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NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JANUARY 8-14, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JANUARY 8 –14, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288 Editor Gabe Meline, ext. 202

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Contributors Michael Amsler, Alastair Bland, Rob Brezsny, Dani Burlison, Richard von Busack, Rachel Dovey, Jessica Dur Taylor, Gretchen Giles, James Knight, Jacquelynne Ocaña, Sara Sanger, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow, Ken Weaver, L. Kent Wolgamott

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Publisher Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2014 Metrosa Inc.

Cover illustration by Joe Leonard. Cover design by Kara Brown.

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This photo was taken on the Joe Rodota trail in Sebastopol. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

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‘It gives to the knife like an indulgent lover and spreads in a glistening ribbon onto a hot, fresh pizzete.’ EATS P1 1 How to Deal with 100,000 Mice P8 Sweet and Dry at Meadowcroft P1 5 ‘On Such a Full Sea’ P17

Jewelry Repurposing Specialist

We trade or buy gold & platinum

Expert Repairs Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Dining p11 Restaurants p12 Wineries p14

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Music p20 Clubs & Concerts p21 Arts & Events p24 Classified p27 Astrology p27

ABOUT THE COVER ARTIST This issue’s cover art is by Joe Leonard, whose widely known talents as a tattoo artist can be seen beneath the clothing of nearly half the population of Santa Rosa. He owned and operated Monkey Wrench Tattoo for years; much to the area’s loss, he’s now based in Florida. Miss you, holmes.

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NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JANUARY 8 –14, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Where’s the Water? Taking measures against drought BY RACHEL KAPLAN AND WENDY KRUPNICK

T

he driest year in California’s recorded history has passed, and there is no promise that the drought will end any time soon. Some scientists think we are in a mega-drought cycle that could last for many years. We are writing to encourage municipal leadership on this issue, as well as action on the part of every Sonoma County resident.

The specter of extended drought is as scary as the “super storms” happening in other parts of the world. Equally frightening is the silence of our public officials, who have barely acknowledged this crisis nor called for mandatory conservation measures. While we are told that our county does not need to worry about this unprecedented lack of rain because there is water in Lake Sonoma, the fact is that most of us depend on groundwater reserves for our primary or backup source of water. Water from Lake Sonoma is completely irrelevant to a significant part of our population, including virtually all of our farms and ranches. Even if Lake Sonoma refills this winter, which is highly unlikely, our seriously depleted groundwater reserves will not. In the 1970s, California experienced a drought less severe than this one, and mandatory conservation measures were enacted in many communities. We stopped watering lawns, washing our cars and sidewalks with hoses, and used low-flow water devices. We let “yellow mellow” and took short showers. These measures made a big difference, and we found we could do just fine using less water. We call on our supervisors, the Sonoma County Water Agency and the SCWA’s municipal clients to enact mandatory water conservations measures immediately. In addition to prohibitions and fees, there should be incentives for businesses to convert landscapes to low water plantings. Independent water districts and HOAs must mandate conservation measures as well. And we ask each resident of our county to count every drop of water as the precious, scarce resource it is, and to do your part to adapt to our changing world. Even if there is rain in the next few months, extended droughts are likely in our region. It’s time to make conservation a way of life. Rachel Kaplan works as a somatic psychotherapist, permaculture gardener and educator. She lives in Petaluma. Wendy Krupnick teaches, consults and practices organic farming and gardening and is active with several related community groups. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

These Boots Are Made for Strummin’

Thanks for the article on Frankie Boots (“Buckle Up,” Dec. 25). You place Frankie Boots in a line that includes Kate Wolf and other Sonoma County folk-country-bluegrass figures, and rightly so. Indeed there are a number of good local, younger bands that could be placed there: Driftwood, the Bootleg Honeys and Old Jawbone, to name a few. And, just to fill in a bit more of that history, it’s worth noting that Sonoma County was, indeed, a hotbed of that music for many years. I moved here in 1978 hoping to secure the guitar chair in Kate Wolf’s band (only to find Nina Gerber got there first), but what I discovered was a wealth of talent and band-playing opportunities. Bluegrass, in particular, was popular during this time. Between the wellknown bluegrass bands (Boothill, Eagle Ridge, HiJinks & the High Forehead Boys) and the old-time bands (too many to name), it seemed you could find really good acoustically driven music most nights of the week. In fact, I played bluegrass at a club, now long gone, on Fourth Street called Joe Frogger’s every week. It was a wildly popular club, overrun nightly with fans of that music. Among local acoustic musicians from that era, some of the names of the best remain vital today: Chris Carney, Layne Bowen, Evan Morgan, Ted Dutcher. And then there’s Chip Dunbar. He was responsible for teaching many, many people the joy of the banjo, guitar, mandolin and singing. Though he passed a few years ago, Chip’s legacy lives on with groups like the Mighty Chiplings, so named to honor their first important teacher in this music. And we shouldn’t forget important venues like the Inn of the Beginning in Cotati, concert home to many of the important figures in acoustic music. I remember seeing David Grisman (with

a fresh-faced young singer who went on to some Nashville fame, Vince Gill), David Bromberg, Doc Watson (who politely requested that folks refrain from smoking so he could sing), Norman Blake and Bay Area bluegrass icon Laurie Lewis. I could go on and on.

So, yes, let’s hoist a glass and honor those great musicians here in Sonoma County who have always entertained us, educated us and endured with us the comings and goings of fashions and the closure of clubs that support this music. A final tip of the hat to Sheila Groves down at the new Twin Oaks in Penngrove. Looks like country-bluegrass (i.e., Americana) may have a new home in Sonoma County.

KEVIN RUSSELL Santa Rosa

Women and Prowling Bravo to all of the contributors to this piece (“So Long, 2013!,” Jan. 1). You did a great job summarizing some of the most important issues that captured the spotlight and imaginations of the people of Sonoma County last year. But I must clarify something. You report that Ms. Darling says that nobody is talking about the effect that Efren Carrillo’s conduct has had on women. This is not entirely true. While I (and others) perceived a dearth of outcry of shock and disgust from the women in this county for a time after this shameful incident occurred, that all changed at the second meeting held by the Citizens for Accountability, which was held at the Sebastopol Grange a week before Thanksgiving. At that time, several women, one by one, got up out of their chairs, bravely faced the members of the large crowd and spoke of their own past unrelated experiences and how hearing about Carrillo’s reprehensible conduct in the early morning hours of July 13, 2013, violated their right to feel safe in their own home. Then, at the third meeting

THIS MODERN WORLD

held by the Citizens for Accountability, several women once again rose up out of their chairs, took the mic and expressed similar feelings. Also, it should be pointed out that I and others have been raising this issue since day one of this incident; in fact, I wrote a letter to this publication, which was published, identifying the real victim as the woman who, at 3:40 in the morning on July 13, was so terrified by Efren Carrillo’s actions that she found it necessary to call 911, not once but twice. I will reiterate once again that I stand with this victim and hope that she will avail herself of each and every opportunity that may become available to her in her personal pursuit of justice. And it is my sincere hope that she is receiving the support that she needs to get her through this most trying time.

THOMAS BONFIGLI

Sebastopol

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

By Tom Tomorrow

Top Five 1

New allegations against Erick Gelhaus filed in Andy Lopez wrongful death suit

2

Amy & Tina are back hosting the Golden Globes Jan 12 (5pm; NBC; bring gin)

3

(Speaking of the Globes, Neil Patrick Harris’ “margarita series” on Instagram, ha ha)

4

Wood-grilled Brussels sprouts with pancetta and lemon at Picco in Larkspur

5 Get out the Aqua Net! Ratt play the Phoenix Theater on Jan. 22

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 8–14, 2014 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Rants

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THE

Paper HOME SWEET HOME The Farallon Islands are home to scientists and researchers—and up to 100,000 mice.

Mice Capades Potential use of rodenticides on the mice of the Farallon Islands divides environmentalists BY ALASTAIR BLAND

F

rom 1980 through 2003, Peter Pyle worked at the Farallon Islands off the coast of Marin. The veteran bird researcher counted seabirds, observed them feeding their young during nesting time, and

many times witnessed and recorded great white sharks attacking and killing pinnipeds in the ocean waters surrounding the legendary islands. Pyle worked for the Point Reyes Bird Observatory at the time, and with a rotating

team of assistant scientists, he lived in a small house on Southeast Farallon Island, the 357-foot-high crag visible to landlubbers from 30 miles away but offlimits to the general public. They hiked about the rocky shores, received grocery

deliveries twice a month, and often fished for lingcod from a small skiff in the hours before dinnertime.

Pete Warzybok/Point Blue

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JANUARY 8 –14, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Today, Pyle, now working with the Institute for Bird Populations in Point Reyes, remembers his many seasons at the islands with a strange blend of sweet nostalgia and dread that makes the skin crawl—for the islands, now as then, are crawling with house mice. The animals are non-native, introduced accidentally more than a century ago by boaters, and every summer and fall their population explodes to grotesque numbers on two of the islands—namely, Southeast Farallon Island and an abutting crag called West End that becomes separated from the bigger island at high tide. “They’re just crawling around everywhere,” says Pyle, who was working with the Point Reyes Bird Observatory during his years of island research. “It’s like some invasion-of-the-rats movie.” The resident scientists, he says, sometimes kept a small compost heap in back of the house where hundreds of mice could be seen at a glance. Walking about on the rocky landscape, mice peeked out from nearly every crack and burrow. Nights in the old Victorian house were especially unsettling, he recalls. The rodents swarmed though the old dwelling. They skittered about on the counters, knocked over dishes, defecated on the dinner table and tousled sleepers’ hair. Many individuals, Pyle says, have made attempts at controlling the animals using snap traps. Killing 50 a night can be easy, but it’s a futile effort on an island whose mouse population in high season may reach 60,000 to 100,000.

