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COPPERFIELD’S COPPERFIE ELD ’ S BOOK BOOKSS UPCOMINGG EVENT EVENTSS Friday, November 8, 7:30pm

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The World Until Yesterday: What Can We Learn from Traditional Societies?

Culinary Birds: The Ultimate Poultry Cookbook

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‘These are the people who run the show but rarely get noticed. Every year, we take notice of them.’ BOHO AWA R DS P1 8 Family of Andy Lopez Files Lawsuit T H E PA P E R P 8

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Napa Valley Film Festival Returns F I LM P 2 6 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Dining p13 Restaurants p15 Small Bites p15

Stroller & Warm Clothes Drive For the fifth consecutive year we will collect strollers in good working order at our branches for The Living Room, which serves homeless or at-risk women & their children. Additionally this year, we are collecting new or lightly used warm winter clothing for the teen & young adult clients of Social Advocates for Youth (S.A.Y). Kindly do what you can. Nov. 15 through Dec. 31.

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Culture of Guns

No perfect solutions in the shooting of Andy Lopez BY SUSAN LAMONT

‘H

e shouldn’t have been carrying that replica of an AK-47.” Sounds just like “She shouldn’t have been wearing that short skirt,” doesn’t it?

“He was just a child!” doesn’t factor in that children now shoot and kill. Maybe this is more complicated than either reaction. Andy Lopez was growing up in a country that was sending him some very conflicting messages. This is a gun-worshiping nation. In 2011, the Santa Rosa Police Department encouraged small children to play with real weapons in a local park. Our culture assigns godlike status to its law enforcement and military. Capitalism says that we can’t infringe on the rights of a company to sell replica “toys.” Parents dress their babies in camouflage. How can we then turn to a young boy and tell him he’s not supposed to be influenced by this culture? And what is law enforcement supposed to do in the face of children who kill? I’d first suggest we understand that any child with intent to kill is a child in despair. Our first instinct should be to save that child, not eliminate him. Shoot to kill and ask questions later does not work. This has not always been law enforcement policy, but gradually we have become convinced that the safety of a deputy, a police officer or a soldier is more important than anything else. It’s time for some creative problem solving by law enforcement, working with community input. Yes, it’s more difficult than just picking up a gun and firing. No solution will be perfect. But really, the current policy is a disaster. After WWII, the Defense Department conducted a study which concluded that 80 percent of soldiers refuse to kill, even at risk to themselves. Soldier training was changed, so that now 80 percent will kill. Part of this change includes militarizing and desensitizing civilians—with predictable results, including dead innocent children. We all have a role to play here. The cultural change that is required for a safer society—where safety is created by more peaceful people, rather than by more law enforcement—will require all of us. It’s long past time to get to work. Susan Lamont is a local peace and social justice activist and writer. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Critical Analysis

Thank you to Gabe Meline for an informative, critical analysis that looks beyond the pressconference talking points offered by the Santa Rosa Police Department (“Gun Crazy,” Nov. 6). If only other news outlets would take such a necessary examination into this tragedy to prevent it from occurring again and again.

MICHAEL HENNING Healdsburg

I moved up here to Sonoma four months ago from Los Angeles. Down there, this stuff goes on weekly, if not daily. A 73-year-old homeless woman was gunned down because she wouldn’t put down a can opener. Another person was shot and killed because he rammed a cop with a shopping cart. I couldn’t make this stuff up if I tried. Way too many others to list here. Why are the police and their like sent to and tested at shooting ranges? What happened to putting one in the knee? And how typical that over half the article was on review boards and litigation. Sorry folks, too late; the boy is dead. Nothing will make anybody feel better about this. Cops have an “us vs. them” mentality. Oh, and by the way, none of them joined the force to hand out tickets—and I know a few. They are always on the lookout for action. They want a reason to use their guns. I could go on and on. This is sick.

DAVID DALE Sonoma

They put orange tips on toy guns and airsoft guns for a reason: to prevent others from thinking that it is a real gun. A 13-year-old boy like Andy Lopez knows why the tip is there. He also knows that taking the tip off makes it look more like a real gun. Given that he knew the gun looked like a real one with the tip removed, he should have immediately laid the gun on the ground before turning around. The

cop responded the way they are trained to respond to a threat of death—completely eliminate the threat. That is what he did. It is a shame, but it does not represent a wrongful death.

JETHRO HOOPER Via online

Star of the Galaxy A fantastic article (“Destination: Rancho Obi-Wan,” Oct. 30). Steve is a tremendous ambassador, and Rancho Obi-Wan is an amazing place to celebrate your passion for Star Wars and the personal friendships made because of the world that George Lucas created.

MICHAEL WISTOCK Via online

Good Ol’ Boys The good ol’ boy network and the two-tiered justice system is alive and thriving in Sonoma County. Peeking?! How many people have been charged with peeking in the last 10 years? (“Efren Carrillo Charged with Misdemeanor Peeking,” Oct. 31.) The Efren camp, with the help of their friends at the Press Democrat, would like us to believe that his transgressions are no more serious than a child’s nursery game. The board of supervisors did manage to break the deafening silence they’ve embraced since Efren’s return from rehab. “I don’t see this as a distraction,” said chairman David Rabbitt. “[T]his was slightly uphill from nothing, to be honest.” Two arrests, a 3am underwear romp, a long-term problem with binge-drinking, a month in rehab, a likely civil suit and a misdemeanor charge of “peeking” equals no distraction and adds up to little more than nothing? Welcome to the new standard for serving on the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors.

THOMAS MORABITO Sebastopol


Rants By Tom Tomorrow

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JJewish ewish Community Communit y Center Center SONOMA COUNTY

Clearcut Issue Why would the Artesa Vineyards & Winery that Alastair Bland writes about (“Chainsaw Wine,” Oct. 16) want to clear-cut forests to plant grapes? The answer can be described in one word: greed. What if local winemakers and retailers respond to the assault on our forests by committing to making and selling wines that come only from nonforest-conversion vineyards? They could develop a system whereby local winemakers would have a forest-safe symbol on their labels much like the dolphin-safe symbol on tuna cans. Savvy wine lovers and clubs would know to boycott “chainsaw wine” and purchase forest-safe wines.

MIRIAM GINDEN Santa Rosa

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

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THIS MODERN WORLD

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No Peeking

Nicolas Grizzle

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Sonoma County Supervisor Efren Carrillo will not face a felony charge from his Aug. 20 arrest for trying to break into a woman’s bedroom at 3am wearing only his socks and underwear. Instead, he faces a single misdemeanor count of “peeking,” filed by prosecutor Cody Hunt of the Napa district attorney’s office, which carries a maximum sentence of six months in jail and a $1,000 fine. Carrillo has yet to enter a plea. “My client is relieved that Efren Carrillo is finally being brought to justice,” says Rosanne Darling, the lawyer for the unidentified victim in the case, “but she is disappointed because . . . the charge seems inadequate for what she went through that night.” Darling also notes that any rumor of a relationship between Carrillo and her client, romantic or otherwise, is “simply rubbish.”

CALLING FOR JUSTICE Darlene Arechiga and Andres Beltran at a march for Andy Lopez outside the sheriff’s office.

To The Courts Lopez family files federal lawsuit over slaying of their son BY GABE MELINE

T

he family of 13-year-old Andy Lopez has filed a lawsuit in federal court over the fatal shooting of their son, claiming that Sonoma County Sheriff’s deputy Erick Gelhaus has a history of reckless acts and “shot without provocation or cause.”

At a Monday press conference in San Francisco, standing between the boy’s parents Rodrigo and Sujey Lopez, attorney Arnoldo Casillas declared the Santa Rosa Police Department’s investigation into the shooting would be “a whitewash” and promised a thorough investigation via the legal process. “We filed the lawsuit, as Rodrigo and Sujey would tell you, because we want an uncritical

and honest investigation, and we believe that the only way that we’re going to get an honest investigation, an uncritical investigation, is if we do it ourselves,” said Casillas. “And that’s what we’re going to do.” On the afternoon of Oct. 22, Andy Lopez was shot and killed by Gelhaus, who says he believed the replica AK-47 rifle the boy was carrying at the time was real. According to Casillas, ) 10

Darling, a prosecutor with the Sonoma County district attorney’s office before leaving this summer for private practice, sounded disappointed with the charges as well, especially after so many delays granted to the prosecutor to allow him to gather evidence to build his case. “As a former prosecutor, if all you’re bringing is a misdemeanor charge, it seems odd that it would take you three full continuances to come to this decision.” The Napa district attorney’s office, which was assigned to the case by the state attorney general, has a conviction rate of almost 84 percent for felonies in the past three years, and over 90 percent for misdemeanors in the same period. According to statistics from the American Grand Jury Foundation, that’s among the highest in the state, and near the top of all counties in the Bay Area.—Nicolas Grizzle

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.


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Andy Lopez ( 8 only three seconds elapsed between the moment one of the deputies called for the boy to drop the gun and the moment Gelhaus began firing. Casillas spoke to reporters about the autopsy, which bears out witnesses’ statements that Deputy Gelhaus continued to fire his gun after Lopez had fallen to the ground. A bullet that entered Lopez’s right buttock, Casillas explained, traveled up into the boy’s torso, proving that the shot was fired when Lopez was horizontal. The attorney also detailed the initial shot that hit and felled Lopez, which entered his body above his right nipple and traveled toward his left shoulder. “It went through his heart. It killed him,” Casillas said. Such a trajectory would appear to show that Lopez had only turned halfway to face Gelhaus by the time the first fatal shot was fired—in essence, that Lopez had no chance to see who was calling to him before he was struck with bullets. Gelhaus has stated that he cannot remember if he identified himself as law enforcement when he called for Lopez to drop his gun. The suit also alleges that Gelhaus has “engaged in a custom and practice of reckless and dangerous use of firearms and other misconduct.” In 1996, Gelhaus and his partner were accused of falsifying police reports in a domestic violence matter, the suit says; the partner was fired, Gelhaus was not. Last week, area resident Jeff Westbrook came forward to say that Gelhaus had pulled him over for a traffic violation and pointed his pistol at Westbrook twice— once when Westbrook offered to move his car to give Gelhaus more room on the road shoulder, and once when Westbrook lifted his shirt to show that he was carrying no weapons. In December of 2012, Casillas won a $24 million jury verdict in Los Angeles after an LAPD officer shot and paralyzed a 13-year-

old boy. Casillas stated Monday that the amount in Lopez’s case could be even higher. But the involvement of the Lopez family in marches and vigils since their son’s death hints that the results of subpoenaed information regarding the shooting and potential changes to the current protocol in Sonoma County are equal priorities. Currently, investigations in officer-related shootings in Sonoma County call for the Santa Rosa Police Department to investigate the sheriff’s department, and vice-versa. But because of the shared duties and close relationship between the two agencies—at this time, the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the SRPD for an incident earlier this month—the ostensibly “outside” investigations contain a conflict of interest. Investigations are then reviewed by the district attorney’s office. In district attorney Jill Ravitch’s case, more conflicts arise as she faces an election year. Sheriff Freitas, a key supporter, spoke at her campaign kickoff event at Kendall-Jackson winery in June. Additionally, the Santa Rosa Police Officers’ Association has endorsed her campaign. Meanwhile, a coalition of 11 groups has officially called for the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights to return to Sonoma County and examine officer-related shootings, 26 of which have been fatal since 2000, and none of which has resulted in finding any wrongdoing on the part of the officer. In 2000, the same commission recommended the creation of a civilian review board to review officer-related shootings in Sonoma County. Until that happens, high-paid attorneys will have to ask the hard questions of Gelhaus. “We will ask him, ‘What the hell were you thinking?’” said Casillas on Monday. “‘This is a 13-year-old boy. He is five-footfour. He is 140 pounds. . . . What did you expect him to do when you called out, if not turn around and look at you?’”


