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Berryessa on the Brink p9 Gayeton’s ‘Local’ p24 Honky-Tonk Heroes p28

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n i y o j e n d E i R In the shop with underground surfboard shaper Jamie Murray p17


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nb SOUL CRAFT Shaper Jamie Murray makes surfboards tailored to North Coast conditions and surfers, p17.

‘What we can’t comprehend, we avoid We tune out. Call it climate fatigue.’ A RTS & IDEAS P24

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Song of the North Bay Organic Farmer BY JONAH RASKIN My bedroom’s in the fields, my kitchen’s in the ground. Radishes restore me, sunflowers fertilize me. I’m nurtured by the cover crop I cut down and turn over in the belly of the earth. I pollinate and I plow, yoke barnyard to backyard, feed the whole town, talk farmer talk at supper table, pass bowls of organic chard and bushels of country charm. I walk the farmer walk through valleys of alfalfa and rows of wheat, gather new potatoes and ripe tomatoes, pledge allegiance to compost and mulch, sing a pagan hymn to fecund flowers and ungainly weeds, watch the peas climb skyward, take the seasons a second at a time, in drought or flood, wade through waves of spring, inhale the heat of summer, wrap autumn’s evening shadows around my shoulders and wear the light of the harvest moon across my wildly beating heart.

Jonah Raskin is the author of ‘Marijuanaland’ and ‘Field Days: A Year of Farming, Eating and Drinking Wine in California,’ and is a frequent contributor to these pages. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Who’s to Judge?

Norman Solomon is not exactly the best judge of any Democrat (“Who Is Levine?” June 11). He does not know the party or its leadership. He spent his life as a selfappointed critic of Democrats. He has only been a registered Democrat since 2007. Before that, he was active in the Green Party and helped Ralph Nader challenge Gore in 2000 (and elect Bush in the process). He did attempt to capitalize on his minor celebrity among the left by running for office, but he was beaten by someone he labeled a corporate Democrat (Jared Huffman) and a Republican. He has called nearly every Democrat at the national level a “corporate democrat.” So now Levine is labeled the same way Solomon has labeled Bill Clinton, Hillary Clinton, Al Gore, Barack Obama, Jerry Brown, Gavin Newsom, both of our state senators, Jared Huffman and a hundred other prominent and historical leaders of the Democratic Party. The Democrats win here and throughout California by being a bigtent party and by not being as narrowminded as some of its newer members such as Mr. Solomon.

VICTORIA HOGAN Via online

Collect Calls The gouging of county jail inmates through outrageous phone charges is widespread. The families of Marin County inmates can expect to pay $4.50 for a local call through Global Tel Link, which was discredited by the city of San Francisco and sued for $1 million last year. Global’s contract with the Marin County Sheriff’s Department calls for a 55 percent “compensation fee” per call based on its overpriced equipment and tolls.

Balancing the jail budget on the backs of poor people is morally indefensible. This is after the sheriff just purchased a tank for $700,000 to flesh out his paramilitary force, which was so sorely needed in Marin.

That most inmates—and, by extension, their families—are poor is a given. Just go down to Courtroom N at Marin Civic Center any weekday morning and watch the judges and prosecution extract money from those least able to pay. So jail it is. Getting to use the phone to find help securing your release thus becomes a near impossibility. Just more burden on the taxpayers and the families of the inmates. Matt Taibbi, in his new book The Divide, shows how there are two systems of justice in this country: a painless nonprosecution for the rich (Wall Street and the well-to-do) and a horribly vindictive meat grinder and destroyer of families for the poor.

ALEX EASTON-BROWN, MARIN UNITED TAXPAYER’S ASSOCIATION Lagunitas

Speak Up Neighborhood and citizens groups concerned about development in the wine country are speaking up, and members of the established wine industry are getting involved. If you are a group or individual that would like to be part of the conversation, please contact Geoff Ellsworth at the email address napavoice@gmail.com or sonomavoice@gmail.com, depending on which county you are from.

GEOFF ELLSWORTH St. Helena

Lie and Repeat The U.S. seems to have a hard time figuring out reasons for its wars, especially the ones it wages on Iraq, so


THIS MODERN WORLD

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707.575.1626 DAVID E. MARCUS, M.D. SABRINA SPEER, RN it keeps changing them until it finds something that will stick and sound reasonable and justifiable.       The first Gulf War in 1991, waged by Bush the elder, started off as a war to “stop naked aggression” and then morphed into a war “to preserve the American way of life,” as well as to save the oil, preserve jobs, etc.  Back in August 2002, when the U.S. was trying to come up with a better reason to attack Iraq, the White House chief of staff told the New York Times: “From a marketing point of view, you don’t introduce new products in August.” And guess what? The new and improved excuses for an upcoming war on Iraq were rolled out in September. What a coincidence!        For the second Gulf War, the U.S. started off trying its best to tie Saddam to Osama bin Laden’s outfit so they could pin part of the blame for 9-11 on him. But they couldn’t come up

with any real credible evidence, and even the CIA admitted they didn’t think Saddam was connected—and got rebuked by the White House for disagreeing! But even though Bush wasn’t able to come up with any proof to satisfy the international community, he managed to convince most Americans. Something like two-thirds of Americans believe Iraq either staged the 9-11 attacks or played some sort of role in the attack behind the scenes, or that some of the 9-11 hijackers were Iraqis. That’s not the case at all, but it just goes to show that if you keep repeating a lie often enough, people will eventually believe it!

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Two Napas

JoshuOne Barnes

UNCHARTED WATERS The Bureau of Land Management could take over management of Lake Berryessa.

Ghost Lake

T

Head northeast to Lake Berryessa, however, and you cross from wine country into beer country, where the recreation is less fanciful—fishing, boating, camping. But middle-class recreation has been undermined here since 2006,

when more than 1,000 mobile vacation homes were evicted. Now, U.S. Rep. Mike Thompson, a Democrat who represents Napa Valley and the Berryessa area, has a bill that would shift management of the lake from the Bureau of Reclamation to the Bureau of Land Management. “The congressman feels that the BLM is the best agency to manage recreational activities at the lake,” says spokesman Austin Vevurka.

The nonprofit was gifted the property from the estate of Betty Sutro, who bought the land in 1950 with her husband, John. Sutro passed away in 2012, leaving the land trust with the largest land gift of its 38-year history. The trust says in a press release that the preserve at the end of Atlas Peak Road on the east side of the valley will be second in size only to its Dunn-Wildlake Ranch Preserve and will focus on wildlife preservation and habitat restoration. The land is not open to the public at this time. In contrast, the 88-acre, $100 million piece of land is priced as such because of development easements approved for the land, according to reports in the Press Democrat. In short, the site deemed “the crown jewel of Napa Valley” is ready for development to the highest bidder. The highest price ever paid for a residential sale in the United States is $120 million for a 50-acre Connecticut home, also with developable land.—Nicolas Grizzle

Nothing to See Here

Will proposed federal managment save Lake Berryessa? BY TOM GOGOLA he Napa Valley brings to mind images of mud baths, pricey brunches and lots of wine.

Napa Valley’s real estate market is a land of extremes. The same week an 88-acre swath at the northern end of the valley was put on the market by Christie’s for $100 million, the Land Trust of Napa acquired the 1,380-acre Sutro Ranch free of charge.

Thompson has also reintroduced a bill that would encompass the lake in a National Conservation Area (NCA) extending northward to the Berryessa Snow Mountain region. The move would end a multijurisdictional jumble and create a single overseer for the region, which would extend from the lake to the southern end of Mendocino National Forest. ) 10 Thompson’s office

One of these days, a writer will come to Bolinas and write a story that refrains from cliché: the inevitable mention of how locals removed highway signs leading to the Marin coastal town as a way to keep it from being overrun by tourists, developers and travel writers from the New York Times. But until the cliché is retired, we’ll have to endure mocking ) 10 The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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Berryessa ( 9 has also signaled a willingness to consider national monument status for the roughly 400,000acre proposed reserve if his NCA bill fails again. “I don’t know if this would happen or not,” says Vevurka, “but there is an executive path— there’s a way for the [Obama] administration to declare it a national monument.” That designation would provide the same protections as the NCA designation—mining would be banned, for example—without a congressional vote. President Barack Obama used powers under the Antiquities Act earlier this year to create the Point ArenaStornetta National Monument in coastal Mendocino. The Napa Valley tourist economy sings a song of viticultural bliss, thanks in part to Thompson. According to the Center for Public Integrity, he is the House’s second largest recipient of funds from the beer and wine lobby. Thompson took $83,462 in 2013–14 from the lobby, and is sandwiched between House Speaker John Boehner in the top spot and outgoing Majority Leader Eric Cantor in the three-hole. Thompson, a fiscal conservative Blue Dog, has negotiated probusiness tourism and antidevelopment environmental concerns as he’s massaged his bills to win over the locals. He’s been good to the wine people over the years, but Berryessa constituency is leery. In 2006, residents watched as the feds shattered the backbone of the area’s economic driver here when it removed about 1,300 mobile vacation homes from around the lake. “It’s a ghost lake,” says Peter Kilkus via email. Kilkus is a resident who advocates for the lake’s potential and wants to restore it to its former glory, he says. He opposes the NCA move, saying it’s “unnecessary.”

Tuleyome, a regional conservation group, has been pushing to create the Berryessa NCA. Senior policy director Bob Schneider says NCA designation is a win-win for the environment and tourists, noting that a NCA designation for the Rio Grande del Norte in New Mexico saw a big spike in tourism. But Schneider acknowledges that enhanced tourism under a BLM-managed conservation area may come with a “potential threat”: more tourists, more environmental stress. Still, he notes that tourism at the lake wouldn’t return to its previous scale. The mobile homes aren’t coming back. Schneider says BLM is best suited to manage the “impacts of new tourism opportunities” and says new campgrounds would provide four-season activities in an area that he says is primarily a summer boating-season retreat. Thompson, he says, assured locals that motorboats could remain on the lake, and privateproperty owners would be outside the NCA boundaries. “This proposal also provides economic opportunities for towns in and around the lake,” says Schneider. Thompson’s office stresses that the congressman isn’t going to ban motorboats. “Neither one of the bills would have an impact on that whatsoever,” says Vevurka. Yet Kilkus remains skeptical of consolidating the Berryessa region under a BLM umbrella. His concerns are echoed by fisherman Mark Lassagne, who blogged on the Bass Angler website that new federal oversight could “eliminate launch ramps, marinas and much motorized recreation and other recreational uses of the lake.” Kilkus says the NCA bill is likely to fail unless Democrats win back the House and keep the Senate in Democratic hands. Hence the national monument option. “If Congress doesn’t act, then the president should,” says Schneider.

