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Harvest

Stolen Fruit p11

Issue

Sea Forager Kirk Lombard p16

2016 Harvest Fair p31 Tough Row for Cannabis Growers p34


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Bohemian

Editor Stett Holbrook, ext. 202

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Contributors Ben Adams, Rob Brezsny, James Knight, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

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Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

Deplorable Donald Trump is an obese version of James Dean from the 1955 classic film Rebel Without a Cause. At the heart of Trump’s appeal during this presidential race is his authentic childish rage and devil-may-care attitude, but do his supporters really want a sullen teenager with nuclear launch codes at his disposal? The glamour of overt contempt is the flip side of a culture that, perhaps, has gone too far with the “have a nice day” philosophy, but Trump fails miserably in every other respect.

But, with all due respect to Trump supporters, I have to ask: What the hell are you thinking by supporting this candidate? For every sin that Trump commits, for every lie that he spins, the Trumpistas have ready excuses. Trump insults and denigrates blacks, Asians, Jews, Hispanics, Muslims and women. But the pro-Trump folks find this refreshing and dismiss it all as “Trump being Trump.” Trump advocates ignore the fact that Trump stiffed contractors and never even bothered to pay upper-level campaign staff! He doesn’t behave in

THIS MODERN WORLD

an honorable manner, but I guess that’s OK. The corruption at Trump University and the Trump Foundation is met with silence. Trump insulted John McCain, who almost died as a prisoner of war, and spoke derisively of a Gold Star family who lost their son. He claimed to have donated millions of dollars to veterans organizations, but the money did not arrive until the media looked into it! No problem.

Russians invaded the Ukraine! “He’ll surround himself with the best minds,” earnestly argue the advocates of Trump. So it’s OK that he’s a dunce. I’ve argued with a number of Trump supporters, and they are positively delusional about this guy. There’s no getting through to them, even though the future and safety of our country is at stake.

NICOLE GILLETTE

Kentfield

Then there is his abysmal ignorance. Trump wasn’t even aware that the

By Tom Tomorrow

Shaky Ground Similar to “hoax-posturing” of a certain senator from Oklahoma, the Bohemian has jumped on board with the popular mythology regarding the cause of the recently increased earthquake activity (“Snowballs in Hell,” Sept. 14). The preponderance of scientific literature finds that fracking is not causing most of the induced earthquakes. While there may be some relation between fracking and earthquakes, the relation is indirect at best. Research has instead found the culprit to be deep well injection of drilling wastes and byproducts, regardless of the method of extraction.

DOUGLAS MESSENGER

Santa Rosa

Hopkins No Mr. Tansil (“Hopkins Yes,” Sept. 14) projects many admirable qualities on Lynda Hopkins. However, I cannot convince myself that someone who would bail on the most important job she’ll ever have (raising her young children) to pursue political aspirations is a good choice for 5th District supervisor.

JOHN SULLIVAN Guerneville

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


The Abstainers Local politicians practice safe legislating BY NORMAN SOLOMON

T

he North Bay’s state legislators sure know how to abstain. I’m not talking about refraining from sex, alcohol or drugs. I mean abstaining from crucial votes in the California State Legislature.

A champion abstainer is Assemblyman Marc Levine. After voting against a bill for farmworker overtime pay in early summer, he didn’t show up to vote when a similar bill finally got the Assembly’s approval in late August. Abstaining might seem evenhanded, but in fact it has the same effect as a “no” vote. Sounds nicer though. Another member of the Assembly from the North Bay, Jim Wood, also abstained on the farmworker bill. But Wood has a lot of catching up to do if he wants to match Levine’s abstinence record. As the Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Gary Cohn pointed out, Levine has been at it since entering the Assembly in 2013, “when a bill to give the state Coastal Commission authority to levy fines against shoreline despoilers came for a vote.” At that time, Levine “sat out the single most important vote for his constituents that year—which helped doom the measure.” Cohn reported that Levine went on to “abstain or skip votes on bills helping farmworkers and creating a bill of rights for domestic workers.” And he voted against other major progressive bills, which “should come as no surprise.” During two Assembly campaigns, Levine had received “hundreds of thousands of dollars from some of the state’s largest business interests.” While serving those interests, it’s a challenge to pose as some kind of principled lawmaker. So the option of abstaining—in hopes of fogging up the choice—can be too attractive to resist. Just ask our state senator, Mike McGuire, who’s getting the hang of abstaining. He went for the euphemism instead of a flat-out “no” vote in August when he abstained on the bill for farmworkers’ overtime. Weirdly, in his formal statement about the matter, McGuire declared: “My stand was on principle. I’m never going to vote against farmworkers.” He had just voted against farmworkers. Welcome to the corporatefriendly “progressive” world of the abstainers. Norman Solomon is a co-chair of the Coalition for Grassroots Progress. He is the author of many books, including ‘War Made Easy: How Presidents and Pundits Keep Spinning Us to Death.’ He lives in Marin County. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

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Rants

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Paper THE

CANNABIS CZAR Lori Ajax comes to her post as chief of the Bureau of Medical Cannabis Regulation from the state Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control.

Hashing It Out

State and medical-cannabis industry meet to create new regulations BY STETT HOLBROOK

T

he Santa Rosa Veterans Memorial Building, home of rock-ribbed American ideals of law, order and country, played host to a most curious road show last week.

Officials from California’s Bureau of Medical Cannabis Regulation (BMCR) and Office of Medical Cannabis Safety (OMCS) convened the third of eight preregulatory workshops they are holding across the state aimed at soliciting feedback from the

medical-cannabis community on how the industry should be regulated. To see representatives from two newly minted state agencies with the word “Cannabis” in their names mingle with a diverse crowd of about 200

medical-marijuana-industry workers hashing out the finer points of policy under the bright fluorescent lights of the auditorium was a clear example that marijuana in the Golden State has entered a new era. The state officials even provided snacks in the form of Cheez-Its and peanut butter crackers. John Carr/Dept. of Alcoholic Beverage Control

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‘For some small farmers, this is an issue of survival,’ said one grower. ‘We may have no choice but to stay illegal.’ The meeting follows Gov. Brown’s signing of legislation in 2015 that created the barebones regulatory framework for the medical-cannabis industry. While medical cannabis was legalized in the state 20 years ago, there have been no regulations or standards. The Medical Marijuana Regulation and Safety Act provides for licenses (and an array of yet-to-be-determined fees) from no less than three state agencies: the Department of Consumer Affairs’ BMCR, the Department of Public Health’s OMCS and the Department of Food and Agriculture. Thursday’s meeting focused on licensing for medical-cannabis dispensaries, distributors, manufacturers, testing labs and transporters. The Department of Food and Agriculture is holding separate hearings for growers. While it may have a profound effect on the medical-cannabis industry, Proposition 64, a November ballot initiative that would ) 10


9

D E B RI E F E R

The Sonoma County chapter of Organizing for Action (COFA) gave us the heads-up that the Santa Rosa City Council would soon vote on a proposal to stem the city’s growing homeless problem. OFA’s Linda Hemenway went to city hall yesterday (Sept. 27) to lobby the council on a Safe Camping proposal that would extend options to the homeless-in-cars local population by allowing homeless people in the city limits to occupy new campsites— and perhaps cook on propane barbecues or camp stoves. The organization Homeless Action! proposed the Safe Camping initiative that was taken up by the council’s Homeless Policy Sub-Committee, which unanimously approved the plan on Sept. 19. Homeless advocate Adrienne Lauby expects it will be taken up by the full council in October. One of the key aspects of the plan would be to allow homeowners to participate by “opening the door for people with private property to set up campsites,” Lauby says. The guidelines passed by the committee, she says, set “a legal framework so that nonprofits, churches and private property owners can allow encampments on their properties this winter.” Still on the Homeless Action! agenda is a push to get the city itself to set aside some land for camping, and to fund portable bathrooms and trash pickups wherever the campsites are ultimately located. Public education efforts are meanwhile ongoing. There’s a Homeless Talk kick-off event on Sept. 29, 5:30–7:30pm at Santa Rosa Christian Church, 1315 Pacific Ave., Santa Rosa. Lauby asks that attendees RSVP at homelesstalk@gmail.com

McGuire the Monitor On Sept. 24, Healdsburg state senator Mike McGuire got the good news

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Sleepless in Santa Rosa

that Gov. Jerry Brown had signed his bill designed to monitor the transition of patients out of the Sonoma Developmental Center as it heads toward a planned closure next year. The SDC currently houses “nearly 400 of the most medically fragile patients in the state system,” says McGuire in a statement, and until Brown signed his bill, there was no way for authorities to monitor and evaluate the transition from the development center to the community.

Saving the Whales McGuire cares about whales, too, and Gov. Brown signed another of his bills last week—SB 1287, which aims to reduce incidents of whales entangled in lost or abandoned crabbing gear. The Whale Protection and Crab Gear Retrieval Act builds on a voluntary pilot program enacted two years ago which McGuire says has led to the recovery of 1,500 crab pots. The entanglements are “skyrocketing” off the California coast, McGuire says, and 2015 was the worst year since the National Marine Fisheries Service started tracking the problem in 1982: last year, 57 whales were entangled in line attached to crab pots, even as the Dungeness crab season was shut down because of domoic-acidrelated health risks. The whales are getting entangled in crab pots that have been on the ocean floor for years. Dungeness crabbers will now be issued a retrieval permit at the end of every crab season and will be paid a “recovery bounty” through industry fees for every pot they salvage. The bill also establishes a fee to be paid by owners who lose or abandon their crab trap. The new law also has claws to it: any crab fisherman who “doesn’t buy back their lost or abandoned crab traps will not be able to get their vessel permit the next season.”—Tom Gogola

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Regulations ( 8

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legalize recreational cannabis, was not under discussion. The state’s goal is to have a set of regulations in place by Jan. 1, 2018, but it’s early in the process, and the state and medical-marijuana industry, once adversaries, are just getting to know each other. The BMCR, which used to be called the Bureau of Medical Marijuana Regulation (BMMR), changed its name because “bummer” didn’t send the right message to the cannabis community. On more substantive matters, BMCR chief Lori Ajax and her staff did their best to tell the crowd they were there to solicit regulatory feedback rather than dictate what the new regulations would be. “We’re here to listen,” she told the crowd. “This is just the beginning.” After introductory remarks, attendees broke into groups based on the particular license they would be seeking to discuss their ideas and concerns. Facilitators with flip boards jotted down their suggestions. Under discussion were topics like how the state should prioritize applications, how business owners are defined and how to handle applicants with criminal records. “Why should the cannabis industry be treated any differently than the wine industry?” asked one dispensary worker. The cost of the coming regulations was the chief concern of a pair of Mendocino County medical cannabis providers who grow and produce their products for gravely ill clients under the label Lovingly and Legally Grown. “For some small farmers, this is an issue of survival,” said the grower, who wished to remain anonymous. She said she makes about $30,000 a year, and fees and distribution costs could cripple her business and deny her clients the medicine they need. She wants to see a provision in the new regulations for smallscale “cottage industry” providers

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like her. “We would just as soon stay illegal, and we may have no choice but to stay illegal,” she said. Her partner said entering the process and submitting their names without knowing what all the fees will be at the other end is unnerving. “They should be driving adoption of the regulations rather than cashing in,” he said. Still, he felt it was important to represent his views at the workshop. “We feel you’re either at the table or you’re on it.” Ajax said she’s heard these concerns at the previous meetings in Redding and Sacramento, and wants to hear from the industry on how to avoid those pitfalls. “They know better,” she said. “That’s why we’re here.” Ajax served with the state’s Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control when it brought the craft-beer industry under regulation, which some point to when looking at how the cannabis industry can be regulated. But she said the alcohol industry is very different from the marijuana business. As the cannabis entrepreneurs hashed out their concerns with each other and shared them with the state officials, Humboldt State University anthropologist Fred Krissman sat in the back of the room taking it all in. “To see an industry being born is unbelievable,” he said. He is studying the medicalmarijuana industry on a state supported grant. Krissman and his colleagues have attended all these workshops, and said confusion over the thickening regulatory climate and how businesses get right with the law is of great concern within the cannabis industry. “How do they get out of the shadows?” he said. Looming over the room is the Drug Enforcement Agency, which continues to classify marijuana as a dangerous, Schedule I narcotic with no medical value. “In the background is a federal government that still sees this as a black market,” he said.


MIX AND MATCH Mocktails made with Stolen Fruit are great, but they’re pretty good with booze thrown in, too.

