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847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288 Editor Gabe Meline, ext. 202

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2013 Metrosa Inc.

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Remembering a Literary Legend Doris Lessing (1919–2013) BY JONAH RASKIN

I

t’s not every day that Nobel Prize winners for literature come to Sonoma County—and not everyday that one has the opportunity to play host and show them around. But that’s what I did with Doris Lessing about 10 years ago when she spoke on the campus of SSU. I showed her around Northern California, which reminded her of Southern Rhodesia, where she was raised. When she came here to visit, she hadn’t yet won the Nobel Prize, but she had written more than 40 books, including The Golden Notebook, her big and wonderful novel about political crack-up and emotional crisis. Winning the Nobel didn’t change her one iota. She never wrote for fame, for prizes or for money, but to wake readers to harsh realities, including the reality of global environmental destruction. To make her messages go down easy, she couched her late narratives as “space fiction.” The books were set on distant planets that had uncanny resemblances to Earth. The fact that Lessing came to Sonoma—and that she traveled relentlessly around the world, meeting readers and talking to her audience—says a lot about her generosity and her curiosity. She came here to find out how we lived in California, and how she might live, too. From 1950 until her death last week, she lived and wrote in London, but she seriously thought about moving to California. She never wrote the same book twice, never repeated herself and always urged writers to tell the truth and to be themselves. I don’t know of another writer who is more of an inspiration to aspiring writers. Lessing never attended a college and never graduated from a University. For the most part, she was self-taught. When she spoke at Sonoma State, she spoke from the heart without pretense. I’ll never forget her, her books, or the day we drove into the hills and across the valleys of Northern California. Now I always see the world in which I live through Lessing’s eyes as a strange and a wonderful land of mystery and poetry. Jonah Raskin is an author and frequent contributor to the Bohemian. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Tragedy’s Legacy Thank you for Steve Bhaerman’s article on John F. Kennedy and his horrific assassination 50 years ago on the streets of Dallas (“A Dream Interrupted,” Nov. 18). Like so many other citizens, Bhaerman is well aware that the murder of our 35th president was not the work of a lone lunatic firing from behind Kennedy’s motorcade.

Doctors who worked furiously at Parkland Hospital to try to save the dying chief executive understood that at least two shots came from in front of the president. These were trauma room doctors who knew well a bullet’s entrance wound from an exit wound. Dr. Malcolm Perry, who performed the tracheotomy on the president’s throat, stated three times in a press conference a short time after Kennedy expired that the throat wound was a wound of entrance. Dr. Robert McClelland, another respected physician in Trauma Room One that day—and the only surviving doctor who attended JFK that day—has always stated unequivocally that the president had a huge hole in the right rear of his skull consistent with a frontal shot. Also, Dallas Police Chief Jesse Curry would argue that there was never any conclusive proof that Lee Harvey Oswald, who was in the Texas Book Depository at the time of the assassination, ever had a rifle in his hand that day. In fact, paraffin tests showed that Oswald could not have fired a rifle on Nov. 22, 1963. Witnesses to the killing of Officer Tippit were not easily able to identify Oswald as Tippit’s assailant, and some of those witnesses saw two assailants of the policeman. Bhaerman is correct to call attention to James W. Douglass’s JFK and the Unspeakable. Douglass’s book is a profound work of investigative research and an indispensable tome for any thinking citizen who wishes to more fully understand the political and historical context of JFK’s assassination.

John F. Kennedy’s turn to peacemaking was viewed as heresy by unyielding cold warriors, of which there were many in the CIA, the Pentagon and his own administration. His death was a tragic loss for our country and the world. It is up to us to carry on the critical work of peace and justice for ourselves and our children.

JOE MARTIN Seattle, Wash.

Sneak Peek Efren Carrillo is an accident waiting to happen . . . again (“No Peeking,” Nov. 6). What is going to do next? He should be cut off from any public salary now. He is a liability, and a walking time bomb.

RICK CARSTEN Via online

NIMBY-ism Away It sounds like both sides have more communicating to do over this center (“Dreams on Hold,” Nov. 20), but I can’t wash the aroma of NIMBY-ism off my fingers after reading about it. Are there any studies proving that homeless youth centers drive down property values? I wouldn’t be surprised if that’s the neighbors’ real concern.

DIANE MCKENNA Via online

For the Earth It’s not often that you get to meet real, live eco-warriors. A couple weeks ago, we students from Nonesuch School in Sebastopol were lucky enough to tour the Rainbow Warrior, one of Greenpeace’s ships that was docked in San Francisco harbor. Greenpeace sails the oceans staging peaceful but daring protests, currently against oil drilling in the Arctic. On Sept. 19, 30 people (“The Arctic 30”) on one of their ships were arrested by Russian authorities. The ship was seized, and everyone aboard charged with piracy, although they were


Rants

in International waters. They were bearing witness and documenting the first Russian arctic offshore drilling operation. Later charges were reduced to hooliganism which carries a jail sentence of seven years. Some crew members have been released on bail, but we encourage people to research the Arctic 30 and support the cause of freeing all of them. Their actions were taken on behalf of the planet and everyone who wants to live on it. In a month when climate change has hit so hard, with the Philippines suffering a devastating typhoon, and the Midwest reeling from killer tornadoes, Greenpeace stands strong, and their work grows ever more important.

ALYSSA BANKSON AND THE STUDENTS AT NONESUCH SCHOOL Sebastopol

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 27–DECEMBE R 3, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

THIS MODERN WORLD

7

By Tom Tomorrow

Top Five 1 ‘Psychic’ Sylvia Browne

books Napa show, dies . . . didn’t see that one coming!

2 Chef Sean O’Toole

opens new Napa restaurant Torc in former Ubuntu spot

3 Ghost & Gale (Brodie

Jenkins and David Luning) release fantastic new EP

Thank You Sonoma County! Early mornings, late nights, extra trucks and tractors on the road — we thank our neighbors, friends, family and the entire Sonoma County community for your patience and support during this year’s harvest, another phenomenal vintage for our region!

We couldn’t have done it without you.

4 Pope Francis rails

against capitalism: ‘Money must serve, not rule.’

5 ‘Tough Dad’ Jerry

Brown did it: California has reported $2.4 billion surplus

WeAreSonomaCounty.com


Paper THE

STUMP CLUMP Redwood logs purchased by the county from Ghilotti Construction now dot Dry Creek in Healdsburg.

Flow Masters

Coho salmon released into a gussied-up Dry Creek BY JAMES KNIGHT

I

n Dry Creek Valley, there’s at least one place where a jumble of felled trees doesn’t spell trouble for coho habitat. It’s part of a multimillion dollar project meant to restore Dry Creek’s salmon population—and possibly save the Sonoma County Water Agency an additional $150 million bill.

On Friday, Nov. 22, representatives from four government agencies, the Dry Creek Rancheria Band of Pomo Indians and members of the press gathered by a slow-moving channel just downstream from Warm Springs Dam to witness the release of 2,000 juvenile coho as part of the six-mile Dry Creek Habitat Enhancement Demonstration Project. Dressed in fatigues, U.S. Army Corp of

Engineers district commander Lt. Col. John Baker carefully lowered the first aquarium net full of small, wriggling fish to their uncertain fate. The impetus behind the effort is a 2008 opinion issued by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). By 2004, the coho population in the Russian River system had declined to the point where little more than a dozen individuals could be counted. A

James Knight

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOVE MBER 27–D EC E M BE R 3, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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crash program at the Don Clausen Fish Hatchery at Lake Sonoma has successfully reared coho salmon that return to the hatchery, but that’s just a start. “We want to restart the populations in historic coho salmon streams,” says Derek Acomb, an environmental scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. “We don’t want the fish to stray back to the hatchery.” A few miles farther downstream, behind Amista Vineyards, the project’s ambitious scale may be viewed at a site just completed last month. Right now, the scene is weird and raw. A four-acre amphitheater was scooped out of the bank, draped with nets and spiked with a thousand sprigs. The scene is punctuated by 20-foot redwood stumps driven into the ground, cut clean at the top, rising out of a murky backwater. If there’s something familiar here, it may be because many of these redwoods were cut down for the Highway 101 widening project near Airport Boulevard in Santa Rosa, and, in a move profitable for Ghilotti Construction, sold back to Sonoma County Water Agency for $98,000. Others came from a sustainable timber operation in Gualala, according to David Manning, SCWA environmental resources coordinator. Working with property owners like Amista’s Mike and Vicky Farrow, Manning secured long-term easements crucial to the project. It may be surprising to learn that the trouble with Dry Creek, from the coho’s point of view, is that there’s too much water— especially in the summer. As the Bohemian has reported in recent years, vineyard frost protection draws and irrigation wells have compromised water levels in some of the watershed’s tributaries. But because of the constant summer flow released from the dam for the benefit of water customers, the creek is turning into a flume that limits the kinds of meandering channels that provide habitat for salmon. Paradoxically, cold water stored by the same dam will also benefit the salmon reared in this constructed pond, which is seven feet deep and


It may be surprising to learn that the trouble with Dry Creek is that there’s too much water. There is a plan B. The water agency and its partners have until 2020 to restore the coho to the satisfaction of the NMFS, which has the last word. The alternative calls for digging up Dry Creek Road and burying a pipeline bypass to route excess water all the way around the creek, at an estimated $150 million price tag. With all that’s at stake, the four-inch ďŹ sh aren’t being sent off with only a hope and a prayer. Since it was reinstituted, the hatchery’s program has beneďŹ ted from genetic advances. Each coho female, according to Acomb, is matched to a list of breeding males ranked in order of preference. Each ďŹ sh released has a small, staple-sized insert just above the nose, which can be identiďŹ ed with a microscope after dissection, if it’s later caught by ďŹ shermen. An additional percentage are outďŹ tted with passive integrated transponders, similar to the chips embedded in pet cats and dogs. These will be read by antennae as the ďŹ sh check out of their quiet backwater for the long journey to the ocean. If they manage to return home after ďŹ ve years, they’ll be checked back in just like widgets in a modern warehouse.

9

Yellow Submachine In the aftermath of the shooting of 13-year-old Andy Lopez at the hands of a Sonoma County Sheriff’s Deputy, state senator and former Santa Rosa city councilwoman Noreen Evans (pictured) has co-authored a bill that would require all BB, pellet and airsoft guns sold in the state to be painted a bright color to avoid confusion with their deadly counterparts. Evans and State Sen. Kevin de Leon, D-Los Angeles, announced last week they plan to reintroduce the legislation in January. Lopez was shot and killed by the deputy after his replica assault rie proved indistinguishable from a real weapon. “Because the use of lethal force against a person carrying an imitation ďŹ rearm is a signiďŹ cant threat to public safety,â€? says Evans, “toys must look like toys and not lethal weapons.â€? The only federal regulation of toy guns requires they must be afďŹ xed with an orange tip, something missing from the toy Lopez carried. In California, only nonďŹ ring toy guns (such as squirt guns) are required to be brightly colored. Legislation similar to the proposed Imitation Firearm Safety Act was signed into law by Gov. Jerry Brown last year after a 2010 tragedy in Los Angeles similar to the one in Santa Rosa. That legislation (SB 1315), authored by de Leon, allows for cities within Los Angeles County to put the issue to a vote. A spokeswoman from de Leon’s ofďŹ ce, however, says not one of the cities has done so yet, possibly for fear of a lawsuit by the NRA. A similar, statewide bill (SB 798) was introduced and voted down in committee in 2011. It was opposed by—big surprise—the NRA, who argued that parts of real guns are now being manufactured in different colors, and this legislation would only endanger public safety ofďŹ cers. —Nicolas Grizzle

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 27–DECEMBE R 3, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

studded with boulders tied to the redwood snags with steel cables. By next summer, willow trees planted along the banks—already sprouting—will begin to shade the water.


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOVE MBER 27–D EC E M BE R 3, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Dining SEASONED GREETINGS For maximum leftover power, use the skillet and add veggies, potatoes and an egg.

Kitchen Reruns ’Tis leftovers season, never fear—ways to make them edible are here BY ARI LEVAUX

R

evelers call it the holidays, retailers call it shopping season. To me, it’s leftovers season. It runs from about Thanksgiving until New Year’s Day, when the last of the Christmas leftovers are used to sponge up the libations of the previous night’s revelry.

Conveniently, leftovers season happens to be a period when the weather is cold enough that jam-packed fridges can overflow

into unheated garages and onto porches, turning these spaces into temporary walk-in refrigerators, easily capable of holding multiple roasting pans and serving bowls. Growing up, I pretty much thought I invented refried turkey for breakfast. Each passing holiday turned the kitchen into a temporary lab for my continued research. Little did I know the art of cooking previously cooked food is a universal, with variations having been honed the world over, producing delicious recipes like Brazilian roupa velha, which means “old clothes.”