DEBRIEFER

(9

pieces about Bolinas like the one in last weekend’s Times. The writer descended on Bolinas and discovered a hotel in town called the Grand Hotel. Except it’s not so grand, after all, unless you’re a person of limited means, in which case it’s affordable. He trashed the place. Ditto the Free Box, where people leave unwanted possessions so others might make use of them. The writer wasn’t having any of that community stuff, and snidely mocked the Free Box based on a few items he found there. The Free Box utilized by working-class Mexican immigrants and poor artists trying to keep the nobility in their poverty. They find all sorts of cool and useful stuff in there, all the time.—Tom Gogola

Union Deal Workers at the Graton Casino were signing union cards this week in an effort to join Unite Here Local 2850, which represents hotel, food-service and other hospitality employees. “Management is staying neutral,” says Sara Norr, a researcher with Unite Here. “Before the casino opened, the leadership said they’d stay out of the way if the workers wanted to organize.” Norr says casino janitors make $12.50 an hour for jobs that don’t come with health benefits, a rate above the minimum wage but still a tough deal in pricey Sonoma County. Other jobs at Graton pay higher hourly rates, but none, says Norr, compete with wages in San Francisco or the East Bay, typically in the $18–$20 range. By Tuesday afternoon, about a hundred workers had signed cards, says Norr. If a majority of the 650 workers are on board, “then management said it would go along with that, and bargain a contract,” Norr says.—Tom Gogola


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Dining Nicolas Grizzle

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THERE BE THORNS The ubiquitous Himalayan blackberry was brought to the U.S. by Luther Burbank. Now it’s everywhere.

Berried Treasure As blackberry season nears, Luther Burbank’s thorny legacy grows even stronger BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

T

he embedded blackberry thorns are pulled fairly easily from the flesh of my thighs, but are far more difficult to remove from the denim of my jeans. The pants were a fashion choice I mistakenly thought would be fitting for an activity like picking blackberries in Sebastopol’s Ives Park, but only resulted in agitation from overheating, frustration from picking tiny throwing stars from my

legs and blood stains on the inside of my clothes. Plants, it seemed, had gotten the best of me this day. But wait—this is the land of Luther Burbank, the man who coerced nature to bow to his vision of the perfect plant. He invented the Russet potato, the spineless cactus and, yes, several varieties of thornless blackberry. As I soothed my wounded pride with the sweet taste of fresh berries, my burning legs prompted a good question: Where are those thornless blackberry bushes now?

To begin, it must be understood that the blackberry most of us know in the North Bay is not a native species. The invasive Himalayan blackberry was brought here from Eastern Europe by none other than Mr. Burbank himself, who praised its structural heartiness and plump fruit. It was picked up by farmers and used as natural cattle fencing. But the plant was just too aggressive, and soon escaped into the wild where it had no natural forces to keep its thick, spiny stems in check. Now

it can be found from Southern California all the way up to Alaska. Oregon’s Willamette Valley, however, hosts a variety of heirloom blackberries. Perhaps most well-known is the marionberry, which is a cross between Chehalem, a descendent of the Himalayan blackberry and the Olallie, itself a cross between the loganberry and youngberry. It was first introduced in 1956 by the USDA Agricultural Research Service at Oregon State University, and is now old enough to be called an heirloom variety, says Paul Wallace of the Petaluma Seed Bank. “When [a hybrid] is stabilized, after about eight or 10 years, it could be termed an heirloom,” he says. When berries are out of season, fruit lovers head to the grocery store, where familiar plastic clamshells bearing bland, tough, enormous black orbs lie in wait with their $6 price tag. These are Tupi blackberries, a commercial variety grown mostly in Mexico. But what about that thornless blackberry developed by Burbank? It seems like such a wonderful idea, why didn’t it take off? Well, Burbank wasn’t doing his work just for the betterment of mankind. He was an inventor who sold his ideas; that’s how he made money. He invented 16 blackberry and 13 raspberry varieties, but not all were commercially successful. The plants are available to home gardeners, but apparently don’t make financial sense for farmers to grow. At Luther Burbank’s home and gardens in Santa Rosa, many of the varieties are on display now, with berry season nearing. It is truly amazing to grasp the stalk of a seemingly ordinary blackberry plant and not recoil in pain. But as the sweet reward of my excruciating berry picking conquest trickles down my throat, I can’t help but wonder if the berries would taste as good if they hadn’t required a little blood as tribute.


Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call ďŹ rst for conďŹ rmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com.

Fish Seafood. $$-$$$.

COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

630 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.3785.

Mike’s at the Crossroads Burgers. $. A

Classic and classy–bistro food at its best. Wine bar. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sun; brunch, Sun. 109 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.433.1380.

top contender for best burger in the county. Mike’s will even make you a triple, if you dare. Great beer menu, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 7665 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.665.9999.

Chicama Peruvian Grill Peruvian. $-$$.

Stout Brothers Pub & Restaurant Irish. $$.

Bistro Ralph Bistro. $$.

Tantalizing menu of authentic cuisine. The ceviche’s already a hit. 3345 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.570.2057.

Diavola Italian/Pizza. $$. Chef Dino Bugica brings classic and authentic Italian cooking techniques to pizzeria/ salumeria. Lunch and dinner daily. 21021 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.0111.

Dierk’s Parkside Cafe American. $. Classic, fresh diner food in a comfortable diner setting. Ought to be in a movie. Breakfast and lunch daily. 404 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.573.5955. Dierk’s Midtown Cafe, 1422 Fourth St, Santa Rosa.

House of Curry & Grill Indian. $-$$. A Sonoma County institution, and for good reason. Of the more than 100 menu choices, all are worthwhile. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. 409 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.579.5999.

Johnny Garlic’s California. $$. At Johnny’s, garlic is God–all dishes are infused with the glorious stinking rose. Lunch and dinner daily. 8988 Brooks Rd, Windsor. 707.836.8300.

La Gare French. $$$. Dine in an elegant atmosphere of Old World charm. Dinner, Wed-Sun 208 Wilson St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.4355. Mac’s Delicatessen Diner. $. Large selection of Jewish-style sandwiches; excellent cole slaw. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Sat.

Atmospheric, if a little faux, but a great ploughman’s lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 527 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.636.0240.

Tonayan Mexican. $ Truly

Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch, Sat-Sun. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

Il Piccolo Caffe Italian. $$. Big, ample portions at this premier spot on Sausalito’s spirited waterfront. Breakfast and lunch daily. 660 Bridgeway, Ste 3, Sausalito. 415.289.1195. Insalata’s Mediterranean. $$$. Simple, high-impact dishes of exotic flavors. Lunch and dinner daily. 120 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.457.7700.

wonderful Sonoran-style classics at rock-bottom prices. The enormous El Jefe combination can’t be beat. Lunch and dinner daily. 500 Raleys Towne Center, Rohnert Park. 707.588.0893.

Pub grub gets a pub-cuisine facelift. Lunch, Wed-Sun; dinner daily. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Vineyards Inn Spanish.

Small Shed Flatbreads

$$. Authentic foods from Spain, fresh fish off the fire broiler, extensive tapas, as well as paellas and more. Emphasis on organic. Open for lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon. 8445 Sonoma Hwy. (Highway 12), at Adobe Canyon Road, Kenwood. 707.833.4500.

Pizza. $$. Slow Food-informed Marin Organics devotee with a cozy, relaxed family atmosphere and no BS approach to great food served simply for a fair price. 17 Madrona St, Mill Valley. Open for lunch and dinner daily. 415.383.4200.

Willi’s Seafood & Raw Bar Seafood. $$. Delicious

Sol Food Puerto Rican. $.

preparations of the freshest fish and shellfish. Lunch and dinner daily; dinner, Mon-Sat. 403 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.9191.

MARIN CO U N T Y Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Citrus & Spice Thai/ Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices,

20 TapstNew Menu Items Top Shelf Whiskey Flights Upstairs Remodel

Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner daily. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

Fradelizio’s Italian. $$.

S O N OMA CO U N TY

13

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Brewpub. $$.

Flavorful, authentic and homestyle at this Puerto Rican eatery, which is as hole-in-thewall as they come. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. San Rafael locations: 811 Fourth St. 415.451.4765. 901 & 903 Lincoln Ave. 415.256.8903. Mill Valley location: 401 Miller Ave, Mill Valley.

Sorella Caffe Italian. $$. The embodiment of Fairfax casual, with delicious, high-quality food that lacks pretension. Dinner, TuesSun. 107 Bolinas Rd, Farifax. 415.258.4520. Station House Cafe American-California. $$. Innovative menu, fresh local seafood and range) fed meats. Outdoor

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Dining

and a great mango-duck summer roll. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.


Dining ( 13

14 NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JUNE 1 8-24, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

dining; full bar. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Thurs-Mon. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1515.

Open daily

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Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N T Y Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. BarBersQ Barbecue/ California. $-$$. An upscale ’cue joint with a high-end chef and high-end ingredients. Gorgeous chipotle-braised short ribs and pulled pork. Lunch and dinner daily. 3900-D Bel Aire Plaza, Napa. 707.224.6600.

Brannan’s Grill California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Thai House Lunch specials start at $7.95 Includes soup or salad Mon-Fri only

Cole’s Chop House American steakhouse. $$$$$. Handsome, upscale 1950s-era steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dryaged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a “nostalgia” cocktail. Dinner daily. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.224.6328.

Open 7 days a week Sun-Th 11:30-9:30 Fri-Sat 11:30-10:00 525 4th Street(Upstairs) 707.526.3939

Compadres Rio Grille

Award Winning 5700 River Road Hand-Crafted Santa Rosa Pinot Noir Open Thurs–Mon and Zinfandel! 10:30 – 4:30 www.woodenheadwine.com

707.887.2703

Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $-$$. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

SMALL BITES

Lobsterpalooza! Among myriad solstice events in Napa County on June 21, paella parties, reggae jams, various roasts and good-time rumpuses, we’re digging the idea that there are competing sunset lobster feeds going down at two renowned vineyards as a high-toned way to celebrate the onset of summer. So slap on a bib in anticipation, and decide on the crustacean destination du jour: Will it be Black Stallion Winery or Schweiger Vineyards for you? Black Stallion, built on the grounds of an old equestrian facility in 2007, will boil the sea-bugs after a separate day-long barbecue event tails off at the well-appointed Napa establishment. The lobsterpalooza busts loose from 6pm to 9pm. Le price: $100 for wine club members; $135 for the general public. (Black Stallion Winery, 4089 Silverado Trail, Napa; 707.227.3250.) Meanwhile, Schweiger Vineyards is putting on a traditional lobster feed on its sun-dappled terrace the same eve. The sun shall set, you shall enjoy the splendidly sublime view and the bib shall be splattered with melted butter. The Schweiger shindig will set you back $150 if you’re a non-member, and runs 6-9:30pm. Members will drop $125. (Schweiger Vineyards, 4015 Spring Mountain Road, St. Helena; 707.963.4882.) Of course both events will be pairing wines with their boiled offerings. Did you really need to ask? And both establishments please ask that you reserve a spot before you claw your way on over. —Tom Gogola

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. Dinner daily. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.251.1900.


Wineries

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S O N OM A CO U N T Y De La Montanya Vineyards & Winery Small family winery turns out diverse small lots culled from the best of a large vineyard operation, just for kicks and giggles. Tucked under Westside Road in a casual barn setting, fun tasting room offers good wines and cheeky diversions: De La Montanya wine club members get both case discounts and the opportunity to pose in fishnets on “PinUp” series labels. 999 Foreman Lane, Healdsburg. Monday–Friday, 11am–5pm. Tasting fee $5. 707.433.3711.

