Page 1


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FE BR UARY 3-9, 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

2

Why Do They Keep Coming to This Doctor?… (who admits to curing no one)

Dear Friend, I wanted to let everyone know what happened while I was in college. It was a moment that changed my life forever. But before I tell you about my experience, I wanted to tell you my story from the start. Let me start by explaining the photo in this letter, I’m the guy in the middle, Dr. Taatjes. You know when I meet people in town and they usually say, “Oh yeah, I know you, you’re Dr. Taatjes. You’ve been in Petaluma for years…” Well, that’s me. Twenty-seven years ago something happened to me that changed my life forever. Let me tell you my story.

I was studying pre-Med in college, in hopes of becoming a medical doctor. Things were looking up, and life was good, until things took a turn for the worse. I began to have terrible back and stomach problems. For a young guy, I felt pretty rotten. My back hurt so badly that I had a hard time even concentrating in class. I was miserable. The medical doctors tried different drugs, but they only made me feel like I was in a “cloud.” I was just not getting better. A friend of mine convinced me to give a chiropractor a try. The chiropractor did an my spine. The adjustment didn’t hurt, it actually felt good. I got relief, and I soon was off all medication. It worked so well that I decided, then and there, to become a chiropractor myself.

Now for my kids, Hayden and Henry. They have been under chiropractic care their entire lives. And, unlike most other kids in their class, they never get the “common” childhood illnesses like ear infections, asthma and allergies. In fact, they have never taken a drug in their lives. And they are now 19 and 21!

It’s strange how life is, because now people come to see me with their back problems and stomach problems. They come to me with their headaches, migraines, chronic pain, neck pain, shoulder/arm pain, whiplash from car accidents, asthma, allergies, numbness in limbs, athletic injuries, just to name a few. If drugs make people well, then those who take the most should be the healthiest, but that simply isn’t the case. With chiropractic

Dr. Taajes with his sons we don’t add anything to the body or take anything from it. We find interference in the nervous system and remove it thus enhancing the healing capacities of the body. We get tremendous results…it really is as simple as that. Here’s what some of my patients had to say:

“I have had a problem with migraines as well as low back pain. Even after seeing doctors and other health professionals, the pains remained. After coming to Dr. Joel, they have helped tremendously. They even take away my migraines. They’re great!” (Judy E.) “I came in pending laser surgery for two herniated discs. Over a few months here the need for surgery subsided, and the pain has subsided to a mild discomfort with occasional morning stiffness. Over all, I feel better visit after visit. It’s a gradual process.” (Jaime O.) Several times a day patients thank me for helping them with their health problems. But I can’t really take the credit. Find out for yourself and benefit from an AMAZING OFFER. Look, it shouldn’t cost you an arm and a leg to correct your health. You are going to write a check to someone for your health care expenses, you may as well write one for a lesser amount for chiropractic. When you bring in this

ADVERTISEMENT

article between February 3. 2016 through March 2, 2016, you will receive my entire new patient exam for $27. That’s with x-rays, exam, report of findings…the whole ball of wax. This exam could cost you $ 350 elsewhere. Great care at a great fee…

Please, I hope that there’s no misunderstanding about quality of care just because I have a lower exam fee. You’ll get great care at a great fee. My qualifications… I’m a graduate of Northwestern College of Chiropractic who regularly goes to monthly educational chiropractic seminars. I’ve been entrusted to take care of tiny babies to neighbors that you may know. I just have that low exam fee to help more people who need care.

My associate, Dr. Linzey, and I are ready to see if we can help you. Our office is both friendly and warm and we try our best to make you feel at home. We have a wonderful service, at an exceptional fee. Our office is called REDWOOD CHIROPRACTIC. Our office is located at 937 Lakeville Street, Petaluma, phone number is 707-763-8910. We would love to help you. Call Alex or Wendy today for an appointment. We can help you. Thank you.

– Dr. Joel Taatjes

redwoodchiropractic.com


3

Do you have, or want to have, a cannabis business?

Cannabis Collectives are about to be abolished.

Come in and experience music at its best

• Growing • Manufacturing • Dispensing • Transporting & Distributing cannabis will soon be a for-profit business

You need an attorney who can help you obtain a license and stay compliant. Attorney Benjaman Adams has been a cannabis attorney for years. Don’t make a mistake now that you could cost you your license later.

Call today for your consultation! 707.999.9999 Ext. 7

LavishHiFi

a division of Lavish Automation

Tues–Sat: 10–6:30pm 1044 4th Street, Santa Rosa 707.595.2020 | www.LavishHiFi.com 1510 Fourth Street • Santa Rosa • www.thepotlawyers.com

Kanji “Love” Pendant

A gift of chocolate with every purchase while supplies last

We Moved! Come see our new digs at 9070 Windsor Road, next to Starbucks on the Windsor Town Green 9070 Windsor Road • Windsor • 707 836 1840 MarkShimizudesign.com

Like us on Facebook for fall Special Events

CUSTOM ELECTRONIC DESIGN & INSTALATION ASSOCIATION

Member

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 3-9, 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

AB 266 CHANGES EVERYTHING!


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FE BR UARY 3-9, 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

4

Super Bowl Feb 7

Sonoma Staycation

Bohemian

Valentineʼs Day

847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288

Editor Stett Holbrook, ext. 202

News Editor Kick off the weekend with Special Offer to dancing in Lounge Sat Locals/North Bay night with UB 707… Residents Only Feb–March 31, Sun–Thurs • Sunday  Champagne Hot rate dates on web site Brunch only from $99–$119 • Super Bowl Game • Salsa Lessons /Dancing Book Hot Rate Dates: Go to Flamingoresort.com Spend the night in a newly remodeled room web site Specials tab for reservations. or Exec. King or Suite Exec Kings +$20, Suites +$50 from $134 FlamingoResort.com

Tom Gogola, ext. 106

Valentineʼs Day Dinner in the Terrace Grill Feb 14 $55 pp + tax, tip

Arts Editor Charlie Swanson, ext. 203

Reservations: 707.523.4745 • Seatings begin at 5pm • Reservations required • Prix Fixe Menu includes : Salad, Intermezzo, Entrée & Dessert Spend Valentines night in a newly remodeled Superior or Exec King or Suite from $ 152 Website Relax at the Spa Rose Facial or Couples Massage

Copy Editor Gary Brandt, ext. 150

Contributors Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, John Flynn, James Knight, Molly Oleson, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow, Flora Tsapovsky

Design Director Kara Brown

Art Director Tabi Zarrinnaal

Production Operations Manager Sean George

Senior Designer Jackie Mujica, ext. 213

Layout Artist Gary Brandt

2777 4th Street, Santa Rosa | FlamingoResort.com | 707.545.8530

Advertising Director Lisa Marie Santos, ext. 205

Advertising Account Managers

Fine Dining For Wild Birds

Your vision… my resources, dedication and integrity… Together, we can catch your dream.

Realtor Coldwell Banker

Suzanne Wandrei

Eco Green Certified

cell: 707.292.9414 www.suzannewandrei.com

Love &

Saxx 71 Brookwood Ave., Santa Rosa 707.576.0861 Mon–Sat 10am–6pm, Sun 11am–4pm • www.wbu.com/santarosa

Birdseed • Feeders • Birdbaths • Optics • Nature Gifts • Books

Jack Victor • Ibiza • Haupt • Tommy Bahama

Open every day 150 Kentucky St. Petaluma 707.765.1715 211 Corte Madera Town Center, Corte Madera 415.924.1715 • louisthomas.com

Augusto León, ext. 212 Mercedes Murolo, ext. 207 Lynda Rael, ext. 204

Sales Operations Manager Deborah Bonar, ext. 215

Publisher Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2016 Metrosa Inc.

Cover illustration by Gina Contreras. Cover design by Tabi Zarrinnaal.


5

Storm Water & Erosion Landscape Services DESPERATELY SEEKING

nb Kids! Once upon a time people put ads in the newspapers to get dates! p15.

‘Oh, um, pardon me, Mabel, could you take the kids while I go see a whore ?’ N EWS P 8

Time for Tea D I N I NG P 10

Love in the Time of Newsprint

Erosion Control

Sediment Control

Run-Off Management

Water Diversion

Structure/Founda�on Protec�on

Minor Flood Control

(707) 824-0836

PermacultureArtisans.com

Where Wine Country Buys Wine

COV ER STORY P15

This Wine Is Taken SW I R L P 13 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Dining p10 Wineries p13 Swirl p13

Cover Feature p15 Culture Crush p20 Arts & Ideas p21 Stage p22 Film p23

Music p24 Clubs & Concerts p25 Arts & Events p28 Classified p31 Astrology p31

Your New Year’s Headquarters!

Expert Advice on Wine, Beer & Spirits | Wine Shipping Available | Amazingly Low Prices 3331 Industrial Drive | Santa Rosa | 707.528.1161 | bottlebarn.com Open Mon–Sat 9–7:30, Sun 9–6

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 3-9, 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Before: We AnƟcipate During: We Respond A�er: We Repair

iño Solutio N ns El


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FE BR UARY 3-9, 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

6

Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

Kudos Come Lately Very belatedly, I want to commend your rant on the American electorate, “Not Ready” (Dec. 30), partly because I agree with it, point by point. But also because I thought it was one of the clearest and most insightful things I’ve read on current politics. I don’t read a hell of a lot and see very little TV news, but I

Before I could get around to writing this, I got hung up reading “Condemned Men Talking” (Jan. 15). That took me a while; because the subject matter is so unpleasant, I set it aside for a bit. Not a fun read, but a fine reporting and writing job on a tough subject.

face masks as protection against tossed feces or other prisoner responses to the reporters’ presence. It wasn’t clear if you wore one or whether a pair of eyeglasses was considered protection enough, if you wear glasses. And I don’t think you reported the general reception by the prisoners. Did anyone throw feces, spit, curse? It seemed worth mentioning one way or another.

I did wind up with a couple of questions. You mentioned being issued goggles or

The other question was about the inmate you almost interviewed, only to

read the New York Times daily. You made your points beautifully.

THIS MODERN WORLD

learn from the escorting officer later that he “was the very inmate who ended those officers’ careers.” I’m guessing Lt. Robinson didn’t provide any details about how the inmate ended those careers, but it wasn’t clear whether you or any other reporter asked him and he declined to answer or whether no one bothered to ask. Minor details in a fine and comprehensive report.

MARTIN MCREYNOLDS Santa Rosa

By Tom Tomorrow Tom Gogola responds: No inmates threw anything at the reporters. I wore glasses, and the inmate in question had committed acts of violence.

Speaking for the Trees I am feeling pretty angry that our Santa Rosa Council has decided to cut the trees down in downtown. They say the trees need to be cut to make room for more parking and two new streets, which in my humble opinion will create more traffic jams. Was there any plan to even look and see if the trees could be saved? I honestly don’t know. And I don’t need Chris Smith to tell me the plans to revitalize downtown Santa Rosa have been on the agenda for years. But I don’t remember reading about the trees’ need to be cut. If this had been mentioned earlier, I am sure many residents would have voiced our concerns long ago. I will no longer patronize the business merchants who said yes to cutting down the trees.

MIKE SHEA Santa Rosa

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


in time for Valentine’s Day!

The Green Way Southeast Greenway is a great opportunity for open space BY TONY WHITE This could be the pivotal year for the Southeast Greenway Campaign, a community-based effort to convert the Highway 12 right-of-way in Santa Rosa into a two-mile greenway connecting Farmers Lane with Spring Lake. The Southeast Greenway offers a great opportunity to convert vacant land into a valuable resource that will benefit the whole community, providing alternative transportation through bike and pedestrian paths, an educational resource, open space for recreation and community gardens, and a restored natural habitat with three streams, oak woodlands and grasslands. It will also provide an east-west link from Sonoma Valley to the SMART path and to West County trails. Studies show that, besides offering new possibilities for exercise and recreation, similar greenways in other communities are an economic asset, attracting tourists as well as employers seeking quality amenities. Since Caltrans has abandoned plans to extend the freeway and the Santa Rosa City Council voted unanimously to initiate a general plan amendment to rezone the property, there will be public meetings this year to determine the best use of the land, appraisals will be prepared to arrive at a fair price, and efforts will be launched for its transfer to local ownership. The Greenway Campaign was recently awarded a Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance grant from the National Park Service to promote the Greenway story through the media, and completed a very successful fundraising effort this fall. This year’s campaign kicks off with a community event called “Southeast Greenway 2016: The Time Is Now” on Feb. 20, from 10am to noon, at Montgomery High School in Santa Rosa. The meeting will provide an opportunity for members of the community to learn more about the Greenway and how to participate in the planning and fundraising process. David Koehler, the new executive director of Sonoma Land Trust, the Greenway’s fiscal sponsor, will give a talk called “Greenways: Their Power to Connect Us.” Those interested in attending this free event can register at southeastgreenway.org. Tony White is a retired Sonoma State history professor living in Santa Rosa and a volunteer on the Southeast Greenway Campaign. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Smooth those lip lines and plump up your kisser!

Restylane Lip Treatment —only $465! $

545 value. Must call by Feb. 14.

LOVE YOUR LIPS for Valentine’s Day. There’s a lot of pucker in this offer!

707.575.1626 DAVID E. MARCUS, M.D. Cosmetic Surgery & Laser Center 1128 Sonoma Avenue, Santa Rosa, California drdavidmarcus.com

Voted Best Plastic Surgeon in the North Bay Bohemian Readers Poll 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015

ANIMAL HEALING ARTS Holistic Veterinary Medicine Integrative Wellness Care Over 18 years experience

Dr. Lisa Pesch • Dr. Ilsi Medearis 5430 Commerce Blvd., Suite 1K, Rohnert Park AnimalHealingArts.net • 707.584.PETS (7387)

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 3-9, 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Rants

Luscious Lips

7


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FE BR UARY 3-9, 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

8

Paper THE

ILLEGAL USE OF HANDS Contrary to popular belief, big sporting events like the Super Bowl don’t lead to a rash of sex trafficking.

Sex Fumble

Everyday prostitutes caught up in human-trafficking hysteria around the Super Bowl BY JOHN FLYNN

S

ex trafficking has become a major focus of Bay Area law-enforcement agencies in recent months. They’ve been especially fretful leading up to the Super Bowl at Santa Clara’s Levi’s Stadium this weekend. The marquee event and human trafficking are connected by widespread predictions that

hordes of cash-flush chauvinists will swarm into town for the costumed war play, then ravish tens of thousands of women and children—brought here against their will—to quell their surging testosterone. The problem is it just isn’t true. Maggie McNeill, an “unretired call girl” and nationally published writer, has been debunking this myth ever since its first rumblings at the 2004 Athens Olympics. At the 2006 World Cup in Germany,

human rights organizations estimated that 40,000 prostitutes would flock to the event. By the time of the 2010 Super Bowl in Miami, the number had stayed the same, except that it was no longer voluntary prostitutes, but captive women and children. “It morphed,” McNeill says. “It became a more and more interesting lie—because force, fraud and coercion are more interesting than voluntary prostitution. Voluntary

prostitution, that’s old hat. It’s known. Nobody cares about that.” The hysteria has led to shortterm prevention efforts. During the 2012 Super Bowl, host city Indianapolis passed harsher sex laws, trained 3,400 people to recognize the signs of human trafficking and distributed 40,000 bars of soap branded with the trafficking hotline number to all area hotels. Authorities made 68 commercial sex arrests; two qualified as human-trafficking cases. During the 2015 Super Bowl, Phoenix law enforcement identified 71 adult prostitutes, arrested 27 sex solicitors and found nine underage sex workers who may or may not have been trafficked. A soon-to-be-released Stanford case study of the last five Super Bowl cities confirms that there is no significant statistical basis for the claim that sex trafficking, or the demand for paid sex, increases around marquee sporting events. The Super Bowl sex-trafficking sirens fly in the face of conventional prostitution economics. Most sex workers build a cache of reliable clients that provide most of their income through steady yearround visits. For the myth to be true, traffickers would have to travel from event to event, board their captives in hotels at inflated rates, advertise to attract dozens of new-in-town customers, then charge less than the local prostitutes to undercut the competition. All while law enforcement is on its most alert status. “It’s just not a viable business model,” McNeill says. “From an economic standpoint, the whole trafficking myth is bogus. It doesn’t make sense.” Plus the market is thin, McNeill says. Road-tripping bros blow their life savings to pack themselves 10 to a room. Many can’t afford paid sex, much less a private space for the deed. And other potential customers are often family men with the whole brood in tow. “What are they going to say? ‘Oh, um, pardon me, Mabel, could you take the kids while I go to see a whore?’ It’s ridiculous,” McNeill says. “Trade shows, that’s where


it’s a completely different situation. The smugglers keep their passport and put them into a situation where they’re being exploited for their labor and they don’t have the freedom to leave.” Authorities are working to develop awareness strategies ahead of Super Bowl 50. Santa Clara County funded and published a 12-minute movie detailing red flags that might signal human trafficking, but the finished product reeks of amateurish iMovie editing and plods along far too slowly for the modern attention span. It has been viewed fewer than 900 times.

