comedy by Tim Bauer

SAT, NOVEMBER 5

Whose Live Anyway?

SAT, NOVEMBER 12

Sebastopol Community Center

Oct 30, 3:30pm, Creative Arts Series with organist R Monty Bennett. 303 Stony Point Rd, Santa Rosa, creativeartsseries. com. Oct 29, creepy carn-evil with D’ginn. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

NEW SHOW ON SALE OCT 28 AT NOON!

Sonoma Speakeasy

Spancky’s Bar

Thurs, 7pm, Thursday Night Blues Jam. Oct 28, Electric Funeral and Ancient Mariner. Oct 29, Unbalanced. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Subud Hall

Oct 29, Ecstatic Kirtan with Jai Uttal. 234 Hutchins Ave, Sebastopol.

The Tradewinds Bar

Oct 29, Halloween Bash. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Twin Oaks Roadhouse Oct 28, Serf & James. Oct 29, Dodgy Mountain Men. Oct 31, the Blues ) Defenders pro

26

Neko Case

with special guests Eric Bachmann and Jon Rauhouse FREE LOCAL LIVE MUSIC GIGS LIVE MUSIC. NEW STAGE AND SOUND. NEW DANCE FLOOR. NEW AIR CONDITIONING. SUDS TAPS - 18 LOCAL & REGIONAL SELECT CRAFT BEERS & CIDERS. EATS NEW MENU, KITCHEN OPEN ALL DAY FROM 11AM ON. CHECK OUT OUR FRIED CHICKEN SANDWICH W/CORN ON THE COB. DIGS DINING OUT-DOORS. KIDS ALWAYS WELCOME - NEW KID’S MENU. RESERVATIONS FOR 8 OR MORE. HAPPY HOUR M-F 3-6PM. $2 CHICKEN TACOS. $3 HOUSE CRAFT BEERS. WEEKLY EVENTS MONDAYS • BLUES DEFENDERS PRO JAM TUESDAYS • OPEN MIC W/ROJO WEDNESDAYS • KARAOKE CALENDAR THU OCT 27 • TIMOTHY O’NEIL BAND AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 7:30PM / 21+ FREE FRI OCT 28 • SERF AND JAMES AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 7:30PM / 21+ FREE SAT OCT 29 • DODGY MOUNTAIN MEN WILEY RIC AND HIS QUESTIONABLE DECISIONS, EREMY GALLEGOS 7:30PM / 21+ FREE CHECK OUT OUR FULL MUSIC CALENDAR www.TwinOaksRoadhouse.com Phone 707.795.5118 5745 Old Redwood Hwy Penngrove, CA 94951

SUN, NOVEMBER 13

Celtic Thunder: Legacy

MON, NOVEMBER 14

Amos Lee

TUE, NOVEMBER 22

Scott Bradley’s Postmodern Jukebox WED, NOVEMBER 30

Celtic Woman Home for Christmas: The Symphony Tour DECEMBER 2 - 4

Joy to the World

from Transcendence’s “Broadway Under The Stars”

707.546.3600 lutherburbankcenter.org

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 26- NOVE MBER 1 , 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Thur 10/27 • Doors 7pm • $17 ADV / $19 DOS HONEYHONEY with Benham Sat 10/29 • Doors 8pm • $22 ADV / $25 DOS


Music ( 25

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTOBER 26- NOV E M BE R 1 , 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

26

jam. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

MARIN COUNTY

707.829.7300 230 PETALUMA AVE | SEBASTOPOL

Civic Center Library

OPEN MIC NIGHT

EVERY TUES AT 7PM WITH CENI WED OCT 26 SO LD

OUT! KIMOCK + SPECIAL GUEST JEFF CHIMENTI

+ WITH SPECIAL GUEST MICKEY HART $30/DOORS 8/SHOW 9/21+

with the Petaluma Downtown Merchants

THUR OCT 27

COUNTRY LINE DANCE (EVERY 4TH THURSDAY)

$10/DOORS 6-SHOW 7/ALL AGES

FRI OCT 28

9TH ANNUAL CIRQUE DU SEBASTOPOL

EL RADIO FANTASTIQUE CABARET DE CALIENTE

2 NIG

+ JUNK PARLOR $15–$30/DOORS 8/SHOW 9/21+

HTS!

SAT OCT 29

9TH ANNUAL CIRQUE DU SEBASTOPOL

HTS 2 NIG

!

PANTYRAID

+ SUGARBEATS, INI $20–$125/DOORS 8/SHOW 8:45/21+

MON OCT 31

MONDAY NIGHT EDUTAINMENTDANCEHALLOWEEN WITH

Follow the Trick-or-Treat Trail in Downtown Petaluma. Safe, community Halloween fun for kids 10 and under. Look for the balloons and posters in shop windows! www.petalumadowntown.com

DJ JACQUES & DJ GUACAMOLE $8/DOORS-SHOW 10/21+

WED NOV 2

$5/DOORS-SHOW 7/ALL AGES

WWW.HOPMONK.COM Book your

Oct 26, pro blues jam. Oct 27, Cabanijazz Project. Oct 28, James Moseley Band. Oct 29, the Unauthorized Rolling Stones Halloween Bash. Oct 30, 6:30pm, Nikita Germaine. Nov 1, West Coast Songwriters Competition. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

George’s Nightclub

Oct 27, college night. Oct 28, Hip-Hop Halloween Party. Oct 29, George’s Halloween party with DJ Jorge. Oct 30, Mexican Banda. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

19 Broadway Club

Oct 26, open mic night with Salty Barnacle. Oct 28, the Hots. Oct 29, Hollywood halloween with Pride & Joy. Nov 2, open mic night with the Refreshments. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200. Oct 26, Lender. Oct 27, Liquid Green. Oct 28, Halloween funk party with DJ Carlos. Oct 29, Mind, Body & Soul Band. Oct 30, 4pm, the Full Tilt! Band. Oct 30, 8pm, the Hubcap Stealers. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar

Ethnic Arts Jewelry Clothes • Beads 1149 First St, Napa 707.252.3060

Oct 26, Brian Byrnes. Oct 27, C-JAM with Connie Ducey. Nov 1, Swing Fever. Nov 2, the Jazz Roots Band. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Peri’s Silver Dollar

Oct 26, the Whole Catastrophe. Oct 27, Mo’Lasses. Oct 28, Michael Aragon Quartet. Oct 29, Fuzzy Slippers with Chris Saunders. Oct 30, Harlow’s Monkeys and Logan Magness. Oct 31, Kimrea & the Dreamdogs. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Novato Copperfield’s Books

Oct 28, 6pm, jazz in the neighborhood with Mary D’Orazi. 999 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.763.3052.