Shaking It Up

New mixers bridge wine and cocktail culture, and invite the NA crowd to the party BY JAMES KNIGHT

S

tolen Fruit would like to steal a little shelf space away from conventional, high-fructose, corn-syrupsaturated, artificially flavored and colored cocktail mixers. And it’s about time. Taking a cue from craft cocktail recipes, the Healdsburgbased company uses verjus, a slightly sweet, somewhat sour unfermented grape juice

that’s historically been used in European cooking, as a base. Verjus is traditionally made from unripe grapes picked before the wine harvest, and that’s also the inspiration for the brand’s name, says cofounder Doug Provisor. “We’re sort of taking it from the winemakers before they get their hands on it,” Provisor explains. They wanted something “a little edgy—not wine country cliché, if you will.” It all started out innocently

enough. Provisor, his wife, Susan, and their friend, chef Peter Brown, were all enjoying some drinks one fine evening in wine country when someone posed the puzzler: “OK, what are we going to drink when we’re not drinking alcohol?” They were inspired by the fresh, nonalcoholic grape juice made by Navarro Vineyards from their Mendocino County Pinot Noir, Gewürztraminer and Chardonnay grapes. “We love them,” says Provisor, “and we couldn’t

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Dining

understand why varietal grape juice isn’t bigger than it was. Then we learned the reasons why.” The production of a stable, nonalcoholic grape juice product is tricky, since grapes want to ferment. Persisting with their experiments, the partners came up with a product that gets its essence of fermentation from soaking dried grape skins in the mixture. A byproduct of winemaking at Kendall-Jackson, the grape pomace comes from the same source as Barbara Banke and Peggy Furth’s gluten-free WholeVine flour products. The verjus is sourced from fresh Napa Valley grapes, while the varietal concentrate comes from Lodi and Amador counties. “Those regions are warmer,” says Provisor, “and that drives the high sugars we’re looking for in this type of product. There’s no added sugar in any of them.” Provisor grows four acres of Grenache around his house in the hills west of Healdsburg, but these are coveted by up-and-coming vintner clients like Jolie-Laide Wines, Leo Steen Wines and Angela Osborne’s A Tribute to Grace Wine Company. The property itself comes thanks to Provisor’s former career in the music-software business. He’s no longer involved in that, but stays in the tech game with a startup that promises to help young girls learn entrepreneurship via a print-on-demand service. With their prototype “mocktail” mixer in the jar, the group sought the counsel of Healdsburg-area bartenders. “This is delicious,” they said, “you really have to add this to alcohol!” They advised against focusing exclusively on the mocktail aspect, explaining that from a business perspective, “alcohol is your friend.” Chef Brown took the setback in stride, and got to work in the kitchen. “I’d get these texts late at night,” says Provisor. “‘Oh, with spirit X, it was fucking fantastic!’ So we went down the slippery slope where everything has alcohol in it.” Stolen Fruit’s five blends are each based on a winegrape variety, plus a sort of mixologist’s interpretation of a classic cocktail. Jasmine Juniper ) 12


Stolen Fruit ( 11

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Viognier, for instance, contains verjus, filtered water, Viognier creative grape juice concentrate, organic juniper berries, green jasmine tea californian and dried grape skins. cuisine... Sampled straight up, it’s rather tart, with just five grams of sugar per one ounce serving, and a bitter finish from the juniper and the tea. It needs the sensation of sweetness and body that a spirit like Spirit Works Distillery’s new Navy Strength gin provides at, well, Navy strength, or 114 proof. ...meets craft cocktails Matched up one to one and + lounge shaken with ice, the Stolen Fruit private dining spaces mixer contributes to a kind of martini that benefits from the happy hour sweet character of this distillery’s winter wheat-derived base alcohol (a regular, dry vermouth martini made with the Navy Strength demonstrates quite plainly that you don’t need sugary mixers— spoonbar.com especially of the grotesque, conventional variety that have 707.433.7222 ruled the mixer shelf for too many 219 healdsburg ave decades—to enjoy a sweet sensation on the palate), and is spoonbar Ad: 2.0156” x 4.8438”, CMYK / 300 DPIaromatic with its double plenty dose of gin and spices. Easy does it with this tipple, though, or you’ll FOR VOTING soon be sailing three sheets to the wind, indeed. One part of Jasmine Juniper Viognier is plenty with two parts Hanson ginger-flavored vodka, also made in Sonoma County. TIME AFTER TIME Here, the sweet spiciness of the ginger offsets the bitter, acidic BARBECUE | CATERING bite of the Stolen Fruit mixer. OUTDOOR PATIO At $18 suggested retail, these 1207 FOOTHILL blvd, CALISTOGA, CA 707.942.5605 mixers, available at a few local WWW.BUSTERSSOUTHERNBBQ.COM retail locations like Bottle Barn, /busterssouthernbbq Oakville Grocery and Wilibees Wine & Spirits, stand a bit higher on the shelf than others, but offer the quality of a $15 cocktail from some tattooed mixologist. Styled as a Manhattan mixer, like red vermouth, Fig Grains of Paradise Zin makes a stygian concoction in the suggested recipe of two ounces mixer to two ounces bourbon, with a dash of bitters and a maraschino cherry. It’s a potent brew, almost overthe-top, deriving a fig-roll flavor from the same Central Valley supplier that Brown uses as chef

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for Jimtown Store’s fig and olive spread products. “According to Peter,” Provisor says, “they’re the only one doing high-quality stuff in California.” At two parts rye whiskey to one part mixer, the woodiness of the rye cuts in, but it’s still intense and fragrant with a hint of fermented grape skin—the sweet scent of freshly spent grapes heaped in compost piles. Smells like fall in wine country. Compared to most Manhattans, it’s like having shaved asiago for the first time, after a lifetime of

shaking dried cheese product from a can. According to Provisor, the mixers provide a bridge between wine and wine country culture, and cocktail culture—“if people would like a cocktail, but feel it’s a little gauche if everyone’s drinking wine.” Other flavors include hibiscus Grenache, lemongrass ginger Sauvignon Blanc and blood orange Muscat, all paired with nonalcoholic recipes, as well, for those mocktail moments.

Switch to Switchel The world needs another energy drink like it needs a longer presidential election campaign. But hold on. Sisters Switchel is different. A switchel, I learned, is an ancient beverage made with vinegar, water and a sweetener. The story goes that switchel was created by ancient (rhyming?) mariners who added vinegar as a kind of antiseptic to make water potable. The sweetener and sometimes ginger came in to make it drinkable. Sailors passed their beverage on to landlubbers in colonial America, particularly farmers who developed a taste for the beverage during harvest, where it became known as haymaker’s punch. Anyway, North Bay cycling friends Brenda Lyons and Melanie Larson developed an interest in switchel. Lyons was a professional mountain bike racer and is national sales director for Pioneer Cycle Sports while Larson is a dietician for Kaiser. The two friends wanted to start a business together. Lyons heard about a Vermont company called Up Mountain, switchel made with apple cider, ginger and maple syrup. Turns out the combination of ingredients in switchel is a great pre- and post-exercise beverage that isn’t laced with all the nasty stuff that taints many popular energy drinks. The duo started experimenting with their own recipe and found they liked the taste of honey over maple syrup. Thus was Sisters Switchel born. It’s a decidedly local beverage: it’s bottled in Petaluma; the glass comes from a Windsor company; the apple cider comes from Manzana in Graton; and the honey comes from Gipson’s Golden in Santa Rosa. The ginger comes from somewhere far away where they grow ginger. Each of the three ingredients is healthful on its own, but combined they’re even better, says Lyons. She says it’s naturally energizing. “You don’t have to be an athlete to get the benefits and digestive support,” she says. It’s good stuff—sweet but not overly so. I like it as a thirst quencher after exercise. Larson and Lyons have been at work on the product for 18 months, and the beverage is just reaching market now. Currently, Sisters Swichel is available at Willibees Wine & Spirits in Santa Rosa and Petaluma and Petaluma Market where it goes for $3.99 a bottle.—Stett Holbrook


Wineries

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Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

Copain Wine Cellars

Barn-style tasting room provides panoramic view of the Russian River Valley and a peek into the cellar from whence emanate low-alcohol, food-friendly, continentalstyle Syrah and Pinot Noir crafted with subtle oak, forest-floor notes and cool dark fruit flavors on a smooth finish. 7800 Eastside Road, Healdsburg. Open Thursday– Sunday, 11am–5pm; Tuesday– Wednesday, by appointment. 707.836.8822.

Freeman Vineyard & Winery Rundown,

trashed—this little winery had seen better times when the Freemans found it. With a spotless crush pad and new horseshoe-shaped cave, it’s giving back the love. Pinot Noir from top West County vineyards. 1300 Montgomery Road, Sebastopol. By appointment only. 707.823.6937.

Harvest Moon Winery Two paths diverged in a bramble, and the one lesstraveled leads here. Tart, taut, and enchanting loweralcohol Zinfandel in modest, comfortable tasting room in the middle of family-owned vineyards. Sparkling Gewürz, too. 2192 Olivet Road, Santa Rosa. Open daily, 10:30am– 5pm. 707.573.8711.

Joseph Phelps Freestone Vineyards

Casual, airy space furnished in whitewashed country French theme, on the road to the coast. Sit down at long tables for tasting or have a picnic. Fogdog Pinot and Ovation Chardonnay will have you applauding. 12747 El Camino Bodega, Freestone. Daily, 11am–5pm. Tasting fee, $15. 707.874.1010.

Korbel Champagne Cellars A large, ivy-covered

winery with a huge tasting room, fun staff, excellent deli and hourly tours, a perfect stop

on the way to the Russian River. 13250 River Road, near Rio Nido. Open daily, 10am– 5pm daily. 707.824.7316.

Littorai Wines The future of integrated, sustainable wine farms may be glimpsed through a window darkly, while Sonoma Coast Pinot and Chard are brilliant in the glass. Tour and tasting by appointment. In west Sebastopol, 707.823.9586. Mill Creek While the historically inspired building is just spinning a decorative wheel, quaint is just a footnote to quality. All the wines are above average. 1401 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 10am–4pm. 707.431.2121. Occidental Road Cellars High-end clients

like Schramsberg and RadioCoteau buy most of the Prathers’ grapes; just 5 percent are made into their own wine, and at a comparative “grower’s discount.” Chard, Pinot, and cool-climate Syrah at its very best. 2064 Gravenstein Hwy. N., Building 7, Sebastopol. By appointment, Saturday 1–4pm. 707.874.9470.

Old World Winery

Meaning, a simpler time when grapes were trodden under bare foot and wine was made the natural way? Yes. Fun fact: the small, family-owned winery was the original Williams-Selyem location. 850 River Road, Fulton. Thursday– Sunday 11am–5pm or by appointment. Tasting fee $5. 707.578.3148.

Pellegrini Family Vineyards Why not take

Olivet, and find some of the area’s best Pinot Noir and old vine Zinfandel. Family-owned winery offers well-priced Pinot from its Olivet Lane vineyard in the barrel room; local St. George cheese yours for the munching. Tasting appointments can generally be arranged upon sticking one’s head through the cellar door. 4055 West Olivet Road, Santa Rosa. Open 10:30am–4:30pm by appointment. No fee. 707.545.8680.

NAPA COUNTY Del Dotto Vineyards

(WC) Caves lined with Italian marble and ancient tiles, not to mention Venetian chandeliers and mosaic marble floors. They host candle-lit tastings, replete with cheese and chocolate, Friday–Sunday. Opera resonates until 4pm; rock rules after 4pm. 1055 Atlas Peak Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.963.2134.

Domaine Carneros Inspired by Taittinger’s Château de la Marquetterie of Champagne, this house of premium sparkling wine is a hard-to-miss landmark on the Carneros Highway. Enjoy a private Balcony Package for special occasions or taste sparkling and still wines paired with artisan cheese and caviar with the masses. Luxury bubbly Le Rêve offers a bouquet of hoary yeast and crème brûlée that just slips away like a dream. 1240 Duhig Road (at Highway 12/121), Napa. Wine flights $15; also available by the glass or bottle. Open 10am–5:45pm. 800.716.2788.

OPEN DA I LY 10 – 4 PM | TOUR S TH UR–MON AT 10 : 30 & 1: 30 RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED | SONOM ACUTR ER .COM/TOUR S 70 7 2 37 3 4 8 9 | 4 4 01 S LUS S E R R OA D, W I N D S OR , C A Please enjoy our wines responsibly. ©2016 Sonoma-Cutrer Vineyards ® ,Windsor, Sonoma County, California USA

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Eagle & Rose Estate

(WC) Tours of this small winery are led either by the winery owner or the winemaker himself. 3000 St. Helena Hwy. N., Napa. By appointment. 707.965.9463.

Hess Collection Winery An intellectual outpost of art and wine housed in the century-old Christian Brother’s winery. Cab is the signature varietal. 4411 Redwood Road, Napa. Open daily, 10am–4pm. 707.255.1144.

RustRidge Ranch Down one of Napa’s less-traveled roads, the story began with thoroughbred horses. Bed and breakfast stays available in a rambling ranch house with wall-to-wall horse decor. 2910 Lower Chiles Valley Road, St. Helena. By appointment, 10am–4pm. Tasting fee, $20. 707.965.9353.

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Footwork The latest way to crush grapes, same as the oldest way BY JAMES KNIGHT

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Over the centuries, the ancient method of simply treading grapes underfoot has been replaced by technology of ever-increasing sophistication, from hand-cranked crushers to computerized sorting machines. Yet in some of the savviest new wineries, from New Zealand to Napa Valley, footstomping has come back into vogue. “I don’t know enough people that do it to say that it’s in vogue,” demurs Scott Schultz, assistant winemaker at Wind Gap Wines. “But we foot-stomp everything here.” By everything, besides a few bins of Cabernet Sauvignon and Pinot Noir they destemmed mechanically this crush, Schultz is talking about a lot of grapes—at least 250 tons, each ton coming in two half-ton bins. “We have great interns this year,” says Schultz. “They see those bins come in—they run over, pop their shoes off, put their shorts on, and they’re after it.” Located in the Barlow in Sebastopol, Wind Gap’s crush pad is just around the corner from its popular tasting room. People walk by all the time and exclaim, “I didn’t know people still did that!” “It began as the only logical way to do it, because we didn’t have a crusher,” Wind Gap founder Pax Mahle explains. “Now that’s just how we do it.” Since the grapes are often picked in the middle of the night and come in well chilled, it’s not all glamor and fun. Still, most of the time, the team goes without the boots provided for the task. And when they step on it barefoot, says Schultz, “we know what that fruit feels like pretty intimately.” Their feet relay information that may be helpful to winemaking, like temperature and condition of the grapes and stems. “It tells you a lot without really doing anything—you’re just relying on your senses.” Winemaker Duncan Meyers, cofounder of Healdsburg’s ArnotRoberts, gets more technical: “The stems also bring aromatic lift to the wine and help to slow down the fermentation kinetics by providing a more permeable mass for the juice to channel through, resulting in cooler peak temperatures and a gentler fermentation curve.” Other benefits include color stabilization and o`ther features that expensive enological products offer, to similar effect. “Many of our favorite producers in the Rhône Valley, Burgundy and the Jura in France use this ancient technique to good result,” says Meyers. There’s still time to try your hand—or foot, rather—at stomping grapes at the Sonoma County Harvest Fair, Friday, Oct. 1, through Sunday, Oct. 3, at 1350 Bennett Valley Road, Santa Rosa.


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Tom Gogola

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TheSea Forager Kirk Lombard is your guide to fishing off the beaten path BY TOM GOGOLA

K

irk Lombard scans the shoreline and the surf, and says he hasn’t been to this spot in West Marin for a couple of years—but he has a knack for knowing just where the surfperch are and the best time for catching them.