‘From an economic standpoint, the whole trafficking myth is bogus.’ But measures like this are considered necessary because trafficking victims cannot identify themselves. In an effort to do something about this concealed crime, California shifted its focus to the sex trafficking of minors and passed Proposition 35 in November 2012. The law beefed up the penalties for sex trafficking, registered the convicted as sex offenders and funneled any funds received from raised fines into law enforcement and victim services. Prosecutors no longer had to prove force, fraud or coercion for survivors under 18, because they’re too young to consent to any form of sex. Following this, anti-trafficking efforts jumped, but as antitrafficking agencies patrol websites linked to prostitution, they sweep up voluntary prostitutes in their nets. In 2013 and 2014, the Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Office arrested five prostitutes total. In 2015, they arrested 31, a more than six-fold increase in half the time.

Sex worker Maxine Doogan fumes over the increased arrests brought on by anti-trafficking efforts. “A prostitution arrest is a pink slip,” she says. “It forces people to migrate to another area to find work. Any time you’re a worker in the underground economy and you come into a new area, you are at high risk for a violent act—rape, theft, sexual assault. That’s where you start to see the force; fraud and coercion start to happen. Because of the criminalization, you can easily have a volunteer situation and turn it into something that’s involuntary, and you don’t have any recourse, any access to equal protection under the law.” Under California code, anyone who receives any money resulting from the labor of a sex worker can be considered a pimp, a felony charge punishable for up to six years in state prison. “My son, who I was helping through school, would be qualified as a pimp,” says the pimp-free Doogan, who arranges meetings with clients online. “People that we are living with, and who are benefiting from our earnings, in that we contribute our fair share of rent, are pimps. Our landlord is a pimp. Our dry cleaner is a pimp. Everybody is a pimp.” Decriminalizing sex work in the Bay Area is a ways off, considering that San Francisco, a mecca of open-mindedness, failed to pass a measure in 2008. “What decriminalization does is bring sex work out into the open,” says Jerald Mosley, a retired deputy attorney general for California who spoke at a recent hearing. Sex workers could be brought into the anti-trafficking crusade. Instead, this ideological wall has alienated a potentially valuable ally. “They don’t care about me. None of those people ever come to me,” Doogan says. “The prostitute nation is alive and well in the Bay Area. We’re very visible. And they don’t have the respect to call me up and say, ‘I want to save trafficking victims.’ Great. Go save trafficking victims. But you don’t need to do it on my back, and on the back of everyone in my community.”

DEBR IEFER Pay It Forward The Santa Rosa City Council approved a plan Jan. 26 to reunify downtown’s Courthouse Square, ending a months-long battle between downtown businesses and tree lovers over the fate of about three dozen redwood trees on the site. The upshot: some trees will go, but they will not go to waste. The city identified 20 trees, including eight redwoods, that will be removed during the project, which is scheduled to be completed by mid-November this year. The reunification plan creates a public space where Mendocino now runs between Third and Fourth streets. So what will become of the trees once they are removed? Any trunks or roots of redwoods and cedar removed from the site will be shipped off to an ongoing project at Santa Rosa’s Colgan Creek. According to the city, “the logs and root wads will be incorporated into Phase 2 of the Colgan Creek restoration, where the wood will help habitat for fish and birds, and also protect the creek banks.” Last April, the Sonoma County Agricultural and Open Space District awarded a $2.6 million grant to Santa Rosa to restore a 1.3 mile-section of the creek in the southwest part of town, a process that began in 2007. As part of the deal with city, the open space district will retain a conservation easement over that stretch of creek. Redwood agitators at Courthouse Square might take some measure of comfort in the payit-forward plans for Colgan Creek, the restoration of which “will result in a more natural meander and will provide a healthier seasonal creek ecosystem that includes riffles, pools, and native streamside vegetation for a contiguous riparian corridor.”—Tom Gogola

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

9 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 3-9, 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

we make our money. There are expense accounts, so the company is taking care of their food and their lodging. They can take their own money and pay for girls.” The Super Bowl sex rumor helped spawn a moral panic surrounding human trafficking that has become a cottage industry for local law enforcement agencies. In 2014, the California Legislature appropriated $5 million to begin developing “multi-disciplinary protocols” to combat human trafficking; following that, annual funding of $14 million will keep the programs going. These anti-trafficking efforts respond to some truly shocking— though highly questionable— estimates of a worldwide epidemic: 14.2 million people in global labor trafficking, up to 300,000 U.S. children “vulnerable” to sexual exploitation. Citing the disparity between spending and results, sex workers believe that they have become targets under the moral banner of trafficking-prevention to fund politically fashionable law enforcement activities at the expense of marginalized communities. “Cha-ching—it’s money. It’s all about more money, more manpower,” McNeill says. Still, champions of the crackdown cite the Bay Area as among America’s highest risk areas for human trafficking, especially labor trafficking, which is three times more prevalent than sex trafficking worldwide. Our region’s ethnic diversity and proximity to ports means that victims can be moved around without attracting suspicion, especially since most victims are smuggled in from other countries. “What we’ve seen in the majority of those cases is that the victims know their traffickers—family members, a friend, neighbors—from their home country, and are brought here under the pretense that they’re going to have a job, make good money, and so on,” says Perla Flores of Community Solutions, a service provider to human-trafficking survivors in Santa Clara and San Benito counties. “But once they arrive,


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FE BR UARY 3-9, 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

10

Dining GOING GREEN Wine isn’t the only way to get your antioxidants.

Tea for Two

Healdsburg’s Taste of Tea refreshes body and soul BY FLORA TSAPOVSKY

A

teahouse in the middle of wine country? Why not.

The Taste of Tea in downtown Healdsburg offers more than just a cup of tea. Owners Donna and Nez Tokugawa initially planned to focus on a business that was 80 percent production and 20 percent retail. But after finding a space on North Street and gauging local interest, they

decided to offer a full-blown teahouse with food offerings. Taste of Teas also features a spa with tea-based treatments. “Healdsburg is really foodiecentric with both locals and visitors, who truly understand the relationship between how and where things grow and how they taste,” says Donna, who believes tea fits perfectly in Sonoma County. “There are a lot of similarities. People love using their winetasting and pairing skills with tea.”

The couple, with help from marketing director and daughter Tai, import teas from Japan, Taiwan and China, and also create their own blends at a facility in Germany. Tea is available by the pot ($6) or cup ($4), or by siphon pot ($7), in which custom blends of tea and spices are extracted in a process involving an alcoholfueled burner. Tea options are many: sencha, jasmine, oolong, puerh, black blends and more. The milky

oolong is creamy and buttery without a drop of dairy. The Kyoto bancha is dry and slightly bitter, with a lasting finish. The emerald “Marteani” ($7), a fun twist on the alcoholic classic, is a delicate mix of matcha, coconut milk and mint syrup. The mixture is shaken like a cocktail and served in small glasses with a mint sugar rim and fresh mint garnish. The food menu, not intended to take center stage, serves, rather, as a light accompaniment to the tea. “As we were building out the space,” says Donna, “we had several people walking by asking for ramen, noodles and Asianinspired healthy choices.” One customer, Doug Provisor of Provisor Vineyard, organized a tasting of Nez Tokugawa’s cooking, and the feedback convinced the couple to add food to the menu: ramen and udon, Japanese curry rice, a variety of rice balls and a couple of noodle and farro salads. I tried the moderately spicy and refreshing green tea, soba noodle salad ($11), with Napa cabbage, mushrooms and a bright miso vinaigrette. It’s a delicate but filling appetizer. The ramen ($12) is served with a fish cake instead of the customary egg, and isn’t as deeply flavored as some I’ve tried, but it pairs well with the tea. The Japanese green-tea roll cake ($3.50), made with matcha powder and filled with whipped cream, is an airy and memorable dessert. The decor is minimal and unassuming, so it might come as a surprise that Taste of Tea also has a “relaxation room” in the back of the shop, where customers can get tea-infused face masks and foot soaks. The Tokugawas have introduced their teas to spas and wellness centers, so they decided to try a tea-based spa of their own. A tea tasting in the softly lit space, followed by a tea foot soak, facial mask and neck wrap goes for $75. “Most people,” says Donna, “don’t want to leave.” Over a cup of tea on a rainy day in Healdsburg, that’s how I felt. Taste of Tea, 109 North St., Healdsburg. 707.431.1995. thetasteoftea.com.


Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OMA CO U N TY Brody’s Burgers & Brew American. $. This family restaurant serving (cheap!) beer is not to be confused with a bar. Big burgers made with quality ingredients and a kidfriendly casual dining room. 3135 Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa. 707.526.4878.

Chloe’s French Cafe.

Cafe. $. Hearty French fare, decadent desserts and excellent selection of French and California wines 3883 Airway Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3095.

Corks American. $$. The

restaurant at Russian River Vineyards sits in a 19thcentury farmhouse, with food equally down-to-earth. Comfort-food favorites are taken up a notch with attention to detail. 5700 Hwy 116, Forestville. 707.887.3344.

El Coqui Puerto Rican. $-$$. Authentic and delicious Puerto Rican home cooking. Chuletas, Pollo al Horno, Jibarito–it’s all delicious. Plan on lunching early, because the place fills up fast. 400 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.542.8868.

Formosa Bistro Asian.

$$. Chinese, Japanese and sushi done tastily and affordably, with no MSG and an accompanying solid vegetarian menu. 799 Gravenstein Hwy S, Sebastopol. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 707.823.6688.

Gravenstein Hwy, Ste M (in the Apple Valley Plaza), Cotati. . 707.793.9300.

Pamposh Indian. $-$$.

Clean, fresh, exciting traditional Indian food. Chicken tikka masala is indescribably good. 52 Mission Circle, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.538.3367.

The Pullman Kitchen American. $$. Distinctive gourmet eatery featuring locally sourced fish, dairy meats and fresh seasonal produce. Expert service. 205 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.4300.

Ricardo’s Restaurant & Bar American. $$-

$$$. A local Bennett Valley neighborhood hangout, where you can enjoy delicious American comfort food. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.545.7696.

The Spinster Sisters

American. $$-$$$. Always something surprising and delicious on the menu. Go for breakfast! 401 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.7100.

Tai Yuet Lau Chinese. $$.

Atmosphere is nothing to write home about, but the food will bring you back. 941 Golf Course Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.545.2911.

Tides Wharf Seafood. $$. This famous backdrop for Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘The Birds’ offers an ocean-view for every seat in the house. Fresh seafood straight from the bay. Try the clam chowder. 835 Coast Hwy 1, Bodega Bay. 707.875.3652. Twist Eatery California.

American. $$. A casual hotspot with a great comfort-foodinspired menu in a key Railroad Square location. Get “The Undecided” pizza, with surprise toppings that never disappoint. 135 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.6900.

$$. Quaint little spot in a quaint little town that serves satisfying, homemade plates from fresh ingredients. The pulled pork sandwich and organic beet salad are standouts on this winning menu. 6536 Front St, Forestville. 707.820.8443.

Lynn’s Thai Thai. $$.

Willi’s Wine Bar Bistro.

Jackson’s Bar & Oven

A taste of real Thailand in convivial atmosphere. 8492

$$$. Bistro dishes and extensive wine list. A terrific

124 Annual

Zazu European. $$$.

Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. 6770 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.523.4814.

MARIN CO U N T Y Bay Thai Thai. $. Fresh Thai

food with curries that combine the regions classic sweet and tart elements. Some of the best fried bananas to be found. 809 Fourth St, San Rafael. (Cash only). 415.458.8845.

Buckeye Roadhouse

American. $$-$$$. A Marin County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless service, and a convivial atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.331.2600.

Take Hwy 101 to Citrus Fair Drive exit in Sonoma County DAILY! Pay one price for UNLIMITED CARNIVAL RIDES Pre-Sale Dicounts Available at Office

Mountain Home Inn

American. $$$-$$$$. Great summer sandwiches with a view atop Mt Tamalpais 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley. 415.381.9000.

P   F’

PRESIDENTS’ WEEKEND February 12–15 Come Rain or Shine!

Continuous Family Entertainment including:

CITRUS EXHIBITS • ARTS & CRAFTS • CARNIVAL FARM ANIMALS • CHEFS’ DEMOS • QUEEN PAGENT

W T ~ SAT & SUN 1 TO 5 COMEDY HYPNOTIST TYZEN

Saturday, Sunday & Monday —2 Shows Daily FREE WITH FAIR ADMISSION! • Thursday • Feb 11 Pre-Fair Cabaret Shipwrecked

Show, $25 ~ 6pm ~ Tickets Pre-Sale or at Door

The Garden

Mediterranean. $$. Casual environment supplying dishes with Mediterranean and Italian flair. Pastas and salads seem to be a favorite among regulars. 333 Enfrente Road, Novato. 415.883.9277.

Cloverdale Citrus Fair

General Admission: $7 Juniors 6–12 & Seniors 62+: $5 Children 5 & under are FREE! For info call 707.894.3992 or visit www.cloverdale citrusfair.org

• Friday • Feb 12 • BINGO SENIORS’ DAY, 62 & over $1 admission • Saturday • Feb 13 PARADE at 11am ~ Talent Show Shipwrecked Cabaret Dinner & Show 6pm pre-sale only • Sunday • Feb 14 • MARIACHI TARASCO, 1pm & 3pm Shipwrecked Cabaret Dinner & Show 6pm pre-sale only • Monday • Feb 15 • KIDS’ DAY, 12 & UNDER FREE!

SHAWN ERIC –MAGIC FUN Saturday through Monday

Nick’s Cove American.

$$$$. Fresh from the bay oysters, upscale seafood, some steaks and a great burger. 23240 State Route 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033.

123 Bolinas California.

$$. Urban-moderne decor pairs with a locally sourced menu for a must-try highlight on the Fairfax dining scene. Pizza, soups, local cheese and charcuterie, greens and a wine bar, all done well. 123 Bolinas St., Fairfax. 415.488.5123.

Plate Shop Classic

California. $$$. Mediterraneaninflected, Bay Area farm-totable cooking. Don’t be afraid of the excellent rabbit-liver crostini, but the pork chops, chicken and ravioli are good as well. 39 Caledonia St., Sausalito. ) 415.887.9047.

12

11

th

Happy Valentine’s Day Sunday, February 14, 2016 Served 5pm - 10pm STARTERS

Lobster Bisque ~ $9 00 • Half-Dozen Pacific Oysters on the Half Shell ~ $18 00 Mediterranean-Style Roasted Prawns ~ $14 00 Pear, Hazelnut and Point Reyes Blue Cheese Tart ~ $1200 • Baby Lettuce Salad ~ $10 00

ENTREES

Grilled Salmon ~ $30 00 • Seared Diver Scallops ~ $28 00 Saffron Risotto Frutti di Mare ~ $30 00 • Fettuccine Paglia e Fieno alla Papalina ~ $24 00 Grilled Lamb Chops ~ $36 00 • Surf and Turf ~ $44 00

DESSERT

Classic Tiramisu ~ $9 00 • Grand Marnier-Ricotta Cheesecake ~ $9 00 Chocolate Lava Cake ~ $9 00 • Profiteroles & Assorted Gelato ~ $9 00

The Bay View Restaurant & Lounge at The Inn at the Tides 800 Highway One, Bodega Bay 800.541.7788 ~ www.InnattheTides.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 3-9, 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Dining

place to dine before a show at the Wells Fargo Center. 4404 Old Redwood Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.526.3096.


