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Protester Harassment p8 Buster’s Bangin’ BBQ p11 Jennifer Lawrence p20

Cracks in the System Restorative justice keeps teens from the school-to-prison pipeline while fixing a broken method of school discipline— no wonder it’s gaining such ground LEILANI CLARK REPORTS P15

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Contributors Michael Amsler, Alastair Bland, Rob Brezsny, Dani Burlison, Richard von Busack, Rachel Dovey, Jessica Dur Taylor, Gretchen Giles, Brooke Jackson, James Knight, Jacquelynne Ocaña, Sara Sanger, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow, Ken Weaver

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

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‘It sounds bad, but if I’d never stolen shoes from Sears, I wouldn’t be active in the community today.’ F EATUR E P1 5 Andy Lopez Protesters Claim Harassment T H E PAP E R P 8

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Baby Steps Obama’s NSA speech: half-hearted at best BY BIANCA MAY

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his past week brought a storm of news regarding “internet security” (sort of any oxymoron in today’s day and age), NSA spying (at this point, we all know they do it) and the vast extent to which our government infringes on our lives.

“Those who are troubled by our existing programs are not interested in a repeat of 9-11,” said President Obama last week, “and those who defend these programs are not dismissive of civil liberties. The challenge is getting the details right, and that’s not simple.” The president recommended changes to the NSA’s citizen spy program, but said it as if he were doing us all a favor. While I commend the president in addressing these activities, this still raises the question, why? What does the government need to know about you or I that they should legally be allowed to tap our phones without cause? We have a Constitution and a Bill of Rights that are slowly disintegrating, and we should not be treated as criminals in the name of “national security.” Nothing that Obama mentioned should be a shock to people in the current age of electronic media, social networking and everchanging “privacy” policies. We live in an age when our lives are becoming entrenched in electronic media. Although internet services are convenient, we should pause a moment to survey just how much of our lives we have willingly put online. Credit cards, banking, bills, emails, family photos . . . We volunteer this without hesitation to the internet ether. I love my Facebook as much as anyone, but even I am reevaluating how much information I want to keep floating around for others to grab. It may be time to get back to conversations in person, visiting people in person and writing letters with good old-fashioned paper and pens. (I’d say, pick up the phone and call a friend but, you know, the NSA . . .) In other words, if you want to say something securely and privately, the best way to do it is with your mouths, in person and behind closed doors—preferably your own. For now. Bianca May is a graduate of Sonoma State University and self-described feather-ruffler living in Rohnert Park. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Let Them Have Dreams

multigeneration side effects of the kinds of very controversial poison compounds being proposed for broadcast here.

When Social Advocates for Youth’s proposal for a Dream Center met with some neighborhood opposition (“Dreams On Hold,” Nov. 20), they had a unique response: they opened the doors of their existing residential facility, Tamayo Village, to all who had questions or concerns about their ability to manage such a project.

The inhumane slow death by which this broad-spectrum poison kills the targeted species is well established. The dirty little secret behind this plan is that in spite of generally ineffective efforts to scare nontarget animals away, a range of predators higher up the food chain will inevitably feed on the dying mice and on the persistent poison pellets and also die, in a phenomenon dismissively called “bykill.” This controversial brodifacoum poison, in particular, can also damage future generations of exposed nontarget animals that fail to succumb, thereby likely interfering with the ongoing biological viability of important wildlife populations within the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary.

A series of free, open dinners at Tamayo Village were set up by volunteers, and all were welcomed The evening I attended, I heard powerful poetry from a phenomenal young man, and stories from other youth that broke my heart. I witnessed the bonds of support these young adults formed with each other, and met dedicated volunteers who were committed to empowering them to make healthy choices. I also heard from a Bennett Valley neighbor who had previously opposed the Dream Center, but left with her opinion transformed. I encourage everyone to check out SAY’s ‘frequently asked questions’ page on their Dream Center web page. It will likely clear up confusion over misleading statistics disseminated by those opposed to this project. My hope is that our community will come together to help create an effective, supportive, responsible and safe Dream Center for all who need it.

JULIE CHASEN Santa Rosa

Disrupting the Ecosystem Thanks for the informative cover story by Alastair Bland on the proposal by Fish and Wildlife Service to apply poison to our local Farallon Islands (“Mice Capades,” Jan. 8). A follow-up would be useful, to further disclose the nasty

However well-intended poisoning on this scale here may be—and however financially profitable for certain groups—this is unfortunately the wrong precedent to set for management of our national ocean treasures, not only on the California coast, but throughout the U.S. Marine Sanctuary system. Target the mice, not the whole ecosystem.

RICHARD CARTER Vice-chair, Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council, Bodega Bay

We’re the GOP The war in Iraq, the war in Afghanistan, the war on drugs—each of them illconceived, unwinnable and not only a failure but counterproductive, a tragic misuse of good money and good lives. Yet the party chiefly responsible for launching all three of these disasters, the party that now wants to cut back on food stamps and unemployment benefits, is happy to go on throwing $2 billion-plus a week down the war hole. And who profits by this? No mystery there.

J. B. GRANT Sebastopol

THIS MODERN WORLD

CeCe’s Imprisonment CeCe McDonald’s plight is evidence again that our criminal justice system must be reformed. Most people would find it unthinkable that a woman would be imprisoned in a jail for men. As our report “Injustice at Every Turn” shows, trans-women of color such as CeCe face shocking levels of physical violence and discrimination by the police, the courts and the prison system. The truth is CeCe McDonald shouldn’t have spent any time behind bars in the face of racist, homophobic and transphobic slurs and the physical attack on her. Her story should be a wake-up call for our nation.

THE REV. DARLENE NIPPER Deputy executive director, National Gay and Lesbian Task Force Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

By Tom Tomorrow

Top Five 1

Hootie coming to Santa Rosa, yee haw, at Country Summer 2014 in June

2

Dogecoin raises $30,000 to send Jamaican bobsled team to Sochi Olympics

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John Sakowicz tries to block KZYX license because, duh, that’s what he does

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CalTrans finally removes its bird-killing nets on Highway 101 in Petaluma

5 San Francisco officially the third least-affordable major city in the world

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NOT THEIR PROBLEM? T Talk a alk of of protestor protestor h harassment arassment highligh highlighted ted the first-ever first-eever llaw aw enf enforcement fo orcement T Task a ask F Force o orce meeting. m

On n Target Tar arget Andy Lopez Andy Lopez activists activists char charge ge har harassment, asssment, law enf for o cement c rresponds espond ds BY NICOLAS GR GRIZZLE RIZZLE enforcement

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hee bright lights h aand an d sshouting houting v oices didn’t didn’t voices sseem eem rreal eal at first, ssays ays Li sbeet M endoza, 15. Lisbet Mendoza, “W We th houg ght h it i w as a joke,” j ke,” jok “We thought was sshe he told members members of th thee S onoma County County C ommunity Sonoma Community an dL ocal Law Law Enf orcement and Local Enforcement T ask F orce at its J an. 13 Task Force Jan. in augural meeting. meeting. inaugural Mendoza’s M endoza’s v voice oice tr trembling embling with

fearr, sshe fear, he continued: continued: “They “They told us our hands to o put put o ur h ands on our our head head . . . they had guns us.”” S She th hey h ad g uns pointed at us. he and an nd her her friends friends were were handcuffed, handcuffed, leaving and though le eaving deep bruises, bruises, an d th oug gh nine enforcement n ine llaw aw enf orcement vehicles vehicles arrived ar rrived on the the scene, scene, the the teens teens weren’t given their w eren’t gi ven a rreason eason ffor or th eir detainment, d etainment, she she said. said. “They “They were were ssearching earching ffor or a gun,” gun,” she she told the th he task “but wee didn’ didn’tt h have ta ask fforce, orce, “b ut w ave a gun. had was staple gun.” g u All we un. we h ad w as a sta ple g u ” un. On the the evening evening of Jan. Jan. 9, Jose Jose

Luis “Louie” Godoy, drove L uis “L ouie” Godo y, 24, dr ove ffour our teenagers back from thee stor storee after teen agers b ack fr om m th buying markers, posterboard and b uying m arkers, pos sterboard an d other upcoming oth er ssupplies upplies ffor or an n upc oming Justice Andy Lopez march. op J ustice ffor or An dy L pez m arch. Upon hiss rreturn Moorland U pon hi eturn to M oorland Avenue hee an and A venue in Santa Santa Rosa, Rossa, h d thee teenagers by th teenagers were were ssurprised urprised b y vehicles waiting sseveral everal ssheriff’s heriff ’s v ehiicles w aiting thee d dark their off.. in th ark with th eirr lights off Two deputies T wo minutes after de eputies announced their presence, ann ounced th eir pr esence, a helicopter was ssheriff’s heriff ’s h elicopter w as on ) 10

It may se seem eem a stretch stretchh to conne ect connect personal w finance with empowe rment, empowerment, especiall or those who have especiallyy ffor lived by the t mantr mantraa of “Eat the rich” sinc ce birth. Having money rich” since yoou ou’rre evil, evil right? The 1%! means you’re ll, Warren Warren Buffett! Buffett! Go to he hell, All jokingg aside, personal finance finanncial planning shouldn’t shouldn’t and financial be a luxu ury rreserved eserved ffor or the rich. luxury We all deserves deeserves the chance to We understaand where where out money understand goes andd how we can make our w best ffor or us. That ’s income work That’s eep It! Save why the Earn It! KKeep It! (EKS) coalition is an idea me has come. Created Created whose ti time specifically ffor or Bay Area Area residents, residents, specifically EKS’ mis sion is to pr ovide fr ee mission provide free tax pr epaaration as a tool to help preparation low inco me rresidents esidents become income financially stable—and part financially of the Un nited W ay’s str ategic United Way’s strategic initiative to cut local poverty in half by 2020. 2 Her S County y, Empir Heree in Sonoma County, Empiree g accounting a g students College VITA, a tax pr eparation will use VITA, preparation program thr ough the IRS, to program through deliver fr ree income ser vices to free services low-inco ome rresidents esidents (household low-income m be less than income must through April $52,000 in 2013) through 15. The pprogram rogram is a win-win in that it pr rovides valuable tax pr ep provides prep guidance, which can lead and guidance, to gr eateer rreturns, eturns, and work greater workss service-based v learning as a service-based opportun t nity it ffor or Empir EEmpire i e College C ll opportunity accounting students, who must accounting become IRS certified in tax preparation to participate. preparation The EKS kick-off event gets underway on Satur dayy, Jan. 25, at underway Saturday, Empir C 3035 Cleveland Empiree College. A ve., San nta Rosa. 9am–1pm. Ave., Santa 707 7.546.4 . 4000. A ttendees will have 707.546.4000. Attendees the chan nce to explor ee tax chance exploree fr free help, ons site heal thcare and onsite healthcare CalFresh enrollment, enrollment, and dir ect CalFresh direct deposit and a bank ser vices. services. For mor ormation, see moree inf information, www.unitedwaywinecountry.org. www.unitedwaywinecountry.org. —Leilani Clark

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A Toast To Bob Anderson

Nick Frey Community Contribution Award Recipient We’re proud to recognize Bob Anderson as our 2014 Nick Frey Community Contribution Award recipient. Bob works tirelessly, attends dozens of agency and government meetings and supports the winegrowing community in Sonoma County, often behind the scenes. As Executive Director of United Winegrowers for Sonoma County for almost three decades, Bob is a trusted resource on hundreds of issues affecting winegrowers and agriculture. His impact has been immeasurable. Bob,

We Thank You!

In 2013, the Sonoma County Winegrowers established an annual award to recognize individuals and organizations whose contributions to the grape growing community have gone above and beyond. The award was named after former Sonoma County President Nick Frey to honor his 14 years of service and commitment to the growers of Sonoma County.