In the U.K., there are several dishes that specialize in rehashing Christmas dinner, like the Scottish rumbledethumps or English bubble and squeak, which in turn has many variations, like parsnip bubble and squeak hash. There’s also a Finnish dish called hänt i veckan (“happened this past week”), as well as biksemad, a Danish dish loosely translated as “food which as been mixed together.” Today, many of these recipes use some combination of fresh and leftover ingredients, while some postmodern renditions are made with entirely fresh ingredients, but

in the spirit of leftovers. The only ingredients I consistently add to my leftovers are olive oil, garlic, hot sauce and perhaps an egg. You don’t need a recipe to cook leftovers. You just have to heat them up. But you have to do it tastefully, and there are some important principles that should be followed. If they are, and the leftovers are properly resurrected, round two could very well eclipse the first. When deciding how much food to reheat, keep in mind that the nutritional value of food breaks down with successive heatings and coolings, as does the food’s aesthetic value. You don’t want to face the prospect of leftover leftovers. If all you want to do is simply reheat last night’s glory, then you might as well do it in the oven. It will heat the food, put a little brown crisp on top and won’t screw anything up. I like to customize my leftovers as I reheat them, so I prefer the pan. I start by frying the leftover proteins, be they ham, fish or tofurkey, in olive oil. Any cooking oil, or even butter, will work, but the drippings in the pan do not qualify as oil. While they do contain grease, there are many more constituents as well, some of which will burn in a hot pan. But the drippings are valuable in their own right. I regard drippings as a poor man’s demi-glace, to be used judiciously and thoughtfully in order to add richness to the food. When it’s almost done cooking, simply add drippings to the refried leftovers pan. A recipe like spiced parsnip bubble and squeak would likely have you include fresh onions, caramelized in oil or butter. I rarely bother, as the leftovers themselves likely contain caramelized onions. As the proteins sputter in the oil, add whatever else you want to cook, in order of longest to shortest cooking times. Add potatoes and carrots first, so they can brown. Add greens, broccoli and other sensitive veggies at the end, so they don’t overcook. Fry at no higher than at lowmedium heat. There should be no rush, and you don’t want to put yourself in a position where you have to act quickly to prevent burning. Especially on New Year’s Day. While reheating, I don’t like to


11

Holiday Home Tour & Winter Market Sat. Dec 7th 11 am – 5 pm

Hilton Sonoma Wine Country, 3555 Round Barn Blvd., Santa Rosa. The day will include touring stunning homes in prestigious Santa Rosa neighborhoods decorated for the holidays, as well as shoppingfrom various artisans within our community. JOIN US FOR: Wine Cellar Raffle • Hors d’oevures & Refreshments • Professionally Designed Wreaths Caroling & Music • Shopping Sonoma County’s very own Marcy Smothers- Radio Host, Home Cooker, Writer Marcy will be signing her latest book- SNACKS: Adventures in Food, Aisle by Aisle Tour and Market Tickets: $45 Wine Cellar tickets: $50 Raffle Tickets: 1 for $10 or 10 for $20 Order here: www.jlns.org

November Special $185 Weekdays

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 27–DECEMBE R 3, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

stir the whole pan together into some kind of mishmash goulash surprise. Instead, I’ll stir each little pile of individual leftovers, keeping the groups separate. When the proteins are sputtering, stir in some minced garlic. Once the garlic has had a moment to cook, and the kitchen smells amazing, gingerly stir in some of those pan drippings. If you’ve been nibbling at the leftovers as they reheat, and there’s almost nothing left for breakfast— or if you just really want to pig out—now would be a good time to consider adding an egg to the pan. Scrambling an egg in with the leftovers may sound like an easy way to go, but it’s a tricky move to pull off in an appetizing way. The egg will absorb all kinds of unsightly bits and pieces of food, stick to the pan, and perhaps burn. If you want scrambled eggs with your leftovers, it’s best to scramble them in a separate pan and add them to the leftovers. Cooking a fried egg atop the leftovers, however, is a completely respectable way to go. The leftovers should be fully reheated by the time the egg is cracked, with each component pile of leftovers having achieved its requisite skin of pan-fried crisp. The garlic and pan drippings have been added. It’s time to turn off the pan, in other words. But first, crack an egg (or two) on top of the whole business. Choose a place to dump the egg where it will stay together, rather than letting the egg white spread like a creeping amoeba into crevices among the leftovers. Add a few drops of water to any exposed patches of bare pan, and cover the pan with a tight lid so the eggs steam. At this point, the leftovers could probably use a little water anyway, to loosen up some of the crispy refried turkey and potatoes that have bonded to the pan. Peek at the egg while it cooks, adding more water if necessary to keep it steaming. When the egg is done to your liking, serve the leftovers or eat them straight from the pan. Have a bottle of hot sauce on hand, as well as coffee, mayo, the newspaper and whatever else you need to fully enjoy your refried leftover breakfast. ’Tis the season, after all.


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOVE MBER 27–D EC E M BE R 3, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Dining Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OM A CO U N T Y Chelino’s Mexican Restaurant Mexican. $. Standout generous taqueria fare with fresh ingredients daily. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1079 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.571.7478.

Haku Sushi. $-$$. Cleverly

with bonito brioche, daikon radish, snap peas, and charred japapeno vinigrette. Lunch, Thursday-Monday; dinner daily. 219 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.7222.

Sushi Tozai Japanese. $$. Spare, clean ambiance and some of the freshest sushi you’ll ever eat. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 7531 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.9886.

named rolls like “Jedi Mind Trick” and “Roll me a Fatty” are as flavorful as they are fun. Lunch and dinner daily. 518 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.541.6359.

Thai Issan Thai. $$. Popular full-spectrum Thai restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 208 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.762.5966.

Mac’s Delicatessen

Rich Thai food made with crisp, fresh ingredients, reasonably priced. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. 1005 Vine St, Healdsburg. 707.433.0515.

Diner. $. Large selection of Jewish-style sandwiches; excellent cole slaw. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Sat. 630 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.3785.

The Red Grape Pizza. $-$$. Delectable New Havenstyle thin-crust pizzas with fresh ingredients and a dazzling array of toppings. Lunch and dinner daily. 529 First St W, Sonoma. 707.996.4103.

The Restaurant at Sonoma Mission Inn California cuisine. $$$. In this world-class spa setting sample Sonoma County-inspired dishes or an elegant traditional brunch. Dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 18140 Sonoma Hwy, Boyes Hot Springs. 707.939.2415.

Saddles Steakhouse. $$$$$$$. A steakhouse in the best American tradition, with top-quality grass-fed beef. Pies are made from fruit trees on restaurant property. Dinner daily. 29 E MacArthur St, Sonoma. 707.938.2929.

Spoonbar Regional cuisine. $$. Chef Louis Maldonado’s market-driven menu includes such creative dishes as chickpea-crusted avocado, slow-cooked beef petite tender, and Spanish octopus

Thai Orchid Thai. $-$$.

Underwood Bar & Bistro European bistro. $$. The Underwood’s classy bistro menu and impressive bar belie its rural setting. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat; dinner, Sun. 9113 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.823.7023.

Willi’s Wine Bar Small plates/wine bar. $$$. Bistro dishes and extensive wine list. A terrific place to dine before a show at the Wells Fargo Center. Lunch, Tues-Sat; dinner daily. 4404 Old Redwood Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.526.3096.

MARIN CO U N T Y

Fish Seafood. $$-$$$. Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner daily. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

Hilltop 1892 American. $$-$$$$. Casual dining with panoramic Marin views and a California-cuisine take on such classic fare as steaks, fresh seafood and seasonal greens. Complete with custom cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; Sunday brunch. 850 Lamont Ave, Novato. 415.893.1892.

Marin Brewing Co Pub food. $-$$. Excellent soups, salads, pub grub and awardwinning pork-beer sausage. Lunch and dinner daily. 1809 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.4677. Pier 15 American. $$. Fun, tucked-away old-fashioned spot overlooking hidden harbor. Great place for breakfast at a bar, too. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, SatSun. 15 Harbor St, San Rafael. 415.256.9121.

Poggio Italian. $$-$$$. Truly transportive food, gives authentic flavor of the Old World. The cheaper way to travel Europe. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 777 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.7771.

Robata Grill & Sushi Japanese. $$. Mmm. With thick slices of fresh sashimi, Robata knows how to do it. The rolls are big winners. Lunch, MonFri; dinner daily. 591 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.381.8400.

Salito’s Crab House Seafood . $$$. Waterfront setting with extensive marine menu plus steak and other American staples. Lunch and dinner daily. 1200 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.331.3226.

Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Mon. 1 Drake’s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Sol Food Puerto Rican. $. Flavorful, authentic and homestyle at this Puerto Rican eatery, which is as hole-in-thewall as they come. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. San Rafael locations: 811 Fourth St. 415.451.4765. 901 & 903 Lincoln Ave. 415.256.8903. Mill Valley location: 401 Miller Ave, Mill Valley.

Finnegan’s Marin Pub

Station House Cafe

fare. $$. Irish bar with the traditional stuff. Lunch and dinner daily. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.899.1516.

American-California. $$. Innovative menu, fresh local seafood and range-fed meats. Outdoor dining; full bar.

Drake’s Beach Cafe

Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Thurs-Mon. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1515.

N A PA CO U N T Y Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

French Laundry Definitive California Cuisine. $$$$. What else is there to say? Chef Thomas Keller’s institution is among the very best restuarants in the country. 6640 Washington St., Yountville. 707.944.2380.

Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Gillwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788. Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $-$$. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner daily. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

SMALL BITES

Cocktail Time! Repeal Day, which celebrates the end of Prohibition, isn’t just about drinking copious amounts of booze. It’s about celebrating the government’s admission that its attempt to control the country’s morality failed miserably. And what better place to champion the victory of alcohol than the home of some of the finest wines in the world? The Napa Valley Museum of Art marks the 80th anniversary of Prohibition’s end with a 1930s-style fundraiser, complete with swinging music, themed food and fancy cocktails from St. Helena’s Charbay Spirits. To get you in the mood, try one of our . . . alas, the Bohemian can’t serve drinks, that’s illegal. We can, however, suggest several old-timey, bitter, flapper-era beverages to be purchased from our friends at the “pet store” down the street: Sidecar Cointreau, brandy, lemon juice shaken with ice, strained into a sugarrimmed cocktail glass. Aaah. Sazerac Peychaud’s bitters and one sugar cube muddled in a glass, then mixed with rye whiskey before being served in a glass lined with absinthe. Aaaah. Champagne Cocktail Shake three dashes of bitters onto a sugar cube in a Champagne flute before filling with Champagne. Aaaaah. Negroni Gin, dry vermouth and Campari, in equal parts, shaken with ice and served in a rocks glass (pictured). Aaaaaah. Old Pal Substitute gin for rye and dry for sweet vermouth in a Negroni (aaaaaah, my personal favorite). Celebrate government’s admission of failure with a drink or three on Friday, Dec. 6, at the Napa Valley Museum. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 7pm. $45. 707.944.0500.—Nicolas Grizzle

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.252.9250.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.251.1900. Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$.

Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.


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Wineries

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Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N TY Bella Vineyards (WC) Specializing in Zinfandel, Bella Vineyards farms three vineyards in Sonoma County: Big River Ranch in Alexander Valley, and the Lily Hill Estate and Belle Canyon in Dry Creek Valley. 9711 W. Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am– 4:30pm. 866.572.3552.

Fort Ross Vineyard & Winery Pinot meets Pinotage at the edge of the continent. Take the turnoff to Meyers Grade Road and don’t look back. 15725 Meyers Grade Road, Jenner. Open daily, 10am–6pm. Tasting fee, $10. 707.847.3460.

Jacuzzi Family Vineyards So Californian? So Italian. Replica Italian villa with tour-bus parking offers rare Italian-varietal wines in well-staffed tasting room, all thanks to a therapeutic water pump that became a household name. Oily goods on offer in the adjacent Olive Press. 24724 Arnold Drive, Sonoma. Open daily 10am to 5:30pm. No fee for most tastings; $1 reserves. 707.931.7575.

Mercury Geyserville

VIETNAMESE CUISINE

3883 Airway Drive Ste 145, Santa Rosa 707.528.3095 www.chloesco.com M–F, 8am–5pm

BURSTING

with Flavor & Nutrition • GMO free beef • free range poultry • organic veggies & tofu

320 West 3rd St, Ste G Santa Rosa • 707.595.4447 www.phocrazy.biz

No fee, 20 percent discount for Sonoma County residents and 12-pack wooden crates of mini-jug wine; two turntables, an LP record player–put on your winged shoes, it’s time to party in sleepy Geyserville! Also pickled comestibles, jam, peppers–and pretty good Pinot, Cab, Cab Franc, and Merlot. 20120 Geyserville Ave., Geyserville. Open daily, 11am– 6pm. No fee. 707.857.9870.

Simi Winery Pioneered

HOLIDAY CATERING FOR HOME OR OFFICE Savory small bites menu Box lunches, Sandwich trays Whole cakes & Tarts

female winemaking by hiring the first female winemaker in the industry. The tastingroom experience is mediocre, but the wine is fantastic and worth the wait. Excellent Chard, Sauvignon Blanc and Cab. 16275 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.473.3213.

Talisman Wine Husbandand-wife industry veterans play out their passion for Pinot in unassuming warehouse space—now pouring earthy, spicy Pinot in rustic Glen Ellen. Brunch alert: steps away from Garden Court Cafe. 13651 Arnold Drive, Glen Ellen. Thursday–Monday, noon– 5pm and by appt. Tasting fee, $25. 707.721.1628.

Trione Vineyards & Winery One-time owners of Geyser Peak Winery now wear all the different hats that a small winery requires. A popular stop along a well-liked cycling route, where you’re likely to be greeted with a glass of crisp Sauvignon Blanc, or Bubba the bulldog. 19550 Geyserville Ave., Geyserville. Thursday–Sunday, 10am–5pm. Tasting fee, $5–$15. 707.814.8100.

MA R I N CO U N TY Bacchus & Venus A trendy place for beginners and tourists. Great place to learn the basics. 769 Bridgeway, Sausalito. Open daily, noon– 7pm. 415.331.2001. Point Reyes Vineyards The tasting room features many varietals but the main reason to go is for the sparkling wines. Open Saturday–Sunday, 11am–5pm. 12700 Hwy. 1, Point Reyes. 415.663.1011.

N A PA CO U N TY Beaulieu Vineyard History in a glassful of dust– Rutherford dust. Somethingfor-everyone smorgasbord of solid varietal wines, plus library selections of flagship Georges de Latour Cab back to 1970. 1960 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Daily, 10am–5pm. Tastings $15–$20; Reserve Room, $35. 707.967.5233.

Ceja Vineyards “Vinum,

Cantus, Amor.” Founded by one-time field workers, this Mexican-American-owned winery celebrates culture and wine at their sleek downtown lounge. Wine flights, light bites and one of the few full-bodied rosés “con huevos” in the county. Free salsa lessons and dance party spice up the night. Bailamos! 1248 First St., Napa. Sunday–Thurs, 11am–6pm, Friday–Saturday, 11am–8pm; Salsa Saturdays at restaurant Bistro Sabor, 1126 First St. Tasting fees vary. 707.226.6445.