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FE BR UARY 3-9, 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

12

Celebrate Valentine's Day with that special someone with a complimentary

Korbel California Champagne & Chocolate Pairing Sun, Feb 14 10–4:30 in The Korbel Tasting Room

Valentine’s Dinner February 14th 5:00-9:00pm Breathtaking Sunset, Panoramic Ocean Views, Specialty Menu

Dining ( 11 Tavola Italian Kitchen

Italian. $$. Cozy-casual dining within a stucco-clad strip mall. Thin crust pizzas, homemade pasta and sausage, meat and fish entrees, and crisp greens. An authentic gem within the Hamilton Marketplace. 5800 Nave Drive, Novato. 415.883.6686.

N A PA CO U N T Y Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen Eclectic. $$-$$$. As

SHOP SPECIAL DISCOUNTS

Winery Tours available all day Award-winning Deli for Brunch or Lunch Visit our historic Champagne Cellars

comfortable as it sounds, with a rich and varied melting pot of a menu. 1327 Railroad Ave, St Helena. 707.963.1200.

CELEBRATE RESPONSIBLY.

Farmstead Restaurant

BodegaHarbourGolf.com

707-875-3513 KORBEL CHAMPAGNE CELLARS 13250 RIVER ROAD | GUERNEVILLE 707.824.70 0 0 | KORBEL.COM

Located at The Links at Bodega Harbour 21301 Heron Drive, Bodega Bay

3AM EVERY DAY! DINE-IN OR DELIVERY

American. $$$. Gourmet home-style cooking with an emphasis on local and organic ingredients. Fresh soups and salads to start. Chicken, fish, and “cut of the day” grass-fed beef are only some of the entrée options. 738 Main St., St Helena. 707.963.9181.

Gillwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788. 707.253.0409. Goose & Gander

Special Valentine Treats Hand-decorated Cookies Specialty Cupcakes Chocolate Cherry Cheesecakes Valentine's Princess Cake Pink Champagne Cake Strawberry Almond Tarts

707.52NYPIE

7 0 7. 5 2 6 . 9 7 4 3

www.NEW-YORK-PIE.com 65 Brookwood Ave, Santa Rosa

American. $$. Cozy steakhouse vibes, but with a much more generous menu. Fish, pasta and steak are some of the standard dishes, but the G&G burger should not be overlooked. Interesting charcuterie and cheese lists. 1245 Spring St, St Helena. 707.967.8779.

La Toque Restaurant

French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Morimoto Japanese. SANTA ROSA 707.527.7654 1445 Town & Country Drive SEBASTOPOL 707.829.8101 6760 McKinley St. #150 villagebakerywinecountry.com

$$$$. Upscale meets casual with a wide range of Asianinspired dishes from Iron Chef Masaharu Morimoto. Cold and hot appetizers, great seafood options, and newcomer dishes such as Tuna Pizza. Perfect for the adventurous eater. 610 Main St, Napa. 707.252.1600.

SMALL BITES

Barbecue at the Crossroads Heading toward Sonoma from Napa recently I found myself on a rural stretch of road with a powerful hunger and no clear idea where to stop for lunch. Then, like a desert oasis, a colorful sign beckoned me: the Schellville Grill was just ahead. I was saved. The Schellville Grill is exactly the kind of place you want to find at a lonely crossroads, in this case highways 12 and 121. I’ve passed the restaurant a number of times over the years, but never stopped. I was glad to finally satisfy my curiosity—and my appetite. A hulking smoker out front and the whiff of wood smoke told me this roadhouse meant business. Inside, the cash only-restaurant is bright and colorful with loads of photos and Americana bric-a-brac on the walls. The lunch menu offers burgers ($11.95), smoked pork ribs ($16.95), tri-tip ($14.95) and brisket ($18.95) sandwiches and a pulled-pork and grilled-cheese sando ($15.95) they call one of the best in America. It gets my vote. The pork shoulder is smoked for a leisurely 10 hours before it’s shredded into a juicy mound and piled between two slices of toasted sourdough. A gooey layer of cheddar cheese and caramelized, bourbon-napped onions ties it all together. But hoist this sandwich at your own risk. The abundant pork spilled out on the plate and made picking it up without spilling the contents onto my lap difficult. A fork and knife are the best way to approach this stellar sandwich. Schellville Grill, 22900 Broadway Sonoma. 707.996.5151.—Stett Holbrook

Napa Valley Biscuits

American. $$. A very casual diner serving up biscuits and gravy, fried chicken, and chicken and waffle sliders. And they aren’t kidding when they say “sweet tea.” 1502 Main St., Napa. 707.265.8209.

Oenotri Italian. $$$. A casual eatery with the three P’s of Italian: pizza, pasta, and panini. Delicate pizza and pasta dishes, and they butcher

their own meat. These guys do simplicity well. 1425 First St, Napa. 707.252.1022.

Ristorante Allegria Italian. $$. Inside a historic 1916 building lies this Italian restaurant with music, candlelight and a robust menu. Full bar, wine list and special dining in “the Vault”– more romantic than it sounds, believe us. 1026 First St, Napa. 707.254.8006.


Wineries

13

SONOMA COUNTY Davis Family Vineyards Friendly, funky

barrel-room bar readily located by wacky recycled sculpture. Handcrafted estate wines, apple brandy to lift the spirits– but the zesty Sauvignon Blanc is from down under. 52 Front St., Healdsburg. Open Thursday–Sunday, 11am–5pm. 707.433.3858.

Fog Crest Vineyard

Brand-new spot for Pinot, Chard and a good view of the Laguna de Santa Rosa area. 7606 Occidental Road, Sebastopol. Open Thursday– Monday, 11am–5pm, December–May; summer, daily. Tasting fee, $10. 707.829.2006.

Gourmet au Bay Seafood takes to wine even better than water. Wine bar and retail shop offers flights served on custom wooden “surfboards,” artisan cheese and cracker plate, and liberal bring-your-own picnic policy. Cold crab cakes and sparkling wine at sunset on the bay? Sounds like a date. 913 Hwy. 1, Bodega. Wine surfing, $8. 707.875.9875. Inspiration Vineyards

The colorful pastoral depicted on the label does exist, but this small, family-owned labor of love is sensibly located in the Pinecreek Business Park. Stylish tasting room; Chard, Cab and Blanc. 3360 Coffey Lane, Ste. E, Santa Rosa. Daily 11am–4:30pm. $10 tasting fee. 707.237.4980.

Mauritson Family Winery Zinfandels are the

hallmark of this fledgling winery. Reserve vintages routinely sell out, including the much sought-after Rockpile Zinfandel. There’s a lot of buzz about wines from the Rockpile Appellation. 2859 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Tasting room open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.431.0804.

Nalle Winery Rising above the vineyards like some

kind of New Age bunker, the rosemary-shrouded winery houses a down-toearth father-and-son team dedicated to low-alcohol Dry Creek Zinfandel. Greeters Lila and Pella present soggy tennis balls. 2385 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Saturdays, noon– 5pm. No fee. 707.433.1040.

Red Car Wine Co. Lay

some track to the “Gateway to Graton” and take your palate on a ride with Boxcar Syrah and Trolley Pinot from Sonoma Coast vineyards. Next stop: Côte-Rôtie on the way to Beaune. 8400 Graton Road, Sebastopol. Open daily, 10am-5pm. Tasting fee $10. 707.829.8500.

Rued Winery Folks been farming grapes here since 1880s; the best bottomland Sauvignon Blanc and benchland Zinfandel and Cabernet skimmed from the family’s 160 acres of grapes is offered at comparatively farmstand prices. 3850 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily 11am–4:30pm. Tasting fee $5. 707.433.3261. Timber Crest Farms

Animal labels abound at Peterson Winery’s expanded tasting room adjacent the cellar. Is that a Jackalope, or is that just the Dry Creek Valley Zinfandel? Also on hand is Papapietro-Perry and the six Family Wineries of Dry Creek. Dashe Cellars crafts mainly powerful Zinfandels and other reds. At Kokomo Winery, it’s about the reds. Also look for Mietz Cellars, Lago di Merlo and Collier Falls. 4791 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Tasting rooms generally open daily from around 11am to 4:30pm. 707.433.0100. 707.431.7568.

NAPA COUNTY Bouchaine Vineyards

Venerable producer of estategrown Burgundian style wine in the rustic wind-scraped hills of Carneros. Pinot Noir and

Pinot Meunier with a coolclimate, cherry-skin crispness that nearly crunches in the mouth, and Chardonnay with a “mouth of butter.” Patio service in fair weather, cozy hearthside tasting in cooler days; good-humored hospitality throughout. 1075 Buchli Station Road, Napa. Open daily, 10:30am–4:30pm; tasting fee $20–$30. 707.252.9065.

Fantesca Estate & Winery (WC) Set on land

that was the dowry gift when Charles Krug married in 1860, this estate winery specializing in Cab features a wine-aging cave built right into the side of Spring Mountain. 2920 Spring Mountain Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.968.9229.

Inglenook Vineyard

What’s new at Inglenook? Very little. The iconic stone building, robed in green vines, appears exactly as it did in 1890. But that’s news, and all thanks to owner Francis Ford Coppola. Still living up to Gustave Niebaum’s dream of fine wine to rival France, the oncebeloved Inglenook is putting out the goods once again. 1991 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Daily, 10am–5pm. Reservations for tour and tasting ($50) recommended; none required for bistro and exhibits. 707.968.1161.

Robert Sinskey Vineyards In the lofty,

barnlike hall–as elegant as a theater, as solid as a ski lodge–visitors can take in the tank room action; at least, the gleaming stainless steel, framed by wood and stonework and brewpubstyle chalkboard menus imbues the space with a sense of energetic immediacy. “Gluttonous Flight” pairs savory munchables prepared in the gourmet demonstration kitchen with biodynamically farmed Carneros Pinot Noir and Bordeaux varietals. Not to worry: there’s no flight for ascetics offered, so go for it. 6320 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open 10am–4:30pm daily. 707.944.9090.

Branded Taken Wines may be complicated, but they’re also available BY JAMES KNIGHT

H

ow do you stay fun and playful when you’re ready to get serious? That’s the whole trick in wine marketing, as the creators of the Taken Wine Company have learned. But they think they’ve found the right balance, and they’re ready to seduce their millennial peers into a world of affordable and only slightly sassy wines.

All three tiers of Taken Wine fit into a coherent, racy theme. But the brand’s origins weren’t nearly so suggestive, according to cofounder Josh Phelps. The son of a Napa Valley winemaker (no relation to Joseph Phelps Vineyards), Phelps grew up with Carlo Trinchero (of the same Trincheros with the runaway White Zinfandel success) in St. Helena. After college, they reconnected to brainstorm a new wine brand: “We wanted to make a wine that was appropriate to our generation,” Phelps says. “At the time, we were 22, 23 years old. We priced it at $30—in terms of Napa Cab, it’s at the lower end of the spectrum.” Impressively purple-hued in the glass, Taken’s 2013 Napa Valley Red ($30) is a blend of 60 percent Cabernet Sauvignon with 40 percent Merlot. A just-overripe fruit bowl of aromas is detailed with peat smoke and purple marker notes, but it’s Merlot softness that carries the mild palate. The packaging for Taken is more suggestive of Zen than anything else, but originally the name referred to the feeling that all the good brand names were already taken, and, as well, the two friends’ circular path that has taken them back to their roots in Napa. Having recently turned 30, Phelps is on the leading edge of the millennial generation, which he hopes to target with the Taken brand. “Our age group is growing up from college, and they have careers,” says Phelps, “and they’re starting to have disposable income for wine.” Taken’s ideal customers are in their late 20s or early 30s, but not ready to get into the fancy stuff. “Even a $15 price point is not considered cheap,” says Phelps. “I think our wines are perfect for that. You don’t have to speak Italian to say ‘available.’” Available is the duo’s latest project, planned as a “world tour” of varietal wines. They chose Puglia, in the “heel of the boot of Italy,” for their first region because of their Italian heritage. The 2014 Available Pinot Grigio ($13) offers a striking, spicy perfume, like a spritz of lemon verbena. The middle-tier Complicated 2014 Sonoma County Chardonnay ($18) straddles a line between Muscat and caramel, with partial malolactic fermentation adding a creamy tone to the finish. As for the theme: “I will say,” Phelps admits, “people tend to steer away from the Complicated wines at weddings.”

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 3-9, 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FE BR UARY 3-9, 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

14

VALENTINE’S DAY DINNER FEBRUARY 14, 2016, 5:30PM TO 9:00PM 1st course choice of

FRUITS

DE

M ER

TWO

FOR

Miyagi Oysters/Prawns/Champagne Poached Lobster Tail/Accompaniments

A HI TARTARE

Thai Chili/Pine Nuts/Mint/Toasted Sesame Oil/Soy Sauce/Tobiko/Won ton Chips

BACON WR APPED SCALLOPS Truffled English Pea Puree/Wild Mushroom/Watercress

2nd course choice of

SHRIMP BISQUE

Butter Lettuce/Mandarin orange/Pistachio/Avocado Goat Cheese/Blood Orange Vinaigrette

3rd COURSE choice of

OF

L AMB

Pomegranate Reduction/Almond Cous Cous/Sauteed Rainbow Chard and Currants

L OBSTER STUFFED PETROLE SOLE

Vermouth Cream/Crispy Bamboo Rice/Snap Peas

GRILLED VEGETABLE WELLINGTON

Layers of Seasonal Vegetables/Sauteed Baby Kale/Golden Pepper Coulis FOR

TWO

Garlic Mashed Potatoes/Roasted Asparagus/Roasted Mushroom Barrel Aged Worcestershire

FINISHING TOUCH

TASTING PLATE

FOR

Saturday, February 13 10 am–4 pm

RAIN OR SHINE!

Springs Rd.; 10 minutes west of

EQUUS HOUSE SALAD

PORTERHOUSE

Lake Sonoma Steelhead Festival Milt Brandt Visitors Center at Lake Sonoma, 3288 Skaggs

Crème Fraiche/Fresh Chives

PISTACHIO CRUSTED R ACK

FREE, FUN & FANTASTIC!

2:

Vanilla Bean Crème Brulee/Chocolate Mousse/Red Velvet Cake Reservations Required

Healdsburg on Dry Creek Rd.

Wildlife & Conservation Exhibits Fishing • Hatchery Tours • Wine Food Trucks • Beer • Art Projects Live Performances by The Solid Air Band • Children’s Entertainment by “Mr. Music” — Jim Corbett Sponsors: Sonoma County Winegrape Commission, Winegrowers of Dry Creek Valley, Bear Republic Brewing, American AgCredit, The Belli Corporation, The Bohemian, Bowland Vineyard Management, Brandt Insurance, Exchange Bank, Lake Sonoma Marina, Russian River Watershed Association, Vineyard Industry Products

lakesonoma.org

707 431-4533

LakeSonomaSteelheadFestival 101 Fountaingrove Parkway • Santa Rosa 707.578.0149 • www.fountaingroveinn.com

Note: Event admission and activities are free, but food and beverages must be purchased.

featured artist:

Alana Tillman Friday, Feb 19 5–8pm Please join us for the Opening Reception & Open Studio Event at our Gallery. 1200 River Rd, Fulton | fultoncrossing.com | Open Sat & Sun 12–5


15 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 3-9, 201 6 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Old-Fashioned LOVE Before Tinder or Match.com, there was the newspaper personal ad BY MOLLY OLESON

S

andy De Long contacted the Pacific Sun offices a few months ago in search of something that she had misplaced. She had come from Mill Valley to describe the personal ad that a man named Russ had placed in the Classifieds section of the newspaper in 1975. There was the story of how she had seen the ad, the story of how she had replied to it and the story of how, the following year, she had married Russ.