It’s nearing the end of a flood tide in Bolinas, and I’m fishing with Lombard along the channel that leads into the Bolinas Lagoon. He whistles sharply in my direction and points to the spot, a cut in the shoreline where there’s a drop-off and the perch are hanging out, very close to shore. “The big ones are close in,” he says. “Don’t over-cast.” I keep catching little ones. The ubiquitous surfers of Bolinas paddle nearby as heavy surf washes across the channel and seals pop their heads up. We’re fishing with light-tackle spinning poles, perfect for these

small, scrappy panfish, with rigs consisting of three small hooks attached and baited with bits of rubber sandworms. We’ve got small pyramid sinkers that are supposed to grab the bottom; the tide’s still running a little strong but will ease off before too long. It’s a pitch-perfect, blue-skies day. Lombard is the author of the just-published Sea Forager’s Guide to the Northern California Coast (Heyday; $22), and the Half Moon Bay resident has driven up the coast and through the city for a late-morning outing in West Marin. For his effort, I’ve presented him with a hand-hewn wooden

gaff I plucked off a remote spot last year north of Agate Beach in Bolinas. He’s psyched (“I need a gaff! Thanks!”) and tells the story of a guy who lost a big halibut boatside just the other day— because Lombard’s boat didn’t have a gaff on it. The tide is just about right and the fish ought to be biting. Lombard is a little hoarse after the previous night’s outing—a publication party for his book that featured him and his wife, Camilla, singing sea shanties for a boisterous and appreciative crowd in Oakland. He’s a 50-year-old man with two young children and says

that his three-and-a-half-year-old boy already has the fishing bug— about the same age when Lombard got bit. Lombard’s guidebook is a lot of fun to read and a real standout from your typical fishing guides, which tend to be heavy on the “how to catch the big one” information but usually do not come with evocations of Marcel Proust or Tuvan throat singers (the latter are mentioned by way of comparison to croaking bottomdwellers). Lombard is a passionate angler who admits that he weeps for certain baitfish. And Lombard’s book also comes with a heavy


irk Lmbard is a New York City native who moved to the Bay Area in 1993 to get married. That didn’t pan out. When that relationship went south—“The chick ran off with a modern furniture designer”—he stayed in the Bay Area and started working for the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission as a fish observer (the job was part of a joint program with the then– California Department of Fish and Game; it’s now called Fish and Wildlife). He’d jump on party boats and do fish surveys for the agency from public piers, which served to help him grow his expertise in the fishes and fauna of Northern California. Before he worked with Fish and Game, Lombard fronted a band called the Rube Waddell, named for an early 20th-century professional baseball player who was famous for his on-the-field antics that included abruptly departing the pitcher’s mound to go fishing. The band toured all over the country and Europe. “Waddell was sort of my life before I started working for Fish and Game,” he says. Lombard is influenced by old blues recordings and the music of Captain Beefheart, and he played

K

harmonica and tuba for Rube Waddell, which got its name after a house party in San Francisco that found Lombard regaling attendees with stories about the old baseball player—they really loved the one about how he wrestled crocodiles. One of his band mates listened in and afterward told Lombard, “We need to call this band the Rube Waddell.” To that point the band had been called Hellbender. Lombard was going to write a book about Waddell but instead left the pitcher’s mound himself and wrote a book about fishing. Youtube is now replete with Rube Waddell songs and Lombard instructionals on how to properly dress a squid. The former videos are characterized by songs like “Down in the Hole” (hey, that’s where the surfperch are today!), a barrel-house blast of crunchy, gutbucket honky-tonkery. The instructionals are quite useful if you don’t know how to dress a squid, and The Sea Forager’s Guide also has lots of handy hints for prepping fish for cooking, and recipes too. Performance and entertainment is in Lombard’s blood—and Sea Forager jumps off the page like a school of manic flying fish, a lively and learned book with writing of playful bluntness on subjects such as the relative culinary value of surfperch which may be described as “meh.” Performance is met with his personal ethic around fishing. Lombard recalls one career day in nursery school when he was a youngster growing up in New York’s West Village—his father and grandfather were both Broadway actors—and he declared that he wanted to be a conservationist when he grew up. Fast forward four-plus decades when Lombard was working as a conservationist and came to understand firsthand that there’s a lot of unethical fishing and poaching going on along the piers and boat-rails, and that “if everyone’s going out there and winging it and following their own rules, it’s not sustainable.” Indeed, Lombard’s concerns about overfishing created an ethical dilemma for him over whether to write this book at all. Did he really want to be

encouraging more people to go fishing? “I thought about it long and hard,” he says, and talked with his publishers at the nonprofit publisher Heyday, in Berkeley, who convinced him to write the book. His guide provides the technical basics, the how-tos, but Lombard says, “I didn’t give anyone any advantage they couldn’t get from a Fish and Game pamphlet.” But there are also lots of advantages to his book that you won’t find in those handy, state-issued how-to guides, including many illustrations by San Francisco artist Leighton Kelly. Some of Lombard’s first fishing adventures TOOLS OF THE TRADE In addition to being took place, as they a great resource, Lombard’s guidebook features often do, with his father, excellent illustrations by Leighton Kelly. the late actor Peter Lombard (he died in 2015, and all over the lake,” Lombard recalls. Kirk dedicated his book to him). “A giant muskellunge hit it and I Peter Lombard was in a bunch of got that fish all the way up to the Broadway plays and perhaps most boat and the line snapped. I cried notably played Thomas Jefferson and I cried and I cried. My dad in the bicentennial-era production would tell the story about that fish of 1776. at parties, at dinner, and finally, With a laugh, Lombard says his after the pain of having lost it had dad wasn’t much of a fisherman, disappeared, the fish was replaced but grandpa was—Lombard’s by this really good story, and that first-ever fishing trip was with his was the consolation and the lesson grandfather in Santa Cruz, when from it.” The other lesson is that to he was around four years old. We’ll this day, Lombard will jump into save that story for the moment, but the water to make sure he doesn’t after that first fishing adventure, ever lose a big one like that again. Lombard’s next memorable Jumping in the water and chasing outing was when his father was fish is kind of his signature. doing summer stock theater on But Lombard’s very first the East Coast and took young actual fish story doesn’t even Kirk fishing on a rented boat on involve a fish. He was visiting his Lake Winnipesaukee in New grandfather, Milton Watson, who Hampshire. Lombard recalls the had grown up in the Monterey fishing-with-dad story with relish, area, and was fishing out on the or perhaps tartar. “Dad didn’t Santa Cruz pier. Lombard recalls know anything about fishing, but that he had a bite on his very first he knew that I loved fishing. He cast. Wow. Except it was a seagull always tried. He knew that me and that took his bait, and the bird my grandfather had this bond,” tried to fly off with it, like a kite. Lombard says. The youngster reeled it in and They got in the boat and headed the bird was released unharmed. out onto the lake and “we just “That’s my first fish story: I caught started trolling this gigantic lure a seagull. It’s been all ) 18

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and appreciated through-line that highlights his conservation ethic, delivered lightly, as one might encrust a halibut fillet with corn meal—along with lots of entertaining, fish-specific haiku and footnotes that are by turns hilarious and informative, or both. Lombard has a real knack with the sharp observation delivered deadpan (“Anecdotally speaking, the least inhibited people catch the most clams”; “To be clear, it’s no problem shoving your hand into the gills of a lingcod. Pulling your hand back out is where the problem lies”). Lombard thinks you should work a little for the fish or other creature you’ve foraged, and distinguishes between fishing consumers and fishing citizens. The former will pry big fat mussels off a rock with a crowbar. The latter will put on a glove and get down and dirty with the work. Lombard wants you to get down and dirty.


The Sea Forager ( 17

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downhill since then. I haven’t caught anything since then from the sky.” e’re out on the beach in Bolinas and Lombard is drilling the surfperch and catches his limit (10 per person per day) within an hour or so, and I catch a few too. He’s wearing waders and I’m dodging the crashing surf in jacked-up blue jeans, barefoot. His fishing book is replete with recipes and commentary on the tastiness of various sea creatures and plants one can forage in these parts. The surfperch, alas, come up a little short in that department, though Lombard swears by ceviche made with the fish, and that’s how he’ll prepare his catch—squeeze that lime till the juice transforms the mushy meat. Without wanting to sound all pretentious about it, Lombard considers himself a writer first and a fisherman second. He has a couple of boats in Half Moon Bay, but makes it abundantly clear that he doesn’t compare himself to a typical commercial fishermen who is out there day after day, year after year, grinding it out amid a sea of regulations and dwindling resources. “I’m not some guy making a living as a salmon fisherman,” he says as he throws props in the direction of the commercial guys. “They are brilliant in a lot of ways that I am not—they can take engines apart, for one thing.” After he was laid off from Fish and Game, in the middle-aughts, Lombard started offering weekend tours of the San Francisco littoral zone, which became immensely popular and were declared by the SF Weekly to be the best walking tours available in San Francisco. He was also supplementing his income catching night smelts and monkey-faced eels (which are not, in fact, eels, and which grace the cover of The Sea Forager’s Guide). On the shoreline tours, he’d give lessons to participants on the byzantine California fishing regulations and he’d teach people how to throw a cast-net in the

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parking lot—“A very good way to catch the smaller fish that I like to talk about, the herring or surf smelt, two really amazing species.” He describes the tours as a rolling sort of stream-of-consciousness adventure heavy on the on-thespot explanation. A performance. Lombard noticed at the end of every tour, he’d be hearing the same thing from its participants, who were concerned and interested but not necessarily motivated to catch fish or forage seaweed themselves: I’m not going to go fishing, I don’t have the time for it, but I want to buy and eat fish in an ethical and sustainable manner. “I would do these tours and teach people how to get stuff, but then I noticed that people weren’t interested in foraging but we were getting high Yelp ratings,” he recalls. Interest in the tours grew with the big shout-out from the SF Weekly, and Lombard leveraged the interest in his tours into a subscription-based seafood service, which is now his primary business (at least when he is not promoting his book—he brought the whole family on a book tour that’s ongoing and that stopped in at Pt. Reyes, Gualala, Crescent City, Yachats and Portland). Lombard contacted Kenny Belov at Fish restaurant in Sausalito and told Belov that he’d been sending his tour customers his way when they asked about sustainable fish. “Kenny said, ‘Shit, why don’t you start a business?’” So Lombard started a business, Sea Forager Seafood, a community supported fisheries company. He sent out a mailer to everyone on his Sea Forager Tours mailing list and within a month had 75 people signed up. He thought, “Wow, man. This could work.” Another month went by, and he doubled his mailing list and thought, “Holy shit! This is a business.” Then his wife quit her job to work fulltime at Sea Forager, and within another few months they were up to 375 subscriptions. Camilla, aka Fishwife, throws down some of the recipes that populate the guide. Today Lombard has 630 subscribers who pay $24 a week and receive either weekly or


’m hanging with Lombard at an outdoors table at the Coast Cafe in Bolinas after our outing, and he’s sharing pictures of his family from the iPhone as we trade fishing stories and talk regulations and other subjects. Turns out Lombard and I have fished some of the same party boats on the East Coast. As usual, there are fish and chips on the lunch menu at the Coast, but we’ve both got a fish dinner on ice for later, or at least that’s why I ordered a bacon sandwich instead of the fish and chips. Later, we catch up on the phone and talk about the jewel that is the North Bay and the Marin-Sonoma coastline. I ask him to compare it to other waters he’s fished. “There’s just so much there,” he says. “I don’t want to say it’s better or it is more significant, but it sure

I

is unspeakably beautiful.” And he says there are shorebound hotspots all over the North Bay for raking clams or catching stripers or crabbing for the mighty Dungeness off the beach. Lombard tells me a few of them on one condition: Don’t tell anybody. No worries. It’s all about the stories, anyway. He tells another one by way of explaining the point of his book— which he kicks-off by first talking about the late Dr. Isaiah Ross who, like Lombard, is a harmonica player (or was—the Mississippian died in 1993). Unlike, say, bluesharp titan Little Walter, hardly anybody has ever heard of Ross, but Lombard loves him and says he’s generally inspired by “the things that fall through the cracks. I just love that guy, but you have to dig a little to find him.” And ditto the stories and asides and creatures you’ll find that populate his book—or even the ones you won’t find, since they didn’t involve catching a fish but releasing one. One story that didn’t make the cut in the final edit of his guide is about the guy Lombard encountered on a public pier who had hooked a sturgeon that was about 200 pounds. “He masterfully pulled it in, but it was a foot too long and he had to throw it back,” Lombard recalls. “I’m more interested in the story of the guy who didn’t get the big fish, the story of the heartbreak of having to throw it back, and why he threw it back.” The sturgeon is a beleaguered species, explains Lombard, and you can’t tell the difference between a male and a female, so this one might have been a female “with millions of little sturgies” waiting to be born. “This guy threw it back because he understood all of that.” It’s worth noting that when Lombard first started telling this particular fish tale, the sturgeon weighed north of 300 pounds. The weight kept dropping as Lombard told the story and laughingly copped to his exaggeration. Okay maybe 250. Probably around 200. I wondered if Lombard turned to angler-writer John Gierach for inspiration. Gierach’s 2014 book on fly-fishing is called All Fishermen Are Liars.

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biweekly deliveries of fish fillets, sourced either through Belov “or fishermen that I trust,” he says. “There are only two or three wholesalers in [San Francisco] that when they sell you a fish, it is traceable to the captain, the boat and the port it came from.” There are pick-up spots around the Bay Area for subscribers, including one in Sausalito. Lombard is a family man and a self-described eccentric (“I used to play a tuba on the street-corner in San Francisco!”) who regales a listener with a seemingly endless basket of stories that somehow always wind up back at something having to do with fishing, if not catching. For example, the one about how Grandpa Milton Watson used to play basketball with John Steinbeck when they were kids, and that one day Steinbeck was in New York—one of his books was then on Broadway— and recognized Watson during a Broadway performance of either Oklahoma or Annie Get Your Gun. After the show, Lombard’s grandfather was backstage in his dressing room and all of a sudden some guy was outside singing the fight song from Santa Cruz High School, and wouldn’t you know it, but it was the author of Cannery Row. “He opens the door, and it’s Steinbeck,” Lombard says. “They went out and had drinks after that.”


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Crush CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide

S A N TA R O S A

S T. H E L E N A

New Beat

Big Band Benefit

Two years ago, when singer, songwriter, producer and label owner Calvin Johnson was last in Santa Rosa, he was fronting his latest band, the Hive Dwellers, offering indie rock tinged with dulcet vocals. This time around, Johnson is bringing a whole new sound to the North Bay in his latest project, Selector Dub Narcotic, a DJ-oriented dance band with remixed club beats and potently humorous lyrics. Johnson gets the party started with help from experimental Mississippi psychedelic rockers Hartle Road and local noisemakers Gender Trash and Felix Astroblade on Thursday, Sept. 29, at Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa. 8pm. $10–$20. 707.528.3009.

All summer, Long Meadow Ranch has been hosting bluegrass-fed musicians in Napa Valley. This weekend, the ranch offers its biggest lineup of the season—literally. The LMR All-Star Big Band assembles 20 of the most accomplished musicians playing a set of jazz classics and contemporary selections to raise funds for the Timothy Hall Foundation. Founded in 1996, the nonprofit fosters school gardens and innovative curriculum for grades K through 12, and this concert goes a long way to helping the foundation build stewardship in students. The band plays on Sunday, Oct. 2, at the Farmstead restaurant at Long Meadow Ranch, 738 Main St., St. Helena. 3:30pm. $50–$60. 707.963.4555.