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the scene, shining a spotlight from overhead. Backup from the Santa Rosa Police Department was called, and Godoy was arrested just half a mile from the site of Lopez’s death, which has been turned into a makeshift memorial park by the community. The task force is powerless to enforce any action on this issue, as it is only an advisory body constructed to make recommendations to the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors in the wake of the shooting of 13-year-old Andy Lopez at the hands of Deputy Erick Gelhaus. But the issue was discussed as an indication of a larger problem stemming from the death of Andy Lopez: the frustration of both law enforcement and the community. “That’s the crux of this issue,” said task force member Caroline Bañuelos, referring to the incident. Though many have claimed that Godoy and others are a target of harassment by law enforcement due to their participation in recent protests, for which the city has estimated its costs to be upwards of $250,000, officials assert the incident had nothing to do with Andy Lopez, and that Godoy was arrested as a suspect in a previous incident that day. “[Godoy] was identified as a person that pointed a handgun at a citizen in traffic,” says Santa Rosa Police Sgt. Mike Lazzarini, one of the responding officers, reached by phone this week. After that initial incident, reported at 4:15pm near the intersection of Hearn and Corby avenues, an investigation and witness identification pointed to Godoy as a suspect. Sheriff’s deputies “happened to find him,” says Lazzarini, and called for “emergency backup” when the situation drew onlookers. “A bunch of people from the neighborhood had come out and were being loud and causing a challenge for the deputies,” says Lazzarini, one of the responding officers. No weapons were found, but “there had been quite a time frame” between the call and the identification of Godoy as a suspect, he added.

Sonoma County Sheriff’s deputies were not available for comment at press time. Despite law enforcement’s explanation, the case has prompted charges of harassment. Jon Melrod, a leader of the Justice for Andy Lopez campaign, says the Lopez family’s lawyer, Arnoldo Casillas, plans to file a lawsuit within the week alleging harassment of Andy’s Youth and coalition activities, “on behalf of the youth that were harassed.” From that point, the county has 45 days to settle or reject the claim, after which a federal suit can be filed. No official complaints have been submitted to the Santa Rosa Police Department.

‘They told us to put our hands on our head . . . they had guns pointed at us.’ “I think it’s a positive thing, because it’s going to show how the department works,” says Nicole Guerre, an activist whose son was good friends with Lopez. “It’s also positive for the kids, because it shows them there are consequences when things happen.” As for Lisbet Mendoza, after the Jan. 13 task force meeting, she and her friend Karina Alvarado, 13, recalled more details of the evening. That morning, they had been at the courthouse to support Godoy in his appearance following an arrest on charges of obstructing a police officer during a Dec. 10 protest in Santa Rosa. Mendoza recognized deputies from the courtroom at the Jan. 9 arrest. “All the deputies that were there at the court, they were there that night,” she says. “They’ve been harassing us really bad.” At the core of it all, as Bañuelos points out, is the concern felt by the community. “It’s like a war zone in the Latino community,” says Guerre. “My son even says, ‘Am I next?’”

CALISTOGA COOKER Buster Davis cooks between 35 and 50 giant chunks of his famous tri-tip on weekends.

Stick to Your Ribs Buster’s, a taste of true California ’Cue in Calistoga BY BROOKE JACKSON

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he smoke billowing up through the trees is the first hint. Then the whiff of grilling meat confirms it: Buster’s Southern Barbeque & Bakery is just up ahead. Sitting at the very top of Napa Valley, Busters’ brings together bikers, wine snobs and

families at the crossroads of Calistoga. Regularly voted by Bohemian readers as the best barbecue in Napa, one bite of the succulent tri-tip is all it takes to understand why. Buster Davis cut his chops in the barbecue field in Southern California, perfecting family recipes for dry rub, sauce and

cooking techniques. Twelve years ago, he headed north, taking over the rundown Jolly Kone ice cream store and spiffing up the property. The prep kitchen moved into the tiny ice cream dispensary, with the front windows remaining for ordering and pick up. An adjacent seating area is now closed-in, with heating and A/C added in the last couple years to provide year-round comfort. Along the perimeter of

the horseshoe driveway are tables tucked in among the trees. The heart of Buster’s is the barbecue pit, which was made by Davis’ brother. In a deep metal box with a grill rack that can be raised or lowered, an oak fire licks the meat, kissing it with mouthwatering wood-smoke flavor. It’s a style of cooking commonly associated with Santa Maria on the central coast of California, where cooking over coastal red oak has a rich history. From the days of the ranchos some 150 years ago, when the vast central-coast inlands were covered with large cattle ranches and the land was still owned by Mexico, beef was cooked over open fires. The cuts were strung onto branches and roasted over pits of roaring oak, giving the meat a signature woodgrilled flavor. Today, that time-honored style of barbecue is still going strong around the Santa Maria valley where tri-tip is king—and also up in Calistoga at Buster’s, where the tritip is the most popular item on the menu. Buster’s cooks between 35 and 50 of the football-sized hunks on busy weekends, slicing it thickly and serving it with their signature sauce. The sauce sets Buster’s apart from other barbecue. It comes in medium and hot versions, and is served on the side so diners can dip and slather to their liking. Tangy, smoky and with a hint of spice, the medium is the most popular, while the hot sauce is not for the faint of heart—it’s got an incendiary kick that will have diners reaching for a frosty glass of Buster’s homemade lemonade. In fact, a big sign near the register states that there are no refunds or exchanges if the sauce is too fiery for customers; Buster’s wife, Barbara Jolly, says people have tried to return it after one bite. Racks of beef and pork ribs are another popular menu item. (Gnawing on bones is a modernday caveperson’s dream.) The beef ribs come chewy, with good flavor, and the pork ribs are juicy and luscious, falling off the bone with that signature wood) 12 smoke flavor.

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Authentic Indian Cuisine & select American Summer Fare

BAY VIEW RESTAURANT & BAR – BODEGA BAY ESTA BLISH ED IN 1984

Bombay style Indian Chinese entrees also Open for Lunch & Dinner 11:30am–9pm

Sizzling Tandoor II 9960 HWY 1 s 707-865-0625

Traditional Italian and Local Seafood at Affordable Prices

Thai House

SERVING DINNER Wednesday–Sundays (Saturday Piano Bar) ~ Full Bar, Fireside Lounge, Outdoor Patio ~ Featuring Sonoma County Wines ~ Spectacular Sunset Views ~ Winemaker Dinner Series featured Monthly ~ Groups and Receptions Welcome

Inn at the Tides 800 Hwy One, Bodega Bay 707.875.2751 www.InnattheTides.com

Lunch specials start at $7.95 Includes soup or salad Mon-Fri only

Open 7 days a week Sun-Th 11:30-9:30 Fri-Sat 11:30-10:00 525 4th Street(Upstairs) 707.526.3939

Rounding out the offerings are chicken, hot links and pork loin. Davis recently added pulled pork, simply because so many people kept asking for it. The pile of scrumptious shreds goes well with the slabs of garlic toast that come with every meal, and that hot sauce is the perfect accompaniment to put the tiger back in the tank. Impeccable barbecue calls for tasty side dishes, and Buster’s doesn’t disappoint. The beans, in both baked and chili varieties, are velvety, with each bite setting up a craving for the next. Macaroni salad is a starchy foil for the juicy, spicy meats, as is the potato salad, bound with the right amount of good mayonnaise to make a creamy, satisfying mouthful. The coleslaw and three-bean salad are the only green vegetables on offer, piquant and tangy. The cornbread is moist and slightly sweet, an extra that must be ordered separately but well worth it. Meats can be ordered as dinners, which include two sides and garlic toast; sandwiches served on the garlic toast that come with one side; or as combination plates with up to three grilled items sharing the plate with two sides. Another option is to get the meats to go, in whole or half portions for the tri-tip, racks of ribs, chicken or pork loin, and by the pint for the pulled pork or the piece for the hot links. Jars of barbecue sauce are for sale, and this writer highly recommends having some on hand for whatever’s cooking on your home grill. A dollop of Buster’s sauce makes everything taste just right. Davis and Jolly are hoping to tear down the old Jolly Kone structure and erect a larger kitchen building to accommodate the growing business. Their restaurant is for people from all walks of life who appreciate good, rib-sticking comfort food. As one customer stated after wolfing down some of the finest barbecue in northern California: “It’s not a meal, it’s an experience.” Buster’s Southern Barbeque & Bakery, 1207 Foothill Blvd., Calistoga. 707.942.5605.

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OMA CO U N TY Abyssinia Ethiopian/ Eritrean. $. Authentic and filling, and a welcome culinary addition. Lunch and dinner daily; breakfast, Sat-Sun. 913 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.568.6455.

Belly Californian. $$. When he’s not serving up crispy pork belly or healthy quinoa salads, owner/chef Gray Rollin tours with rock bands like Linkin Park as a personal chef. Lunch and dinner daily. 523 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.526.5787

Carneros Bistro & Wine Bar Californian. $$$$. As fancy as foie graschestnut froth parfait for dinner, as simple as huevos rancheros for breakfast, and all superb. Bre0akfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 1325 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.931.2042.

Dempsey’s Alehouse Gourmet pub fare. $-$$. Popular brewpub and bistro, award-winning handcrafted beers, outdoor dining in summer and pork chops to die for. Lunch and dinner daily. 50 E Washington St, Petaluma. 707.765.9694.

Gary Chu’s Chinese. $$. Fine Chinese food in elegant setting. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 611 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.526.5840.

LaSalette Portuguese. $$-$$$. Authentic rustic dishes include classic lusty Portuguese stews and seafood. Dinner, Wed-Sun. 452-H First St E, Sonoma. 707.938.1927.

Mike’s at the Crossroads Burgers. $. A top contender for best burger in the county. Mike’s will even make you a triple, if you dare. Great beer menu, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat.

7665 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.665.9999.

Pub Republic Pub fare. $-$$. Pub grub from Petaluma’s southernmost tip, featuring Brussels sprout tacos and a hearty selection of brews. Lunch and dinner daily; weekend brunch. 3120 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma. 707.782.9090.

West Side Bar & Grill Sports Bar. $$. Home of the almost-famous bacon cheeseburger. Seventeen beers on tap (wine list available). Fourteen flat screen televisions to watch all of the hottest sports events. Two great pool tables. Lunch and dinner daily. 3082 Marlow Rd # B8, Santa Rosa. 707.573.9453.

Willi’s Seafood & Raw Bar Seafood. $$. Delicious preparations of the freshest fish and shellfish. Lunch and dinner daily; dinner, Mon-Sat. 403 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.9191.

Willi’s Wine Bar Small plates/wine bar. $$$. Bistro dishes and extensive wine list. A terrific place to dine before a show at the Wells Fargo Center. Lunch, Tues-Sat; dinner daily. 4404 Old Redwood Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.526.3096.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

MARIN CO U N T Y Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Benissimo Ristorante & Bar Italian. $$. Hearty and

and a great burger. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 23240 State Route 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033.

Cafe Reyes Pizza. $$. At the end of the main drag in West Marin’s quintessential small town sits a wood-fired oven serving piping pizzas of perfection. Beer and oysters can be had as well. Lunch and dinner, Wed–Sun. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.9493.

$-$$. Tasty and filling Chinese fare without the greasy weigh-down. Nice vegetarian selections, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun; closed Tues. 3001 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.5818.

Casa Mañana Mexican. $. Big burritos a stone’s throw from the perfect picnic spot: Perri Park. The horchata is divine. Lunch and dinner daily. 85 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax. 415.454.2384.

Citrus & Spice Thai/ Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices, and a great mango-duck summer roll. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.

Comforts Californian. $$. The Chinese chicken salad is beyond rapturous. Excellent celebrity sightings. Eat in or takeout. Breakfast and lunch daily. 335 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.454.9840. Copita Tequileria y Comida Mexican. $$. California-inspired preparation of traditional Mexican fare, including spit-roasted chicken, homemade tamales and “eight-hour” carnitas. Some ingredients are sourced from the restaurant’s own organic garden. Lunch and dinner daily. 739 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.331.7400.