We were intrigued by her words and her memories, and we wondered what it must have been like to meet someone that way, at a time when carefully chosen words to strangers could hold so much power and meaning. How romantic. And in today’s fastpaced world, how foreign. “Call me

old-fashioned,” she would later say. The way that she talked about her relationship with her husband reminded me of the way that my grandfather, after more than 60 years of marriage, still looked at my grandmother, as though he were seeing her for the very first time. “Isn’t she something?” he’d ask. ) 16


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FE BR UARY 3-9, 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

16

• Full service auto repair • STAR certified smog station • Energy efficient operations • Reduce, Reuse, Recycle learn more…greentechautomotive.com With increased awareness of the environment and conservation, GTA delivers responsible, low impact repair alternatives. 5% DISCOUNT on labor for Go Local Rewards Card holders A CLEAN APPROACH TO A DIRTY JOB

707.545.7076

501 BARHAM AVE SANTA ROSA MON–FRI 8AM–5PM • NOW OPEN SAT Certified Green Business

Personals ( 15 OIL CHANGE SPECIAL plus a FREE Seasonal Check-up

$

2499

Inspection includes: • Inspect Brakes • Inspect Lights • Inspect Tires • Inspect Belts & Hoses • Inspect All Fluid Levels • Plus…Road Test! Shop supplies & taxes extra. Most cars/light trucks. Oil change includes up to 5qts of motor oil & new oil filter. Cannot combine with any other offer. Offer expires February 29, 2016.

greentechautomotive.com

INCREDIBLE CANINE The difference between the backyard and the world

Free evaluations by appt

707-322-3272

IncredibleCanine.com

Rejuvenate Your Body • Relax Your Mind Soothe Your Soul

Happy Couple Valentine’s Day Special

• TRADITIONAL THAI • SWEDISH

GIFT CERTIFICATES

Spa Packages • Candles • Oils • Lotions and More…

• AROMATHERAPY • REFLEXOLOGY • DEEP TISSUE • PRENATAL MASSAGE

www.JaiyenSpa.com • Downtown Sebastopol: 7106 Bodega Ave • 707.861.3562

After all of those years, Sandy De Long was looking for a tangible memento from that time—something to remind her of their correspondence. “I think his ad started out, ‘Does the woman exist who . . . ,’” Sandy recalls recently by phone. “I liked what he was looking for; I liked all of the detail.” She notes that she was just looking at the personals for fun and wasn’t intending to respond. But his ad, full of adjectives—intelligent, independent, sensitive—that described the kind of woman that he hoped to meet, caught her eye. De Long wrote Russ a letter on a Thursday, the day the ad appeared in the paper. He received her letter on Saturday, called her on Sunday and they set a date for Monday. Russ received 37 replies to that ad. She says that she replied in a “résumé style,” outlining her likes and dislikes, and providing her IQ score. She added at the end that she had “freckles, glasses and unkempt hair.” Russ, sharing the land line with his wife, chimes in: “She added it like it was a bad thing, but I happened to love freckles, glasses and unkempt hair.” De Long called her mom in San Francisco and told her that she had replied to a man’s personal ad in the paper. “You did what?!” her mother shouted. “It could be an axe murderer!” “And then this guy in his three-piece suit drives up in his Mercedes to take me out to dinner,” Sandy says with a laugh. It was very clever, she admits, of Russ to put an ad in the paper, asking for replies by mail. “To have someone write to you rather than a phone call . . . because you can tell a lot about a person by their letter.” Following the marriage of Sandy and Russ in October of 1976, the Sun ran an article titled, “Want Ad Romance,” about how the couple had met through the personals. “We’re working on our 40th year,” Sandy says proudly. A treasure trove of microfilm— going back to the early ’60s—at the Mill Valley Library, revealed

the article. It was a glimpse into the dating world of a bygone era—a time when a “sincere, healthy guy” desired the companionship of “an honest, attractive gal.” When a 17-yearold woman, who enjoyed “bike riding, guitar, swimming and real communication,” expressed her need for “some moving, learning, open friends.” A time when a “rare woman” was being sought out—a woman who was strongly in need of “a special man who is intense about life, people, nature, justice, loving, sexuality—in short, a man who has a ‘lust for life.’”

‘It became a happy habit that endured till the turn of the century.’ If you are a ‘lady at tea,’ a ‘cook in the kitchen’ and a tiger overall— and turn on to the above—run don’t walk to the mail box with your letter . . .’ At that time, the Sun, along with other Bay Area newspapers, ran a handful of personal ads (for which people would be charged by the word) per week in the Classifieds section. But in the late ’70s, and through the ’80s and ’90s, Sandy says, “It kind of exploded.” Before long, there were “pages and pages” of people “looking.” “Women looking for men, men looking for women, men looking for men,” Sandy says. “Men looking for ducks . . . Whatever it was, it was in there.” Rosemary Olson, publisher of both the Bohemian and the Pacific Sun, recalls that heyday at the Bohemian. “I hosted ‘Romance Parties,’” she says, “helping most attendees write their ads, many wanting sunset, romantic walks on the beach.” Olson’s favorite party was at a grand home overlooking Hamilton Field in Novato. “We had so many people attend,” she


says, noting that most alternative weeklies had a designated “Personals Specialist” who would handle walk-ins, read letters and hand-input the text for print. “The house was packed with happy Sonoma, Napa and Marin singles.” The Pacific Sun also hosted mixers, where people who placed personal ads in the paper could get in for free. “People had a chance to meet each other, even if they didn’t meet anyone,” says Mal Karman, a Pacific Sun contributor who is quick to relay humorous stories of corresponding with “a beauty of Romanian descent” and a “Goldie Hawn lookalike.” “You’d hear people on the street talking about the Sun’s wacky, often perverse personal ads,” says Sun movie page editor Matt Stafford, who has

Baby Chicks Are Coming! First Shipment Arrives March 12th See Our Website For Schedule

* Large variety of breeds * Baby chick supplies * Organic feeds * Chicken coops * Feeders & waterers * Poultry health supplies * Incubators and more! a

The Farm In The City!

WESTERN FARM CENTER (707)545-0721

21 W 7th St. - Santa Rosa, CA www.westernfarmcenter.com

17 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 3-9, 201 6 | BOH E MI A N.COM

BETWEEN THE LINES Dating before the internet was a simpler time.

been contributing to the paper for years. “In the ’70s, the ads reflected that fun, free, groovy, pre-AIDS, pre-Reagan, pre-tech era when people would hook up with less fear and loathing than they do now. Then it became a happy habit that endured till the turn of the century.” On April 21, 1995, Match.com, claiming to be “#1 in dates, relationships and marriages,” launched, throwing a wrench in the personal-ad business, and opening up a gamut of new possibilities in the world of romance. According to a Pew Research Center study from last year, in the mid-1990s, only 14 percent of American adults were internet users. Today, nearly nine in 10 Americans are online, and online dating sites like OkCupid (free) and eHarmony (costly), along with apps like Tinder (where one can find users nearby) continue to grow in popularity. A 2013 Pew study found that attitudes toward online dating have also changed, with 59 percent of Americans agreeing with the statement, “Online dating is a good way to meet people,” compared to 44 percent in 2005. “I think the personals dwindled in popularity around the same time the internet came along and more or less doomed the newspaper business,” Stafford says. “This also, of course, coincided with a new proclivity for faceless social media.” Judy Orsini, a 63-year-old retired campus planner who lives in Mill Valley, remembers using the Pacific Sun personals in 1998, around the time that online dating was gaining steam. She responded to an ad—“the longest and most informative”—by a man named Roy who described himself as “easy on the eyes.” He was looking for someone to bike, ski and travel with—all interests that she shared. After five years of living together, Judy and Roy married. “I know that when he put the ad up, he had at least half a dozen dates before he met me,” Orsini says. “He told himself he was going to be a gentleman, not a jerk. He wanted to take the time to meet everyone, ) 18


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FE BR UARY 3-9, 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

18

HUGE

Anniversary Sale! 50% OFF EVERYTHING

Personals ( 17

SUNDAY

February 7, 12–5pm

MONDAY

February 8 10am–5:30pm Republic of Thrift, a 501c3 nonprofit, benefits Sonoma Valley Public Schools Over $130,000 distributed to SV Public Education since opening in February 2012. Thank you Sonoma County for 4 great years!

17496 Sonoma Highway Sonoma CA 707.933.9850 republicofthrift.com

QR CODE

707.526.2800

• Personal Service • Free item for new members and referrals • Wide selection of edibles • Safe medicine testing by CW Analytical • Everyday discounts for seniors, veterans and volume purchases, student discount Fridays

WEEKDAYS 10–7 WEEKENDS 10–5

www.sonomapatientgroup.org

2425 Cleveland Ave, Suite 175, Santa Rosa Highway 101 at Steele Lane, next to Big 5

Floatation Therapy is a great way to relax and unwind your mind and body

NOW OFFERING MASSAGE & REFLEXOLOGY SPECIAL OFFER! 60 Min Float & 60 Min Massage $120

which I thought was kind of a sweet thing.” Orsini says that the personal ad was the most efficient way to meet someone. “You know when you’re working and busy all the time, and you want to meet people? I wasn’t into the bar scene. I’m not extremely outgoing, so it’s not that easy for me to meet someone on the street or in a store and strike up a conversation.” She didn’t have many single friends at the time. “Not true today!” Most, she says, are looking for love on Match.com. And most of them have had very little luck. “Everybody thought it was going to be the big solution to finding your mate for life,” Orsini says of online dating. “Of course, what I hear all the time is that people lie.” “Times have changed,” she says, wistfully. “I just don’t think that people are as honest as they used to be.” Orsini suspects that when it comes to her friends and family dating online, the low success rate also has something to do with the higher number of people looking online today, versus the number of people who were looking through personal ads at the height of their popularity. With the kind of technology available at our fingertips, singles have more options than ever before for finding love. Does having a gigantic online pool of hopeful romantics mean that everyone eventually finds exactly what, and who, they’re looking for? Not necessarily, says 35-yearold Molly Corbett, a finance and operations manager at Stanford who lives in San Francisco. “[Online dating] is like this endless stream of people,” says Corbett, who first gave it a go in 2007. She’s used it off and on for the past six years. “You just don’t even think of them as people,” she says of the faces that pop up on her device at any given time. “They’re pictures on a screen that you can scroll right through. I think it gives people a license to be flaky.” Corbett has tried Match.com, OkCupid and apps like Tinder, Hinge and Coffee Meets Bagel.

What she’s looking for is fairly straightforward: A committed relationship that leads to marriage and children. “Not necessarily a white picket fence in the ’burbs,” she says, “but just something more traditional.” But what she’s found instead are guys who are not interested in real relationships, and many who “just want to have fun and not grow up.” “I think it’s reached like this fever pitch,” Corbett says of online dating. “When it first came out, it had a stigma to it. People were a little weirded out. Now there’s so much out there, it’s almost like we have to start back at zero, and figure out how to meet people in person. Because it’s just not working.” With the personals, Orsini says, someone had to put the ad in the paper and someone else had to make the phone call. “So right away, there was voice contact.” The first time she spoke to her future husband, she says, they talked for two hours. “I really got a good, strong sense of who he was. Whereas online, people go back and forth with emails and text messages before they ever even talk to each other.” That’s one of the most frustrating parts of meeting people online, Corbett says. What if you spend days, weeks or even months sending messages back and forth to someone, only to find out that the person who you finally meet is not who you thought they were at all? She shares a story about a guy she met online recently who appealed to her because it sounded as though he, too, had become fed up with the online dating environment. “He wrote a whole paragraph about how the online thing was ruining us,” she says, “that it was making people not treat people like actual people. I wrote to him to say, ‘I agree with that. I appreciate you writing that.’ We were trying to set up a time to meet. We picked a day. And then he backed out. He said, ‘I’m sorry, I’m just too skeptical about this whole thing. You really do sound great.’ That’s how he ended it.” Do you think we could ever


You are invited to 17th Annual

West College Ave. at Stony Point Road, Santa Rosa, California Heartfelt art created by Shelter & Rescue Animals Live & Silent Auctions Wines by Mutt Lynch, Pedroncelli, Iron Horse & Korbel Champagne Gourmet Hors d’Oeuvres

Admission: $40 Donation Adv / $50 At Door / VISA/MC accepted

For more information please visit: www.pawsforlove.info or email: Ellyn@pawsforlove.info or call:707.799.6151 All proceeds benefit Animals In Need

Handmade Dark Chocolate TASTE THE DARK SIDE

DREAMBOAT This handsome guy not only lived on a boat, he made his own

personal ad.

return to the age of personal ads, I ask her, to a simpler time, when people weren’t overwhelmed by endless options? She pauses to think about it. “I just don’t even understand how people meet people in real life,” she says, noting that for many singles, checking devices and meeting people online has become ingrained. “Everyone is just buried in their own little world.” Stafford says that he thinks people in general—especially people under 40—are more fearful of strangers now than they were 20 years ago. “There seems to be a fear of people who aren’t safely contained in a digital device,” he says. Corbett reconsiders my question about a potential resurgence of personal ads, even in our deviceaddicted dating culture. “Maybe,” she says, with a little more hope this time. Personal ads, she says, seemed to “get to the core” of who people were. You didn’t dismiss someone

because you saw a bad picture of them—which is what many people dating online do today. A small flaw, rather than being a reason to swipe or scroll, could be something beautiful. “Everyone’s being so specific about their criteria,” Orsini says of online dating, “that I guess you’re led to believe that the perfect person is out there if you just keep going through all those people.” Does Corbett believe that her perfect match is out there? “Ummm . . . yes,” she replies. “Just because they have to be. Otherwise . . . you know, I don’t want to give up.” Perhaps all that remains of the era of newspaper personal ads is what’s left on microfilm and what’s tucked into photo albums. And the stories, relayed by those who reminisce. “So much of it is about chemistry,” Orsini says. “Until you meet and look into each other’s eyes . . . ” She laughs: “The oldfashioned way.”

Chocolate

Sonoma County’s Best Chocolatier since 2009 6988 McKinley Street Sebastopol (next to Whole Foods)

sonomachocolatiers.com

CollegeStudents Ride Free This Year!

*Extended thru 2016! *Your valid ID card is your 2016 sctransit pass.

contact us at 800.345.7433 or visit us on the web at sctransit.com for more information.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 3-9, 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Saturday, February 6, 2016

6:00 to 10:00 pm • Finley Community Center

19


NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | FE BR UARY 3-9 | BO H E M I AN.COM

20

The week’s events: a selective guide

Crush CULTURE

YOUNTVILLE

In Residence

Dedicated to promoting the arts in Napa Valley, the Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater presen ts worldclass arts and music and fost ers arts education, having partnered with the San Francisco Conservatory of Mus ic to bring graduate and post-graduate students to the valley as artists in residence. This week, current artists-in-r esidence and alumni come together for a concert event, ‘For the Love of Mus ic,’ that also features Napa sensati on Marnie Breckenridge. Presenting clas sical and contemporary works, the mus ic comes to the community on Friday, Feb . 5, at Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Drive, Yountville. 7pm. Free; reservations are required. 707.944.9900.

S A N TA R O S A

Fire of Love

n year, Rumi’s Carava Returning for a 16th of y da a y Ba rth No e once again offers th ne al performances do reading and music e Th . ion dit tra igious in an ecstatic rel rs he ot d an fiz Ha , mi mystical poems of Ru y a volunteer group come to life courtes e ders, backed by liv of impassioned rea sh rvi de pired whirling music and Sufi-ins o ravan presents tw Ca ’s mi dancing. Ru st. fea l na tio op an shows, divided by te e Center for Clima Proceeds go to th s en ht lig en an Carav Protection. Rumi’s nter, Ce r se Gla e th at on Saturday, Feb. 6, m e., Santa Rosa. 2p 547 Mendocino Av st, fea 5; $3 5– $2 5pm. and 7pm, feast at n. k.com/Rumi.Carava $50. www.faceboo

BLAME DENNIS HOPPER talks about Hopper and her car Actress and author Illeana Douglas eer in Hollywood at the Smith Rafael Film Center on Thursd ay, Feb. 4. See Film listings, p28 .

N A PA

Radical Art

the singly away from As we move increa e, on ial a digital, artific natural world into re mo ng tti ge t are landscapes in ar ental. This week, di rim pe ex d an t ac abstr ich al Landscapes,’ wh Rosa opens ‘Radic e th h ug ro th nt veme captures this mo th Wi y Area artists. eyes of seven Ba d both complex an e ar works that ver ne ve ha s pe ca ds contemplative, lan e l; whether it’s th looked so unusua rt be Ro er int pa s of dystopian cityscape -scale photographs ge lar e th or ni rvi Mine e ich give form to th of Trevor Paglen, wh e. nc illa rve su nt rnme idea of mass gove ril 3 s” runs through Ap pe sca nd La l ica ad “R a th wi 6, b. turday, Fe and opens on Sa y., Hw ma no So 00 52 , reception at di Rosa 7.226.5991. Napa. 4pm. Free. 70

P E TA L U M A

Street Party

With January already behind us, everyone is looking forward to Februa ry’s most popular holiday—Mardi Gra s! In the spirit of the extravagant event, the town of Petaluma is taking Fat Tuesday to the streets with the 25th ann ual Mardi Gras Mambofest. This yea r, the all– New Orleans R&B revue act Rhy thmtown Jive once again leads the live ly parade from Putnam Plaza through downtown Petaluma, and back up Americ an Alley, before the festivities move indo ors for a dance party in the coolest und erground jazz club in the county. The Mambofest kicks off on Tuesday, Feb. 9, at the Big Easy, 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 5:30pm. $5–$7. 707.776.4631.

nson lie Swa r a h C —


HOW FITTING ‘It’s about feeling safe in your body, and knowing we’re all different,’ says designer Rachel Blodgett.