Frank Family Vineyards A media mogul imagineered a Napa Valley winery that’s surprisingly no-frills, friendly and free of charge, from the flute of bubbly welcome to the last sip of award-winning Cab. Emphasis is on the historic Larkmead winery, the wine and, natch, the guest at this popular tasting room set in the winery’s remodeled craftsman farmhouse. Frank Family Vineyards, 1091 Larkmead Lane, Calistoga. Tasting daily, 10am–4pm, $10; reserve, $25. 707.942.0753.

Inglenook Vineyard What’s new at Inglenook? Very little. The iconic stone building, robed in green vines, appears exactly as it did in 1890. But that’s news, and all thanks to owner Francis Ford Coppola. Still living up to Gustave Niebaum’s dream of fine wine to rival France, the oncebeloved Inglenook is putting out the goods once again. 1991 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Daily, 10am–5pm. Reservations for tour and tasting ($50) recommended; none required for bistro and exhibits. 707.968.1161.

Jericho Canyon Vineyard Oh boy, boutique Napa Cab from celebrity consultant Michel Rolland and high-rollers who used to spend half the year in Hawaii? Well, yeah, but they’re super nice, work hard, and their wines are tops. Cab and Sauv Blanc. 3322 Old Lawley Toll Road, Calistoga. Tour and tasting by appointment only, $30. 707.942.9665.


Driven family opens bistro in former Zazu spot BY JAMES KNIGHT

the wisdom wisd om ooff the scientist scientistt the passion passion of of the artist

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n the Russian River Valley as in Burgundy, there’s a difference between a north slope and a south slope. And there’s a difference between a long a and a short a. For several years I wondered, what is this Walter Hansel, quietly growing Pinot Noir and Chardonnay just west of Santa Rosa? Turns out, I’d been thinking of a Germanic pronunciation: “HAHN-zel.” Instead, as commonly spoken in these parts, it’s a red-blooded short a (as in Lina Lamont’s Singin’ in the Rain plaint “I keeeian’t steeeiand it!”). Oh—Hansel, as in the folks who have been selling cars to Sonoma County residents since 1961!

Proprietor Stephen Hansel grew up across the road from this plain, utilitarian winery, where he meets a group of visitors gathered around an upturned wine barrel on a weekday morning. Some only know about his Parker scores, and this is their first trip east of Napa. Hansel explains that after the wine turned out particularly good when Tom Rochioli farmed the family’s just-for-kicks half acre one year, they asked, “What did you do different?” Thus began Hansel’s education in the finer points of grape farming, which he explains in a way that makes you feel you’re getting straight talk, no slick salesmanship. If Hansel said the Chardonnay tastes better with a clear coat option, you might just go for it. But first, the test drive. The 2011 Cahill Lane Chardonnay ($39) is characterized by concession-stand popcorn, while the 2011 Cuvée Alyce Chardonnay ($39), named for Hansel’s mother (“She was over the top, she drank whisky, she didn’t drink wine”) sizzles with lemon-drizzled apples. The Pinot is where it really winds up. The 2011 Cahill Lane Pinot Noir ($39) is a pretty little spicy root beer and cherry cola number; the 2011 Cuvée Alyce Pinot Noir ($39) darkly perfumed with cranberry-black cherry, finishes silky-strawberry, with lingering tension on the tongue. And then Hansel thieves some 2012 samples out of barrel. The unusually fair price point—given all the Parker name dropping—will be held as long as practicable. The plain talk at the barrel-top tasting, however, is no longer the whole story, now that Hansel’s opened the doors to Walter Hansel Wine & Bistro in the former Zazu location. Here you can wash down oysters cold and warm, cheese plates or Liberty Ducks rillettes with house and other local wines, as well as red and white Burgundy—Hansel doesn’t draw the line at driving a Ford or pushing a Chambolle-Musigny. He’ll sell you both. Walter Hansel Winery, 5465 Hall Road, Santa Rosa. 707.525.3614. Visits by appointment only; no fee. Bistro, 3535 Guerneville Road, Santa Rosa. Wednesday–Sunday, 5–10pm. Entrées, $16–$26. 707.546.6462.

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The holidays, of course, are all about stuff. “Stuffy stuffy stuff stuff!” shout the holidays, “Buy more stuff!” For this year’s Gift Guide, we haven’t eschewed material gifts altogether, but you’ll find a healthy mix of experiences along with must-have presents that one can wrap in a box. Most of those experiences are entirely local—and along that thought, we continue to remind readers to seek out the locally owned, independent shops for tactile gifts. (In fact, next week’s issue is devoted entirely to that very ethos.) Here are a few of our recommendations this year.

Glued to the Screen

HOT WHEELS Love it or hate it, ‘Grand Theft Auto V’ is this year’s must-have game.

It’s (Maybe) a Wrap A mix of the material and the intangible in our annual Gift Guide BY LEILANI CLARK, NICOLAS GRIZZLE, TARA KAVEH AND GABE MELINE

Chromecast ($35) is a tiny, USB-powered HDMI dongle that’s inexpensive and streams anything in Google’s Chrome browser, from any device, directly to a television. It’s a little buggy, and there isn’t as much support for it as one might like just yet, but it makes hanging out and watching YouTube videos with friends a whole lot more social. Of course, web-to-TV devices have been around for several years, the two other big ones being Apple TV and the Roku box. . . . Apple TV ($99) does basically the same thing as Chromecast, but it’s more of a set-top box designed to replace or augment cable TV. It allows wireless mirroring from any Apple device, and has apps for streaming services like Netflix and Hulu. . . . Roku ($50–$100) does basically the same thing, again, minus the mirroring— it’s purely an app-driven box, but it has more choices, costs less and still offers the best interface of the three. . . . The PlayStation 4 ($399), no longer just for video games, can also act as a web-to-TV interface. With an eight-core processor and sleek, modern design, it’s a natural progression from the PS3. It plays Blu-Ray movies and games, connects online for downloading apps for streaming services and more. Users can easily record and share up to 15 minutes of game play, which will

) 18

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I

t happens every few years: we look in our closet, attic or garage, or those two boxes we’ve been lugging around for the past three moves and have forgotten what’s inside, and we say, “Damn, I should have listened to George Carlin. I have too much stuff.”


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOVE MBER 27–D EC E M BE R 3, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

18 Gift Guide ( 17 only add to the amount of popular YouTube videos of in-game play. . . . Microsoft’s Xbox One ($500; microsoftstore.com) is a similar gaming console but integrates paid TV service (like cable) and comes with the Kinect motion and voice controller. Instead of a remote, users just flail their arms at the TV and speak like people in old movies trying to talk to natives on a tropical island. . . . It’s not available on PS4 or Xbox One just yet, but Grand Theft Auto 5 ($60) is the hottest game, well, ever. The lives of the multiple protagonists are so detailed, each even uses a different cell phone based on personality type. Up to 16 players can play online simultaneously, and there will be plenty of potential teammates in this virtual world—the game earned $1 billion in sales its first three days on the market. —Nicolas Grizzle

On the Stereo The world’s music listeners are spinning records again, as Billboard reports vinyl sales in 2012 to have skyrocketed 500 percent since 2007. There’s a chance you’ve got someone on your list asking for physical albums again, and luckily the music industry has responded. Many major new releases are pressed on LP now, including Lorde, M.I.A., Pearl Jam, Justin Timberlake, Katy Perry, Paul McCartney and plenty more— and reissues of classic material abound. For electronic music fans, the recent Boards of Canada reissues are perfect pressings of very hard-to-find albums, while world music fans will be thrilled with the just-released Manu Chao back catalogue. The Beatles’ At the BBC, Vol. 2 is fresh, too, as is Bob Dylan’s Another SelfPortrait and the Grateful Dead’s One From the Vault (a deluxe three-LP set). The German site Vinyl-Digital carries a number of rare hip-hop bootlegs from Drake, Kendrick Lamar and Frank Ocean, and Nashville’s

Third Man Records has a box set designed to give palpitations to any blues fan: ‘The Rise and Fall of Paramount Records 19171932 Vol. 1’ contains six Lps, a 250-page book, another 360-page book and a USB drive designed to look like a Victrola needle. The whole thing’s housed in a quarter-sewn, velvet-lined oak cabinet, and costs a whoppingbut-worth-it $400. . . . Shopping for the beginner who needs a turntable? Avoid cheap portable Crosley turntables, or just about any unit sold at Urban Outfitters. A nice introductory record player is the Audio-Technica AT-LP60-USB, priced at around $175 (and available locally at the Last Record Store). It’s solid, durable and comes with a USB output to digitize older records. . . . This has been a good year for music books. Questlove, drummer for the Roots, has released two: an autobiography called ‘Mo’ Meta Blues: The World According to Questlove,’ and the definitive story of Don Cornelius’ pioneering show, ‘Soul Train: The Music, Dance and Style of a Generation.’ . . . Morrissey’s long-awaited autobiography has cross-generational appeal, and no one writes quite as beautifully, or miserably. . . . Stanley Crouch’s ‘Kansas City Lightning: The Rise

and Times of Charlie Parker’ is a remarkable, in-depth book about jazz’s towering visionary, and ‘The Riot Grrrl Collection’ serves as a comprehensive anthology of a turning point in punk and indie rock. . . . finally, Bernie Krause’s ‘Great Animal Orchestra’ was reprinted this year, and weaves together the sounds of nature with modern music; if you were blown away by that popular Facebook post of a recording of crickets slowed down, sounding like human voices, this book is for you. . . . Much like Miles Scott simply asked “I want to be Batkid,” your teenager might simply ask, “I want to make beats.” The best new software to realize this wish includes ACID Music Studio 9, which interacts well with MIDI and live instruments; FL Studio, which is perfect for beginners but lacks more specialized editing capabilities; and Mixcraft 6, which has a huge library of sounds. Don’t forget headphones—if you want something cheaper (and better) than the ubiquitous Beats By Dre models, go for our recommendation: Audio-Technica’s ATH-M50 Headphones, which are crisp, dynamic and should last for years to come.—Gabe Meline

The Great Outdoors Every family has one. That relative who’d rather be camped out by a lake, roasting hot dogs over an open fire, than doing anything else. How about a tiny, backpack-friendly Bush Smarts Game Kit ($35; www. bushsmarts.com) to keep them entertained under the stars? It comes with miniature cards, dice and a score pad for dozens of different games, promising hours of entertainment. . . . Don’t underestimate the power of a really good lantern. The 1.1-pound Goal Zero Lighthouse 250 ($80; www.goalzero.com) casts a strong light for up to 48 hours and can be hand-cranked back to life in a pinch; a built-in USB hub makes for easy charging. . . . Outdoor adventures in the summer usually involve mucking about in water. The Astral Porter ($85; www. astraldesigns.com) is a water shoe that actually looks cool and dries in the blink of an eye. . . . Anyone who’s spent a sleepless night in the woods will appreciate the gift of a Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XLite Sleeping Pad ($179.95; www.rei.com). Lightweight, warm and packable, this will make the die-hard backpackers on your list very happy. . . . Seriously,


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Eater’s Delight ‘L.A. Son’ ($30) reads as part memoir, part cookbook from Roy Choi, the man behind the Kogi Taco Truck franchise in Los Angeles. Credited with helping birth the gourmet food truck

) 20

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what’s better for camping or traveling than the Izola Sunrise Travel Cup ($18; www.izola.com), a collapsable vessel that can transform from a shot glass into a 2-ounce espresso cup in the blink of an eye? . . . I don’t know about you, but I’ve always dreamed of having a sleeping bag that I could wear. Lucky for lazy campers like me, the dream is alive with Poler’s Napsack ($130; www. polerstuff.com). With zippers at the shoulders (the better to stick out your arms), and a cinch at the bottom for easy leg extension, this is a wearable sleeping bag that’ll make those cold mornings on Mt. Shasta all the more bearable. —Leilani Clark

scene in Southern California, his original, down-to-earth style is as fun to read as his tacos are to eat. Is life like a box of chocolates? Forrest Gump may have been talking about the Russell Stover Gift Box ($13) when he delivered his famous musing, but the Noir Truffle Box ($26) from Recchiuti Confections offers deeper insight. With each bite of these super-gourmet treats, the meaning of life melts into one’s being until the box is empty, and it’s time to rediscover it again. Nine chocolates, including four distinct, single-origin squares, delight even the most discerning of chocolate aďŹ cionados. Aspiring Alton Browns will certainly get a kick out of Molecule-R’s Molecular Gastronomy Kit ($59). With tools like pipettes, tubing and silicon molds, and additives like agar-agar, calcium lactate and soy lecithin, home chef becomes mad scientist in the virtual kitchens of El Bulli. Nobody will judge you for laughing maniacally while turning food into spheres, emulsiďŹ cations and deconstructed versions of their former selves. If you want food to look pretty, you had best prep correctly. It’s easy to do with Fred & Friends’ Obsessive Chef Cutting

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Gift Guide ( 19

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The people on your list already have enough

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Board ($26), which features angled guides for slicing, grids for dicing and fine lines for assisting with that exact julienne. Ants on a Log becomes exactly seven ants on a 3.5-inch log; baguettes will be cut into one-inch rounds at precisely 45-degrees; and most importantly, when your food and beverage director asks for an equal amount of blueberries in each muffin, he will get an equal amount of blueberries in each muffin.—Nicolas Grizzle

Between the Lions For the avid reader, nothing beats the gift of a new book or a subscription to a magazine or journal. ‘N+1,’ a literary journal that’s been around since 2004, combines politics, literature and culture into one seamless reading experience (www.nplusonemag.

com). For those who enjoy edgy, contemporary writing, there’s an abundance of options, including ‘Pank’ (www.pankmagazine. com), ‘The Los Angeles Review’ (www.losangelesreview.org), ‘The Normal School’ www. thenormalschool.com) and ‘Annalemma’ (www.annalemma. net). Locally, the ‘West Marin Review’ is always a solid choice (www.westmarinreview.org). Environmentally conscious folks will love a year-long subscription to ‘Yes! Magazine,’ ‘The Sun,’ ‘Orion’ or the ‘Earth Island Journal.’ . . . Or how about a bestselling book? A decade in the making, ‘The Goldfinch’ (Little, Brown; $30) by enigmatic writer Donna Tartt, has received rave reviews since its publication last month. Inspired by a painting in New York City’s Frick Collection, it tells the story of Theo Decker,