T

he main problem associated with the Farallon Islands’ mice is a complex of ecological imbalances. For one, the mice prey on two native species that live nowhere else: the camel cricket and the arboreal salamander. The rodents’ presence has also attracted a population of burrowing owls, predators that previously only used the island for brief migratory

and Wildlife Service released a 700-page environmental impact statement discussing the Farallones’ mice and dozens of ways to potentially address the matter. Doug Cordell, a spokesman with the service, says his agency considered a total of 49 different solutions to the infestation, including releasing cats onto the islands, using traps to curb their numbers and checking their fertility using medicine-laced bait. Most of these proposed actions have been dismissed, he says, leaving on the table just three. Two involve poisoning the rodents. The other would be to do nothing at all. “We wouldn’t move forward with any option that posed more risk to the environment than benefits,” Cordell says. “Our job as an agency is to serve and protect wild lands and wildlife.” Cordell stresses that the Fish and Wildlife Service currently has “no preferred alternative.” Yet he describes the mice at the islands as “plague-like”

Jim Tietz/Point Blue

‘STUART’ Burrow owls have flocked to the islands for the mice, but are also

eating rare native birds in the winter and spring.

in numbers, and he tells the Bohemian that successful rodent eradication would require removing every single individual mouse from a population. Traps, he says, would likely fail to substantially dent the mice’s numbers. Cats, too, would not catch every last one, and would certainly prey on the Farallones’ birds. It may sound like an unlikely prospect—eradicating invasive rodents from a place where the ground appears to crawl with them. Yet this has been successfully achieved on many small islands worldwide. For instance, Anacapa Island, off of Santa Barbara, was successfully cleared of rats in 2001 using grainbased pellets laced with a powerful rodenticide called brodifacoum. This is likely the poison that would be used at the Farallones. A tiny amount would be applied, according to Cordell. He says the pellets under consideration contain just 0.005 percent rodenticide—such a low density, Cordell says, that any bait pellets that drift into the ocean would dissolve and be rendered virtually harmless. The pellets would not be aimlessly scattered either, according to Jaime Jahncke, a researcher with Point Blue Conservation Science, formerly the Point Reyes Bird Observatory. Jahncke, who backs the poisoning plan, says the pellets would be dropped from a low-flying helicopter and directed away from the tidal zone via a deflector at the mouth of the dispenser. This, he says, would minimize the number of pellets that reach the water. Even if some pellets do dissolve into the tide pools, it may be unlikely that the marine environment would be effected. Jahncke points to an accidental spill in New Zealand in 2001 that put 15,000 pounds of poison pellets—containing almost a pound of brodifacoum—into a tidal marsh. The event, he says, had virtually no lingering measurable effects. Harvesting of shellfish for consumption was temporarily banned after the accident but was soon green-lighted again by officials. ) 10

Keep Calm

As the first day of 2014 wound to a close, a mysterious fire destroyed part of a tent, photos and other sacredly infused objects at a large Moorland Avenue memorial to Andy Lopez, at the site where the 13-yearold boy was shot and killed by Sonoma County Deputy Sheriff Erick Gelhaus on Oct. 21. Speculation about the fire’s origins immediately set the community on edge. In a letter addressed to retired Santa Rosa Police Department chief Tom Schwedhelm (he stepped down Dec. 20) and Sheriff Steve Freitas, dated Jan. 2 and sent via overnight delivery, Lopez family attorney Arnoldo Casillas wrote, “The first-hand accounts I have received indicate that the fire appears to be intentionally set.” Casillas continued: “The intentional burning of the monument represents a threat against the parents of Andy Lopez based upon their race/ ancestry/national origin and is a blatant act of intimidation. . . .” In the letter’s conclusion, he requested that officials undertake a “hate crime investigation.” Other activists and community members soon leapt to the conclusion that the fire had been set with some sort of malicious intent; with tensions running high since the shooting and Gelhaus’ subsequent return to work— despite calls for his ouster—the assumptions are somewhat understandable. But it may be time for cooler heads to prevail. A daylong investigation by arson investigators from four agencies determined that the fire was started accidentally—most likely by a burning candle at the center of the memorial structure. Central Fire Authority chief Doug Williams told the Press Democrat that no evidence of accelerants, such as gasoline, were found at the site. Plans are in the works to rebuild the memorial.—Leilani Clark The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

9 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 8–14, 2014 | BOH EMI A N.COM

stopovers but who now, due to the abundance of mice, remain for long periods. When the mouse population suddenly plummets early each winter, the owls abruptly find themselves with almost nothing to eat. This turns their attention to native birds, in particular the ashy storm-petrel, a rare species that nests on the islands every winter and spring. The owls, according to experts, are slowly whittling away the petrels’ population. But the owls prefer mice, and if only the rodents could be eliminated, the owls, too, might go away. For many ecologists associated with the islands, the solution to the matter seems clear: poison the rodents. “Nobody is happy about maybe having to use poison,” Pyle says. “Nobody wants to do it, but when you weigh the costs against the benefits, it’s probably worth doing.” The idea is more than an informal conversation topic. In October, the federal Fish

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JANUARY 8 –14, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

“And that case involved a closed waterway and a humungous amount of poison placed directly into the water,” says Jahncke, who is also a member of the five-person Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council. By comparison, the proposed poison drop at the Farallones would involve no more than about two tons of pellets containing 1.5 ounces of brodifacoum. If officials opt for another rodenticide called diphacinone—less potent than brodifacoum—they will use about 16,000 pounds of pellets containing up to about a pound of the poison.

‘They come out of their holes and go wandering around eating each other.’

S

till, opposition to the effort is strong. Jared Huffman has made statements questioning the wisdom of the plan, and the Marin County pest-management company WildCare Solutions is a firm opponent. The general public seems also to be leaning against the idea. Hundreds of written objections to the poisoning plan have been submitted to the Fish and Wildlife Service through its website since August. Sean Van Sommeran, a shark researcher based in Santa Cruz, believes rodenticides applied at the Farallones could remain in the environment for long periods. “They’re pretending this won’t have residual impacts,” says Van Sommeran, the founder and director of the Pelagic Shark Research Foundation. “It’s going

to affect seabirds and marine mammals. It’s just going to be one more addition to the contaminants already in the water.” He believes the rodenticide could migrate through the food web and eventually contaminate large predators—like great white sharks, the core of Van Sommeran’s research—much the way that heavy metals find their way into sharks, swordfish and tuna. There is little doubt that some birds—especially omnivorous western gulls—will eat the pellets and die. But Cordell says casualties could be minimized by scaring away the birds during the poisoning effort. Hazing methods—like using loud explosives and laser pointers to scatter flocks of gulls—have been tested already and proven effective at the islands. Owls, liable to suffer the consequences of eating poisoned mice, would need to be trapped and relocated during the eradication effort, Cordell says. Eliminating the mice will benefit more than just petrels, says Brad Keitt of Island Conservation, a group based in Santa Cruz. “Removing invasive species has had incredible benefits to islands around the world,” he says. At the Farallones, Keitt says, “the driving issue is to restore the balance of the ecosystem.”

T

he Farallon Islands have seen non-native species come and go before. The islands were first visited by Russian sailors in the early 1800s, but it’s believed by scientists who have genetically examined the islands’ mice that the rodents were brought later in the century, from mainland American stock. Around the same time, rabbits were released on Southeast Farallon Island. Hundreds of them were still living there in 1971, as were several feral cats, when a scientist named David Ainley first set foot on the island. “There was a lot of junk out there—sheds and garbage and things,” says Ainley, a Marin City resident who previously worked for the Point Reyes Bird Observatory and, through the 1970s, spent about half his life living on the island. “We got that all cleaned out.”

Jim Tietz/Point Blue

10 Farallones ( 9

NOT SO CUTE The Farallon mice knock over dishes, defecate on the dinner table

and rustle through sleeping people’s hair.

Ainley helped direct a focused trapping and shooting effort that successfully eliminated the rabbits. Three cats, he says, were captured and sent to the mainland. The mice, however, remained. In fact, removing the rabbits meant more food for the mice, especially the seeds of the many grasses that consequently thrived unchecked. The mouse population soared higher than ever. “Poisoning is the only chance to get rid of the mice,” Ainley says. But mice, he says, are not easy animals to eradicate, both because they are small and easily able to remain unseen and because they reproduce prolifically. Southeast Farallon Island, at high tide, is roughly 60 acres, Ainley says. “There are infinite cracks and holes that they can hide in.” Every winter, the Farallones’ mouse population plummets. Pyle explains that the first rains cause millions of small seeds scattered about the islands to germinate. This leaves the mice with nothing to eat. On top of that, winter rainfall tends to flood out their burrows,

driving tens of thousands of starving mice into the cold open air. “They come out of their holes and go wandering around eating each other,” Pyle says. He feels that eradicating the mice would not just benefit birds but would eliminate immeasurable rodent suffering. So many mice starve each winter on the Farallones that for several months, from March to June, resident researchers don’t see a sign of the animals. Pyle guesses the mouse population bottoms out at perhaps 100 scrawny survivors in the early spring. “Then the numbers start climbing, and by October it’s mayhem again,” he says. Any poisoning effort would take advantage of this population cycle by hitting the mice while their numbers are down. The Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed the poisoning to take place in November of 2014, although the service is still considering its options and will release a final environmental impact statement this spring.

THE NEXT LEVEL The delectable burrata at Rosso: much more than super-fresh mozzarella.

Burrata, Borracho Cheese stuffed with cheese and more cheese (with wine and more wine) at Rosso BY GRETCHEN GILES

S

aturday morning at 10am: Leon and I are drunk.

Don’t get me wrong. We’re often quite sober at 10am, no matter the day of the week, but this Saturday was different. Instead of completing some marvelous health-giving exercise like running or yoga, we were sitting in Rosso Pizzeria in Santa Rosa tasting five different types of Sauvignon Blanc while John Franchetti, the man in front of us, taught us how to make cheese.

Each bolstered by the nutritious breakfast splendor of exactly one half of one fresh pear, we had arrived 30 minutes earlier, eager to learn about the mysteries of fresh mozzarella and, particularly, that of burrata. We had forgotten about the wine. Imagine our delight. We were no burrata virgins, having often ordered it at Rosso. It arrives, gleaming and white on a plate, kissed with excellent olive oil and just a grind of salt. It gives to the knife like an indulgent lover and spreads in a glistening ribbon

onto a hot, fresh pizzete. But we had always thought that burrata was merely super-fresh mozzarella. And it kind of is. Except that it’s super-fresh mozzarella stuffed with three kinds of cheese— including mozzarella. Continue to imagine our delight. We tasted through our Sauv Blancs, dutifully noting cat piss and minerals, grass and citrus, apples and lemon, asparagus and passion fruit. We chose not to spit. Chef finally got the cheese part started. Placing a pound of fresh

mozzarella curds in a metal bowl, he had his sous add two quarts of boiling, heavily salted water. The curds immediately began to wilt as he stirred until they formed a large gluey ball in the water. Wearing gloves, he began to twist small balloons off the ball, placing them on a plate. He invited the group to come up, put on gloves and twist their own balloons of mozzarella. Leon and I sipped our wine patiently. And then the burrata began. To make burrata, you first make the stuffing, taking a quarter pound each of ricotta and mascarpone cheese and mixing them together in a large, nonreactive bowl. Then you add a half a pound of mozzarella cheese curds, enough heavy cream to smooth the mixture, olive oil to further the smooth, and salt and pepper to taste. It takes a lot of salt and pepper to make all of this white stuff pop. Once thoroughly mixed, you make more fresh mozzarella. Only this time, chef pulled out a rolling pin and flattened the gluey ball into a sheet thin enough to see his stainless-steel table through. Cutting the sheet into fours, he mounded the cheese mixture onto each square and rolled them like egg rolls. Molti bene! Burrata. The cat piss and apple notes and grass taste faded miraculously when paired with all the lovely fat that a slice of burrata provides. We sipped and tasted. Leon held my hand. I leaned against his shoulder. The room grew louder as the rest of the group got drunk on a Saturday morning. The class was done. We walked unsteadily home at 11am, clutching each other against fall’s foul morning light. We sat briefly in the backyard. Leon disappeared into the house and reemerged clutching an excellent bottle of Pinot Noir. He smiled. His teeth glinted sharply in autumn’s sloping yellow glow. Imagine my delight. Rosso Pizzeria, 53 Montgomery Drive, Santa Rosa (707.544.3221) and 151 Petaluma Blvd. S. (707.772.5177). To learn of upcoming cheese classes at Rosso, sign up for the email newsletter at www.rossopizzeria.com.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 8–14, 2014 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Sara Sanger

Dining

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12 ųŴ

Dining

or chicken parm sandwiches. Dinner, Tues-Sun. 2780 Stony Point Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.579.2083.