Under Cover

Serpent and Bow creates lingerie with women in mind, not men BY FLORA TSAPOVSKY

A

s Valentine’s Day clichés go, sexy lingerie ranks right up there with chocolate and roses. But what does lingerie mean to you and your body? That’s a question the romance-obsessed holiday avoids altogether. But not local lingerie designer Rachel Blodgett. Born and raised in Santa Rosa,

Blodgett, 27, says she’s “an artist, providing imagery you can wear.” She studied printmaking and textiles at the California College of Arts in Oakland, and moved to Providence, R.I., after graduation to focus on her drawing and artistic vision. After a turbulent breakup with someone she’d known for a decade, Blodgett, who dabbled in lingerie-making in college, started her own brand, Serpent and Bow. “I took a year of celibacy,”

Blodgett recalls, “and made myself a different garment every month.” For Blodgett, lingerie has nothing to do with cheap romance and seduction. “We’re trained culturally to think of our body in a way that relates to the male gaze and objectifying ourselves, rather than seeing ourselves as a living, spiritual creature,” she says. “Lingerie is a secret clothing layer, like a ritual for yourself, and for me, it’s about manifesting how you want to feel about your body

as an individual versus how you want to be looked at. It’s a rare type of lingerie.” Serpent and Bow couldn’t be further away from the lacy, seethrough bras and underpants of department stores. The cottonspandex briefs are high-waisted and roomy, and the rather loose bralettes are tied on the neck like swimsuit tops. “They’re not meant to be shapewear,” she says. “It’s more about letting your body do what it naturally does while being held.” It’s also largely about the imagery. All garments are handpainted in batik wax then naturally dip-dyed in indigo or seasonal natural dyes like marigold flowers. Moon Cycle, a staple collection sold on Boldgett’s website, features eclipses, women’s figures and mythical images, but a large portion of Serpent and Bow business relies on customized art. “One woman ordered images from her childhood to cover a bralette she wants to wear during childbirth,” says Blodgett, emphasizing the deeply personal aspect of her work. “People are drawn to mythology, plants and other symbols—ancient arts, tarot cards—but also things that seem not that important but we use on a daily basis, like teacups.” In the same way her garments are well considered, Blodgett thinks deeply about relationships, dating and other urgent Valentine’s Day matters. She recently started an adult sex-ed class in Santa Rosa, hosting guest speakers and taking on topics like consent, fertility awareness and transsexuality. “It’s about feeling safe in your body, and knowing we’re all different and need to communicate,” Blodgett says. For more information, visit serpentand-bow.com.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 3-9, 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Collin Morrow

Arts Ideas

21


Stage Eric Chazankin

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FE BR UARY 3-9, 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

22

LOVE GUN Taylor Diffenderfer plays a mourning widow in ‘The Bear.’

Short and Sweet Two shows feature frisky one-acts about love

BY DAVID TEMPLETON

S Get Your MOJO Flowing! Legal Highs | Quality Glass Art Potent Aphrodisiacs | Flow Toys all available at

West County Head Shop

20301 HWY 116, Monte Rio 707.865.5077 Wed–Sun 10–6

hort plays are tricky to pull off, but when done well, they can deliver a lot in a small package. With Valentine’s Day looming, two local companies are offering separate showcases of short, comedic plays, all written in the language of love.

In the intimate Studio Theater at 6th Street Playhouse, From Russia with Love is a high-spirited assemblage of shorts by Anton Chekhov. Anchored by two classics of the short-form comic romance— The Bear and A Marriage Proposal—the show elegantly intertwines, in segments directed by Beulah Vega, the text of real love letters from Chekhov (Adam Palafox) to his wife, Olga (Yelena Segal), adding an unexpected dose of tender, heart-warming emotion.

The Bear, directed by Eyan Dean, gives us a grief-stricken widow (Taylor Diffenderfer) whose self-indulgent mourning period—she promises her alarmed servant, Luka (Kathy Ping Rogers), that she’ll never leave her house again—is rudely interrupted by the intrusion of a gruff, blustery businessman (Ryan Severt), who arrives to collect a debt and ends up falling in love—with disastrous and rather funny results, that include a duel by pistols. In A Marriage Proposal, directed by Palafox, a wildly hypochondriac landowner (Matthew Cadigan) attempts to propose to Natalia (Segal), the daughter of his affable neighbor Stepan (Clark Miller). But before he can manage to propose, he keeps being drawn into petty, escalating arguments with his intended. Feisty, physical and farcical in the extreme, these two laugh-inducing one-acts are delivered in a 90-minute package that might make you rethink everything you believed about Chekhov. Evidently, he was a very funny guy, and he sure had a way with a love letter. Rating (out of 5): Then there’s In Love with the 8 x 10, presented by Lucky Penny Productions in Napa. Eight 10-minute shorts culled from over a hundred submissions from around the country, these unevenly acted but generally outstanding shorts include the twisty tale of two nerds on a very rocky date (which features actual rocks), a pair of Labradors discussing the complex etiquette of dog mating, and a lawyer who brings his fiancée to a shrink to learn small talk and gets a lesson in true love. Think of it as the stage equivalent of those candy heart sayings—though with a bit more bite beneath all the sugariness. ‘From Russia with Love’ runs Thursday–Sunday through Feb. 14 in the Studio at 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W. Sixth St., Santa Rosa. $15–$25. 707.523.4185. ‘In Love with the 8 x 10’ runs through Feb. 13 at the Lucky Penny Community Arts Center, 1758 Industrial Way, Napa. $21–$31. 707.266.6305.


MOBILE HOME It ain’t Downton Abbey, but it will have to do.

Get $5.00 off premium price per ticket mention promo code: WODKA

Senior Moments

In which the great Maggie Smith trades her estate for a van BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

A

charming memoir of a smelly, prickly old lady, The Lady in the Van, directed by Nicholas Hytner (The History Boys), is based on material performed first as a stage play, then a radio play. Surprisingly, it hasn’t lost any of its keenness as a movie. The story’s writer and subject is Alan Bennett (played by Alex Jennings), a playwright who had his first breakthrough as part of the Beyond the Fringe quartet that paved the way for Monty Python. When Bennett moved in 1973 to Gloucester Crescent in London’s Camden Town, it was a changing district, awaiting the gentry who inhabit it today. Priding themselves on their liberality, the neighbors put up with one Miss Mary Shepherd (Dame Maggie Smith), a transient old lady living in her van. When the parking police tried to run her off, Bennett allowed her to park in his driveway. She would be encamped there for 15 years. The role is so right for Smith that it might be easy to underrate her very tough and touching work here. Mary Shepherd is a strong soul; we never really think of this 80-year-old performer’s fragility until the end of the film, when her character’s `health fails. Bennett, not an enormous fan of the physical world, admires the way the ambulance people and social workers handle this exasperating woman without minding her moods or her smell. He downplays his own ability to stand her bad tendencies, such as Miss Shepherd’s habit of soiling his driveway. It’s bemusing to imagine the army of people in their vans, trucks and campers today, displaced by the obscene rents of the Bay Area, being looked after with the care and dignity demonstrated by the characters in this story. The Lady in the Van wells up with compassion; it never drills for it. ‘The Lady in the Van’ is playing at the Century Regency, 280 Smith Ranch Road, San Rafael. 415.479.6496

2/5–2/11

Honorable

®

Hail, Caesar! R (10:45-1:15-4:00)-6:45-9:10

The Lady in the Van PG13 (10:30-1:00-3:45)-6:30-8:55

45 Years R (10:15-12:45-3:30)-7:00-9:10 2016 Oscar Shorts – Animated NR 7:15pm 2016 Oscar Shorts – Live Action NR 9:00pm Anomalisa R 8:00pm Carol R (11:00am) Spotlight R (2:00pm) Brooklyn PG13 (11:15-1:45-4:15) Room R (5:00pm) 551 SUMMERFIELD ROAD • SANTA ROSA 707.525.8909 • SUMMERFIELDCINEMAS.COM

All Digital Projection • Bargain Tuesday $7.75 Select Shows Schedule for Fri, February 5 – Thu, February 11 Bargain Tuesday - $7.50 All Shows Bargain Tuesday $7.00 All Shows Schedule for Fri, Feb -16th 20th Thu, Feb 26th Schedule for Fri, April –– Thu, April 22nd Schedule for Fri, June 22nd - Thu, June 28th Bruschetta • Paninis • Soups • Salads • Appetizers

CAFE WINE BAR NOW OPEN! Academy Award “Moore Gives Her BestNominee Performance

Best Foreign Language Film! 8 Great“Raw Beers on Tap + Wine by the Glass and Bottle In Years!” – Box Office and Riveting!” – Rolling Stone Demi Moore David Duchovny WALTZ WITH BASHIR Enjoy in the Cafe HEART or Theatre A MIGHTY Open Daily at Noon Movie Optional (1:00) 3:00 5:00 9:15 RR THE JONESES (12:30) 2:45 5:00*7:00 7:20 9:45

(12:30) 2:45 5:00 7:20 9:45 R

HAIL CAESAR!

(12:30) 2:40 Noms 4:50 Including 7:10 PG-13 9:20 2 Academy Award BestRActor!

“A Triumph!” – 5:00) New Observer “A Glorious Throwback ToYork The More Stylized, (12:20 2:40WRESTLER 7:15 9:30 THE Painterly Work Of Decades Past!” – LA (12:20) 5:10 9:45 R Times LA2:45 VIE EN ROSE ® 7:30 (12:45) 3:45 6:45OF 9:45 PG-13 THEAward SECRET KELLS 10 Academy Noms Including Best Picture! (1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:00 NR SLuMDOG MILLIONAIRE “★★★★ – Really, Deeply – (1:40) 6:00 Truly, 10:00 R “Superb! No One4:00 Could Make This 7:10 R Believable One of (1:15) This Year’s Best!”9:40 – Newsday If It Were Fiction!” – San Francisco Chronicle

2016 OSCAR NOMINATED LIVE ACTION SHORTS ANIMATED SHORTS

ONCE 8 Academy Award Noms Including

8 Academy Award Noms Including PRODIGAL SONS (11:45 4:00) 8:15 (Final R) (1:00) 3:10 5:20PG 7:30 9:40short R Best Picture, Best Actor & Best Director! (2:20) 9:10 NR No 9:10 Show Tue or Thu

(2:45 ANOMALISA MILK

MILK – Rolling Stone “Haunting and Hypnotic!” “Wise, Humble and Effortlessly (1:30) 4:10 6:45 Funny!” 9:30 R – Newsweek 4:45) 6:45 8:45

THETHE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO FINEST HOURS Please Note: 1:30 Show Sat, Thu Please Note: No No 1:30 Show Sat, No No 6:45 6:45 Show ShowPG-13 Thu WAITRESS

WAITRESS (1:10) 4:30 7:307:40 NR 9:55 (12:40 3:00 5:15) (1:30) 4:00 7:10 9:30 Best R Picture! 5 Academy Award Noms Including “★★★1/2! AnFROST/NIXON unexpected Gem!” – USA Today

KUNGFROST/NIXON FU PANDA 3 PG (2:15)Mysterious, 7:20 R GREENBERG “Swoonly 3D: (12:15)Romatic, 2D: (2:30 4:45)Hilarious!” 6:50 9:00 (12:00) 9:50 R – Slant5:00 Magazine

REVOLuTIONARY ROAD 4:40) 7:45 R THE“Deliciously REVENANT unsettling!” PARIS, JE (1:30 T’AIME (11:45) 4:45 9:50– RLA Times (1:15) 4:15 7:00 9:30 R THE GHOST WRITER THEpresents BIG SHORT Kevin Jorgenson the California R Premiere of (2:15) 7:15 PG-13 Wed: No 7:10 show (1:50 4:30) 7:10 9:50 PuRE: A BOuLDERING FLICK Michael Moore’s Thu, Feb 26th at 7:15R THE CAROL MOST DANGEROuS (4:30) SICKO MOVIES IN MORNING MAN INTHE AMERICA STAR WARS:

Starts Fri, June 29th! Fri, Sat, Sun &PENTAGON Mon DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THENow PAPERS Advance Tickets On Sale at Box Office! 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 NR No7:30 6:50 Show Tue or Thu FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:30 5:00 10:00 No Passes (12:30 3:30)6:50 6:30 9:30 PG-13 10:15 AM VICKY Their CRISTINA BARCELONA First Joint Venture In 25 Years! (1:50) 7:00 10:20 AM CHANGELING Venessa Redgrave Meryl Streep Glenn CloseAM CHEECH CHONG’S Mon: No AND 7:00 Wed: No (1:50) 10:40 RACHEL GETTING MARRIED 10:45 AM HEYSHORTS WATCH THIS 2009 LIVE ACTION (Fri/Mon Only))Mon: EVENING No show (12:15) 10:45 Sat, Apr17th at 11pm & Tue, Apr 20th 8pmAM 2009 ANIMATED SHORTS (Sun Only) Starts Fri, June 29th!

THE FORCE AWAKENS SPOTLIGHT

ALL AGES WELCOMED • BISTRO MENU ITEMS, BEER & WINE AVAILABLE IN ALL 4 AUDITORIUMS HEALDSBURG • RAVENFILMCENTER.COM

THE DANISH GIRL BROOKLYN (11:30) PG-13 Wed: No show ROOM (11:30) 9:35 R Wed: No 9:35

23 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 3-9, 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Film

January 29 - February 14


Music

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FE BR UARY 3-9, 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

24 FUNCTIONAL ART

wo ie ni tikonoronhkwa amo

s’agapo

Je t’aime

Bahibik

Doostat d aram

miluji te

Just say... I Love You,

VALENTINE

fine & fashion jewelry beautiful handmade gifts supporting local artists since 1999

146 N. Main St., Sebastopol 707.829.3036 ~ Daily 10:30 to 6:00pm, Sunday til 5:00pm www.artisanafunctionalart.com

LISA ARTISANA 1204 BOHO JAM

OM Into

Love McNear’s Dining House

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner THUR 2/4 • 7:30PM DOORS • 21+ SINGER/SONGWRITER

THE WHITE BUFFALO

DRINKS THE KOOLAID

FRI 2/5 • 8PM DOORS • 21+ SINGER/SONGWRITER

G. LOVE & SPECIAL SAUCE SAT 2/6 • 7:30PM DOORS • 21+ POP

YOUNG DUBLINERS FRI 2/12 • 7:30PM DOORS • 21+ POP/SOUL

THE ENGLISH BEAT

• Local Handcrafted Jewelry • Passion Candles by Aloha Bay • Sex Vitality Botanicals

FEATURING Crown Califa American Apparel Shire Fit & Co. North Bay’s Finest

SAT 2/13 • 8:45PM DOORS • 21+ 80’s, 90’s NOW HITS

WONDERBREAD 5

SUN 2/14 • 7:30PM DOORS • 21+ CALIFORNIA ROOTS PRESENTS: AN EVENING WITH

MATISYAHU

SAT 2/20 • 8PM DOORS • 21+ POP

PRIDE & JOY

AN EVENING WITH No Children Under 10 to All Ages Shows 23 Petaluma Blvd, Petaluma

707.765.2121

www.mcnears.com

Love Songs

Famed NYC pianist joins Symphony Pops on stage BY CHARLIE SWANSON

P

DON’T FORGET…WE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

PLUS ALICE

SO SWEET Billy Stritch’s concert will feature music from Sinatra, Nat King Cole and others.