GUERNEVILLE

SONOMA

Punx at Play Miniature golf and punk rock may not seem like natural bedfellows, but anyone looking for a fun, rowdy time should check out what the Nor Bay Pyrate Punx are putting together this weekend. The summer send-off event will feature a full day of Bay Area bands and barbecue set amid the windmills and castles of a mini golf course. Headlining the BYOB party is Oakland band Kicker, with Sebastopol punks Thought Vomit and Santa Rosa bands Hellbomber, Slandyr and Resilience also on the bill. Golfing gets loud on Saturday, Oct. 1, at Pee Wee Golf & Arcade, 16155 Drake Road, Guerneville. Noon. $15, includes golfing and food. 707.869.9321.

Boo!

PICKING UP THE PIECES ‘30 Rock’ and ‘Saturday Night Live’ alumnusTracy Morgan gets back to his standup roots on Saturday, Oct. 1, at the Luther Burbank Center for the Arts in Santa Rosa. See Comedy, p29.

Born in San Francisco and raised in Sonoma County, documentary filmmaker Tom Wyrsch has spent his life making Bay Area–based docs that revisit lost treasures of the past, like Playland at the Beach and the Cliff House. Now Wyrsch has turned his eye to the North Bay’s spooky history in his new film, ‘Haunted Sonoma County.’ Uncovering ghost stories and urban legends, the film explores a colorful and shadowy past, narrated by Hollywood Haunted author Laurie Jacobson. Wyrsch and cast will premiere the new feature-length film on Monday, Oct. 3, at Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St. E., Sonoma. 7pm. $15. 707.996.9756.

—Charlie Swanson


COMMON GROUND The film ‘East Jerusalem/West Jerusalem’ explores artistic community within the Palestinian-Israeli conflict.

Far and Wide

Jewish Film Festival brings the world to Sonoma County’s doorstep BY CHARLIE SWANSON

A

n intense police thriller, an inspiring innercity drama, a darkly comic mystery, a gastronomical expedition: the 21st annual Jewish Film Festival has a little bit of everything.

Hosted by the Jewish Community Center of Sonoma County (JCC), this seasonal series of films, running on select

Wednesdays through November at Rialto Cinemas, presents an enlightening lineup of recent films from Israel, France, Hungary, the Netherlands and the United States. Inspired by the San Francisco Jewish Festival, the oldest fest of its kind in the world, Sonoma County’s own festival is part of a movement that JCC executive director Ellen Blustein says has spread around the globe. “We’re a relatively small

JCC, but we have a lot of cultural programs for anyone in or interested in the Jewish community,” says Blustein. Like the center’s other offerings, the festival was formed, and is still run by, a grassroots group of people. Blustein says the JCC selects films each year that appeal to the local community. “We watch about 80 movies a year to pick the seven or eight films we end up showing,” she says. Keeping

up with film festivals the world over, the JCC’s films are not yet in distribution, meaning all the films screened are making their North Bay premiere. Wounded Land, the 2015 Israeli drama that opens the fest on Wednesday, Oct. 5, chronicles an intense chain of events following a suicide bombing in which the bomber survives. The film, nominated for nine Ophir Awards (the Israeli equivalent of the Oscars), comments on the unsettling effects such violence wreaks upon culture. For audiences seeking something more light-hearted, the JFF screens the uplifting Once in a Lifetime, about a French teacher sparking inspiration in her inner-city students, on Oct. 19. Following that, on Nov. 2, the powerful East Jerusalem/West Jerusalem features a cast of American, Israeli and Palestinian artists finding common musical ground amid old tensions. One of Blustein’s favorite selections this year is Fire Birds, screening Nov. 9, in which three octogenarian widows investigate a mysterious murder with dark humor and inventive craft. Nov. 16’s presentation of Fever at Dawn offers an unlikely love story between two Hungarian Holocaust survivors, and on Nov. 30 the festival screens its quirkiest selection, Moos, a Dutch coming-of-age film that follows a wallflower who dreams of becoming an actress. Wrapping the festival on Sunday, Dec. 4, is celebrity chef Michael Solomonov’s delicious documentary, In Search of Israeli Cuisine, that goes deep into the country’s current foodie revolution and presents a microcosm of diverse cultures coexisting in a compact region. For tickets and more info, visit jccsoco.org.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 28-OCTOBER 4, 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Arts Ideas

21


Stage Eric Chazankin

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | SEPTE MBER 28- O CTO BE R 4, 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

22

ELEMENTARY LAUGHS Spreckels’

production of ‘Baskerville’ fuses ‘Sherlock Holmes’ and ‘Monty Python.’

Light and Dark Fun ‘Baskerville’ and strangely flat ‘Sweeney’ face off

BY DAVID TEMPLETON

T

wo murderous Victorian yarns have just unspooled in North Bay theaters.

Baskerville, a Sherlock Holmes Mystery (Spreckels Theater Company) is Ken Ludwig’s spoofy take on Arthur Conan Doyle’s Hound of the Baskervilles. Raven Players’ Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street follows a vengeful ex-convict teaming up with a pie-maker for a cannibalistic killing spree. Surprisingly, the livelier of the two is not the show with slashing razors; it’s the one where a guy gets mauled by a big stuffed dog. Baskerville, directed by David Yen (with obvious affection for Monty Python), follows Sherlock Holmes (Steve Cannon) and

Watson (a marvelous Chris Schloemp) as they take the case of a man killed by a mysterious beast. The play is jam-packed with pratfalls, outrageous accents, silly walks—and a massive cloud of machine-made fog that seems to have a mind of its own. Though Cannon’s ultra-dry delivery as Holmes reads mostly as lifeless and unfunny, the rest of the cast is a brisk and bouncy delight, especially Larry Williams, excelling in an array of hilariously over-the-top roles. Kim Williams and Zane Walters do exceptional work as numerous potential murderers and/or victims. The best performance of the show, though—thanks to Williams’ utter commitment to the moment—is from the floppy stuffed-animal appearing as the mysterious hound itself. Rarely has an inanimate object been funnier. Rating (out of 5): If only Sweeney Todd had the same level of energy. Though it features one of the best orchestras I’ve heard in the North Bay—with expert musical direction from Lucas Sherman— Steven Sondheim’s spirited, darkly fun tale feels disappointingly dour. Directed by Carl Hamilton (who delivered one of 2015’s best shows in All My Sons), this Sweeney suffers a mortal blow from stiff staging that, despite several nice visual touches (loved the falling red fabric when key characters die), often feels flat, leaving the actors looking constrained and frozen. A bit more melodramatic vitality and dynamism is called for in this kind of show. As Todd, Matt Witthaus cuts a fine figure, and reveals a powerful singing voice, but the largerthan-life intensity of presence for which he’s become known is rarely capitalized on. Far more lively and on-the-mark is Tika Moon as the pie-making Mrs. Lovett, balancing her characters’ dark humor and comic tragedy with masterful ingenuity.

For dates and times for ‘Baskerville,’ visit ci.rohnert-park.ca.us; for ‘Sweeney Todd,’ check raventheater.org.


SALTY LANGUAGE Jaimal Yogis’ memoir ‘Saltwater Buddha’ is now a documentary film.

Surf Night

Catch a wave at the Rialto—for one night only BY STETT HOLBROOK

W

atching a surf movie is a special event for aficionados of the genre. The films are often short on plot but long on footage of surfing in epic locations. The crowd hoots and hollers as surfers get spit out of tubes and freefall from the pitching lips of waves as beer bottles smuggled inside roll down the theater floor. This Thursday, Sebastopol’s Rialto Cinemas is hosting a surf movie night, but it’s going to be a little different. The one-nightonly event will feature Saltwater Buddha, a documentary based

23

MVFF MUSIC

NINE NIGHTS OF LIVE MUSIC

THAO NGUYEN

PREZIDENT BROWN & THE ITALS

ALASDAIR FRASER & NATALIE HAAS

FRIDAY, OCT 7

SATURDAY, OCT 8

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Refer to mvff.com/music for full music program schedule SPONSORED BY The Lodge At

TIBURON OCTOBER 7-15 | MVFF.COM/MUSIC

9/30–10/6

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PG

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BRINGING THE BEST FILMS IN THE WORLD TO SONOMA COUNTY

Schedule for Fri, Sep 30 – Thu, Oct 6

The Dressmaker

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Author: The JT Leroy Story R (10:30-1:00)-6:30-9:00

The Beatles: Eight Days a Week NR (10:45-1:45)-5:15-8:15

Snowden

DINE-IN CINEMA Bargain Tuesday - $7.50 All Shows Bargain Tuesday $7.00 All Shows Schedule for Fri, Feb -16th 20th Thu, Feb 26th Schedule for Fri, April –– Thu, April 22nd Schedule for Fri, June 22nd - Thu, June 28th

Academy Award “Moore Gives BestNominee Performance Food BeerHer Wine Movies!

Foreign Language Film!Stone Years!” – Box Office “RawBest and Riveting!” –• Rolling Bruschetta •In Paninis • Soups Salads • Appetizers Demi Moore David Duchovny WALTZ BASHIR 8 Great Beers onMIGHTY Tap +WITH Wine by the Glass and Bottle A HEART

(1:00) 3:00 5:00 9:15 Enjoy in the Cafe or Theatre • Open DailyRRat Noon THE JONESES (12:30) 2:45 5:00 7:00 7:20 9:45

QUEEN OF KATWE

(12:30) 2:40 Noms 4:50 Including 7:10 9:20 2 Academy Award BestRActor!

“A Triumph!” – New “A Glorious ToYork The Observer More Stylized, THE WRESTLER (1:30Throwback 4:20) 7:15 9:50 PG Painterly Work2:45 Of Decades Past!” – LA (12:20) 5:10 9:45 R Times VIE EN 7:30 ROSE Fri: LA (1:30) plays at (12:00) (12:45) 3:45 6:45OF 9:45 PG-13 THEAward SECRET KELLS 10 Academy Noms Including Best Picture! (1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:00 NR SLuMDOG MILLIONAIRE “★★★★ – Really, Truly, 9:50 DeeplyPG-13 – (12:00 2:30 7:25 “Superb! No One5:00) Could Make This 4:00 7:10 R Believable One of (1:15) This Year’s Best!”9:40 – Newsday If It Were Fiction!” – San Francisco Chronicle

DEEPWATER HORIZON THE BEATLES: EIGHT DAYS A WEEK

ONCE Including 8 Academy Award PRODIGALNoms SONS

(1:00) 3:10 5:20 R Best Picture, Actor7:30 & Best9:40 Director! (2:20) 9:10 Best NR No 9:10 Show Tue or Thu

(1:30 4:15) 7:00 9:45 NR Limited! MILK

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Mr. Church

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PG13 (4:00)

Hell or High Water R (10:15-3:45)-8:55

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MILK – Rolling Stone “Haunting and Hypnotic!” Wed: No (4:15) show “Wise, Humble and Effortlessly (1:30) 4:10 6:45 Funny!” 9:30 R – Newsweek THE GIRL THE TATTOO Please Note: 1:30 Show Sat, PleaseWITH Note: No No 1:30 ShowDRAGON Sat, No No 6:45 6:45 Show Show Thu Thu WAITRESS

MISS PEREGRINE’S HOME FOR PECULIAR CHILDREN

WAITRESS (1:10) 4:30 7:30 NR (1:30) 4:00 7:10 9:30 Best R Picture! 5 Academy Award Noms Including “★★★1/2! AnFROST/NIXON unexpected Gem!” – USA Today FROST/NIXON (12:45 3:45) 6:45 3D: 9:30 PG-13 (2:15)Mysterious, 7:20 R GREENBERG “Swoonly Romatic, Hilarious!” (12:00) 9:50 R – Slant5:00 Magazine

SNOWDEN

REVOLuTIONARY ROAD

(12:30 3:30) 9:20 R “Deliciously unsettling!” PARIS, JE6:40 T’AIME (11:45) 4:45 9:50– RLA Times (1:15)GHOST 4:15 7:00 9:30 R THE Kevin Jorgenson presents the WRITER California Premiere of (2:15) 7:157:30 PG-13 (12:40 3:00 5:15) 9:40 PG-13

SULLY

PuRE: A BOuLDERING FLICK Michael Moore’s Thu, Feb 26th at 7:15SEVEN THE MOST DANGEROuS THE MAGNIFICENT SICKO IN THE MORNING (1:00 MOVIES 4:00) 7:00 PG-13 No Passes MAN IN9:45 AMERICA Starts Fri, June 29th!

Starts Fri,Sun June 29th! Fri, Sat, &PENTAGON Mon DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THENow PAPERS Advance Tickets On Sale at Box Office! 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 6:50 NR No7:30 6:50 Show Tue or Thu FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:30 5:00 10:00 (12:15 2:30 4:45) 6:45 9:00 PG 10:15 AM VICKY Their CRISTINA BARCELONA First Joint Venture In 25 Years! 10:20 AM CHANGELING Venessa RedgraveAND Meryl CHONG’S Streep Glenn CloseAM CHEECH 10:40 RACHEL(4:25) GETTING8:45 MARRIED R Thu: No 8:45 show HEYSHORTS WATCH THIS 2009 LIVE ACTION (Fri/Mon Only)) 10:45 AM EVENING 10:45 Sat, Apr17th at 11pm & Tue, Apr 20th 8pmAM 2009 ANIMATED SHORTS Only) Starts Fri,(Sun June 29th!

STORKS

‘Saltwater Buddha’ screens Sept. 29 at 7pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St., Sebastopol. 707.525.4840. Q&A with Jaimal Yogis and Lara Popyack follows.