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com.

Speakeasy Tapas-Asian.

COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

$-$$. Small plates with a large vegetarian selection and an Asian fusion-leaning menu. And they’re open until 2am! Dinner daily. 139 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.776.4631.

Sushi Hana Japanese.

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SONOMA COUNTY Bear Republic Brewing Co Brewpub. $-$$. Award-winning ales and pub fare. Hearty portions and friendly service. Casual dining, outside patio. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 345 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.2337.

Bruno’s on Fourth American. $$-$$$. There’s real sophistication lurking in these upscale American comfort staples like flat-iron steak and fries, macaroni-ham casserole and stellar braised lamb shank. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Fri; dinner only, Sat; Sun, brunch and dinner. 1226 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.569.8222.

Chloe’s French Cafe

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El Coqui Puerto Rican. $-$$. Authentic and delicious Puerto Rican home cooking. Plan on lunching early–the place fills up fast. Lunch and dinner daily. 400 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.542.8868.

Forchetta / Bastoni

We welcome special orders and will be happy to track down that hard-to-find item.

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French. $. Hearty French fare, decadent desserts and excellent selection of French and California wines. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Fri. 3883 Airway Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3095.

Bombay style Indian Chinese entrees also Open for Lunch & Dinner 11:30am–9pm

Sizzling Tandoor II 9960 HWY 1 s 707-865-0625

Asian-Italian. $$. Southeast Asian street food served alongside rustic Italian in unique two-in-one restaurant. Heart-warming Italian from Forchetta, while Bastoni’s focuses on Vietnamese and Thai. Lunch and dinner daily. 6948 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.9500.

Hopmonk Tavern Pub fare. $$. More than serviceable bar food with a menu that hops the globe. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Le Bistro French. $$. A tiny space, simple menu, excellent food–and a reasonable price. Dinner, Wed-Sun. 312 Petaluma Blvd S, Petaluma. 707.762.8292.

Monti’s Rotisserie & Bar California cuisine. $-$$. Small plates and a few larger entrées with emphasis on house-roasted meats. Lunch and dinner daily. 714 Village Ct, Santa Rosa. 707.568.4404.

Phyllis’ Giant Burgers American. $. Come with a hearty appetite for an oldfashioned patty. Lunch and dinner daily. Four locations: 4910 Sonoma Hwy, Ste B, Santa Rosa. 707.538.4000. 1774 Piner Road #B, Santa Rosa. 707.521.0890. 924 Diablo Ave, Novato. 415.898.8294. 2202 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.456.0866.

Pongo’s Kitchen & Tap Thai. $$. Family-owned and operated with superfresh ingredients and a full kids’ menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 701 Sonoma Mt Pkwy, Petaluma. 707.765.9800.

Roberto’s Restaurant Italian. $$. Reliable home-style Italian cooking. Dinner, TuesSun. 4776 Sonoma Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.539.0260.

Rocker Oysterfeller’s American. $$-$$$. Friendly, warm service in a spot whose menu is thick with local, organic ingredients. Dinner, Thurs-Sun; brunch, Sun. 14415 Coast Hwy 1, Valley Ford (at the Valley Ford Hotel). 707.876.1983.

Sea Thai. $$. An oasis of exotic Bangkok with some truly soul-satisfying dishes. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Fri; dinner, Sat. 5000 Petaluma Blvd S. 707.766.6633.

Simply Delicious Italian/ Mediterranean. $-$$. Tiny cafe with huge flavors. All dishes are homemade, with lots of organics. Fantastic lasagna, margherita pizza and meatball

$$. Popular sushi destination offers delightful treats. Dollar sushi night on Wed and Sat really packs ’em in. Lunch and dinner daily. 6930 Burnett St, Sebastopol. 707.823.3778.

Yao-Kiku Japanese. $$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from Japan steals the show in this popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

M A R I N COUNTY Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Benissimo Ristorante & Bar Italian. $$. Hearty and flavorful food in authentic neighborhood-style Italian restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 18 Tamalpais Dr, Corte Madera. 415.927.2316.

Boca South American. $$$$$$$. Enjoy flavorful and rich regional fare in the rustic décor of an Argentinean ranch. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 340 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.833.0901.

Bubba’s Diner Homestyle American. $-$$. Comforting Momma-style food like fried green tomatoes, onion meatloaf and homey chickenfried steak with red-eye gravy in a restaurant lined with cookbooks and knickknacks. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun; breakfast and lunch, Tues. 566 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.459.6862.

Buckeye Roadhouse

Comforts Californian. $$. The Chinese chicken salad is beyond rapturous. Excellent celebrity sightings. Eat in or takeout. Breakfast and lunch daily. 335 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.454.9840.

Copita Tequileria y Comida Mexican. $$. California-inspired preparation of traditional Mexican fare, including spit-roasted chicken, homemade tamales and “eight-hour” carnitas. Some ingredients are sourced from the restaurant’s own organic garden. Lunch and dinner daily. 739 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.331.7400.

Frantoio Italian. $$-$$$. Perennial winner of SF Chron’s “100 Best,” Frantoio also produces all of its own olive oil. Dinner daily. 152 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.289.5777.

Hilltop 1892 American. $$-$$$$. Casual dining with panoramic Marin views and a California-cuisine take on such classic fare as steaks, fresh seafood and seasonal greens. Complete with custom cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; Sunday brunch. 850 Lamont Ave, Novato. 415.893.1892.

Marin Brewing Co Pub food. $-$$. Excellent soups, salads, pub grub and awardwinning pork-beer sausage. Lunch and dinner daily. 1809 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.4677. Nick’s Cove Seafood/ contemporary American. $$$$. Fresh from the bay oysters, upscale seafood, some steaks and a great burger. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 23240 State Route 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033.

Pier 15 American. $$. Fun, tucked-away old-fashioned spot overlooking hidden harbor. Great place for breakfast at a bar, too. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, SatSun. 15 Harbor St, San Rafael. 415.256.9121.

Pizzeria Picco Pizza. $-$$. The wood-fired oven keeps

things cozy, and the organic ingredients and produce make it all tasty. Lunch and dinner, Sat-Sun; dinner only, Mon-Fri. 316 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.8900.

Poggio Italian. $$-$$$. Truly transportive food, gives authentic flavor of the Old World. The cheaper way to travel Europe. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 777 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.7771.

Robata Grill & Sushi Japanese. $$. Mmm. With thick slices of fresh sashimi, Robata knows how to do it. The rolls are big winners. Lunch, MonFri; dinner daily. 591 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.381.8400.

Sorella Caffe Italian. $$. The embodiment of Fairfax casual, with delicious, high-quality food that lacks pretension. Dinner, TuesSun. 107 Bolinas Rd, Farifax. 415.258.4520. Station House Cafe American-California. $$. Innovative menu, fresh local seafood and range-fed meats. Outdoor dining; full bar. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Thurs-Mon. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1515.

N A P A COUNTY Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you can’t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.4870.

Boonfly Cafe California cuisine. $-$$. Extraordinary food in an extraordinary setting. Perfect pasta and mussels. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 4080 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.299.4900.

Bouchon French. $$$. A Keller brother creation with a distinctly Parisian bistro ambiance, offering French classics. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 6534 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.8037.

Celadon Global comfort food. $$. Relaxed sophistication in intimate neighborhood bistro setting by the creek. Superior wine list. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 500 Main St, Ste G, Napa. 707.254.9690.

Cindy Pawlycyn’s Wood Grill & Wine Bar American. $$-$$$. Classic American fare that stays up on current mainstays like crispy pork belly, braised short ribs and crab roll but doesn’t skimp on the burger. Long wine list, kids menu, patio and more. Lunch and dinner, WedSun. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700.

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

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French Laundry Definitive California Cuisine. $$$$. What else is there to say? Chef Thomas Keller’s institution is among the very best restuarants in the country. 6640 Washington St., Yountville. 707.944.2380.

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California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

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Gillwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

Miguel’s MexicanCalifornian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast,lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Save 20% on Dining

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch and dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.252.9250.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

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American. $$-$$$. A Marin County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless service, and a convivial atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, SatSun. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.331.2600.

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JANUARY 8 –14, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA COUNTY

wine, the best of which are the reds. 5110 Hwy. 128, Geyserville. Open daily, 10:30am–5pm. 707.433.1944.

D’Argenzio Winery

MARIN COUNTY

Much like the family-run, backstreet bodegas of the old country that the decor invokes. Sangiovese, Moscato di Fresco, and Randy Rhoads Cab. 1301 Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa. Daily 11am–5pm. $10 tasting fee. 707.280.4658.

Gamba Vineyards & Winery On Sundays, the vintage vinyl spins and the old vine Zin flows at this highly regarded but off-thebeaten track little cellar. 2912 Woolsey Road, Windsor. By appointment. 707.542.5892.

Karah Estate Vineyards Like a riddle bottled up in a mystery, it’s all but hidden in plain sight above the 101 freeway’s Cotati Grade. Impressive view; mixed bag of low-alcohol, low-priced Pinots from quirky winery. 1010 W. Railroad Ave., Cotati. Friday– Sunday 11am–5pm. $5 fee. 707.795-3030.

Matanzas Creek Winery Matanzas Creek Winery features a peaceful tasting room overlooking its famed acres of lavender. 6097 Bennett Valley Road, Santa Rosa. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. 707.528.6464.

Robert Rue Vineyard A new wave of Zin specialists helped keep small, old vineyards like this in production. Now, they’re making their own; refreshing Sauvignon Blanc, too. 1406 Wood Road, Fulton. Friday to Sunday, 10am–5pm, or by appointment. Tastings $5. 707.578.1601.

Selby Winery Regularly served at White House state dinners, Selby Chard has been through several administrations. 215 Center St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–5:30pm. 707.431.1288.

Stryker Sonoma Vineyards Off-thebeaten-path winery features beautiful views and spectacular

Bacchus & Venus A trendy place for beginners and tourists. Great place to learn the basics. 769 Bridgeway, Sausalito. Open daily, noon– 7pm. 415.331.2001. Point Reyes Vineyards The tasting room features many varietals but the main reason to go is for the sparkling wines. Open Saturday–Sunday, 11am–5pm. 12700 Hwy. 1, Point Reyes. 415.663.1011.

NAPA COUNTY Bennett Lane Winery The old trope “beer-drinking NASCAR fans vs. Chardonnaysipping highbrows” runs out of gas at a winery that sponsors an annual NASCAR race and has its own car, emblazoned with grapes. A Roman emperor who appreciated hearty vino as much as a good chariot race inspired Maximus White and Red “feasting wines.” 3340 Hwy. 128, Calistoga. 707.942.6684.