Drake’s Beach Cafe Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Mon. 1 Drake’s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Hilltop 1892 American. $$-$$$$. Casual dining with panoramic Marin views and a California-cuisine take on such classic fare as steaks, fresh seafood and seasonal greens. Complete with custom cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; Sunday brunch. 850 Lamont Ave, Novato. 415.893.1892.

Nick’s Cove Seafood/ contemporary American. $$$$. Fresh from the bay oysters, upscale seafood, some steaks

Tommy’s Wok Chinese.

The William Tell House American & Italian. $$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Lunch and dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N T Y

13

SMALL BITES

A Dab o’ Crab The bib, the lemon, the fork, the stringy sea-flesh of unusual texture—ah, yes, it’s still crab season here along the coast. And though crab feeds come and go, largely advertised via plywood placards on the outskirts of small rural towns, this week’s feed at Lagunitas benefits Cinnabar Theater. Indeed, the theater with the steep loping driveway doesn’t just open its mouth and sing—it also open its mouth and eats. The Cinnabar’s Chili Cook-Off is the stuff of legend, and their Taste of Petaluma event gets more popular by the year. So it’s no doubt they’re gonna open the curtain on a fine second-annual crab feed. Salad, bread and desserts round out the menu, with Lagunitas on the sudsy stuff. Bring your own crab implements and support the arts on Tuesday, Jan. 28, at Lagunitas. 1280 N. McDowell Blvd., Petaluma. 5:30–8:30pm. $55. 707.763.8920. —Gabe Meline

Celadon Global comfort food. $$. Relaxed sophistication in intimate neighborhood bistro setting by the creek. Superior wine list. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 500 Main St, Ste G, Napa. 707.254.9690.

Cole’s Chop House American steakhouse. $$$$$. Handsome, upscale 1950s-era steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dryaged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a “nostalgia” cocktail. Dinner daily. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.224.6328.

Compadres Rio Grille Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Gillwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788. Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $-$$. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner daily. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch and dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.252.9250.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222. Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.251.1900. Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, MonFri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 22–28, 2014 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Dining

flavorful food in authentic neighborhood-style Italian restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 18 Tamalpais Dr, Corte Madera. 415.927.2316.

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JANUARY 22– 28 , 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N TY Clos du Bois With picnicking area, friendly staff and knickknacks galore, Clos Du Bois is a reliable treasure. 19410 Geyserville Ave., Geyserville. Open daily, 10am– 4:30pm. 800.222.3189.

Frick Winery Tailwagging hospitality team greets visitors at this rustic little bodega that’s anything if not picturesque. Proprietorrun winery specializes in lively Rhône-style blends and varietally bottled Syrah, Viognier; rare Counoise is a special treat. Honest, handmade wines with a sense of place. 23072 Walling Road, Geyserville. Open Saturday– Sunday, noon–4:30pm. Tasting complimentary with purchase. 707.857.1980. Matrix Winery Taking over the former warren of Rabbit Ridge, Mazzocco Winery’s new spinoff promises (threatens?) “Wines to die for.” Pinot, Zin and Syrah are tragically good; bar stool seating and a relaxed vibe are pluses. 3291 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Tasting fee $5. 707.433.1911.

River Road Vineyards Russian River Pinot for $18 at no-nonsense, solid producer. 5220 Ross Road, Sebastopol. By appointment only, Monday–Friday. 707.887.8130.

Selby Winery Regularly served at White House state dinners, Selby Chard has been through several administrations. 215 Center St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–5:30pm. 707.431.1288.

Stonestreet Late wine magnate Jess Jackson took to the hills in a big way. Eight hundred acres, 400 blocks, at elevations up to 2,000 feet. Tasting room is a fewfrills affair, while “mountain excursions” offer views plus Cab and Chardonnay, plus lunch. 7111 Hwy. 128, Healdsburg. Daily, 11am to

4:30pm. $12, $15 and $25; Mountain excursion, $75. 707.433.9463.

Topel Winery Hailing from Hopland, Topel offers estategrown Meritage and other wines in this well-appointed tasting room with casement windows open to the street, across from Oakville Grocery. Cedar, chicory, chocolate and brown spice–makes one hungry for a portobellomushroom-on-focaccia sandwich. 125 Matheson St., Hopland. Open daily, 11am– 7pm. Tasting fees, $5–$12. 707.433.4116.

Wilson Winery Scenic setting and rustic-modern tasting room makes for an atmospheric, recommended visit. Single-vineyard Zinfandels, Cabernet Sauvignons, Cabernet Franc, Syrah and Petite Sirah win awards for good reason— namely, even curmudgeons take one sip and turn into believers. 1960 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am to 5pm. Tastings are $5; $10 for reserves. 707.433.4355.

N A PA CO U N TY Frank Family Vineyards A media mogul imagineered a Napa Valley winery that’s surprisingly no-frills, friendly and free of charge, from the flute of bubbly welcome to the last sip of award-winning Cab. Emphasis is on the historic Larkmead winery, the wine and, natch, the guest at this popular tasting room set in the winery’s remodeled craftsman farmhouse. Frank Family Vineyards, 1091 Larkmead Lane, Calistoga. Tasting daily, 10am–4pm, $10; reserve, $25. 707.942.0753.

Monticello Vineyards Thomas Jefferson had no success growing wine grapes; happily, the Corley family has made a go of it. Although winetasting is not conducted in the handsome reproduction

building itself, there’s a shaded picnic area adjacent. 4242 Big Ranch Rd., Napa. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. $15. 707.253.2802, ext. 18.

Patz & Hall In a Napa business park, this highlyregarded brand’s tasting room may look corporate-slick, but the spotlight is on the dirt farmers who make it all happen. Pinot and Chardonnay. 851 Napa Valley Corporate Way, Ste. A, Napa. Wednesday– Sunday, 10am–4pm. Seated tastings 10:30am, 1pm and 3pm. Tasting fee, $20–$40. 707.265.7700.

Saintsbury A contrarian enterprise in the 1970s, now a hallowed hall of Carneros Pinot Noir. Visitors may linger under shade trees in fair weather or sit down for a serious tasting adjacent the office. 1500 Los Carneros Ave., Napa. Monday– Saturday, by appointment. 707.252.0592. Stony Hill Vineyard In the 1940s, advisers from UC Davis told them, “Under no circumstances plant Chardonnay.” So they planted Chardonnay. Intimate tastings in the flagstone-studded, Eisenhower-era McCrea living room; Chardonnay and White Riesling are legends. 3331 St. Helena Hwy., St. Helena. By appointment, Monday through Friday, weekends when available. $25. 707.963.2636.

Swanson Vineyards Not lotus-eating, per se, but caviar, Grana Padano, artisan chocolate bonbons–same idea. Whimsically elegant Salon or informal, candystriped Sip Shoppe. Known for Merlot. 1271 Manley Lane, Rutherford. Sip Shoppe Thursday–Sunday 11am–5pm; call or ring gate. Fee $15–$20. Salon by appointment, $60. 707.754.4018.

Taste at Oxbow Stylish setting across from Oxbow Market offers a roster of popular flavors from Waterstone Wines. 708 First St., Napa. Generally, from noon to 6 or 7pm. Tasting fee $15. 707.265.9600.

Beringer Vineyards Rockin’ it in the Rhine House BY JAMES KNIGHT

I

can’t imagine what Mrs. Beringer might have thought about the scene unfolding today in her ladies’ sitting room. Decorated with floral motifs in its stained glass windows, the ladies’ sitting room of the Rhine House is open to any member of the general public who wanders in—wine tasters, use side door. The atmosphere is loosey–goosey. While my companion first overshoots then undershoots the spittoon in a game attempt to practice the essential skill of tasting and spitting, a young woman points out to us above the general din how she swirled her wine too enthusiastically and stained her pink tights. From a menu that was splotched with spills long before we arrived, we order a sample of a wine that costs more than did two acres of Napa Valley land when Jacob and Frederick Beringer purchased it in 1875. This is my first visit to the Rhine House. I’d long wondered about it. The mansion was built in a winningly Germanic late19th-century architectural style for Frederick Beringer, who had his brother’s modest cottage moved to a less choice spot down the hill for the purpose. Jacob did all the advance work, first securing a job in Charles Krug’s cellar; Frederick was the finance guy. What else is new? Down to their trendy long beards, the Beringer bros look less like fusty pioneers of an antique era and more like the kind of moneyed Eurobrats—calling their vineyard venture “Los Hermanos”—who might fit smoothly into the Napa scene in 2014. That this California historic landmark is a nicely landscaped, largely unsupervised playground that can swallow hordes of drop-in tourists with ease, I’m not surprised. But my expectation that the Rhine House represented a genteel escape from the crowd was off the mark. Staff in these cramped quarters are hard-bitten but accommodating, like veterans of a rollicking good dive bar. The tasting menu is incongruously themed to “Rock Stars,” detailed with song snippets from the Rolling Stones and the Cars. The 2012 Private Reserve Chardonnay ($44) is fruity, buttery, standard stuff; the 2011 Quantum ($65), a soft, plush Bordeauxstyled blend. But the 2010 Private Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon ($160) is surely the key pour here. With dusty framboise aromas and a raspberry-infused finish, this is the kind of refined, top-tier wine that’s unremarkable precisely because it’s so seamlessly integrated. More memorable, the 2007 Nightingale ($40 for 375ml) is a fairly convincing Sauternes-style wine, rich in treacly mandarin orange and candied walnut flavor. If the ghosts of old Beringers are still about, instead of worrying about their parlor, they’re surely retired from care in a cask of this wine, murmuring, “Let it be.” Beringer Vineyards, 2000 Main St., St. Helena. Daily, 10am– 5pm; (June–October, 10am–6pm). Tasting fee $20–$25; tours available. 707.963.8989.

15 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 22–28, 2014 | BOH EMI A N.COM

A Better Discipline Two years ago, zero tolerance reigned and Latinos made up half of Santa Rosa’s expulsions. Now, with restorative justice, going to the principal’s office won’t ever be the same BY LEILANI CLARK

SMILIN’ THROUGH Sam Blechel found a new life after restorative justice; he now heads the student group.

Z

ac Good first got a taste for stealing in middle school. A self-described screwed-up and troubled child, the Santa Rosa teen started smoking, getting in fights and engaging in competitions for who could steal the most from local stores, just for the hell of it.

“We were jerks to everyone,” admits the 18-year-old Santa Rosa High School student. “It gave us something to do that wasn’t sitting around being bored. I was always acting out.” He got away with the petty theft and violence for a while—until his junior year, when two administrators

suddenly pulled him out of sixthperiod culinary class. They’d received a report that he was carrying a knife. Not just any knife, mind you; Good was carrying a four-and-a-half-inch switchblade (along with a second knife and a pack of cigarettes), a zero-tolerance violation that merited expulsion from his Northeast Santa Rosa high school. He spent three days in juvenile hall and faced a possible misdemeanor charge for having a switchblade longer than two inches. After his release, he received a letter in the mail from an organization called Restorative Resources, asking him if he’d be willing to undertake a 12-week program—also called an accountability circle—in life skills

like empathy, compassion, anger management and decision-making. If he completed the program successfully, he could circumvent the juvenile justice court system. Good agreed to give it a try. “The program covered stuff I knew but didn’t take seriously,” says the thin, dark-haired teen, wearing jeans and a black hoodie, a silver class ring glinting on his hand. Halfway through the circle, in group work with other teens that had gotten into trouble, his mindset began to shift. He started thinking of his little brother, who was 10 at the time. “I began thinking about how my decisions would affect my brother, and it was really embarrassing for me,” he says. Then he started

considering his parents, his teachers and his friends, and how any decision he made, bad or good, affected not only those people but also everyone they interacted with. He wrote letters acknowledging the pain that he caused his parents, his brother, the teacher in his culinary class, the arresting officer, the school administrators that caught him and even his girlfriend at the time. He says writing the letters helped him process the importance of making amends for his actions. “It’s this wake-up call that sticks with you,” Good explains. “By the end of the program, you realize that your action was entirely your fault. Responsibility is the first lesson.” ) 16

Justice ( 15

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JANUARY 22– 28 , 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Good graduated from the Restorative Resources program in December 2012, and started to turn his life around. He stopped smoking and stealing. He went back to high school (a different one) where his GPA rose from 1.7 to 3.8. He got his driver’s license and found an after-school job. He earned the rank of Eagle Scout, which he calls “his proudest achievement in life.” Whereas Good hadn’t given any thought to the future before, he now plans to attend the culinary program at Santa Rosa Junior College before earning a business degree—all part of his plan to eventually open a ’50s-style soda fountain similar to one his family once owned in San Jose. “Before, I didn’t care about the future,” Good says, “and now I’m thinking about how I can go out and be in the world.”