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NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOV E M BE R 6-1 2, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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David Templeton

One Big Arts Party!

Live performances by Transcendence Theatre Company and David Templeton!

Celebrate our 16th Annual Boho Awards Recipients and rub elbows with artistic movers and shakers!

Recipients: Pt. Reyes Books | Sonoma County Museum Martin Hamilton, Arlene Francis Center Sheila Groves-Tracey | Sebastopol Center for the Arts

WINTER EVENT! Sat, Nov 16, 10am–5pm Wells Fargo Center for the Arts Hwy 101 at River Rd in Santa Rosa

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Thursday, November 7, 2013 | 5:30-7:30pm Sebastopol Center for the Arts, 282 S. High Street, Sebastopol | www.sebarts.org Enjoy appetizers by Corks Restaurant | Cash Bar | $5 at the door

Contact the Bohemian for more information 707.527.1200

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THREE GENERATIONS Charles Imwalle, Kevin Imwalle Hatch and Joe Imwalle III (L–R) at Imwalle Gardens.

Farm in the City Imwalle Gardens, a legendary Santa Rosa oasis BY JESSICA DUR TAYLOR

A

s far as business plans go, Joe Imwalle’s is pretty simple. He doesn’t advertise. He has no cell phone, doesn’t use a computer and isn’t sure what email is all about. His wife, Maria, keeps the books, and son Charles, who will eventually take over, works alongside him. His employees are few and loyal:

most have worked there for two decades. Thanks in part to paying no rent, he can afford to keep his prices low. As he puts it, “I just can’t gouge people.” Unsurprisingly, the familyowned Imwalle Gardens, which has been growing and selling produce and plants since 1886, is the business most locals said they would hate to see closed, according to a recent local poll. Lucky for them, Joe shows

no signs of stopping. “I’m 73; I should be retired,” he tells me on a recent afternoon. We’re sitting in his office, a cozy nook just off the barn, which his grandfather built out of virgin redwood in 1919. His desk is filled with photos of his three grandkids, a clutter of papers and order forms, and a phone that periodically chirrups. He grins and explains, “Business has really grown the last few years. I’ve built it up so big that I can’t leave it now!”

This despite the fact that the very popular Oliver’s Market, with its polished produce, opened a nearby store on Stony Point Road in 2007. “We don’t aim to sell everything under the sun,” says Imwalle of the difference between his stock and that of a supermarket, “and we can’t give you a box of perfect-looking tomatoes.” What they do have, though, is remarkable: a huge selection of flavorful produce, much of it grown right on their eightacre farm, sold at surprisingly low prices. On a recent visit, I picked out a bunch of organic kale, a shallow basket of plump blackberries, two local Rome apples, an organic onion and two huge gold beets. My total came to $5.79. I had to check the receipt to believe it. Longtime customer Hannah Bartee remembers pulling into the parking lot one summer day. “There was Joe,” she smiles, “plucking figs off the giant fig tree, then bringing them right into the store to sell.” The store itself is little more than a covered stand, where the wagons used to load up their vegetables for delivery. In addition to all the produce, Imwalle sells a smattering of bulk nuts, dried fruits, crackers, cider and some other picnicworthy items. And then there’s the nursery, a maze of greenhouses filled with bedding plants and vegetable starts, potted ferns and coleus and tuberous rooted begonias, which were developed by Imwalle’s grandfather, Joseph. When he moved to the United States from Germany in 1885 at the age of 21, Joseph was already a skilled horticulturalist. For years, he saved up to buy 15 acres on West Third Street in Santa Rosa, which at its heyday blossomed to a population of 60. But from a business standpoint, flowers weren’t enough—“You can’t make a living just selling shrubs,” Imwalle points ) 14

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Michael Amsler

Dining

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NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOV E M BE R 6 –1 2, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Imwalle( 13 out—so Joseph started growing vegetables for his burgeoning truck-garden business. “He used to deliver by horse and buggy,” says Imwalle, who was eight when his grandfather died. “The horses knew the way to the customers’ houses and knew how to get back home again.” According to his granddaughters, Joseph was a talented, classy man: he did his hoeing in a suit and tie, often collaborated with friend Luther Burbank and won a gold medal at the San Francisco World’s Fair in 1915. The farm’s business survived the inevitable grind of development, especially the opening of the Golden Gate Bridge in 1937, which gave people access to San Francisco’s farmers markets stocked with Central Valley produce. Joseph’s two sons, Joseph II and Henry, took over the business when he retired in the 1940s, expanding the acreage with a hop yard and prune orchard. Once again, the business survived another disruption in the form of Highway 12, which bisected the property and cut half the land off from the creek’s water supply. Eventually Joe III, who’d been learning the farming business since his first steps, graduated from Santa Rosa Junior College and joined the Marine Corp Reserve. Had he done better in English, he would’ve liked to become a teacher, like his mother and sisters. Fate had it otherwise: in 1966, when Imwalle was 23 years old and in the Marine Corp Reserve, his father died, bequeathing his half of the business to his only son. When his uncle retired, Imwalle bought him out, split the land and continued farming. Imwalle tends to speak not in dates but in time passed. He remembers when Santa Rosa was a nice little friendly town of 17,000 people who moved about with relative ease. Forty-five years ago, he marvels, you could buy a beautiful home with hardwood

floors, a fireplace and a two-car garage for $14,000. Twentyfive years ago, he’d wake up at midnight twice a week and trek to San Francisco to buy and trade produce. One hundred and twenty-seven years after its founding, the family truck-garden business lives on, keeping many local restaurants, from La Gare to the Union Hotel, in supply of wholesale produce. The fourth generation of Imwalles are all actively involved—in addition to Charles, Imwalle’s sons Paul and Joe IV work there part-time, and his daughter Angela, who also lives on the property with her family, helps out a lot. Thanks to his recent business boom, “the work days are longer now than they were 10 years ago,” says Imwalle, who, along with Charles, works from 7:30am until 6:30pm most days of the week. In the evening, he sits at his kitchen table, typically taking about two dozen produce orders by phone while watching the shows he likes best—Dancing with the Stars, college football, Family Feud. “Charles works just as hard as I do,” he tells me more than once. Much has been made about the value of Imwalle’s property, smack in the middle of the city, a developer’s dream. Several years ago, at the height of the market, Imwalle’s two sisters sold off their 10-acre share. But when I ask him about the worth of his share, he is characteristically nonchalant. “Four or five years ago, it was worth a lot,” he admits. “But now the value is much less.” Imwalle shrugs and continues, “Money isn’t everything. Health is more important, and the joy you get from work. I’ve lived here my whole life,” he tells me, “and I’m gonna die here.” The phone rings and a customer pops his head in, asking about the best price for onions for this weekend’s polenta dinner. Imwalle will get him 20 pounds by Friday morning. When I tell him nearly 45 minutes have passed, he’s surprised. It’s time to get back to work.


Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

MA R I N CO U N T Y Drake’s Beach Cafe

S O N OMA CO U N TY Chinois Asian Bistro Asian. $$. Pan-Asian cuisine done delicious. Happy hour tapas and cocktails weekdays. Dinner daily; lunch, Mon-Fri. 186 Windsor River Rd, Windsor. 707.838.4667.

Diavola Italian/Pizza. $$. From the folks of Taverna Santi, with artisan wood-fired pizzas and elaborate antipasti served in a rustic-chic old brick former smokehouse. Lunch and dinner daily. 21021 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.0111.

Forchetta / Bastoni Asian-Italian. $$. Southeast Asian street food served alongside rustic Italian in unique two-in-one restaurant. Heart-warming Italian from Forchetta, while Bastoni’s focuses on Vietnamese and Thai. Lunch and dinner daily. 6948 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.9500.

Hamburger Ranch & Pasta Farm American. $. Old-fashioned, informal mom’n’-pop roadhouse. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 31195 N Redwood Hwy, Cloverdale. 707.894.5616.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Pub fare. $. Casual, homey place serving no-nonsense pub grub like shepherd’s pie. Lunch and dinner daily. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Parish Cafe Cafe. $$. Authentic po’ boy sandwiches elicit the sound of a big brass marching band with every bite. Breakfast favorites include shrimp and grits, but don’t forget the beignets. Breakfast and lunch, Wed-Sun. 60-A Mill St, Healdsburg. 707.431.8474 Roberto’s Restaurant Italian. $$. Reliable home-style Italian cooking. Dinner, TuesSun. 4776 Sonoma Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.539.0260.

Sunflower Caffe Cafe. $-$$. Excellent, satisfying food served cafeteria-style. Breakfast and lunch daily. 421 First St, Sonoma. 707.996.6645.

Sushi Tozai Japanese. $$. Spare, clean ambiance and some of the freshest sushi you’ll ever eat. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 7531 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.9886. Thai Taste Restaurant Thai. $-$$. Lovely ambiance and daily specials showcase authentic Thai flavors. A hidden gem in Santa Rosa’s Montecito neighborhood. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Fri; dinner, Sat. 170 Farmers Lane #8, Santa Rosa. 707.526.3888.

Three Squares Cafe

Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Mon. 1 Drake’s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Fish Seafood. $$-$$$. Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner daily. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

Fradelizio’s Italian. $$. Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch, Sat-Sun. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

Cafe. $-$$. Home-style cooking in iconic Railroad Square location. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 205 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.4300.