Domaine Carneros Inspired by Taittinger’s Château de la Marquetterie of Champagne, this house of premium sparkling wine is a hard-to-miss landmark on the Carneros Highway. Enjoy a private Balcony Package for special occasions or taste sparkling and still wines paired with artisan cheese and caviar with the masses. Luxury bubbly Le Rêve offers a bouquet of hoary yeast and crème brûlée that just slips away like a dream. 1240 Duhig Road (at Highway 12/121), Napa. Wine flights $15; also available by the glass or bottle. Open 10am–5:45pm. 800.716.2788.

Inglenook Vineyard What’s new at Inglenook? Very little. The iconic stone building, robed in green vines, appears exactly as it did in 1890. But that’s news, and all thanks to owner Francis Ford Coppola. Still living up to Gustave Niebaum’s dream of fine wine to rival France, the oncebeloved Inglenook is putting out the goods once again. 1991 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Daily, 10am–5pm. Reservations for tour and tasting ($50) recommended; none required for bistro and exhibits. 707.968.1161.

Monticello Vineyards Thomas Jefferson had no success growing wine grapes; happily, the Corley family has made a go of it. Although winetasting is not conducted in the handsome reproduction building itself, there’s a shaded picnic area adjacent. 4242 Big Ranch Rd., Napa. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. $15. 707.253.2802, ext. 18.

Nichelini Winery Take a joyride in the Napa backcountry and discover this rustic little winery that’s been in the family for generations. See the only Roma n wine press in the Western Hemisphere. 2950 Sage Canyon Road, St. Helena. Saturday and Sunday, 10am– 5pm. No fee. 707.963.0717.

Patz & Hall In a Napa business park, this highlyregarded brand’s tasting room may look corporate-slick, but the spotlight is on the dirt farmers who make it all happen. Pinot and Chardonnay. 851 Napa Valley Corporate Way, Ste. A, Napa. Wednesday– Sunday, 10am–4pm. Seated tastings 10:30am, 1pm and 3pm. Tasting fee, $20–$40. 707.265.7700.

Taste at Oxbow Stylish setting across from Oxbow Market offers a roster of popular flavors from Waterstone Wines. 708 First St., Napa. Generally, from noon to 6 or 7pm. Tasting fee $15. 707.265.9600.

Try T ry O Our ur Legendary Legendary Pizzas! Pizzzas! Follow the flying fence to the sign of the bee BY JAMES KNIGHT

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espite a steady drumbeat of press insisting that Riesling is a dry, dry, dry wine, I’m told that the most common remark among visitors to this tasting room is surprise that it is not always sweet. This after decades of well-intentioned incantations against the enduring infamy of cheap Liebfraumilch. But instead of despairing, perhaps it’s time to stop chanting that tune and accept that when the gods made Riesling, they gave it the noble stuffing to make both excellent sweet and dry wines. Meadowcroft has got your palate covered either way, and bless ’em for that.

All three in the current Riesling lineup are sourced from Borden Ranch in Lodi. Neither brisk with acidity nor deeply aromatic, they’ve got their own charms—with the 2011 Reserve Riesling ($26), it’s spicy orange tea aromatics and dry pear and peach juice flavors; chamomile tea, Sweet Tarts for the 2012 Thomas Henry Riesling ($18), named for winemaker Tom Meadowcroft’s father. The unfashionably sweet treat is the 2011 Foyt Riesling ($32), made for the family of four-time Indy 500 winner A. J. Foyt, but even this is really half-dry. The tasting room inhabits a freestanding shack at the entrance to Cornerstone Sonoma, the diverting complex of sculpture gardens and antiquey-boutiquey shops whose signature feature was once a big, blue tree. Today, look for plastic snowmen. The atmosphere is casual, there’s stuff to buy and a big, sleeping dog to step around, and a comfortably furnished deck upon which to lounge. At first sombre with mulchy notes shrouding pie-crust aromas, the 2011 Bonneau Vineyard Sonoma County Chardonnay ($26) brightens up for a rich, butterscotchy finish. Reds begin with a stewed Pinot and a rustic Sangiovese, picking up a bit at the 2011 Knight’s Valley Zinfandel ($28), a juicy and round enough claret. Meadowcroft’s main event is the 2010 Mt. Veeder Estate Cabernet Sauvignon ($75). Like a lot of producers’ top Cabs, however, it displays obvious, promising quality with its dusty and well-knit finish and somewhat reduced, young and weedy aromas, but is not currently as much fun as the runner-up 2010 Oak Knoll Cabernet Sauvignon ($50), with its plush, cranberry-black cherry liqueur flavors. As for tawny hue and treacly, the chocolate liqueur smack of the port-style “All She Wrote� Cabernet ($36 for 500 milliliters) is just as delicious and sweet as it’s supposed to be. Meadowcroft Wines, 23574 Hwy. 121, Sonoma. Daily, 11am–5pm. Tasting fee, $5–$10. 707.934.4090.

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Meadowcroft Wines

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16

CULTURE

Crush

The week’s events: a selective guide

P E TA L U M A

South Central Rain

For a relatively underground rapper from Los Angeles, Nipsey Hussle has covered a lot of ground in the industry. His 2008 mixtape, Bullets Ain’t Got No Name, resulted in features with Drake and Snoop Dogg and a nod in XXL magazine. Unfortunately, his major-label Epic Records debut achieved “infinitely shelved” status, and now Mr. Hussle hustles for himself. In October, his mixtape Crenshaw was available in a limited edition of 1,000 copies, priced at $100 each. Twenty-four hours later, he’d sold them all—100 of them to Jay-Z. Needless to say, the buzz on this guy is huge. Catch him on Friday, Jan. 10, at the Phoenix Theater. 201 E. Washington St., Petaluma. 8pm. $20. 707.762.3565.

N A PA

Oui, Oui If the words “French Cinema” don’t make you salivate with anticipation, read no further. But if you’re one of the many who can’t get enough of the country’s pioneering styles, daring scripts and risqué plot twists, then settle in for three days of Francophile heaven at Jarvis Conservatory’s French Film Celebration. On offer are Edouard Deluc’s Mariage à Mendoza, about two brothers on a road trip; Au Galop, directed by LouisDo de Lencquesaing, about a torrid affair; Samuel Collardey’s Comme un Lion, about a teenage footballer; and Sandrine Bonnaire’s J’Enrage de Son Absence, about an awkward family reunion. Films run Thursday–Friday, Jan. 9–11, at

PRETTY PURDIE Funk drum legend Bernard Purdie plays with Grant Green, Jr. at Sweetwater Music Hall on Jan. 11. See Concerts, p21.

the Jarvis Conservatory. 1711 Main St., Napa. Times vary. $10. 707.255.5445.

M I L L VA L L E Y

Devotion San Francisco is lucky enough to have the St. John Coltrane African Orthodox Church, where every Sunday, devotees of Coltrane’s probing form of spiritual jazz gather to honor his music and spirit. Mill Valley, however, gets a little slice of Coltrane this week with Chicago’s J. Hanrahan Quartet performing the landmark album A Love Supreme in its entirety. Now together for over 20 years, Hanrahan’s quartet knows the album better than a saxophonist knows his spit valve; a second set promises Coltrane standards, while a third set is the audience’s choice. Sounds like a sermon from the mount, if you ask me; be there on Sunday, Jan. 12, at Sweetwater Music Hall. 19 Corte Madera Ave., Mill Valley. 7pm. $12–$14. 415.388.1100.

R O H N E R T PA R K

Behold the Pipa The pipa is a four-stringed instrument looking somewhat like a lute, or an oud, and though you’ve likely never heard of the pipa, the stunning musician Wu Man plays the hell out of it. As a member of Yo-Yo Ma’s Silk Road Ensemble, Wu Man brings the traditional Chinese pipa to worldwide audiences with elegance and skill—she was named “Instrumentalist of the Year” at the 2013 Musical America awards. In an American premiere, the Santa Rosa Symphony performs Zhao Jiping’s Concerto for Pipa and Orchestra alongside Mozart’s Symphony no. 15 and Beethoven’s “Pastorale Symphony” on Saturday, Jan. 11, at the Green Music Center. 1801 E. Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park. 8pm. $20–$80. 707.546.8742.

—Gabe Meline

WHAT DREAMS MAY COME Chang-Rae Lee appears as part of Copperfield’s ‘Lit Nights’ series.

Future Days

Chang-Rae Lee’s ‘On Such a Full Sea’ reflects modern society as futuristic dystopia BY LEILANI CLARK

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hang-Rae Lee’s latest novel may take place sometime in the future, in a world slightly more sinister than the world we inhabit now, but, bucking the Zeitgeist, there aren’t any zombies coming for dinner in On Such a Full Sea. Instead, the latest book by the Pulitzer Prize finalist and one of The New Yorker’s “20 Writers for the 21st century” has given us an aching, somber and beautifully written

meditation on community, identity, class and love—with just a hint of cannibalism. Similar to Cormac McCarthy’s The Road and Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower, Lee’s story centers around a protagonist who goes on a journey through a changed world in which the social norms and rules no longer apply, and where the human capacity for violence has run amok. ChangRae Lee appears at Copperfield’s Petaluma on Jan. 11. On Such a Full Sea follows the journey of Fan, a 16-year-old resident of B-Mor who leaves her orderly and sheltered community

for the “open counties,” where basic needs are met but not much else. It’s a hero’s journey through a chillingly prescient future world; Fan’s departure to search for her disappeared boyfriend Reg triggers hairline cracks in B-Mor’s complacent society, revealing how thin the line between prosperity and dissolution can be. Told by a collective narrator, the “we” of B-Mor, the story digs into the nuances of Fan’s journey and the ways her decision inspires those she left behind. B-Mor is a walled community, built over the ruins of what was “once known as Baltimore,” which

functions as a hive for a passive worker society of descendants of a people who were transported over from Xixu City in China years before—pushed out of their home after the water was fouled by farms, factories, power plants and mining operations into something beyond “all methods of treatment.” B-Mor serves as one layer of a three-pronged society segregated by class status, with “open counties” residents at the bottom and the “Charters,” an exalted, wealthy, pampered and hypercompetitive society, at the top. (For further illustration, just look at the lifestyles of any of the current 1%.) Reading Lee’s book brings to mind an anthropological study I was assigned to read in college. “Body Ritual of the Nacirema” details the odd and ridiculous behaviors of a cultural tribe that seems far removed from our own. It’s only at the end that you realize Nacirema is “American” spelled backwards. Some of the behaviors of the B-Mor people seem strange, until the reader realizes that many of these behaviors and perversities are already common to the Western experience. A mindless consumption of media; the desire for highly curated temperature- and soundmodulated microenvironments (shopping centers, strip malls, department stores), where consumption is indulged with languid impassivity; sex trafficking; mass shootings of innocents—the list goes on. Set in the future, Lee’s new book acts as a warning and a parable for what we might be, could be and already are, and the flashes of love, friendship, community and small heroic acts that we all need to employ to survive in a world gone mad. Chang-Rae Lee appears Saturday, Jan. 11, at Copperfield’s Books. 140 Kentucky St., Petaluma. 7pm. 707.762.0563.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 8–14, 2014 | BOH EMI A N.COM

David Burnett

Arts Ideas

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Stage

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JANUARY 8 –14, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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GLASS & SASS Raena Jones and Matthew T. Witthaus in ‘Taste.’