Osteria Divino

Oct 26, Jonathan Poretz. Oct

Terrapin Crossroads

Mon, Billy D’s open mic. Oct 26, the New Sneakers. Oct 27, Mark’s Jam Sammich. Oct 28, the Happys and Barnyard Hammer. Oct 29, Hustlerween with Beso Negro. Oct 31, Halloween night with Sabbath Lives. Nov 1, the Good Guys. Nov 2, the Weissmen. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Throckmorton Theatre

Presidio Yacht Club

BurgerFi

San Geronimo Valley Community Center

Thursdays 7:30pm

Handmade “Lotus” Hoops

Oct 26, Scott Law and the Terrapin Allstars. Oct 27, Lorin Rowan’s Deep Blue Jam. Oct 28, Top 40 Friday. Oct 29-30, the Terrapin Allstars. Oct 31, Grateful Monday with Scott Law. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

Harmonia

Bellydance Classes

5681 Redwood Dr, Rohnert Park 707.584.8058 or 707.477.2757

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Grazie Restaurant

HopMonk Novato

with Kathy

HONEYHONEY and Benham. Oct 29, the Brothers Comatose and the Good Bad. Oct 30-31, Dumpstaphunk Halloween party with the Jazz Mafia Horns. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Oct 28, the 7th Sons SpookTacular Dance Party. 679 Sommerville Rd, Sausalito. 415.332.2319.

Oct 29, Halloween Masquerade Party. 2200 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.1432.

next event with us, up to 250, kim@hopmonk.com

456 Tenth St, Santa Rosa • Tue–Sat 11–5 707.781.7070 • calabigallery.com

Fenix

Oct 29, Twin Soles. 823 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.897.5181.

SCIENCE BUZZ CAFE

Firebird (For Stravinsky) by Sutter Marin, 1983

Oct 27, 6pm, Monster Mash Family Halloween Dance. 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 415.473.6058.

27, Barrio Manouche. Oct 28, Smith Dobson Trio. Oct 29, David Jeffrey’s Jazz Fourtet. Oct 30, Bay Tones Trio. Oct 31, James Henry’s Hands on Fire. Nov 1, 4pm, Tenth Anniversary Celebration. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355.

Oct 29, 8pm, “Jazz in Sacred Space” with Schawkie Roth Jazz Quartet. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

Sausalito Seahorse

Wed, Milonga with Marcelo Puig and Seth Asarnow. Oct 27, Hot French Strings. Oct 28, DJ Jose Ruiz. Oct 29, Ricardo Lemvo & Makino Loca. Oct 30, 5pm, Julio Bravo & Salsabor. Nov 1, Noel Jewkes and friends. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899.

Smiley’s Schooner Saloon

Oct 27, Luke Callen. Oct 28, Whiskey & Women. Oct 29, Koolerator. Mon, Epicenter Soundsystem reggaae. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Smitty’s Bar

Oct 31, Void Where Prohibited. 214 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.332.2637.

Spitfire Lounge

Last Thursday of every month, the North Bass DJ night. Fourth Friday of every month, DJ Beset. 848 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.5551.

Sweetwater Music Hall

Oct 26, Celebration of Billy Lee Lewis feat Mark Karan and Glenn Walters. Oct 27,

Wed, 12pm, noon concert series. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

NAPA COUNTY Beringer Vineyards

Oct 30, 12:30pm, Twang Ditty. 2000 Main St, St Helena, 866.708.9463. Oct 29, 3pm, Diamond Silver. 967 First St, Napa. 707.927.5373.

Ca’ Momi Osteria

Oct 28, Nate Lopez Duo. Oct 29, Ruby Jaye. 1141 First St, Napa. 707.224.6664.

Deco Lounge at Capp Heritage Vineyards

Oct 29, Leigh Guest. 1245 First St, Napa. 707.254.1922.

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Oct 27, Four on the Floor. Oct 28, the Blue Hand Band. Oct 29, Ralph Woodson. Oct 30, DJ Aurelio. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

RaeSet

Wed, jazz night. Oct 28, Friday Night Blues with GretschKat. Oct 31, Halloween Night Monster Mash with Randy Foisey. 3150 B Jefferson St, Napa. 707.666.9028.

River Terrace Inn

Oct 27, Sean Carscadden. Oct 28, Craig Corona. Oct 29, Dawn & Tony. 1600 Soscol Ave, Napa. 707.320.9000.

Silo’s

Oct 26, Scott Pullman. Oct 27, Doug Houser. Oct 28, the Deadlies. Oct 29, the Fabulous Screwtops. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uva Trattoria

Oct 26, Tom Duarte. Oct 27, Duo Gadjo. Oct 28, Tony Macaroni Trio. Oct 29, Jackie and friends. Oct 30, Trio Solea. 1040 Clinton St, Napa. 707.255.6646.


Galleries RECEPTIONS Oct 27

Finley Community Center, “Three Artists/ Three Styles,” collage artist Thea Evensen, landscape painter Lynnie Rabinowitsh and abstract mosaic artist Kathy Farrell display. 5pm. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

Oct 29

MarinMOCA, “Fall National Juried Exhibition,” annual show presents a thought-provoking survey of figurative and representational imagery, expressed through a variety mediums. “Waste Not: The Art of Recology”, group exhibit features artists who participated in San Francisco’s Recology Artist in Residence Program, including Marin residents Karrie Hovey, Bill Russell and James Sansing. 5pm. 500 Palm Dr, Novato. 415.506.0137.

Oct 30

Headlands Center for the Arts, “Fall Project Space Exhibitions,” Oakland-based artist Chris Duncan and New York-based artist Alejandro Guzmán display their works as seasonal artists-inresidence. 3pm. 944 Fort Barry, Sausalito. 415.331.2787. West County Museum, “The Hippies,” memorabilia recreates the environment of rebellion against consumerism and conformity built in the forests of Graton and Occidental in the 1960s and ‘70s. 12:30pm. 261 S Main St, Sebastopol. 707.829.6711.

SONOMA COUNTY Alchemia Gallery

Through Oct 30, “A Face in the Crowd,” 10 artists are represented in this collection of acrylic and oil portraits inspired by the works of iconic artists. 111 Kentucky St, Petaluma. Mon-Tues, Fri, 10 to 5; Wed-Thurs, Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, 11 to 4. 707.775.3794.

Aqus Cafe

Through Nov 1, “Day of the Dead,” seasonal show from local artists offers several takes on Dia de los Muertos. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Art Museum of Sonoma County

Through Jan 29, “Faith Ringgold: An American Artist,” features storyquilts, works on paper, tankas, soft sculpture and original illustrations from the African American artist. Reception, Nov 12 at 5pm. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. TuesSun, 11 to 5. 707.579.1500.

The Art Wall at Shige Sushi

Through Oct 31, “Marsha Balian Solo Show,” the artist’s representational collages offer a sense of mystery, invention and narrative. 8235 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. Hours vary. 707.795.9753.

Charles M. Schulz Museum

Through Nov 27, “It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown,” exhibit celebrates 50 years since the animated Peanuts Halloween special. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Dutton-Goldfield Winery

Through Nov 15, “Nancy Ray Ricciardi Solo Show,” breathtaking landscapes from the artist and teacher. 3100 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. Daily, 10am to 4:30pm. 707.827.3600.