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a professor at Occidental College and expert in restorative practices. Rather than handing out blanket punishments to offenders, the practice requires them to take responsibility for their actions and to make amends—think of a circle instead of a straight line out the door. Unlike punitive tactics, restorative justice emphasizes reparation, accountability and the web of relationships that make up a school and greater community, with the ultimate goal of preventing a reccurrence of the behavior in the future. Karym Sanchez, 23, manages the Accountability Circle Program at Restorative Resources in Santa Rosa. He has also chaired the North Bay Organizing Project’s education task force since 2012, which has been vocal and active in support of bringing restorative justice to Santa Rosa City Schools. At the Restorative Resources office, located in a modest office suite near the Empire College campus, Sanchez speaks with a maturity beyond his years about how his own background as an at-risk, troubled youth who was able to turn his life around— something that he credits to concerned teachers and exposure to social justice thinkers like Howard Zinn—informs his work with youth aged 12 to 17 in the accountability circles. “True justice has to come from a place of love,” Sanchez says. “If it comes from a place of vengeance, there’s no true healing. There’s very little you get out of asking for vengeance. I truly believe it has to come from a place of love, especially for youth, who pick up these subtle messages. When you tell them, ‘Get out of here, we don’t want you in our schools anymore,’ the youth think, ‘These schools hate me, my teachers hate me, everybody’s out to get me.’ But when you remind them,

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estorative justice has gained much ground in the United States, especially as data increasingly shows that the zero-tolerance approach favored since Columbine is not only ineffective but discriminatory toward minority and disabled students. A new joint report issued by the U.S. departments of Justice and Education, based on data collected by the Civil Rights Data Collection, explicitly states that black and Latino students in U.S. schools have been more heavily disciplined than their peers. The report provides a set of guiding principles that would move districts away from zero tolerance and into a “wide range of strategies to reduce misbehavior and maintain a safe learning environment, including conflict resolution and restorative practices.” Restorative justice programs in the United States have grown exponentially since 2005, according to Thalia González,

On the heels of her blessing, the Santa Rosa City Schools Board approved funding for a $125,000 pilot restorative justice program in mid-September, to be implemented immediately at Cook Middle School and Elsie Allen High School. So far, it seems to be working better than anyone could have imagined.

‘F

ar and away, the results have been greater than anybody anticipated,” says Santa Rosa City Schools Board of Education president Bill Carle. At a board meeting last November, the data for Cook Middle School showed 82 suspensions between Aug. 14 and Nov. 1 for the 2012–2013 school year, in comparison to only 27 suspensions for the same time period in 2013–2014. That’s a 67 percent reduction. At Elsie Allen, the numbers were down 60 percent. Carle says that normally the board will see 30 to 40 suspensions or expulsions by the first winter session in early December. At the time of our conversation in late 2013, the board had yet to see one disciplinary case come before them, and “that has absolutely never happened,” says Carle. Not only are kids remaining in school and in class, but the savings in average daily attendance (ADA) California state funding in this same period of time has reached $139, 357, according to the same data presented to the school board. The number is a combination of daily ADA and staff savings—for example, the savings when a vice principal doesn’t have to take two or three hours out of a day, at $58 per hour, to prepare for and attend disciplinary hearings. But, Carle says, beyond the savings potential (and that’s money that can then be invested in vibrant school programs and materials instead of discipline issues), he’s impressed by the life skills being taught to kids that “generally [aren’t] in the curriculum,” as well as the development of a sense of community that wasn’t there before. ) 18

17 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 22–28, 2014 | BOH EMI A N.COM

‘No, we love you and we need you here,’ it speaks volumes.” The 12-week program ends with a talking circle, or conference, that brings together the offender, community volunteers and those affected by the crime, who together come up with a list of amends. These can take the form of letters, speaking to younger kids about their actions or attending enrichment activities that help them get involved in something outside of themselves. Restorative justice has been used in the criminal justice system for years, and school districts in Portland, Oakland, Chicago and Denver have already started implementing the process as a way to completely restructure a flawed and often discriminatory discipline system. It’s a challenge that the Santa Rosa City School District is taking seriously. That’s good news, considering the bleak district discipline statistics released last year. In 2011, the district suspended 4,587 students, a number exceeded by only three other large districts in California. More disconcerting, a disproportionate number of the students facing disciplinary action were nonwhite. Out of 256 students expelled in 2011, 127 were Latino, 56 white, 18 black, 14 Native American and 41 multiple-race. The suspensions and expulsions translate not only to hundreds of thousands of lost state funding as students miss days of school, it can lead to even more serious repercussions for individual youth as they get funneled into what’s often called the “school-to-prison pipeline.” “From the moment I arrived, the [Santa Rosa City Schools] Board was clear in their belief that there needed to be a fresh look at student behavior and family and community engagement in schools, including but not limited to discipline practices,” explains Santa Rosa City Schools superintendent Socorro Shiels via email. On Sept. 10, before an audience of about a hundred people at a rousing education forum organized by the North Bay Organizing Project, Shiels spoke out in favor of restorative justice.

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JANUARY 22– 28 , 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

18 Justice ( 17 “The students are looking at, ‘What are the consequences of my actions, and what affect do they have on other people?’” he explains. “I think it has such an emotional long-term value. Intuitively, we are learning that kids will stay in school longer, and there will be a certain level of personal growth that’s helpful as well.” Carle does point out that more serious disciplinary cases, such as the incident at Elsie Allen where a student stabbed a teacher with a mechanical pencil, would still go the traditional disciplinary route.

R

ob Halverson is research and program development manager with the Sonoma County Probation Department. He and deputy chief probation officer David Koch worked on restorative justice in Multnomah County in Oregon, in the Parkrose School District and then Portland Public Schools, for 10 years before coming to Sonoma County. (Koch spoke in favor of a restorative justice pilot program at a Santa Rosa City school board meeting last spring.) Halverson recalls his time working with the Parkrose School District in Oregon, how the administration was able to avoid 200 missed days of school—a figure that translates directly into budget savings— due to the implementation of restorative practices. “It’s a strategy that gains seat time for kids in school,” Halverson tells me. “It keeps them connected and keeps them on track.” If anyone has a sense of the negative repercussions of suspensions and expulsions on youth, it’s the probation department. Halverson says that he and Koch are “really interested in interrupting the school-toprison pipeline.” “When kids disconnect from school, that’s a risk factor that stacks up against them in a number of ways,” he explains. “Some of those kids end up involved in the justice system.” A restorative approach provides not only an alternative to exclusionary discipline, but also a prevention strategy for keeping kids connected to school while

developing a crime-free path to adulthood and out of the justice system, adds Halverson. “If you have a few experiences with being suspended or expelled, your chances of graduating are far less, and that’s not good for people developing on a successful trajectory.” For Sam Blechel, 17, this theory has proven to be on point.

‘I

t sounds kind of bad,” the Santa Rosa High School junior tells me during a conversation at a local coffee shop, “but if I’d never stolen shoes from Sears, I would not be active in the community today.” As he talks, Blechel leans forward urgently, halfstumbling to find the right words to capture the effect restorative justice has had on his life. Blechel’s story could have ended much differently, possibly even with a stint in juvenile hall and probation time. A sophomore at the time, he was caught by store security with a pair of shoes in his backpack, stolen for a friend, he says. A few days later, he received a letter from Restorative Resources. At first, he didn’t see the point. Why couldn’t he just do some kind of one-day class, something quick that he could knock out, forget about and go back to the way things were? “At the beginning, I thought it was kind of stupid because they were a bunch of life skills that I already knew about,” explains Blechel, tugging at the sleeve of a long-sleeved red shirt worn with faded jeans and black Converse, “but after a while, it really helped me to find myself, to become part of the community, to become more in sync.” “Before, I would see someone walking down the street, and they would be a stranger to me,” he says. “Now when I see someone walking down the street, I see them as a neighbor. They’re just like me. It helped introduce me to community in a civil and appropriate way.” Blechel, who says that last year he’d spend his afternoons zoning out in front of the television, filling out worksheets and biding time until the next school day, has since developed into an impassioned community organizer. He’s the

ARMED WITH ACCOUNTABILITY ‘Justice,’ says Karym Sanchez of

Restorative Resources, ‘has to come from a place of love.’

cofounder and president of Students United for Restorative Justice, a small group of engaged students with the ambitious goal of transforming the entire school community. In a well-edited video posted on their active Facebook page, members of the group explain their desire to challenge and change the disciplinary status quo at Santa Rosa High School and beyond. He admits to recently being stressed-out as he tries to rally his peers and administrators at his school to embrace the idea of restorative justice. “It would really hurt me not to see it go anywhere,” he adds. Still, he’s buoyed by the outcome of a recent meeting with his school principal, which ended with the approval of a restorative justice presentation to the school faculty. At the same time, he worries that teachers will feel that the program “takes power” away from their ability to discipline students. Fortunately for Blechel and Students for Restorative Justice, the positive results of the pilot program at Cook and Elsie Allen point to the possibility of district-wide implementation of restorative practices. Superintendent Shiels affirms the possibility by email. “Based on the evidence we have now, about how this has informed discipline decisions at both sites, we feel strongly that this will be a district-wide practice,” she writes. The next step will be to provide support for the legion

of volunteers, not to mention the comprehensive training in reparative practices for teachers and administrators needed to make it all happen. It’s a shift that could put Santa Rosa on the map for educational innovation, says Zach Whelan, deputy director at Restorative Resources. “What Santa Rosa is doing is pretty remarkable,” he says. “People are blown away at how the schools have really taken this on. When people see the transformation that’s happened, this will be one of the beacons in the coming years.”

F

or Zac Good, the lessons learned through restorative justice have been lifealtering, and he wants all youth to have access to the tools that helped make such great changes. “The current system doesn’t work, it’s flawed,” Good says. “It works in some cases, but for the majority of kids, it doesn’t. Kids that get in trouble get mad at other people, and they do it again. It’s a rabbit hole, and they fall deeper and deeper in.” Good says the point is to catch kids like him early on, to help them see themselves as part of a community, while offering a sense of self-worth. “It’s not punishment. It’s about fixing the problem,” he says. For more information on Restorative Resources, including volunteer and training opportunities, go to www. restorativeresources.org or call 707.542.4244.

Crush h

19 NO R RTH TH B BAY A Y BO H E M I AN AN | J JANUARY ANU A R Y 22 22-28, - 28, 201 2014 4 | BOH EMI A N N.COM .C O M

CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide

CORTE MADERA

WHERE YOU LIVE

Booze & Typewriters Real Food Ernest Hemingway. F. Scott Fitzgerald. Tennessee Williams, John Berryman, John Cheever. Raymond friggin’ Carver. What do these authors have in common? (“They were all overrated white males” is not the answer we’re looking for.) They all ordered booze by the boatful, and in her new book, The Trip to Echo Spring: On Writers and Drinking, author Olivia Laing explores why. Having grown up in an alcoholic family herself, Laing removes the romance from drinking to reveal just how destructive theses famous men’s habits became; she appears Wednesday, Jan. 22, at Book Passage. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. 7pm. Free. 415.927.0960.