OM

3851 Sebastopol Rd Suite 103A Santa Rosa

707.843.4866

erformer and composer Billy Stritch is one of New York City’s most sought-after musicians, working with greats like Liza Minnelli and playing everywhere, from piano bars to Broadway, with classic showmanship and a broad musical range. On Feb. 14, Valentine’s Day, Stritch joins the Santa Rosa Symphony and guest maestro Michael Berkowitz at the Wells Fargo Center for the Arts in Santa Rosa for an afternoon Symphony Pops concert, “Love Is a Many Splendored Thing,” that features a program of love songs from icons like Frank Sinatra and Nat King Cole. “I’ve been into this music since I was really young,” Stritch says. “It was music I really resonated

with and songs that I thought were wonderful.” Growing up in Texas, Stritch was already playing piano by ear at the age of 12, as well as singing at churches and country clubs. At a young age, he dove deep into the music of George Gershwin and Cole Porter. Stritch’s first foray into performing came while attending the University of Houston and forming a jazz vocal trio. That eventually brought him to New York City, where he played Carnegie Hall with legendary singer Mel Tormé. Moving to New York after collage, Stritch made a living playing small supper clubs and bars; he was discovered by Liza Minnelli some 25 years ago. Since then, it’s been a whirlwind of shows on Broadway, at Radio City Music Hall and elsewhere. Stritch still plays the clubs, touring the country in various tribute shows and revues. For the upcoming performance in Santa Rosa, he is looking forward to sharing the stage with longtime friend Michael Berkowitz. “Mike is someone I’ve known many, many years,” Stritch says. Berkowitz and Stritch worked together for years as Minnelli’s band and musical arrangers. “But I haven’t done anything with Berk for two or three years now, so we’re excited about this.” Berkowitz, the longtime Symphony Pops conductor, approached Stritch about this show last year and asked him to suggest a female vocalist who could accompany the concert. Stritch immediately thought of award-winning singer Gabrielle Stravelli. “She’s got a terrific jazz feel, and she’s a lot of fun,” Stritch says. “She’s done things with big bands more than I have. She’s going to work into it perfectly.” Stritch is also looking forward to performing these classic standards with a full symphony. “It’s exciting to do the songs, but what’s just as exciting is to do them in these settings.” Symphony Pops presents ‘Love Is a Many Splendored Thing’ on Sunday, Feb. 14, at the Wells Fargo Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 3pm. $37 and up. 707.546.3600.


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY G Love & Special Sauce

Longtime Philadelphia hip-hop and blues band is back with a new album, “Love Saves the Day,” and those famous eyebrows. Feb 5, 9pm. $30 and up. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Merle Haggard

Widely regarded as country music’s greatest living recording artist, Haggard plays from his 50 years of hits. Feb 10, 8pm. $45-$85. Wells Fargo Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Pato Banton & the Now Generation British reggae singer, known worldwide for his uplifting positive music, graces the stage with his band for a celebration of Bob Marley. Feb 6, 9pm. $15-$20. Redwood Cafe, 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

MARIN COUNTY Communion

Phil Lesh’s ensemble also includes Terrapin favorites Stu Allen, Ross James, Grahame Lesh, Alex Koford and Scott Guberman Feb 4, 8pm. $49. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

alumni artist-in-residence musicians and special guest Marnie Breckenridge perform classic and contemporary works. Reservations required. Feb 5, 7pm. Free. Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Annex Wine Bar

Wed, Calvin Ross. Feb 5, the Mark Larson Band. 865 W Napa St, Sonoma. 707.938.7779.

Annie O’s Music Hall

Sun, 5pm, Sunday Dance Party with the Blues Defenders. Feb 4, Levi Lloyd. Feb 5, Highway Poets with Marshall House Project and Girls & Boys. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.542.1455.

Arlene Francis Center Tues, Open Didgeridoo Clinic. Wed, Open Mic. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Barley & Hops Tavern

Feb 4, Mark McDonald. Feb 5, New Skye. Feb 6, Dave Hamilton. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.874.9037.

Bergamot Alley

Feb 6, the Americans. 328-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8720.

The Big Easy

New Century Chamber Orchestra welcomes British violinist Daniel Hope in an eclectic and personal program of works dedicated to his mentor and friend, Yehudi Menuhin. Feb 7, 5pm. $29$61. Osher Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Feb 3, Bruce Gordon & the Acrosonics. Feb 4, Sweet Potato 5. Feb 5, the Pulsators. Feb 6, Barrio Manouche and the Oddjob Ensemble. Feb 7, Miano Jazz Trio. Feb 9, 5:30pm, Mardi Gras Day Mambofest with Rhythmtown Jive. Feb 10, Tracy Rose and friends. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.4631.

Scott Pemberton

Brixx Pizzeria

Hope for Menuhin

Oregon native’s self-described “Timber Rock” is a funky and woodsy blend of rock and roll weirdness. Feb 4, 10pm. $12$14. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.1100.

NAPA COUNTY For the Love of Music

Lincoln Theater’s current and

Feb 6, Third Rail Band. 16 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.766.8162.

B&V Whiskey Bar & Grille

Tues, “Reggae Market” DJ night. 400 First St E, Sonoma. 707.938.7110.

Cellars of Sonoma

Tues, Wavelength. Feb 4, Craig Corona. Feb 5, Ricky Alan Ray.

25

Coffee Catz

Mon, open mic. Tues, 12pm, Jerry Green’s Peaceful Piano Hour. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 3-9, 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

Feb 6, John Pita. 133 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.578.1826.

Corkscrew Wine Bar Feb 9, Staggerwing. 100 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.789.0505.

Dry Creek Kitchen

Feb 8, Susan Sutton and Piro Patton Duo. Feb 9, Ian Scherer and Steve Froberg Duo. 317 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.0330.

Ellington Hall

Feb 7, 1pm, the Dixie Giants. 3535 Industrial Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.545.6150.

Finley Community Center

Get $5 off premium price per ticket use promo code: “Skiffle”

Mon, 11am, Proud Mary’s ukulele jam and lessons. First Friday of every month, Larry Broderick Trio. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

Flamingo Lounge

Feb 5, Stax City. Feb 6, UB707. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

French Garden

Feb 5, Bear’s Belly. Feb 6, Christian Foley-Beining Trio. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Friar Tuck’s

Fri, DJ Night. Wed, Sat, karaoke. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.792.9847.

Gaia’s Garden

707.829.7300 230 PETALUMA AVE | SEBASTOPOL

Feb 3, Judith Lerner’s Hand Pans. Feb 5, Virgil Elliott. Feb 10, Gaian String Trio. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

EVERY TUES AT 7PM WITH BILL THU FEB 4

Green Music Center

FRI FEB 5

Feb 6, Ms Lisa Fischer and Grand Baton. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

OPEN MIC NIGHT

CASH'D OUT

$15/DOORS 6/SHOW 7/21+

SPARK AND WHISPER KEITH GREENINGER $15/DOORS 8/SHOW 8:30/21+

SAT FEB 6

Green Music Center Schroeder Hall

Feb 5, One Great City Duo. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Guerneville Library

VOKAB KOMPANY

+ 808 BAND WITH RADIOACTIVE $10/DOORS 9/SHOW 10/21+

SUN FEB 7

LAUGH SABBATH (EVERY 3RD SUNDAY)

MYLES WEBER

$10/DOORS 7/SHOW 8/21+

Feb 6, 2pm, Gravenstein Mandolin Ensemble. 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

MON FEB 8

HopMonk Sebastopol

THU FEB 11

Tues, open mic night. Feb 4, Cash’d Out. Feb 5, Spark & Whisper. Feb 6, Vokab Company. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300. )

26

MONDAY NIGHT EDUTAINMENT WITH

YOUNG FYAH

(1-BLOOD/KING OF KINGS)

$10/LADIES $5 B4 11/DOORS-SHOW 10/21+

EUFORQUESTRA

$10/DOORS 8/SHOW 8:45/21+

FRI FEB 12

PEPPERLAND

$10/DOORS 8/SHOW 8:45/21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM Book your

next event with us, up to 250, kim@hopmonk.com

Thur 2/04 • Doors 9:30pm • ADV $12 / DOS $14

Scott Pemberton Fri 2/05 • Doors 8pm • ADV $17 / DOS $20

Natural Wonder - The Ultimate Stevie Wonder Experience Sun 2/07 • 3:30pm • FREE

Super Bowl Party Tue 2/09 • Doors 7pm • ADV $14 / DOS $16

Michael Landau Group with Kirk Fletcher Band Wed 2/10 • Doors 7pm • $17

Peter Bradley Adams

with Molly Parden Sun 2/14 • Doors 7pm • ADV $17 / DOS $20 Celebrate Valentine's Day with

Jon Cleary

Mon 2/15 • Doors 7pm • ADV $22 / DOS $25 The Skiffle Players feat. Cass McCombs, Farmer Dave Scher, Neal Casal, Dan Horne & Aaron Sperske Wed 2/17 • Doors 7pm • ADV $38 / DOS $44

Ottmar Liebert & Luna Negra www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FE BR UARY 3-9, 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

26

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Fireside Dining 7 Days a Week

Sebastiani Theatre

HopMonk Sonoma

Feb 5, Jesse Hanson. Feb 6, Dan Martin. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

D I N N E R & A S H OW

First Fri HANNAN Fr idays Feb 5 JAERRY Marin Treasure 8:00 / No Cover

Jamison’s Roaring Donkey

OLKER STRIFLER BAND Feb 6 V Original Blues Grooves 8:30 ♥♥♥ Valentine’s Day Weekend ♥♥♥

Wed, open mic night. Feb 6, Highway Poets and Stubborn Sons. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.772.5478.

Sat

Fri

Double Header! Feb 12 PETTY THEFT and Sat

Music ( 25

Jasper O’Farrell’s

San Francisco Tribute to Tom Petty

Feb 13 and the Heartbreakers 8:30 ♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥

Tues, Sessions hip-hop and reggae night. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

E JAZZ HOT Feb 14 L Romantic French Music &

Lagunitas Tap Room

Celebrate Valentine’s Day with

Sun

Fabulous Food and Drink! 7:30

♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥ lu s Dance Feb 19 STOMPY JONES 7:45 p Lessons! Fri

The Hottest Swing

Feb 21 SAN GERONIMO Sun

Hard Charging Americana 4:00 / No Cover

TOMMY CASTRO AND

Mar 12 THE PAINKILLERS 8:30 Mar 19 STEVE LUCKY AND Sat

THE R HUMBA BUMS FEATURING MISS CARMEN GETIT 8:30

April 18: Hello Dolly (1969) Stood Still (1956)

Mar 11 Blues Weekend! Sat

March 14: Quiet Man (1952) May 16: The Day the Earth

Fri

and

February 15: Adam’s Rib (1974)

ce Danrty ! Pa

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

June 13: The Pink Panther (1963) Tickets : $9 at the door

Movies call 707.996.2020 Tickets call 707.996.9756 SONOMA sebastianitheatre.com

Feb 3, JimBo Trout. Feb 4, Ragtag Sullivan. Feb 5, Hessel Road Project. Feb 6, Jimbo Scott. Feb 7, Junk Parlor. Feb 10, the Rosetown Ramblers. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Last Record Store

Feb 6, 2pm, Lungs and Limbs. 1899-A Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.1963.

Lavish Hi-Fi

First Thursday of every month, 5:30pm, Music for Enjoyment and Pleasure. 402 Moore Ln, Healdsburg. 707.433.9199.

Many Rivers Books & Tea

Feb 5, Lamentatio Orpheo with Dominic Schaner. 130 S Main St, Sebastopol. 707.829.8871.

Mc T’s Bullpen

Mon, Wed, Fri, DJ Miguel. Feb 6, Levi Lloyd. Feb 7, 4pm, Jimi James. Feb 7, 8pm, George Heagerty & Never the Same. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

Murphy’s Irish Pub

Feb 5, Deluxe. Feb 6, Andrew Freeman. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre

Feb 3, Snoop Dogg. Sold-out. Feb 4, the White Buffalo and Alice Drinks the Kool Aid. Feb 6, Young Dubliners. Feb 10, Antsy McClain & the Troub Trio. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Phoenix Theater

Feb 5, Earth Crisis and Sworn Vengeance. Feb 6, Hatriot with Water into Blood and the King Must Die. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Prasada

Feb 7, 5:30pm, Jens Jarvie & the Heart Wide Open. 3880 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental, 203.241.7115.

Redwood Cafe

Thurs, Open Mic. Feb 3, Irish set dancing. Feb 5, D’Bunchovus. Feb 6, 3pm, Shawna Miller student recital. Feb 7, 5pm, Gypsy Kisses. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Remy’s Bar & Lounge First Friday of every month,

Jay Fresco. Feb 6, Night Before featuring Bobby V. 130 Stony Point Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.578.1963.

Rio Nido Roadhouse Feb 6, Mardi Gras! with Weekend at Bernie’s. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Rossi’s 1906

Feb 4, 6:30pm, Paint Night at Rossi’s. Feb 5, the Cork Pullers acoustic. Feb 6, “Saints & Sinners Ball” with T Luke & the Tight Suits and Dixie Giants. 401 Grove St, Sonoma. 707.343.0044.

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub

Feb 6, Wine Country Swing. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Sonoma Speakeasy

Thurs, R&B classics. Fri, Sat, R&B party. Sun, R&B diva night. Tues, New Orleans R&B night. 452 First St E, Ste G, Sonoma. 707.996.1364.

Spancky’s Bar

Thurs, 7pm, Thursday Night Blues Jam. Thurs, 11pm, DJ Selecta Konnex. Feb 5, Jackson Stone Band. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Toad in the Hole Pub Sun, live music. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

The Tradewinds Bar

Tues, Open Mic. Wed, Sonoma Cody Edison

MEDICAL CANNABIS DELIVERY SERVICE C-JUICE AND PRE-FILLED CARTRIGES AVAILABLE GREENLIGHT ALTERNATIVES

XOXO SPECIAL VALENTINE’S PRIX FIXE MENU

707.484.8921 WWW.GREENLIGHT ALTERNATIVES.COM

Serving Sat & Sun Feb 13 & 14 ESPRESSO • DELI • CATERING WOOD FIRED PIZZA WINE BAR • COMFORT FOOD

707.827.9700 EARTHSBOUNTYKITCHEN.COM 5755 MOUNTAIN HAWK WAY SANTA ROSA, CA

AMERICAN MADE L.A. rock band the Americans are out the door and should hit

Healdsburg’s Bergamot Alley by, oh, Feb. 6. See Clubs & Venues, p25.


Belrose Theater

Thurs, open mic night. Second Wednesday of every month, Ragtime jam. 1415 Fifth Ave, San Rafael. 415.454.6422.

Benissimo Ristorante & Bar

Thurs, Fri, live music. 18 Tamalpais Dr, Corte Madera. 415.927.2316.

Cafe Verde

Feb 6, Ruth Gerson. 502 Tamalpais Dr, Corte Madera. 415.927.1060.

Community Congregational Church

Feb 7, 10am, Eve Decker. 145 Rock Hill Dr, Tiburon.

Fenix

Wed, Pro blues jam. Feb 4, Kymberly Jackson. Feb 5, Kevin Russell Band. Feb 6, the Jean Genies. Feb 7, 11:30am, Jim Pasquel & Sheldon Lee Cowen brunch show. Feb 7, 6:30pm, the Doorslammers. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

George’s Nightclub

Feb 6, DJ Jorge. Feb 7, Mexican Banda. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Ghiringhelli Pizzeria Grill & Bar

First Sunday of every month, 5pm, Erika Alstrom with Dale Alstrom’s Jazz Society. 1535 South Novato Blvd, Novato. 415.878.4977.

HopMonk Novato

Feb 3, open mic night with Revenent. Feb 4, Atilla Viola & the Bakersfield Boys. Feb 5, Aqua Nett. Feb 6, IrieFuse with Yeshua & the Hightones. Feb 10, open mic with B Sharp. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

JB Piano Company

Feb 4, Dick Fregulia Trio plus Piro Patton. 540 Irwin St, San Rafael. 415.456.9280.

19 Broadway Club

Mon, open mic. Wed, Walt the Dog. Feb 4, DJ Adam S. Feb 5, First Friday Reggae. Feb 6, New Monsoon. Feb 7, 9pm, Fairfax blues jam. Feb 9, 6pm, the Jeb Brady Band. Feb 9, 8:30pm, the People’s Blues. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar

Tues, open mic. Feb 5, Michael

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Feb 3, Ricki Rush. Feb 4, Donna D’Acuti. Feb 9, Panama Jazz Trio. Feb 10, DownLow Duo. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Papermill Creek Saloon

Feb 6, Bruce Brymer’s Rockit Science. 1 Castro, Forest Knolls. 415.488.9235.