Frantoio Italian. $$-$$$.

Underwood Bar & Bistro European bistro. $$.

Small Shed Flatbreads

The Underwood’s classy bistro menu and impressive bar belie its rural setting. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat; dinner, Sun. 9113 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.823.7023.

Willow Wood Market Cafe Mediterranean. $$. Homey, eclectic foods. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; brunch, Sun. 9020 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.823.0233.

Wolf House Californian. $$. Stick with the simple, classics dishes, as they always shine. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 13740 Arnold Dr, Glen Ellen. 707.996.4401. Yao-Kiku Japanese. $$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from Japan steals the show in this popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly

Perennial winner of SF Chron’s “100 Best,” Frantoio also produces all of its own olive oil. Dinner daily. 152 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.289.5777. Pizza. $$. Slow Food-informed Marin Organics devotee with a cozy, relaxed family atmosphere and no BS approach to great food served simply for a fair price. 17 Madrona St, Mill Valley. Open for lunch and dinner daily. 415.383.4200.

Sol Food Puerto Rican. $. Flavorful, authentic and homestyle at this Puerto Rican eatery, which is as hole-in-thewall as they come. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. San Rafael locations: 811 Fourth St. 415.451.4765. 901 & 903 Lincoln Ave. 415.256.8903. Mill Valley location: 401 Miller Ave, Mill Valley.

Tommy’s Wok Chinese. $-$$. Tasty and filling Chinese fare without the greasy weigh-down. Nice vegetarian selections, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun; closed Tues. 3001 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.5818.

The William Tell House American & Italian. $$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Lunch and dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N T Y BarBersQ Barbecue/ California. $-$$. An upscale ’cue joint with a high-end chef and high-end ingredients. Gorgeous chipotle-braised short ribs and pulled pork. Lunch and dinner daily. 3900-D Bel Aire Plaza, Napa. 707.224.6600.

Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you can’t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.4870. Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen Eclectic. $$-$$$. As comfortable as it sounds, with a rich and varied melting pot of a menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 1327 Railroad Ave, St Helena. 707.963.1200.

15

SMALL BITES

Grinders & Finders Sausage is one of those wonderful inventions that make life a little bit better. “Meat in tube form,” as food writer and TV personality Anthony Bourdain lovingly calls it, has a home in almost every cuisine, from Chinese to Brazilian. Marina Meats of San Francisco has been making its own sausage for years, and their butcher, Dave Budsworth, will share his secrets in a make-and-cook session (with dinner) on Thursday, Nov. 7, at the Next Key Center. 1385 N. Hamilton Parkway, Novato. 6:30pm. $55. 415.382.3363. David Tanis (pictured) knows the value of good ingredients. He was the chef of Berkeley’s Chez Panisse, the Slow Food movement’s epicenter, for almost 25 years. He’s written a few books in his time there, each centering around a specific ingredient, and his latest, One Good Dish, seems to have a similar ideal. He speaks and signs books over lunch on Wednesday, Nov. 13, at the Left Bank Restaurant. 507 Magnoilia Ave., Larkspur. Noon. $110. 415.927.0960. Tanis also appears at Copperfield’s Books on Saturday, Nov. 16. 106 Matheson St., Healdsburg. Free. 3pm. 707.433.9270.—Nicolas Grizzle

Cole’s Chop House American steakhouse. $$$$$. Handsome, upscale 1950s-era steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dryaged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a “nostalgia” cocktail. Dinner daily. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.224.6328.

Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Gillwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788. Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $-$$.

Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

Miguel’s MexicanCalifornian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast,lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch and dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.251.1900. Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 6 –1 2, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Dining

executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.


Wineries

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOV E M BE R 6 –1 2, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

16 20 TapstNew Menu Items Top Shelf Whiskey Flights Upstairs Remodel Join us for $ 4 CRAFT BREW PINT NIGHTS Every Thurs 6–9pm

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N TY Cotati Corner Fine Wines What a funky

TH3T 3ANTA2OSAs707sstoutbrospub.com

college town like Cotati needs in a wine shop is friendly, unpretentious, with a small but unique selection of under $20 wines. And that they have. Thursday tastings. 1818 La Plaza, Ste. 106, Cotati. Open Tuesday–Saturda; tastings, Thursday–Friday, 5–8pm. 707.793.9357.

Gamba Vineyards & Winery On Sundays, the

Award Winning Wines - Exceptional Cuisine Honored Open-Table Diners' Choice Award for Top Outdoor Dining Restaurant in the U.S. (Based on 5 million reviews, ranked among 100 restaurants honored of 15,000 in the running)

Wine Club member and a guest save 20% dining at Corks

Open 7 Days - Brunch - Lunch - Dinner Tasting Room Open Daily

5700 Hwy. 116 ‹707.887.3344 ‹Corks116.com

vintage vinyl spins and the old vine Zin flows at this highly regarded but off-thebeaten track little cellar. 2912 Woolsey Road, Windsor. By appointment. 707.542.5892.

Kamen Estate Wines Key lines from screenwriter Robert Kamen’s features are available on T-shirts, packaged in film cans. Cabernet Sauvignon with intense red fruit flavor over inky tannins. Insert chase scene, destination: 111-B E. Napa St., Sonoma. Monday–Thursday, noon–6pm; Friday–Sunday, 11am–6pm. Tasting fees, $20 and $35. 707.938.7292.

Larson Family Winery

Choosing us is no Accident Offers New & Loyal Customer Discounts up to $500 Discounted Rental Cars Free Detail with Repair Free Towing with Repair Free Shuttle with Repair

Matanzas Creek Winery Matanzas Creek Winery features a peaceful tasting room overlooking its famed acres of lavender. 6097 Bennett Valley Road, Santa Rosa. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. 707.528.6464.

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CLINE COLLISION CENTER

Barbecue wine alert! 23355 Millerick Road, Sonoma. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.938.3031.

707.591.9909 All insurance welcomed clinecollisioncenter.com 1701 Piner Rd., Ste. C, Santa Rosa Behind Valley Fast Oil

and-wife team went the distance, selecting Barbera cuttings from the Italian alps: their Barbera was named best in the world. You’ll also find Vermentino, Pinot, and rusticchic two-liter milk jugs of “vino di tavola� in comfortable downtown lounge; wine education classes for groups. 107 North St., Healdsburg.

Open daily, 10:30am–7pm. Tasting fee, $5–$12. 707.395.0960.

Robert Hunter Winery Surprise–fine mĂŠthode champenoise sparkling wine hails from the warm “banana beltâ€? of Sonoma Valley. Colorful history of estate once owned by a sugar heiress, and tour of gardens leads to sit-down tasting in far-from-the-crowds setting where visitors with a yen for the intimate rather than glitz find a hidden gem on the wine road less traveled. 15655 Arnold Drive, Sonoma. Tours by appointment only, $25. 707.996.3056.

Talisman Wine Husbandand-wife industry veterans play out their passion for Pinot in unassuming warehouse space—now pouring earthy, spicy Pinot in rustic Glen Ellen. Brunch alert: steps away from Garden Court Cafe. 13651 Arnold Drive, Glen Ellen. Thursday–Monday, noon– 5pm and by appt. Tasting fee, $25. 707.721.1628.

Woodenhead Damn good wine. Pinot, Zin–yum, yum, yum. 5700 River Road, Santa Rosa. Open Thursday– Monday, 10:30am–4:30pm. 707.887.2703.

N A PA CO U N TY Bennett Lane Winery The old trope “beer-drinking NASCAR fans vs. Chardonnaysipping highbrows� runs out of gas at a winery that sponsors an annual NASCAR race and has its own car, emblazoned with grapes. A Roman emperor who appreciated hearty vino as much as a good chariot race inspired Maximus White and Red “feasting wines.� 3340 Hwy. 128, Calistoga. 707.942.6684.

Cain Think you know about what food to pair with Napa Valley “mountain grown� Cabernet Sauvignon? How about sake-marinated poached cod in a light broth?

Yeah, it is different up here. 3800 Langtry Road, St. Helena. Tour and tasting by appointment only, Monday– Friday, 10am and 11:30am; Saturday, 10am and noon. $35. 707.963.1616.

Far Niente (WC) Far Niente was founded in 1885 by John Benson, a ’49er of the California Gold Rush and uncle of the famous American impressionist painter Winslow Homer. The estate boasts beautiful gardens as well as the first modern-built wine caves in North America. 1350 Acacia Drive, Napa. By appointment. 707.944.2861. Jericho Canyon Vineyard Oh boy, boutique Napa Cab from celebrity consultant Michel Rolland and high-rollers who used to spend half the year in Hawaii? Well, yeah, but they’re super nice, work hard, and their wines are tops. Cab and Sauv Blanc. 3322 Old Lawley Toll Road, Calistoga. Tour and tasting by appointment only, $30. 707.942.9665.

On the Edge A key stop for devotees of the cult to Charbono. 1255 Lincoln Ave., Calistoga. Open daily, 10am– 5:30pm. 707.942.7410.

Opus One Future archaeologists may conclude that this earthen mound located in the center of Napa Valley was intended to inter this society’s finest bottles for the exclusive use of winepharaohs Baron Philippe de Rothschild and Robert Mondavi in their afterlife; meanwhile, it’s available to the teeming masses. 7900 St. Helena Hwy., Oakville. 707.944.9442. By appointment daily, 10am–4pm. Tour and tasting, $60–$90; tasting only, $40. 707.944.9442.

Saintsbury A contrarian enterprise in the 1970s, now a hallowed hall of Carneros Pinot Noir. Visitors may linger under shade trees in fair weather or sit down for a serious tasting adjacent the office. 1500 Los Carneros Ave., Napa. Monday– Saturday, by appointment. 707.252.0592.