Frick Winery Tailwagging hospitality team greets visitors at this rustic little bodega that’s anything if not picturesque. Proprietorrun winery specializes in lively Rhône-style blends and varietally bottled Syrah, Viognier; rare Counoise is a special treat. Honest, handmade wines with a sense of place. 23072 Walling Road, Geyserville. Open Saturday– Sunday, noon–4:30pm. Tasting complimentary with purchase. 707.857.1980. John Tyler Wines For decades, the Bacigalupis have been selling prized grapes to the likes of Chateau Montelena and Williams Selyem. Now, the third-generation wine growers offer the pick of the vineyard in their own tasting room, brandnew in 2011. Graceful Pinot and sublime Zin. 4353 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Open dail,y 10:30am–5pm. Tastings $10. 707.473.0115.

Jordan Vineyard & Winery Fronted by poplars, wreathed in ivy, robed in privets—à la chateau. Favored by restaurants nationwide, Cab and Chardonnay are served in a sumptuous sitdown tasting with cheese and hors d’oeuvres. How do they peel those little eggs? 1474 Alexander Valley Road,

Healdsburg. Tour and tasting, Monday–Saturday, Sundays through October. $20–$30. 800.654.1213.

Joseph Phelps Freestone Vineyards Casual, airy space furnished in whitewashed country French theme, on the road to the coast. Sit down at long tables for tasting or have a picnic. Fogdog Pinot and Ovation Chardonnay will have you applauding. 12747 El Camino Bodega, Freestone. Daily, 11am–5pm. Tasting fee, $15. 707.874.1010.

La Follette Wines You’ve heard of the brands he’s helped to create or save— Flowers, La Crema—but do you know Greg La Follette? Find out how the man behind “big-hair Pinot” has reinvented himself. 180 Morris St., Suite 160, Sebastopol. Daily, 11am– 6pm. Tasting fee, $10–$15. Saturday Terroir Tour, $30. 707.827.4933.

MacPhail Family Wines Anderson Valley vineyards were something of a new frontier when James MacPhail set out. Now partnered with Hess Collection, MacPhail makes Pinot to reminisce about with each sip. 851 Magnolia Drive, Healdsburg. By appointment only, Monday–Saturday (opening in the Barlow Center, late 2014). Tasting fee, $10. 707.433.4780.

Naked Wines An innovative mix of Kickstartertype investing and web marketing: be an “angel,” and get a hefty discount on diverse wines, many made by veteran winemakers seeking a market for their side projects. 8450 Sonoma Hwy., Kenwood. Open daily, 11am–5pm. Tasting fee, $10. 707.408.0011. Portalupi Wine Husbandand-wife team went the distance, selecting Barbera cuttings from the Italian alps: their Barbera was named best in the world. You’ll also find Vermentino, Pinot, and rusticchic two-liter milk jugs of “vino di tavola” in comfortable

downtown lounge; wine education classes for groups. 107 North St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 10:30am–7pm. Tasting fee, $5–$12. 707.395.0960.

N A PA CO U N TY August Briggs Winery Tasting room is a white barn lit by skylights and often staffed by the owner’s wife or mother. 333 Silverado Trail, Calistoga. Open Wednesday–Monday, 11am–5pm. 707.942.5854.

Del Dotto Vineyards (WC) Caves lined with Italian marble and ancient tiles, not to mention Venetian chandeliers and mosaic marble floors. They host candle-lit tastings, replete with cheese and chocolate, Friday–Sunday. Opera resonates until 4pm; rock rules after 4pm. 1055 Atlas Peak Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.963.2134.

Domaine Carneros Inspired by Taittinger’s Château de la Marquetterie of Champagne, this house of premium sparkling wine is a hard-to-miss landmark on the Carneros Highway. Enjoy a private Balcony Package for special occasions or taste sparkling and still wines paired with artisan cheese and caviar with the masses. Luxury bubbly Le Rêve offers a bouquet of hoary yeast and crème brûlée that just slips away like a dream. 1240 Duhig Road (at Highway 12/121), Napa. Wine flights $15; also available by the glass or bottle. Open 10am–5:45pm. 800.716.2788.

Vermeil Wines Pair the Chardonnay with baked brie en croute, if you’re having that kind of Super Bowl party. Also rare Charbono from OnThEdgle Winery, and late harvest Sémillon, perfect for potato chips. 1255 Lincoln Ave., Calistoga. Sunday–Thursday, 10am–5:30pm; Friday– Saturday, 10am–8pm. Tasting fee, $12. 707.341.3054.

Liquid Sunlight Savvy A selection of 2012 Sauvignon Blanc— did light strike again? BY JAMES KNIGHT

A

s the trickle of new wine from 2013 grows to a steady stream, it’s a good time to liquidate your inventory of light, fresh whites from the previous vintage. Like that bottle of 2012 Sauvignon Blanc that’s been gathering dust on the kitchen counter in that stylish little wroughtiron wine rack. Or is it too late? “Light-struck” is not a 1980s musical or the sequel to Bottle Shock, but a wine flaw that develops when a bottle has been left out in natural light or interior lighting. A skunky or plastic aroma is typical. Brown glass offers the best protection, but it’s not as pretty as clear glass, which offers the worst protection. This week I blind-tasted seven Savvies, two of which were improperly stored for nearly a year, I’m sorry to say. Would they stand out? Maybe not, says Courtney Humiston, wine director at the Dry Creek Kitchen at Hotel Healdsburg, who advises, “If the temperature in your home stays relatively moderate, I would not expect a wine that has been struck by a little light to be spoiled.” Napa Cellars 2013 Napa Valley Sauvignon Blanc ($18) Wouldn’t you know it, the one 2013 that snuck into the mix is the favorite. Fresh and enticing aromas of honeydew melon and cucumber, some weight without sweetness—maybe on account of the 14.5 percent abv. Murphy-Goode 2012 The Fumé ($14) A lean brut without the spritz—powdered sugar on pear tart. Sour, but nice enough. The Fumé is partly barrel-fermented. Taft Street 2012 Garagistes Sonoma County Sauvignon Blanc ($25) Cat pee on a lemon tree; lemon blossom, barely ripe pear juice aromas. White grapefruit keeps the finish fresh and interesting. This new tier is available only at the winery. Kendall-Jackson 2012 Vintner’s Reserve Sauvignon Blanc ($13) With a touch of Chardonnay plus Semillon and Viognier to tart it up, it’s got oak and apple aromas, and there’s a little of that K-J Vintner’s candy on the finish. Martin Ray 2012 Napa Valley Sauvignon Blanc ($20) Flowering vines, bitter melon; do not attempt without fish tacos. Atalon 2012 Napa Valley Sauvignon Blanc ($21) Stored on a rack in moderate light in a corner of the office, this had a match stick note on first whiff, and became not unpleasant on second tasting. Aromas and flavors of “white wine.” Francis Ford Coppola 2012 Diamond Collection Sauvignon Blanc ($16) Whiling away the year in a wine rack that lets in filtered morning sunlight a few weeks of the year, this bitter wine’s lack of fruit may not be its fault—but I did not sniff it out at the “light-struck” sample, after all. On the plus side—a summertime savor of bitter melon rind.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 1 8-24, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.


NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JUNE 1 8-24, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Hydrodynamic

Jamie Murray and the craft of the North Coast surfboard

S

urfing in Sonoma and Marin counties is dodgy in the best of times, but spring is downright dismal. Northwest winds scour the coast, rendering any waves that straggle ashore into ragged, unsurfable junk. The constant onshore blow dredges up deep, cold water to give surfers brainfreezing headaches as they duck under waves.

BY STETT HOLBROOK

But there are not many waves worth surfing this time of year anyway. Spring is a season of transition. Northwest swells from the Gulf of Alaska have all but dried up, and Southern Hemisphere swells have yet to make their way to our shores. Still, Jamie Murray manages to stay connected to the ocean during the windy season inside his 108-square-foot shop tucked behind his home in Santa Rosa’s west end. Murray, 40, is a surfboard ) 18 shaper, one of just a few in Sonoma County. If he can’t ride a


Jamie Murray ( 17

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JUNE 1 8-24, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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ATTENTION TO DETAIL Jamie Murray uses a microplane

to shape a board’s nose.

surfboard, he can make one. He doesn’t advertise or sell his boards in surf shops, but the word has spread about his handiwork through the North Coast surf underground. “He’s talented,” says Jay deLong, 42, a veteran North Coast surfer who has ordered several boards from Murray. “He’s really a craftsman. He’s got curiosity, and he’s not afraid to fail. He’s that classic person who is enjoying the ride.” As an in-demand shaper, Murray spends a lot more time in his shop than he does in the water. Once he closes the shop door, he disappears for hours in a private world of tools, foam dust and hydrodynamics. “My wife and kids have to get

me,” he says. “There’s no possible way I can keep track of my own time.”

Connecticut to California Murray is an unlikely shaper and surfer. With his shortcropped hair, glasses and wry smile, he doesn’t fit the surfer stereotype. He looks more like an English teacher. Which he is. He was a founding faculty member at Sonoma Academy. His writing skills and sense of humor come across on his blog at www.headhighglassy.blogspot. com:


Shaping in Spring

Parenting in Spring My kids now think I’m effing with them at bedtime. “How could it be?” They plead, pointing out the window. “It’s still light outside!” And they’re correct, but it’s also 8pm and daddy needs a Manhattan, so off they go. Take that, spring! Murray grew up in Connecticut, a state with a nearly nonexistent surf scene. Because there were no local surf shops, he and his friends surfed scavenged old boards. “We were 10 to 20 years behind,” he says. “We were always surfing stuff that was out of date.” He learned to surf on a 1970s-era 5-foot, 11-inch twin fin. “It was pretty retro before retro was cool,” he says. Murray got used to those outdated designs, and when he moved to California in the 1990s after college in Colorado, he wanted to rekindle his love of surfing. By then the surf industry was focused on short and thin boards patterned after the highperformance, competition-style boards surfed by the pros. For someone used to riding boards with more foam and width, they were no fun. Murray asked a Santa Cruz shaper to make him one more suited to his liking. He got turned down. So Murray decided to make his own.

The Art of Shaping For all their graceful lines and high-gloss finishes, surfboards begin life as an unremarkable plank of polyurethane foam called a blank. It’s a shaper’s job to artfully saw, plane and sand away

‘Jamie Murray’s that classic person who is enjoying the ride.’ There are mass-produced, computer-cut surfboards, but since surfing’s rise in popularity in the 1950s, there has always been demand for handmade surfboards. Other than custom bicycles, there are few sports where you can work with a designer and craftsman to create a piece of equipment built to your specs. Back home in Connecticut, Murray’s dad, like many Yankee dads, had a basement workshop that kept him busy through the long winters. As a kid, Murray made his own skateboards because his father wouldn’t buy something he could make himself. “If you wanted it, you were going to have to make it,” Murray says. “That was his philosophy.” And it became his philosophy, too. So Murray got a blank and set to work making his first board. “It was totally shitty and came out terrible,” he remembers. But he learned from his mistakes, and the next one was better. So was the next. These were the early days of the internet, and there wasn’t much information available on surfboard shaping. To expand his knowledge, he spent time observing a few master shapers and asking questions. After making 30 or so boards, he started to get the hang of it. By this time, Murray had moved to Santa Rosa and ) 20 taken a job at Sonoma

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The deeper into spring, the weirder the boards: long, wide, fat boards that will catch everything. Short, wide, fat boards that catch almost everything. Medium, wide, fat boards that fit perfectly between short-period windswell troughs. Many ways to skin the grumpy, uncooperative, foggy cat of spring. Take that, spring!

the blank to reveal a surfboard shape within. Once the blank is shaped to the shaper or client’s specifications, colors, decals and fin boxes are added, then it’s layered with resin and sheets of fiberglass. Before it’s ready to be surfed, it gets sanded and polished.