Politicians love to talk about the plight of the “American farmer,” but what they’re usually referring to are factory-farming corporations. Third-generation Iowa farmer Howard Vlieger has spent years studying the problems small farmers experience as a result of Big Ag’s insistence on GMO crops. No West County hippie, Vlieger is a conservative Christian Republican; he’s simply vehemently opposed to GMOs, and speaks about their destructive nature on Saturday, Jan. 25, at the Sebastopol Grange (6000 Sebastopol Ave., Sebastopol; 10am), Sunday, Jan. 26, at the Windsor Grange (9161 Starr Road, Windsor; 2pm) and the Seed Bank (199 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma; 7pm). For more, see LabelGMOs.org.

M I L L VA L L E Y

R O H N E R T PA R K

The Other Timmy

The Visitors

Whenever I’m blue in the off-season, I cue up the video of Angel Pagan, in May 2013, hitting a walk-off, inside-the-park home run in the 10th inning to beat the Rockies. The glory of Pagan’s achievement, however, must be shared by third-base coach Tim Flannery (above), who had the chutzpah to send Pagan to home plate as the throw came in from center field. Flannery has made plenty of similarly confident moves, a trait he brings to his side career in music. A devout Deadhead with a new solo album, The Wayward Wind, the Giants coach plays his own original songs on acoustic guitar on Friday, Jan. 24, at Sweetwater Music Hall. 19 Corte Madera Ave., Mill Valley. 8pm. $22–$24. 415.388.1100.

The Green Music Center is usually home to the Santa Rosa Symphony, but this week sees two visiting outfits. On Thursday, Jan. 23, the San Francisco Symphony rolls into the space with violinist Alexander Barantschik, who’ll perform Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto in D Minor and conduct works by Mozart, Britten and Astor Piazzolla. On Saturday, Jan. 25, Harry Bicket conducts the English Concert in Handel’s opera Theodora, featuring Sarah Connolly, Andrew Kennedy and others (7:30pm; $40–$85). Green Music Center, 1801 E. Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park. 866.955.6040.

—Gabe Meline

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JANUARY 22– 28 , 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

20

Arts Ideas COME HITHER No longer the soft, promising actress from ‘Winter’s Bone,’ Jennifer Lawrence is our modern Shirley MacLaine.

Down by J-Law The liberation of Jennifer Lawrence BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

F

our years ago, when the film Winter’s Bone was released, I interviewed Jennifer Lawrence, now dead certain to win the Oscar for Best Supporting Actress for her most recent role in American Hustle. Interview sessions, particularly for a small movie that needs the push, are brutal for young actors.

It’s unlikely you’ll come up with something they haven’t heard before. I heard Simon Pegg once gave an interviewer a $20 bill for asking an original question. I didn’t get that $20. Somehow it was decided that director Debra Granik and “J-Law” would be interviewed as a team, which is highly unusual. Even the nicest actors would agree that Brando was right when he said “an actor is someone who, if you ain’t talking

about them, they ain’t listening.” The truth was that I didn’t have a lot of questions for Lawrence. Her role in Winter’s Bone was starmaking—and that film is seriously recommended to Breaking Bad fans—but having limited space, I just gave up and blurbed like anyone else: “This is one of the best performances of the year.” Lawrence’s Ree Dolly was a clear, steel-true character, a heroine of few words. So I only asked small questions regarding Lawrence’s favorite scenes (she

said stunts were tough for her) and her personal origins. Lawrence was from Louisville, so she knew the Missouri terrain, but the locations were sometimes deep in the country. “At first,” she said, “you want to just stand back and observe; I watched for a long time and waited to integrate myself a little bit. Everybody was nice and welcoming.” I suspect the publicists teamed Granik and Lawrence to protect J. Law’s youthful shyness and innocence. Which made it slightly amusing for me to later see her on Conan talking about butt plugs. I didn’t recognize Lawrence as a Shirley MacLaine–caliber firecracker, though other stars come to mind when watching Lawrence act—Shelly Winters, for instance, when she was playing young, crazy and doomed parts, before she grew bravado and girth and started naming names. There’s also something in Lawrence of the sweet-faced, dreamy, illogical ’70s sprite, like Barbara Harris in Hitchcock’s Family Plot. No one will inherit Nostradamus’ turban for noting that Lawrence’s fierceness and spirit will transcend the role of “Kindness Everteen” (as film critic J. Hoberman put it)— people will get sick of the Hunger Games long before they get sick of her. Maybe we should be thanking David O. Russell, director of both American Hustle and 2012’s Silver Lining Playbook, which also costarred Lawrence, for liberating the young actress. In Playbook, he encouraged her to go lewd (“It was hot,” she growls, reminiscing about a sexual encounter), and let her go mad in American Hustle, where she plays a bipolar housewife who plants a big Bugs Bunny kiss on Amy Adams. Russell was ingenious to toss the script and just let Lawrence spin her remarkable wheels.

Ŵų NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 22-28, 2014 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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The Incubators

WRITERS WORKSHOP

Hooked: Memoir of Addiction

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A writing group designed for people: ˆ[MXLEHHMGXMSRW[LSLEZIXMQIMR VIGSZIV] ˆLEZIFIIRMREVIPEXMSRWLMT[MXLE WYFWXERGIEFYWIV ˆ[LSKVI[YTMREREHHMGXIHJEQMP] ˆER]SRI[LSJIIPWLISVWLI[SYPH FIRIJMX The workshop can take two directions. It can be a starting point for establishing the beginnings of a memoir, or it could be a complete experience that would be contained within the workshop. The workshop will emphasize the expression of telling the story, rather than a sense of writing perfectly. In addition to memoir, writers will be free to explore other forms, such as fiction or creative non-fiction as well.

2 Saturdays, Mar 1 & 15 9am to 4:30pm 7IFEWXSTSP'IRXIVJSVXLI%VXW $

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Guy Biederman, M.A., College teacher, workshop leader and private writing instructor

Bill McCausland, Ph.D., Psychologist, APA board certified in psychoactive use disorders, MFA candidate in writing

Stage Robin Jackson

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JANUARY 22– 28 , 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

22 FUNCTIONAL ART

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s’agapo

Je t’aime

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Just say... I Love You,

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STANHOPE, SIR! David Yen, in a

constant state of inebriation.

War Games Banality, impatience on the front lines in stellar ‘Journey’s End’ BY DAVID TEMPLETON

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1/24 1/ 24 – 1/ 1/30 30

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here is nothing new about war.

From the siege of Troy and the jungles of Vietnam to the deserts of Iraq and Afghanistan, war stories have always been told— some highlighting the glory, some the blood and guts. What’s remarkable about playwright R. C. Sherriff’s strikingly authentic World War I drama Journey’s End, which just opened a month-long run at the Ross Valley Players’ Old Barn Theatre, is how modern, fresh and funny the play is. Beautifully written with equal measures of crisp insight and dark comedy, and sharply and sensitively staged by director Jim Dunn, one might never guess this thing has been around for 86 years. Sherriff, a British writer and novelist who eventually turned to screenwriting (The Four Feathers, Goodbye Mr. Chips), based his claustrophobic stage masterpiece

on his own experience of trench warfare in France toward the end of the first World War. Though the weapons and technical methods of warfare have changed since Sherriff’s days, it’s easy to believe that the alternately conflicted, committed, bored, terrified and traumatized soldiers of Journey’s End have much in common with troops serving overseas today. Just 50 yards from the front line, where British infantrymen are literally dug in for a yearslong standoff against the German army, a group of English officers wait—and wait and wait—for the next dreaded battle. They fill their time with hilariously mundane conversation (comparing rugby to cricket, commenting on the importance of pepper), rounding out the long days and nights with mindnumbing amounts of alcohol and the occasional high-stakes tabletop earwig race. Capt. Stanhope (an excellent David Yen) has perfected the art of commanding his men while maintaining a constant state of numb inebriation. Lt. Osborne (played with amiable resignation by Tom Hudgens) has earned the nickname “Uncle,” counseling newcomers, reading poetry aloud to calm everyone’s nerves, making tension-lightening jokes about the food prepared by inventive cook Mason (a hilarious Sean Gunnell), and defending Stanhope’s alcoholism. Second Lt. Trotter (Stephen Dietz, never better) has perfected a kind of dutiful nonchalance, surrendering his fear to the monotony of routine. The genius of the play is how tense all of this waiting becomes. Whenever something happens, Osborne admits, it happens fast. Then everyone goes back to waiting. And although the final moments of the play do feel a tad rushed after so much buildup, the overall effect of Journey’s End is powerfully, elegantly devastating. Rating (out of 5): +++++ ‘Journey’s End’ runs Thursday– Sunday, Jan. 17–Feb. 16, at Ross Valley Players. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Ross. Thursday, 7:30pm; Friday– Saturday at 8pm; 2pm matinees on Sunday. $13–$26. 415.456.9555.

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You are invited to the 15th Anniversary

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 22-28, 2014 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Saturday, February 8, 2014 TOPMsFinley Community Center West College Ave. at Stony Point Road, Santa Rosa, California Heartfelt art created by Shelter & Rescue Animals Live & Silent Auctions Wines by Kenwood, Mutt Lynch & Pedroncelli Gourmet Hors d’Oeuvres

Admission: $40 Donation Adv / $50 At Door / VISA/MC accepted

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Music

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JANUARY 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 28 , 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

24

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BAM BAM Selecta Green B is all over

the Bayâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;geographically and musically.

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Monday ~ Open Mic Night with Austin DeLone 7:30pm :HG-DQĂŁSP

Jason Crosby & Friends featuring Lebo,

Jay Lane, & Robin Sylvester 7KXU-DQĂŁSP

The Overcommitments )UL-DQĂŁSP

Tim Flannery 6XQ-DQĂŁSP

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Wednesday Night Local with Dore Coller with Matt Lax 7KXU-DQĂŁSP

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Peter Rowan Band & Special Guests with Melody

Walker & Jacob Groopman

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Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

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BUCK NICKELS AND Jan 24 L OOSE CHANGE Fri

New Country Music 8:00 Put on Your Dancinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Boots Jan 25 LONE STAR RETROBATES Roadhouse/Western Swing 8:00 Sat

Sun

Jan 26

TODOS SANTOS

WITH

WENDY FITZ

A Harmonious Excursion 4:00 / No Cover Fri Chinese New Year Dance! Jan 31 TOM FINCH GROUP Year of the Horse 8:00 / No Cover Sat Dance! Party 1 Feb STEVE LUCKY AND THE

RHUMBA BUMS WITH MISS CARMEN GETIT 8:30

PETTY THEFT Feb 8 The Ultimate Tom Petty Tribute 8:30 Sat

â&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľ Celebrate Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day with Fri THE BAGUETTE QUARTETTE Feb 14 7:00pm â&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľ Sat Feb 15 TOM RIGNEY & FLAMBEAU

JENNIFER JOLLY CAJUN ORKESTRA 8:30

WITH

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On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Selecta Green B, the Bayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s baddest reggae DJ BY JACQUELYNNE OCANA

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n a recent Friday afternoon, San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most sought-after female reggae DJ puts the ďŹ nishing touches on three separate sets for three totally different parties around the Bay. Selecta Green B will hold down the Island Reggae party at S.F.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Elbo Room in a few hours, Saturday she shares the booth at Embrace the Bass in Oakland, and Sunday is a strictly African and roots reggae club night in San Jose. Between releasing 18 full-length mixtapes under her label Hot Gyal Promotion and co-selecting for Coo-Yah! Ladeez reggae sound system, DJ Green B guest-appears at dancehall parties up and down the West Coast, all while serving as regular contributor to SiriusXMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

the Joint. The legitimacy is thereâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; but she is a rarity on the scene. Reggae sound systems are by tradition male-dominated, and even to this day women are hesitant to step up to the tables. Of course, there are ladies rocking the decks in other genres, like Pam the Funkstress, who recently killed it a few Mondays back with the best mashup of classic â&#x20AC;&#x2122;90s hip-hop Hopmonk has ever heard. The fact that the North Bayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest reggae night, Monday Night Edutainment (running 14 years strong this June), keeps top female selectors in rotation shows how much respect they garner. And the esteem is mutual. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been listening to Jacquesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; mixtapes for years,â&#x20AC;? says Green B of party founder Jacques Powell-Wilson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At lot of the artists he grew up with are the people who inďŹ&#x201A;uenced my love for reggae music.â&#x20AC;? Some people say dancehall music hit its club peak a few years ago. More often than not, venue owners have been turning to EDM (a rash catch-all term for the current electronic dance music craze) to ďŹ ll clubs on weekends. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bass music has taken over,â&#x20AC;? says Green B, whose own Coo-Yah! Ladeezâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wednesday nights was shuttered as S.F. venues switched over. Even here in the North Bay, the biggest nightclubs have EDM DJs on constant rotation. Consequently, reggae DJs are pulling samples from every subgenre of EDM, from dubstep to trap and tacking them onto island riddims and dancehall tunes. The result is a whole new sound experience. On any given Monday night, DJ Jacques will likely throw down a deep dubstep whomp, turning roots into a bass music mutation. And to be at the forefront of the hype, DJs like Green B are following suit, mixing and mashing digital beats into their own sets. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jacques takes his sound system out for a stroll,â&#x20AC;? says Green B. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deďŹ nitely one of my favorite parties to play at.â&#x20AC;? Catch Selecta Green B at Monday Night Edutainment on Monday, Jan. 27, at Hopmonk Tavern. 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. 9pm. $10. Ladies free before 11pm. 707.829.7300.