HELL OR HIGH WATER

ALL AGES WELCOMED • BISTRO MENU ITEMS, BEER & WINE AVAILABLE IN ALL 4 AUDITORIUMS HEALDSBURG • RAVENFILMCENTER.COM

THE HUNT FOR WILDERPEOPLE (12:15 2:20) 6:40 PG-13

Wed: Plays at (4:15) only Thu: No 6:40 show

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 28- OCTOBE R 4, 201 6 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Film

on Jaimal Yogis’ 2009 memoir of the same name. The book is a series of short stories that follow Yogis as he runs away from his home in Sacramento to learn how to surf in Maui and figure out what do to with his life. Along the 10-year-long journey, he discovers Buddhism and a deeper appreciation for waves and the world. The film, made by director Lara Popyack and producer Mike Madden, includes footage shot in Hawaii, Costa Rica, El Salvador, New York and San Francisco’s Ocean Beach. Popyack and Madden approached Yogis about turning his book into a film shortly after it was published, and it has been in production ever since. “It’s taken a really long time,” says Yogis from his home in San Francisco. “There were times when I thought it would never amount to a film.” The film, made for about $50,000, takes an impressionistic approach to the book with Yogis’ narration and diverse music. In addition to Saltwater Buddha, the event will feature a performance by Nine Pound Shadow and a screening of the short documentary “Thank You, Please Surf Again,” a film about Surf for Life, a nonprofit “voluntourism” organization that takes surfers to volunteer in impoverished coastal communities. Berkeley’s Nine Pound Shadow played before Yogis’ bookstore appearances when he was promoting his book. The band has recently been signed to Columbia Records and recorded with produced Danger Mouse. “It feels like being back where we started,” Yogis says. Oh, and no need to smuggle in the brews. Beer is for sale, along with wine and a full food menu at the theater.


Music

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | SE PTEMBER 28- O CTO BE R 4, 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

24 WEDNESDAY

SEP 28 THURSDAY

DELHI 2 DUBLIN

ALTERNATIVE ROCK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

BUKU

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CUNNINLYNGUISTS

SADISTIK, PSALM ONE, SAM ROBERTS URBAN • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

OCT 1

ALLEN STONE DELTA RAE

SUNDAY

KING

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SOUL • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

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OCT 7 OCT 8 MONDAY

POP/ROCK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

JULES, KINGSBOROUGH ROCK N ROLL • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

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WITH WEB

AND JOSEPH ROSE OCT 10 THREE URBAN • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

10 ⁄ 12 Marc Broussard, Jenn Grinels, Peter Aristone, 10 ⁄ 14 Easy Rider Live, 10 ⁄ 15 Alejandro Escovedo, 10 ⁄ 15 Saved By The 90s, 10 ⁄ 20 Reverend Peyton's Big Damn Band, Supersuckers, Jesse Dayton

WWW.MYSTICTHEATRE.COM 23 PETALUMA BLVD N. PETALUMA, CA 94952

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Din ner & A Show

Swing Dance Lessons 7:45 Sep 30 Stompy Jones 8:00

Oct 2

Terry Haggerty with Katie Guthorn 5:00 / No Cover

Hannan Oct 7 Jerry Marin’s Troubador 8:00 / No Cover Fri

Sun

Oct 9 Oct 14 Sat

Oct 15 Sun

Jeremy D’Antonio Darren Nelson

& Friends 5:00 / No Cover

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FOxeS in THe HenHOuSe

7:30pm/Dancing/$10

sat OCt 1

THe SORenTinOS

thu OCt 6

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8:30pm/Dancing/$10 8pm/Jazz/No Cover 7:30pm/Dancing/$10

PHil lawRenCe FeaT.

david & linda laFlamme FROm iT’S a BeauTiFul day

8:30pm/$10

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THE BLOODSTONES + WOLFGANG VON COPE $10/DOORS 8/SHOW 9/21+

Ron Thompson

MON OCT 3

Classical/Flamenco 8:00 / No Cover Welcome Back!

& The Resistors 8:30

Sometime Tonight

SHANA MORRISON $15/DOORS 8/SHOW 9/21+

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DJ JACQUES & DJ GUACAMOLE $8/DOORS-SHOW 10/21+

Real Folk Music 5:00

THU OCT 5

with Will Durst Putting the Mock Back in Democracy 7:00

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LOCAL GIRL Shelby Lanterman developed her talent through local shows and in Nashville.

Light the Way Napa songwriter takes the show on the road

SAT OCT 1

Oct 23 “Elect to Laugh” Fri

8pm/Dancing/$5

Freddy Clarke

Oct 16 Kaye Rodden’s Sun

fRi sep 30

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Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

Fri

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CheCk out the Art exhibit

thu sep 29

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next event with us, up to 250, kim@hopmonk.com

BY CHARLIE SWANSON

B

orn and raised in the city of Napa, singer-songwriter Shelby Lanterman perfectly encapsulates the town’s musical ascension in the last 20 years. “The music scene in Napa has definitely grown a lot,” says Lanterman. “When I was a little kid, there were three or four local bands, and that was it. But now we have the BottleRock festival and the Porchfest that we do every year. That’s helped the local scene, and it’s brought out a lot of musicians.” Lanterman is one of Napa’s, and the North Bay’s, busiest performers today. This week, she unveils her debut solo record, Paper Thin, with a show at Rossi’s 1906 in Sonoma.

Though she grew up with her dad’s classic rock LPs, the 23-yearold Lanterman also considers herself a child of the ’90s, and her sound captures an alternative folk somewhere between the wistfulness of Dar Williams and the grunge of Kathleen Hanna. Playing guitar at 12 years old, Lanterman entered the Napa School of Music’s Garage Band 101 program. “That got me interested in doing rock and roll, and that segued into writing my own music.” In 2014, Lanterman took up a six-month residency in Nashville, where she studied audio engineering at Dark Horse Institute and immersed herself in the music scene there. “It was awesome to be in that environment,” she says. “Everyone you meet is a musician, and it’s music first before anything.” Upon returning to Napa, Lanterman was approached by City Winery Napa to lead an emerging local artist concert series at the Napa Valley Opera House. With City Winery closing last year, Lanterman moved the series to the HopMonk Tavern in Novato this year, and is now looking to continue the show somewhere else in the North Bay. Throughout all this, she’s been refining and recording her songs at Purple Cat Recording Studios in American Canyon, working with engineer Rob DaSilva and a full band. Paper Thin is an earnest album of folk rock. A self-professed bookworm, Lanterman crafted each song into a short story inspired by literary references that come alive with the backing band and overlaid harmonies. This fall, Lanterman will take the album across the country on a massive tour, hitting the East Coast for the first time before headlining San Francisco’s Great American Music Hall in December. First, she invites fellow Napa songwriters Zak Fennie and Kristen Van Dyke to help her celebrate the album’s release this week. Shelby Lanterman performs on Friday, Sept. 30, at Rossi’s 1906, 401 Grove St., Sonoma. 8pm. $10, includes a copy of the album. 707.343.0044.


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Emmylou Harris

The expressive and eloquent folk songwriter and enduring social activist performs. Sep 30, 8pm. $49-$69. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Omara Portuondo

Vocalist from the Buena Vista Social Club appears for an evening of Latin jazz with guests Roberto Fonseca, Anat Cohen and Regina Carter. Oct 2, 7pm. $40 and up. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Selector Dub Narcotic

Olympia, Wash, underground songwriter Calvin Johnson (Beat Happening, the Hive Dwellers) plays in his new band, with Mississippi band Hartle Road and local rockers Gender Trash and Felix Astroblade. Sep 29, 8pm. $10-$20. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

MARIN COUNTY Crystal Bowersox

Gifted singer-songwriter and former American Idol finalist returns to the North Bay for an evening of bluesy folk rock. Sep 28, 8pm. $27-$32. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.1100.

Eggs Over Easy Box Set Release Party

Celebrate the release of the complete recorded works of this quintessentially American band and Marin staple, with Austin de Lone and Jack O’Hara. Oct 3, 8pm. $20-$25. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.1100.

Paula West

San Francisco soul singer leads a night of jazz and cocktails. Oct 1, 8pm. $28-$35. Osher Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

NAPA COUNTY Leanne Rees & Egils Straume

An evening of classical and jazz music from the two

pianists and composers, with Eddie Daniels and other guests opening. Sep 29, 8pm. $25. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

LMR All-Star Big Band Twenty-member strong band wraps up Long Meadow Ranch’s bluegrass-fed concert series in a benefit for the Timothy Hall Foundation. Oct 2, 3:30pm. $50-$60. Farmstead at Long Meadow Ranch, 738 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.4555.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY A’Roma Roasters

Sep 30, Ghost River Junction. 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Aqus Cafe

Sep 28, bluegrass and old-time music jam. Sep 30, Now & Zen. Oct 1, the Rains. Oct 2, 2pm, Tyler Allen. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Barley & Hops Tavern

Sep 29, Jacob Green. Sep 30, Loyal Rose. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.874.9037.

The Big Easy

Sep 28, Wednesday Night Big Band. Sep 29, Left Coast Syncopators. Sep 30, Howard Wales with Terry Haggerty and Kevin Hayes. Oct 1, Earles of Newtown with the Crux. Oct 4, Cosmonaut Radio with Jared O’Connell. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.4631.

Sep 30, the Sticky Notes. Oct 1, Wisp & Willows. Oct 4, the Rivertown Trio. 100 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.789.0505.

D’Argenzio Winery

Sep 29, 6pm, Bear’s Belly. 1301 Cleveland Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.280.4658.

Flamingo Lounge

Sep 30, Electric Funeral. Oct 1, Power House. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Graffiti

Sep 30, 5:30pm, the Peter Welker Sextet. 101 Second St, Petaluma. 707.765.4567.

Green Music Center

Sep 29, 6:30pm, Jewish music series with Ben Goldberg and Invisible Guy. Free. Oct 1, 7pm, Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Green Music Center Schroeder Hall

Sep 30, 7:30pm, “Music from the Movies” with Wesla Whitfield and Mike Greensill. $30. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

HopMonk Sebastopol

Sep 29, Inna Vision. Sep 30, the Bloodstones and Wolfgang von Cope. Oct 1, Shana Morrison. Oct 3, Monday Night Edutainment with DJ Jacques and DJ Guacamole. Oct 5, Science Buzz Cafe. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

HopMonk Sonoma

Sep 30, 5pm, Sean Carscadden. Sep 30, 8pm, Dawn Angelosante and Tony Gibson. Oct 1, 1pm, Born Lucky. Oct 1, 8pm, Aaron Ford. Oct 2, 1pm, HOR_Boh10_3rdpg.indd Geena Fontella. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Blue Heron Restaurant & Tavern

Hotel Healdsburg

Oct 4, 6pm, Michael Hantman. 25300 Steelhead Blvd, Duncans Mills. 707.865.2261.

Oct 1, Randal Collen Trio with Chris Amberger and Zach Morris. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Brixx Pizzeria

Jasper O’Farrell’s

Oct 1, Jinx Jones. 16 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.766.8162.

Cellars of Sonoma

Sep 29, Ricky Alan Ray. Sep 30, Craig Corona. Oct 1, John Pita. 133 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.578.1826.

Coffee Catz

Sep 30, 3:30pm, PR Jazz Duo. Tues, 12pm, Jerry Green’s Peaceful Piano Hour. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 28-OCTOBER 4, 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

25

Corkscrew Wine Bar

Sep 28, jazz jam. Sep 30, Universal Battery Dub Reggae with Electro MC. Oct 1, Subtomik and DJ Gabriel Francisco. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Lagunitas Tap Room

Sep 28, O Happy Dagger. Sep 29, Aqua Velvets. Sep 30, the Rhythm Rangers. Oct 1, the Pine Needles. Oct 2, the California Stars. Oct 5, Roem Baur. 1280 N )

26

1

9/24/16 9:24 AM

Snoopy’s Home Ice Presents

An Ice Ballet Company for the 21st Century

One Night Only Saturday October 15 Tickets On Sale Now

1667 W Steele Lane, Santa Rosa 707-546-7147 • www.snoopyshomeice.com


Music ( 25

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | SE PTEMBER 28- O CTO BE R 4, 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

26

McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776. Sun 10/3 • Doors 7pm • ADV $20 / DOS $25

Eggs Over Easy Release Party

SUN, OCTOBER 30

John Cleese & Eric Idle Together Again At Last ... For the Very First Time

SAT, NOVEMBER 5

Whose Live Anyway? SAT, NOVEMBER 12

Neko Case

feat. Austin de Lone & Jack O'Hara with Caroline de Lone Fri 10/7 • Doors 8pm • $27 Thao Nguyen solo (of Thao and the Get Down Stay Down) Sat 10/8 • Doors 8pm • ADV $27 / DOS $32

Prezident Brown & The Itals Sun 10/9 • Doors 7:30pm • $32

Alasdair Fraser & Natalie Haas

Mon 10/10 • Doors 7pm • ADV $17 / DOS $20 Erika Wennerstrom (of Heartless Bastards)with Petter Stakee (of Alberta Cross) Tue 10/11 • Doors 8pm • $50

Bang! Bert Burns Tribute Wed 10/12 • Doors 7:30pm • $57

Fred Hersch

Thu 10/13 • Doors 7pm • $25 ADV / $30 DOS

Trevor Hall (solo)

SUN, NOVEMBER 13

Celtic Thunder

707.546.3600 lutherburbankcenter.org

Fri 10/14 • Doors 8pm • $27

Alejandro Escovedo Trio Sat 10/15 • Doors 7:30pm • $75

The Great Mill Valley Gospel Show with Narada Michael Walden www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

FREE LOCAL LIVE MUSIC GIGS LIVE MUSIC. NEW STAGE AND SOUND. NEW DANCE FLOOR. NEW AIR CONDITIONING. SUDS TAPS - 18 LOCAL & REGIONAL SELECT CRAFT BEERS & CIDERS. EATS NEW MENU, KITCHEN OPEN ALL DAY FROM 11AM ON. CHECK OUT OUR FRIED CHICKEN SANDWICH W/CORN ON THE COB. DIGS DINING OUT-DOORS. KIDS ALWAYS WELCOME - NEW KID’S MENU. RESERVATIONS FOR 8 OR MORE. HAPPY HOUR M-F 3-6PM. $2 CHICKEN TACOS. $3 HOUSE CRAFT BEERS. WEEKLY EVENTS MONDAYS • BLUES DEFENDERS PRO JAM TUESDAYS • OPEN MIC W/ROJO WEDNESDAYS • KARAOKE

Oct 10: BEETLEJUICE Nov 14: A SHADOW OF A DOUBT Dec 12: THE SHOP AROUND THE CORNER Movies call 707.996.2020 Tickets call 707.996.9756 SONOMA sebastianitheatre.com

Oct 1, 6:30pm, the Poyntlyss Sistars. 1400 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.529.5450.

Montgomery Village Shopping Center

Oct 1, 12pm, Johnny Vegas & the High Rollers. Oct 2, 1pm, Jami Jameson Band. 911 Village Court, Santa Rosa.

Murphy’s Irish Pub

Sep 30, Solid Air. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Muscardini Cellars Tasting Room

Oct 1, 6pm, Rett Hamer Blues Band. 9380 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood. 707.933.9305.