Jamie Murray ( 19

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JUNE 1 8-24, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Academy. During the day he taught literature and writing, and at night and on weekends he continued to make boards and surf them in the heavy waters of the Sonoma and Marin coasts. Eventually, someone saw one of his boards and asked if he’d make one for him. “I was loath to take orders,” he remembers. “I really didn’t know what I was doing.” But his boards got better, and soon he had a growing list of customers. Paddle out at Salmon Creek or Dillon Beach, and chances are you’ll see a board with a dragonfly decal, Murray’s logo. It turns out his fondness for the retro boards of his youth— wide, thick ones designed for easy paddling and their wavecatching ability rather than aerial maneuvers and competition—fit right in with the North Coast’s surfing demographic. Murray sums up the area’s surfers with one word: “Old.”

Most surfers here have been around for a while. The area is challenging and doesn’t offer many beginner-friendly spots, so there aren’t many first-timers or young kids in the water. Old guys—and girls—rule. Whether it’s nostalgia for old designs or simply the desire for a board that will help surfers paddle through the North Coast’s notoriously heavy currents and surf, Murray’s designs are tailormade for the region. “It’s a big playing field out there,” says Sebastopol surfer Neil Ramussen, 62. He ought to know. He’s been surfing the North Coast since 1966. “You want something to get you around. Bigger boards are better.” Several of Murray’s shapes were created with local surf breaks in mind. Winemakers talk about terroir and how their wines reflect the local soil and climate. Murray’s boards reflect the power and mercurial ) 22


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Jamie Murray ( 20

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nature of our stretch of coast. While springtime is rough, the North Coast can get good waves. Sometimes really good. And when it’s on, you want the right board for the job. Murray’s “Pit Boss� was created to surf a powerful, barreling wave near Dillon Beach that requires a long paddle over notoriously sharky waters. His “Clover� design is suited to Salmon Creek when a winter groundswell is pulsing and the waves get steep and hollow. He also makes “Broadswords,� longboards suited to both smaller, mushier summertime waves and big winter surf . There is demand for highperformance surfboards, but Murray usually steers those customers to Ed Barbera, a master shaper who makes boards behind Bodega’s Northern Light Surf Shop. “He does such a killer job with them,� Murray says.

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Though people have been surďŹ ng in Southern California and Santa Cruz since the early 1900s, surďŹ ng is relatively new to Sonoma and Marin counties— mainly because it’s so damn hard to surf here and there is more consistent surf just about everywhere else in the state. “Twenty years ago, the Sonoma Coast was the frontier,â€? says veteran surfer deLong. DeLong counts himself as part of the ďŹ rst wave of young surfers in Sonoma County. There were a few older surfers like Rasmussen who surfed back then, but they were few in number and some scampered farther north when their solitude was disturbed by newcomers paddling out. “Back then, there was hardly anyone in the water,â€? he says. “You’d be happy if there was someone else out there with you.â€? Murray says most surfers he meets simply want to get into the ocean and enjoy the area’s natural beauty and bag a few waves along the way. He includes himself in this group.

“As older, experienced surfers, we’re looking for a wilderness experience. It’s not about wave count or blasting big airs.� He says he enjoys working with surfers, half of whom are women, to bring their ideas to life. What do customers want from a board?

‘As older, experienced surfers, we’re looking for a wilderness experience.’ “Everything,â€? Murray jokes. “It’s got to handle everything from ankle high to double overhead. Our conditions are wild and unpredictable. [Shaping for those conditions] is a fool’s errand, but that’s part of the challenge.â€? He much prefers custom shaping to sticking a board in a shop for someone he’ll never meet. “I like shaping for people I know. It’s more fun to imagine who I’m making it for.â€? Murray isn’t planning to quit his day job. He ďŹ gures he makes enough from each board he shapes to buy a good sandwich. Every dozen boards or so he’ll have enough money to make a board for himself. Which he apparently does a lot. There are boards stacked in and around his house like cordwood. What is it that compels him to shape in his tiny shop and lay awake at night thinking about foils, rockers and hulls? “My wife asks me that all the time,â€? he says, smiling. “It’s my quiet time, and it’s nice to do something physical after teaching all day. If I put in four hours in the shop there’s a [ďŹ nished] product. It’s what I want to be doing.â€?


Crush C Cr ru h

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CULTURE C ULT URE U

The week’s T week’s events: a events: selective selective guide guide

LIVING LOVING MAIDS Zepparella Zepparrell e a strik strikee the hammer of of the gods gods at the M Mystic ystic Theatre, Theatre, June 21. See See Clubs Clubs & Venues, Venues, e p2 p29. 9.

N A PA

P T. R E Y E S S TAT I O N

SEBASTOPOL

M I L L VA L L E Y

Party On

The Boys B Are Back

Hot Summer Da Days ays

Pontiac Man M

Welsh songwriter and pr Welsh producer roducer KKarl arl W ellington fformed ormed W orld dP arty nearly Wellington World Party 30 years ago, and has bbeen een turning out pop hits just as long g. Even a br ain long. brain aneurysm couldn ’t stop the party couldn’t party.. W ellington rreturns eturns with World World Party Party Wellington ffor or a U.S. tour that stopss in the North Bay this week. Wellington Wellingtoon and company have just rreleased eleased a mas ssive box set massive of W orld P arty material, material Arkeology Arkeology, y, World Party eviouusly unreleased unreleased and most of it is pr previously stuff. Expect to hear World World Party’s Party’s stuff. longstanding hits and a slew of new ays on Friday tunes when the band pla plays Friday,, Wineryy, 1030 Main St., St., June 20, at City Winery, 70 077..226.7372. Napa. 8pm. $25–$35. 707.226.7372.

Before he was Before was in the Gr Grateful ateful Dead, Jer ry Gar cia spent time in two bands Jerry Garcia with teenag teenagee buddies. The Black Mountain Bo oys (Jer ryy, David Nelson and Boys (Jerry, Eric Thomps son) got together 51 years Thompson) ago, and thee A sphalt Jungle Mountain Asphalt Boys (Jer ryy, Eric Thompson and Jody (Jerry, SStecher) techer) sta rted jamming together 50 started years ago. Now N the rremaining emaining boys ar aree uniting fforces orcees for for a rreunion eunion of sorts, sorts and thr owing fid ddle master P aul Shelask throwing fiddle Paul Shelaskyy into the mixx when they play together as the Black Mountain M A sphalt Boys. Boys. Their Asphalt bluegr ass so ound and keen musicianship bluegrass sound is on displayy Friday Friday,, June 20, at the Dance P alacce, 503 B SSt., t., P oint Reyes Palace, Point SStation. tation. 8pm. 8pm m. $22. 4415.663.1075. 15.663.1075.

Cabaret de C Cabaret Caliente aliente is the North Bay’s B beloved burlesque company trical company.. Theat Theatrical and fun, they’r or their monthly m they’ree known ffor series in Santa Rosa. This month, they t unveil the biggest show of the sea ason, in season, celebr ation of summer ’s official op pening celebration summer’s opening day (and night). Solstice Seduction n sees the company perf orming their clas ssically performing classically inspir ed burlesque sets with the hhelp elp inspired of the jazz combo the MegaFlame Big Band, the S.F F..-based outfit whoo S.F.-based specialize in off ering vintage rrenditions enditions offering of classic and contempor ary tuness contemporary alike. Solstice Seduction takes plac ce on place Satur dayy, June 21, at Hopmonk TTavern, aavvern, Saturday, 230 P etaluma A ve., Sebastopol. 8:3 30pm. Petaluma Ave., 8:30pm. $20–$30. 707 7..829.7300. 707.829.7300.

OK, so I don’t don’t know if Ray Bonneville actually drives a P onttiac; but if he Pontiac; doesn ’t, then the CCanadian-born anadian-born singerdoesn’t, songwriter is missing out on a gold mine of an endorsement de eal. Either way y, deal. way, Bonneville has a huge ely popular and hugely influential body of blu ues and ffolk olk music blues under his bel t, and a new album, Easy belt, Gone, that ffeatures eatures hi his is moody guitar and soulful lyrics in ppeak eak fform. orm This orm. week, Bonneville give givess the North Bay a new taste of his im pressive blues impressive sound when he perf orrms on Tuesday, Tuuesdayy, performs June 224, 4, at Sweetwater Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Mader ve.,, Mill V alley. 8pm. Maderaa A Ave., Valley. $17 7. 4415.388.1100. 15.388.1100. $17.

—Charlie —C h lie S har Swanson wanson


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Arts Ideas SUSTAINABILITY, DEFINED In Douglas Gayeton’s ‘Local,’ urban farmers like Novella Carpenter,

from Oakland, point to the pleasure in growing one’s own food.

Lexicographer Douglas Gayeton’s new book brings our food system to the grass-roots level BY SARA BIR

T

he most insightful part of Douglas Gayeton’s new book, Local: The New Face of Food and Farming in America (Harper; $34.95), might be the afterword, where he discusses the unfortunate fate of the term “climate change”: “What we can’t comprehend, we avoid. We tune out. Call it climate fatigue.” That sort of fatigue encompasses many hot-button issues, including our food supply,

the production of which is inextricably linked with climate change. It takes time, energy and discipline to stay on top of this stuff, especially when the rhetoric is all about fear. And I’m tired of people telling me to be afraid of food. Even when fear is grounded, there’s only so much we can get out of it. It inflames our passions quickly, but exhausts them just as fast. Enter Local, part of a multi-platform project called the Lexicon of Sustainability. The project is about hope,

locality, and ordinary people taking action on large and small scales. The idea is that words come before actions. As Gayeton writes, “words illuminate.” Creating a shared language of terms—“a real food dictionary”—educates consumers so they know what they’re eating and who ultimately benefits from the money they spend. Gayeton, a Petaluma resident and multimedia artist, cofounded the Lexicon with his wife, Laura-Howard Gayeton (North Bay residents may have some familiarity with Laloo’s,

her goat’s milk ice cream company). He traveled across America, interviewing and photographing farmers, scientists and entrepreneurs in both urban and rural environments to learn more about how they generate abundance using sustainability. The result, documented in Local, is a growing bank of over 200 terms, each illustrated with a colorful photo collage overlaid with Gayeton’s folksy handwriting. These “information artworks” are dense with color and words, as saturated as a modern-day Book of Kells, but the general idea comes across pretty quickly. For instance, “cage-free” only means the poultry was not raised in a cage; it says nothing about how it was raised (most likely crowded and indoors, as it turns out). You can also see the information artwork on the Lexicon of Sustainability website, and watch the series of short “Know Your Food” videos. The book is advantageous because it’s a bit stickier; you can read it in bed, peruse over it at breakfast and leave it out for friends to flip through. It’s interesting to see how different bits and pieces shine in each medium, even though they essentially use the same content. The Lexicon collects the terminology of both boutique food producers (“heritage breed”) and social justice (“food security”), allowing them to coexist on the pages of Local without the antagonistic attitudes that flourish around the difference between the haves and have-nots. This is something I struggle with, especially with the foodrescue nonprofit I work with in my own community. Is it better to focus the organization’s resources on delivering our clients the