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’Scuse Me While I Kiss the Sky who miraculously survives an accident that kills his mother and is eventually drawn into the art underworld. ‘Dissident Gardens’ (Doubleday; $27.95) by acclaimed author Jonathan Lethem relays the epic saga of a family of radicals in New York. ‘The Stud Book’ (Hogarth Books; $17.50) by Monica Drake takes a darkly humorous look at a group of friends in Portland as they deal with the onslaught of middle age, marriage and whether or not to procreate in a climate-change ravaged world that will probably end by 2030. ‘The Good Lord Bird’ (Riverhead; $16.98) by James McBride, narrated by an escaped slave during the John Brown Harper’s Ferry era, won the National Book Award for fiction and is a good choice for historical fiction lovers. Out now on Kelly’s Cove Press, ‘A Raid on the Oyster

Humankind may be kings of the land, but can we conquer the skies and seas as well? These gifts include freefalling through the skies higher than any bird is brave enough to fly and diving deeper in the ocean than the toughest shark himself. Starting at altitudes of 10,000 feet in the wild blue yonder and flying at up to 120 miles per hour, NorCal Skydiving offers tandem skydiving gift cards ($169–$199) for the more adventurous among one’s friends. After the parachute opens, the peace and serenity of canopy flight ensues, with spectacular views of the Pacific Ocean, steam from the geysers, the glaciers of Mount Shasta, Tomales Bay, the Russian River and the lush valleys of Napa and Sonoma. . . . For a little less speed, but with breathtaking views, California Hang Gliding offers tandem hang gliding ($275) that includes an in-action video of your ) 22

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Pirates’ ($15) features an original story by Jack London. First published in 1905 and now in the public domain, the story has been illustrated with new drawings and watercolors by William T. Wiley. An excellent gift idea for kids or London/Wiley fans alike. . . . Finally, the commuter in your life—the one who catches up on all of her book reading with ears instead of eyes—will love a subscription to Audible.com ($14.95; www.audible.com), an audio book repository with loads of literary choices.—Leilani Clark


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOVE MBER 27–D EC E M BE R 3, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Gift Guide ( 21

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experience to take home. Soaring off the cliffs of Mt. Tamalpais, your only job is to relax and enjoy the ride full of beautiful birds-eye-views unmatched by those seen from the ground. . . . Perhaps an adrenaline rush isn’t what you are looking for but you still seek unbelievable views. Seaplane Adventures ($179– $589) offers a helicopter ride with a Golden Gate tour, sunset Champagne tour, greater Bay Area tour, NorCal coastal tour and winetasting tour. The tours take off from Sausalito and are good to keep in mind for visiting relatives. . . . For an even more hands-on helicopter experience, Sonoma Helicopter ($300-$600) offers gift certificates for not only tours but flight training, during which you’ll ride in an R22 helicopter with an instructor, learning and actually flying the aircraft with your own hands. . . . Soaring over the beautiful countryside, hot air balloons are a prime way to

float up into the skies. In a wicker gondola high in the air, the serene ride is almost always capped with a glass of Champagne. The North Bay has an abundance of hot-air balloon rides from any of these locally owned companies: Napa Valley Balloons ($215), Napa Valley Drifters ($205), Balloons Above the Valley ($159$209), Napa Valley Aloft Balloon Rides ($150-$245) and Calistoga Balloons ($219-$349). . . . For an adventure not quite so high in the skies, zip-lining combines adrenaline and speed while gliding through the forest and, in the case of Sonoma Canopy Tours ($59-$99), taking in the beauty of NorCal’s coastal redwoods. . . . Maybe you’ve got someone on your list who wants to “fly through the air with the greatest of ease”? In the shade of an oak grove next to a babbling brook, Trapeze Pro ($40) offers flying trapeze classes, a circus art in a picturesque environment. . . . We


Other Boxless Wonders It might sound like the voiceover in a cheesy commercial, but seriously, why not give the gift of an experience to your loved ones over the holidays, rather than a big, plastic thingamabob packaged in a thousand layers of bubble wrap?

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have better maps of the surface of Mars than we do of our own ocean floor. Under the surface of the sea are entirely new worlds, waiting for us to explore what it has to offer—a kind of mysterious and untouched beauty not found on land. Getting scuba certified is the first step to ocean exploration, and training and open water classes for certification are available at Marin Diving Center ($149), Harbor Dive Center ($315) and Sonoma Coast Divers ($189).—Tara Kaveh

For the grandparents, especially the ones that live nearby, a spot in a music class with their favorite grandchild is something they’ll never forget. This year, I sprung for a Mini Music class for my mother-in-law and my daughter (www.minimusictime. com). For just $160, they’ll get 10 weeks of music, movement, fun and bonding; classes take place in both Sonoma and Marin counties. Grandma’s gonna love that much more than another pair of slippers. . . . Another option is a membership to the Bay Area Discovery Museum (www.baykidsmuseum.org). Family memberships are $150 and include year-round admission. Likewise, the Schulz Museum offers memberships starting at $40. . . . Outdoor enthusiasts will love an annual parks pass to either the state or regional parks system. A membership to Sonoma County Regional Parks (parks.sonomacounty.ca.gov) runs $69 and provides yearround opportunity to enjoy the multitude of parks in the area with extra perks. The Marin County Parks (www.marincounty.org) pass is $85 and provides access to miles of gorgeous nature. . . . OK, so you’ve got a sister who isn’t into camping and hates taking classes, but loves getting her hair and nails done. A gift certificate to a happening nail salon, one that offers fabulous nail art manicures, might be just the ticket. Try Nail Art Spa (707.526.3808) in Santa Rosa or Queen Nails (707.255.1826) in Napa. . . . Art aficionados will be happy to receive a membership to the Sonoma County Museum ($40; www.sonomacountymuseum.org), the Sonoma Valley Museum of Art ($30–$35; www.svma.org) or the di Rosa Preserve (Starting at $50; www.dirosaart.org). . . . You also can’t go wrong with gift certificates for the movies, a cooking class, a concert or a massage, especially for those who rarely take time out for themselves. The gift of self-care and a night out can be the best gift of all.—Leilani Clark

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The week’s events: a selective guide

CULTURE

Crush

SA N R A FA E L

Loads o’ Lesh

The golden age of rock ’n’ roll may be over if you’re looking at the Billboard charts, but the Bay Area remains a hub for icons that keep the timeless vibe alive. Phil Lesh created Phil Lesh and Friends for this very purpose: to pay homage to the Grateful Dead’s music by playing originals, common covers and songs from the members of his band. Back from their tour in New York and performing again at home in Lesh’s own spot, Lesh, Warren Haynes, Jimmy Herring, John Molo, Jeff Chimenti and Neal Casal perform Wednesday–Saturday, Dec 4–7, at Terrapin Crossroads. 100 Yacht Club Drive, San Rafael. 8pm. $79. 415.524.2773.

M I L L VA L L E Y

Stacks o’ Wax In an age of disposable downloads, you can now hear kids asking, “Mommy, what’s a record store?” ‘Village Music: The Last of The Great Record Stores’ tells the story of Mill Valley’s own—John Goddard’s Village Music. Chronicling the final nine months of the store’s existence, the film documents Goddard through the evolution of American music and his building of a musical community. Featuring interviews and performances with Elvis Costello, Bonnie Raitt, Ry Cooder, Sammy Hagar, Bob Weir and Jerry Garcia, the film screens Friday, Nov. 29, at Sweetwater Music Hall. 19 Corte Madera Ave., Mill Valley. 2pm. Free. 415.388.1700.

P E TA L U M A

Words o’ Tan Renowned for The Joy Luck Club, author Amy Tan has a new novel, The Valley of Amazement. Following the lives of an American mother and her half-Chinese daughter who are separated when the Qing Dynasty is overturned, the novel spans the collapse of China’s last dynasty to the beginning of the republic, and recaptures the lost world of Shanghai through the inner workings of courtesan houses. Tan reads from her story of trauma, desire, deception and the power of love on Monday, Dec. 2, at Copperfield’s Books. 140 Kentucky St., Petaluma. 7pm. Free. 707.762.0563.

S A N TA R O S A

Jokes o’ Tosh Comedy Central Tosh 2.0 host Daniel Tosh has the type of crude humor that makes it impossible not to laugh—no matter how obscene his material may be. Local fans of Tosh’s show noted last month his pick for “unfortunate high school name of the week”: Analy High School, which led into an onslaught of ass jokes. (“Located up your butt and around the corner, just off of the Hershey Highway in NorCal.”) Tosh brings his annual “Tosh Saves the World” comedy show to town on Saturday, Nov 30, at the Wells Fargo Center. 50 Mark West Springs Road, Santa Rosa. 8pm. $65–$75. 707.546.3600.

—Tara Kaveh

SOX O’ ROX Crystal Bowersox plays Nov. 4 at the Sweetwater Music Hall in Mill Valley. See Clubs, p31.


Kevin Berne

DARK DAYS An effective bleakness

drives this unique ‘Carol’ adaptation.

Spirit, Rejoice! MTC sets ‘Carol’ on the stage of Hades BY DAVID TEMPLETON

O

minous scaffolding casts shadows across a dimly lit stage. A high, wood-plank bridge spans the spare performance space, steeply raked and surrounded by crates, backstage paraphernalia and festoons of iron chains hanging like clusters of evil fruit. It’s the perfect playground for a Christmas play taking place mainly in Hell.

Such is the set of Marin Theatre Company’s Jacob Marley’s Christmas Carol, directed by Jon Tracy (Strangers, Babies; Terminus). In Tom Mula’s dark, alternative adaptation of Charles Dickens’ Christmas Carol, the familiar story is retold from the point of view of Jacob Marley, Ebenezer Scrooge’s dead business partner. Of course, ghosts, chains

‘Jacob Marley’s Christmas Carol’ runs Tuesday–Sunday, Nov. 26–Dec. 22, at the Marin Theatre Company. 397 Miller Ave., Mill Valley. Tuesday, Thursday–Saturday at 8pm; Wednesday at 7:30pm; Sunday at 7pm; 2pm matinees on Sunday. $37–$53. 415.388.5208.

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Shop LOC CAL for the Ho olidays!

y

Santa’s Riverboat Arrival - No ovember 30th, 11am

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Theatre Square Tree Lighting - November 30th, 6pm

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Merchant’s Holiday Open House Dec. 7th, 11am–5pm 5

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 27–DECEMBE R 3, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Stage

and the threat of eternal damnation hang over the original version as well, and both end with a satisfyingly redemptive, catch-inthe-throat climax. But the change of perspective in Mula’s story yields many pleasures and surprises. Director Tracy, working at a blurring, frenetic pace here, does have a knack for the macabre, and he certainly turns on the darkness. By keeping the stage dim and slightly hazy with smoke, he emphasizes the metaphor, while the actors carry flashlights to illuminate each other’s faces and create some stunning X-Files-type effects. Rooted in the glorious oratory of Victorian speech, this is the kind of play in which all actors serves as narrator, stepping in and out of character to deliver poetic descriptions and set the rapidly changing scenes. Marley (Khris Lewin) is dead, and in the afterlife offices of the Record Keeper (Stacy Ross), he learns that he must serve eternity in Hell, his soul doomed to gradually fuse into the locks and cash-boxes to which he devoted his life. When he learns that his only hope of escape is in finding a way to redeem the miserly soul of his partner Scrooge (Nicholas Pelczar), Marley reluctantly accepts the challenge. With the help of a boyish, underworld assistant named the Bogle (Rami Magron), Marley sets out, now a ghost among the living, to try and change the heart of a man even less redeemable than himself. Cleverly and inventively staged, with the energetic actors serving double-duty as props and scenery, Tracy keeps things visually interesting, though the poor actors’ words fly so fast and furious it’s sometimes hard to separate the moments of true emotion from all the rest. Still, there is much to delight the spirit and stir the senses in this offbeat but largehearted twist on a beloved classic. Rating (out of five): ++++


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOVE MBER 27–D EC E M BE R 3, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Film

THE GAMBLER Ben Bernanke heads the nation’s most puzzling institution.

Inside Job ‘Money for Nothing’ exposes checkered history of Federal Reserve BY LEILANI CLARK

W

hat do you know about the Federal Reserve? For the average American the answer is not much. The documentary Money for Nothing: Inside the Federal Reserve remedies this by explaining the powerful influence of the Fed on the global economy. Yes, a movie about “the Fed” sounds about as interesting as watching a 72-hour lawn-bowling match, but Money for Nothing drips with intrigue, from secret, high-powered banking meetings to stock market booms (and busts). Arising out of a secret meeting in 1910 (held on an island, no less) between a senator and the upper echelon of Wall Street, the Federal Reserve was originally instituted as a central bank, one that would set interest rates, regulate banks and “act as a guardian of financial stability and prevent chaos in markets,” according to one economist. In other words, the Fed was steering a Titanic called the U.S. economy, and it hit an iceberg first with the Great Depression, and second in 1971, when Nixon essentially announced the end of the gold standard, which kicked off 10 years of rising inflation and exorbitant interest rates. The third—well, we’re still experiencing the hangover from it. Most interestingly, the film touches on the deification of Ayn Rand acolyte and Fed chairman Alan Greenspan for his ability to “steer” the economy in a way that led to an unprecedented boom for stock market investments. Greenspan wasn’t afraid of intervening in the market, which at the time was unprecedented in the history of the Fed. Greenspan’s refusal to enforce Sandy Weill’s former foe known as the Glass-Steagall Act—and, ultimately, his push to abolish it—is one of those moments in economic history that continues to have lasting repercussions for millions of average Americans. ‘Money for Nothing: Inside the Federal Reserve’ screens on Tuesday, Dec. 3, at Rialto Cinemas. 6868 McKinley St., Sebastopol. 7pm. $7.25–$9.50. 707.525.4840.