Mystic Theatre

Sep 28, Delhi 2 Dublin. Sep 29, BUKU and Stylust Beats. Sep 30, CunninLynguists. Oct 1, Allen Stone and Delta Rae. Oct 2, King. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Northwest Regional Library

CALENDAR FRI SEP 30 • FREE PEOPLES AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 7:30PM / 21+ FREE SAT OCT 1 • AMERICAN HONEY AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 7:30PM / 21+ FREE THU OCT 6 • LEVI'S WORKSHOP, STEFANIE KEYS (CD RELEASE) 7PM / 21+ FREE CHECK OUT OUR FULL MUSIC CALENDAR www.TwinOaksRoadhouse.com Phone 707.795.5118 5745 Old Redwood Hwy Penngrove, CA 94951

Oct 1, John Roy Zat. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books

Sep 30, 6pm, the Jazz in the Neighborhood Collective. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Sonoma Valley Regional Library

Oct 1, 2pm, Sol Flamenco. 755 W Napa St, Sonoma. 707.939.0379.

Spancky’s Bar

Thurs, 7pm, Thursday Night Blues Jam. Thurs, 11pm, DJ Selecta Konnex. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Subud Hall

Sep 30, Stella Mara. 234 Hutchins Ave, Sebastopol.

Toad in the Hole Pub Sun, live music. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

The Tradewinds Bar

Oct 1, Hearts and Bones. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Banda. Oct 4, hip-hop open mic. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Ghiringhelli Pizzeria Grill & Bar

First Sunday of every month, 5pm, Erika Alstrom with Dale Alstrom’s Jazz Society. 1535 South Novato Blvd, Novato. 415.878.4977.

Grazie Restaurant

Oct 1, Kurt Huget and Peter Penhallow. 823 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.897.5181.

HopMonk Novato

Sep 28, open mic night with the Larkdales. Oct 1, 7pm, “Rock for the Homeless” with the Happys and Columba Livia. Oct 5, open mic night with Beth Marlin. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Marin Country Mart

Sep 30, 6pm, Friday Night Jazz with Lee Waterman & Jazz Caliente. Oct 2, 12:30pm, Folkish Festival with the Alcatraz Islanders. 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur.

19 Broadway Club

Sep 30, Free Peoples. Oct 1, American Honey. Oct 3, the Blues Defenders pro jam. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Mon, open mic. Sep 28, Lender. Sep 29, Liquid Green and Voodoo Switch. Sep 30, 5:30pm, Darren Nelson and Michael Weiss. Sep 30, 9pm, Pack of Wolves. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Oct 1, Meredith Axelrod: Popular Songs from a Bygone Era. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Whiskey Tip

No Name Bar

Pee Wee Golf & Arcade

Yeti Indian Restaurant

Oct 1, 2pm, ChaskinakuyAndean Village Music. 150 Coddingtown Center, Santa Rosa. 707.546.2265.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Sebastiani Theatre

Vintage Film Series

Monroe Dance Hall

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub

Oct 1, 12pm, Kicker with Slandyr and Resilence. 16155 Drake Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9321.

Phoenix Theater

Oct 1, Nef the Pharaoh. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Redwood Cafe

Twin Oaks Roadhouse

Sep 30, Restless Sons. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5535. Thurs, Fri, 6pm. through Sep 30, Fusion Himalayan music with Seti Maiya Rajchal. 190 Farmers Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.521.9608.

MARIN COUNTY Book Passage

Sep 29, Sidemen. Oct 1, 3pm, Shawna Miller student recital. Oct 1, 8:30pm, the Sorentinos. Oct 2, 5pm, Gypsy Kisses. Oct 4, 6pm, Rock Overtime student performance. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Sun, 11:30am, Songs & Stories with Megan. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Rio Nido Roadhouse

Fenix

Oct 1, Hot Zone. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Rossi’s 1906

Wed, Paint Nite at Rossi’s. Thurs, open mic night. Sep 30, Shelby Lanterman album release show. Oct 1, Choppin Broccoli. 401 Grove St, Sonoma. 707.343.0044.

Downtown Tiburon

Sep 30, 6pm, Friday Nights on Main with the Fundamentals. Main St, Tiburon. 415.435.5633. Sep 28, pro blues jam with Dallis Craft. Sep 29, Bait & Switch Blues Band. Sep 30, Jesse Brewster. Oct 4, West Coast Songwriters Competition. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

George’s Nightclub

Sep 29, college night. Sep 30, Viva Friday. Oct 2, Mexican

Tues, open mic. Sep 28, Robert Elmond Stone and friends. Sep 29, Harmonic Law. Sep 30, Michael Aragon Quartet. Oct 3, Kimrea & the Dreamdogs. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Novato Library

Oct 5, 7pm, classical guitar music with Joseph Bacon. 1720 Novato Blvd, Novato. 415.898.4623.

Osteria Divino

Sep 28, Jonathan Poretz. Sep 29, Dave Ricketts. Sep 30, Ken Cook Trio. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355.

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Sep 28, Judy Hall and friends. Sep 29, C-JAM with Connie Ducey. Oct 4, Swing Fever. Oct 5, Charlie Docherty. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Papermill Creek Saloon

Oct 1, 9pm, Ned Endless & the Allnighters. 1 Castro, Forest Knolls. 415.488.9235.

Peri’s Silver Dollar

Mon, Billy D’s open mic. Sep 28, the New Sneakers. Sep 29, Dr Mojo. Sep 30, Ann Halen. Oct


27

SOMO Village - Sonoma 5K Family Fun Run

9:00am start

www.colorstride.com

SOMO Village - Rohnert Park

JAZZ MAN Wynton Marsalis leads the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchesta in the

Green Music Center’s 2016–17 season-opening gala on Saturday, Oct. 1, in Rohnert Park. See Clubs & Venues, p25.

Rancho Nicasio

Trek Winery

Wed, 12pm, noon concert series. Oct 2, 5:30pm, Nathan Bickart Trio. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Sep 30, Stompy Jones. Oct 2, 5pm, Terry Haggerty with Katie Guthorn. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sep 30, Dennis Hagerty & the Blind Date Trio. 1026 Machin Ave, Novato. 415.899.9883.

Sausalito Seahorse

Sep 28, 12pm, piano lunch serenade with Nancy Fox. 930 Tamalpais Ave, San Rafael. 415.456.9062.

Wed, Milonga with Marcelo Puig and Seth Asarnow. Sep 29, Charity Goodin. Sep 30, DJ Jose Ruiz. Oct 1, Fleetwood Macrame. Oct 2, 5pm, Julio Bravo & Salsabor. Oct 3, 6pm, open mic with Judy Hall. Oct 4, Noel Jewkes and friends. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899.

Whistlestop

NAPA COUNTY Beringer Vineyards

Oct 1, 12:30pm, Jazz Mirage. Oct 2, 12:30pm, Whiskey & Honey. 2000 Main St, St Helena, 866.708.9463.

Always Elvis. 1403 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9777.

Molinari Caffe

Thurs, Open Mic. 828 Brown St, Napa. 707.927.3623.

Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater

Oct 1, Rock Stars & Stripes with David Victor. Oct 2, 3pm, Drums of India with Bickram Ghosh. 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

Napa Valley Roasting Company Fri, jammin’ and java with Jeffrey McFarland Johnson. 948 Main St, Napa. 707.224.2233.

Mon, Epicenter Soundsystem reggaae. Sep 30, Doobie Decibel System. Oct 1, Marty O’Reilly. Oct 2, Adrian & Meredith. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Thurs, live music. 1234 Third St, Napa. 707.226.7506.

Ca’ Momi Osteria

River Terrace Inn

Spitfire Lounge

Sep 30, Brian Coutch. 1001 Second St, Napa. 707.224.0800.

Last Thursday of every month, the North Bass DJ night. 848 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.5551.

Sweetwater Music Hall Sep 30, Petty Theft. Oct 2, Laura Marling. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.1100.

Terrapin Crossroads Sep 28, CMac & the Casual Coalition with Lebo. Sep 29, Victoria George Band. Sep 30, Top 40 Friday with the Terrapin All-Stars. Oct 1, the Infamous Stringdusters. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

Billco’s Billiards

Sep 30, OoN. Oct 1, Xochitl. 1141 First St, Napa. 707.224.6664.

Carpe Diem

Deco Lounge at Capp Heritage Vineyards

Oct 1, the Mikel Paul Trio. 1245 First St, Napa. 707.254.1922.

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant

Sep 29, Otis & the Smokestacks. Sep 30, C4 Inc. Oct 1, Weekend at Bernie’s. Oct 2, DJ Aurelio. Oct 4, Bay Area Blues Society Caravan of Allstars. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Hydro Grill

First Saturday of every month,

www.colorstride.com

Our Roots:

20-30

Local Schools

ACTIVE CLUB PRESENTS SONOMA COUNTY'S PREMIER FAMILY-FRIENDLY PORK COMPETITION & FESTIVAL

RaeSet

Sep 28, jazz night. Sep 30, Friday Night Blues with Gretschkat. 3150 B Jefferson St, Napa. 707.666.9028.

Smiley’s Schooner Saloon

Charity

Join us for a family friendly, untimed run / walk that supports Rotary Club of Rohnert Park-Cotati! Each event has music, food, drink and fun for the entire family.

SPONSORED BY

OCT 8

Silo’s

Sep 29, Two of Us. Sep 30, AgapeSoul with Darryl Anders. Oct 1, 8 Track Massacre. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

✓ 0% loans for AG students

Uptown Theatre

Locally earned money stays LOCAL!

Oct 5, Ani DiFranco with Chastity Brown. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

✓ YouthSaver to 7.07% (APY)

Uva Trattoria

Sep 28, Tom Duarte. Sep 29, David Ranconi. Sep 30, Gentlemen of Jazz. Oct 1, Juke Joint Band. Oct 2, the Hillwilliams. 1040 Clinton St, Napa. 707.255.6646.

12:30 PM TO 7 PM

SATURDAY

Sep 29, Sean Carscadden. Sep 30, Johnny Smith. 1600 Soscol Ave, Napa. 707.320.9000.

Guerneville Healdsburg Santa Rosa Sebastopol Napa

HERE FOR GOOD 707/546-6000

comfirstcu.org

TICKETS:

BURNINGHAM SONOMA.COM PENNGROVE PARK

ROASTED LUAU PIGS

RIBS

BACON

.

Throckmorton Theatre

SOMO Village – Sonoma October 9th 9th - 9:00am 5K Family Fun October Run

PULLED PORK MC DANO of

.

1, the Right Time. Oct 2, Atilla Viola & the Bakersfield Boys. Oct 4, Waldo’s Special. Oct 5, the Weissmen. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BER 28-OCTOBER 4, 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

October 9th

LIVE MUSIC

KIDS AREA


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | SEPTE MBER 28- O CTO BE R 4, 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

28

INCREDIBLE CANINE The difference between the backyard and the world

Arts Events RECEPTIONS Oct 1

Aqus Cafe, “Day of the Dead,” seasonal show from local artists offers several takes on Dia de los Muertos. 3pm. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Free evaluations by appt

707-322-3272

IncredibleCanine.com

Sunday

Oct. 2

Noon to 5pm A benefit festival at the Marin Humane Society Featuring music by

Wonder Bread 5 Tickets and more information at

Graton Gallery, “What You See,” featuring new works by Bruce K. Hopkins and others. 2pm. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.829.8912.

Room Art Gallery, “MOCÓ,” the Brazilian artist blurs the boundaries between high and low art. 6pm. 86 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.380.7940.

Mill Valley Community Center, “Mt Tam As We See It,” art show and sale by BayWood artist group supports nonprofit One Tam’s preservation and stewardship of Mt Tamalpais. 11am. 180 Camino Alto, Mill Valley.

Oct 4

Throckmorton Theatre, “Michael Cutlip Solo Show,” influenced by graffiti and street art, the Bay Area native’s works showcase metropolitan life as seen through an abstract lens. 5pm. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Gallery One

Through Oct 15, “Sonoma County Art Trails Preview Exhibit,” works from over 30 artists participating in the upcoming Art Trails event is previewed. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts

Through Oct 16, “Masks, Puppets & Games,” juried exhibition includes art that explores interpretations of the masks we wear, puppet-people and games we play in real life and in the imagination. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

History Museum of Sonoma County

Through Oct 9, “Artistry in Wood,” annual exhibit brings together the best works of the Sonoma County Woodworkers Association. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sculpturesite Gallery

Galleries Through Oct 30, “A Face in the Crowd,” 10 artists are represented in this collection of acrylic and oil portraits inspired by the works of iconic artists. 111 Kentucky St, Petaluma. Mon-Tues, Fri, 10 to 5; Wed-Thurs, Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, 11 to 4. 707.775.3794.

The Art Wall at Shige Sushi

contact us at 800.345.7433 or visit us on the web at sctransit.com for more information.

Oct 3

Vin Antico Wine Bar, “Ashley Dawn Solo Show,” modern impressionistic painter seeks to create beauty that invites the beholder to find rest and feel joy. 4pm. 881 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.721.0600.

Alchemia Gallery

College Ride Free Students in 2016!

Marin Society of Artists, “In Your Dreams,” juried fine art exhibit is juried by Michael Azgour. 2pm. 1515 Third St, San Rafael. 415.464.9561.

Bay Model Visitor Center, “Natural Mystic,” Marin photographer Shayne Skower harnesses the power of Mother Nature through the lens of his camera. 1pm. 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.3871.

SONOMA COUNTY

*Your valid ID card is your 2016 sctransit pass.

Oct 2

Rosa artist Lucy Liew displays imaginative landscapes and magical worlds runs through October. 1200 River Rd, Fulton. Sat-Sun, noon to 5pm 707.536.3305.

Through Oct 31, “Marsha Balian Solo Show,” the artist’s representational collages offer a sense of mystery, invention and narrative. 8235 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. Hours vary. 707.795.9753.

Calabi Gallery Through Oct 15, “Summer Show,” featuring works by three Sonoma County artists, Terry Holleman, Bernadette

Howard and Bambi Waterman, who share a sensibility of revering and preserving the natural world. 456 10th St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Chroma Gallery

Through Oct 8, “Flight,” aerialinspired show features original paintings, sculptures, photos and prints by Sonoma County and Bay Area artists. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.293.6051.