17 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 6 –1 2, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Red Blends

Varietal stews are melting off the shelves BY JAMES KNIGHT

I

n recent years, sales of inexpensive red blended wine, have taken off, and a lonely sea of Syrah has been given a new role in sexing up the old California recipe of Zin and Cab. Red blends are now poised to overtake Merlot. Bohemian staffers assembled to offer their considered opinions on a blind sampling from this category, scoring wines on a scale of one to five stars. (Asterisked prices are approximate.) E&J Gallo 2011 ‘Apothic’ California Red Blend ($11*) A blend of Cab, Zin, Syrah and Merlot, Apothic is prototypical of this style. Another winery told me that they analyzed it in the lab, “because we were curious,â€? and found it had 1.5 percent residual sugar—not exactly “sweetâ€? but well above “dry.â€? The clear favorite before scores were tallied. Aromas of crème de cassis, black olive, leather, blueberry-vanilla and a bold yet silky palate. Curiously, it was twice compared to beer: “Guinnessy,â€? and like Anderson Valley’s Summer Solstice cream ale. ++++ Jellybean 2010 California Cabernet Sauvignon ($11*) The opposite of Apothic’s gothy mystery look, here’s an obvious come-on which says, right on the label, that it’s “bursting with sweet, juicy fruit flavors . . . just like the colorful candy you love.â€? It was hard to dislike at the end of the tasting, anyway: simple, sweet black cherry juice, lip-smacking, round, gumball finish. From Petaluma-based Offbeat Brands. ++++ St. Francis 2011 ‘Red Splash’ California ($12.99) Red berry fruit, vanilla and chocolate, a, nicely-knit finish; a “sleeper hit.â€? ++++ Adler Fels ‘Totally Random’ California Sweet Red ($10) The label has its own Facebook and Twitter logos. Stop trying to push them, drink the wine. Anise and bitter herb aroma, but sweet strawberry jam flavor. Very Lodi Zin. ++++ Fetzer 2010 “Crimsonâ€? California Red Blend ($8*) See how the “jeans patchâ€?-style label incorporates Fetzer’s oak-tree theme while getting the “fun wineâ€? message across. Some detected the aroma of what a Nesquik powdered wine mix might produce, plus chocolate fondue fountain; raspberry jam, late-harvest Zin finish. +++ MĂŠnage Ă  Trois 2011 California Red Blend ($9.99) The dependable, created by Napa winemaker Scott Harvey in the late 1990s. Toasted dusty oak, spicy chocolate, chocolatecovered cherry. A sweet, plush payoff on the finish, skipping real complexity, for a nice price. +++ Geyser Peak 2011 ‘Uncensored’ California Red Blend ($15) Despite the name, it seems as if they could have let loose a little more with this one. Dusty pencil lead over reserved raspberry fruit, it’s somewhat tart, with a firm, slightly bitter finish. Seems like a more traditional Bordeaux-style blend. ++

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Honoring the Arts

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The Bohemian’s 16th annual Boho Awards

e always were the types of people to pore over the fine print. Liner notes on album sleeves, closing credits at the end of movies, production notes buried in the back pages of a playbill—here in the Bohemian offices, we’re more likely to be racking our brains over who served as key grip in a hit film than who played the starring role. It’s the same with covering the arts regionally, as we’ve done for over 30 years. Certain names will pop up regularly in that fine print and lodge themselves in our minds. People behind the soundboard, in the wings, running the lights or, as so often is the case, in a tiny closet of an office— these are the people who run the show but rarely get noticed. Every year, for 16 years now, we take

notice of these people. Our annual Boho Awards honor those who’ve made significant contributions to the arts in the North Bay, and not always with applause or recognition. These people and places include Martin Hamilton, who’s turned the Arlene Francis Center into the eye of a cutting-edge art and music storm in Santa Rosa; the Sonoma County Museum, long overdue to be honored, not just for top-notch art exhibits but for its role in our communal history and new outreach programs and expansion; Point Reyes Books, which brings top literary names to West Marin and hosts the Geography of Hope conference; Sheila-Groves Tracey, who for 26 years has brought thousands of bands to play in every county in the North Bay; and the Sebastopol Center for the Arts, a little idea that’s blossomed, 25 years later, into an organization we can’t imagine living without. The following profiles will tell you a little bit about why we’ve chosen each honoree

as a Boho Award recipient. But to truly understand the work performed by these dedicated people, we encourage readers to get out of the house and visit an opening, attend a performance or seek out a street festival. We live in an area incredibly robust for the arts, and it’s a testament to this creative drive that we manage to keep finding deserving movers and shakers to celebrate in these pages year after year. You can help us celebrate this year’s Boho Award winners in a special soiree on Thursday, Nov. 7, at the Sebastopol Center for the Arts (282 S. High St., Sebastopol; admission $5). Starting at 5:30pm and replete with performances by the Transcendence Theatre Co. and our own David Templeton, it’ll feature food, drinks, winners, toasts, speeches from all winners, mingling, lingering and all things good and well with the world. Just like the arts are supposed to be. See you there, and read on! —Gabe Meline


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ith all of the dancing, craft beer, young artists in glitter and leather and compelling conversation happening in the shadows of an edgy, colorful Bud Snow mural, a recent block party outside the Sonoma County Museum could have been mistaken for a night out in Brooklyn or Los Angeles. Next door, as the moon rose high in the sky, art lovers checked out work by Tina Modotti, Edward Weston and Graciela Iturbide, part of a “Photography in Mexico” exhibition on loan from the SFMOMA, while upstairs in museum offices, developing plans to expand and offer even more art to the community percolated. This stellar evening of art and community is just one example of how the area’s only collecting art and history museum between San Francisco and Portland has ramped up programming, outreach and exhibitions in the North Bay since visionary executive director Diane Evans (pictured) took over the reins in 2008. And these are just a few of the many reasons why it’s about time we give the Sonoma County Museum a long overdue, welldeserved Boho Award. Evans says that the museum, a Smithsonian affiliate, has been in expansion mode for the past five years but has lacked the physical space needed to put on the kinds of art and history exhibitions they’d like to host. After shelving a plan to move the contemporary art collection into the old AT&T building located on Third Street in Santa Rosa, it was announced that the museum would instead take over the building at 505 B St., previously leased to Conklin Bros. This leaves the 1910 Post Office building as the designated spot for the museum’s vast historical archives, managed by Eric Stanley.

Evans wasted no time enlisting three local artists, Julia Davis (who signs her murals “Bud Snow”), Judy Kennedy and Carlos de Villasante to dress the non-descript brown building in gorgeous, streetart-inspired murals, establishing a trend toward collaborative relationships with young and emerging arts in Sonoma County. The museum has also put out a call for artists, dancers and musicians to stage pop-up events in the large, currently empty warehouse space as funds are raised to build a new art museum. “Our future is exciting, as SCM has a real opportunity to become a significant art center for the region,” explains Evans, citing the property’s debt-free status and strong programming, board and staff. “This will allow us to build our art collection—something we have not been able to do without dedicated exhibition and storage space. At the same time, we will finally be able to bring our collections out from storage and develop a focused regional history program.” Currently, the museum houses a collection of 20,000 artworks and historic objects. In addition to fine art, the

Gabe Meline

An irreplaceable hub of art and community BY LEILANI CLARK

and an exhibition focusing on the emergence of the environmental movement in California. Evans says there will also be a continued focus on art workshops dedicated to collecting stories from immigrant communities. “Our focus is on bringing outstanding exhibitions and education programs to Sonoma County that cannot be seen elsewhere in the region,” explains Evans, who plans on working with collectors and artists to expand the collection now that the physical space is available. “My favorite exhibitions are those where we’ve been able to make strong connections with artists, museums and communities both in the county and around the world.”

Martin Hamilton The cultural ringleader of the Arlene Francis Center BY GABE MELINE

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t’s Halloween, and Martin Hamilton has turned down one of the biggest parties in town. With DJs, dancing and cocktails galore, the event would have raked in plenty of revenue for the Arlene Francis Center. “But in Sonoma County, everything is so run toward commerce,” Hamilton bemoans,

sitting on an old couch in the center’s front room. “Entertainment and culture is so driven by money all the time.” For the last three years, Hamilton has grown the Arlene Francis Center into a lightning rod for the region’s artistic community, operating the large brick warehouse on the

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Sonoma County Museum

museum’s programming tends to cover all aspects of life in Sonoma County. Recent exhibitions have included “Margins to Mainstream,” which focused on artists with disabilities in the region; a history exhibition about Santa Rosa’s Chinatown that shed light on a little-known area of the city’s past; and body mapping workshops, funded through the Irvine Foundation, which shared the stories of immigrants in Sonoma County. In 2014, museum-goers can look forward to exhibitions with work by contemporary Korean artists from Jeju Island, a sister city of Santa Rosa. Also in the wings is a retrospective of Magnolia Editions studio, featuring works by Chuck Close, Hung Lieu and William Wiley,


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Boho Awards ( 19 edges of Railroad Square with an eye not toward money but toward art, community, social change and culture. For this, we’re more than pleased to honor him with a Boho Award. On any given week, Hamilton serves as manager, teacher, student, bartender, neighborhood liaison and guiding force at the Santa Rosa hotspot. In addition to music, the AFC regularly hosts art shows, ďŹ lm premieres, poetry gatherings, Renaissance music, dance performances, theater productions, food workshops, fermentation workshops, Bach choral recitals and just about anything else that meets the center’s criteria. “Part of it is, what constitutes a meaningful activity?â€? asks Hamilton, theoretically. “And sometimes you have to stretch to ďŹ nd the meaning of, like, a heavy metal concert. And then I do!â€? Hamilton relates a story of welcoming a group of 18-year-olds to the center who’d hitchhiked from L.A. solely to see a headlining punk band; at the end of the show, one emerged from the mosh pit, sweaty and ushed, “and he said, ‘Hey Martin, thank you very much. This was one of the best experiences of my whole life.’ “It was one of the times that I really appreciated that there was the old-fashioned part of me that said ‘I shouldn’t do this, this is dangerous’ versus what turned out to be a loving mosh pit. I felt like they had gone to the Hajj, in Saudi Arabia, moving around the cobblestone.â€? Only Hamilton could compare a mosh pit to the Hajj, probably due to his illustrious background. Born and raised in St. Louis in a Catholic family of 11 siblings, Hamilton moved to Los Angeles when his father, a factory manager, was relocated. After his junior year of high school, he visited Haight Street in the summer of 1967, and everything changed. He attended USF, and was later hired at the New College of California in 1977. As for the building at 99 Sixth St., it was eventually purchased by

Hamilton’s New College partner, Peter Gabel, under the banner of the Arlene Francis Foundation. (Francis, the charismatic Hollywood actress best known for her episode-stealing turns on the television show What’s My Line?, was Peter’ mother; his father was Martin Gabel, an actor who worked with Alfred Hitchcock, Billy Wilder and Humphrey Bogart.) A former our-processing plant that served, over the years, as a moving warehouse, a brewery, a winery and more, the building housed the Santa Rosa branch of the New College of California until its collapse in 2008. Soon, Hamilton started meeting younger music fans and bands eager to use the space as an all-ages venue. It wasn’t long before art started hanging on the walls. Then a poetry organization came in for a weekend. Hamilton had harnessed the proverbial snowball and pushed it off the hill, and the center started gathering more and more snow. “I do feel that many of the volunteers here really are such creative and wonderful people,â€? says Hamilton. “It just shows you the capacity for human beings to do the right thing. So that motivates me. And just giving people a chance. Otherwise, the culture doesn’t give them much chance.â€? And on this night, Halloween, instead of an alcohol-drenched meat market? The best of the Arlene Francis Center is on offer: the Crux performing songs from the original musical The Ratcatcher with actors from the Imaginists Theatre Co., live trapeze and breakdancing, tarot readings, African xylophone, black-light dancers and more, all under one roof. “Hopefully, there’s some of the best aspects of the work of trying to take seriously our life on earth and the responsibility of social change and fairness and equity and justice,â€? says Hamilton of his work at the Arlene Francis Center. “And not forgetting the spiritual aspects of life—the way arts make you feel better, music and how it moves you in certain ways, and just the joy of it all.â€?