Swirling Script ‘Taste’ adapts ‘Pygmalion’ for wine country BY DAVID TEMPLETON

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ast year, actor-director Jacqueline Wells learned that the Raven Players were looking for directors, specifically encouraging female directors. After applying and interviewing, Wells was offered local playwright Jody Gehrman’s Taste, which was set for its debut staging at the Raven Performing Arts Theater.

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Dysphunctional Species

Wishing you health and joy in the New Year! We are happy to announce the new location of our gallery—456 10th Street, Santa Rosa, CA. Please check our website or call for our opening date and new hours of operation. 707.781.7070 calabigallery.com

“They sent me an email saying that because I’d expressed interest in directing new works, they wanted me to direct Taste,” Wells recalls. “And I wrote back, ‘Great! I can’t wait to read it!’ And luckily,” she laughs, “I liked it!” Putting a modern, wine country spin on George Bernard Shaw’s Pygmalion, itself the inspiration for the musical My Fair Lady, Taste is the story of a debt-ridden Sonoma County winery whose owner has died. On the eve of an

all-important winetasting competition, the deceased owner’s niece, Astrid (played by Raena Jones), arrives to inform the staff (Nick Charles, Saskia Baur and Matthew T. Witthaus) that she has inherited the winery and plans to sell it. A New York activist hoping to use the winery money to build a shelter for homeless teens, Astrid— who knows nothing about wine and is regrettably fashionchallenged—agrees to let the winery’s head winemaker, Joe (Witthaus), try to transform her into an elegant, make-believe Duchess, whose presence at the upcoming gala will increase the price tag of the winery. And wine isn’t the only thing that ferments as Astrid and Joe move from a not so cordial relationship into a something a bit steamier. “It’s definitely a romantic comedy,” says Wells, who admits that the trickiest part of directing Taste is in accurately representing the environment of a Sonoma County winery. “Doing a wine play in wine country has its challenges,” she laughs. “I knew we would have to make sure the actors did things correctly. But not all of the actors were familiar with how to properly hold a wine glass or how to sip and swirl and spit. They had to learn how to pronounce certain wine industry words. “We had experts come in and work with the cast,” Wells adds, “and we actually practiced spitting— using fake wine and real wine.” Wells says that she has especially enjoyed working with Gehrman, best known for her popular YA novels (Audrey’s Guide to Witchcraft, Babe in Boyland), but also an experienced playwright. “I’ve had a dream playwright and a dream cast,” she says. “Not only are they all excellent actors, but the chemistry between us all has been fantastic. I think audiences are going to see that.” ‘Taste’ runs Thursday–Sunday, Jan. 10– Jan. 19 at the Raven Performing Arts Theater. 115 North St., Healdsburg. Thursday–Saturday at 8pm; 2pm matinees on Sunday. $15. 707.433.6335.

1 8 E C H O Sonoma County’s Original Roadhouse Tavern

Great Food & Live Music Thur Jan 9 118'4˜LhENUGN2/˜FEx

Karaoke Party with Razor Karaoke Fri Jan 10 118'4˜LhENUGN2/˜FEx

Trailgatorz BYE GOOD It’s all about the mustache in Joaquin Phoenix’s performance.

Incarnation

‘Her’ pits Joaquin Phoenix against the romance of technology BY RICHARD VON BUSACK reetings from future Los Angeles! In Her, director-writer Spike Jonze digitally merges that city with today’s Shanghai. It’s rarely looked better—spread up and out, and crowded but prosperous.

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Theodore (Joaquin Phoenix) is a love-letter writer at BeautifulHandwrittenLetters.com, his heart aching as he sits in an office lined with glowing glass panels. Theodore composes little notes for happy couples, and tries to avoid signing the finishing papers on his divorce. One day, he learns of a new OS, a system essentially like the super-powered granddaughter of Siri. The bubbling, flirtatious voice on his pocket-sized computer calls itself Samantha. Theodore has found a new friend, and more. There are a thousand ways this slip of an idea could have gone wrong. Essential to the success of the romance is Scarlett Johansson’s voice acting. Could it be that the allure of the actress goes so deep that even her voice is rich with it? The other women in the film can’t live up to this invisible imago, even a drabbed-down Amy Adams. Olivia Wilde, as Theodore’s highly demanding date, is a classic example of how a woman can be so beautiful that she’s almost ugly. Just as Samantha is all voice, Rooney Mara, seen in flashback, is the voiceless, moody ex-wife Theodore can hardly bear to think about. But Samantha isn’t a perfect alternative to other women. She pushes back, withdraws, has flares of temper. This unlikely love story stays believable into a third act, as Samantha grows in strength and consciousness. The film also has a smooth religious side to it, bearing a subtle metaphor about love as enlightenment; it’s irresistible with its living, compassionate computers, and its fields of skyscrapers glowing with Pacific sunlight. You sort of ache for wanting it to come true. ‘Her’ is playing in select theaters.

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NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JANUARY 8 –14, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Music

A Sebastopol Community Cultural Center and Cumulus Presents Production Cloud Moss’ 60th birthday

Charity Benefit Concert Saturday, January 25

All proceeds to benefit Redwood Empire Food Bank and Sebastopol Community Cultural Center

Featuring Dave Alvin (trio), Jimmy Lafave (band), Wavy Gravy, Special Guest Nina Gerber, Jim (Mr. Music) & The Corbettes, Teresa Tudury and Analy High School Vocal Ensemble (singing doo-wop) Concert begins at 7pm (6pm doors) includes late night dance set Pre-concert reception 4pm, Center Annex, includes food, entertainment & libations Ticket Prices: Victrola $100 • Gramophone $78 • Vintage $60 Juke Box $45 (reception only) • Vinyl $33.33

SONOMA WEST

Sponsored in part by:

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I M E S

&

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E W S

Kate Wolf Music Festival

Tickets and Info: cumuluspresents.com, seb.org or 707-823-1511

NONE MORE BLUE? Jonny Lang hopes you like his new direction.

Long Way Home Jonny Lang’s blues journey

BY L. KENT WOLGAMOTT

Music / Events

Lydia’s Organics

.ERĈĀTQĈ Ancient Future World Fusion Concert Strains of flamenco, ancient Celtic music, and Indian raga will emanate from this improvisatory duet featuring world guitar pioneer Matthew Montfort accompanied by renowned Indian tabla virtuoso Vishal Nagar!

.ERĈTQĈĀSliding Scale

Reggae Benefit Concert *SVą1EOIXLI,SQIPIWW7QMPIĆ Featuring Jamaican Recording Artist Ragga Lox with La Luna, I-Triniti and 7IPIGXE6IFIP! * AN ALL AGES ~ ALCOHOL FREE EVENT *

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PURCHASE TICKETS ONLINE AT W W W.LYDIASORGANICS.COM /.$%08&--#-7%t1&5"-6."t$"

707.792 . 530 0

T

here are no blues songs on Fight for My Soul, Jonny Lang’s first album in seven years.

Instead, it’s a mix of pop, rock and contemporary R&B that at times sounds more influenced by Michael Jackson than Buddy Guy. “When I was younger, I thought, ‘I’ll always be a blues guy, so to speak,’” Lang says. “Things just change. You grow up. The songs I write myself have always been different from what people might expect, different from a guitarcentric rockin’ blues record. But I’m sure some people are going to say, ‘Dude, where are all the blues songs and guitar solos?’” Lyrically, Lang’s making a similar jump, expressed in “Blew Up

(The House),” a catchy stomp about a guy who’s hit bottom and is starting fresh. That’s not entirely autobiographical, but Lang says it captures something about him. “The content is kind of all over the place, from being autobiographical to some stories that are completely fiction that get across a concept or just abstract things,” he said. “There’s a lot of me in it.” Lang and wife Haylie, whom he married in 2001, have four children and are now at home in Southern California, where Lang puts a priority on being a husband and father rather than living anything resembling a wild life. “All that has served to tame me,” he says. “It’s really helped me become a better person and maybe not being so self-destructive.’ Lang freely confesses that he headed for excess in the past, when he was a teenager living out the rock and roll dream. A native of North Dakota, Lang started playing guitar at 12, released his first album at 14, got signed to A&M Records and put out his major label debut Lie to Me in 1997—when he was all of 16. That record went multiplatinum and Lang was a young star, touring with his heroes, like the Rolling Stones and Buddy Guy, and playing a White House gig for President Clinton in 1999. Now, he says, he’s bringing his most personal music to fans who have followed him for 16 years the best way he knows how—by playing live shows. Rest assured, Lang will be doing some of his old songs and cranking up the guitar at the shows as well. “We’re going to do our best to try to span the years and play a little of each era,” he said. “If they let us, we’ll go two hours or more. You can cover a lot in that amount of time. If we have to go shorter than that, it gets a little more difficult. But we’ll try to cover everything.” Jonny Lang plays Sunday, Jan. 12, at the Uptown Theatre. 1350 Third St., Napa. 8pm. $45–$55. 707.259.0123.

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Nipsey Hussle Rapper appearing with TeeFLii, Kool John, Willie Joe, City Shawn Jan 10, 8pm. $20. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

John McCutcheon Folk troubadour just as adept at the guitar and hammered dulcimer as he is with a lyric. Jan 13, 7pm. $22. Sebastiani Theater, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.2020.

Santa Rosa Symphony “East-West Musical Dialogue� features Wu Man on pipa. Jan 11, 8pm, Jan 12, 3pm and Jan 13, 8pm. $20-$80. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Al Stewart Will 2014 be the “Year of the Cat� for this ‘70s folk rocker? Jan 11, 7:30pm. $20$58. Andrews Hall, Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

MARIN COUNTY Celly Cel Vallejo rapper whose ‘Killa Kali’ album still reverberates in the Crest. Jan 10, 9:30pm. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Grant Green Jr & Bernard Purdie Son of famed jazz guitarist Grant Green teams up with one of the most-sampled funk drummers in history. Jan 11, 9pm. $17-$20. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

‘A Love Supreme’ Chicago jazz group J Hanrahan Quartet performs the greatest jazz record ever made from start to finish. Jan 12, 7pm. $12$14. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

NAPA COUNTY Johnny Lang Blues singer started garnering critical acclaim at age 13. Honor By August opens. Jan 12, 8pm. $45-$55. Uptown

Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Hotel Healdsburg

Clubs & Venues

Jasper O’Farrell’s

SONOMA COUNTY A’Roma Roasters Jan 10, Collaboration. Jan 11, Gabe Gladstein. 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Andrews Hall Jan 11, Al Stewart. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

Aqus Cafe Jan 10, Gabe Gladstein. Jan 11, the Stringrays. Jan 12, Jazz Roots Band. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Center Jan 10, Trio Nebuli, Plectrum Ensemble, River Song, Dixie Giants. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Dry Creek Kitchen Jan 13, Chris Amberger & Randy Vincent. Jan 14, Susan Sutton & Piro Patton. 317 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.0330.