HARD ON THE SINK Quickly brush

up on your Kanye spoofs for family dinner.

Go West

Your guide to talking about Kanye during the holidays BY GABE MELINE

A

s the family gathers around the table this year, talk will veer into all the usual territories: what Aunt Meg is doing for a job, how much everyone misses Buster the dog, the price of gas. But then, inevitably, some niece or other will mention the popular cultural topic that, sadly, you are ill-equipped to discuss: Kanye West.

The paralysis is immediate to you, who deplore all “controversyâ€? surrounding this “artist,â€? whose “attitudeâ€? you can’t stand. You could try to steer the conversation into friendlier musical territory (isn’t that Macklemore great?). But let’s face it: you don’t get this Kanye asshole, and you never will. Never fear! Here’s your easy, ďŹ ve-point guide to talking about Kanye West during the holidays. 1. Question: “Have you guys

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NEW RIDERS OF THE PURPLE SAGE PLUS MOONALICE &2)s8PM DOORSs BLUEGRASS

POOR MAN'S WHISKEY PLUS HEAD FOR THE HILLS 3!4s8PM DOORSs LED ZEPPELIN TRIBUTE BAND

ZEPPARELLA

35.s0-$//23s ROCK

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(ALL ORIGINAL BAND MEMBERS)

PLUS THE BLASTERS &2)s0-$//23s NEIL DIAMOND TRIBUTE BAND

AN EVENING WITH

SUPER DIAMOND .O#HILDREN5NDERTO!LL!GES3HOWS 0ETALUMA"LVD 0ETALUMA

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Sat Dec 7

Merle Haggard Special Guest The Malpass Brothers

Sun Dec 8 An evening with The Wailin’ Jennys

Wed Dec 11 "Come Together Tour" 'ĆŒĹ˝ĆľĹśÄšÄ‚Ć&#x;ŽŜ

Fri Dec 13

Craig Ferguson—Hot and Grumpy Sat Dec 14

The Blind Boys of Alabama Christmas Show Sun Dec 15

Dave Mason Sun Jan 12

111/29 1/29 – 12/5 12 / 5

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Jonny Lang Sun Feb 9

Boz Scaggs Sat Feb 15

Toad The Wet Sprocket

Alll is Al is L Lost ost

PPG13 G13 (10 : 30-1:15- 4 :15 ) -7: 00-9 : 20 (10:30-1:15-4:15)-7:00-9:20 WWednesday ednesday 12/4 12 / 4 only onl y ((4:15)-7:00-9:20 4 :15 ) -7: 00-9 : 20

Tue Feb 23

BB King Thur Feb 26

Clint Black Planning an event? Contact us for rental info

1350 Third St, Napa | 707.259.0123 www.uptowntheatrenapa.com

Summer field Summerfield 551 Summerfield 5 51 S ummer field Road Road Santa S anta R Rosa osa 707.522.0719 70 7. 522 .0719

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 27–DECEMBE R 3, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

seen the ‘Bound 2’ videoâ€?? Explanation: This refers to a new video showing Kanye and his wife Kim Kardashian simulating sex while riding a motorcycle though a Thomas Kincade backdrop. It’s alternately chintzy and artistic, and you could reference Jeff Koons here, but that’s too esoteric. Answer: “Yeah, messed up! And why did they airbrush out Kim Kardashian’s nipples? It’s not like she has a problem being naked and having sex on camera.â€? Zing! 2. Question: “Did you see Seth Rogen and James Franco’s spoof?â€? Explanation: This refers to a remake of the video with two popular comedic actors; they emulate the sex scenes and make out with each other. Showing you’re merely aware of it isn’t enough. Go for the gold. Answer: “Yeah, and did you see Kim tweeted that Kanye loved it? I thought he was going to go on another tirade!â€? There you go! 3. Question: “What did you think of Yeezus?â€? Explanation: This is Kanye West’s latest album, which is experimental, noisy and divisive. You can say you really need to listen to it more to make up your mind, and this is safe and understandable. But to show your prowess, remark on at least one song. Answer: “I like his old songs with that slowed-down soul sample element, so ‘Bound’ is my favorite.â€? You’re a champion! 4. Question: “But isn’t he such a jerk?â€? Explanation: Ooooh, the gauntlet is thrown! But you can do this. Say you’ve thought long and hard about his interviews, and his beef with Jimmy Kimmel—a popular late-night host—and his onstage “rants.â€? And then play it safe. Answer: “I think he’s misunderstood, and trying too hard. Why would anyone want to break into the stupid fashion world anyway?â€? Hooray! 5. If your interrogator starts getting too speciďŹ c and remarks on something you can’t possibly fake knowledge of, simply get up, go to the computer and watch the Seth Rogen video together, and laugh. There’ll be a suggested video in the sidebar of Tom Brady yelling at referees on the football ďŹ eld—this is your savior! Click on it, call over Uncle Mitch and let the holiday talk resume to the tried and true. All is well again!


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOVE MBER 27–D EC E M BE R 3, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

28

Spreckels Theatre Company presents

SCROOGE Book, Music and Lyrics by LESLIE BRICUSSE Directed by GENE ABRAVAYA Music Direction by CYNTHIA HEATH Choreography by MICHELLA SNIDER Costume Design by PAMELA ENZ

Music Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Ceremony Hardcore group originally from Rohnert Park (yes, really) returns to the Bay Area. Big Eyes, Tony Molina, Creative Adult and Provos open. Nov 30, 8pm. $10. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Through December 22, 2013 Thurs 7:30pm Friday & Saturday, 8pm Saturday & Sunday Matinees, 2pm

Mannheim Steamroller Christmas America’s favorite epic holidaygasm comes to Santa Rosa for the first time. Dec 3, 8pm. $55-$75. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Based on Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, this delightful stage musical version has been adapted from the 1970s film of the same name starring Albert Finney as Scrooge.

New Riders of the Purple Sage Psychedelic ‘60s group once included Jerry Garcia. Nov 30, 8:30pm. $25. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

It's the perfect holiday entertainment for the whole family.

San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus

TICKETS Box Office: 707.588.3400 Box Office hours: Tues–Sat, noon–5pm and 1 hour before show To purchase tickets ONLINE please go to: http://purchase.tickets.com/buy/Ticket Spreckels Performing Arts Center - 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park

Funny, outrageous, loving and always entertaining, this group of 200 velvet-voiced men sing holiday favorites. Dec 1, 7:30pm. $30-$45. Jackson Theater, Sonoma Country Day School, 4400 Day School Place, Santa Rosa. 707.284.3200.

MARIN COUNTY Paul Barrere & Fred Tackett of Little Feat Renowned guitarists play with Matt Jaffe. Nov 30, 9pm. $22$27. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Phil Lesh & Friends Grateful Dead bassist with Warren Haynes, Jimmy Herring, John Molo, Jeff Chimenti and Neal Casal. Dec 4-7, 8pm. $79. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

Carlos Reyes Santana meets Gypsy Kings with Paraguayan harpist and violinist. Nov 30, 8pm. $28$45. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

NAPA COUNTY Faith Ako Hawaiian music also featuring Steven Espaniola and Patrick Landeza. Nov 30, 8pm. $25$30. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY A’Roma Roasters Nov 29, Disclaimer. Nov 30,

These Paper Satellites. 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Aqus Cafe Nov 29, Billy Love Express. Nov 30, Moonlight Rodeo. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Center Nov 30, Ceremony, Big Eyes, Tony Molina, Creative Adult, Provos. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Brixx Nov 30, Hundred. 16 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.766.8162.

Chrome Lotus Fri, Sat, Live DJs. 501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5643.

Devi Yoga Center Nov 30, Jens Narvie & Sahar. 7151 Wilton Ave, Sebastopol. 707.318.6538.

Dry Creek Kitchen Dec 2, Greg Hester and Jim Passarell. Dec 3, Christian Foley-Beining and Tom Shader. 317 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.0330.

Flamingo Lounge Nov 29, Poyntlyss Sistars. Nov 30, B4 Dawn. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Forestville Club Nov 27, Planet Waves. Nov 29, Rovetti & Meatballs. 6250 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.2594.

French Garden Nov 29, Da Puna Bruddahs. Nov 30,

) 30

Tuesday

Ladies Play Free Wednesday

1/2 off Pool Thursday

Lagunitas $2 Draft Daily Happy Hour 1pm-7pm

Buffalo Billiards

762-8921 www.buffalo-billiards.com 246 Petaluma Blvd N. Petaluma, CA

HORA DECUBITUS Rohnert Park heroes Ceremony make their mighty return to

the Arlene Francis Center on Nov. 30. See Concerts, above.


ŴŻ NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 27- DECEMBE R 3, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM


Music ( 28

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOVE MBER 27–D EC E M BE R 3, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

30

Organix. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

707.829.7300 70 7. 829 . 7 3 0 0 SEBASTOPOL E B AS T OP OL 230 2 30 P PETALUMA E TA L U M A A AVE VE | S

OPEN O P E N MIC M I C NIGHT NIGHT

EVERY E VERY T TUES UES A AT T7 7PM PM W WITH ITH E EVAN VAN FRI F RI N NOV OV 29 TTRAP R AP | B BASS A SS | G GLITCH L I TC H

AN-TEN-NAE AN -TEN-NAE $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

SAT S AT N NOV OV 3 30 0

ROCK R O CK | PROGRESSIVE PRO GRESSIVE | ALTERNATIVE ALTERNATIVE

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

$$8/DOORS 8 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

SUN SU N DEC D EC 1

BLUEGRASS B LUEGR A SS | A AMERICANA MER IC ANA | FFOLK OLK ROCK R O CK

LARRY L ARRY K KEEL EEL A AND ND T THE HE NATURAL N ATURAL BR BRIDGE IDGE FREE/DOORS FR EE / DOORS 5PM/21+ 5PM /21+

$$7/ 7/ LLADIES ADIES FFREE REE B4 B4 11/DOORS 11/DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM/21+

WED W ED D DEC EC 4

DUBSTEP D UBS TEP | WEST WES T COAST COA S T | GLITCH G L I TC H

BRAINSTORM BR AINSTORM W WITH ITH

LLOTUS OTUS D DROPS ROPS

$$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM /21+

THUR T HUR DEC D EC 5

BRASS B R A SS | JAZZ JA Z Z | FUNK FU N K

CALIFORNIA C ALIFORNIA HONEYDROPS HONEYDROPS $20/DOORS $2 0 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM W W W. H O PM ONK .CO M BBook ookk yyour our

next ne x t eevent vent with with u us, s, u up p tto o2 250, 50, kkim@hopmonk.com. i m @ h o p m o n k . co m .

Heritage Public House Nov 30, Kingsborough. 1901 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

Hopmonk Sebastopol

Hopmonk Sonoma

MON M ON D DEC EC 2

DJJ JACQUES D JACQUES & D DJJ GUACAMOLE GUACAMOLE

Dec 1, Santa Rosa Children’s Chorus. 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Nov 27, BrainStorm. Nov 29, AnTen-Nae. Nov 30, Boo Radley’s House, Stimuli, Mercury in Retroshades. Dec 1, Larry Keel & the Natural Bridge. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

BOO B OO RADLEYS RADLEYS HOUSE HOUSE

REGGAE R EGGAE | DANCEHALL DANCEHALL | H HIP IP HOP HOP MONDAY M ONDAY NI NIGHT GHT E EDUTAINMENT DUTAINMENT W WITH ITH

Glaser Center

Come see us! Wed–Fri, 2–9 Sat & Sun, 11:30–8

Brewery Tours Daily at 3! 1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

w w w.L AGU N ITAS.com

Nov 27, Jamie Clark. Nov 29, the Blackberry Bushes. Nov 30, the Ruminators. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg Nov 30, Michael MacKenzie Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Jackson Theater Dec 1, San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus. Sonoma Country Day School, 4400 Day School Place, Santa Rosa. 707.284.3200.

Jasper O’Farrell’s Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

DIN N E R & A SHOW Fri 2nd Annual Leftover Party! Nov 29 THE JERRY HANNAN BAND Original Entertainment 8:30 Sat

The Fabulous Nov 30

BUD E LUV’S 9th Annual Holiday Party! 8:30

JESSE BREWSTER Dec 6 Original Rock, Americana, Alt Country Fri

8:30

“A Christmas Rock n’ Roll Dance Party� Dec 7 JOHNNY ALLAIR AND PETE LIND RIDE AGAIN! 8:30

Sun

“Second Sunday Series� Dec 8 TINY TELEVISION 4:00 / No Cover

Fri

“Double Trouble� Dec 13 BESO NEGRO AND THIS OLD EARTHQUAKE 8:00

Sat

“Shana and Santa!� Dec 14 SHANA MORRISON Sizzling Singer/Songwriter 8:30 Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Nov 29, Stefanie Keys Band. Nov 30, Rhythm Rangers. Thurs, Open Mic. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

River Theatre Thurs, Thugz. 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.3194.

Dave. Mon, Donny Maderos’ Pro Jam. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Wells Fargo Center Dec 3, Mannheim Steamroller Christmas. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

MARIN COUNTY

Russian River Brewing Co Dec 1, Nick Lopez. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub Nov 29, Larry K Potts. Nov 30, Chinchillas. Sun, Evening Jazz with Gary Johnson. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Society: Culture House Wed, North Bay Blues Revue. Thurs, Casa Rasta. Sun, Church on Sundays. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Toad in the Hole Pub Mon, open mic with Phil the Security Guard. First Sunday of every month, Robert Herrera, Brianna Lee, Josh Barrett. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Tradewinds Nov 27, Fabulous Bio Tones. Nov 29, Ricky Alan Ray Band. Nov 30, Levi Lloyd & the 501 Band. Tues, Jeremy’s Open Mic. Thurs, DJ

142 Throckmorton Theatre Nov 30, Carlos Reyes. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Club 101 Wed, 8:20pm, salsa dancing with lessons. 815 W Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.460.0101.