Fulton Crossing

Through Oct 30, “My Secret Garden,” solo show from Santa Rosa artist Lucy Liew displays imaginative landscapes and magical worlds in two parts; “Blossoming” runs through Sept 25 and “Weathered” runs through October. Through Oct 31, “October Art Show,”

featuring several artists opening their studios to the public. 1200 River Rd, Fulton. Sat-Sun, noon to 5pm 707.536.3305.

Graton Gallery

Through Nov 6, “What You See,” featuring new works by Bruce K Hopkins and others. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. TuesSat, 10:30 to 6; Sun, 10:30 to 4. 707.829.8912.

Hammerfriar Gallery

Through Nov 5, “Ancestor Worship,” artist and architect Tramaine de Senna presents a contemplative show of architecture as art. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

1667 W Steele Lane, Santa Rosa 707.546.7147 • snoopyshomeice.com

Healdsburg Museum

©Peanuts

Nov. 3 - 6

Through Nov 13, “School Days Then & Now,” exhibition features area’s first schools from 1858 to the present through artifacts, photographs and scale models of buildings. Compare classrooms in 1916 and 2016. 221 Matheson St, Healdsburg. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.431.3325.

14 STUDENT

CHOREOGRAPHERS

• •

Hopscotch Gifts & Gallery

2 SHOWS ♥

= HEART

Through Nov 16, “Wings,” bird-themed art show includes works by local artists ranging from watercolors to metal sculpture. 14301 Arnold Dr, #2A, Glen Ellen. Thurs-Mon. 10 to 6. 707.343.1931.

& SOUL

Directed by Christine Cali

Tickets $5-$17 www.sonoma.edu/tix

Theatre Arts & Dance @ Sonoma State University

Journey Center

Through Nov 13, “Hearts of the World,” the artist Potenza displays art, images and stories from her recently completed World Peace Project after 24 years. 1601 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 9 to 5; weekend hours by appointment. 707.578.2121.

Marilyn Hulter M.D. Medical Cannabis Evaluation Clinic

$49

Renewal From Any Doctor

Redwood Cafe

Through Oct 31, “October Art Show at Redwood Cafe,” featuring works by artists Cathleen Francisco, Zack Rhodes, Lauren Marks and Caitlin Sorrells. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. Open daily. 707.795.7868.

Riverfront Art Gallery

Through Nov 6, “Early Fall Show,” featuring the unique painting of Georgianne Fastaia and the vibrant photography of Gus Feissel. 132

) 28

$69

(Limited Time)

New Patient

Book Now @ www.mmjdoc.org Tel:707-527-0680

Marilyn Hulter M.D.

(Walk Ins Welcome)

3806 Sebastopol Road Santa Rosa CA 95407

Sharon Olson D.O.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 26- NOVE MBER 1 , 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Arts Events

27

Heart-pounding, breathtaking thrills!


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTOBER 26- NOV E M BE R 1 , 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

28

★★★★★★★★★ JERRY KNIGHT’S HISTORIC

River Theatre

16135 Main Street Guerneville, CA 95446 ★★★★★★★★★

DOORS OPEN AT 8:00PM TICKETS: $30 AT THE DOOR OR BROWNPAPERTICKETS.COM

HALLOWEEN COSTUME BALL

MELVIN SEALS & THE JERRY GARCIA BAND Costume Contest Fabulous Prizes!

★★★★★★★★★

OVER 21 ONLY

707.869.8022 MMEF THEATER RESTORATION

HALLOWEEN NIGHT MONDAY, OCT 31

A E

( 27

Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Rustic Bakery

Nov 1-Jan 31, “California Colors,” plein air oil paintings by Laura Culver boast vibrant colors and light. 2017 Larkspur Landing Cir, Larksput. 415.461.9900.

MARIN COUNTY Aroma Cafe

Through Nov 5, “Abstracts, Fantasies & Digital Manipulations,” the eclectic photography of Michel Kotski is on display. 1122 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.459.4340.

Art Works Downtown

Competitive Prices • Expert Staff • Convenient Location

AUTHORIZED RETAILERS OF THESE & OTHER FINE PRODUCTS

707.433.4068 • OPEN 7 Days a Week

30 A Mill Street, Healdsburg • www.thrivehydro.com

Enter to Win Trip for 2 to Squaw Valley-Alpine Meadows & plus film tickets

Through Nov 11, “20/20 Vision,” exhibition celebrating 20 years of Art Works Downtown looks at the past, present and future. Through Nov 5, “Circling,” Cayen Robertson’s solo exhibit features selections from the last 15 years of her artistic career, as well as her most recent pieces. Through Nov 7, “Wild Things,” recent watermedia paintings by nationally acclaimed artist Rita Sklar is featured at the Donor’s Gallery. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

Bay Model Visitor Center

Through Nov 12, “Natural Mystic,” Marin photographer Shayne Skower harnesses the power of Mother Nature through the lens of his camera. 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.3871.

© HANK DE VRÉ

Gallery Route One

Through Oct 30, “Canto XXV,” immersive art and sculpture exhibit from Diana Marto is inspired by Chinese spirit paper. Shows in conjunction with Cynthia Tom’s “Stories to Tell” and tc moore’s “Reflections.” 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Society of Artists

Through Oct 29, “In Your Dreams,” juried fine art exhibit is juried by Michael Azgour. 1515 Third St, San Rafael. WedSun, noon to 4pm 415.464.9561.

Osher Marin JCC

Through Oct 30, “We Are the Bridge,” exhibit showcases over 30 artists from multiple faith traditions, the majority of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Stinson Beach Library

Mumm Napa

Through Nov 6, “Through a Liquid Mirror,” exhibit features a collection of 38 underwater photographs by Wayne Levin. 8445 Silverado Trail, Rutherford. Daily, 10am to 4:45pm. 707.967.7700.

Napa Valley Museum

Through Nov 6, “Mother Nature, Eccentric Architect,” Julia Crane’s immersive installation reflects her fascination with the shapes and forms found across myriad ecosystems. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.944.0500.

Sharpsteen Museum

Through Oct 30, “Treasures from the Button Box,” clothing buttons from the late 1700s to the 1960s capture a longago world while evoking the pride and quality of small manufacturers. 1311 Washington St, Calistoga. Daily, 11 to 4. 707.942.5911.

Comedy Will Durst

SweetE Organic

Fundamentals of Stand-Up Comedy Workshop

Through Oct 30, “Kiddo Art & Artists,” art show includes Mill Valley students’ paintings and drawings. Strawberry Village. 800 Redwood Hwy, Ste 612, Mill Valley. Mon-Sat, 11 to 6; Sun, noon to 5. 415.380.5000.

Throckmorton Theatre

Crome Architecture

Toby’s Gallery

Through Oct 30, “Visual Poetry,” artists Bryn Craig, Robin Brandes and Leisha Douglas display works that find poetry in ordinary subject. 417 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. Mon-Sat, 10 to 6 415.524.8932.

NAPA COUNTY

Through Oct 31, “Stinson Beach Ranches Past & Present,” hosted by the Stinson Beach Historical Society. 3521 Shoreline Hwy, Stinson Beach. 415.868.0252.