Epicurean Connection Jan 12, Jen Tucker. 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

French Garden Jan 10, Haute Flash. Jan 11, Honey B & the Pollinators. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Gaia’s Garden Jan 8, French Session. Jan 11, the Acoustamatics. Jan 12, Haute Flash Quartet. Jan 15, Klezmer Creek. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Glaser Center Jan 11, Robin Rogers’ Festival of Friends. 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Green Music Center Jan 11-13, Santa Rosa Symphony: East-West Dialogue. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Heritage Public House Jan 11, the Grain. 1901 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

Hopmonk Sebastopol Jan 8, Ini. Jan 10, Ill Gates. Jan 11, Kingsborough, Roem & the

Jan 11, Susan Sutton. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

21 Monday ~ Open Mic Night with Austin DeLone 7:30pm 7KXU-DQĂŁSP

Jesse Brewster & Stefanie Keys )UL-DQĂŁSP

Anthony B with IrieFuse

Jan 10, DJ PhG. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

6DW-DQĂŁSP

Grant Green Jr. with Bernard Purdie

Lagunitas Tap Room

6XQ-DQĂŁSP

Jan 8, Junk Parlor. Jan 9, HOTS Acoustic. Jan 10, Hand Me Down. Jan 11, Vintage Grass. Jan 12, Jason Bodlovich. Jan 15, Rusty Evans. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Mavericks Jan 11, Paulie’s Garage, Buck Nickels & Loose Change. 397 Aviation Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.765.2515.

Monroe Dance Hall Jan 11, Circles n’ Squares Hoedown. 1400 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.529.5450.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Jan 10, Hellhounds. Wed, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

From Chicago:

The J. Hanrahan Quartet performing John Coltrane's

"A Love Supreme" 7XH-DQĂŁSP

Lee Gallagher and the Hallelujah & New American Farmers :HG-DQĂŁSP

Guitar Legend Albert Lee with The Bootleg Honeys )UL-DQĂŁSP

Stu Allen & Mars Hotel 6DW-DQĂŁSPĂŁ[*UDPP\:LQQHU

Ike Stubblefield Trio

with Eddie Roberts of New Mastersounds

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave Mill Valley CafĂŠ 415.388.1700 | Box Office 415.388.3850

Mystic Theatre Jan 9, Young Dubliners, Jerry Hannan. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Phoenix Theater Jan 10, Nipsey Hussle, TeeFLii, Kool John, Willie Joe, City Shawn. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Quincy’s Jan 10, Nothing to Lose. 6590 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park. 707.585.1079.

Redwood Cafe Jan 11, Planet Waves. Thurs, Open Mic. Second Friday of every month, J&H Big Band. Second Sunday of every month, trad Irish. Second Tuesday of every month, 9pm, Barnburners Poetry Slam. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub

DON’T FORGET‌WE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

McNear’s Dining House "REAKFASTs,UNCHs$INNER 4(52s0-$//23s CELTIC ROCK

YOUNG DUBLINERS &2)s0-$//23s!,,!'%3

THE TAHOE ADVENTURE FILM FESTIVAL 3!4s0-$//23s BLUES/ROCK

ROY ROGERS & THE DELTA RHYTHM KINGS PLUS SPECIAL GUEST CARLOS REYES 3!4s7PM DOORSs!,,!'%3 JAZZ

LAVAY SMITH AND HER

RED HOT SKILLET LICKERS &2)s0-$//23s REGGAE/WORLD MUSIC

Jan 10, the Rains. Jan 11, Megan McLaughlin. Sun, Evening Jazz with Gary Johnson. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

IRATION

AUTOMATIC WINTER TOUR WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

NATURAL VIBRATIONS AND THE MOVEMENT .O#HILDREN5NDERTO!LL!GES3HOWS 0ETALUMA"LVD 0ETALUMA

Sebastiani Theatre Jan 13, John McCutcheon. 476 First St E, Sonoma. ) 707.996.9756.

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 8–14, 2014 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

revival, Girls & Boys. Jan 15, Dub Specialists. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment with Jacques & Guac. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

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NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JANUARY 8 –14, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Fireside Dining 7 Days a Week

DIN N E R & A SHOW Fri Dance Party! Jan 10 STOMPY JONES The Coolest Swing 8:00

STEFANIE KEYS Jan 11 Rockin’ Originals/ Americana Sat

8:00

Guitar Shootout Jan 12 TERRY HAGGERTY AND MOBY GRAPE’S JERRY MILLER 6:00 Fri

It’s Party Time! Jan 17 THE ED EARLEY BAND Funky Grooves 8:00 / No Cover Sat

John’s Big Birthday Bash Jan 18 DOUG ADAMZ & BRAVO! Mr Americana 8:00 Austin’s Legendary

Jan 19 GREEZY WHEELS 4:00 / No Cover

Fri

Jan 24

BUCK NICKELS AND

LOOSE CHANGE

New Country Music 8:00 Sat

Jan 25

Wed, North Bay Blues Revue. Thurs, Casa Rasta. Sun, Church on Sundays. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Sunflower Center

Sun

Sun

Society: Culture House

Put on Your Dancin’ Boots LONE STAR RETROBATES Roadhouse/Western Swing 8:00 Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Jan 10, Ancient Future. Jan 11, Ragga Lox, La Lune, I-Triniti, Selecta Rebel. 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Jan 11, George Winston. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Dance Palace Jan 10, Van der Maaten & friends. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Fenix Jan 10, Delta Wires. Jan 11, Zydeco Flames. Jan 12, Amy Hogan. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

George’s Nightclub Jan 10, Tribe of the Red Horse, Pretending. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Hopmonk Novato

Stefanie Keys. Jan 12, Terry Haggerty & Jerry Miller. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sleeping Lady Jan 10, Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs. Jan 12, Tracy Blackman. Sat, Uke Jam. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. Second Wednesday of every month, Finger-Style Guitar Showcase. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smiley’s Wed, Larry’s karaoke. Sun, open mic. Mon, reggae. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Studio 55 Marin Jan 11, Misner & Smith. Jan 12, the Special Consensus. 1455 E Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.

Sweetwater Music Hall Jan 9, Jesse Brewster & Stefanie Keys. Jan 10, Anthony B, IrieFuse. Jan 11, Grant Green Jr, Bernard Purdie. Jan 12, J Hanrahan Quartet performs John Coltrane’s “A Love Supreme”. Jan 14, 8pm, Lee Gallagher & the Hallelujah, New American Farmers. Jan 15, Albert Lee. Mon, Open Mic. Every other Wednesday, Wednesday Night Live. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads Thurs, Tiny Television, First Mate Quartet. Sat, Acacia. Sun, Midnight North, Chris Hague. Jan 14, American Jubilee. Wed, Terrapin Family Band, Rusty String Express. Fri, 4:20 Happy Hour with live music. Fri, Brian Lesh & Ross James. Fri, Walking Spanish. Sun, Terrapin Family Band. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

NAPA COUNTY Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Wed, Jumpstart. Sun, DJ Night. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Napa Valley Opera House Second Tuesday of every month, Cafe Theatre Comedy Series. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Silo’s Jan 10, Breakway Patriot, Far From Ashlie. Jan 11, Sandy & Richard Riccardi. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre Jan 12, Johnny Lang. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Jan 9, Dustbowl Revival. Jan 10, Pop Fiction. Jan 11, Midnight Sun Massive. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Wed, Jan 8 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 10:15am– SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE 12:45pm Youth and Family

19 Broadway Club 707.829.7300 70 7. 829 . 7 3 0 0 S E B AS T OP OL 230 PETALUMA AVE 230 P E TA L U M A A V E | SEBASTOPOL

OPEN O P E N MIC M I C NIGHT NIGHT

Thur, Jan 9 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–10pm CIRCLES N’ SQUARES Square Dance Club

EVERY T EVERY TUES UES A AT T7 7PM PM W WITH ITH E EVAN VAN WED W ED JJAN AN 8

Fri, Jan 10 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7:30–10:30pm CALIFORNIA BALLROOM DANCE

FRI F RI JJAN AN 10 10

Sat, Jan 11 10:15am– 12:45pm 7–11pm

8:30–9:30am Jazzercise SCOTTISH CHALLENGE DANCE with Gary Thomas Circle N’ Squares HOEDOWN

Sun, Jan 12 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 5–9:25pm Steve Luther DJ COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS AND DANCING Mon, Jan 13 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pmJazzercise 7–9:25pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, Jan 14 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7:30–9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

DUBSTEP D UBS TEP | WEST WES T COAST COA S T | GLITCH G L I TC H

BR AINSTORM W BRAINSTORM WITH ITH IN INII $$5/DOORS 5/ DOORS 110PM/21+ 0PM /21+

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IILL. LL. GATES GATES

$15/DOORS $ 15/ DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM /21+

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Jan 8, On the Spot. Jan 9, Victor Little’s Big Hit. Jan 10, Celly Cel. Jan 11, Soul Jah Family Band. Jan 15, Alphabet Soup. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Osteria Divino Jan 8, Dick Fregulia’s Bill Evans Tribute Trio. Jan 9, Passion Habanera. Jan 10, Grant Levin Trio. Jan 11, Joan Getz Quartet. Jan 12, David Sturdevant & John Stafford. Jan 14, Norris Clement. Jan 15, Jonathan Poretz. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Panama Hotel Restaurant Jan 8, Lorin Rowan. Jan 9, Wanda Stafford. Jan 14, James Moseley. Jan 15, M-Tet. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Peri’s Silver Dollar Jan 8, Liv Gibson Band. Jan 10, Pocket Change. Jan 11, Feather Witch. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio Jan 10, Stompy Jones. Jan 11,

San Francisco’s City Guide

Sasha Go Hard Chicago rapper who came up with Chief Keef leads allfemale MC lineup. Jan 9 at the New Parish.

Charlie Murphy’s Acid Trip Chappelle cohort and standup comedian brings national tour to the jazz club. Jan 9 at Yoshi’s Oakland.

Tennis Husband-and-wife duo with fashion sense direct from the Regan era. Jan 10 at the Bottom of the Hill.

Yacht Part of a special 10-year anniversary seies at the storied venue. Jan 10 at the Rickshaw Stop.

Benga His 2008 album “Diary of an Afro Warrior” remains a landmark release in modern dubstep. Jan 11 at Mezzanine.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

Cumulus Presents & Sebastopol Community Cultural Center

The one, the only, Mister‌

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David Lindley

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Also Coming Soon Poor Man’s Whiskey (night of Allman Brothers Band music) February 15th Tim O’Brien & Darrell Scott – March 1st R. Carlos Nakai with Will Clipman – March 22nd

Celtic Fiddle Festival (featuring Kevin Burke, Christian LemaÎtre, and AndrÊ Brunet) – April 11th Greg Brown – April 26th

Tickets and Information: www.seb.org or 707-823-1511

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24

Arts Events Galleries RECEPTIONS Jan 12 Marin Society of Artists, Jan 12-Feb 1, “Passages,” nonjuried exhibit by MSA members. 2pm. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.454.9561.