Concerts

122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

Flamingo Lounge

SONOMA COUNTY J Boog Reggae meets island sound. Los Rakas open. Jan 22, 9pm. $30. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Jan 24, Koncept. Jan 25, Powerhouse. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

French Garden Jan 24, Solid Air. Jan 25, Da Puna Bruddahs. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

John Jorgenson

Green Music Center

Guitarist has collaborated with Elton John, Bonnie Raitt and many others. Jan 25, 7:30pm. $20-$58. Andrews Hall, Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

Jan 23, San Francisco Symphony. Jan 25, Theodora. Jan 26, Trio Navarro. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Ratt

Jan 22, Kicks n’ Licks. Jan 24, Grace in the Woods, Sally Haggard, Lungs & limbs. Jan 24, Punching Billy. Jan 27, Selecta Green B. Jan 29, MiKHAL. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment with Jacques & Guac. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hair metal at its finest. Shotgun Harlot opens. Jan 22, 8pm. $33. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

San Francisco Symphony San Francisco Symphony concertmaster Alexander Barantschik leads the orchestra. Jan 23, 8pm. $20$156. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Theodora Handel’s opera in concert with the English Concert. Jan 25, 7:30pm. $40-$85. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Hopmonk Sebastopol

Hopmonk Sonoma Jan 24, Highway Poets. Jan 25, Dirty Cello. Wed, Open Mic. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg Jan 25, John Simon Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Jan 22, Adam Traum & the Mosey Boys. Jan 23, Cherry Pickers. Jan 24, JimBo Trout. Jan 25, Levi Lloyd. Jan 26, Danny Uzilevsky. Jan 29, Doug Adamz & Chris Goddard. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Main Street Station Jan 22, Willie Perez. Jan 24, Vernelle Anders. Jan 25, Jess Petty. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Jan 23, Timothy O’Neil Band. Jan 25, the Perfect Crime. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Thur Jan 23 118'4˜LhENUGN2/˜FEx

Karaoke with DJ Hewy Dawg Fri Jan 24 118'4˜LhENUGN2/˜FEx

The Good Ol Boys Sat Jan 25

Jan 22, J Boog, Los Rakas. Jan 24, Maniacal Rejects, Wet & Reckless, the Goochers, Skeptic Feast, Jakoffs. Jan 25, Lavay Smith & Her Red Hot Skillet Lickers, Petaluma High School Jazz Ensemble. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

118'4˜LhENUGN2/˜FEx

Newman Auditorium Jan 24, Szymanowski Quartet. Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4372.

The AllwaysElvis Show & Band Sun Jan 26 118'4˜HhL2/˜FEx

Blues & BBQ with The Defenders Plus on Fri & Sat Nights:

Rasta Dwight's BBQ! 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove

707.795.5118 twinoakstavernpenngrove.com

Occidental Center for the Arts Jan 25, Jubilee Klezmer Ensemble. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Phoenix Theater Jan 22, Ratt, Shotgun Harlot. )

26 707.829.7300 70 7. 829 . 7 3 0 0 SEBASTOPOL E B AS T OP OL 230 230 P PETALUMA E TA L U M A A AVE VE | S

OPEN O P E N MIC M I C NIGHT NIGHT

EVERY T EVERY TUES UES A AT T7 7PM PM W WITH ITH E EVAN VAN WED W ED JAN JAN 22 22 BASS B A SS | TRAP TR AP | EDM ED M

BRAINSTORM BR AINSTORM W WITH ITH K KICKS ICKS N LICKS LICK C S $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 7PM/21+ 7PM /21+

FRI F RI JJAN AN 24

CLASSIC C L A SSIC | ROCK RO CK | COVERS COVERS

SONOMA COUNTY

PUNCHING P UNCHING BI BILLY LLY $8/DOORS $ 8 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

Andrews Hall

SAT S AT JJAN AN 2 25 5

Jan 25, John Jorgenson. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

AMERICANA A MERIC ANA | ROOTS RO OTS | ACOUSTIC ACOUS TIC

GRACE IIN GRACE NT THE HE WOODS, WOODS, SALLY SALLY H HAGGARD, AGGARD, LUNG LUNG AND AND LIMBS LIMBS $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

Aqus Cafe

MON M ON JJAN AN 2 27 7

Jan 24, Funktopus. Jan 25, Bee Rays. Jan 29, Pine Needles, Adam Lee, Market Farmers Band. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

REGGAE R EGG AE | D DANCEHALL A N CEH A L L | H HIP IP HOP HOP

MONDAY M ONDAY NI NIGHT GHT E EDUTAINMENT DUTAINMENT W WITH ITH

DJJ G D GREEN REEN B ((COOYAH COOYAH LLADEEZ) ADEEZ)

$$10/ 10/ LADIES LADIES FREE FREE B4 B4 11/DOORS 11/DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM/21+

WED W ED JJAN AN 29

BASS B A SS | TRAP TR AP | EDM ED M

Dry Creek Kitchen

BRAINSTORM BR AINSTORM W WITH ITH

Jan 27, Christian Foley-Beining & Tom Shader. Jan 28, Ian Scherer & Steve Froberg. 317 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.0330. Jan 23, the June Drops. Jan 26, Ananta Fiddle Hooper.

Great Food & Live Music

Mystic Theatre

Clubs & Venues

Epicurean Connection

Sonoma County’s Original Roadhouse Tavern

MIHKAL M IHK AL

$$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 10 10PM/21+ PM /21+

FRI F RI JJAN AN 3 31 1

ROOTS R O OT S | R ROCK OCK | REGGAE R EG G AE

BLACKJACK DAVID Dave Alvin leads a hell of a lineup at the Sebastopol Community Center on Jan. 25. See Clubs & Venues, p26.

PATO P AT TO BANTON BANTON $15/DOORS $ 15/ DOORS 9PM/21+ 9PM /21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM W W W. H O PM ONK .CO M BBook ookk yyour our

n e x t eevent vent with with u s, u p tto o2 50, kkim@hopmonk.com. i m @ h o p m o n k . co m . next us, up 250,

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 22–28, 2014 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

25

Lagunitas Tap Room

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JANUARY 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 28 , 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

26

Upcoming Concerts at Sebastopol Community Cultural Center

Music ( 25

Baltaian. 410 Sycamore Ave, Mill Valley.

& Seth Asarnow. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

19 Broadway Club

Sleeping Lady

Jan 22, Matt Heulitt. Jan 23, Dedicated Maniacs. Jan 24, New Monsoon. Jan 25, RonKat & Katdelic. Jan 26, Steve Abramson & friends. Jan 29, Kortyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hump Jam. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Jan 22, King & Ace. Jan 24, Optomistics. Jan 25, Fenton Coolfoot & the Right Time. Jan 26, Namely Us. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Redwood Cafe

Benefit Concert for the Redwood Empire Food Bank Saturday, January 25 â&#x20AC;˘ Concert at 7pm â&#x20AC;˘ Pre-concert reception at 4pm Featuring Dave Alvin (trio), Jimmy Lafave (band), Wavy Gravy, Special Guest Nina Gerber, Teresa Tudury and more

Sponsored in part by:

Jan 24, Midnight Sun Massive. Jan 25, Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Bunchovus. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

River Theatre Jan 24, Lester Chambers of the Chambers Brothers. Jan 25, Lester Chambers with Los Diablos de Amor. 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.8022.

Ruth McGowanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewpub

The Second Annual

Sebastopol Guitar Festival Saturday, February 1, 10am to 10pm Concerts by by master guitarists Jim Hurst, Jim Nichols

and Guitars Without Borders featuring Scott Nygaard, Jody Stecher and Eric Thompson

Also Coming Soon

Habib Koite â&#x20AC;&#x201C; January 31st Poor Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Whiskeyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a Tribute to the Allman Brothers â&#x20AC;&#x201C; February 15th Tim Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien & Darrell Scott â&#x20AC;&#x201C; March 1st

Tickets and Information: seb.org or 707-823-1511

Tune into DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

McNearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dining House "REAKFASTs,UNCHs$INNER

3!4s7PM DOORSs!,,!'%3 JAZZ

LAVAY SMITH AND HER

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Swingin' with Sinatraâ&#x20AC;?

RED HOT SKILLET LICKERS &2)s0-$//23s REGGAE/WORLD MUSIC

FOREVERLAND 45%s7PM DOORSs COUNTRY

THE WOOD BROTHERS PLUS INDUBIOUS

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Sausalito Seahorse

Toad in the Hole Pub Jan 25, Ode to Robbie Burns, Days like Nights. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Jan 23, Mariana August. Jan 24, Juke Joint. Jan 25, Rolando Morales & Carlos Reyes. Jan 26, Candela. Jan 29, Marcelo Puig

Jan 24, Swoop Unit. Jan 25, Just Friends. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Station House Cafe Jan 26, Paul Knight. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1515.

Sweetwater Music Hall Jan 22, Jason Crosby & friends. Jan 23, the Overcommitments. Jan 24, Tim Flannery. Jan 26, Peter Walsh & friends. Jan 28, the Janks, King Washington, the Lucky Lonely. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

NAPA COUNTY Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jan 23, Mirror Image. Jan 24, Darrell Edwardsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Heavy Weather Band. Jan 25, J*Ras & SouLifte, Skunk Funk. Jan 26, Clairdee. Jan 28, Howard Levy, Chris Siebold. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Tradewinds Jan 24, Levi Lloyd & the 501 Band. Jan 25, the Hots. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Jan 24, Tom Rigney & Flambeau. Jan 25, Los Pinguos. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Jan 24, Cisum. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

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Jan 22, Dr Mojo. Jan 24, Slim Jenkins. Jan 25, Rusty Evans & the Ring of Fire. Jan 26, Junk Parlor. Jan 29, (W+T) J2. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Jan 24, Undercover. 446 B St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8277.

Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub

HELM

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar

Sprengerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tap Room

Jan 24, Nicolas Bearde. Jan 26, Farzad Arjmand. Jan 28, Nancy Northrup & the Neighbors. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

AN EVENING WITH

Jan 22, Noel Jewkes. Jan 23, Deborah Winters. Jan 24, Ken Cook Trio. Jan 25, David Jeffrey. Jan 26, Con Quimba. Jan 28, Chris Huson. Jan 29, Jonathan Poretz. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Jan 24, Buck Nickels & Loose Change. Jan 25, Lone Star Retrobates. Jan 26, Todos Santos. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Fenix

3!4s0-$//23s MICHAEL JACKSON TRIBUTE BAND

BLACK UHURU

Jan 25, Dave Alvin, Jimmy Lafave, Wavy Gravy, Nina Gerber, Teresa Tudury, Jim & the Corbettes. 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

Jan 25, Cheap Therapy. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

NATURAL VIBRATIONS AND THE MOVEMENT

3!4s8PM DOORSs REGGAE

Sebastopol Community Center

Dance Palace

IRATION AUTOMATIC WINTER TOUR WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

PLUS AMY

Jan 24, Acoustamatics. Jan 25, Mark Lemaire & Twilight. Sun, Evening Jazz with Gary Johnson. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Osteria Divino

Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Hopmonk Novato Jan 24, Pop Rocks. Jan 25, Beso Negro. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Mt Tamalpais United Methodist Church Jan 26, Emilio Colon & Sarkis

Bill Frisell Residency Guitarist plays in solo, trio, quartet and quintet settings with rotating members. Jan 23-26 at SFJAZZ Center.

Darkside Experimental noise or modern New Age? Electronic duo tours behind new LP, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Psychic.â&#x20AC;? Jan 24 at the Fillmore.

Ryan Hemsworth Canadian producer whose â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kitsch Geniusâ&#x20AC;? showcases new dimensions in loops and samples. Jan 24 at the Independent.

Rhett Millerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Variety Show SFrontman for Old 97s presents â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wheels Off,â&#x20AC;? a variety show with John Doe from X. Jan 27 at Yoshiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SF.

The Hood Internet Chicagoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mashup duo blends indie rock with mainstream rap to twee /comic /ironic effect. Jan 30 at Mezzanine.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

27

Galleries RECEPTIONS Jan 26 Osher Marin JCC, “Sacred Words,” interfaith art. 4pm. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

SONOMA COUNTY Charles M Schulz Museum Through Feb 3, “Play Things: Toys in Peanuts,” a nostalgic journey through popular toys in the Peanuts comic strip. Through Mar 2, “School Projects,” follow the Peanuts gang as they struggle through a typical school year with original comic strips. Through Apr 27, “Starry, Starry Night,” feautring Peanuts characters under the night sky. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Fulton Art Depot Sundays, 1pm. through Jan 26, “A Month of Sundays,” former chicken slaughterhouse now an art depot. 1200 River Rd, Fulton.

Graton Gallery Through Feb 24, “Invitational Exhibition,” fine art by North California painters, printmakers and sculptors. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Healdsburg Museum Jan 29-May 4, “Sonoma County & the Civil War,” artifacts from the 1860s. 221 Matheson St, Healdsburg. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.431.3325.

History Center Through Feb 6, “Sculpture Trail,” outdoor exhibit with sculptures along Cloverdale Boulevard and Geyserville Avenue changing every nine months. 215 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale.

Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center Through Mar 25, “Once Upon a Wetland,” art by Ane Carl Rovetta. 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Petaluma Arts Center Jan 22-Mar 16, “Form & Finish,” Sculptures by Michael Cooper and John de Marchi. Gallery talk, Feb 2, 2pm, $10. Panel discussion, Feb 5, 6:30pm, $10. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Redwood Cafe Through Mar 11, Sandra Jill Anfang presents acrylic paintings and collage. Reception, Jan 29, 6pm. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Through Feb 14, “Vessels,” juried exhibition. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sebastopol Gallery Through Mar 1, “A Fashion Statement,” wearable art. Reception, Feb 7, 5pm. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

Sonoma County Museum Through Jan 24, “Studio: 50 Sonoma County Artists,” pop-up exhibit of portraits of Sonoma County visual artists. Panel Discussion, Jan 23, 7pm. Jan 25-26, “SRJC Black & White Photography.” Through Jun 1, “Precious Cargo,” exhibition of California Indian cradle baskets. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Mar 2, “Site & Sense,” the Architecture of Aidlin Darling Design. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

MARIN COUNTY Art Works Downtown Through Feb 28, Paintings by Jeremy Morgan. Closing reception, Feb 14, 5pm. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

Dance Palace Jan 29-Feb 16, “Birdhouses & Beyond,” hand-made tiny avian homes. Party and auction, Feb 16. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Falkirk Cultural Center Through Mar 8, “Artisans,”

emerging and internationally known artists. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

Gallery Route One Through Feb 9, “Catalyst,” Juried show. Reception, Jan 19, 3pm. Closing salon, Feb 9, 4pm. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Community Foundation Through Jan 24, “Transmissions,” work by 30 artists from around the country. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

‘RUBY’ Work by sculptor Michael Cooper (shown) and John de March is on display at the Petaluma Arts Center through March 16. See Galleries, this page.

Marin MOCA Through Feb 23, “Re/Vision,” work by members that has undergone revisions. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Marin Society of Artists Through Feb 1, “Passages,” nonjuried exhibit by MSA members. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. Mon-Thurs, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 415.454.9561.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Jan 23, “Member Show,” featuring sculpture, paintings, photography and more. Jan 29-Feb 20, “Real & Imagined,” mixed-media by Deborah Sullivan. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Osher Marin JCC Jan 26-Apr 7, “Sacred Words,” interfaith art. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

San Geronimo Valley Community Center Through Jan 30, “Senior Lunch Group Show.” 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

NAPA COUNTY di Rosa Through Apr 6, “Inherent Vice: This is Not a Bruce Conner Exhibition,” Will Brown works with Bruce Conner collaborators to make a fluctuating exhibition related to the artist. Through Feb 2, “Beatnik Meteors,” collaborative sculptures by regional artists. 5200 Sonoma

Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Downtown Napa Through Jan 1, “Metamorphosis,” outdoor sculpture exhibit with selfguided tour. Main and Third streets, Napa.

Napa Valley Museum

Dance Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium

Through Mar 23, “Thinking Outside the Bottle,” exploration of the artistic passions of the people behind the wine. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Tues-Sun, 10am to 4pm. 707.944.0500.

Jan 25, 7pm and Jan 26, 6pm, RoCo Dance Onstage. $20. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael 415.499.6800.

Comedy

Community Healing Festival

Jay Alexander Dazzling combination of magic and comedy. Jan 26, 2 and 5pm. $20. Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Dave Burleigh As seen on “America’s Got Talent.” Drennon Davis opens. Jan 25, 8pm. $20. Trek Winery, 1026 Machin Avenue, Novato. 415.899.9883.

Larry the Cable Guy Blue-collar comedian knows how to “git ‘er done!” Jan 29, 7 and 10pm. $60. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

3 Blonde Moms Comedy trio includes one former Miss California, an actress and a standup comedian. Jan 23, 8pm. $20$35. 142 Throckmorton Theatre,

Events Hands-on healings, clairvoyant readings and aura healings. Jan 27, 6:30pm. Donation. The Sunflower Center, 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

one day to 17 months old, accompanied by a parent or caregiver. Fri, 10:45am. free. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Sunday Cruise-In Last Sun monthly at noon, fire up your hot rod and bring the kids for day of live music, food, prizes and more. Last Sun of every month. Free. Fourth and Sea Restaurant, 101 Fourth St, Petaluma. www. sundaycruisein.com.

Waterbird Festival Naturalist-led field trips, a kayak adventure on the outskirts of the sanctuary’s waters, bird walks, family activities and more. Jan 25, 9am. Richardson Bay Audubon Center, 376 Greenwood Beach Rd, Tiburon. 415.388.2524.

iLearn Fair Sponsored by “Sonoma Family Life” magazine. Jan 26, 10am. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Low-Cost Physicals Family physicals for adults and children by appointment. Ongoing. $20-$65. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2880.

Mr Healdsburg Pageant Who’s the hottest man in Healdsburg? Jan 22. $45. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

Preschool Storytime A lap-sit program for infants,

Film La Gioconda From the Opera de Paris. Jan 25, 7pm. $20. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Little Shop of Horrors Screening with live shadow cast. Jan 25, 9:30pm. $12. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Somm Humorous, emotional and illuminating look into the Court of Master Sommeliers. Jan 23, 7pm. $10. Napa ) Valley Museum, 55

28

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 22–28, 2014 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Arts Events

A E

Music / Events

Lydiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Organics

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2 Year Anniversary 'IPIFVEXMSRSJ*SSH,IEPXL'SQQYRMX] & Cultural Diversity

( 27

Jazz, Folk, Funk, Flamenco, Bollywood, Kirtan, Didgeridoo, Dance, Drum Circle, Hooping ~ Kids Crafts, Face Painting, Speakers on Health & Toxicity

 3JJ)ZIV]XLMRKÄ -RGPYHMRK*SSH .ERYEV]Ä&#x2C6;EQÄ&#x20AC;TQÄ&#x2C6;

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;SQIRÄ&#x192;W(E]PSRKXS6ITPIRMWL Your Sacred Well

Santa Rosa Original Certified Farmers Market

Food & Drink

Sat, 9am-1pm and Wed, 9am1pm. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

Civic Center Farmers Market

Local produce, meat and artisan goods. Sun, 10am1:30pm. Sebastopol Plaza, McKinley St, Sebastopol.

Corte Madera Farmers Market

Renew your soul & re-energize yourself as a healing presence on the planet. www.sevensistersmysteryschool.com

6:30pm. $55. Next Key Center, 1385 N Hamilton Pkwy, Novato. 415.382.3363, ext 211.

Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Sun at 10am, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eat Local 101â&#x20AC;? provides walking tour with information, cooking advice and ideas inspired by locally grown foods. Year-round. Thurs, 8am-1pm and Sun, 8am-1pm. Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 800.897.3276.

Sebastopol Farmers Market

Lectures

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Year-round. Wed, noon-5pm. Town Center, Tamalpais Drive, Corte Madera. 415.382.7846.

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Crab Feed

Baba Harihar Ramji

7,-17,%-SR:EPIRXMRIÄ&#x192;W(E] 7,-17,%-GSRGIVXÄ&#x20AC;Ä&#x2C6;(MRRIV7IVZIHÄ&#x20AC;TQ (MRRIV 'SRGIVXÄ&#x2C6;'SRGIVXSRP] $30 Dinner only

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Year-round. Tues, 3-7pm. Russian River Vineyards, 5700 Hwy 116, Forestville. 707.887.3344.

French Garden Farm Market Enjoy produce from restaurantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s farm, along with freshly baked breads and pastries from their kitchen. Every Sun, 10 to 2. Free. French Garden, 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Harvest Market Selling local and seasonal fruit, flowers, vegetables and eggs. Sat, 9am-1pm. Harvest Market, 19996 Seventh St E, Sonoma. 707.996.0712.

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At the Veterans Building 282 South High St. Sebastopol, CA 95472 707.829.4797 www.sebarts.org

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Organic farm and garden produce stand where you bring your own bag. Wed, 10am-3pm. College of Marin, Indian Valley Campus, 1800 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.454.4554.

Redwood Empire Farmers Market Sat, 8:30am-1pm and Wed, 8:30am-noon. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

Rustic Tuscany Chef Francesco Torre of Canneti Roashouse Italiana prepares a three-course meal. Jan 23,

Rehabilitation Success Stories Dr Dan Famini shares stories of wild animals in captivity. Jan 24, 5:30pm. $5. Petalua Wildlife Museum, 201 Fair St (on Petaluma High School campus), Petaluma. 707.778.4787.

Science Buzz Cafe Jan 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Science & Science Fiction: The Romance Continuesâ&#x20AC;? with Robert Poirter, PhD & Gus diZerega, PhD. Feb 25, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stories of Ancient Rock Artâ&#x20AC;? with Bill Petry. Fourth Tues of every month, 7pm. through Feb 25. $5. Coffee Catz, 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Sim Van der Ryn Amphibians of Sonoma County With biologist Dave Cook. Jan 29, 7pm. $5-$10. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

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Babaji of Sonoma Yoga Ashram offers monthly satsang, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Living Fully in Each Moment.â&#x20AC;? Fourth Thurs at 7. Church of the Oaks, 160 W Sierra Ave, Cotati. 707.996.8915.