Through Oct 31, “ExtraOrdinary Shapes,” group show of paintings from the Marin County Watercolor Society. 707 Meadowsweet Dr, Corte Madera. 707.924.6444.

Desta Art & Tea Gallery

bohemian.com

Through Nov 4, “Falkirk’s Juried Exhibit,” featuring hundreds of Bay Area artists working in a wide range of media. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

Through Oct 31, “Michael Cutlip Solo Show,” influenced by graffiti and street art, the Bay Area native’s works showcase metropolitan life as seen through an abstract lens. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Corte Madera Library

Through Oct 27, “In Earthed,” recent paintings by Toni Littlejohn. 905 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.0700.

saturday, Nov 12, 8pm marin Center, San Rafael

Falkirk Cultural Center

Through Oct 30, “Positive Choices,” retrospective of Bob Kubik’s drawings, etchings, paintings and sculptures made from recycled materials. 11250 Hwy 1, Point Reyes Station.

Vin Antico Wine Bar

Through Nov 1, “Ashley Dawn Solo Show,” modern impressionistic painter seeks to create beauty that invites the beholder to find rest and feel joy. 881 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.721.0600.

The “Elect to Laugh” tour continues. Oct 30, 7:30pm. $25-$30. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Learn how to write and tell jokes, and prep for the upcoming comedy marathon contest. Tues through Dec 6. $75/$300 full series. Cross & Crown Lutheran Church, 5475 Snyder Ln, Rohnert Park, 414.877.4424.

Grin Reapers

A spooky and silly Halloween standup show also includes magic, musical acts and readings. Oct 29, 8pm. $20$30. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

HAHAHalloween

Featuring several standups and improv from Evil Comedy. Oct 28, 8pm. $10. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

John Cleese & Eric Idle Monty Python founders team up for two live shows, as part of their “Together Again At Last ... For the Very First Time” tour. Sun, Oct 30, 7:30pm and Tues, Nov 1, 7:30pm. $65 and


up. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

29

CRITIC’S CHOICE

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 26- NOVE MBER 1 , 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Mickey Joseph

Standup night features the headlining comic. Nov 1, 9:30pm. Free. 19 Broadway Club, 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Laughing Tomato Comedy Showcase

Local and Bay Area comics, hosted by Tony Sparks. First Tues of every month, 8pm. Free. Sally Tomatoes, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260.

Mort Sahl

Sahl takes the stage every week to deliver his legendary, take-no-prisoners wit. Thurs, 7pm. $20. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Johnny Steele

The San Francisco standup comedian appears with guest Jeff Applebaum. Oct 29, 8pm. $20-$25. Trek Winery, 1026 Machin Ave, Novato. 415.899.9883.

Tuesday Night Live

Featuring comedians at the top of their game, both rising stars and names known worldwide. Tues, 8pm. $17-$27. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Dance Alma del Tango Studio Ongoing, Swing Dance Classes, Learn East Coast Swing and Lindy Hop with instructor Jasmine Worrell. Four-week sessions begin the first of every month. First Wednesday of every month, 7pm, Introduction to Argentine Tango, learn to dance like they do in Buenos Aires, no experience necessary. $18. 167 Tunstead Ave, San Anselmo 415.459.8966.

Angelico Hall

Oct 28, 7pm and Oct 29, 3pm, Alonzo King LINES Ballet BFA Fall Showcase, premiere of four works featuring choreography by Gregory Dawson, Amanda Miller and Carmen Rozestraten. $10. Dominican University, 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael 415.457.4440.

College of Marin Kentfield Campus

Oct 28-29, 7:30pm, Take Flight, College of Marin Dance Faculty’s fall )

30

Living Dead

Dia de los Muertos shows season’s serious side This weekend isn’t all Halloween candy corn and monster mashes; it’s also Día de los Muertos, or the Day of the Dead. Celebrated throughout Mexico, this is a holiday of remembrance, when families and communities honor their loved ones who’ve died and create festive art and altars. In the North Bay, several events carry on the tradition. In Santa Rosa, the History Museum of Sonoma County is running a Día de los Muertos Altars exhibition and hosting two events this week. On Thursday, Oct. 27, Mexico City native Laura Larqué, now a history professor at Santa Rosa Junior College, presents an evening talk on the ancient traditions of life and death in the Mexican culture and the view in Mesoamerica that death is only one state of an infinite life cycle. On Saturday, Oct. 29, the museum opens up for a family day with sugar skulls, face painting and more activities for all ages, running from 2pm to 4pm. (425 Seventh St., Santa Rosa; 707.579.1500.) In Napa, the Napa Valley Latino Heritage Committee hosts a weekend celebration and altar exhibit at Harvest Middle School. Saturday’s events include music and dancing, crafts and food from noon to 6pm. Sunday is a more reverential event, with quiet viewings of the 20 altars from noon to 4:30pm. (2449 Old Sonoma Road, Napa; 707.337.2970.)—Charlie Swanson

For Sonoma & Napa’s Best!

NOW through DEC 31 The Bohemian’s ‘Best Of’ publishes in March 2017!


Never Trim Again!

www.ganjaglobe.org

FREE DEMONSTRATIONS

1 (866)45 GANJA

PATENT PENDING MADE IN USA

Kit Includes:

• Globe • Stand • Soft Air Hose • Sifter

GANJAGLOBE.ORG

Trim Tech Check out

our tutorial

on Youtube! TrimTech LLC

NEED HELP with Health Insurance? whit

Certified Agent – Lic 0582571

(707)

Dance Arts Studios

Sol Studios Fairfax

( 29

Oct 28, 8pm, Halloween Dance Extravaganza, costume contests and dancing. $10-$15. 704 Mission Ave, San Rafael 415.459.1020.

Thursdays, 10:45am, Flamenco Dance Class, bring a shawl and join in the barefoot class. $9. 12 School St #12e, Fairfax 415.785.4861.

Dance Palace

Wischemann Hall

Wednesdays, 6pm, Women’s Collaborative Dance. $5-$15 per month. Sundays, 10am, Ecstatic Dance Point Reyes, explore different rhythms with no experience necessary. 503 B St, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1075.

Mondays, 5:30 and 7pm, Redwood Rainbows Mainstream and Basic Class. 707.478.6409. Sundays, 10am, Soul Motion, open movement practice. 465 Morris St, Sebastopol 707.823.0926.

Fairfax Pavilion

Events

Finnish American Home Association

CALL FOR FREE HELP No Wait on Hold Fast Applications Dan Kessler

● Update 2016 Info ● Fix Problems ● Pick a New Plan ● Off Exchange Insurance

dance concert features diverse and uplifting dance works, both comedic and dramatic. $10-$20. 835 College Ave, Kentfield.

Dance Club. Thursdays, Circles ‘n Squares Dance Club. Oct 28, 7pm, Motown & Disco Dance. Oct 29, 8pm, Challenging Contra Dance. Sundays, Country-Western dancing and lessons. 1400 W College Ave, Santa Rosa 707.529.5450.

A E

Wednesdays. through Nov 30, Dance a la Moxie, fun total body workout for ages 55 and over covers international dance steps throughout time. Free. 415.302.0659. 142 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax.