SONOMA COUNTY Charles M Schulz Museum Through Feb 3, “Play Things: Toys in Peanuts,” a nostalgic journey through popular toys in the Peanuts comic strip. Through Mar 2, “School Projects,” follow the Peanuts gang as they struggle through a typical school year with original comic strips. Through Apr 27, “Starry, Starry Night,” feautring Peanuts characters under the night sky. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Fulton Art Depot Sundays, 1pm, through Jan 26, “A Month of Sundays,” former chicken slaughterhouse now an art depot. 1200 River Rd, Fulton.

Graton Gallery Through Jan 12, “New Watercolors,” paintings by Sally Baker. Jan 14-Feb 24, “Invitational Exhibition,” fine art by North California painters, printmakers and sculptors. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. TuesSun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

History Center Through Feb 6, “Sculpture Trail,” outdoor exhibit with sculptures along Cloverdale Boulevard and Geyserville Avenue changing every nine months. 215 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale.

Redwood Cafe Through Jan 14, “Tracing History in Her Art,” work by Pat Morgenthaler. Jan 14-Mar 11, Sandra Jill Anfang presents acrylic paintings and collage. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Sonoma County Museum Through Jan 12, “Photography in Mexico,” from the collection of the SF MOMA. Through Jun 1, “Precious Cargo,” exhibition of California Indian cradle baskets. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Mountain Village Event Center Through Jan 20, “Cardboard Currency,” found-art pieces by Nick Mancillas. 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Mar 2, “Site & Senses,” the Architecture of Aidlin Darling Design. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

MARIN COUNTY Falkirk Cultural Center Through Mar 8, “Artisans,” emerging and internationally known artists. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

Gallery Route One Through Jan 12, “MixUp,” paintings by Will Thoms. Salon, Jan 12, 4pm. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Community Foundation Through Jan 24, “Transmissions,” work by 30 artists from around the country. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Marin MOCA Through Jan 12, “The Human Experience,” work by Ning Mercer. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

NAPA COUNTY di Rosa Through Feb 2, “Beatnik Meteors,” collaborative sculptures by regional artists. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

Downtown Napa Through Jan 1, “Metamorphosis,” outdoor sculpture exhibit with selfguided tour. Main and Third streets, Napa.

Comedy Adult Content Hosted by Helen Pachynski. Second Fri of every month, 9pm. $4. Gaia’s Garden, 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Comedy Night Second Thurs of every month, 8pm. $7. Guayakí Maté Bar, 6782 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.6644.

Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-and-comers. Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Dance Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium Jan 12, 4pm, Love2Dance. $18$24. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael 415.499.6800.

Marin Society of Artists Jan 12-Feb 1, “Passages,” non-juried exhibit by MSA members. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. Mon-Thurs, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 415.454.9561.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Jan 23, “Member Show,” featuring sculpture, paintings, photography and more. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10

Events Bay Area World Guitar Show Instrument experts from all over the world. Jan 11-12, 10am. $20. Marin Center Exhibit Hall, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Capt’n Jack Spareribs Pirate comedian in a children’s

show. Jan 12, 11:30am. $8. Kanbar Center for the Performing Arts, Osher Marin JCC, 200 No San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Center Literary Cafe Meeting of poets, writers and artists with rotating speakers and readings. Second Wed of every month, 7-9pm. Healdsburg Senior Center, 133 Matheson St, Healdsburg.

Game Tournaments Various card and role-playing games including Yu-Gi-Oh, Dungeons and Dragons and Magic: The Gathering. Mon-Thurs-Sun. Outer Planes Comics and Games, 526 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.546.2000.

Learning Through Art Program for fourth and fifth graders to visually explore art through their own interpretations. Second Sat of every month-noon. Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Pelican Inn, 10 Pacific Way, Muir Beach, RSVP. 415.331.0100.

Film French Film Celebration Jan 9, “Mariage a Mendoza”; Jan 10, “Au Galop”; Jan 11, “Comme un Lion,” “J’enrage de son Absence.” Times vary. Jan 9-11. $10. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Tahoe Adventure Film Festival Skiing, snowboarding, surfing, kayaking and other extreme sports highlighted on the big screen. Jan 10, 7:30pm. $15. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Food & Drink

Public Star Party

Appetizer Showcase

Three main telescopes plus others set up for viewing. Second Sat of every month, 9pm. $3. Robert Ferguson Observatory, Sugarloaf Ridge State Park, 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood. 707.833.6979.

Enter an appetizer for a chance to win wine and chocolate. Jan 11, 4pm. Robert Rue Vineyard, 1406 Wood Road, Fulton. 707.578.1601.

Puppets, Song & Story

One-hour dance lessons followed by a special threecourse menu created by chef Aaron Wright. Second Mon of every month. $40. Lark Creek Inn, 234 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur.

Family program presented live. Jan 12, 1pm. $7-$10. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

San Rafael Art Walk Second Fri monthly, 5 to 8, galleries and retailers host artists and artwork, receptions and entertainment. Second Fri of every month, 6-8pm. Downtown San Rafael, Fifth and A streets, San Rafael.

Solar Viewing Safely observe the sun through a solar telescope. Second Sat of every month-noon. Free. Robert Ferguson Observatory, Sugarloaf Ridge State Park, 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood. 707.833.6979.

Field Trips Marin Moonshiners Hike Monthly three-mile hike to experience sunset, moonrise, picnic and spectacular views. Pack your own picnic. Second Tues monthly at 7:30. $15.

Ballroom & Dining Room

French Garden Farm Market Enjoy produce from restaurant’s farm, along with freshly baked breads and pastries from their kitchen. Every Sun, 10 to 2. Free. French Garden, 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Harvest Market Selling local and seasonal fruit, flowers, vegetables and eggs. Sat, 9am-1pm. Harvest Market, 19996 Seventh St E, Sonoma. 707.996.0712.

Santa Rosa Original Certified Farmers Market Sat, 9am-1pm and Wed, 9am1pm. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

Sebastopol Farmers Market Local produce, meat and artisan goods. Sun, 10am1:30pm. Sebastopol Plaza, McKinley St, Sebastopol.

Totally Truckin’ Thursdays Four food trucks park in the O’Reilly parking lot, provide you with local goodness and donate 10 percent of sales to a monthly selected nonprofit. Thurs. O’Reilly & Associates, 1005 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. 707.827.7190.

West End Wednesdays West End merchants offer wine, coffee and food tastings. Wed, 5-7pm. Free. Downtown Napa, First Street and Town Center, Napa.

For Kids Bay Area Discovery Museum Ongoing, “Animal Secrets.” Hands-on art, science and theater camps, art studio, tot spot and lookout cove adventure area. Wed-Thurs at 10 and 11, music with Miss Kitty. $5-$6. Fri at 11, aquarium feeding. Ongoing. Admission, $8-$10. Bay Area Discovery Museum, Fort Baker, 557 McReynolds Rd, Sausalito. 415.339.3900.

Breakfast with Enzo Bring clapping hands, singing voices, dancing feet and breakfast for weekly family music show. Sun at 10 and 11. Mill Valley Golf Clubhouse, 267 Buena Vista, Mill Valley. 415.652.2474.

Carolyn Parr Nature Center Learn about Napa County habitats and birds of prey through tours, dioramas, games, hands-on activities and books. Ongoing. Free. Carolyn Parr Nature Center Museum, Westwood Hills Park, 3107 Browns Valley Rd, Napa. 707.255.6465.

Children’s Garden Whimsical environments for kids’ exploration. Hours: Mon, noon to 4; Tues-Sun, 9 to 5. Ongoing. Free. Cornerstone Sonoma, 23570 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.933.3010.

Chops Teen Club Hang-out spot for Santa Rosa teens ages 12 to 20 offers art studio and class, open gym, tech lounge, cafe, recording studio and film club. Hours for high schoolers: Mon-Thurs, 3 to 9; Fri, 3 to 11; Sat and school holidays, noon to 11. For middle school kids: Mon-Fri, 3 to 7; Sat and school holidays, noon to 7. Film club meets Tues at 4. Ongoing. Membership, $5-

$10 per year. Chops Teen Club, 509 Adams St, Santa Rosa. 707.284.2467.

Messy Mucking About Every Saturday, 9:30 to 11:30, toddlers and their parents are invited to a drop-in, free-form art studio to create with paint, ceramics, collage, construction, found objects and feathers. Sat. $15. Nimbus Arts, St Helena Marketplace, Ste 1-B, 3111 St Helena Hwy, St Helena. 707.965.5278.

Readers of the Pack A chance for new readers to get together. Tues-Sat. Free. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Icons of Modern Architecture Art historian Ann Wiklund talks about iconic buildings. Tues, 2pm. through Jan 21. $50. Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, 551 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.939.SVMA.

Laguna Keepers Install native plants and check in on other plants flourishing in the landscape. Jan 11, 9am. Free. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Saddle Club

Meditation Group for Mothers

Children six and up are welcome for horse- and stable-related games and a casual dinner. Fri, 5:30pm. $20. Sunrise Stables, 1098 Lodi Lane, St Helena. 707.333.1509.

Mindful meditation and sharing experiences for benefit of mothers and their children. Wed, 8:30am. $10. Shambhala Meditation Center, 255 West Napa St, Ste G, Sonoma.

Pleasures of the Heart

Lectures Beyond Reacting Learn four keys that transform your life from reacting to people and situations. Jan 10, 7:30pm. Donation. Songbird Community Healing Center, 8297 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.2398.

CityZen Evening of sitting meditation, tea and dharma talk. All are welcome. Mon, 7pm. Free. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Death Cafe A relaxed and safe setting to discuss death. Jan 8, 7pm. The Sunflower Center, 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

Drop-In Meditation Classes for all levels include guided meditation and brief commentary. Kids welcome. Ongoing. $10. Mahakaruna Buddhist Center, 304 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.766.7720.

Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution in China Dongping Han tells his life story. Jan 8, 7pm. Free. Peace and Justice Center, 467 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.575.8902.

First Monday, women’s salon. Second Monday, coed discussion group. Second Mon of every month, 7pm. Pleasures of the Heart, 1310 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.482.9899.

PRBO Speaker Series Learn about birds and ecology. Every third Thurs, 6:30pm. $10. PRBO Conservation Science, 3820 Cypress Dr #11, Petaluma. 707.781.2555.

Public Art & Downtown Revitalization: The Oakland Story Lecture by Steven Huss, cultural arts manager for the city of Oakland. Jan 15, 6pm. Sonoma County Museum, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Science Buzz Cafe Jan 9, “Thirty Kinds of Memory” with Chance Massaro; Jan 16, “Income & Wage Inequality” with Steven S Cuellar, PhD; Jan 23, “The Archaeomythology of Marya Gimbutas” with Joan Marler. Thurs, Jan 9, 7pm. $5. French Garden, 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

working with an independent editor. Jan 12, 3pm. $8. Flamingo Lounge, 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Readings Aqus Cafe Mondays, 9:30am, Storytelling with Phaedra. 189 H St, Petaluma 707.778.6060.