John L Burris Civil rights attorney represented Rodney King. Jan 22, 12pm. Bertolini Student Center, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4266.

CityZen Evening of sitting meditation, tea and dharma talk. All are welcome. Mon, 7pm. Free. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Jack London & the Wolf House Fire Jonah Raskin talks about the 1913 fire that burned down the writerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home in Sonoma. Jan 25, 2pm. Free. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Robert Lustig Tactics for readjusting the key hormones that regulate hunger, reward and stress. Jan 28, 6:30pm. $69. Mill Valley Community Center, 180 Camino Alto, Mill Valley.

Planets & Life Beyond Earth There are between 100 and 400 billion planets orbiting around other stars just in our own galaxy. Mind=blown. Times vary. Fri-Sun through Feb 1. $5$8. SRJC Planetarium, Lark Hall 2001, 1502 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4465.

Award-winning architect is the author of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Design for an Empathetic World.â&#x20AC;? Jan 22, 5:30pm. $20. The Sunflower Center, 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

Songbird Saturday Sample classes and healing modalities. Jan 25, 1pm. $10$20. Songbird Community Healing Center, 8297 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.2398.

State of the County Keynote speech by Jerry Nickelsburg, UCLA Anderson Forecastâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s senior economist. Jan 24, 7am. $60. Doubletree Hotel, 1 Double Tree Dr, Rohnert Park.

Tools & Inspiration for Mapping Your Year Workshop on mapping goals and intentions of skill development. Jan 25, 1:26pm. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Howard Vlieger Farmer is an expert on the problems of GMO crops. Jan 25, 10am. Sebastopol Grange Hall, 6000 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. Farmer is an expert on the problems of GMO crops. Jan 26, 2pm. Windsor Grange, 9161 Starr Rd, Windsor. 707.837.8923. Farmer is an expert on the problems of GMO crops. Jan 26, 7pm. Baker Creek Seed Bank, 199 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma, 417.924.8917.

Laura Wells Green Partyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2014 â&#x20AC;&#x153;No Corporate Moneyâ&#x20AC;? candidate for state controller suggests alternatives to our present monetary system. Jan 27, 7:30pm. Free. First United Methodist Church, 9 Ross Valley Dr, San Rafael.

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Readings Book Passage Jan 22, 7pm, “The Trip to Echo Spring: On Writers and Drinking” with Olivia Laing. Jan 24, 7pm, “Saints of the Shadow Bible” with Ian Rankin. Jan 26, 1pm, “People Tools: 54 Strategies for Building Relationships, Creating Joy, and Embracing Prosperity” with Alan C Fox & Jack Kornfield. Jan 26, 2pm, “Rough Translations” with Molly Giles. Jan 27, 7pm, “The Agent: My 40-Year Career Making Deals and Changing the Game” with Leigh Steinburg. Jan 29, 7pm, “Flyover Lives” with Diane Johnson. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Coffee Catz Fourth Thursday of every month, 6pm, Sebastopol Great Books discussion group. 707.829.5643. Fourth Sunday of every month, 3pm, Sonoma County Poetry Reading. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol 707.829.6600.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Jan 22, 7pm, “The Wind Is Not a River” with Brian Payton. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Jan 29, “Lost Planet” with Rachel Searles. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

MINE Art Gallery Jan 26, 3pm, Doreen Stock and Linda Charman. 1820 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax.

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SONOMA & MARIN COUNTIES IMPRESSIONABLE Comedian and celebrity impersonator Dave Burleigh comes to Trek Winery Jan. 25. See Comedy, p27. a headlining poet. Jan 28, Seven-Kelee Boult. $5-$10. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati 707.795.7868.

Robert Louis Stevenson Museum Jan 22, 4pm, “Under the Wide and Starry Sky” with Nancy Horan, dinner with author at private residence. Inquire with museum for details. $150. 1490 Library Lane, St. Helena 707.963.3757.

Theater Date Night Three short plays, including “The Apology,” “Hungry 4 U” and “Kissing.” Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Feb 16. $15-$25. Studio Theatre, Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

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Jan 24, 7pm, “Nighthawks” with Katherine Hastings. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental 707.874.9392.

Spine-tingling, suspenseful drama. Times vary. Fri-Sun through Feb 16. $15. Pegasus Theater Company, Rio Nido Lodge, Canyon Two Rd, Rio Nido.

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Jan 25, 4pm, Roy Mash, Connie Post, Susan Zerner. 1641 Fourth St, San Rafael 415.482.0550.

West Coast premiere of this World War I drama. Times vary. Fri-Sun through Feb 16. $13-$26. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

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Redwood Cafe Fourth Tuesday of every month, 8:30pm, Slamazon Poetry Slam, all-women’s open mic with competitive poetry and

The Miracle Junkie Absurdist comedy about a cult.

Adult themes and material. Presented by Jade Dragon Theater Company. Times vary. Wed-Fri-Sun through Jan 26. $15. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

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Reader’s Theatre One-act plays directed by Damien Olsen include: “Some Famous couples Discuss Their Divorces” by Delia Ephron; “The Problem” by AR Guerney, Jr; “It’s Our Turn Now” by Scott Kersnar; and “Porn” by John Rowan. Wed, Jan 29, 7pm. Free. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

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Astrology

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of January 22

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) Actor Casey AfďŹ&#x201A;eck appreciates the nurturing power of his loved ones. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My family would be supportive,â&#x20AC;? he says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;if I said I wanted to be a Martian, wear only banana skins, make love to ashtrays and eat tree bark.â&#x20AC;? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to see you cultivate allies like that in the coming months, Aries. Even if you have never had them before, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good chance they will be available. For best results, tinker with your understanding of who your family might be. RedeďŹ ne what â&#x20AC;&#x153;communityâ&#x20AC;? means to you. TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20) Author John Koenig says we often regard emotions as positive or negative. Feeling respect is good, for example, while being wracked with jealousy is bad. But he favors a different standard for evaluating emotions: how intense they are. At one end of the spectrum, everything feels blank and blah, even the big things. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At the other end is wonder,â&#x20AC;? he says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;in which everything feels alive, even the little things.â&#x20AC;? Your right and proper goal right now, Taurus, is to strive for the latter kind: full-on intensity and maximum vitality. Luckily, the universe will be conspiring to help you achieve that goal.

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) At her blog otherwordly.tumblr.com, Yee-Lum Mak deďŹ nes the Swedish word resfeber this way: â&#x20AC;&#x153;the restless race of the travelerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heart before the journey begins, when anxiety and anticipation are tangled together.â&#x20AC;? You might be experiencing resfeber right now, Gemini. Even if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not about to depart on a literal trip, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m guessing you will soon start wandering out on a quest or adventure that will bring your heart and mind closer together. Paradoxically, your explorations will teach you a lot about being better grounded. Bon voyage! CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22) How does a monarch butterďŹ&#x201A;y escape its chrysalis when it has ďŹ nished gestating? Through tiny holes in the skin of the chrysalis, it takes big gulps of air and sends them directly into its digestive system, which expands forcefully. Voila! Its body gets so big it breaks free. When a chick is ready to emerge from inside its egg, it has to work harder than the butterďŹ&#x201A;y. With its beak, it must peck thousands of times at the shell, stopping to rest along the way because the process is so demanding. According to my analysis, Cancerian, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re nearing the ďŹ nal stage before your metaphorical emergence from gestation. Are you more like the butterďŹ&#x201A;y or chick?

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not sure where to go from here. I need help.â&#x20AC;? I encourage you to say those words out loud, Leo. Even if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not sure you believe theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re true, act as if they are. Why? Because I think it would be healthy for you to express uncertainty and ask for assistance. It would relieve you of the oppressive pressure to be a masterful problem-solver. It could free you from the unrealistic notion that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to ďŹ gure everything out by yourself. And this would bring you, as if by magic, interesting offers and inquiries. In other words, if you confess your neediness, you will attract help. Some of it will be useless, but most of it will be useful. VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22) Dogs have a superb sense of smell, much better than we humans. But ours isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bad. We can detect certain odors that have been diluted to one part in 5 billion. For example, if you were standing next to two Olympic-sized swimming pools, and only one contained a few drops of the chemical ethyl mercaptan, you would know which one it was. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m now calling on you to exercise that level of sensitivity, Virgo. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a situation in the early stages of unfolding that would ultimately emanate a big stink if you allowed it to keep developing. There is a second unripe situation, on the other hand, that would eventually yield fragrant blooms. I advise you to either quash or escape from the ďŹ rst, even as you cultivate and treasure the second. LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) Whatever adventures may ďŹ&#x201A;ow your way in the coming weeks, Libra, I hope you will appreciate them for what they are: unruly but basically benevolent; disruptive in ways that catalyze welcome transformations; a bit more exciting than you might like, but ultimately pretty fun.

Can you thrive on the paradoxes? Can you delight in the unpredictability? I think so. When you look back at these plot twists two months from now, I bet youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see them as entertaining storylines that enhance the myth of your heroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s journey. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll understand them as tricky gifts that have taught you valuable secrets about your soulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s code.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21) Manufacturing a jelly bean is not a quick, slam-bam process. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a ďŹ ve-step procedure that takes a week. Each seemingly uncomplicated piece of candy has to be built up layer by layer, with every layer needing time to fully mature. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m wondering if maybe thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a metaphorically similar kind of work ahead for you, Scorpio. May I speculate? You will have to take your time, proceed carefully and maintain a close attention to detail as you prepare a simple pleasure.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) I understand the appeal of the f-word. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guttural and expulsive. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a perverse form of celebration that frees speakers from their inhibitions. But Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m here today to announce that its rebel cachet and vulgar power are extinct. It has decayed into a barren clichĂŠ. Its ofďŹ cial death-from-oversaturation occurred with the release of the mainstream Hollywood blockbuster The Wolf of Wall Street. Actors in the ďŹ lm spat out the rhymeswith-cluck word more than 500 times. I hereby nominate you Sagittarians to begin the quest for new ways to invoke rebellious irreverence. What interesting mischief and naughty wordplay might you perpetrate to escape your inhibitions, break taboos that need to be broken, and call other people on their BS and hypocrisy?

CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) German philosopher Immanuel Kant (1724â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1804) has had a major impact on the development of ideas in the Western world. We can reasonably divide the history of philosophy into two eras: pre-Kantian and post-Kantian. And yet for his whole life, which lasted 79 years, this big thinker never traveled more than 10 miles away from Konigsberg, the city where he was born. He followed a precise and methodical routine, attending to his work with meticulous detail. According to my analysis, you Capricorns could have a similar experience in the coming weeks. By sticking close to the tried-and-true rhythms that keep you grounded and healthy, you can generate inďŹ&#x201A;uential wonders. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18) The Aquarian author Georges Simenon (1903â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1989) wrote more than 200 novels under his own name and 300 more under pseudonyms. On average, he ďŹ nished a new book every 11 days. Half a billion copies of his books are in print. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sorry to report that I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think you will ever be as proliďŹ c in your own chosen ďŹ eld as he was in his. However, your productivity could soar to a hefty fraction of Simenon-like levels in 2014â&#x20AC;&#x201D;if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re willing to work your ass off. Your luxuriant fruitfulness wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come as easily as his seemed to. But you should be overjoyed that you at least have the potential to be luxuriantly fruitful.

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20) When Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m older and wiser, maybe Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll understand the meaning of my life. When Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m older and wiser, maybe Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll gain some insight about why Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m so excited to be alive despite the fact that my destiny is so utterly mysterious. What about you, Pisces? What will be different for you when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re older and wiser? Now is an excellent time to ponder this riddle. Why? Because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s likely you will get a glimpse of the person you will have become when you are older and wiserâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;which will in turn intensify your motivation to become that person.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

žų NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 22-28, 2014 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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