▲▲

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | OCTOBE R 26- NOV E M BE R 1 , 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

30

480-4850

www.coveringca.info

ANIMAL HEALING ARTS Holistic Veterinary Medicine Integrative Wellness Care Over 18 years experience

Dr. Lisa Pesch • Dr. Ilsi Medearis 5430 Commerce Blvd., Suite 1K, Rohnert Park AnimalHealingArts.net • 707.584.PETS (7387)

Wednesdays, 5:30pm, African dance and drum workshop, all ages and skill levels are welcome to move and groove with Sandor Diabankouezi, world-class Congolese master drummer. $15. 191 W Verano Ave, Sonoma.

Flamingo Lounge

Tuesdays, swing dancing with lessons. Sundays, 7pm, Sensual Salchata Nights, dress to impress with salsa and bachata dance lessons followed by open dancing. $10. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa 707.545.8530.

Hermann Sons Hall

Mondays, 7pm. through Dec 12, International Folk Dance Class, dances from Romania, Bulgaria, Serbia, Greece, Turkey and more. $7/$65. 415.663.9512. 860 Western Ave, Petaluma.

HopMonk Sebastopol

Oct 27, Country Line Dancing. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol 707.829.7300.

JAS Dance Academy

Fourth Thursday of every month, 7pm, Face2Face Salsa Dance Party. $5. 3273 Airway Dr, Santa Rosa 707 293-4292.

Monroe Dance Hall

Mondays, Scottish Country Dancing. Tuesdays, Razzmataz folk dance club. Wednesdays, Singles and Pairs Square

Adjunct Faculty Recruitment Open House

SRJC is looking for part-time faculty in many fields including math, chemistry and English to meet student demands. Nov 1, 5:30pm. Bertolini Student Center, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4266.

Blind Scream Haunted House Three terrifying hauntedhouse experiences under one roof get you in the mood for Halloween. Through Oct 31. SOMO Village Event Center, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park, blindscream.com.

Bolinas Day of the Dead Event

Celebration of Latin American holiday combines indigenous traditions with European rituals for honoring the dead with alters, treats and more. Nov 1-2. Bolinas Community Center, 14 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.2128.

Bouquets to the Dead

An honoring of our ancestors by local artists includes gong ceremony, public alters, exhibits, a potluck lunch and more to celebrate the lives of those who have passed. Oct 29-30. Free. Sonoma Mountain Cemetery, 90 1st St, Sonoma. 707.938.7485.

Community Heals

Share wisdom and gifts of healing. Last Sun of every month. dhyana Center, 186 N Main St, Sebastopol. 800.796.6863.

Community Media Center of Marin Orientation

Get answers to your media questions and learn how to produce digital media at the center. Tues, Nov 1, 7pm. Free. Community Media Center of Marin, 819 A St, San Rafael. 415.721.0636.

Community Meditation Practice

Sitting and walking meditation with free instruction. Followed by tea and snacks. Sun, 9:30am. Free. Santa Rosa Shambhala Meditation Center, 855 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.4907.

Critique Night

Artists are invited to bring work in for feedback, critique or processing among other artists in a friendly communal atmosphere.. First Wed of every month, 6pm. Free. Prince Gallery, 122 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.889.0371.

Dia de los Muertos Family Day

Learn about the festival, decorate your own sugar skull, have your face painted and bring a photo of a deceased loved one and make an offering to the community altar. Oct 29, 2pm. Free with admission. History Museum of Sonoma County, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Hallow’s Eve in Bolinas Live music, dancing and a brewfest featuring Iron Springs and Lagunitas Brewing Company raises funds for the community center. Oct 31, 7pm. $5-$10. Bolinas Community Center, 14 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.2128.

Mill Valley Papermill Creek Halloween Carnival

Family event features ghoulish games, freaky fun and gourmet food prepared by famous chefs. Oct 30, 11am. Dance Palace, 503 B St, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Petaluma River Cruise Fundraiser

Sail the historic waterway from the Turning Basin in downtown Petaluma to near the mouth of the river in San Pablo Bay and back in this benefit for Petaluma Museum Association. Oct 28, 4pm. Petaluma Historical Library & Museum, 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. 707.778.4398.

Pt Reyes Day of the Dead Procession from

) 32


31 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 26- NOVE MBER 1 , 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTOBER 26- NOV E M BE R 1 , 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

32

Concentrate Headquarters

A E

( 30

Gallery Route One to the Dance Palace leads to celebration with art and dance performance. Oct 29, 1pm. Free. Dance Palace, 503 B St, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Pup Parade & Costume Contest

Shatter $

• Vendor Demonstrations, Samples & Specials

$

• Largest Edible Selection in the North Bay

Scream on the Green

• Wide Topical Selection • Organic & Lab Tested Medicine

• Student Discounts Friday • Bulk Discounts • Senior & Veteran Discounts 7 Days A Week 10am–7pm Mon–Fri • 10am–5pm Sat–Sun 2425 Cleveland Ave, Ste 175 Santa Rosa (Next to Big 5) 707.526.2800

20

15, $30

Dress up your doggy and show off their Halloween costume in this fun, family event. Oct 29, 1pm. Marin Country Mart, 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur.

FRIENDLY AND KNOWLEDGEABLE TRAINED STAFF

both comedy and drama, from Italy in Saturday presentations, plus the addition of two Sunday matinees. Sat, Oct 29. $15/$112 full series. Marin Center Showcase Theatre, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. www. italianfilm.com.

Just Eat It

Sausalito Film Series presents the award-winning documentary on food waste and food recovery shows, with reception and post-show panel featuring local leaders. Oct 30, 5pm. Cavallo Point Lodge, 601 Murray Circle, Sausalito. 415.339.4700.

Novato’s city hall turns into a Chamber of Horrors and familyfriendly activities abound in this fundraising event that features costume contests, games, performances and more. Oct 28-29. Downtown Novato, Grant Ave, Novato. 415.897.1164.

Marin Country Mart Movie Night

Singles Halloween Party

Mind Reels

Dress in costume and dance the night away. Oct 29, 8pm. $10. Embassy Suites Hotel, 101 McInnis Pkwy, San Rafael.

Supernatural Soiree

Annual costume and dance party sets sail with a nautical theme. Oct 28, 9:30pm. Bergamot Alley, 328-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8720.

Witchie Poo Halloween Extravaganza

Annual variety show includes a costume parade at intermission and prizes. Through Oct 30. $9-$11. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Film Cinema & Psyche

Study, watch, and discuss five pre-Code treasures from 1933 with a focus on cultural dissolution, moral revolution and film innovation of the era. Thurs, 6:30pm. through Nov 17. $110. Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 510.496.6060.

CULT Film Series

Gather friends and family to enjoy a classic film on the green throughout the summer. Wed, 6pm. Marin Country Mart, 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur.