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Point Reyes Books West Marin’s great literary center BY DANI BURLISON

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rom the outside looking in, the ecologically diverse, remote slice of West Marin seems an unlikely hub for world-class literary events. But Point Reyes Books, established nearly 12 years ago by husbandand-wife team Steve Costa and Kate Levinson (pictured), has fostered a growing community of readers, writers and lovers of all things local that has attracted top literary talent, earning a welldeserved Boho Award this year. “We were friends with the owner of the Brown Study Bookshop, which carried primarily used

books and was, at best, open a few days a week,â€? says Levinson of the store’s beginnings. “One night when we were having dinner with her, about a year after she ďŹ rst told us she was selling the store, she told us she was lowering the price.â€? Neither Costa nor Levinson had any prior retail experience, but the following morning, Costa woke up and told his wife that he wanted to buy the store. “Steve was not to be deterred by our being weekenders and both having full-time jobs,â€? says Levinson. They purchased the store in May 2002. What the pair eventually ) 22

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created was not merely access to shelves of bestsellers alongside independently published and used books in their homey, hardwood-floored store on Highway 1; aside from big names like Michael Pollan, Vandana Shiva, Bill McKibben, Michael Ondaatje, T. C. Boyle, Pam Houston, Joanna Macy and Frances McDormand as featured guests at their many readings, the store has become the focal point for numerous successful community events. Point Reyes Books is often a key collaborator and driving force behind fundraisers for area nonprofits, environmental field trips, author dinners, film nights and the semi-annual Geography of Hope conference. It is also a sponsor of the Point Reyes farmers market, raising money for the last 10 years to help with the market’s operating costs. As if that doesn’t keep them busy enough, they also publish the West Marin Review, a literary journal that features the work of local writers and visual artists. Levinson attributes the continued success of the store to local shoppers, and to the tourists that stop in downtown Point Reyes Station. But anyone who knows the couple can attest to their kindness, generosity and commitment to being incredible booksellers. The spirit of community is almost palpable when one steps through their doors. They’ve created a book lovers paradise, and have helped strengthen the relationships among the creative talent that populates the ever-fascinating world of West Marin. “People get to know one another in the bookstore and at bookstore events. Sometimes they strike up a conversation, sometimes we introduce them to one another, sometimes we ask them to work together on events we are organizing,” says Levinson, who adores her customers and the greater bookselling community. “Our hearts and minds have been so enriched.”

Gabe Meline

22 Boho Awards ( 21

Sheila GrovesTracey The tireless force behind the music BY GABE MELINE

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t was 1987, and Sheila GrovesTracey found herself in need of a job. She picked up the phone and called up New George’s in San Rafael. “I thought, ‘Booking’s kind of fun, and I’m doing OK with my own band. Maybe I’ll try it,’” she recalls. That fateful rumination would prove transformative for the North Bay’s music community, as Groves-Tracey would go on to become the top talent buyer for the area. Twenty-six years later, she has booked literally thousands of bands, in dozens of venues. Often in the wings and out of sight of the regular fan, she is the force behind generations of North Bay residents’ musical memories. Because of this, we’re pleased to honor her with a Boho Award. Hardworking and courageous, Groves-Tracey established a name for herself early. Within a year of taking the New George’s job, she got a call from Neil Young’s manager to book a Bay Area tour. Also in those early days came a remarkable night with Jerry Garcia and Carlos Santana both sitting in with Los Lobos at New George’s. Melissa Etheridge played the San Rafael club. The Red Hot Chili Peppers played there. The Grateful Dead

filmed a video on its stage. For seven years, Groves-Tracey was at the center of the Marin scene. After leaving New George’s, the Petaluma local turned briefly to the Cotati Cabaret, booking a little-known band called Primus on “dollar Tuesdays” before starting a long run at the Mystic Theatre. “And then we did Train on dollar Thursdays at the Mystic!” she says, remembering how, when the band got huge, they returned to the venue for a special tour kickoff. Cake, Ben Harper, Santana, the Blind Boys of Alabama, the Blasters, R. L. Burnside, Gillian Welch—the list of highlight acts that came through the Mystic Theatre during her 12-year tenure is so long that Groves-Tracey can’t keep track of them all. During that time, she also acted in local plays—How I Learned to Drive, Medea the Musical, Joined at the Head, Foxfire, Smell of the Kill—and played in local bluegrass and country bands. She also offered plenty of local bands opportunities for sharing the stage with their musical idols. “One of the things I love the most about booking is booking the openers,” she says, “because they so appreciate it, it means so much to them. And when they’re really

good, and everybody appreciates them, that feels so good to go, ‘Yeah, see? Aren’t they great?’” In 2010, she was offered the job of general manager at the newly renovated Uptown Theatre in Napa. It wasn’t a booking job, but of course, you can’t keep a good woman down. After eight months, Groves-Tracey was booking the Uptown, too, bringing in Willie Nelson, Devo, the Pixies, Built to Spill, Boz Scaggs, Del the Funkee Homosapien, Lucinda Williams and plenty of others to the restored theater in the past four years. And then came BottleRock. In just three months, Groves-Tracey was hired by the music festival and single-handedly booked over 50 bands—big ones, “half-milliondollar-offer type things”—for what would turn out to be a huge success while the festival was happening and a financial disaster in the aftermath. BottleRock organizers currently owe over $2 million to workers, stagehands, vendors, caterers and others. Groves-Tracey has no part in the money that’s owed, and in fact, isn’t immune from the woes of the festival that she herself booked: she’s still owed $50,000. “You know, it’s such a bummer, because I worked so hard,” she says now, resignedly. “It was such a massive, huge thing. And I couldn’t wait for it to be over so I could say, ‘I did it! I did it, and it worked!’ And I can’t quite do that, because it’s hard to celebrate knowing that people are owed money.” Just this week, Groves-Tracey has left the Uptown to pursue a new phase in life as the new owner of the Twin Oaks Tavern in Penngrove, a roadside honkytonk built in 1924 that’s perfect for Groves-Tracey’s simple-life outlook. Sitting at the back patio, the wind rustling through the trees and the occasional semi-truck lumbering by, she talks about plans for parking-lot parties, weekend concerts and even blues karaoke in the rustic landmark. “I love the idea of going back to the basics and the roots of music, where you’re not at the rock star level with the riders and the attitudes and the tour managers,” she says, relief evident on her face. “But this? This is just music. Let’s just play some music. Grab your banjo. Let’s play.”


Twenty-ďŹ ve years of a good idea, with no bounds BY DAVID TEMPLETON

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he North Bay arts scene, especially here in Sonoma County, is abundant,â€? says Linda Galletta (pictured), executive director of the Sebastopol Center for the Arts. “This is an area that, per capita, has more artists, writers, musicians and poets than anywhere else.â€? For 25 years, the Sebastopol Center for the Arts has been a vibrant and vital source of support and inspiration for those artists, as well as for the wider community in which those artists work, create and dream, making it a perfect Boho Award recipient. Many folks, however, do not remember exactly how humble its beginnings were one quarter of a century ago. “The center actually started out as three ďŹ le folders in my bottom desk drawer at the Sebastopol Chamber of Commerce,â€? says Galletta, who worked for the COC at the time as an economic program specialist. “The center for the arts was initially

a program of the chamber of commerce, where the economic development committee thought it would be a very cool idea to create a subcommittee that addressed the needs of artists and musicians and writers—not just for the artists, but as an economic development element for the community.â€? After three years, an offer came from the pastor at the Sebastopol United Methodist Church, which had a large basement area it was interested in making available to local nonproďŹ t organizations. “We thought, oh my goodness, we could actually move out of these desk drawers and into our own physical space,â€? says Galletta. They spent ďŹ ve years there, eventually moving to a 1,500-squarefoot A-frame building next to a lumberyard. “So we moved into the A-frame, and suddenly there was an explosion of growth and activity,â€? she recalls. “We saw many

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Sebastopol Center for the Arts

more people coming in, and our programs began expanding.â€? It was obvious that the little arts organization was making a habit of growing and growing. Another move came six years later, to a 9,200-square-foot location on Depot Street, where they remained for another 10 years. After all of this nomadic activity, Galletta says the Sebastopol Community Arts Center—having developed a series of classes, performances and gallery shows featuring international participation from artists of all kinds—needed to settle down into what would be a permanent home. “In 2007 and 2008, we began looking for what would be a sustainable, long-term home for this organization,â€? Galletta says. “We began talking to the county of Sonoma, who at the same time had a building in the heart of the community—the veterans hall—that was aging and underutilized, costing the county hundreds of thousands of dollars to maintain and operate.â€? After two years of negotiating, a deal was struck giving the Sebastopol Center for the Arts a nearly unheard of 30-year-lease on the building at the edge of Ives Park. Last year, Galletta and her team took over operations, beginning work on an ambitious renovating and remodeling plan that will turn the 17,800-square-foot facility into a vital, multifaceted destination for artists, writers, ďŹ lmmakers, musicians and performers of all kinds. “The new building has given us the ability to expand our programming and classes,â€? she explains. “It gives us so much more potential. We gained an auditorium with a real stage. The building also came with two grand pianos—and we already had one of our own, so now we have three. The county has been delighted with the improvements we’ve made to the building, turning it into a facility that can serve all of Sonoma County, both residents and visitors.â€? For Galletta, the real fun comes from working with so many brilliant artists. “I love artists! They are a different breed of person,â€? she laughs. “They are a breed that sees no boundaries. Artists are always looking ahead. It’s inspiring to be around them.â€?