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finite fresh produce grown in our community gardens, or recovering massive amounts of sugary dayold pastries? The pastries feed more people, but the homegrown tomatoes and sweet corn generate more positive comments than anything else we deliver. There’s value in both actions. This kind of small-scale, daily activism isn’t for a cultural elite. It’s not just for people who have time to garden or know the difference between a turnip and a daikon. And it’s not just for rich, middle-aged white people. (It’s nice to see different shades of brown skin, as well as teenagers and seniors, in the book.) Gayeton’s emphasis isn’t on what we’re against, but what we’re all for. Pleasure, not guilt, is the point. There are no ominous synthesizer chords scowling in the background of the “Know Your Food” films. In Local, Gayeton playfully refers to what I assume is Monsanto and their agribusiness cohort as “the companies that must not be named.” It’s not only OK to receive pleasure from cultivating food on small urban plots or spending what may seem to be an unreasonable amount on sustainably caught wild fish, it’s essential. As the saying goes, you attract more bees with honey than you do with vinegar—even if it’s unfiltered vinegar made from the cider of pesticide-free Gravenstein apples. If you’ve been paying attention to the news, you know we all need more bees. We can end with the beginning of Local: “After reading this book, please give it away. You’ll know who it’s for,” writes Gayeton in the introduction. I want to give it to my crunchy hippy friends, and my arty design friends. But also my friends who sneer at the farmers market but are happy to spend $12 on breakfast at Denny’s. Or people just like me, who buy those damnable pizzas at Trader Joe’s even though they come in frozen all the way from Italy. As it turns out, we can all use illumination. Even people who are already enlightened.


Stage

HHonorable onor able

66/20 /20 – 66/26 / 26

The Th e Ro Rover ver

Kevin Berne

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(11:00-1:30-4:00)-6:45-9:05 (11: 00-1: 30- 4 : 00 ) -6 : 45-9 : 05

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Words Wo rds an and d Pic Pictures tures PG13 ((3:15)-6:00-8:45 PG13 3 :15 ) -6 : 00-8 : 45 Sunday Sunday 6/22 6 /22 only: only: 66:00-8:45, : 00-8 : 45, TTuesday uesday 66/24 /24 only: only: ((3:15) 3 :15)

IIda da PPG13 G13 (1 (10:45-1:00) 0 : 45-1: 00 ) SSunday unday 6/22 6 / 22 only: only : (10:45) (10 : 45 )

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EPIC FAIL Brian Herndon and Kathryn Zdan ďŹ nd love amid tragedy.

Belle B elle PPGG (1(10:15-3:30) 0 :15-3 : 30 ) Join us Join us SSunday unday 6/22 6 / 22 at at 1:00pm 1: 00pm and and Tuesday Tuesday 6/24 6 / 24 at at 66:30pm : 30pm for for special special ppresentations resent ations of of Driving Driving Miss Mi s s DDaisy aisy ffrom rom tthe he BBroadway roadway sstage! t age !

‘Failure’ Succeeds

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Philip Dawkins’ play dazzles with word-craft and ideas BY DAVID TEMPLETON

N

ellie was the ďŹ rst of the Fail sisters to die.â€? So begins Chicago playwright Philip Dawkins’ rich, mischievously sorrowful play Failure: A Love Story.

‘

The play, Dawkins says, was inspired after a walk in a cemetery where he spotted a gravestone marked “FAIL,â€? the ďŹ nal resting place of the Fail family, who, by the names on the markers, appeared to have had many deaths in the early 1900s. From this macabre jumping-off place, Dawkins has crafted a play as odd and unconventional as it is loving, magical and wise, full of the knowledge that in the end life is futile—but not without its perks. In the slightly Tim Burton–ish

production at Marin Theatre Company, director Jasson Minadakis—and an excellent cast of ďŹ ve actor-singerinstrumentalists—has created a show in which the tone of the thing is as important as its meandering, point-packed plot. There is a deep and very real sadness just beneath the surface of every whimsical twist and lighthearted tragedy, but this fractured fairy tale—with snappy songs and talking snakes to sweeten the existential angst—makes a person wonder if there’s any point to it all—until, suddenly, there is. The Fail sisters, Nellie (Kathryn Zdan), Jenny June (Liz Sklar) and Gertie (Megan Smith), live in their family home and clock shop in Chicago, at the corner of Lumber and Love streets. The shop (an outstanding set by Nina Ball) is shared with adopted brother John (Patrick Kelly Jones), who was found oating in a basket in the polluted river, and now prefers animals (played by an array of marvelous puppets) to human beings. The siblings’ parents died tragically (and, of course, humorously) 13 years ago, but the Fails are nothing if not resilient, and their hopes and dreams—and all of the clocks in the family shop—tick on. Then Mortimer Mortimer arrives. A young dreamer described as “a man so famous he was named after himself,â€? Mortimer instantly falls in love with Nellie, forever changing the course of his life, which is about to encounter a veritable parade of death, loss and the occasional instance of puppet euthanasia. Inventively staged and packed with language-loving dialogue (“In the story of his sleep, he was safe from the sadness of being awakeâ€?), Failure: A Love Story is a wholly original work that drips with ideas and dazzling word-craft, and is eventually quite profound. The play’s only fault is that it takes so long to take its own sadness seriously. Rating (out of 5): ++++ ‘Failure: A Love Story’ runs Tuesday– Sunday through June 29 at Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave., Mill Valley. Times vary. $20–$58. 415.388.5208.


IRRESISTIBLE! A VASTLY ENTERTAINING TRIP THROUGH DECADES OF POP CULTURE.” -LEONARD MALTIN

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G’DAY MATE Guy Pearce gets tough in Australian film ‘The Rover.’

Move Over, Rover

David Michôd’s post-apocalypse film disappoints BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

E

ven after the “Collapse,” things should make sense in a post-Collapse way. The Rover, David Michôd’s disappointing follow-up to The Animal Kingdom, takes place in Australia ten years after the world economy implodes

Monosyllabic Avenger (bearded, jut-jawed Guy Pearce) drives up to a middle-of-nowhere bar to mutely wash his neck, when three inept bandits crash their truck and steal his car. With some ease, the M.A., called Eric, extracts the truck the bandits left and Road Warriors–down the three bandits. They pull over for the parlay, and knock Eric over the head—but don’t do the common sense thing of killing him and taking his car. Shortly afterward, Eric finds the gut-shot brother they left behind, a Faulknerian idiot named Rey (Robert Pattinson using a spastic honk that seems to be a tribute to Billy Bob Thornton in Sling Blade). In cold pursuit, Rey and Eric drive to the Flinders Range where there is

a physician of sorts, a lone woman doctor (Susan Prior). Thence to the well-worn trail of vengeance. The Rover throbs with nativist fears that don’t quite rattle our Yankee bones. The gawk-worthy visuals do capture the heat, dust and terrible remoteness, but when comparing this, as some have, to Austrailia’s classic 1971 Wake in Fright, note the lack of savage pleasure in The Rover; The Road Warrior looked like the end of the world, but it also had jokes, like when the gyro-pilot asks “Remember lingerie?” The only humor in The Rover is the dark, mirthless anti-joke hidden in the title. All the bloodshed is due to something that isn’t valuable in the ordinary sense, except in a demonstration of the principle of the thing. Common sense takes a holiday. Blame The English Patient and Cormac McCarthy in equal measures. ‘The Rover’ opens June 20 at Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Road, Santa Rosa. 707.522.0719.

27 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 1 8-24, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Film

MEET T THE MAN WHO INVENTED SEX , DRUGS AND ROCK ‘N’ ROLL


28

Music

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JUNE 1 8-24, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Napa's premier intimate intimate concert conceert venue,e, resta restaurant, venu urant, tap wine bar b and private event space.

your

OSH THEJJOSH BOTHROUSE

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K KELLY 6.20

THE BANGLES BANGL LES

CAROLINA CHOCOLATE DROPS

Dwight Yoakam’s latest record is his most acclaimed to date.

Honky Tonkers

7.3

Napa’s Uptown hosts Dwight Yoakam and many others

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A

fter nearly 30 years in the business, country-roots singer-songwriter Dwight Yoakam has done it all. Platinum-selling albums only hint at the prolific work of the honky-tonk man, born in Kentucky and bred in Nashville’s music scene. Though he struggled to break through early in the ’80s, Yoakam soon hit it big. The man who brought traditional country back to the mainstream now has more than 20 albums to his name and recently released his most acclaimed record yet, 3 Pears. The album was hailed as a return to Yoakam’s form of “hillbilly music” that incorporated his wide array of influences into a

cohesive Americana sound. This fall, Yoakam, known for his rousing live shows, heads out on a national tour with BottleRock headliner Eric Church. But first he makes his Uptown Theatre debut this month when he visits the historic Napa venue on June 27. His appearance marks the beginning of an exciting lineup for the Uptown, which looks forward to hosting an impressive collection of country, blues and rock and roll artists all summer. July gets into full swing when the voice of Foreigner, Lou Gramm, performs on July 11. Two days later, Grammy-winning country singer Wynonna Judd makes her Uptown debut. Judd, who has recently taken new directions authoring a book and dancing on reality television, is still recording new material and will perform with her new band, the Big Noise. Rich Robinson, formerly of the Black Crowes, appears on July 19 with songs from his brand-new album, The Ceaseless Sight. The next day, the Uptown heads into the “danger zone” with Kenny Loggins, playing with his recently formed country rock trio, Blue Sky Riders. On July 26, another famous Kenny appears at Uptown when Kenny Wayne Shepard carries on the blues-rock tradition he learned from legends like Stevie Ray Vaughn. August continues the trend when crooner Chris Isaak plays on Aug. 8. Isaak recently moved into new rockabilly territory infused with his signature wistful and passionate style. It’s a move the songwriter has wanted to make for decades, and his latest release has been his most acclaimed. Aug. 15 sees the wild card in this season’s lineup when Idaho indie rock icons Built to Spill play. Sure to be the loudest show of the season, Built to Spill cap off a hot summer of shows at the Uptown Theatre. Dwight Yoakam performs on Friday, June 27, at the Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St., Napa. 8pm. $65–$105. www.uptowntheatrenapa.com. 707.259.0123.


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Grant Geissman Jazz guitar legend kicks off the Jazzy Summer Nights series at the winery. Jun 21, 5pm. $49. Sonoma-Cutrer, 4401 Slusser Rd, Windsor. 707.237.3489.