Finley Community Center

Through Oct 13, “Cliff Strother: My Year with the Jari Tribesmen of South Vietnam,” the former Army medic shares his story through paintings and photographs. Through Oct 20, “Sonoma County Senior Art Show,” fine art from local seniors is on display. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 6; Sat, 9 to 11am. 707.543.3737.

Fulton Crossing

Through Oct 30, “My Secret Garden,” solo show from Santa

Through Oct 14, “Emil Alzamora: New Works,” New York sculptor explores the human figure in a variety of novel ways. Show includes a video series documenting Alzamora in his studio. 14301 Arnold Dr, Ste 8, Glen Ellen. Thurs-Mon, 10:30am to 5:30pm. 707.933.1300.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Through Oct 16, “Sonoma County Art Trails Preview Exhibit,” showing several works from artists involved in Art Trails. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat-Sun, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sebastopol Gallery

Through Oct 1, “Above & Below – Into the Deep,” watercolor and mixed-media paintings by Susan St. Thomas is inspired by galaxies photographed by the Hubble telescope and the deepest realms of the sea. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

Steele Lane Community Center


Through Oct 16, “Wood, Paper, Ink: Contemporary Woodcuts,” features a group of nationally and internationally recognized artists working in the centuries-old technique of woodcut. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

West County Museum

Through Oct 1, “Sebastopol Bottles,” milk, soda, seltzer, beer and water bottles throughout history are exhibited along with pharmacy and medicine bottles. 261 S Main St, Sebastopol. Thurs-Sun, 1 to 4. 707.829.6711.

MARIN COUNTY Bolinas Museum

Through Oct 16, “Bounty,” exhibit looks at fine food production in coastal Marin, from 1834 to today. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

Gallery Route One

Through Oct 30, “Canto XXV,” immersive art and sculpture exhibit from Diana Marto is inspired by Chinese spirit paper. Shows in conjunction with Cynthia Tom’s “Stories to Tell” and tc moore’s “Reflections.” 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

MarinMOCA

Through Oct 23, “Emerging Artists of Northern California,” five diverse artists display their mutlimedia works. 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 11 to 5. 415.506.0137.

Osher Marin JCC

Through Oct 30, “We Are the Bridge,” exhibit showcases over 30 artists from multiple faith traditions, the majority of whom live and work in the Bay Area. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Red Barn Gallery

Through Oct 7, “The Epic West,” fine-art photographer Darby Hayes exhibits dozens of large-format photographs celebrating the centennial of the National Park Service.

NAPA COUNTY Caldwell Snyder Gallery

Through Oct 15, “What a Long Strange Trip It’s Been,” David Buckingham’s bold, colorful art is part sculpture, part assemblage and made from recycled metal. 1328 Main St, St Helena. Open daily, 10 to 6. 415.531.6755.

di Rosa

Through Oct 2, “Equilibrium,” exhibition explores the work of Paul Kos and reflects on the San Francisco-based artist’s longstanding engagement with the Western landscape. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10 to 6. 707.226.5991.

Comedy Tracy Morgan

The “30 Rock” and “Saturday Night Live” star appears as part of his Picking Up the Pieces tour. Contains adult content. Oct 1, 8pm. $49-$65. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Events Beyond the Book Bash Benefit for Mill Valley Library Foundation features a Pulitzer Prize winner, a bestselling author, an award-winning filmmaker, a master Def Jam slam poet, a local rising music star and others. Sep 30, 8pm. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Calabash

This celebration of gourds, art and the garden benefits Food for Thought with music, food, wine and a silent auction of gourd art by well-known Bay Area artists. Oct 2, 1pm. $50-$55. Food for Thought, 6550 Railroad Ave, Forestville. 707.887.1647.

Chilly Billy Fun Run Hot Rod & Motorcycle Show

Cool cars, motorcycles, live music, BBQ lunch, vendors and a raffle for a Harley Davidson benefits North Bay charity Veterans Housing & Services. Oct 1. Free admission. Sonoma-Marin Fairgrounds,

29

175 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma, ripcityriders.org.

Creole United Festival

Fourth annual event features live music, arts and crafts, kids activities and food vendors offering a variety of authentic Creole cuisines combined with a blend of California favorites and libations. Oct 1, 11am. $20-$25. Lagoon Park, Marin Civic Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. www. creoleunitedfestival.com.

by Kurt Weill

52 W. 6th Street, Santa Rosa CA 95401

and Bertolt Brecht Directed by

Michael R.J. Campbell

Oktoberfest & Car Show Classic cars and German fun mix well in this daylong benefit for the museum that also boasts pretzels, beer, live music and more. Oct 1, 3pm. Free attendance. Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Open Studio & Moving Sale

Artist Cecilia Hallinan opens her studio to the public in preparation to move to a larger space in Petaluma that will help expand her educational outreach and house press and printmaking activities. Oct 1-2, 11am-5pm. Cecilia Hallinan Studio, 2080 Llano Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.796.3045.

Musical Director

Janis Wilson

Choreography by

Serena Flores

Sonoma County Harvest Fair

Forty-second year of celebrating the region’s rich harvest brings award-winning wines, beers and innovative culinary experiences together. Sep 30-Oct 2. $7-$10. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.545.4200.

Walk & Roll to School Day

Schools across Sonoma County join in the world wide celebration of International Walk to School Day, doing their part to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve community health and safety. Oct 5, 7am. various locations, around Sonoma County, Santa Rosa, bikesonoma.org.

Wood, Fiber, Clay Pop-Up Shop

The shop offers unique holidays gifts and handcrafted items by independent makers, vintage finds, and sustainable, fair-trade goods made of natural materials. Oct 1-Dec 23. Oxbow Public Market, 610 First St, Napa.

Zoppe Italian Family Circus

Guests of all ages are welcome to the big tent ) to see old-world

30

Reflection Pools of the Senses: Touch by Bambi Waterman

University Art Gallery

by appointment only. 1 Bear Valley Rd, Pt Reyes Station. 415.464.5218.

456 Tenth St, Santa Rosa • Tue–Sat 11–5 707.781.7070 • calabigallery.com

affordable clothing boutique OPEN 11–6 Mon–Sun 707.242.3027 8200 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati

NOW OPEN!

Your vision… my resources, dedication and integrity… Together, we can catch your dream.

Realtor Coldwell Banker

Suzanne Wandrei

cell: 707.292.9414 www.suzannewandrei.com

Eco Green Certified

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Through Oct 19, “Shadow of the Past,” four artists manipulate physical pieces from the past through assemblage and mixed-media art forms. 415 Steele Ln, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 7; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.543.3282.


A E

( 29

circus acts from seasoned performers including acrobats, clowns, jugglers and more. Oct 1-2. $20-$30. Napa Valley Expo, 575 Third St, Napa. 707.253.4900.

AN ORIGINAL PRODUCTION INSPIRED BY POWERFUL STORIES FROM SRJC STUDENTS

CREATED BY SRJC STUDENTS AND INSTRUCTOR LAURA DOWNING-LEE

Oct 7, 8, 12, 13, 14, 15 at 8PM Oct 9, 15, 16 at 2PM Newman Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College Emeritus Hall, Elliott Avenue, Santa Rosa Campus STUDENT G

TICKETS: $12 - $18 BOX OFFICE: 707.527.4307 ONLINE: theatrearts.santarosa.edu ERNMEN T OV

SEMBLY AS

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | SE PTEMBER 28- O CTO BE R 4, 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

30

Recommended for ages 14 and above. Contains adult content.

Film 1932 Pre-Code Treasures

Cinema & Psyche hosts film studies class that watches and discusses pre-Code essentials from 1932 and focuses on cultural dissolution, moral revolution and film innovation of the era, seen through archetype, symbol and myth. Thurs, 6:30pm. through Sep 29. $110. Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 510.496.6060.

Haunted Sonoma County

Local history has never been so spooky as this new documentary premiering with two showings. Oct 3, 7 and 9pm. $15. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Italian Film Festival

Bohemian 4.3438 x 4.8438 (1/4” square) - color $464.40 per ad Run dates: 9/28, 10/5, 10/12 PDF artwork due 9/23 (before noon)

The fest turns 40 and once again offers eight great films, both comedy and drama, from Italy in Saturday presentations, plus the addition of two Sunday matinees. Through Oct 2. $15/$112 full series. Marin Center Showcase Theatre, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. www.italianfilm.com.

The

Latino Film Festival

JEWELRY OCTOBER 21, 22, 23

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Community Media Center of Marin hosts screenings of select documentary films from the Cine+Mas SF Latino Film Festival. Oct 3-7. Albert J Boro Community Center, 50 Canal St, San Rafael, latinofilmfestival. splashthat.com.

Making a Killing: Guns, Greed & the NRA Film describes our country’s gun culture, who supports it, who profits from it and the lives that are hurt by it. It also offers ways to make our country safer from gun violence. Sep 28, 11am and Sep 29, 7pm. Free. St Patrick’s Episcopal Church, 9000 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood. 707.833.4228.

Saltwater Buddha

Film chronicles Jaimal Yogis’ journey from the suburbs to jungle communes and

the Pacific Ocean. Premiere includes live music, short film “Thank Yo, Surf Again” and filmmaker Lara Popyack and Yogis in person. Sep 29, 7pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Wounded Land

The Jewish Community Center of Santa Rosa kicks off its 21st annual Jewish Film Festival with the riveting Israeli police drama. Oct 5, 1 and 7:30pm. $10. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol, jccsoco.org.

Food & Drink Cheese Talk & Tasting

Kiri Fisher of the Cheese School of San Francisco will be giving a mini-class and creating a platter featuring three cheeses followed by a cheese tasting. Oct 4, 7pm. Diesel Bookstore, 2419 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.785.8177.

Dog Bar

Ongoing happy hour event with treats for you and your pup benefits Napa Humane and includes special guests discussing healthy dog lifestyles. First Tues of every month, 5pm. through Oct 4. $25. Bardessono Hotel & Spa, 6525 Yount St, Yountville. 707.204.6000.

Hands Across the Valley

Taste the latest from noted chefs, restaurateurs and winemakers while participating in silent and live auctions, dancing and enjoying a special VIP dinner. Oct 1, 4pm. $125$250. Charles Krug Winery, 2800 Main St, St Helena. 707.253.0868.

Healing Foods Basics Class

Class offers an overview of Ceres’ nutrient-rich approach to healthy eating while providing a fun environment and loving community. Wed, Sep 28, 6pm. $10-$35. Ceres Community Project, 7351 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.8295.

Rosh Hashanah Gourmet Honey Tasting Learn about local honey about the other symbols and rituals for Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. Sep 28, 3pm. Free. Oliver’s Market, 560 Montecito Ctr, Santa Rosa. 707.537.7123.

X2 Release Harvest Celebration

Experience harvest at its finest with live music, grape stomping and uniquely paired BBQ bites. Oct 1, 2pm. $100$115. Paraduxx, 7257 Silverado Trail, Napa. 707.945.0890.

For Kids Children’s Mask & Mime Performance artist Eliot Fintushel’s children’s show explores body language through mime illusions and more. Oct 1, 2pm. $5-$15. Healdsburg Center for the Arts, 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1970.

Magical Moonshine Theatre: The Carnival Mask Puppet Show

Oct 1, 11am. Healdsburg Library, 139 Piper St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3772. Oct 1, 2pm. Santa Rosa Central Library, 211 E St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.0831.

Not-So-Scary Halloween Show

Come in costume! Oct 1, 2pm. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Lectures Adults Abused as Children Anonymous

A safe and confidential place for healing in a nonsectarian setting. Thurs, 6:15pm. Free. First United Methodist Church, 1551 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa.

CA Ballot Measures Pros & Cons Discussion

The League of Women Voters of Marin County presents nonpartisan information on each of the 17 ballot measures. Oct 3, 12pm. Free. Marin Commons, 1600 Los Gamos Drive, Ste 200, San Rafael. Public forum discusses several measures on the upcoming ballot, presented by the League of Women Voters of Sonoma County. Oct 5, 6pm. Rohnert Park Council Chambers, 130 Avram Ave, Rohnert Park, 707.588.2226.

Cameraperson

Photographer Kirsten Johnson presents her debut film, which explores the complex relationships between filmmakers and their subjects. Oct 1, 4pm. Smith Rafael Film


Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Candidate Forum

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Santa Rosa City Council candidates talk and take questions in this forum hosted by the League of Women Voters of Sonoma County. Sep 29, 6pm. Santa Rosa City Council Chambers, 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa, 707.543.3282.

Holistic Veterinary Medicine Integrative Wellness Care

Chinese Cultural Revolution: After Fifty Years

Conference offers a critical evaluation of the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution with presenters bringing direct experience and/or knowledge to advance our understanding. Oct 1-2. Free. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2880.

Forum: P residential Politics

Dominican University’s chair of political science Alison Howard leads a lively discussion. Oct 2, 4:30pm. Free. Mill Valley Community Church, 8 Olive St, Mill Valley.

SF Bay American Cetacean Society Talk

Explore new insights into the feeding behavior of humpback whales from five oceans, fin whales from the Atlantic and blue whales from California. Sep 29, 7pm. $5. Bay Model Visitor Center, 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.3871.

Readings Angelico Hall

Sep 28, 7pm, “A Truck Full of Money” with Tracy Kidder, copresented with Book Passage. $35. Dominican University, 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael 415.457.4440.

Book Passage

Sep 28, 7pm, “Here I Am” with Jonathan Safran Foer. $30. Sep 29, 6pm, “Tell Me the Number Before Infinity” with Dena and Becky Taylor. Sep 30, 12pm, “The Nightingale” with Kristin Hannah, a literary lunch event. $55. Sep 30, 7pm, “Accidental Life” with Terry McDonell. Oct 1, 1pm, “The Death of Fred Astaire” with Leslie Lawrence. Oct 1, 7pm, “The Best Travel Writing: Volume 11” with various authors. Oct 3, 7pm, “Risuko” with David Kudler. Oct 4, 7pm, “Chasing Portraits” with Elizabeth Rynecki. Oct

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Harvest Fair showcases local bounty A tasty tradition 42 years strong, the Sonoma County Harvest Fair is back this weekend for three days of food, wine, beer and family fun. The highlight of this year’s fair is the Wine Country Marketplace, a one-stop shopping experience where you can browse, sample, buy and take home the best local wines and food while enjoying chef demonstrations from cheese master Sheana Davis, John Ash & Co. executive chef Thomas Schmidt and pastry chef Doug Cavaliere of Costeaux French Bakery in Healdsburg. Another favorite of the fair is the annual World Championship Grape Stomp. A grand prize of $1,500 will get the competitive juices flowing. Sign up with a friend, decide who’s going to be the stomper and who’s going to be the swabby, and make sure you dress up in a colorful costume for creative flair. There’s even a kids round for stompers under 13. Wine and food seminars, live music, a classic car show, a rotten apple catapult, an art show and sale and a harvest pumpkin patch are all part of the fair. Celebrate harvest season Sonoma County–style Friday, Sept. 30, through Sunday, Oct. 2, at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Road, Santa Rosa. Friday, 4–9pm; Saturday–Sunday, 11am–5pm. $5 gate admission; some events cost extra. 707.545.4200.—Charlie Swanson

5, 7pm, “Manitou Canyon” with William Kent Krueger. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Cloverdale Performing Arts Center Sep 29, 7pm, “Shakespeare &

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Stein Walk into a Bar” with Katherine Hastings, a Books on Stage event with host Lisa Michaels. $10 donation. 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale 707.829.2214.