Fenix Nov 29, Luvplanet. Nov 30, Greg Scott. Dec 1, Kurt Huget. Wed, Blues Night. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

George’s Nightclub Nov 29, the Cheeseballs. Wed, Salsa & Bachata. Thurs and Fri, DJ Rick Vegaz. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Hopmonk Novato Nov 29, Yeah Sure Whatever. Wed, Open Mic. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

19 Broadway Club Nov 27, Cambo & the Life.

Last Saturday of every month, Good Hip-Hop. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Monday ~ Open Mic Night with Austin DeLone 7:30pm :HG1RYĂŁSP

14th Annual Black Wednesday Party

Vinyl )UL1RYĂŁSP

The 85's Black Friday Bash: An 80's Dance Party with

Matt Jaffe & The Distractions 6DW1RYĂŁSP

Paul Barrere & Fred Tackett of Little Feat with Matt Jaffe

Sat

Redwood Cafe

:HG'HFĂŁSP

Crystal Bowersox with Seth Glier )UL'HFĂŁSP

Two Gallants Once and Future Band

Lagunitas Tap Room Nov 27, Beau & friends. Nov 29, Hand Me Down. Nov 30, Ain’t Misbehavin’. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Main Street Station Nov 27, Susan Sutton Trio. Nov 30, Bruce Halbohm & Greg Hester. Dec 1, Janie Roberts. Dec 4, Pocket Canyon Ramblers. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Nov 27, Gentleman Soldiers. Nov 30, Timothy O’Neil Band. Wed, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre

Blame Sally

Nov 30, New Riders of the Purple Sage. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

6XQ'HFĂŁSP

Phoenix Theater

6DW'HFĂŁSPĂŁQG6KRZ

Will Hoge

with Red Wanting Blue )UL6DW'HF ĂŁSP

Monophonics Annual Soulful Social www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave Mill Valley CafĂŠ 415.388.1700 | Box Office 415.388.3850

Tues, 7pm, Acoustic Americana jam. Wed, 6pm, Jazz jam. Sun, 5pm, rock and blues jam. Mon, 7pm, young people’s AA. Fourth Thursday of every month, writers workshops. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

San Francisco’s City Guide

Nightmares on Wax Stellar productions from the U.K. range from stoned soul to trip-hop to modern house. Nov 29 at the Mezzanine.

Less Than Jake Gainesville’s ska-punk juggernaut continues its pizzaand-Teddy-bear crusade. With Anti-Flag. Nov 29 at Slim’s.

Adventure Club Montreal dubstep duo currently taking the internet and club scene by storm. Nov 30 at Regency Ballroom.

Cat Power Like Bruce Cockburn once sang: You pay your money and you take your chance. Dec. 1 at Regency Ballroom.

Louis Hayes Jazz drummer leads Cannonball Legacy Band in “Mercy, Mercy, Mercy� and other favorites. Dec 3-4 at Yoshi’s Oakland.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.


31

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Osteria Divino Nov 27, David Sturdevant & John Stafford. Nov 29, Eric Markowitz Trio. Nov 30, Denise Perrier. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Music / Events

Panama Hotel Restaurant Nov 27, Kellye Gray. Dec 1, Ann Brewer. Dec 3, Swing Fever. Dec 4, Joan Getz Quartet. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Peri’s Silver Dollar Nov 30, Rusty Evans & the Ring of Fire. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio Nov 29, Jerry Hannan Band. Nov 30, the Fabulous Bud E Luvs. Dec 1, Matt Bolton. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sausalito Seahorse Nov 29, North Bay Blues Revue. Nov 30, Freddy Clarke. Dec 1, Orquestra la Moderna. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady Nov 29, Fenton Coolfoot & the Right Time. Nov 30, Eli & Javi’s Gypsy Jazz. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smiley’s Nov 29, Beso Negro. Nov 30, This Old Earthquake. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Sweetwater Music Hall Nov 27, Vinyl. Nov 29, Matt Jaffe & the Distractions. Dec 1, Moonalice. Dec 4, Crystal Bowersox, Seth Glier. Every other Wednesday, Wednesday Night Live. Mon, Open Mic. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads Nov 30, Walking Spanish. Dec 1, Midnight North. Wed, Terrapin Family Band Bar Show. Fri, 4:20 Happy Hour with live music. Fri, Brian Lesh & Ross James. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

NAPA COUNTY Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Wed, Jumpstart. Sun, DJ Night. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Lydia’s Organics

(IGĈĀTQĈ*6))

(IEXL'EJI How to Make the Most SJ=SYV *MRMXI 0MJIAt "Death Cafes", people

C’mon Baby! Paulie Hips & the Childbearers shout pure primal poetry Certain bands have betweensong banter that proves just as entertaining, if not moreso, than their songs. I have a friend who’s memorized every spoken interlude on Kiss Alive!, Fugazi is the subject of a much-shared download (“Ice cream-eating motherfucker, that’s what you are�), and Guided by Voices released an album entirely of their singer’s hilarious rants. Enter Sonoma’s raucous, debauched Paulie Hips & the Childbearers, a dirty-fuzzyglammy hard rock band whose namesake frontman keeps the oooh-yeawuh and awwwlryyyite tradition alive with wild abandon. Sure, they play places like the Blue Moon Saloon, the Olde Sonoma House and the Moose Lodge, but when Mr. Hips starts a frenzy of urgent yelping or dedicating songs to Huey Newton, one could imagine they’re in Detroit’s Cobo Arena itself. Paulie Hips & the Childbearers are the featured attraction at Gundlach-Bundschu’s “MonMOMental Movember Shave-Off� this week, in which gentlemen who’ve participated in the annual November tradition of growing a mustache for charity ceremoniously have said flavor-saver shaved. A photo booth, prizes and wine round out the event—oops, I mean, the “lightnin’ hard rock ’n’ roll explosion, awwwyyeah!�—on Saturday, Nov. 30, at Gundlach-Bundchu Winery. 2000 Denmark St., Sonoma. 2–4pm. Free. 707.938.5277.—Gabe Meline

come together in a relaxed and safe setting to discuss death. The objective of Death Cafe is 'To increase awareness of death with a view to helping people make the most of their (finite) lives.

(IGĈÄ€TQĈ*6))

Holiday Belly Dance

North Bay Belly Dancers feature instructors and students from all over the Bay Area, in a holiday belly dance show at the Sunflower Center! Sponsored by Katherine Wolf and Theresea Jade, both instructors of belly dance in Sebastopol and Santa Rosa

(IGĈĀTQĈMRGPYHIW'(

Music &*YRO]6SGO(ERGI4EVX] to 'IPIFVEXI &IRIJMX1EVNSVMI6MGLEVHWSR

8LI&MPP]0SZI)\TVIWW + Special Guests +MVPW2MKLX3YX8LI&EF]&SSQIVW

PURCHASE TICKETS ONLINE AT W W W.LYDIASORGANICS.COM /.$%08&--#-7%t1&5"-6."t$"

707.792 . 530 0

Sonoma County’s Original Roadhouse Tavern

Great Food & Live Music Tues Dec 3 118'4˜LhENUGN2/˜FEx

"Levi's Workshop" with Levi Lloyd & Friends Fri Dec 6 118'4gLhENUGN2/˜FEx

Kyle O’Brien Trio Sat Dec 7 118'4gLhENUGN2/˜FEx

JimBo Trout

Silo’s

Uptown Theatre

Nov 30, Mr P Chill, Mike Colossal, Max Bundles. 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Nov 29, Caravan of All Stars. Nov 30, Sargent Tucker Band. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Nov 30, Faith Ako, Steven Espaniola, Patrick Landeza. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Wed, Fri & Sat Nov 27, 29 & 30

Top 40 DJs TOP 40 & PARTY ROCK

Sun, Dec 1

118'4gLhENUGN2/˜FEx

tim hockenberry

Christmas Jug Band

LIVE PIANO & VOCALS

& The Fish People Fri Dec 13

Coming in Dec—

Jarvis Conservatory

LIVE MUSIC. NO COVER.

Rasta Dwight's BBQ! 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove

707.795.5118 twinoakstavernpenngrove.com

Happy Hour Daily 4–6:30pm

132 KELLER ST, PETALUMA 707.238.0158 info@socialclubrestaurant.com

for calendar of events & information

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 27–DECEMBE R 3, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Nov 29, Tom Finch Group, lumanation. Nov 30, Benefit for Hummingbird Cafe. Dec 4, Kugelplex. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | NOVEMBE R 27–D EC E M BE R 3, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

32

34th ANNUAL HOLIDAY

Arts Events Galleries

Luther Burbank

SONOMA COUNTY Artlife Gallery

Home & Gardens

Through Dec 28, “What Are You Looking At?� works by Ken Berman and William C Cutler. 958 Gravenstein Hwy S, Sebastopol. 707.824.8881.

Dec 7 & 8 Sat & Sun 10am–4pm

Calabi Gallery

$

Through Dec 31, “Gallery Group Show.� 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

2 Admission ages 12 & over

Tour the historic home decorated for the holidays in Victorian style Santa Rosa & Sonoma Aves, Downtown Santa Rosa FREE PARKING at 1st & D Sts & FREE RIDES on Rosie between this event and the DIckens Holiday Crafts Fair

707.524.5445

www.lutherburbank.org

Luther Burbank Home & Gardens—A Registered National, State, & City Historic Landmark 501(c)(3) Nonprofit Tax ID# 26-3008405

1030 Main Street in downtown Napa

NVOH.ORG

707.226.7372 Persimmon Pudding by Carolyn Lord

TICKETS TO ANY 3 SHOWS BELOW

PAULA POUNDSTONE

Open Wed thru Sun, 11 to 5pm 144 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma

707tcalabigallery.com

FRI, NOV 29

A ROCKAPELLA CHRISTMAS THU, DEC 5

WINDHAM HILL WINTER SOLSTICE

Through Dec 31, “Red It Is,� Christmas exhibit. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts

SAT, DEC 14

THU, DEC 19

Gallery One

Through Dec 1, “New Work,� paintings by James Fred and Sandra Rubin. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

FRI, DEC 13

NVOH IS THE RECIPIENT OF CORKAGE FEES FROM FARMSTEAD FOR THE MONTH OF NOVEMBER!

Through Dec 3, “Senior Show,� artwork by Sonoma County seniors. Through Dec 19, “Drawing Towards Design,� works by architect Obie G Bowman. Through Dec 19, “Student Show,� art by SRJC students. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Graton Gallery

A CHARLIE BROWN CHRISTMAS WITH DAVID BENOIT

HOT CLUB OF SAN FRANCISCO A COOL YULE

Through Feb 3, “Play Things: Toys in Peanuts,� a nostalgic journey through popular toys in the Peanuts comic strip. Through Mar 2, “School Projects,� follow the Peanuts gang as they struggle through a typical school year with original comic strips. Through Apr 27, “Starry, Starry Night,� feautring Peanuts characters under the night sky. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; SatSun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Finley Community Center

Tickets & Information

2013 HOLIDAY PACKAGE SAVE 25% WHEN YOU BUY

Charles M Schulz Museum

At the Veterans Building 282 South High St. Sebastopol, CA 95472 707.829.4797 www.sebarts.org

Through Dec 31, “Art for the Holidays,� works by 25 artists for sale. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

History Center Through Feb 6, “Sculpture Trail,� outdoor exhibit with

sculptures along Cloverdale Boulevard and Geyserville Avenue changing every nine months. 215 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale.

Occidental Center for the Arts Through Jan 5, “OCA Paintings,� works by Adam Wolpert, Tony King, Jack Stuppin and Bill Wheeler. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Redwood Cafe Through Jan 14, “Tracing History in Her Art,� work by Pat Morgenthaler. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Jan 5, “New Work,� photography by Lance Kuehne. Through Jan 5, “Water, Water Everywhere,� photography by Gus and Sharon Feissel. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Through Nov 30, “Fiber Art VI,� large, international, juried fiber art exhibition. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sebastopol Gallery Through Jan 4, “Beneath the Surface,� art by Bert Kaplan and Rebeca Trevino. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

Sonoma County Museum Through Dec 1, “Day of the Dead Altars,� pieces made to honor lost ones who have passed. Through Jan 12, “Photography in Mexico,� from the collection of the SF MOMA. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Dec 1, “Delicious Images: Art About Food,� paintings and works on paper by Wayne Thiebaud and Joseph Goldyne. Through Dec 1, “Kitchen Memories,� culinary art and equipment collection of Kathleen Thompson Hill. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. WedSun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

University Art Gallery Through Dec 15, “Mark

Perlman: A 25 Year Survey,� pieces by retiring SSU art professor. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

Upstairs Art Gallery Through Nov 30, “Impressionistic Paintings,� works by Cynthia JacksonHein. 306 Center Ave (above Levin & Co bookstore), Healdsburg. Sun-Thurs, 10 to 6; Fri-Sat, 10 to 9. 707.431.4214.

MARIN COUNTY Bolinas Museum Through Dec 29, “Annual Mini Show,â€? featuring a little something different. Through Dec 29, “Inspired by Process,â€? works by coastal Marin printmakers. Through Dec 29, “Mordançage,â€? photography by Elizabeth Opalenik. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

Community Media Center of Marin Through Nov 30, “Retrospective,� art by David Quinley. 819 A St, San Rafael. 415.721.0636.

Gallery Route One Through Dec 1, “Edges and Flows,� paintings by Mary Mountcastle Eubank. Through Dec 1, “For the Birds,� sitespecific installation by Jane Ingram Allen. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Community Foundation Through Jan 24, “Transmissions,� work by 30 artists from around the country. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Marin Society of Artists Through Dec 14, “Winter Holidays & Gifts,� small works and handcrafted items. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. Mon-Thurs, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 415.454.9561.

MINE Art Gallery Through Dec 1, “BreathingLight,� sculptures by Sandra Cohn. 1820 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax.