Solstice Seduction The MegaFlame Big Band accompanies live burlesque Cabaret de Caliente. Jun 21, 8:30pm. $20-$30. Hopmonk Sebastopol, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Timothy O’Neil Band Album release show also features the Crux, Eminor, the Dirty Diamonds and the Three Legged Sisters. Jun 21, 7pm. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

MARIN COUNTY Black Mountain Asphalt Boys Two classic bluegrass bands that featured pre-Dead Jerry Garcia team up for a reunion show. Jun 20, 8pm. $10-$22. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

Aqus Cafe Jun 20, the Pond. Jun 21, Fast Heart Mart. Jun 22, Gabe Gladstein Trio. Third Wednesday of every month, West Coast Singer Songwriter Competition. Fourth Wednesday of every month, Bluegrass Jam. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Center Jun 20, Miles Ahead. Wed, Open Mic. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Bergamot Alley Jun 20, the Railsplitters. Jun 22, Blue & Lonesome. Jun 24, David T Carter. 328-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8720.

Cloverdale Plaza Jun 20, LoCura. Cloverdale Blvd between First and Second St, Cloverdale.

Downtown Guerneville Plaza Jun 19, “Rockin’ the River� with Pride & Joy. 16201 First St, Guerneville.

Epicurean Connection Jun 25, Robert and Amy Ethington. 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

El Radio Fantastique

Flamingo Lounge

The band plays with San Geronimo, Danny Click and others to benefit India Cloud. Jun 22, 7pm. $20. 19 Broadway Club, 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Jun 20-21, live music. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

The Mother Hips Bay Area rock band has been delivering California soul since 1991. Jun 19-20, 8pm. $20. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

NAPA COUNTY 10,000 Maniacs The acclaimed alternative band is back together and touring with a new album on the way. Jun 21, 8pm. $40-$50. City Winery Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY

Hopmonk Sebastopol Jun 19, Phesto, Rasco and Mykill Miers. Jun 20, Jerry Hannan. Tues, open mic night. Wed, Brainstorm EDM show. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment with Jacques & Guac. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hopmonk Sonoma Jun 20, Tony Gibson. Jun 21, Jamie Clark. Jun 22, Michael Bloch. Wed, Open Mic. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg Jun 21, Dick Conte Trio with Steve Webber and Bill Moody. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Jack London State Park Jun 19, Jami Jamison Band. 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen. 707.938.5216.

Lagunitas Tap Room Jun 18, the Royal Deuces. Jun 19, Levi Lloyd. Jun 20, the Gravel Spreaders. Jun 21, Jay “Buckaroo� Bonet. Jun 22, Ain’t Misbehavin’. Jun 25, the Gypsy Trio. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Lounge at La Rosa Jun 25, Choppin Broccoli. 500 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.3663.

Main Street Station Jun 20, Susan Sutton Jazz Trio. Jun 21, Wendy Dewitt. Jun 24, Greg Hester. Sun, Kit Mariah’s Open Mic Night. Mon, Gypsy Cafe. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mc T’s Bullpen Jun 20, DJ Sameo. Jun 21, Wiley’s Coyotes. Sun, DJ Prodkt. Tues, Thurs, 9pm, karaoke with Country Dan. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Jun 19, 3 on a Match. Jun 21, the Perfect Crime. Jun 22, Adam Traum. Jun 24, the Highway Poets. Wed, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

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Mystic Theatre Jun 21, Zepparella. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Phoenix Theater Jun 20, Thus the Buzz presents Pink Floydâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The Wall. Jun 21, Mobb. Tues, 7pm, Acoustic Americana jam. Wed, 6pm, Jazz jam. Sun, 5pm, rock and blues jam. Mon, 7pm, young peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s AA. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Redâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Apple Roadhouse Jun 18, Tyler Gregory. Jun 20, Dave Hamilton. Jun 25, Brooke & the Caterpillar. 4550 Gravenstein Hwy. North, Sebastopol. 707-861-9338.

Redwood Cafe Jun 20, the Zins. Jun 21, Full Steem. Thurs, Open Mic. Third Wednesday of every month, Prairie Sun. Fourth Sunday of every month, Old Time Music. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Rodney Strong Vineyards Jun 21, Jazz Attack. 11455 Old Redwood Hwy, Healdsburg. 707.431.1533.

Andrews Hall

Kenwood Depot

Ruth McGowanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewpub

Jun 25, Joe Chaplain. Sonoma

Third Thursday of every month,

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DEE D EE R RASCO ASCO AND AND M MYKILL YKILL MIERS MIEERS $$13 13 ADV/$18 ADV/$18 DOS/DOORS DOS/ DOORS 9PM/21+ 9PM /21+

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IINDIE NDIE | R ROCK O CK | SONGWRITER S O N GW R I T ER

JJERRY ERRY HANNAN HANNAN $$12/DOORS 12/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

Sonoma Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Original Roadhouse Tavern

Great Food & Live Music Wed Jun 18Â&#x2DC;LhEE2/

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DJ Huey Dawg

Fri Jun 20Â&#x2DC;LhEE2/

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Whiskey and Circumstance

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$10 DANCE $10 DANCE PARTY PART Y ONLY/$20 ONLY/$20 GA GA $25 $ 25 R RESERVED ESERVED SEAT/ SEAT/ $30 $30 PREMIUM PREMIUM SSEATING/ EATING / $70 $70 VIP VIP TABLE TABLE FOR FOR 2/$150 2/$150 VIP V IP B BOOTH OOTH FFOR OR 44/DOORS / DOORS 8:30PM/21+ 8 : 30PM /21+

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Open Mic with Carl Green The Bootleg Honeys Plus on Fri & Sat Nights:

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 1 8-24, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

29

Open Mic Cafe. 314 Warm Springs Rd, Kenwood.


Music ( 29

30

CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JUNE 1 8-24, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Guns. Sun, Evening Jazz with Gary Johnson. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610. Showtimes: Sun 12pm/Thur 8pm/Fri & Sat 9pm

>=i`-&)'Â&#x203A;BlueShift >Sat 6/21Â&#x203A;80s Party >Sun 6/22Â&#x203A;Sunday Bumps >=i`-&).Â&#x203A;Thrive with Iriefuse >JXk-&)/Â&#x203A;Street Urchinz &

They Went Ghost >Jle-&)0Â&#x203A;Hip Hop Sundaze f/A-Plus

Spanckyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Thurs, Dj Tazzy Taz. Thurs, 7pm, Thursday Night Blues Jam. Sat, live music. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Stout Brothers Jun 25, Iron Rhythm. 527 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.636.0240.

Sugarloaf Ridge State Park Jun 20, Funky Fridays: Motordude Zydeco. 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood.

The Blue Heron Restaurant & Bar June 20, 8pm $15

Jens Jarvie Ecstatic Solstice Kirtan & Mantra June 21, 8pm $20 Adv / $25 Door

Fanna-Fi-Allah Sufi Qawwali Music June 22, 6:30pm Donation

Cancellieri

Traveling Indie Folk Songwriter

Jun 22, Zins. 25300 Steelhead Blvd, Duncans Mills. 707.865.2261.

Tradewinds Jun 18, Ralph Woodson Unplugged. Jun 20, the Ruckus Band. Jun 21, Elvis and the Flashbacks. Tues, Jeremyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Open Mic. Thurs, DJ Dave. Mon, Blues Defenders Pro Jam. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Twin Oaks Tavern Jun 18, Biscuits and Gravy. Jun 20, Whiskey and Circumstance. Jun 21, Trailer Park Rangers. Jun 22, 4 x 4 Singer-Songwriter Series. Jun 25, Bootleg Honeys. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Wed, June 18 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 10:15amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE 12:40pm Youth and Family 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7-10:00pm SINGLES & PAIRS Square Dance Club Thur, June 19 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7:15-10:00pm CIRCLES & SQUARES Square Dance Club Fri, June 20 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10:30pm 9TH ANNUAL FAULTLINE FROLIC Sat, June 21 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am JAZZERCISE 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm 9TH ANNUAL FAULTLINE FROLIC Sun, June 22 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am JAZZERCISE 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;2pm 9TH ANNUAL FAULTLINE FROLIC 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm Steve Luther DJ COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS AND DANCING Mon, June 23 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tue, June 24 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922

1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

Vino di Amore Jun 20, Craig Corona. Jun 21, Linda Ferro Trio. Jun 19, Bruce Halbohm and Greg Hester. 105 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.6166.

Whiskey Tip Sweet Hay by Carolyn Lord, Watercolor 5FOUI4U 4BOUB3PTBt5VFo4BUo 707tcalabigallery.com

Jun 20, Blueshift. Jun 21, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;80s Party. Jun 22, Sunday Bumps. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa.

Yoga Community Jun 20, Paradiso and Rasamayi. 577 Fifth St W, Sonoma. 707.935.8600.

Zodiacs Jun 18, Rusty Stringfield. Jun 19, Throwdown Thursdaze. Jun 20, Wil Blades Trio. Jun 21, the Pulsators. Jun 25, New Copasetics. 256 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma. 707.773.7751.

Back to the Future Mother Hips look back with new album When youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve spent the last 23 years inventing and perfecting a subgenre all your own, in this case California soul, there is invariably a lot of material that gets left on the cuttingroom ďŹ&#x201A;oor. Take the Mother Hips, for example. Even with their periods of hiatus, the band has steadily been building an ever-changing catalogue of cool grooves and hot rock. This year, the San Francisco jam masters re-entered the editing room to collect those clippings and have assembled a new record of never-released rarities and demos, Chronicle Man, set for release July 14. Showcasing the Mother Hipsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; earliest efforts, the album is primarily made up of the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grungier, fuzzed-out sound. This collection came to life reportedly after these demos were found on their original 2-inch analog tapes in an L.A. basement in 2009. The band pored over the material with their official archivist (which brings up the question of how many unofficial archivists may still be out there), and selected their favorites. The Chronicle Man tracks get a live airing when Mother Hips appear Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Friday, June 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;20, at Terrapin Crossroads. 100 Yacht Club Drive, San Rafael. 8pm. $20. 415.524.2773.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Charlie Swanson

MARIN COUNTY At the Veterans Building 282 South High St. Sebastopol, CA 95472 707.829.4797 www.sebarts.org

142 Throckmorton Theatre

Dance Palace

Fenix

Jun 22, San Francisco Institute of Music Student Concert. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Jun 22, Tamalpais String Quartet. Jun 25, Yesway. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Jun 20, Zeppelin Live. Jun 21, Greg Johnson & Glass Brick Boulevard. Jun 22, Denise Perrier with the Tammy Hall


Quartet. Wed, Blues Night. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600. Jun 19, Julio Bravo. Jun 22, Mexican Banda. Wed, Rock and R&B Jam. Sat, DJ Night. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Hopmonk Novato Jun 19, the Grain. Jun 20, We the Folk. Jun 22, Peter Case and Jerry Hannan. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

19 Broadway Club Jun 18, Hi Beamz. Jun 19, Luciano. Jun 20, Wonderbread 5. Jun 21, Sambada. Jun 24, Charlie Hickox & Cleveland Soul. Jun 25, salsa night. Tues, Bluesday Piano Night. Last Tuesday of every month, Radioactive with Guests. Mon, 9pm, open mic. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Osteria Divino Jun 18, Jonathan Poretz. Jun 19, Lilan Kane. Jun 20, Ken Cook Trio. Jun 21, Nicholas Culp Trio. Jun 22, Marcelo Puig and Seth Asarnow. Jun 24, Ken Cook. Jun 25, Noel Jewkes. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Panama Hotel Restaurant Jun 18, Marianna August. Jun 19, Deborah Winters. Jun 24, Lorin Rowan. Jun 25, Wendy DeWitt with Kirk Harwood. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Station House Cafe Jun 22, Nearly Beloved. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1515.