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S A N TA R O S A

Damn Right Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Buddy Guy approaches 78 years old with an album reminiscent of his years spent influencing classic rock artists like Eric Clapton and Jimi Hendrix while singlehandedly pioneering Chicago’s electric blues sound. The living legend takes a look back at his extraordinary life on his new album, Living Proof, and performs Friday, Nov. 8, at the Wells Fargo Center. 50 Mark West Springs Road, Santa Rosa. 8pm. $47–$67. 707.546.3600.

NICASIO

Wonderful Wanda As the “Queen of Rockabilly,” Wanda Jackson put glamour into country music and even dated the King, Elvis Presley. But it’s her recordings that earned her a spot in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. At 76, the Queen shows no signs of rest from her unique showmanship and undying love for music. She performs on Saturday, Nov. 9, at Rancho Nicasio. Town Square, Nicasio. 8:30pm. $25. 415.662.2219.

M I L L VA L L E Y

King of the Keys Ike Stubblefield spent most of the ’70s and ’80s touring with R&B legends like Stevie Wonder, Martha Reeves, Al Green, Ike and Tina Turner and B. B. King. In the past 10 years, Stubblefield laid low to fight cancer, but now he’s back and stronger than ever, with a new album of his own and guest spots on 29 others. Stubblefield unleashes his legendary Hammond B-3 organ sounds on Friday, Nov. 8, at the Sweetwater Music Hall. 19 Corte Madera Ave., Mill Valley. 8pm. $22. 415.388.3850.

P E TA L U M A

Acoustic Riot Did you know that People That Can Eat People Are the Luckiest People in the World? Well, according to the title of Andrew Jackson Jihad’s second album, they are! Ever entertaining, the Arizonabased duo helped usher in a strain of folk-punk with social commentary highlighting such topics as social anxiety, poverty, religion, existentialism and politics, and perform on Saturday, Nov. 9, at the Phoenix Theater. 201 E. Washington St., Petaluma. 8pm. $10–$12. 707.762.3565.

—Tara Kaveh

REAL ANIMAL Alejandro Escovedo, human badass supreme, plays the Mystic Theatre on Nov. 10. See Concerts, p27.


OVERDUE David Strathairn asks: Who keeps a library book for 113 years?

Fighting Fate David Strathairn is obsessed librarian in ‘Lintel’ BY DAVID TEMPLETON

T

he search for meaning is a daunting subject for any play, but that hasn’t stopped playwrights from tackling the topic over and over. From the very beginning of the dramatic art form, the best plays have been those that pit humans against the ravages of fate.

Playwright Glen Berger (cowriter of Spiderman: Turn Off the Dark on Broadway and the Emmy-winning animated series The Octonauts) has long been attracted to such big questions, and in his sneaky philosophical fantasy Underneath the Lintel (through Nov. 17 at American Conservatory Theater, in San Francisco), he addresses weighty issues while maintaining a light, comic touch. A one-actor show, this mostly

ADVERTORIAL

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest 6th Street Playhouse has another success on its hands, this time an authentic revival of the Dale Wasserman/Ken Kesey classic “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,� ably directed by Lennie Dean. Edward P. McCloud brings plenty of swagger to the role of iconoclastic troublemaker Randle P. McMurphy; his nemesis is the ice-cold manipulator Nurse Ratched, played by Critics Circle Best Actress winner Jill Zimmerman.

Dallas Munger and Alan Kaplan are standouts as psych-ward patients Harding and Scanlon, and Nick Christenson is an imposing and confident presence as Chief Bromden. A special treat is Stacey Kerr’s early-1960s slide show whose rapid-fire black-and-white images go a long way toward establishing an era that in terms of treating the mentally ill (or the merely uncooperative) was the equivalent of surgery when it was performed by barbers. Perhaps not much has changed—lobotomies are rarely done now, but only because we have drugs that are more effective than scalpels. Fifty years after its debut, “Cuckoo’s Nest� still provides plenty of food for thought. —Barry Willis President, SF Bay Area Theater Critics Circle

Nov 7, 8, 9, & 10 Thurs, Fri, Sat ~ 8pm Sat & Sun ~ 2pm

707.523.4185 x101 or www.6thstreetplayhouse.com

Monday ~ Open Mic Night with Austin DeLone 7:30pm 7KXU1RYĂŁSP

Patty Larkin (guitar virtuoso) )UL1RYĂŁSP 6 Time Grammy Winner

Ike Stubblefield

0DUYLQ*D\H$O*UHHQ(ULF&ODSWRQ

with Austin DeLone Trio

6DW1RYĂŁDP

Live Music Brunch

FREE SHOW with Michael Lassiter 6DW1RYĂŁSP

Pimps of Joytime

with Diego's Umbrella 6XQ1RYĂŁDP

Live Music Sunday Brunch

FREE SHOW with Jenny Kerr 6XQ1RYĂŁSP Make A Wish Greater Bay Area Benefit Concert featuring

Jonathan Cain of Journey 7XH1RYĂŁSP

Wesley Stace (F/K/A/ John Wesley Harding) with Alec Ounsworth (Clay Your Hands Say Yeah)

:HG1RYĂŁSP

James Moseley Band with Nick Lopez )UL 6DW1RY ĂŁSP

‘Underneath the Lintel’ runs Tuesday– Sunday through Nov. 23 at American Conservatory Theater. 415 Geary St., San Francisco. Showtimes vary. 415.749.2228.

Reverend Horton Heat with Larry and His Flask

& Deke Dickerson

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave Mill Valley CafĂŠ 415.388.1700 | Box Office 415.388.3850

25 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 6 –1 2, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Stage

lively production of Underneath the Lintel features stage and screen star David Strathairn (Lincoln, Good, Night and Good Luck, Dolores Claiborne) playing the befuddled librarian as he describes his journey around the world in search of the anonymous gentleman who recently returned a library book 113 years after it was checked out. Strathairn is marvelous in the role, straddling an array of simultaneous emotions and conicting impulses. Directed by Carey Perloff, furnished within the cluttered backstage of an enormous rundown theater, the play begins as a straightforward comedy but gradually moves into unexpectedly absurdist terrain, as the librarian displays the various scraps and pieces of “lovely evidenceâ€? he’s collected on his obsessive adventure around the globe. It bogs down a bit in all the detail but builds up to a heck of a twist: the librarian’s far-fetched conclusion that the globe-hopping mystery man with such astonishing longevity might actually be the mythical ďŹ gure known as “the Wandering Jew.â€? An odd but enduring bit of medieval trivia, the Wandering Jew—an ever-evolving ancient Christian cautionary tale— describes a cobbler from Jerusalem who, fearing the Romans, refuses to allow Jesus of Nazareth to rest on his doorstep while carrying his cross to Calvary, and as punishment, the cobbler is forced by God to wander the earth for all eternity. Where the librarian—and playwright Berger—take this tale might surprise those Medieval gentlemen who originally envisioned it. Berger uses the story to ask hard questions about what lengths to which some people will go whenever God or fate or the simple twists and turns of life hand them a raw deal. In Underneath the Lintel, the answer is as inspiring as it is thought-provoking. Rating (out of ďŹ ve): ++++


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOV E M BE R 6 –1 2, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

26

Peter Travers,

“A

g game-changinG a me-ch anginG movie m ov ie e event v ent.”

Film

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++++ + of the features fe a t u r e s some s om e of t he 4/4 4 / /4

bravest b r av eshtavp performances e rfo f r mtaon ces you’ll y ou’ll ever e ver have e the the privilege pr i vileg e to witness.” w itness.”

FESTIVAL HUNK Colin Farrell is scheduled for

several events in Napa.

Copyright Cop yrriight © 2013 20 013 Twentieth Twentieth Century Centtur u yF Fox. ox. All Rights R Reserved. eserved.

EXCLUSIVE E XCLUSI V E E ENGAGEMENTS NG AGEMENTS NO NOW WP PLAYING L AY ING NAPA Century Valley Napa Vall ey & XD (800) FAN FANDANGO DANGO #2521

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Movies on the Move Napa Valley Film Fest returns

BY CHRISTINA JULIAN

Y

ear three of the Napa Valley Film Festival (NVFF) throws off elitist hints of Tinseltown in favor of come-one, come-all camaraderie, according to festival cofounder and producer Brenda Lhormer. “This year, we wanted to make the festival more open, in every way, to anybody,” she says. “We’ve expanded programming so it would be more accessible to all ages, interests and economic levels.” In years past, the only way to bump elbows with A-listers entailed lobbying for rush tickets or ponying up for a festival pass. But this year, the general public get gratis entry to certain parts of the fest, including access to the new LifeStyle Pavilion, dubbed the hub for all things wine, food and film. Also open to the public and pass holders (who get

first-entry rights, access to parties and red carpet walks, plus free-flowing wine, food and more) are culinary demos, “Festival Front Porches” and free filmindustry panels (including “Actors in Conversation” on Sunday, Nov. 17, with celebs Ralph Macchio and Glee’s Dianna Agron expected). At the Napa River Inn, more edgy and adventurous fare is screened. The Crash Reel, following snowboarder Kevin Pearce (and the Shaun White rivalry) in the wake of his brain injury, is a sure bet. Other films includes The Bounceback, with its raunchy romp into the world of Austin’s honky-tonks and “air sex” competitions. Anita Hill is on deck for Q&As following screenings of the documentary Anita, chronicling the 1991 senate hearings of her sexual harassment claim against Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas. And music fans that missed Dave Grohl’s directorial debut, Sound City, can catch the Foo Fighter for an encore screening and Q&A at the Uptown on Nov. 17. Mainstream film junkies can hit the Nov. 13 opening-night screening of August: Osage County (starring Julia Roberts and Meryl Streep) and Thursday night’s Saving Mr. Banks, replete with a red-carpet strut for Colin Farrell, who stars opposite Tom Hanks and Emma Thompson. Farrell is also slated to settle in for an in-depth talk with Access Hollywood’s Billy Bush at the Lincoln Theater’s Celebrity Tribute on Nov. 15. Recently added screenings include Jason Reitman’s Labor Day with Kate Winslet and Out of the Furnace with Christian Bale. If all that isn’t enough, the festival’s “Movies on the Move” feature should get attention with its impromptu outdoor screenings. Scout the next showing via Twitter, or simply look for the Cadillac Escalade around town, toting a screen. With the NVFF in town, it looks like November is no longer “seasonal slump” time in wine country. The Napa Valley Film Festival runs Nov. 13–17 at various venues around Napa County. For more info, see www.napavalleyfilmfest.org.