Peri’s Silver Dollar

Mon, Billy D’s open mic. Feb 3, the Weissmen. Feb 4, Burnsy’s Sugar Shack. Feb 5, Swoop Unit. Feb 6, Sucker MC’s. Feb 7, the Milestone. Feb 9, Fresh Baked Blues & Waldo’s Special. Feb 10, the New Sneakers. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio

Feb 5, Jerry Hannan. Feb 6, Volker Strifler Band. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Mon, Open Mic. Feb 5, Natural Wonder. Feb 7, 11am, the Cork Pullers brunch show. Feb 9, Michael Landau Group. Feb 10, Peter Bradley Adams and Molly Parden. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.1100.

Terrapin Crossroads

Feb 9, Mardi Gras with Lebo and friends. Feb 10, Lettuce. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

Throckmorton Theatre Wed, 12pm, Noon concert series. Feb 7, 5:30pm, Jazz Sundays with Nathan Bickart Trio. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

NAPA COUNTY Deco Lounge at Capp Heritage Vineyards Sat, live music. 1245 First St, Napa. 707.254.1922.

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant

Feb 5, Disrupted Continuum. 14 Bolinas Ave, Fairfax. 415.453.7999.

Tues, the Used Blues Band. Feb 4, Ordinary Sons. Feb 5, Charles Wheal Band. Feb 7, the Special Guests. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Rickey’s

Hydro Grill

Feb 5, SwingSet. Feb 6, Charles Wheal Band. 250 Entrada Dr, Novato. 415.883.9477.

First Saturday of every month, Always Elvis. 1403 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9777.

Sausalito Cruising Club

Jarvis Conservatory

Revolution 9

Feb 5, Mardi Gras Mambofest with Rhythmtown-Jive. 300 Napa St, Sausalito.

Sausalito Seahorse

Tues, Jazz with Noel Jewkes and friends. Wed, Tango with Marcelo Puig and Seth Asarnow. Feb 4, Jason Wright. Feb 5, the 7th Sons. Feb 6, Aquarian Bash & Dance. Feb 7, 5pm, Orquesta la Moderna Tradicion. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899.

Smiley’s Schooner Saloon

Sun, open mic. Mon, Epicenter Soundsystem reggaae. Feb 4, Josephine Johnson. Feb 5, McHugh & Devine. Feb 6, Just Friends. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Spitfire Lounge

First Thursday of every month, the North Bass DJ night. First Friday of every month, Truthlive. 848 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.5551.

Studio 55 Marin

Feb 5, David Nelson & Eric Thompson. 1455 E Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.

27

Sweetwater Music Hall

Feb 6, It’s a Grand Night for Singers. 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Molinari Caffe

Thurs, Open Mic. 828 Brown St, Napa. 707.927.3623.

Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater

Feb 6, 7pm, Napa Valley Youth Symphony and Sinfonia. 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 3-9, 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

MARIN COUNTY

Aragon Quartet. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

NEW SHOW: ON SALE MARCH 4!

9/7

Ray LaMontagne Become a Member to Get Your Tickets First!

FEBRUARY

2/10 Merle Haggard 2/18 The Summit: The Manhattan Transfer Meets Take 6

2/22 Black Violin 2/26 CMT PRESENTS Jennifer Nettles

2016 Next Women of Country Tour with Brandy Clark & more!

707.546.3600

wellsfargocenterarts.org

The Sphinx Rule by Easton, 2005

County Blues Society. Feb 6, the Restless Natives Band. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

456 Tenth St, Santa Rosa • Tue–Sat 11–5 707.781.7070 • calabigallery.com

A Birth at a Time Angela Chang, LM, CPM HoMe BirtH Midwife / HosPitAL douLA NAturAL CHiLdBirtH eduCAtioN eNCAPsuLAtioN / MAssAge Serving abirthatatime@gmail.com Sonoma www.abirthatatime.com County

818.939.8982 (cell)

Silo’s

Feb 3, Syria T Berry. Feb 4, Shelby Lanterman with Kristen VanDyke and Zak Fennie. Feb 5, Brian Coutch Band. Feb 6, Jackson Stone Band. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uncorked at Oxbow

100% Natural, Organic Henna/Mehndi

Thurs, open mic night. Fri, Sat, live music. 605 First St, Napa. 707.927.5864.

Celebrate Love!

Uva Trattoria

Feb 3, Bob Castell Blanch. Feb 4, Trio Solea. Feb 5, Jack Pollard and Dan Daniels. Feb 6, Jackie and friends. Feb 7, Bob Castell Blanch. 1040 Clinton St, Napa. 707.255.6646.

Lovers and Couples 50% OFF Open tO all ages • grand prize $100 Fri Feb 26 • 7–9, 6:30 dOOrs • $15 WindsOr COmmunity Center 901 adele drive auditiOns: Jan 29, 6:30–8

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE PRIVATE AND GROUP CLASSES! 100 Brown St, Ste. 140, Sebastopol www.facebook.com/hennabyhayet 707.243.2022


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FE BR UARY 3-9, 20 1 6 | BO H E M I AN.COM

28

Arts Events RECEPTIONS Feb 4

Fairfax Library, “For the Love of Art,” group show of oil and acrylic paintings by local artists. 7pm. 2097 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. 415.453.8092. Robert Allen Fine Art, “Works on Paper,” group exhibit features prints, drawings and mixed media from Susan Adame, Tracey Adams, Aleah Koury and others. 5:30pm. 301 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.2800.

Feb 5

Chroma Gallery, “Small Works Show,” ninth annual show features several galleries in the SOFA arts district displaying paintings, sculptures and ceramics no larger than a square foot. 5pm. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.293.6051. My Daughter the Framer, “Botanicals, Birds & Butterflies,” Sonoma County colored pencil artists Vi Strain, Elizabeth Peyton and Nancy Wheeler Klippert show detailed depictions of nature’s subjects. 5pm. 637 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.542.3599.

Galleries SONOMA COUNTY Art Museum of Sonoma County Through Feb 7, “Inside Magnolia Editions: Collaboration & Innovation,” an experimental collection of renowned works from the topnotch Oakland printmaking company. 505 B St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.579.1500.

Calabi Gallery Through Feb 6, “Woodblock Prints by Michael McMillan,” the diverse artist’s fine woodwork centers an show that also features works by Douglas Ballou, Mary Jarvis, Sherrie Lovler and others. 456 10th St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Feb 6

di Rosa, “Radical Landscapes,” exhibition explores the natural environment through a contemporary lens with works by Bay Area-based artists. 4pm. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10 to 6. 707.226.5991. Seager Gray Gallery, “Material Matters,” third annual exploration of the interactions of artists with their materials features several local artists in various media. 5:30pm. 108 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley.

Feb 7

Sausalito Library, “Living on the Anchor,” an exhibit of photographs of Sausalito’s anchor-out community by Bente Marei Stachowske. 5pm. 420 Litho St, Sausalito. 415.289.4121.

Feb 8

The Art Wall at Shige Sushi, “Facets,” collage and paintings by Lisa Beerntsen and Deborah Salomon takes a faceted approach to space. 5:30pm. 8235 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.9753.

City Hall Council Chambers Through Feb 12, “Clark Swarthout Solo Show,” Santa Rosa artist presents an exhibit of intricate and imaginative pen and ink drawings. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Erickson Fine Art Gallery Through Feb 23, “Carlos Perez: Recent Work,” features the Healdsburg artist’s paintings in oil and mixed media exploring portraits and abstraction. 324 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. Thurs-Tues, 11 to 6. 707.431.7073.

Fogbelt Brewing Feb 3-29, “SuperMonks,” images by artist Clay Vajgrt that show the calm and peaceful side of Superheroes. 1305 Cleveland Ave, Santa

Rosa. Wed; 3pm to 9pm, ThursSat; noon to 10pm, Sun; noon to 8pm 707.978.3400.

Fulton Crossing

Through Feb 29, “February Art Show,” Alanna Tillman’s exhibit of acrylic paintings, Craig Janakos’ vintage antiques and art showroom, Robert Redus’ jewelry and new gallery artists Henrik Liisberg, Teri Sloat and Adam Springer are all featured. 1200 River Rd, Fulton. Sat-Sun, noon to 5pm 707.536.3305.

Gallery One

Through Feb 22, “White Plus One,” juried exhibit. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Graton Gallery

Through Feb 28, “Small Works Show,” fifth annual group show is juried by Sandra Speidel and Clark Mitchell. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sat, 10:30 to 6; Sun, 10:30 to 4. 707.829.8912.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts

Through Feb 7, “Annual Members Exhibition,” show provides a unique opportunity for HCA artist members to exhibit their work free from the restrictions of traditional shows. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

History Museum of Sonoma County

Through Feb 28, “Journey to Fountaingrove,” exhibit chronicles the life of Japanese national Nagasawa Kanaye, who took over the Fountaingrove estate and made renowned wines in Sonoma County. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. TuesSun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

Through Feb 7, “Water Media Exhibit,” paintings from the International Exhibition of the American Watercolor Society are on display as part of a traveling show along with a SCA water media show with local talent. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sonoma Community Center

Through Feb 26, “Andrews Hall Renovation 2013,” Owen Orser presents a photographic tribute to the center’s recent

renovations. 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. Daily, 7:30am to 11pm. 707.938.4626.

MARIN COUNTY Gallery Route One

$65. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.473.6800.

7pm. Free. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Events

Breakfast at Tiffany’s

Through Feb 14, “Aqua,” group show interprets the word aqua in a variety of ways as selected by Susan Snyder, of the Caldwell Snyder Gallery in San Francisco. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Asian New Year Celebration

MarinMOCA

Mardi Gras at the Museum

Through Feb 21, “Layers,” group show features MarinMOCA members interpreting the theme in materials or meaning. 500 Palm Dr, Novato. WedFri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 11 to 5. 415.506.0137.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts

Through Feb 18, “Art of Love,” romance is in the air with a group showing of Valentine’s-inspired work. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

NAPA COUNTY Caldwell Snyder Gallery

Feb 3-29, “Cole Morgan Solo Show,” abstract, playful and enigmatic, the shapes and forms represented in Morgan’s paintings seem to live somewhere between imagination and reality. 1328 Main St, St Helena. Open daily, 10 to 6. 415.531.6755.

Comedy Hanging with Creed

Actor and musician Creed Bratton, best known for his role of “The Office,” shares stories in a musical comedy show at the SSU student center. Feb 3, 7:30pm. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2880.

Celebrate the Year of the Monkey with delicious Asian cuisine and entertainment from Vietnamese social group. Feb 4, 2:30pm. $5. Whistlestop, 930 Tamalpais Ave, San Rafael.

ArtQuest presents a night of creole cooking, Southern cocktails and live zydeco music. Feb 6, 5:30pm. $75. Art Museum of Sonoma County, 505 B St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Mardi Gras Party for Singles

A fun mixer for single professionals includes games and prizes, masks and beads and more with mardi gras merriment. Feb 9, 7pm. $10. Spinnaker, 100 Spinnaker Dr, Sausalito. 415.332.1500.

West Side Stories

Petaluma’s own story-slam event invites you to come to tell or listen to true stories, told on stage without notes. This month’s theme is “It Takes Two to Tango.” Hosted by Dave Pokorny. Feb 3, 7:30pm. $8$10. Sonoma Valley Portworks, 613 Second St, Petaluma. 707.769.5203.

Film The Anthropologist

Dr Susan A Crate presents and discusses this climate change documentary as part of the “Science on Screen” event series. Feb 9, 6:30pm. $8-$12. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Laugh Sabbath

Best of the San Francisco Jewish Film Festival

Standup comedian Myles Weber headlines. Feb 7, 8pm. HopMonk Sebastopol, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Selections from the most recent SFJFF screens in a fourpart series. Tues, Feb 9, 7pm. $36. Osher Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Dance

The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution

Romeo & Juliet

Moscow Festival Ballet performs classic piece in time for Valentine’s Day. Feb 5, 8pm. Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium. $20-

Indie Lens pop-up screening features the first feature length documentary about the Black Panther Party and its significance to the broader American culture. Feb 8, 1 and

Start with breakfast bites and bubbly by Cindy Pawlcyn, followed by a screening of Audrey Hepburn’s iconic film. Then spend the afternoon shopping downtown St Helena. Feb 6, 11am. $20. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3946.

An Evening with Illeana Douglas

The excellent character actor, writer and director shares stories from her career in film and television, read from and sign copies of her memoir “I Blame Dennis Hopper” and show clips from her filmography. Feb 4, 7pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Keeper of the Beat

The eloquent documentary follows Barbara Borden on her path to being a worldclass percussionist practicing “drumbeat diplomacy.” Q&A and live performance with Borden and Joyce Kouffman follow the film. Feb 6, 7:30pm. $15-$20. Dance Palace, 503 B St, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Landfill Harmonic

Documentary following South American youth group the Recycled Orchestra of Cateura, who turn garbage into musical instruments, screens with a musical performance from local youth beforehand. Feb 8, 6:30pm. $7-$11. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Phil Frank’s Secret Sausalito

Frank’s clips explore Sausalito’s lesser known historic sites. Feb 5, 7pm. Sausalito Library, 420 Litho St, Sausalito. 415.289.4121.

Wild & Scenic Film Festival

Program of 11 films is full of breathtaking scenery, inspiring stories, and courageous conservationists. Feb 4, 6:30pm. $20. Bay Model Visitor Center, 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.3871.

Food & Drink Alice in Wonderland English Tea Party Enjoy afternoon tea in this


Council Chambers, 420 Litho St, Sausalito. 415.289.4117.

Painting Arcadia

Sublime Beauty:

Raphael’s “Portrait of a Lady with a Unicorn” is examined in this Illustrated Lecture by museum docent Marsha Holm. Feb 9, 7pm. Free. Corte Madera Library. 707 Meadowsweet Dr, Corte Madera. 707.924.6444.

The USACE: From the Sierras to the Sea

Talk looks back on the history of the US Army Corps of Engineers. Feb 6, 1:30pm. Free. Bay Model Visitor Center, 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.3871.

Feb 5, 7pm, “Where All Light Tends to Go” with David Joy, a “books and brew”’ reading presented by Copperfield’s Books. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.772.5478.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Feb 5, 7pm, Two Poets in Winter, with former and current Sonoma County Poet Laureates, Mike Tuggle and Iris Jamahl Dunkle. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental 707.874.9392.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books

Feb 10, 7pm, “Pacific Burn” with Barry Lancet. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Unity in Marin

Feb 3, 7pm, “A New Healing Paradigm” with Keith Braselton. Free. 600 Palm Dr, Novato.

Readings Theater Book Passage

PEACEFUL KNIGHT Artist Clay Vajgrt’s superheroes turn the action down in ‘SuperMonks’ exhibit, showing at Fogbelt Brewing in Santa Rosa. See Galleries, adjacent page. benefit for Fairfax Theatre Company, with a colorful cast of characters and hot chocolate for the kids. Feb 7, 2pm. $20. Fairfax Women’s Center, 46 Park Rd, Fairfax. 415.302.0659.

Dining with Writers Book Passage presents author Jill Nussinow reading from her book “Vegan Under Pressure” and leading a special dinner. Feb 3, 6:30pm. $95. The Spinster Sisters Restaurant, 401 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.7100.

The Great Sonoma Crab & Wine Fest Sonoma County Farm Bureau presents the 27th annual event, joining together leaders from agricultural and business communities and boasting perhaps the largest crab feed in the Bay Area. RSVP at sonomafb.org. Feb 6, 4pm. $75 and up. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.545.4200.

Respect the Craft(s) Eleven-time World Pizza

Champion Tony Gemignani teams up with Lagunitas Brewing Company for an afternoon of food and brews. First Sun of every month, 1pm. through May 1. $25 and up. Tony’s of North Beach at The Graton Casino, 630 Park Court, Rohnert Park, 586-0777.

Sausalito’s Souper Bowl of Clam Chowder Ten downtown Sausalito restaurants square off in this chowder challenge, and you can taste them all. Feb 4, 2pm. $10. Downtown Sausalito, Caledonia Street, Sausalito.

Third Anniversary Party St Florian’s Brewery celebrates three years of beers with a fun party featuring food trucks, live music and their excellent craft brews. Feb 6, 12pm. St. Florian’s Brewery, 7704A Bell Rd, Windsor. 707.838.BREW.