Studio 55 Marin Jun 22, Matthew Schoening. 1455 E Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.

Sweetwater Music Hall Jun 20, Hot for Teacher. Jun 21, Mark Karan and guests. Jun 22, Remi & Chloe. Jun 24, Ray Bonneville. Jun 25, Paper Bird. Mon, Open Mic. Every other Wednesday, Wednesday Night Live. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads Jun 18, Terrapin Family Band. Jun 21, Jeff Derby Quartet. Fri, 4:20 Happy Hour with live music. Sun, Midnight North. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

Town Center Corte Madera Jun 22, 2pm, Jessie Lee Kincaid.

100 Corte Madera Town Center, Corte Madera. 415.924.2961. Jun 18, Josh Rouse with Doug Paisley. Jun 19, Maria Muldaur. Jun 20, World Party. Jun 22, Taylor Bartolucci and friends sing Rogers & Hammerstein. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Jun 19, Full Chizel. Jun 20, Walter Hand and the Blue Hand Band. Jun 21, Lucky Dog. Jun 25, Skunk Funk. Wed, Jumpstart. Sun, DJ Aurelio. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

FARM at Carneros Inn Jun 18, D’Bunchovus Trio. Jun 19, Carlos Herrera Trio. Jun 25, Swell Surf Trio. 4048 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 888.400.9000.

Goose & Gander Jun 22, Mark Sexton Band. 1245 Spring St, St Helena. 707.967.8779.

Silo’s Jun 19, the Rising Tide. Jun 20, Delbert Bump and friends. Jun 21, Iriefuse. Jun 22, Full Swing Vocal Trio. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Peri’s Silver Dollar Jun 20, Jay Bonet. Jun 21, Rusty Evans and the Ring of Fire. Jun 22, Horses Heaven. Tues, John Varn and Tommy Odetto. Mon, acoustic open mic. Third Wednesday of every month, Elvis Johnson Soul Review. Third Thursday of every month, Burnsy’s Sugar Shack. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio Jun 20, High Tide Collective. Jun 21, Shana Morrison. Jun 22, Wendy Dewitt with Nate Ginsberg. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sausalito Seahorse Jun 19, Janet Lee and the Dan McGee Three. Jun 20, Doc Kraft Dance Band. Jun 21, Campbell, Markels and Pendergast. Tues, Jazz with Noel Jewkes and friends. Wed, Tango with Marcello and Seth. Sun, live salsa music. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady Jun 18, Rory McNamara, Stevie

31

City Winery Napa

San Francisco’s City Guide

Zara McFarlane Jamaican-British soul singer makes U.S. debut on tour supporting jazzy sophomore record. June 18 at Yoshi’s SF.

Color Me Badd Popular ‘90s R&B vocal trio appear for special performance of chart-topping hits. June 20 at Mezzanine.

Anuhea Hawaii’s top female artist brings her sultry, acoustic styling to the Bay Area. June 21 at the Independent.

Allah-Las L.A. garage rock quartet formed while they worked at the famous Amoeba Hollywood record store. June 22 at Great American Music Hall.

Tamar Braxton Sister of Toni Braxton breaks out on her own with Grammy-nominated music. June 23 at Regency Ballroom.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 1 8-24, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

George’s Nightclub

Coyle and Doug Adamz. Jun 20, Jazzitude. Jun 21, Helm. Jun 22, Namely Us. Jun 25, Spark & Whisper. Sat, Ukulele Jam Session. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. Mon, open mic with Simon Costa. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.


NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JUNE 1 8-24, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

32

Arts Events 18 18-22 -22 2014 201 4

WEDNESDAY, WEDNE SDAY, JU JUNE NE E 18

EDDIE MONEY FRIDAY, FR IDAY, JUNE JUNE 20 0

THURSDAY, TH URSDAY, JU J JUNE NE 19

BRETT ELDREDGE SATURDAY, S ATURDAY, J JUNE UNE 21

CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVISITED SUNDAY, S UNDAY, JUNE JUNE 22 22

FIESTA LATINA: GRUPO EL TIEMPO,

LA SONORA SANTANERA,

& LA MAR-K

ONE PRICE FITS ALL!

Galleries RECEPTIONS

Through Jun 29, “Evolution Revolution,” juried exhibit reflects the evolution of all things organic and man-made. 1200 River Rd, Fulton.

Jun 19

Gallery One

Calabi Gallery, “Summer Selection Exhibition,” showing new works from gallery artists and an inventory of vintage pieces. 5pm. 456 Tenth St, Santa Rosa. 707.781.7070.

Jun 21 Lonbgoard Vineyards, “Maverick’s Surf Photography Exhibit,” displays the oceanic giants. 4pm. 5 Fitch St., Healdsburg. 707.433.3473.

Jun 22

PLUS! Wine Tasting featuring North of the Gate Wine Competition Award Winners Culinary Pavilion Featuring Top Area Chefs

ADULTS $15 KIDS & SENIORS $10

ADMISSION INCLUDES:

Concerts, Carnival Rides, Exhibits, Chef Demos, World’s Ugliest Dog® Contest, Kids Area, and Hands-on Fun!

Gallery Route One, “Open Secrets” is the annual members exhibition, featuring contemporary works from 20 artists. 3pm. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1347.

SONOMA COUNTY Arts Guild of Sonoma Through Jun 29, “Michael Mudd / Brian Martinelli,” the two artists and other guild members are on display through the month. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. Wed-Thurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

Atascadero Creek Winery Through Jun 20, “Buon Fresco and Inks,” Solo show of fresco fragments made in the true ancient technique of roman frescos with a contemporary twist by French-American artist isabelle Proust. 6542 Front st, Forestville. Thurs to Mon, 12pm to 5pm. 707.812.7101.

Finley Community Center

Information Informa tion and Discount T Tickets ickets online: o

WWW.SONOMA-MARINFAIR.ORG WWW W.SONOMA . -MARINF FAIR.ORG

Fulton X Gallery

Through Jun 19, “Art at the Source Preview Exhibition,” features work from artists participating in the upcoming Art at the Source open studios weekends. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Through Jun 30, “A Gem-Small Works,” features the work of Else Gonella, Lori Mole, Helen Moreda, Alan Plisskin and Joanne Tepper. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Graton Gallery Through Jun 22, “In Water,” presents mixed media by Marylu Downing and Barbara Hoffman. Jun 23-Aug 3, “Scenes from the Road,” art by Pam Powell, Linda Ratzlaff and others. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts Through Jun 22, “Metal Arts Exhibit,” shows functional and decorative art with metal. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center Through Jun 29, “Treescapes,” exhibits the paintings and prints of artist Green Greenwald. 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

New Leaf Gallery Through Jun 29, “Surfaces,” exhibits three sculptors Michael Hannon, Kari Minnick and Pam Morris. Cornerstone Place, 23588 Hwy 121, Sonoma. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.933.1300.

Redwood Cafe Through Jun 30, “June Art Show,” shows works from photographer Ken Bradley, sculptor Rick Butler and others. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

RiskPress Gallery Through Jun 29, “Alive at the Cusp: Remaking Our Relations,” displays collage work from six women envisioning the complex relations within ourselves and our surroundings. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Seishin Studio & Gallery Through Jun 22, “Hitsohii (Similar),” features two artists, Shoji Uemura and Ken

Matsumoto, working under the influences of East and West. 360 A St, Santa Rosa.

Towers Gallery Through Jun 26, “California on My Mind,” featuring painter Henry White. 240 North Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. Thurs-Mon, 10am to 7pm. 707.894.4229.

Upstairs Art Gallery Through Jun 29, “French Impressions,” Carolyn Wilson’s richly textured watercolor paintings of France. 306 Center Ave, Healdsburg. SunThurs, 10 to 6; Fri-Sat, 10 to 9. 707.431.4214.

MARIN COUNTY Gallery Bergelli Through Jun 26, “Memories of Dreams” exhibits new paintings by Bay Area artist Sanjay Vora. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Jun 19, “The Beauty of Imperfection,” OHCA’s 11th annual Wabi-Sabi show, is a group exhibit inspired by Japanese aesthetics. Jun 24Jul 24, “Water,” presents the element in all its forms. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

San Geronimo Valley Community Center Through Jun 28, “Norm Catalano photography” 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

Seager Gray Gallery Through Jun 29, “The Long Voyage,” the art of sculptor Joe Brubaker. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

Toby’s Gallery Through Jun 30, “For the Birds,” presented by the Artists in the Schools Program. 11250 Hwy 1, Point Reyes Station.

Youth in Arts Gallery Through Jun 20, “Everything Under the Sun,” featuring works donated by 10 artists for exhibition and auction leading up to the gallery’s Summer


gala event. 917 C St, San Rafael. 415.457.4878.

Dennis Rae Fine Art Through Jun 30, “ELEMENTAL,” new works by Bernard Weston and Ronald Jermyn are drawn from their inspiration of nature and a place of inner peace and strength. 1359 Main St, St Helena. Daily, 10am-6pm 707.963.3350.

Jessup Cellars Through Jun 25, “Neil Young Series,” Grammy-award winning art director Jenice Heo’s exhibit of original rock-and-roll paintings. 6740 Washington St, Yountville. Daily, 10am-6pm 707.944.5620.

Comedy Will Durst The political comedian returns with his tribute to baby boomers: “BoomeRaging: From LSD to OMG.” Jun 21, 8pm. $18$22. Studio 55 Marin, 1455 E Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.

Andrew Norelli As seen on the Late Show with David Letterman. Jun 21, 8pm. $20-$25. Trek Winery, 1026 Machin Ave, Novato. 415.899.9883.

Doug Stanhope The outspoken, adult-only comedian makes his way to the North Bay. Jun 20, 8pm. $25. Sally Tomatoes, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260.

Dance Bubbly Burlesque This month’s production is a circus spectacular, presented by Cabaret de Caliente. J un 19, 7pm. $10-$20. Christy’s on the Square, 96 Old Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa 707.528.8565.

Events Santa Rosa Toy Con “Ghostbusters” star Ernie Hudson and “Ren & Stimpy” creator John K. headline the collectible event with over 200 vendors selling vintage and newer toys. Jun 21. $10-$30. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.545.4200.

“Diamonds are FAIRever,” features family fun, fair food, livestock shows and more; with live music by Eddie Money, Uncle Kracker and others. Jun 18-22. $10-$15. Petaluma Fairgrounds, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.283.3247.

Film Broadway to Hollywood with Richard Glazier Richard Glazier, concert pianist and master storyteller, gives a live multimedia performance dedicated to great movie music. Jun 18, 7:30pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Casablanca Plays as part of the Classic Film Series. Thurs, Jun 19 and Sun, Jun 22. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.5111.

The Fruit Hunters Documentary that combs the globe for exotic fruits is shown. Jun 18, 8:30pm. $5. SHED, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

Gen Silent Documentary covers the struggles of LGBT seniors. Jun 19, 1:30pm. Sebastopol Senior Center, 167 High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.2440.