33

Come see wonderful new things from all your favorite lines and celebrate the holiday season Sebastopol Style! 707 824-4300

195 N. Main St, Sebastopol

(SPANDEX) PANTS ON FIRE ‘The Armstrong Lie,’ about Lance Armstrong’s

steroid use and rage-addled denial thereof, is showing at the Rafael Film Center.

NAPA COUNTY di Rosa Through Dec 31, largest collection of contemporary Bay Area art. Tours daily. Through Feb 2, “Beatnik Meteors,� collaborative sculptures by regional artists. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

Downtown Napa Through Nov 30, 6pm, “Art on First,� the third annual exhibition bringing art to empty storefronts in downtown Napa. Includes work by 13 Bay Area artists on display through 2013. Through Jan 1, 2015, “Metamorphosis,� outdoor sculpture exhibit with self-guided tour. Main and Third streets, Napa.

Grand Hand Gallery Through Nov 30, “Found in Translation,� mixed-media by Thomas Morphis and ceramics by Hiroko Ishida. 1136 Main St, Napa. No phone.

Comedy Jay Alexander Mentalist, comedian and magician. Nov 29, 8pm. $25$40. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Regular panelist on NPR’s “Wait... Wait... Don’t tell Me.� Nov 29, 8pm. $40. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Slip-Goose Monkey Highlight performers from “Best of Sonoma County Improv 2009� tackle improvised comedic theater games on the fly. Last Thurs monthly at 7. Free. Aqus Cafe, 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Daniel Tosh Host of Comedy Central’s Tosh.0 is raunchy, offensive and hilarious. Nov 30, 8pm. $65-$75. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-and-comers. Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Dance Spreckels Performing Arts Center Nov 27, Babes in Toyland, presented by Tamara Grose. $15-$20. Nov 30, 7pm and Dec 1, 2pm, Nutcracker, presented by Petaluma’s North Bay Performing Arts Association and Contessi Ballet. $15-$25. 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park 707.588.3400.

Wells Fargo Center Fri, Nov 29, 8pm, So You

Think You Can Dance, top 10 finalists from TV dance show perform. $49-$69. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa 707.546.3600.

Events Bayer Farm Tending All ages welcome to join LandPaths for garden care. Wed, 4-8pm. Bayer Farm, 1550 West Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.524.9318.

Calistoga Art Walk Follow the signs and view art with strolling tour of shops and galleries. First Wed-Thurs of every month, 5-7pm. Free. Downtown Calistoga, Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.225.1003.

se every e era e & style t e s jewelry e e s ffurniture t e s ffruitt

Nov 30, Holiday art sale including work by Matthew Carden, Cara Brown and more. 906 Grant Ave, Novato, 415.408.3929.

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Elemental Dance Constantine Darling leads conscious movement dance using earth’s alchemy followed by sound healing. Monthly, last Fri at 7. $15-$20. Meridian Sports Club, 1001 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.2490.

Entrepreneurs’ Happy Hour Enjoy wine and hors d’oeuvres while socializing with local innovators, service providers and investors. First Tues of every month, 5pm. Free. Sonoma Mountain Business Cluster, 1300 Valley House Dr, Ste 100, Rohnert Park. 707.794.1240.

Fiber Arts Forum Informal gathering of fiber artists for idea sharing. All disciplines and experience levels, ages 15 and ) up. Last Fri each

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 27–DECEMBE R 3, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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month, 1 to 3. $5 donation. Sebastopol Center for the Arts, 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Game Tournaments

Gingko Cuff by Michael Michaud

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOVE MBER 27–D EC E M BE R 3, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Various card and role-playing games including Yu-Gi-Oh, Dungeons and Dragons and Magic: The Gathering. Mon-Thurs-Sun. Outer Planes Comics and Games, 526 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.546.2000.

Heirloom Craft Hub Each evening includes instruction for a specific craft. Last Thurs of every month. $5. Marin History Museum, Boyd Gate House, 1125 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.8538.

Holiday Toy Show Presented by Santa Rosa Toy Con. Nov 30, 10am. $5-$10. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

Low-Cost Physicals Family physicals for adults and children by appointment. Ongoing. $20-$65. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2880.

Mill Valley Art Walk First Tues monthly, 6 to 8, downtown area galleries and businesses showcase local artists. First Tues of every month, 6-8pm. Free. Downtown Mill Valley, Throckmorton Avenue, Mill Valley. 415.721.1856.

Parade of Lights Snow sledding on the street, a holiday marketplace and, of course, the parade of lights. Nov 29, 5pm and Nov 30, 9am.

Free. Downtown San Rafael, Fifth and A streets, San Rafael.

Plant Nursery Work Day Volunteer at the Sonoma Garden Park. Thurs, 9am2pm. Sonoma Ecology Center, 20 E Spain St, Sonoma. 707.996.0712.

Preschool Storytime A lap-sit program for infants, one day to 17 months old, accompanied by a parent or caregiver. Fri, 10:45am. free. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Resource Clinic Get info on housing, transit, food stamps and Medi-Cal. Wed, 11am-1pm. Free. Petaluma Health Center, 1301 Southpoint Blvd, Petaluma. 707.559.7500.

Senior Bridge Meet up and play a few hands, no partner required. Fri. Napa Senior Center, 1500 Jefferson St, Napa. 707.224.2055.

Teen Health Clinic Thurs, 3:30-6pm. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Toddler Storytime High-energy storytime for toddlers 18 months to three years old. Fri, 10am. Free. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Field Trips Sunset Hike & Dine Meet at parking area across from inn for two-hour hike

on moderate-to-steep trails with midhike wine and cheese overlooking Pacific Ocean. Last Sat of every month. $15. Mountain Home Inn, 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley, RSVP. 415.331.0100.

Turkey Trot Two-mile fun run. Nov 30, 9am. $10-$15. Bolinas Museum, 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.0330.

Film American Jerusalem Documentary about the pioneer Jews of San Francisco. Q&A with producer. Dec 4, 7:30pm. $12-$17. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Circus Dreams Documentary follows group of 12 to 18-year-olds of Circus Smirkus. Dec 3, 6pm. Free. Bay Model Visitor Center, 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.3871.

In the Cobbler’s Shoes Documentary about a cobbler in Mill Valley. Nov 30, 11:30am and 2pm. $12. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Larger Than Life Opera Nov 30, “Die Fledermaus.� Last Sat of every month, 7pm. through Nov 30. $20. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Village Music Documentary about the last of the great record stores. Nov 29, 2pm. Free. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

A LITTLE BIT O’ SOLE ‘In the Cobbler’s Shoes,’ about Mill Valley cobbler Misak Pirinjian, screens Nov. 30 at Sweetwater Music Hall. See Film, above.


1pm. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

Civic Center Farmers Market

Local produce, meat and artisan goods. Sun, 10am1:30pm. Sebastopol Plaza, McKinley St, Sebastopol.

Sun at 10am, “Eat Local 101” provides walking tour with information, cooking advice and ideas inspired by locally grown foods. Year-round. Thurs, 8am-1pm and Sun, 8am-1pm. Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 800.897.3276.

Corte Madera Farmers Market Year-round. Wed, noon-5pm. Town Center, Tamalpais Drive, Corte Madera. 415.382.7846.

Forestville Farmers Market Year-round. Tues, 3-7pm. Russian River Vineyards, 5700 Hwy 116, Forestville. 707.887.3344.

French Garden Farm Market Enjoy produce from restaurant’s farm, along with freshly baked breads and pastries from their kitchen. Every Sun, 10 to 2. Free. French Garden, 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Harvest Market Selling local and seasonal fruit, flowers, vegetables and eggs. Sat, 9am-1pm. Harvest Market, 19996 Seventh St E, Sonoma. 707.996.0712.

Healdsburg Farmers Market Sat, 9am-noon through Nov 30. Healdsburg Farmers Market, North and Vine streets, Healdsburg. 707.431.1956.

Indian Valley Farmers Market Organic farm and garden produce stand where you bring your own bag. Wed, 10am-3pm. College of Marin, Indian Valley Campus, 1800 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.454.4554.

Redwood Empire Farmers Market Sat, 8:30am-1pm and Wed, 8:30am-noon. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

Santa Rosa F armers Market First Wed of every month. Oakmont Farmers Market, Oakmont Drive and White Oak Drive, Santa Rosa. 707.538.7023.

Santa Rosa Original Certified Farmers Market Sat, 9am-1pm and Wed, 9am-

Sebastopol Farmers Market

Totally Truckin’ Thursdays Four food trucks park in the O’Reilly parking lot, provide you with local goodness and donate 10 percent of sales to a monthly selected nonprofit. Thurs. O’Reilly & Associates, 1005 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. 707.827.7190.

West End Wednesdays West End merchants offer wine, coffee and food tastings. Wed, 5-7pm. Free. Downtown Napa, First Street and Town Center, Napa.

Grandparent,” Mon and Thurs at 2:30. Bilingual storytime for ages three and up, second and fourth Wed at 10:30. Ongoing. Free. Calistoga Library, 1108 Myrtle St, Calistoga. 707.942.4833.

Carolyn Parr Nature Center Learn about Napa County habitats and birds of prey through tours, dioramas, games, hands-on activities and books. Ongoing. Free. Carolyn Parr Nature Center Museum, Westwood Hills Park, 3107 Browns Valley Rd, Napa. 707.255.6465.

Central Library Babytime, Tues at 10:15. Storytime for toddlers, Tues at 11. Preschool storytime, Fri at 11. Tues-Fri. Free. Central Library, Third and E streets, Santa Rosa. 707.545.0831.

Children’s Garden

For Kids American Canyon Library Preschool storytime. Tues, 10:30am. Free. American Canyon Library, 3421 Broadway (Highway 29), American Canyon. 707.644.1136.

Bay Area Discovery Museum Ongoing, “Animal Secrets.” Hands-on art, science and theater camps, art studio, tot spot and lookout cove adventure area. Wed-Thurs at 10 and 11, music with Miss Kitty. $5-$6. Fri at 11, aquarium feeding. Ongoing. Admission, $8-$10. Bay Area Discovery Museum, Fort Baker, 557 McReynolds Rd, Sausalito. 415.339.3900.

BelvedereTiburon Library Mon at 10:30 and 11, songs and fingerplays for kids under two. Wed at 11, toddler storytime; at 4, read-along program for ages seven and up. Mon. BelvedereTiburon Library, 1501 Tiburon Blvd, Tiburon. 415.789.2665.

Breakfast with Enzo Bring clapping hands, singing voices, dancing feet and breakfast for weekly family music show. Sun at 10 and 11. Mill Valley Golf Clubhouse, 267 Buena Vista, Mill Valley. 415.652.2474.

Calistoga Library Storytime with “Library

Whimsical environments for kids’ exploration. Hours: Mon, noon to 4; Tues-Sun, 9 to 5. Ongoing. Free. Cornerstone Sonoma, 23570 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.933.3010.

Chops Teen Club Hang-out spot for Santa Rosa teens ages 12 to 20 offers art studio and class, open gym, tech lounge, cafe, recording studio and film club. Hours for high schoolers: Mon-Thurs, 3 to 9; Fri, 3 to 11; Sat and school holidays, noon to 11. For middle school kids: Mon-Fri, 3 to 7; Sat and school holidays, noon to 7. Film club meets Tues at 4. Ongoing. Membership, $5$10 per year. Chops Teen Club, 509 Adams St, Santa Rosa. 707.284.2467.

Cloverdale Library Tues at 10:30, preschool storytime. Ongoing. Cloverdale Library, 401 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.5271.

Corte Madera Library Wed at 10 and 11, preschool storytime. Wed, 11am. Corte Madera Library. 707 Meadowsweet Dr, Corte Madera. 707.924.6444.

Fairfax Library Tues at Sat at 11, storytime for ages three and up. Tues-Sat, 11am. Fairfax Library, 2097 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. 415.453.8092.

Family Story Time Thurs. Petaluma Historical Museum & Library, 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. 707.778.4398.

Guerneville Library Wed at 11,

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Food & Drink


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOVE MBER 27–D EC E M BE R 3, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Become a

Book Angel! Gift one of 500 deserving children without many books in their homes. Call or visit the store.

Bookstore Holiday Open House MUSIC • HOT CIDER • GIFTS

Friday, Dec 6, 5:30–8pm

2013 Boho Arts Award Winner!

A E

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Preschool storytime. Wed, 11am. Free. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

HUGE H UG Wed, Nov 27 10:15am– 12:45pm 7–10pm

8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family SINGLES & PAIRS Square Dance Club

Clearan Clearance Sale S ale tthrough h TThanksgiving! hanks

Fri, Nov 29 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7–11pm Steve Luther DJ hosts WALTZAPALOOZA Sat,Nov 30 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 8–11pm North Bay Country Dance Society/Contra Dance Sun, Dec 1 5–9:25pm

8:30–9:30am Jazzercise DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING

Mon, Dec 2 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–9:25pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, Dec 3 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7:30pm–9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

LLover’ over’s Playthings Playthings • SSensual ensual Lingerie Lingerie • GGift ift CCertificates ertificates • JJewelry ewelry

Is your life in trouble?

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Meditation Group for Mothers

Messy Mucking About

Yountville Library

Every Saturday, 9:30 to 11:30, toddlers and their parents are invited to a drop-in, free-form art studio to create with paint, ceramics, collage, construction, found objects and feathers. Sat. $15. Nimbus Arts, St Helena Marketplace, Ste 1-B, 3111 St Helena Hwy, St Helena. 707.965.5278.

Storytime with “Library Grandparent,” Tues, 3pm. Free. Yountville Library, 6548 Yount St, Yountville. 707.944.1888.

Alone Together

Peace in Process

Northwest Regional Library

Learn how to cope with holiday blues with Joann Bostow. Dec 1, 2pm. Donation. Songbird Community Healing Center, 8297 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.2398.