Taste of Place with the Scholium Project

Unique dining experience features cult winemaker Abe Schoener. Oct 27, 6:30pm. $115. Healdsburg Shed, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

For Kids Guerneville Library

Wed at 11, Preschool storytime. Wed, 11am. Free. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Halloween Fun

Costumes, crafts, books and treats. Oct 29, 1pm. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Weekly series presents notable documentary films as well as guest speakers and performers bringing the film’s ideas to life. Tues-noon. $25-$30. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.5111.

Pirate Halloween Party Pirates

No Home Movie

Roald Dahl’s Willy Wonka

New French-Belgian documentary film, directed by Chantal Akerman, focuses on conversations between the film-maker and her mother, a Holocaust survivor. Fri, Oct 28, 7pm and Sun, Oct 30, 4pm. Sonoma Film Institute, Warren Auditorium, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2606.

Petaluma International Film Festival Eighth annual showcase features independent feature and short films from around the world. Oct 2830. $12 and up. Boulevard Cinemas, 200 C St, Petaluma, PetalumaFilmFestival.org.

Food & Drink

Classic HP Lovecraft-inspired film “From Beyond” screens with scream queen Barbara Crampton on hand for a Q&A. Oct 27, 7pm. $10. Roxy Stadium 14 Cinemas, 85 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.8909.

Chili Cook-Off

Italian Film Festival

Halloween Candy Swap & Drop

The fest turns 40 and once again offers eight great films,

exchange for some of delicious, natural treats. Nov 1-5. SweetE Organic, Strawberry Village. 800 Redwood Hwy, Ste 612, Mill Valley. 415.380.5000.

A cooking competition brings out the best in chili while live music and more entertain. Oct 29, 4pm. Sebastopol Grange Hall, 6000 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol.

Drop off commodity candy in

festive event for kids of all ages. Oct 29, 12pm. $20 and up. Falkirk Cultural Center, 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438. Enjoy the timeless story with a musical adaptation perfect for all ages. Oct 27-30. $10$20. Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

Lectures Back in Time

Watch an accelerated time lapse of SF Bay’s last 18,000 years and see how one of the world’s largest natural estuaries and one of the few inverted deltas on the planet were created. Oct 29, 1:30pm. Bay Model Visitor Center, 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.3871.

Dr Cesar Lozano

A high-energy and humorous talk that illustrates the differences between men and women to help improve relationships. Oct 26, 8pm. $35$75. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Ice-T

The famed rapper, actor and entrepreneur appears in a special lecture event titled “Overcoming the Impossible.”


Books. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa 707.546.3600.

Polls & the Presidential Election

Oct 28, 7pm, “Eternal Frankenstein” with Ross Lockhart. Nov 1, 7pm, “The Magic Word” with Mac Barnett. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Find out what the polls teach us about this year’s contest. Oct 27, 6pm. San Rafael Library, 1100 E St, San Rafael. 415.485.3323.

Wild Canines of Marin

Park Ranger Rob Ruiz discusses the habits and identifying characteristics of our canine neighbors. Oct 26, 7pm. Fairfax Library, 2097 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax, marincounty.org.

Readings Book Passage

Oct 27, 6pm, “Today Will Be Different” with Maria Semple, a literary supper event. $65. Oct 27, 7pm, “The Mothers” with Brit Bennett. Oct 28, 7pm, “In the Company of Women” with Grace Bonney and contributors. $40. Oct 29, 1pm, “Belonging to God” with Will Keepin. Oct 29, 7pm, “Billy Gogan, American” with Roger Higgins. Oct 30, 4pm, “Marrow” with Elizabeth Lesser. Nov 1, 7pm, “A Crooked Smile” with Terri Tate. Nov 2, 7pm, “Let the Good Prevail” with Noah and Logan Miller. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Bump Wine Cellars

Oct 28, 7pm, “Things That Go Bump In the Night” poetry event, hosted by the Sonoma Writers Workshop. 521 Broadway, Ste A, Sonoma 707.228.9214.

Diesel Bookstore

Oct 26, 7pm, Larkspur Book Club Pioneers, meet to discuss “The Tsar of Love and Techno” by Anthony Marra. Oct 27, 7pm, “This is Cancer” with Laura Holmes Haddad. Oct 29, 11am, “A Recipe for Cooking” with Cal Peternell. Nov 1, 7pm, “Clean Soups” with Rebecca Katz. 2419 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur 415.785.8177.

Healdsburg Copperfield’s Books

Oct 28, 6pm, “The Mothers” with Brit Bennett, followed by wine reception at Thumbprint Cellars. 104 Matheson St, Healdsburg 707.433.9270.

Luther Burbank Center for the Arts

Oct 27, 7pm, “Big American Cookbook” with Mario Batali, co-presented with Copperfield’s

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books

San Geronimo Valley Community Center

Oct 30, 4pm, “Days of the Dead” with James A Jacobs. Free. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo 415.488.8888.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books

Oct 29, 7pm, “Witch Dancer Book 2” with Lisa Miranda. Nov 2, 7pm, “Let There Be Laughter” with Michael Krasny. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Terrapin Crossroads

Oct 27, 12:30pm, “Big American Cookbook” with Mario Batali. $125. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael 415.524.2773.

Theater Bad Dates

Jennifer King stars in this charming and sweet onewoman play about a hilarious journey of self-discovery, presented by Sonoma Arts Live. Oct 26-30. sonomaartslive. org. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.938.4626.

Dancing at Lughnasa

Widely regarded as a modern theater classic, the play looks at a nostalgic summer of 1936 in the fictional town of Ballybeg, just before the dawn of the Second World War. Through Oct 30. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.0177.

Dial M for Murder

The classic thriller gets a new production from the North Bay Stage Company. Through Nov 6. $28. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

The Jungle Book

Marin Theatre Company’s family series presents a retelling of Rudyard Kipling’s classic story. Oct 29-Nov 6. $18$22. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

Murder at Joe’s Speakeasy

Get a Clue Productions presents

33

a new murder-mystery dinner theater show set in the roaring ‘20s. Fri, Oct 28, 7pm. $68. Charlie’s Restaurant, Windsor Golf Club, 1320 19th Hole Dr, Windsor, getaclueproductions. com.

Peter & the Starcatcher Marin Onstage presents the story how Peter Pan becomes the magical, eternal boy of legend. Through Nov 12. $12$25. Belrose Theater, 1415 Fifth Ave, San Rafael, marinonstage. org.

The Quality of Life

Compassionate and humorous work deals with life and death among four fully realized characters. Through Oct 30. $15-$30. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

The Rocky Horror Show

That sweet transvestite, Dr. Frank-N-furter, and his motley crew return in the original stage musical. Through Nov 13. Studio Theatre, 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Titanic: The Musical

Award-winning Spreckels Theatre Company presents the North Bay premiere of the Tony award-winning show. Through Oct 30. $16-$26. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

The Woman in Black

The Raven Players go on the road and present the theatrical adaptation of Susan Hill’s ghostly tale creates an intimate play-within-a-play experience for the audience. Through Oct 30. $10-$25. Costeaux French Bakery, 417 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg.