Julia & Romeo From the Royal Swedish Ballet, this production turns the classic tale on it’s head. Jun 21, 7pm. $15. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Shine a Light Scorsese’s documentary on the Rolling Stones screens as part of the Rock Cinema Series. Jun 25, 7pm. $5. City Winery Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Stripped Documentary on the comic strip screens with directors Dave Kellett and Fred Schroeder on hand for Q&A. Jun 21, 5pm. Free. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

The Third Man Part of the Tuesday Night Flicks series, hosted by Richard Miami. Jun 24, 7pm. $7. City Winery Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Food & Drink

Novella Carpenter. Jun 24, 7pm, “The Essential Hits of Shorty Bon Bon” with Willie Perdomo. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

Exploring Bitters Workshop

Napa Bookmine

Sample a variety of bitter herbs in different forms, and learn about the basic physiology from herbalist Nicole Kurmina Gilson. Jun 22, 1pm. $40. SHED, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

Jun 21, 6:30pm, “This Is How You Say Goodbye” with Victoria Loustalot, presented in partnership with Napa Pride. Jun 25, 5pm, “Brazen” with Katherine Longshore, part of the Teen Book Club series. 964 Pearl St, Napa.

La Dolce Vita

Readers’ Books

A celebration of Italian culture and lifestyle with espresso, mozzarella pulling and pizza making. Jun 20, 6pm. $55. Rosso Rosticceria + Eventi, 1229 N. Dutton, Santa Rosa. 707-526-1229.

Mill Valley Market Wine, Beer & Gourmet Food Tasting Samplings from the area’s best restaurants, breweries and wineries. Jun 22, 1pm. $50-$60. Depot Plaza, Throckmorton and Miller, Mill Valley. 415.388.9700.

Readings Book Passage Jun 18, 7pm, “Gone Feral” with Novella Carpenter. Jun 19, 7pm, “Denali’s Howl” with Andy Hall. Jun 21, 1pm, “Why You Were Born” with Jerry Downs. Jun 21, 7pm, “Margarita Wednesdays” with Deborah Rodriguez. Jun 22, 2pm, California Writers Club. Jun 22, 4pm, “Losing Touch” & “Woman with Crows” with Sandra Hunter and Ruth Thompson. Jun 23, 7pm, “Euphoria” with Lily King. Jun 24, 7pm, “Animal Madness” with Laurel Braitman. Jun 25, 7pm, “The Book of Unknown Americans” with Cristina Henríquez. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Jun 21, 5pm, “The Red Room” with Ridley Pearson, Reading is preceded by dinner at Monit’s in Montgomery Village, by reservation only. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Jun 23, 7pm, “My Salinger Year” with Joanna Rakoff. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books Jun 19, 7pm, “Gone Feral” with

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Jun 19, 7pm, “The Roots of the Vines” with Arlene Morgan. 130 E Napa St, Sonoma 707.939.1779.

San Rafael Copperfield’s Books Jun 18, 7pm, “The Shaman Within” with Claude Poncelet. Jun 25, 6pm, “The Ways of the Dead” with Neely Tucker. 850 Fourth St, San Rafael 415.524.2800.

Theater Failure: A Love Story MTC closes their season with the West Coast premiere of the Philip Dawkins-penned story of the three Fail sisters aiming to find love before their time is up in 1920s Chicago. Through Jun 29. $37-$58. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

The Fellowship World premiere performance. Inspired by J.R.R. Tolkein, a small town misfit sets out on a quest. Jun 18-Jul 13. AlterTheater Ensemble, 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.2787.

The Full Monty: The Musical ETC presents the fun and revealing Broadway show. Through Jun 29. $36. Andrews Hall, Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

Moonlight & Magnolias A comedy about the true story of the trials and tribulations to write the ‘Gone with the Wind’ screenplay in 1939. Through Jun 22. $18. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

T.I.C. (Trenchcoat in Common) The comedy written by SF playwright Peter Sinn Nactrieb follows a girl exploring her apartment building during a dull summer vacation. Through

Forget About It New book reminds us what it’s like to be a kid “It’s a children’s book for adults, about what you knew as a kid, why it was important to forget and how great it is to remember,” writes 64-year-old San Rafael photographer Jerry Downs about Why You Were Born ($29.95) on his Kickstarter page. The 165-page book successfully raised $20,000 in October and will be delivered to his home this week. “What I care about is what art and photography are about,” Downs says by phone from his San Rafael home. “And they’re about life.” Though the book is worth it for the artwork alone, the text is what makes Why You Were Born a must-have for deep thinkers, people-ologists and curious life-explorers. Why You Were Born is at times insightful, touching, philosophical, sappy and hilarious, but its most endearing quality is its honesty. With each new reading, it reveals something as yet unseen—just like life. Jerry Downs will be reading from Why We Were Born Saturday, June 21, at Book Passage. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. 1pm. Free. 415.927.0960. The book’s official kickoff party is Saturday, June 28, at the Fort Mason Firehouse. 2 Marina Blvd., San Francisco. 6–11pm. Free. 415.345.7500.—Nicolas Grizzle

Jun 29. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar,

send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

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Astrology

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of June 18

ARIES (March 21April 19) If you were alive 150 years ago and needed to get a tooth extracted, you might have called on a barber or blacksmith or wigmaker to do the job. (Dentistry didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t become a formal occupation until the latter part of the 19th century.) Today, you wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t dream of seeking anyone but a specialist to attend to the health of your mouth. But Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m wondering if you are being less particular about certain other matters concerning your welfare. Have you been seeking ďŹ nancial advice from your massage therapist? Spiritual counsel from your car repair person? Nutritional guidance from a fast-food addict? I suggest you avoid such behavior. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to ask for speciďŹ c help from those who can actually provide it. TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;My music is best understood by children and animals,â&#x20AC;? said composer Igor Stravinsky. A similar statement could be made about you Tauruses in the coming weeks: You will be best understood by children and animalsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and by all others who have a capacity for dynamic innocence and a buoyant curiosity rooted in emotional intelligence. In fact, those are the types I advise you to surround yourself with. For now, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best to avoid sophisticates who overthink everything and know-it-all cynics whose default mode is criticism. Take control of what inďŹ&#x201A;uences you absorb. You need to be in the presence of those who help activate your vitality and enthusiasm.

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nikhedoniaâ&#x20AC;? is an obscure English word that refers to the pleasure that comes from anticipating success or good fortune. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nothing wrong with indulging in this emotion as long as it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t interfere with you actually doing the work that will lead to success or good fortune. But the problem is, nikhedonia makes some people lazy. Having experienced the thrill of imagining their victory, they ďŹ nd it hard to buckle down and slog through the gritty details necessary to manifest their victory. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be like that. Enjoy your nikhedonia, then go and complete the accomplishment that will bring a second, even stronger wave of gratiďŹ cation. CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22)

Bostonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Museum of Fine Arts has a collection of Japanese art that is never on display. It consists of 6,600 wood-block prints created by artists of the ukiyo-e school, also known as â&#x20AC;&#x153;pictures of the ďŹ&#x201A;oating world.â&#x20AC;? Some are over 300 years old. They are tucked away in drawers and hidden from the light, ensuring that their vibrant colors wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fade. So they are well-preserved but rarely seen by anyone. Is there anything about you that resembles these pictures of the ďŹ&#x201A;oating world, Cancerian? Do you keep parts of you secret, protecting them from what might happen if you show them to the world? It may be time to revise that policy. (Thanks to Molly OldďŹ eldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The Secret Museum for the info referred to here.)

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) In the next two weeks, I hope you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fall prey to the craze that has been sweeping Japan. Over 40,000 people have bought books that feature the photos of hamuketsu, or hamster bottoms. Even if you do manage to avoid being consumed by that particular madness, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m afraid you might get caught up in triďŹ&#x201A;es and distractions that are equally irrelevant to your long-term dreams. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what I suggest: To counteract any tendency you might have to neglect whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s truly important, vow to focus intensely on whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s truly important. VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22) Writing at FastCompany.com, Himanshu Saxena suggests that businesses create a new position: chief paradox ofďŹ cer, or CPXO. This person would be responsible for making good use of the conďŹ&#x201A;icts and contradictions that normally arise, treating them as opportunities for growth rather than as distractions. From my astrological perspective, you Virgos are currently prime candidates to serve in this capacity. You will continue to have special powers to do this type of work for months to come. LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) In accordance with the astrological omens, you are hereby granted a brief, one-time-only license to commit the Seven Deadly Sins. You heard me correctly, Libra. As long as

you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go to extremes, feel free to express healthy amounts of pride, greed, laziness, gluttony, anger, envy and lust. At least for now, there will be relatively little hell to pay for these indulgences. Just one caveat: If I were you, I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t invest a lot of energy in anger and envy. Technically, they are permitted, but they arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really much fun. On the other hand, greed, gluttony and lust could be quite pleasurable, especially if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take yourself too seriously. Pride and laziness may also be enjoyable in moderate, artful amounts.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21)

Scorpio novelist Kurt Vonnegut rebelled against literary traditions. His stories were often hybrids of science ďŹ ction and autobiography. Free-form philosophizing blended with satirical moral commentary. He could be cynical yet playful, and he told a lot of jokes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to stand as close to the edge as I can without going over,â&#x20AC;? he testiďŹ ed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Out on the edge you see all the kinds of things you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see from the center.â&#x20AC;? Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your role model for the next four weeks, Scorpio. Your challenge will be to wander as far as you can into the frontier without getting hopelessly lost.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Make a name for the dark parts of you,â&#x20AC;? writes Lisa Marie Basile in her poem â&#x20AC;&#x153;Paz.â&#x20AC;? I think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good advice for you, Sagittarius. The imminent future will be an excellent time to fully acknowledge the shadowy aspects of your nature. More than that, it will be a perfect moment to converse with them, get to know them better and identify their redeeming features. I suspect you will ďŹ nd that just because they are dark doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean they are bad or shameful. If you approach them with love and tenderness, they may even reveal their secret genius. CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) Pet mice that are kept in cages need to move more than their enclosed space allows, so their owners often provide them with exercise wheels. If the rodents want to exert their natural instinct to run around, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to do it on this device. But hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a curious twist: a team of Dutch researchers has discovered that wild mice also enjoy using exercise wheels. The creatures have all the room to roam they need, but when they come upon the wheels in the middle of the forest, they hop on and go for prolonged spins. I suggest you avoid behavior like that, Capricorn. Sometime soon you will ďŹ nd yourself rambling through more spacious places. When that happens, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t act like you do when your freedom is more limited. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18)

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s transition time. We will soon see how skilled you are at following through. The innovations you have launched in recent weeks need to be ďŹ&#x201A;eshed out. The creativity you unleashed must get the full backing of your practical action. You will be asked to make good on the promises you made or even implied. I want to urge you not to get your feelings hurt if some pruning and editing are required. In fact, I suggest you relish the opportunity to translate fuzzy ideals into tidy structures. Practicing the art of ingenious limitation will make everything better.

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always important for you to shield yourself against our cultureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s superďŹ cial and sexist ideas about sex. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always important for you to cultivate your own unique and soulful understandings about sex. But right now this is even more crucial than usual. You are headed into a phase when you will have the potential to clarify and deepen your relationship with eros. In ways you have not previously imagined, you can learn to harness your libido to serve both your spiritual aspirations and your quest for greater intimacy.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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