Relax with morning meditation. First Sun of every month, 10:30am. Donation.

preschool storytime. Mon, 10:30am. Northwest Regional Library, 150 Coddingtown Center, Santa Rosa. 707.546.2265. Tues at 10, storytime for ages three to five; at 3, read to a specially trained dog from PAWS for Healing. Wed at 10, babytime; at 7, evening pajama storytime in Spanish and English. Fri at 10, storytime for toddlers. Sat at 4, parent-child reading group for second- and third-graders. Tues-WedFri. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801. A chance for new readers to get together. Tues-Sat. Free. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

1310 Fourth 1310 Four t St. @ C,, San Rafael 41 5 . 4 8 2 . 9 8 9 9 pleasuresoftheheart.com pleasuresoftheheart.ccom 415.482.9899

Windsor Library

explores changing and seasonal topics. Wed. Free. Peace in Medicine, 6771 Sebastopol Ave, Hwy 12, Sebastopol. 707.823.4206.

Babytime and preschool storytime. Tues, 10am. Free. Healdsburg Library, 139 Piper St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3772.

Healdsburg Library

Readers of the Pack

Thur, Nov 28 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise

Free film series, story and craft time. Tues-Wed-Fri. St Helena Library, 1492 Library Lane, St Helena. 707.963.5244. Preschool storytime and storytime for babies and toddlers. Tues-Wed. Free. Windsor Library, 9291 Old Redwood Hwy, Windsor. 707.838.1020.

Petaluma Library 415.663.9480 www.ptreyesbooks.com

St Helena Library

Rincon Valley Library Wed at 10:30, storytime for toddlers; at 11:30, for preschoolers. Wed, 10:30am. Free. Rincon Valley Library, 6959 Montecito Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.537.0162.

Rohnert Park-Cotati Library Toddler storytime, Tues at 10 and 11; preschool storytime, Wed at 10:30. Tues-Wed. Free. Rohnert Park-Cotati Library, 6250 Lynne Conde Way, Rohnert Park. 707.584.9121.

Saddle Club Children six and up are welcome for horse- and stablerelated games and a casual dinner. Fri, 5:30pm. $20. Sunrise Stables, 1098 Lodi Lane, St Helena. 707.333.1509.

Lectures

Ask a Historian Research Advisory Council tackles tough questions posed by moderator, first Sun monthly at 2:30. First Sun of every month. Free. Napa County Historical Society, Goodman Library, 1219 First St, Napa. www.napahistory.org.

Baba Harihar Ramji Babaji of Sonoma Yoga Ashram offers monthly satsang, “Living Fully in Each Moment.” Fourth Thurs at 7. Church of the Oaks, 160 W Sierra Ave, Cotati. 707.996.8915.

CityZen Evening of sitting meditation, tea and dharma talk. All are welcome. Mon, 7pm. Free. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Divorce Options Workshop Volunteer group of attorneys, financial specialists and mental-health professionals offer four-hour workshops on divorce. Last Sat of every month, 9am. $45. Family Service Agency, 555 Northgate Dr, San Rafael. 415.492.9444.

Drop-In Meditation Classes for all levels include guided meditation and brief commentary. Kids welcome. Ongoing. $10. Mahakaruna Buddhist Center, 304 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.766.7720.

Grow Clinic Weekly medicinal gardening clinic with master cultivators

Mindful meditation and sharing experiences for benefit of mothers and their children. Wed, 8:30am. $10. Shambhala Meditation Center, 255 West Napa St, Ste G, Sonoma.

O’Hanlon Roundtable Continuing parade of experienced artists share thoughts on creative process. All artists welcome. First Tues each month, 4 to 6. O’Hanlon Center for the Arts, 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.4331.

Pleasures of the Heart First Monday, women’s salon. Second Monday, coed discussion group. First Mon of every month, 7pm. Pleasures of the Heart, 1310 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.482.9899.

PRBO Speaker Series Learn about birds and ecology. Every third Thurs, 6:30pm. $10. PRBO Conservation Science, 3820 Cypress Dr #11, Petaluma. 707.781.2555.

Public Discussion Institute for the Fulfillment of Human Society invites all for public chat on current issues. First Tues of every month, 7pm. $5. Subud Hall, 234 Hutchins Ave, Sebastopol. 707.793.2188.

Science Buzz Cafe Dec 3, “Quantum Biology & Consciousness” with Charles Ostman. First Tues of every month. through Dec 3. $5. Aqus Cafe, 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Spirit & Revolution Rudolph Steiner’s teachings on social transformation with Abraham Entin. Thurs, 7pm. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Readings Aqus Cafe Dec 2, 6:30pm, Rivertown Poets with Casey Fitzsimmons and Kate Godsey. Mondays, 9:30am, Storytelling with Phaedra. 189 H St, Petaluma 707.778.6060.


37

Book Passage Dec 1, “Design for an Empathic World: Reconnecting People, Nature and Self” with Sim Van der Ryn. Dec 1, 1pm, “Designs for an Empathic World” with Sim Van der Ryn. Dec 1, 4pm, “My Promised Land: The Triumph and Tragedy of Israel” with Ari Shavit. Dec 3, 7:30pm, “Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook: How to Tell Your Story in a Noisy Social World” with Gary Vaynerchuck. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Coffee Catz Fourth Thursday of every month, 6pm, Sebastopol Great Books discussion group. 707.829.5643. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Dec 2, 7pm, “The Valley of Amazement” with Amy Tan. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

West End Cafe First Wednesday of every month, 7pm, First Wed at 7, open mic poetry evening. 1131 Fourth St, San Rafael.

Theater The 39 Steps A madcap spoof of the Hitchcock original in which four

actors play over 150 characters. Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Dec 8. $15-$25. Studio Theatre, Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Angelina Ballerina the Musical Based on the animated series, presented by Vital Theatre Company. Dec 4, 6:30pm. $16$21. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Bram Stoker’s Dracula Classic vampire story. Times vary. Thurs-Sun. $10-$12. Montgomery High School, 1250 Hahman Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.528.5191.

A Christmas Story Will Ralphie Parker get his cherished Red Ryder BB gun? Will he then shoot his eye out? What is Little Orphan Annie’s secret message? Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Dec 22. $15-$32. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Harvey Elwood P Dowd claims his best friend is an invisible, six-foottall white rabbit named Harvey. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Dec 15. $13-$26. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

Jacob Marley’s Christmas Carol The traditional holiday story told from another perspective. Times vary. Tues-Sun through Dec 15. $37-$53. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

Scrooge Classic musical Christmas tale of a heart of coal turned to gold, with music by Leslie Bricusse. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Dec 22. $22-$26. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

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Sleeping Indoors A woman befriends a homeless man and his kitten in this comic-drama. Times vary. Fri-Sun through Dec 22. $15. Pegasus Theater Company, Rio Nido Lodge, Canyon Two Rd, Rio Nido.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 27–DECEMBE R 3, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

‘DARK SIDE SODA’ Photos by Matthew Carden are part of a holiday sale at Super Fresh Art Gallery on Nov. 30. See Galleries, p33.


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | NOVE MBER 27- D EC E M BE R 3, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Astrology

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of November 27

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) Thinking inside the box will be a crime against your nature in the coming weeks. The last place you want to be is in a pigeonhole. I advise you to stay far away from tight squeezes, claustrophobic â&#x20AC;&#x153;sanctuariesâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;convenientâ&#x20AC;? conďŹ nements. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in a one-size-ďŹ ts-all situation, you simply wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be able to access your highest intelligence. So then where should you be? I am rooting for you to wander into the wild frontiers where unsanctioned wonders and marvels await you. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d love for you to ďŹ nd virgin terrain and uncharted territories where the boring old rules donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t apply. TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20)

Mike Finnigan is a veteran keyboardist and blues vocalist who has toured with more than 20 major acts, including Jimi Hendrix, Etta James, Leonard Cohen and Los Lonely Boys. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a primal quality to his singing. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gritty and ďŹ&#x201A;uid and tempestuous, almost feral at times. I understand perfectly why Bonnie Raitt has called him a â&#x20AC;&#x153;tall drink of bacon.â&#x20AC;? The sound he makes with his voice is that lush and tasty. Can you guess his astrological sign? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Taurus, of course. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m naming him your patron saint this week because you yourself are as close as you have ever come to being a tall drink of bacon.

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) French painter Henri Matisse thought highly of his own work. He tended to ignore critics because he didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think they understood his art well enough to produce intelligent critiques. There was one person whose opinion he was willing to heed, though, a single colleague who he said had earned the right to evaluate and assess his art: Pablo Picasso. I encourage you, Gemini, to come up with your own short list of people whose judgment you totally trust and respect. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good time to seek out their feedback on how youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing. CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22)

How is it possible that you have come so far and worked so diligently only to be resigned now to hanging out in limbo, waiting around for the lucky break that may or may not ever arrive? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m here today to escort you out of this infernal place. If you resist, my assignment is to drag you out. Why am I so adamant? Because I am sure itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a mistake for you to be passive and hope for the best. You need to resume working diligently, focused for now on whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right in front of you without worrying too much about the big picture. In my opinion, that approach will lead you to unforeseen helpâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and a clariďŹ cation of the big picture.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) Your levels of personal magic are high. The radiance beaming out of your eyes is extra sparkly. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an artistry to the way you are expressing yourself. Without even trying, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re exuding natural charisma and animal magnetism. In light of all these advantages, I suspect you will have an elevated capacity for both giving and receiving pleasure. In fact, I predict that your ability to feel really good and make other people feel really good will be at a peak. I hereby designate this the Week of Supreme Bliss.

VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22) The BBC reported on an expert who combs Switzerlandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Risoud Forest to ďŹ nd the spruce trees whose wood can be made into the highest quality violins. After years of experience, Lorenzo Pellegrini knows which few trees will produce instruments with the most resonant tones. They grow slowly and have few knots. They need to have had enough water to grow strong, but not so much water that theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re mushy. Your task in the coming weeks, Virgo, has a certain resemblance to the master tree pickerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time for you to start selecting and gathering the raw materials you will use to craft your own lyrical story in 2014. LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the bad news: for all of us, including you, there is a gap between our intentions and our actual effects. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the good news: now is your special time to narrow that gap. More bad news: all of us, you included, are periodically guilty of sending out mixed messages. We confuse people with our ambivalence; what we say is sometimes different from what we feel. More good news: now is your special time to reduce your mixed messages to as close to zero as possible. One more taste of bad news:

like all of us, you are a bit hypocritical. You engage in behavior that you criticize in others. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t practice what you preach. One last piece of good news: now is your special time to work on being forthright, genuine and consistent.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am very fond of strawberries and cream,â&#x20AC;? said author Dale Carnegie, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but I have found that for some strange reason, ďŹ sh prefer worms. So when I went ďŹ shing, I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think about what I wanted. I thought about what they wanted. I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bait the hook with strawberries and cream. Rather, I dangled a worm or grasshopper in front of the ďŹ sh.â&#x20AC;? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good teaching story for you, Scorpio. In order to get your desires fulďŹ lled by the people who have the power to do that, you should give them what they actually long forâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not what you long for, nor what you wish they would long for. This is always true, of course, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s especially applicable to whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on in your life right now.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) Touted as a prime source of â&#x20AC;&#x153;kick-@ss spirituality,â&#x20AC;? author Danielle LaPorte has advice thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good for you to hear. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You will always be too much of something for someone,â&#x20AC;? she says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;too big, too loud, too soft, too edgy.â&#x20AC;? But thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exactly as it should be, she adds. It would be a mistake to â&#x20AC;&#x153;round out your edges,â&#x20AC;? because then you would â&#x20AC;&#x153;lose your edge.â&#x20AC;? And Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m here to tell you that you need all of your edge right now, Sagittarius. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to ignore peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mediocre expectations and push past their limits. To be true to yourself, you will probably have to be too much of something for several someones. CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) Going into my spiritual mentoring session with the priestess, I had the intention of discovering truths about myself I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know before. That meant stirring up revelations about my ignorance as well as my potential. I wanted assistance in facing my ďŹ&#x201A;aws as well as in tapping into my dormant powers. It worked. Her guidance was a potent catalyst. I was able to shed the debilitating nonsense stories Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d been telling myself about who I am. I awakened strengths that had been asleep. What I wish for you, Capricornâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;indeed, what I predict for youâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is a comparable experience. To expedite matters, go out in search of a person, adventure or breakthrough that can help provide you with the kind of prod I received. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18)

I bet people will be gossiping about you more than usual. Is there anything you can do to ensure that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mostly benevolent gossip? Yes, there is. First, make sure that when you gossip about others, you are unfailingly positive in your comments. If you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have anything good to say about someone, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say it. Second, be on your best behavior. Communicate clearly and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even think about taking unethical shortcuts. Finally, contribute more inspirational energy than usual to every group youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re part of. Be an effervescent team player.

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

Maybe your ego isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t big enough. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m serious. Is it possible that you could beneďŹ t from being more proud of yourself? Would it be healthy for you to give yourself more credit for the struggles you have weathered and the skills you have mastered and the beauty you have managed to forge out of the chaotic raw materials that life has given you? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a good feeling about this, Pisces. I can imagine you summoning the playful courage you will need to express more conďŹ dence. I can even picture you beginning to fantasize about embarking on certain stirring adventures youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never believed you were strong enough to try before now.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

žŝ NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 27- DECEMBE R 3, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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jewelry glass art ceramics wreaths fine art wood work and much more December 7, 9am - 5pm December 8, 10am - 4pm Finley Community Center 2060 West College Ave.

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Over 70 artists selling handcrafted goods including 20+ new vendors this year! Live entertainment, prizes & food for purchase

San Francisco Gay Men's Chorus Funny, outrageous, loving and always entertaining, this group of 200 velvet-voiced men sing holiday favorites. Dec 1, 7:30pm. $30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$45. Jackson Theater, Sonoma Country Day School, 4400 Day School Place, Santa Rosa. 707.284.3200.

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December 6-8 Phil Lesh & Friends Grateful Dead bassist with Warren Haynes, Jimmy Herring, John Molo, Jeff Chimenti and Neal Casal. Dec 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7, 8pm. $79. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

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