Zombie Town

Left Edge Theatre presents a comedic mockumentary about an undead outbreak in Texas. Through Oct 30. $25-$40. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

HYDROPONICS, ORGANICS AND MORE

20–35% OFF

ALL HARVEST SUPPLIES SCISSORS! RUBBING ALCOHOL! TURKEY BAGS! AND MORE! Promotion Exp. Nov 30

353 COLLEGE AVE, SANTA ROSA, CA 95401 707.568.6299 | GROWGENERATION.COM

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 26- NOVE MBER 1 , 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Oct 28, 7:30pm. $40. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | OCTOBE R 26- NOV E M BE R 1 , 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

34

THE

Nugget

I Warned You

Proposed county ordinances will sink cannabis industry BY BEN ADAMS

W

hen I wrote last (“The Big Squeeze,” Sept. 28), it was about my fears for the future of the small cannabis farmer. Since then, Sonoma County has released its proposed cannabis ordinance. As it turns out, the future for the small farmer is grim indeed. The biggest issue is the proposed removal of “agricultural and residential” and “rural residential” zoning from areas where licensed commercial cannabis will be permissible. The county estimates that 40 percent of growers are in these zones now. From conversations I’ve had with growers and clients, I think the number is much higher. So far, county officials are taking a hard line. There will be no exceptions, regardless of parcel size, longevity of the site’s operation, opinions of the

neighbors, remoteness of the property or other factors that might make a grow in these areas perfectly safe and acceptable. Why is this so problematic? At least 40 percent (and I believe it’s closer to 70–80 percent) of farmers will either have to move or quit if they want to stay legal under state law. The county will only allow commercial cultivation above 2,500 square feet in agricultural or industrial areas. It’s also requiring minimum parcel sizes. The average person cannot simply buy five or 10 acres of ag land, or a large industrial building, in Sonoma County. Land prices are too high and much of the agricultural land is planted in grapes. This proposed ordinance will dramatically cut the size of the legal cannabis community through land-use restrictions alone. It gets worse. The county will have many (as yet unspecified) requirements to get a conditionaluse permit. These will cost money. Many of these requirements will take small growers by surprise. For example, are you prepared to have an ADA-compliant bathroom at your cultivation site? You may need it. The costs to satisfy the county will be significant. Security and water issues are also likely to be big expenses. Growers might also have to hire expensive experts such as attorneys and engineers. I would not be surprised if the cost of getting through the conditionaluse permit process is in the hundreds of thousands of dollars. Remember that even if the grower gets a county permit, a state license will then be required. That will bring its own expenses, such as track and trace and license fees. This is all so disappointing. Sonoma County had a real chance to create a brand-new industry from the ground up. Instead, the majority of growers will simply go underground or relocate. Ben Adams is a local attorney who concentrates his practice on cannabis compliance and defense.


BOHEMIAN

PLACE AN AD: Phone: 707.527.1200, Monday-Friday 8:30am-5:30pm Fax: 707.527.1288 | Email: sales@bohemian.com Wellness for the Long-term

Adam’s PC Repairs For Windows Based PC’s & Laptops

Adam Alboher

• Amazon Fire TV, Google Chromcast, Roku, & Apple TV Setup • PC Component Replacement, Virus/Malware Removal • Custom Built Computers (including OS Installation) • Network Installation/Management • Playstation & Xbox Console Setup

707.695.8690

$

25 yrs experience

Safe, Gentle and Effective Healthcare •Chronic pain, sports injuries •Digestion, arthritis •Mental health, stress •Insurance, FSA accepted •Auto accidents, workers comp

Alboher@yahoo.com 20 per hour • adamspcrepairs.com

Alterations Bridal and Everyday

Jean Elliot 707.829.1704

Chase L Desso, MS, LAc 707.861.8930 apolloacupuncture.com

&

Alternative Health Well-Being SUBOXONE

Thursday 4–6pm

available for Safe Oxy, Roxy, Norco, Vicodin, and Other Opiate Withdrawal!

STACS

175 Concourse off Airport Blvd.

SUBOXONE Treatment and counseling services

B12HappyHour.com Dr. Moses Goldberg, ND Dr. Dana Michaels, ND 707.284.9200

Confidential Program. 707.576.1919

Full Body Sensual Massage

Spiritual

Connections Finding inspiration & connecting with your community

Unity of Santa Rosa An inclusive, spiritually-minded community. All are welcome. Workshops and events. Sunday School & Service 10:30am 4857 Old Redwood Hwy tel: 707.542.7729 UnityofSantaRosa.org

Donation Requested

With a mature, playful CMT. Comfortable incall location near the J.C. in Santa Rosa. Soothing, relaxing, and fun. Gretchen 707.478.3952. Veterans Discount.

A Safe Place For Healing

Holistic, tantric masseuse. Relaxing, private, unhurried, heart centered. Free consultation with Session. Please call in advance for appt. 707.793.2188

.................................... ....................................

Tell Me When You’ve Had Enough

THE TIME-HONORED GURU-DEVOTEE RELATIONSHIP

Friday, Nov 4 7:00pm

B12 SHOT HAPPY HOUR

A Video Presentation with James Steinberg, Author of Divine Distraction. This session will give insight into how the relationship to an Enlightened Adept-Realizer works and how it serves ones own Realization. Based on the life and Teaching of Adi Da Samraj. “He knows what IT's all about...a rare being” —Alan Watts FINLEY COMMUNITY CENTER

Maple Room, 2060 West College Ave at Marlow Road, Santa Rosa www.adidam.org/santa-rosa/events

$1.00 min. for strong, thorough, relaxing therapeutic Massage. Parts or full body. Over twenty years experience. Colin Godwin, State Cert. 707.823.2990 Mon-Sat; 10 to 10.

Provider of Pleasure

Classic massage by a mature gentleman. Women, men,couples. Since 1991. Aft/eve appts. Santa Rosa 707.799.4467(C) or 707.535.0511 (L) Jimmy ....................................

....................................

Great Massage

By Joe, CMT. Swedish massage, 18 years experience. Will do outcalls. 707.228.6883

Therapeutic Massage Deep Swedish massage. Experienced professional. Santa Rosa. Edward. 415.378.0740