Book Passage Jan 10, 7pm, “Hear Where We Are: Sound, Ecology and Sense of Place” with Michael Stocker. Jan 11, 1pm, “The Holy Universe” with David Christopher. Jan 11, 7pm, “Dream Animals” with Elaine Bond. Jan 12, 1pm, “The Marin County Diet: Feed Your Children Right From Birth” with Albert C Goldberg. Jan 12, 4pm, “Diary of a Feng Shui Consultant and Visual Artist” with Caroline Patrick BorNei. Jan 12, 7pm, “Caught in the Act: Actors Acting “ with Howard Schatz & Beverly J Ornstein. Jan 13, 7pm, “Company Man: Thirty Years of Controversy and Crisis in the CIA” with John Rizzo. Jan 14, 7pm, “Little Failure: A Memoir” with Gary Shteyngart, includes book. $29.50. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Jan 11, 7pm, “On Such a Full Sea” with Chang-Rae Lee. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Dr Insomnia’s Coffee & Teas Second Monday of every month, 7pm, “Poetry Farm,” readings by local writers. 800 Grant Ave, Novato 415.897.9500.

Gaia’s Garden Jan 13, 6pm, Dining with local authors. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa 707.544.2491.

Habitat Books Third Wednesday of every month, 6:30pm, poetry reading series. $5 donation. 205 Second St, Sausalito 415.331.3344.

Healdsburg Library

Rudolph Steiner’s teachings on social transformation with Abraham Entin. Thurs, 7pm. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Second Tuesday of every month, 6:30pm, Center Literary Cafe, an evening of shared song, prose, poetry and drama with three-minute open mic presentations. Free. 139 Piper St, Healdsburg 707.433.3772.

Wendy Tokunaga

Point Reyes Books

Editor and writer talks about

Second Monday of every

Spirit & Revolution

month, 7pm, Knit Lit group. 11315 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1542.

25

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Second Sunday of every month, 4pm, Westword Salon. $1. 707.829.1549. 282 S High St, Sebastopol.

Sebastopol Community Church Jan 14, 7pm, “A Religion of One’s Own” with Thomas Moore. 1000 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol.

The Sitting Room Third Wednesday of every month, 2pm, Sitting Room book club. 707.823.3477. 170 E Cotati Ave, Cotati.

Studio 333 Second Thursday of every month, 7pm, “Why There Are Words,” reading series presents various writers on a theme. $5. 333 Caledonia St, Sausalito 415.331.8272.

Theater Taste Comedic Cinderella story places Eliza Doolittle from “My Fair Lady” in Sonoma County in this story by a local author. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Jan 19. $15. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

Victor/Victoria We know we’re in Paris, but is this persona he or a she? A man or a woman? What confusion, what fun. Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Feb 2. $15-$35. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

A Year with Frog & Toad Comic adventures with animal friends based on the books by Arnold Lobel. PResented by Bay Area Children’s Theatre. SatSun, 10:30am and 12:30pm. through Jan 19. $15-$20. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Chicken Scratches Former slaughterhouse reemerges as art space

The building started as a produce packinghouse in the 19th century, and held stints as a winery, U.S. Army ammunition warehouse and, from the 1950s, a poultry slaughterhouse. After Fulton Valley Farms closed in 2010, the Fulton facility was vacant—until this month. Modern track lighting now stands out against the old wooden beams of the high ceiling, and canvases large and small pop with color on the cement walls. The shiny, sloped floors where chicken blood once pooled are now covered by designer shoes and, perhaps, an occasional droplet of wine from an enthusiastic art lover—the former slaughterhouse is now a pop-up art exhibit. (It’s the second such transformation in the county, the other being Slaughterhouse Space in Healdsburg.) Dubbed the Fulton Art Depot for its proximity to the future SMART rail station, the pop up has been a success with 300 attendees and over 75 artists, including Barbara Elliot (whose work is shown above), responding to a call for work, says Vicky Kumpfer, who helped set up the event. Despite the great response, “A Month of Sundays” will be just that—one month of art exhibits on Sundays. “The space is really raw right now in the sense that the owner is not sure what he’s going to do,” says Kumpfer. “Most likely he will keep it as an artist space.” Catch “A Month of Sundays” at the Fulton Art Depot Jan. 12, 19 and 26. 1200 River Road, Fulton. 1–5pm. Free. 707.477.0567. —Nicolas Grizzle

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 8–14, 2014 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of January 8

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) You can blame it on the coming full moon. You can blame it on the gorgeous storm or the epic dream or the haunting song or the suffering youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re struggling to vanquish. All I ask is that you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t blame it on the alcohol. OK? If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to do wild and brave and unexpected things, make sure they are rooted in your vigorous response to primal rhythms, not in a drunken surrender to weakness or ignorance. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m all for you losing your oppressive selfcontrol, but not the healthy kind of self-control. TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20)

When is the last time you did an experiment? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not talking about scientiďŹ c tests and trials that take place in a laboratory. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m referring to real-life experiments, like when you try out an unfamiliar experience to see if it appeals to you, or when you instigate a change in your routine to attract unpredictable blessings into your sphere. Now would be an excellent time to expose yourself to a few what-ifs like that. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re overdue to have your eyes opened, your limits stretched, and your mind blown.

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) To help take the edge off the darkness you have been wrestling with, I offer you these lines from a poem by Kay Ryan: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The day misspent, / the love misplaced, / has inside it / the seed of redemption. / Nothing is exempt / from resurrection.â&#x20AC;? In other words, Gemini, whatever has disappeared from your life will probably return later in a new form. The wrong turns you made may lead you to a fresh possibility. Is that what you want? Or would you prefer that the lost things stay lost, the dead things stay dead? Make a decision soon. CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22)

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Human beings are often unable to receive because we do not know what to ask for,â&#x20AC;? says the writer Malidoma SomĂŠ in his book Water and Spirit. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are sometimes unable to get what we need because we do not know what we want.â&#x20AC;? With that in mind, Cancerian, hear my two pleas: ďŹ rst, that in the next six weeks, you will work diligently to identify the goodies you want most; and second, that you will cultivate your capacity to receive the goodies you want most by reďŹ ning your skill at asking for them.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) Julia Morgan (1872â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1957) was the ďŹ rst woman licensed as an architect in California. She designed over 700 buildings in the course of her brilliant career, and thrived both ďŹ nancially and artistically. One key to her success was her humility. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ever turn down a job because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beneath you,â&#x20AC;? she advised. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a helpful message for you to hear, Leo. It applies to the work-related opportunities you may be invited to take on, as well as the tasks that your friends, associates and loved ones ask you to consider. You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t possibly know ahead of time how important it might ultimately be to apply yourself conscientiously to a seemingly small assignment. VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22) One of Beethovenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s music teachers said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;As a composer, he is hopeless.â&#x20AC;? When Thomas Edison was a kid, a teacher told him he was â&#x20AC;&#x153;too stupid to learn anything.â&#x20AC;? Walt Disney worked at a newspaper when he was young, but his editor ďŹ red him because â&#x20AC;&#x153;he lacked imagination and had no good ideas.â&#x20AC;? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure there was a person like that in your pastâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;someone who disparaged and discouraged you. But Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m happy to report that 2014 will be the best year ever for neutralizing and overcoming that naysayerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s curse. If you have not yet launched your holy crusade, begin now. LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) As a child, French philosopher and writer Blaise Pascal (1623â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1662) loved math. But his father, who home-schooled him, forced him to forego math and concentrate on studying the humanities. Blaise rebelled. When he was 12 years old, he locked himself in his room for days and immersed himself in mathematical investigations. When he emerged, he had ďŹ gured out on his own some of Euclidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fundamental theorems about geometry. Eventually, he became a noted mathematician. I see the coming weeks as prime time to do something like the young Pascal did: seal yourself away from other peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opinions about who youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re supposed to be, and explore the themes that will be crucial for the person you are becoming.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21)

In 1609, Dutch sea explorer Henry Hudson sailed to America and came upon what we now call Coney Island. Back then it was a barren spit of sand whose main inhabitants were rabbits. But it was eventually turned into a dazzling resort, an â&#x20AC;&#x153;extravagant playground,â&#x20AC;? according to the documentary ďŹ lm Coney Island. By the early 20th century, there were three sprawling amusement parks packed into its two square miles of land, plus â&#x20AC;&#x153;a forest of glittering electric towers, historical displays, freak shows, a simulated trip to the moon, the largest herd of elephants in the world, and panoramas showing the Creation, the End of the World, and Hell.â&#x20AC;? I mention this, Scorpio, because 2014 could feature your very own Henry Hudson moment: a time when you will discover virgin territory that will ultimately become an extravagant playground.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) â&#x20AC;&#x153;If men had wings and bore black feathers, few of them would be clever enough to be crows,â&#x20AC;? said 19thcentury social reformer Henry Ward Beecher. That might be an accurate assessment for most people, but I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think it will be true for you Sagittarians in the foreseeable future. Your animal intelligence will be working even better than usual. Your instinctual inclinations are likely to serve as reliable guides to wise action. Trust what your body tells you! You will deďŹ nitely be clever enough to be a crow. CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) Can you guess what combination of colors makes the most vivid visual impact? Psychologists say itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s black on yellow. Together they arrest the eye. They command attention. They activate a readiness to respond. According to my reading of the astrological omens, this is the effect you can and should have in the coming weeks. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time for you to draw the best kind of attention to yourself. You have a right and a duty to galvanize people with the power of your presence. Whether you actually wear yellow clothes with black highlights is optional as long as you cultivate a similar potency. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18)

Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m guessing that in a metaphorical sense, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been swallowed by a whale. Now youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re biding your time in the beastâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s belly. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my prediction: you will be like the Biblical Jonah, who underwent a more literal version of your experience. The whale eventually expelled him, allowing him to return to his life safe and soundâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and your story will have the same outcome. What should you do in the meantime? Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the advice that Dan Albergotti gives in his poem â&#x20AC;&#x153;Things to Do in the Belly of the Whale.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Count the ribs,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Look up for blue sky through the spout. Make small ďŹ res with the broken hulls of ďŹ shing boats. Practice smoke signals. Call old friends. Organize your calendar. Dream of the beach. Review each of your lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ten million choices. Find the evidence of those before you. Listen for the sound of your heart. Be thankful that you are here, swallowed with all hope, where you can rest and wait.â&#x20AC;?

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

How do you like your tests? Short, intense and dramatic? Or leisurely, drawn-out and low-pressure? Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s another question: Do you prefer to pick out the tests you take, making sure theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re good ďŹ ts for the precise lessons you want to master? Or do you ďŹ nd it more exciting and adventurous to let fate determine what unpredictable tests get sent your way? Ruminate about these matters, Pisces. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re due for a nice big test sometime soon, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in your interest to help shape and deďŹ ne how everything unfolds.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

Ĺ´Ĺš NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 8-14, 2014 | BOH E MI A N.COM

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