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Alejandro Escovedo & the Sensitive Boys Songwriter was formerly in the Nuns, Rank & File and the True Believers. Amy Cook opens. Nov 10, 7:30pm. $21. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Andrew Jackson Jihad Indie folk-punk group from Arizona. The Gunshy and Shinobu open. Nov 9, 8pm. $12. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

multicultural program including works by Osvaldo Golijov, Bruch, Alberto Ginastera and Gershwin. Nov 9, 8pm, Nov 10, 3pm and Nov 11, 8pm. $20-$75. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Sonic Escape Young chamber trio performs program of Haydn, Bach and original music. Presented by the Redwood Arts Council. Nov 10, 4pm. $30. Occidental Center for the Arts, 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

MARIN COUNTY

Foreigner

Wanda Jackson

Bring a blanket–this band’s “As Cold as Ice.” Nov 7, 8pm. $45-$65. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

The original “Queen of Rockabilly” was one of the first female artists in the genre. Red Meat open. Nov 9, 8:30pm. $25. Rancho Nicasio, Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Buddy Guy Guitarist hailed as the reigning king of Chicago blues. Quinn Sullivan opens. Nov 8, 8pm. $47-$67. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Santa Rosa Symphony Cellist Maya Beiser featured in

Ike Stubblefield Hammond B3 virtuoso has played with numerous Motown greats in his 50year career. Nov 8, 9pm. $22. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Grammy-winning group plays music of Billie Holliday, Billy Strayhorn and the Weimar Cabaret. Nov 9, 8pm. $15$30. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

HHonorable onor able

11/8 11 / 8 – 11 11/14 /14

Diana D iana PPG13 G13

2 24 V 224 VINTAGE INTAG E WAY WAY NOVATO N OVATO | 415.892.6200 415 . 8 9 2 . 6 2 0 0

((10:15-1:00-3:30)-6:45-9:15 10 :15-1: 00-3 : 30 ) -6 : 45-9 :15

WEDNESDAYS WE DNESDAYS / VARIETY VARIE T Y | GENERAL GENER AL

Diamond Rio

12 1 2Y Years ears a Slave Slave R

WITH W ITH D DENNIS ENNIS H HANEDA ANEDA FFREE/DOORS REE/ DOORS 6PM/ALL 6PM /ALL A AGES GES

Platinum-selling country artist. Nov 9, 7pm. $25-$45. Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.226.8742.

((11:00-12:45-2:00-5:00)-6:30-8:00 11: 00-12: 45-2: 00-5 : 00 ) -6 : 30-8 : 00

FRII NOV FR NOV 8 / GGLITCH LITCH | DUB DUB STEP STEP | BASS BA SS

All A ll is L Lost ost PPG13 G13

$$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 99PM/21+ PM /21+

NAPA COUNTY

Patty Larkin Bostonian songstress brings her folk pop to Napa. Nov 8, 8pm. $15-$20. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Soja Reggae grooves and urgent, Zeitgeist-capturing themes. Common Kings open. Nov 10, 8pm. $35. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

EPROM E PROM

((10:30-1:15-4:00)-7:00-9:20 10 : 30-1:15- 4 : 00 ) -7: 00- 9 : 20

SAT S AT N NOV OV 9 / JJAM AM | B BLUES LUES | R ROCK O CK

About A bout Time Time R

FRI F RI N NOV OV 1 15 5 / FFUNK UNK | B BLUES LUES | R AND AN D B

((11:15-2:15-5:15)-8:15 11:15-2:15-5 :15 ) -8 :15 SSunday unday 11/10 11/10 only: onl y : (5:15)-8:15 ( 5 :15 ) -8 :15 TThursday hur sday 11/14 11/14 only: onl y : (11:15-2:15) (11:15-2:15 )

Dave Mason Guitarist from Traffic in solo show. Nov 7, 8pm. $32. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

OPEN O PEN MIC MIC NIGHT N I G HT

Enough E nough Said Said PPG13 G13 ((10:30-3:45)-9:20 10 : 30-3 : 45 ) -9 : 20

Join uuss oonn SSunday Join unda y 111/8 1/ 8 at a t 11pm pm aand nd Thursday T h ur s da y 11/14 11/14 aatt 7pm 7pm ffor or sspecial pec ia l ppresentations r e s en t a t ion s ooff PPutting u t t ing IItt TTogether: oge t her: A MMusical u s ic a l Review. Re v ie w.

Summer field Summerfield 551 5 51 S Summerfield ummer field Road Road 3ANTA2OSAs707.522.0719 3 ANTA2OSAs 707. 522 .0719

ZANARDI'S Z ANARDI'S HIGH HIGH BEAMZ BEAMZ $$8/DOORS 8 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

ORGONE OR GONE

$$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

FRI F RI N NOV OV 1 16 6 / RROOTS OOTS | ROCK ROCK | REGGAE R EG G A E

WINSTRONG W INSTRONG $$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 9PM/21+ 9PM /21+

THUR T HUR N NOV OV 21 21 / BBLUES LUES | FFOLK O LK | R ROCK O CK 33 3 3 1⁄3 1 ⁄ 3 MILE MILE SHOWCASE SHOWCASE

THE TH E STRINGRAYS STRINGRAYS $$8/DOORS 8 / DOORS 77PM/21+ PM /21+

FRI F RI N NOV OV 2 22 2 / JJAM AM | B BLUES LUES | R ROCK O CK

THE T HE FALL FALL RISK RISK $$12/DOORS 12/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM W WW.HOPMONK.COM Book yyour Book our next ne x t event e ve n t w with ith us, us, up up to to 150 1 50 people, people, kim@hopmonk.com kim@hopmonk .com

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Arlene Francis Center Nov 8, Baby Seal Club, Bobby Joe Ebola, Chris Chandler. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Dhyana Center Lofts Nov 8, Ecstatic Kirtan. 186 N Main St, Sebastopol. 800.796.6863.

Flamingo Lounge Nov 8, Decades. Nov 9, MI. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Forestville Club Nov 9, the Spyralites. 6250 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.2594.

French Garden Nov 8, Haute Flash. Nov 9, Honey B & the Pollinators. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Green Music Center Nov 9-11, Santa Rosa Symphony. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

AUTUMN LEAVES Patty Larkin performs Friday, Nov. 8,

at the Napa Valley Opera House. See Concerts, above.

Heritage Public House Nov 9, Jeff Walters

) 28

707.829.7300 70 7. 829 . 7 3 0 0 SEBASTOPOL E B AS T OP OL 230 PETALUMA AVE 2 30 P E TA L U M A A VE | S

OPEN O P E N MIC M I C NIGHT NIGHT

EVERY T EVERY TUES UES A AT T7 7PM PM W WITH ITH E EVAN VAN FRI F RI N NOV OV 8 IINDIE NDIE | R ROCK O CK

GIRLS G IRLS AND AND BOYS BOYS $$8/DOORS 8 / DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

SAT S AT N NOV OV 9

IINDIE NDIE | FFOLK OLK | ROCK R O CK

BEARS BE ARS BELLY BELLY $$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

MON M ON N NOV OV 1 11 1

REGGAE R EGGAE | DANCEHALL DANCEHALL

LLET ET JAH JAH LEAD LEAD T THE HE WAY WAY TOUR TOUR WITH W ITH IB IBA A MA MAHR HR $10 / DOORS 10PM/21+ $10/DOORS 10PM /21+

WED W ED N NOV OV 13 13

DUBSTEP D UBS TEP | WEST WES T COAST COA S T | GLITCH G L I TC H

UNLIMITED U NLIMITED G GRAVITY R AVIT Y AN AND ND NICOLUMINOUS NI COLUMINOUS $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM /21+

THUR T HUR N NOV OV 14 14

FFOLK OLK | BLUEGRASS BLUEGR A SS | COUNTRY COUNTRY

GRANT G RANT FARM FARM

$$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 77:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

FRI F RI N NOV OV 1 15 5

SSINGER INGER | SONGWRITER SONGWRITER | ACOUSTIC ACOUS TIC

MARY M ARY GAUTHIER GAUTHIER ((SEATED) SEATED) $$13 13 ADV/$15 ADV/$15 DOS/DOORS DOS/DOORS 7PM/21+ 7PM/21+

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 6 –1 2, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

27

Turtle Island Quartet


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOV E M BE R 6 –1 2, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Cumulus Presents & Sebastopol Community Cultural Center

Upcoming Concerts Celebrating her 65th year on the planet and 40+ years on the road

Holly Near

and the Peace Becomes You Band with special guests emma’s revolution

Friday, November 8, 8:00 pm Swing, Jazz, and Blues, from the Golden Era, with the sultry chanteuse and her all-star band

Lavay Smith and her

Red Hot Skillet Lickers

“Wonderful…a breath of fresh air… plays classic jazz and blues so well and so convincingly” – Johnny Otis

Friday, November 15, 8:00 pm Also Coming Soon Alasdair Fraser & Natalie Haas December 7 Tickets and Information: www.seb.org or 707-823-1511

Music ( 27 Band. 1901 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

Hopmonk Sebastopol Nov 6, Stylust Beats. Nov 8, Girls & Boys, Lungs & Limbs. Nov 9, Bear’s Belly. Nov 11, Iba Mahr. Nov 13, Unlimited Gravity & Nicoluminous. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hopmonk Sonoma Nov 8, the Reefer Twins. Nov 9, Ten Foot Tone. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg Nov 9, Mark Levine Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Lagunitas Tap Room Nov 6, Vintage Grass. Nov 7, Sweetback Sisters. Nov 8, Cascada. Nov 9, Jinx Jones. Nov 13, Jason Bodlovich. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Main Street Station Nov 6, Pocket Canyon Ramblers. Nov 8, Susan Sutton Trio. Nov 9, Jess Petty. Nov 13, John Eggert. Nov 7, Susan Sutton. Nov 11, Gypsy Cafe. Sun, Kit Mariah’s Open Mic Night. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub Nov 8, Under the Radar. Nov 9, Sticky Notes. Sun, Evening Jazz with Gary Johnson. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Nov 8, Laguna Moon. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Sebastopol Community Center Nov 8, Holly Near. 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

Sonoma Valley Veterans Memorial Building Nov 10, Andean Music & Dance. 126 First St W, Sonoma.

Sprenger’s Tap Room Nov 8, Terry Savastano. Nov 9, Dubtown Dread. 446 B St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8277.

The Sunflower Center Nov 9, OneWerd, BP & Praduh, Siras, Baci, DJ Fossil, Masta Smash. 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Nov 10, Holly Near. Mon, Open Mic with Derek Smith.