Astrology

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of October 26

ARIES (March 21–April 19) I invite you to fantasize about what your four great-grandmothers and four great-grandfathers may have been doing on Nov. 1, 1930. What? You have no idea how to begin? You don’t even know their names? If that’s the case, I hope you’ll remedy your ignorance. Your ability to create the future you want requires you to learn more about where and whom you came from. Halloween costume suggestion: your most interesting ancestor. TAURUS (April 20–May 20) At any one time,

over 2 million frozen human embryos are stored in tissue banks throughout Europe and North America. When the time is right, their owners retrieve them and bring them to term. That’s the first scenario I invite you to use as a metaphor for your life in the coming weeks. Here’s a second scenario: Scotch whisky is a potent mind-altering substance. Any particular batch must mature for at least three years, and may be distilled numerous times. There are currently 20 million barrels of the stuff mellowing in Scottish warehouses. And what do these two scenarios have to do with you? It’s time to tap into resources that you’ve been saving in reserve—that haven’t been ripe or ready until now. Halloween costume suggestions: a woman who’s nine months pregnant; a blooming rose or sunflower; ripe fruit.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) To create a bottle of Cabernet Sauvignon, a winemaker needs about 700 grapes. Compare this process with rain-making. When water vapor that’s high in the sky becomes dense enough, it condenses into tiny pearls of liquid called cloud droplets. If the humidity rises even further, a million of these babies might band together to form a single raindrop that falls to earth. And what does this have to do with your life? I suspect that in the coming weeks, you will have both an affinity and a skill for processes that resemble winemaking and rain-making. You’ll need a lot of raw material and energetic effort to produce a relatively small marvel—but that’s exactly as it should be. Halloween costume suggestion: a raindrop or bottle of wine. CANCER (June 21–July 22) Some Brazilians eat the heads of piranhas in the belief they’re aphrodisiacs. In Zimbabwe, women may make strategic use of baboon urine to enhance their allure. The scientific name for Colombia’s leaf-cutter ant is Hormiga culona, translated as “fat-assed ant.” Ingesting the roasted bodies of these critters is thought to boost sexual desire. Since you’re in a phase when tapping in to your deepest erotic longings will be healthy and educational, you may want to adopt elements of the aforementioned love drugs to create your Halloween costume. Here are other exotic aphrodisiacs from around the world that you might be inspired by: asparagus, green M&Ms, raw oysters, wild orchids, horny goat weed. LEO (July 23–August 22) Do you know how to repair a broken zipper or patch a hole in your bicycle tire? Are you familiar with the art of caulking a bathtub or creating a successful budget? Can you compose a graceful thank-you note, cook a hearty soup from scratch, or overcome your pride so as to reconcile with an ally after an argument? These are the kinds of tasks I trust you will focus on in the coming weeks. It’s time to be very practical and concrete. Halloween costume suggestion: Mr. or Ms. Fix-It. VIRGO (August 23–September 22) In the film Terminator 2, Arnold Schwarzenegger played a benevolent android who traveled here from the future. As a strong, silent action hero, he didn’t need to say much. In fact, he earned $30,000 for every word he uttered. I’m hoping your speech will pack a comparable punch in the coming days. My reading of the astrological omens suggests that your persuasiveness should be at a peak. You’ll have an exceptional ability to say what you mean and mean what you say. Use this superpower with flair and precision! Halloween costume suggestion: ancient Greek orator Demosthenes; Martin Luther King Jr.; Virginia Woolf; Sojourner Truth; rapper MC Lyte, Winston Churchill. LIBRA (September 23–October 22)

It’s the

prosperity-building phase of your cycle. Let’s celebrate! Let’s brainstorm! Are there rituals you can create to stimulate the financial lobes of your imagination, thereby expediting your cash flow? Here are a few ideas: 1. Glue a photo of yourself on a $20 bill. 2. Make a wealth shrine in your home. Stock it with symbols of specific thrills you can buy for yourself when you have more money. 3. Halloween costume suggestions: a giant bar of gold, a banker carrying a briefcase full of big bills, Tony Stark, Lady Mary Crawley, Jay Gatsby, Lara Croft, the Yoruban wealth goddess Ajé.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

During this Halloween season, you have cosmic permission to be a bigger, bolder and extra beguiling version of yourself. I trust you will express your deep beauty with precise brilliance and imagine your future with superb panache and wander wherever the hell you feel like wandering. It’s time to be stronger than your fears and wilder than your trivial sins. Halloween costume suggestion: the superhero version of yourself.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21)

I won’t offer you the cliché “When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.” Instead, I’ll provide alternatives. How about this, from the video game Portal 2: “When life gives you lemons, don’t make lemonade. Make life take the lemons back! Get mad! Say, ‘I don’t want your damn lemons!’” Or you could try this version, from my friend Barney: “When life gives you lemons, draw faces on them like Tom Hanks did on his volleyball in the movie Cast Away, and engage them in sexy philosophical conversation.” Or consider this Brazilian proverb: “When life gives you lemons, make caipirinhas.” (Caipirinha is Brazil’s national cocktail.) Suggestion: Play around with these themes to create your Halloween costume.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) Each of us is creator and destroyer. It’s fun and healthy to add fresh elements to our lives, but it’s also crucial to dispose of things that hurt and distort us. Even your body is a hotbed of both activities, constantly killing off old cells and generating new ones. But in my understanding, you are now in a phase when there’s far more creation than destruction. Enjoy the exalted buzz! Halloween costume suggestions: a creator god or goddess, like the Greeks’ Gaia or Prometheus; Rainbow-Snake from the Australian Aborigines; Unkulunkulu from the Zulus; or Coyote, Raven or Spider Grandmother from indigenous North American tribes. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) In 1938, a chef named Ruth Wakefield dreamed up a brilliant invention: chocolate chip cookies. She sold her recipe to the Nestlé company in return for $1 and a lifetime supply of chocolate. Maybe she was happy with that arrangement, but I think she cheated herself. And so I offer her action as an example of what you should not do. During the next 10 months, I expect you will come up with many useful innovations and intriguing departures from the way things have always been done. Make sure you get full value in return for your gifts! Halloween costume ideas: Thomas Edison, Marie Curie, Hedy Lamarr, Leonardo da Vinci, Temple Grandin, George Washington Carver, Mark Zuckerberg. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

Speaking on behalf of the cosmic powers, I authorize you to escape dull realities and go rambling through the frontier. Feel free to fantasize twice as hard and wild as you normally do. Avoid literalists and realists who think you should be more like them. This is not a time to fuss over exacting details, but rather to soar above the sober nonsense and see as far as you can. You have permission to exult in the joys of wise innocence. Halloween costume suggestions: bohemian poet, mad scientist, carefree genius, brazen explorer.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

35 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 26- NOVE MBER 1 , 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Classifieds

FREE WILL


Real Food. Real People.® Oliver’s Market is pleased to introduce Oliver’s Certified 100% Angus Beef. We are sourcing 100% Angus cattle for the first time in our company history, with the goal of bringing our customers consistent quality, appealing texture, and full flavor with every purchase. Why 100% Angus beef? Long associated with outstanding quality, the Angus breed provides excellent consistency. Consumers know Angus beef for its rich, delicious

flavor, quality, and tenderness. Raised in the USA on a diet of grass and grain, and is processed at the USDA’s Grade “A” Maturity level for tenderness. All Oliver’s Certified 100% Angus Beef is USDA Choice or Prime Grade. Customers will not find Select Grade in our stores, assuring an excellent selection every time. The Oliver’s Choice 100% Angus Beef is hand trimmed by our butchers, and is 100% satisfaction guaranteed.

9230 Old Redwood Highway • Windsor • 687-2050 | 546 E. Cotati Avenue • Cotati • 795-9501 | 560 Montecito Center • Santa Rosa • 537-7123 | 461 Stony Point Road • Santa Rosa • 284-3530

Profile for Metro Publishing

Nbb1643  

October 26-November 1, 2016

Nbb1643  

October 26-November 1, 2016