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Sep 28, 6pm, “Bright Precious Days” with Jay McInerney, copresented with Copperfield’s Books. $40-$50. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg 707.431.2800. AUTHORIZED RETAILERS OF THESE & OTHER FINE PRODUCTS

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Napa Bookmine

Sep 29, 7pm, “The Defiant” with M Quint. Oct 2, 2pm, “What Do You Notice Otis?” with Joel Kling. Oct 4, 6pm, Poetry Book Club, read and discuss “Diving into the Wreck” by Adrienne Rich. 964 Pearl St, Napa 707.733.3199.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books

Sep 29, 4pm, “Otis and the Kittens” with Loren Long. Oct 5, 7pm, “To the Bright Edge of the World” with Eowyn Ivey. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Point Reyes Presbyterian Church

Sep 30, 7pm, “Swimming in the Sink” with Lynne Cox. Free. 11445 Shoreline Hwy, Point Reyes Station 415.663.1349.

Readers’ Books

Sep 30, 7pm, “Uncivil Liberties” with Georgia Kelly, presented by Praxis Peace Institute. Free. 130 E Napa St, Sonoma 707.939.1779.

Rebound Bookstore

Sep 28, 7pm, Hand to Mouth/ WORDS SPOKEN OUT, with authors Susan Cohen and Terry Lucas. 1611 Fourth St, San Rafael 415.482.0550.

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Sep 29, 7:30pm, “Treasure of the Heart” with Kalia Chan. $5. 130 S Main St, Sebastopol 707.829.8871.

Sep 29, 7pm, “Swimming in the Sink” with Lynne Cox. Oct 4, 7pm, “Inhabited” with Charlie Quimby. Oct 5, 4pm, “Hilo #2: Saving the Whole Wide World “ and “Lucy and Andy Neanderthal” with Judd Winick and Jeffrey Brown. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

West Marine Sausalito Sharon Olson D.O.

Sep 29, 6pm, “Everything You Wanted to Know About

Standup Paddleboarding” with Suzy Cooney. 192 Donahue St, Marin City.

Theater As You Like It

Petaluma Shakespeare Company presents the comical farce as part of the “Shakespeare by the River” series. An equity approved project. Through Oct 1. Free. Foundry Wharf Green, 1st & H Street, Petaluma, petalumashakespeare.org.

August: Osage County

MTC opens its 50th season with a performance of the celebrated family drama, its first Bay Area professional production since 2009. Through Oct 9. $22-$60. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

Baskerville

Ingenious, fast-paced Sherlock Holmes comedy/mystery features five actors portraying more than 40 characters. Through Oct 9. $16-$26. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

I Hate Hamlet

An actor gets to play Shakespeare’s most popular character; the only problem is he hates it! That and a ghostly roommate make for a fun production from Sonoma Arts Live. Through Oct 9. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma, sonomaartslive.org.

Masks, Inside & Behind Performance artist Eliot Fintushel’s solo show explores human interaction through masks, mime and improv. Fri, Sep 30, 8pm. $5-$15. Healdsburg Center for the Arts, 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1970.

Medea

The College of Marin drama department presents the West Coast premiere of a new version of the classic tale by Euripides. Sep 30-Oct 16. $10$20. College of Marin Studio Theatre, 835 College Avenue, Kentfield. 415.485.9385.

REAL

The Imaginists explore dreams, nightmares, reality and power in a revamp of their 2013 original production, performed in Spanish and English by six actors playing 20 different characters. Through Oct 8. $5-$25. The Imaginists, 461

Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.7554.

Run for Your Wife

A London cabbie juggles two wives and two lives in this uproarious comedy. Through Oct 9. $12-$18. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.2214.

A Streetcar Named Desire

Masterful drama from Tennessee Williams depicting the descent of the fragile Blanche Dubois opens NTC’s theatrical season. Through Oct 2. $12-$27. Novato Theater Company, 5240 Nave Dr, Novato. 415.883.4498.

Sweeney Todd

In 19th-century London, the barber Sweeney Todd vows revenge for his false imprisonment by the evil Judge Turpin in this brilliantly bloody musical. Through Oct 9. $10$30. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

Sylvia

Ross Valley Players kicks off their season with the modern relationship comedy about a man, a woman and a charming dog who enters their life. Through Oct 16. $15-$27. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross, rossvalleyplayers. com.

We Interrupt This Life to Bring You

Writer, performance artist, choral singer, hospice social worker and psychotherapist Christina Ingenito presents her one-woman show about the three words none of us want to hear. Sat, Oct 1, 5pm. $15$20. Moj-San, 301 Wilson St, Petaluma, 808.333.0462.

Wrestling Jerusalem

Aaron Davidman’s solo performance is a personal story that grapples with the complexities of identity, history and social justice. Oct 4, 7:30pm. Evert B. Person Theater, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.


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The Big Squeeze Future looks bleak for small-time growers BY BEN ADAMS

D

ue to major changes in the law, everyone in the cannabis industry will soon have a choice to make: get licensed, stay (or go) black market or quit.

As an attorney, I cannot, and will not, recommend anything other than full compliance with state and local law for those who want to be involved. Unfortunately, it is my opinion that many of those who opt to get licensed will still get squeezed out of the industry. There are two main ways that I see this happening. First, I don’t think the average person realizes the storm of bureaucracy that is approaching. The industry is about to go from basically unregulated to highly regulated. Costs are about to go up. Way up. Margins will drop considerably. This is inevitable. While there are many factors that will influence how long this storm lasts, I see a giant

reshuffling of the deck. Many of those in the industry, and who want to remain, will simply not be able to. Many new people will come in. This is because there will soon be many hands in the pockets of growers. Growers will either have to accept dramatically reduced margins or increase prices. The age-old tension then comes into play: how much can you raise prices without customers turning to the black market? The second way people may be squeezed out is if local land-use ordinances become too restrictive. I worry that local government will greatly narrow where commercial cannabis activity (and especially cultivation) is allowed. It’s important to remember that government will have many voices in its ear, including those opposed to the industry. The wine industry is a powerful one in this county—what position will it take? Local government may simply legislate many farmers out of existence; they simply won’t be able to use their land for cultivation. This is a onetwo punch because we live in a county with insane land prices. Most farmers simply won’t be able to afford to sell land zoned “agriculture-residential” and buy land zoned “diverse agriculture.” What will happen to all those independent small farmers who produce just enough to support their families? Will they be driven out entirely? Or will they be forced to work for those who can navigate the new rules and have the capital reserves to survive a period of low margins? I am not confident in the future of the small farmer. The short term will likely be filled with unexpected expenses and dislocation. Prepare yourself! Ben Adams is a local cannabis attorney. He has been practicing law for almost 20 years and concentrates his practice on cannabis compliance and defense.


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Astrology For the week of September 28

ARIES (March 21–April 19) What’s the difference between a love warrior and a love worrier? Love warriors work diligently to keep enhancing their empathy, compassion and emotional intelligence. Love worriers fret so much about not getting the love they want that they neglect to develop their intimacy skills. Love warriors are always vigilant for how their own ignorance may be sabotaging togetherness, while love worriers dwell on how their partner’s ignorance is sabotaging togetherness. Love warriors stay focused on their relationship’s highest goals, while love worriers are preoccupied with every little relationship glitch. I bring this to your attention, Aries, because the next seven weeks will be an excellent time to become less of a love worrier and more of a love warrior. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

How will you deal with a provocative opportunity to reinvent and reinvigorate your approach to work? My guess is that if you ignore this challenge, it will devolve into an obstruction. If you embrace it, on the other hand, you will be led to unforeseen improvements in the way you earn money and structure your daily routine. Here’s the paradox: Being open to seemingly impractical considerations will ultimately turn out to be quite practical.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) Is it possible that you’re on the verge of reclaiming some of the innocent wisdom you had as a child? Judging from the current astrological omens, I suspect it is. If all goes well, you will soon be gifted with a long glimpse of your true destiny—a close replica of the vision that bloomed in you at a tender age. And this will, in turn, enable you to actually see magic unicorns and play with mischievous fairies and eat clouds that dip down close to the earth. And not only that, having a holy vision of your original self will make you even smarter than you already are. For example, you could get insights about how to express previously inexpressible parts of yourself. You might discover secrets about how to attract more of the love you have always felt deprived of. CANCER (June 21–July 22) I’m not asking you to tell me about the places and situations where you feel safe and fragile and timid. I want to know about where you feel safe and strong and bold. Are there sanctuaries that nurture your audacious wisdom? Are there natural sites that tease out your primal willpower and help you clarify your goals? Go to those power spots. Allow them to exalt you with their transformative blessings. Pray and sing and dance there. And maybe find a new oasis to excite and incite you, as well. Your creative savvy will bloom in November if you nurture yourself now with this magic. LEO (July 23–August 22) One of your old reliable formulas may temporarily be useless or even deceptive. An ally could be withholding an important detail from you. Your favorite psychological crutch is in disrepair, and your go-to excuse is no longer viable. And yet I think you’re going to be just fine, Leo. Plan B will probably work better than Plan A. Secondary sources and substitutes should provide you with all the leverage you need. And I bet you will finally capitalize on an advantage that you have previously neglected. For best results, be vigilant for unexpected help. VIRGO (August 23–September 22) Attention! Warning! One of your signature fears is losing its chokehold on your imagination. If this trend continues, its power to scare you may diminish more than 70 percent by Nov. 1. And then what will you do? How can you continue to plug away at your goals if you don’t have worry and angst and dread to motivate you? I suppose you could shop around for a replacement fear—a new prod to keep you on the true and righteous path. But you might also want to consider an alternative: the possibility of drawing more of the energy you need by feeding your lust for life. LIBRA (September 23-Oct. 22) Thank you for all the entertainment you’ve provided in the past 12 months, Libra. Since shortly before your birthday in 2015, you have taken lively and gallant actions to rewrite history. You have banished a pesky demon and

BY ROB BREZSNY

repaired a hole in your soul. You’ve educated the most immature part of yourself and nurtured the most neglected part of yourself. To my joyful shock, you have even worked to transform a dysfunctional romantic habit that in previous years had subtly undermined your ability to get the kind of intimacy you seek. What’s next? Here’s my guess: an unprecedented exemption from the demands of the past.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

Are you able to expand while you are contracting, and vice versa? Can you shed mediocre comforts and also open your imagination to gifts that await you at the frontier? Is it possible to be skeptical toward ideas that shrink your world and people who waste your time, even as you cultivate optimism and innocence about the interesting challenges ahead of you? Here’s what I think, Scorpio: Yes, you can. At least for right now, you are more flexible and multifaceted than you might imagine.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) You Sagittarians are famous for filling your cups so full they’re in danger of spilling over. Sometimes the rest of us find this kind of cute. On other occasions, we don’t enjoy getting wine splashed on our shoes. But I suspect that in the coming weeks, the consequences of your tendency to overflow will be mostly benign— perhaps even downright beneficial. So I suggest you experiment with the pleasures of surging and gushing. Have fun as you escape your niches and transcend your containers. Give yourself permission to seek adventures that might be too extravagant for polite company. Now here’s a helpful reminder from your fellow Sagittarian, poet Emily Dickinson: “You cannot fold a flood and put it in a drawer.”

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) I believe that during the coming weeks you will have an extra amount of freedom from fate. The daily grind won’t be able to grind you down. The influences that typically tend to sap your joie de vivre will leave you in peace. Are you ready to take full advantage of this special dispensation? Please say YES YES A THOUSAND TIMES YES. Be alert for opportunities to rise above the lowest common denominators. Be aggressive about rejecting the trivial questions that trap everyone in low expectations. Here are my predictions: Your willpower will consistently trump your conditioning. You won’t have to play by the old rules, but will instead have extra sovereignty to invent the future. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you can expect an unlikely coincidence or two in the coming days. You should also be alert for helpfully prophetic dreams, clear telepathic messages and pokes from tricky informers. In fact, I suspect that useful hints and clues will be swirling in extra abundance, sometimes in the form of direct communications from reliable sources, but on occasion as mysterious signals from strange angels. PISCES (February 19–March 20) You know that

inner work you’ve been doing with such diligence? I’m referring to those psycho-spiritual transformations you have been attending to in the dark . . . the challenging but oddly gratifying negotiations you’ve been carrying on with your secret self . . . the steady, strong future you’ve been struggling to forge out of the chaos? Well, I foresee you making a big breakthrough in the coming weeks. The progress you’ve been earning, which up until now has been mostly invisible to others, will finally be seen and appreciated. The vows you uttered so long ago will, at last, yield at least some of the tangible results you’ve pined for.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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Taste our Bakery & Deli Winners…

Oliver’s Bakery’s team of bakers and decorators combine their many talents with some of the finest ingredients available to produce award-winning cakes and desserts that are perfect for your event, be that dinner for one or a huge wedding!

Award Winners

Taste the

BEST...

We pride ourselves in having professionally trained chefs running the kitchens at each of our stores, which means you can expect great quality in every purchase. We like to think of each and every entry into the annual

Best of Show

Sonoma County Harvest Fair as a work of art and a masterpiece of creative expression by our team members.

At Oliver’s Market, we’ve worked very hard and spent years building and cultivating a reputation of quality in Sonoma County. We have a wonderful team of creative & talented bakers and chefs and buyers & planners & doers and thinkers, too.

Real Food. Real People.®

…At the Harvest FAir or Oliver’s! 9230 Old Redwood Highway • Windsor • 687-2050 | 546 E. Cotati Avenue • Cotati • 795-9501 | 560 Montecito Center • Santa Rosa • 537-7123 | 461 Stony Point Road • Santa Rosa • 284-3530

North Bay Bohemian  

September 28-October 4

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