Veggie Sushi Love Learn how to make beautiful vegetarian sushi rolls with local ingredients, and yes, you’ll get to eat them too. Feb 4, 7pm. Free. Mill Valley Library, 375

Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.389.4292.

Wine Tish Winetastings and Jewish studies go together in this event hosted by Congregation Ner Shalom. Space is limited. Feb 6, 2pm. Orpheus Wines Tasting Room, 8910 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood. 707.282.9231.

Lectures The Havana Highway: Rum, Cars & Cigars Second small-group photography workshop taking place in Cuba is led by exhibitor Stuart Schwartz and Jock McDonald. Feb 10-16. $7450. The Image Flow, 401 Miller Ave, Ste. A, Mill Valley. 415.388.3569.

A Noël Coward Soiree Evening of wit, humor, music and laughter celebrating playwright and actor Noël Coward, presented by NPR critic Peter Robinson. Feb 4, 7pm. Sausalito City Hall-

Feb 3, 7pm, “Let the People Rule” with Geoffrey Cowan. Feb 4, 7pm, “The Lovers” with Rod Nordland. Feb 5, 7pm, “When We Fight, We Win” with Greg Jobin-Leeds. Feb 6, 11am, “The Longest Night” with Andria Williams. Feb 6, 1pm, “Your Heart Is a Muscle the Size of a Fist” with Sunil Yapa. Feb 6, 4pm, “Ultimate Immunity” with Elson Haas and Sondra Barrett. Feb 6, 7pm, “Unfinished” with William C. Gordon. Feb 7, 11:30am, “Cockatoo, Too” with Bethanie Murguia. Feb 8, 7pm, “The Blue Line” with Ingrid Betancourt. Feb 9, 7pm, “Girl Behind the Door” with John Brooks. Feb 10, 7pm, “Succulent Wild Love” with Sark and John Waddell. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Center for Spiritual Living

Feb 5, 7pm, “The Money Anxiety Cure” with Koorosh Ostowari. Free. 2075 Occidental Rd, Santa Rosa 707.546.4543.

Covenant Presbyterian Church

Feb 4, 6:30pm, The Authors Forum, four Northern California writers engage in panel discussion and Q&A session. 1226 Salvador Ave, Napa.

Glaser Center

Feb 6, 2 and 7pm, Rumi’s Caravan, mystic poetry accompanied by live music. $25-$35. 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa 707.568.5381.

Bad Dates

Jennifer King stars in this charming and slyly sweet one-woman play involving the Romanian mob, a Buddhist rainstorm and lots of shoes. Feb 5-21. $9-$25. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Brighton Beach Memoirs

The Raven presents part one of Neil Simon’s autobiographical trilogy, a bittersweet memoir that nostalgically captures the life of a struggling Jewish household in 1930s Brooklyn. Through Feb 14. $10-$25. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

A Cajun Midsummer Night’s Dream

Novato Theater Company transports Puck to the Bayou in this spicy rendition of Shakespeare’s fantastical comedy, adapted and directed by Clay David. Through Feb 21. $12-$27. Novato Theater Playhouse, 5420 Nave Dr, Novato. 415.883.4498.

From Russia with Love

The Comedies of Anton Chekhov are explored in this light-hearted love letter to theater. Through Feb 14. $10$25. Studio Theatre, 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Gem of the Ocean

Playwright August Wilson’s penultimate work in his 10-

play century cycle dramatizing the African-American experience in the 20th century is directed by New York City-based performer Daniel Alexander Jones. Through Feb 14. $10-$58. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

Into the Woods Stephen Sondheim’s massively popular musical filled with myriad fantasy characters comes to Sonoma State. Feb 4-14. $5-$17. Evert B. Person Theater, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Murder in the House of Horrors Mystery dinner theatre production looks to the audience to solve the case. Fri-Sat, 6:30pm. through Feb 13. $30. Tam Valley Community Center, 203 Marin Ave, Mill Valley.

Oh No There’s Men on the Land One-woman-show from San Francisco comedian and performer Karen Ripley takes the audience on a wild ride through her mishaps, adventures, and self-discovery in 1970s Berkeley. Feb 6, 7:30pm. $10-$20. Graton Community Club, 8996 Graton Rd, Graton.

The Road to Mecca Written by South Africa’s premiere playwright, Athol Fugard, this story of a widow who creates her own “Mecca” through art and sculpture is a stirring and loving tale of humanity. Feb 5-21. $15-$25. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.0177.

The Taming of Katy Lou The Spreckels youth in arts program’s winter performance is an old west retelling of Shakespeare’s comedy. the Taming of the Shrew. Feb 5-7. $16-$26. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

29 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 3-9, 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Docent lecture looks at one of the defining figures of modernism. Feb 9, 2pm. Sausalito City Hall-Council Chambers, 420 Litho St, Sausalito. 415.289.4117.

Jamison’s Roaring Donkey


30 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 3-9, 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

..

Uber LOVE

First Friday Film Series

Friday February 5 7:00pm

www.uberoptics.com

The Museum’s Film Series returns with more of Charles Schulz’s favorite films featured every first Friday of the month through May. Free for members; $ 5 general public

The Great Escape (1963)

Unique Frames • Digital Rx Lenses • Sunglasses • Adjustments & Repairs

19 Kentucky St.

PETALUMA

707-763-3163

2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa schulzmuseum.org  707.579.4452

Sponsored by Craig Schulz. Media sponsorship by the North Bay Bohemian.


BOHEMIAN

Catering PLACE AN AD:

Need Help Moving? Phone: 707.527.1200, Monday-Friday 8:30am-5:30pm 3205 COMPUTER Moving and Hauling Dutton Ave Fax:Fit 707.527.1288 sales@bohemian.com Get and Stay | Email: Healthy in 2016

Are you a Personal Trainer or Nutritionist? Vegan, GF and Paleo friendly. Let me cook for you or teach you how. Special events, Private Dinners. Inquires at Elmighty707@gmail.com or 707.536.1078

for Less. Rolando at 707.934.5590 or email movingandhaulingfor less@gmail.com .....................................

Help Wanted:

Extreme Pizza is Hiring for New Windsor Location. Drivers, cooks and cashiers PT-tips Call 707.206.1968

REPAIR SERVICES

Santa Rosa

707.546.0000

Newly Expanded

Extra Large Storage Units Super Move-in Specials 10x20 10x30 12x30 $180 $260 $295

Starting Rates—Call for Details

For Windows Based PCs & Laptops • Servicing all Microsoft Operating Systems from Windows XP–Windows 10 • Installation of PC Hardware • Removal of Malware & Spyware • Network & Streaming Set Up $ 20 per hour

Adam Alboher

&

707.695.8690

Alboher@yahoo.com

www.StorageMasterSR.com

Alternative Health Well-Being SUBOXONE

SATURDAY, FEB 6

STACS

Come and get a B-12 shot to help you with stress and to boost your energy.

SUBOXONE Treatment and counseling services Confidential Program. 707.576.1919

Provider of Pleasure

Classic massage by a mature gentleman. Women, men,couples. Since 1991. Aft/eve appts. Santa Rosa 707.799.4467(C) or 707.535.0511 (L) Jimmy ....................................

Full Body Sensual Massage

With a mature, playful CMT. Comfortable incall location near the J.C. in Santa Rosa. Soothing, relaxing, and fun. Gretchen 707.478.3952. Veterans Discount.

NEW! $

30 (reg. $35)

Dr. Moses Goldberg ND Dr. Dana Michaels ND

175 Concourse Blvd., Santa Rosa

707.284.9200

House Builder Design-Build Room Additions Straw Bale Specialists

VIVI

MASSAGE STUDIO

Drew Allen

General Contractor

FOOT REFLEXOLGY THERAPEUTIC BODY MASSAGE

707.981.7128

707.477.1435 drewallengeneralcontractor.com

620 E. Washington St. Suite 208, Petaluma

Great Massage

A Wild Irish Rose

License No.: CSLB 603121

By Joe, CMT. Swedish massage, 18 years experience. Will do outcalls. 707.228.6883

Spiritual

Connections Finding inspiration & connecting with your community

New Heart Ministry

Spring Hills Church. Faith Based Recovery. Mondays at 6:30. Childcare and food. More info: 707.579.5683, X 305

Mature, Independent in Marin. Call for photos. Please call before 11pm. No calls from blocked phone #. Kara, 415.233.2769

Unity of Santa Rosa An inclusive, spiritually-minded community. All are welcome. Workshops and events. Sunday School & Service 10:30am 4857 Old Redwood Hwy tel: 707.542.7729 UnityofSantaRosa.org

word “quaintrelle” refers to a woman who treats her life as a work of art. She is passionate about cultivating beauty and pleasure and wit in everything she is and does. But she’s not a narcissistic socialite. She’s not a snooty slave to elitist notions of style. Her aim is higher and sweeter: to be an impeccable, well-crafted fount of inspiration and blessings. I propose that we resuscitate and tinker with this term, and make it available to you. In 2016, you Tauruses of all genders will be inclined to incorporate elements of the quaintrelle, and you will also be skilled at doing so. If you have not yet dived in to this fun work, start now!

CANCER (June 21–July 22)

NOW is the time to boost your immunity!

First Saturday of the month!

TAURUS (April 20–May 20) The archaic English

B12HappyHour.com

Only $20 (20% off)

10am–noon

ARIES (March 21–April 19) The Bible’s Book of Exodus tells the story of the time Moses almost met God. “Show me your glory, please,” the prophet says to his deity, who’s hiding. “You cannot see my face,” God replies, “but I will show you my back parts.” That’s good enough for Moses. He agrees. I hope that you, too, will be satisfied with a tantalizingly partial epiphany, Aries. I’m pretty sure that if you ask nicely, you can get a glimpse of a splendor that’s as meaningful to you as God was to Moses. It may only be the “back parts,” but that should still stir you and enrich you.

The Immune Boost

THURSDAYS, 4–6PM

available for Safe Oxy, Roxy, Norco, Vicodin, and Other Opiate Withdrawal!

For the week of February 3

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) Sufi teacher (and Gemini) Idries Shah offered this teaching: “They say that when Fortune knocks, you should open the door. But why should you make Fortune knock, by keeping the door shut?” Let’s make this your featured meditation, Gemini. If there is anywhere in your life where proverbial doors are shut—either in the world outside of you or the world inside of you—unlock them and open them wide. Make it easy for Fortune to reach you.

B-12 SHOTS HAPPY HOUR!

SPECIAL B-12 HOURS

Astrology

Certified Male Bodyworker (CMP)

With 17 years of experience, provides relaxing massage. Specializing in lower back & sciatica issues. 707.542.6856

Way of the Shaman

Shamanic Journey, Power and Healing. Explore power animals, shamanic drumming and healing. Feb. 6 & 7, Santa Rosa. Foundation for Shamanic Studies. 541.708.0473 spiritquest@cruzers.com

BY ROB BREZSNY

irregular. That’s because the influences that unbalance you will be the same influences that tickle your fancy and charge your batteries and ring your bell and sizzle your bacon.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21) The

African Association was a 19th-century British group dedicated to exploring West Africa. Its members hoped to remedy Europeans’ ignorance about the area’s geography. In one of the association’s most ambitious projects, it commissioned an adventurer named Henry Nicholls to discover the origin and to chart the course of the legendary Niger River. Nicholls and his crew set out by ship in their quest, traveling north up a river that emptied into the Gulf of Guinea. They didn’t realize, and never figured out, that they were already on the Niger River. I’m wondering if there’s a comparable situation going on in your life, Scorpio. You may be looking for something that you have already found.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21)

Richard P. Feynman was a brilliant physicist who won a Nobel Prize in 1965 for his pioneering work in quantum electrodynamics. He also played the bongo drums and was a competent artist. But excessive pride was not a problem for him. “I’m smart enough to know that I’m dumb,” he testified. “The first principle is that you must not fool yourself—and you are the easiest person to fool.” I suggest you adopt him as your role model for the next two weeks, Sagittarius. All of us need periodic reminders that we’ve got a lot to learn, and this is your time. Be extra vigilant in protecting yourself from your own misinformation and misdirection.

Many Cancerians harbor a chronic ache of melancholy about what they’re missing. The unavailable experience in question could be an adventure they wish they were having or an absent ally they long to be near or a goal they wish they had time to pursue. That’s the bad news. The good news is that you can harness the chronic ache. In fact, it’s your birthright as a Cancerian to do so. If you summon the willpower to pull yourself up out of the melancholy, you can turn its mild poison into a fuel that drives you to get at least some of what you’ve been missing. Now is a favorable time to do just that.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) Food connoisseur Anthony Bourdain has a TV show that enables him to travel the globe indulging in his love of exotic cuisine. He takes his sensual delights seriously. In Charleston, S.C., he was ecstatic to experience the flavorful bliss of soft-shell crab with lemon pasta and shaved bottarga. “Frankly,” he told his dining companion, “I’d slit my best friend’s throat for this.” Bourdain was exaggerating for comic effect, but I’m concerned you may actually feel that strongly about the gratifications that are almost within your grasp. I have no problem with you getting superintense in pursuit of your enjoyment. But please stop short of taking extreme measures. You know why.

LEO (July 23–August 22) How will the next chapter of your story unfold? I suspect there are two possible scenarios. In one version, the abundance of choices overwhelms you. You get bogged down in an exciting but debilitating muddle, and become frazzled, frenetic, and overwrought. In the other possible scenario, you navigate your way through the lavish freedom with finesse. Your intuition reveals exactly how to make good use of the fertile contradictions. You’re crafty, adaptable and effective. So which way will you go? How will the tale unfold? I think it’s completely up to you. Blind fate will have little to do with it. For best results, all you have to do is stay in close touch with the shining vision of what you really want.

AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) You may sometimes be drawn to people or places or ideas long before they can give you their gifts. Although you sense their potential value, you might have to ripen before you’ll be ready to receive their full bounty. Here’s how author Elias Canetti expressed it: “There are books, that one has for 20 years without reading them, that one always keeps at hand, yet one carefully refrains from reading even a complete sentence. Then after 20 years, there comes a moment when suddenly, as though under a high compulsion, one cannot help taking in such a book from beginning to end, at one sitting: it is like a revelation.” I foresee a comparable transition happening for you, Aquarius.

VIRGO (August 23–September 22) “To hell with my suffering,” wrote Arthur Rimbaud in his poem “May Banners.” I suggest you make that your mantra for now. Anytime you feel a sour thought impinging on your perceptions, say, “To hell with my suffering.” And then immediately follow it up with an expostulation from another Rimbaud poem, “It’s all too beautiful.” Be ruthless about this, Virgo. If you sense an imminent outbreak of pettiness or if a critical voice in your head blurts out a curse or if a pesky ghost nags you, simply say, “To hell with my suffering,” and then, “It’s all too beautiful.” In this way, you can take advantage of the fact that you now have more power over your emotional pain than usual.

PISCES (February 19–March 20) The Leaning

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) “I like people who unbalance me,” says Irish writer Colum McCann. Normally I wouldn’t dream of encouraging you to make the same declaration, Libra. My instinct is to help you do everything necessary to maintain harmony. But now is one of those rare times when you can thrive on what happens when you become a bit tilted or uneven or

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

Tower of Pisa is eight stories high, including its belfry, and tilts sideways at a four-degree angle. When builders started construction back in 1173, they laid a weak foundation in unstable soil, and the building has never stood straight since then. And yet it is the most lucrative tourist attraction in the city of Pisa, and one of the top 10 in Italy. Its flaw is the source of its fame and glory. What’s the equivalent in your world, Pisces? Now is a favorable time to take new or extra advantage of something you consider imperfect or blemished.

31 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 3-9, 201 6 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Classifieds

FREE WILL


Oliver’s

I

BBQ

GAME

ON MAKE SURE THE FOOD IS AS GOOD AS THE GAME. Kick off the game right with at Oliver’s. We have everything you need to make sure your food is as good as the game. All your game day

will be out front grilling

meats

for your Super Sunday 10am to 6pm.

Catch all your favorites this week at Oliver’s.

snacks and beverages, grilling meats and deli party trays on sale this week.

Real Food. Real People.® 461 Stony Point Road • Santa Rosa • 284-3530 | 546 E. Cotati Avenue • Cotati • 795-9501 | 560 Montecito Center • Santa Rosa • 537-7123

Profile for Metro Publishing

North Bay Bohemian  

February 3 - February 9

North Bay Bohemian  

February 3 - February 9