142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Dance Palace Nov 8, Tim Weed Band. Nov 9, Turtle Island String Quartet. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Elk’s Lodge Nov 8, Rockit Science. 1312 Mission Ave, San Rafael, 773.755.4700.

Fenix Nov 7, Bohemian Highway. Nov 8, Terrie Odabi. Nov 9, Tim Weed. Nov 10, Masha Campagne. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

George’s Nightclub Nov 8, Department of Rock. Nov 10, Unauthorized Rolling Stones. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Hopmonk Novato Nov 7, Manzanita Falls. Nov 8, Eprom. Nov 9, Zanardi’s High Beamz. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

19 Broadway Club Nov 6, Ken Khristian Memorial Benefit. Nov 6, Ken Khristian Memorial Benefit. Nov 7, Achilles Wheel. Nov 8, Faraway Brothers. Nov 9, Zigaboo Modeliste & the New Aahkesstra. Nov 10, Miles Ahead. Mon, 9pm,

Monroe Dance Hall Nov 9, Mitch Woods & the Rocket 88s. 1400 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.529.5450. Thur Nov 7

Dave Mason Sun Nov 10

SOJA Fri Nov 15

Reverend Horton Heat Sat Nov 16

Sylvia Browne Fri Nov 22

Eddie Money Sat Nov 23 An evening with Pride & Joy

Sat Nov 30

,ĂǁĂŝŝĂŶ,ŽůŝĚĂLJĞůĞďƌĂƟŽŶ featuring Faith Ako, Patrick Landeza and Steven Espaniola

Sat Dec 7

Merle Haggard Special Guest The Malpass Brothers

Sun Dec 8 An evening with The Wailin’ Jennys

Wed Dec 11

"Come Together Tour" 'ƌŽƵŶĚĂƟŽŶ

Fri Dec 13

Craig Ferguson—Hot and Grumpy Sat Dec 14

The Blind Boys of Alabama Christmas Show Sun Jan 12

MITCH WOODS and HIS ROCKET 88s Saturday, Nov 9

Wed, Nov 6 8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 10:15am– SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth 12:45pm and Family 7–10pm SINGLES & PAIRS Square Dance Club Thur, Nov 7 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–10pm CIRCLES N’ SQUARES Square Dance Club Fri, Nov 8 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7:30–10:45pm California Ballroom Dance with WEST COAST SWING LESSON Sat, Nov 9 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 10:30am– SCOTTISH CHALLENGE DANCE with 12:30pm Gary Thomas 7–9pm Steve Luther hosts MITCH WOODS & THE ROCKET 88S Sun, Nov 10 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 5–9:25pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING Mon, Nov 11 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–9:25pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, Nov 12 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7:30pm–9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

Jonny Lang

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922

Planning an event? Contact us for rental info

1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

1350 Third St, Napa | 707.259.0123 www.uptowntheatrenapa.com

Mystic Theatre Nov 10, Alejandro Escovedo & the Sensitive Boys, Amy Cook. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Occidental Center for the Arts

San Francisco’s City Guide

Steel Panther Master parodists of the 1980s LA glam metal sound and look. Nov 8 at the Regency Ballroom.

Nov 9, the Black Brothers. Nov 10, Sonic Escape. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Dev

Phoenix Theater

Of Montreal

Nov 9, Andrew Jackson Jihad, the Gunshy, Shinobu. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Quincy’s Nov 8, the Prodkt. 6590 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park. 707.585.1079.

Redwood Cafe Nov 9, the Mighty Groove. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Russian River Brewing Co Nov 9, Bumptet. Nov 10, Emily Bonn & the Vivants. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Born in 1989, Devin Star Tailes gets the party rolling with hits like “In the Dark.” Nov 8 at Slim’s.

Kevin Barnes debuts material from new LP, written entirely in SF Nov 8 and 9 at Great American Music Hall.

A Minor Forest Math-y indie band from SF plays first show in 15 years. With the atmospherics of Barn Owl. Nov 9 at Bottom of the Hill.

Cults NYC duo ask: if you’re so cool, why aren’t James Franco and Emma Roberts in your video? Nov 13 at the Fillmore.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.


open mic. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Nov 6, Haute Flash Quartet. Nov 7, Wendy DeWitt with Kirk Harwood. Nov 10, C-JAM with Connie Ducey. Nov 12, James Moseley Quartet. Nov 13, Dave Getz Trio. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

DIN N E R & A SHOW

TOM FINCH GROUP Funky Dance Grooves, Original Songs 8:30 Sat The Legendary Queen of Rockabilly 9 Nov WANDA JACKSON Fri

Nov 8

Peri’s Silver Dollar

PLUS

Nov 8, Burl. Nov 9, Swoop Unit. Nov 13, the Hat Stretchers, Dogtown Ramblers. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Sun

Rancho Nicasio

Sun

Nov 8, Tom Finch Group. Nov 9, Wanda Jackson, Red Meat. Nov 10, Ruthie Foster. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sat

Station House Cafe Nov 10, Arann Harris. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1515.

Studio 55 Marin Nov 9, Maurice Tani, Sound of Sirens. 1455 E Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.

Sweetwater Music Hall Nov 7, Patty Larkin. Nov 8, Ike Stubblefield. Nov 9, Pimps of Joytime, Diego’s Umbrella. Nov 10, Jonathon Cain. Nov 12, Wesley Stace, Alec Ounsworth. Nov 13, James Moseley Band. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads Nov 9, Sensations. Nov 10, Mark Karan & Terrapin All Stars. Nov 13, Steve Taylor Band. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

NAPA COUNTY Jarvis Conservatory Nov 9, Napa Valley Youth Symphony. 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Lincoln Theater Nov 9, Diamond Rio. Nov 10, Lincoln Lyrics. 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.226.8742.

Napa Valley Opera House Nov 8, Patty Larkin. Nov 9, Benefit Concert for NVRESET. Nov 12, Salvation Army: Ring in the Season. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Silo’s Nov 7, Simon Russell. Nov 8, Mitch Woods & His Rocket 88s. Nov 9, Terry Bradford Presents. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

8:30

THE LEGENDARY RHYTHM & BLUES REVUE featuring Tommy Castro & the Painkillers

RED MEAT

Nov 10 JEREMY D’ANTONIO AND FRIENDS

4:00 / No Cover Grammy Nominated Singer-Songwriter

Nov 10 RUTHIE FOSTER

Big Apples

Sleeping Lady Nov 7, Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs. Nov 9, Junk Parlor. Nov 10, Amy Wigton. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

Green Music Center lures former president of New York Philharmonic After the departure of Emmanuel Morlet as artistic director of the Green Music Center last month, classical music insiders were left to wonder what developments might be taking place. “We are somewhat befuddled by his disappearance,” wrote the San Francisco Classical Voice in October. “Top officials of the Board are Sandy Weill (chair), Joan Weill and Marne Olson (vice-chair). But no artistic director?” Now it can be told: Sandy Weill, former CEO of Citigroup and namesake of the center’s main hall, has lured Zarin Mehta, former president of the New York Philharmonic, to the role of executive director. In a highly unusual financing deal, Weill will pay 80 percent of Mehta’s $300,000 annual salary. Additionally, Mehta does not plan to move to the area full-time, staying instead in his home base of Chicago. “It’s the opportunity to create a public, to create culture,” Mehta told the New York Times last week of his new job. “I will be there as long as it takes to make this thing a huge success, because the people merit it.” Though he’s taken the reins with zeal, Weill doesn’t plan on supporting the Green Music Center, whose success or failure is tied to the state university’s finances, entirely on his own. Members of his board are expected to contribute $50,000 per year. The center’s next major hurdle is the long-anticipated opening of Schroeder Hall, a recital space for students of the university’s music program, due to open next year.—Gabe Meline

8:00

Nov 16

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Friday, Nov 15 $35 (ages 21+). Get tickets at:  Last Record Store in Santa Rosa cash/check only

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29 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 6 –1 2, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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"MJDF;IV piano Norman Gamboa, conductor Saturday Nov N ov 1 16, 6, 8pm 8pm S unday Sunday N ov 17, 17, 2pm 2pm Nov

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Galleries RECEPTIONS Nov 7 University Art Gallery, “Mark Perlman: A 25 Year Survey,” pieces by retiring SSU art professor. 4pm. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2295.

Nov 8 Community Media Center of Marin, “Retrospective,” art by David Quinley. 5pm. 819 A St, San Rafael. 415.721.0636.

Nov 9 Occidental Center for the Arts, “OCA Paintings,” works by Adam Wolpert, Tony King, Jack Stuppin and Bill Wheeler. 5pm. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392. Riverfront Art Gallery, “New Work,” photography by Lance Kuehne. 5pm. Nov 6-Jan 5, “Water, Water Everywhere,” photography by Gus and Sharon Feissel. 5pm. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.4ART. Upstairs Art Gallery, “Impressionistic Paintings,” works by Cynthia Jackson-Hein. 5pm. 306 Center Ave (above Levin & Co bookstore), Healdsburg. 707.431.4214.

SONOMA COUNTY Arts Guild of Sonoma

sky. Through Feb 3, “Play Things: Toys in Peanuts,” a nostalgic journey through popular toys in the Peanuts comic strip. Through Mar 2, “School Projects,” follow the Peanuts gang as they struggle through a typical school year with original comic strips. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Dutton-Goldfield Winery Through Nov 12, Paintings by Barbara Kelley. 3100 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. Daily, 10am-4:30pm 707.827.3600.

Gallery One Through Nov 10, “25th Anniversary Exhibit,” multimedia works by Judith Klausenstock and Birgit O’Connor. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Graton Gallery Through Dec 1, “New Work,” paintings by James Fred and Sandra Rubin. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Nov 23, “Uncanny... Something to Chew On,” sculptures by Art Moura. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Healdsburg Museum Through Nov 10, “El Día de los Muertos,” special exhibit by students of Healdsburg High School. 221 Matheson St, Healdsburg. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.431.3325.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Through Nov 30, “Fiber Art VI,” large, international, juried fiber art exhibition. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sonoma County Museum Through Dec 1, “Day of the Dead Altars,” pieces made to honor lost ones who have passed. Through Jan 12, “Photography in Mexico,” from the collection of the SF MOMA. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Dec 1, “Delicious Images: Art About Food,” paintings and works on paper by Wayne Thiebaud and Joseph Goldyne. Through Dec 1, “Kitchen Memories,” culinary art and equipment collection of Kathleen Thompson Hill. Gadget demonstration, Nov 9, Nov 22, 5:30pm, $12. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Studio Blomster Through Nov 13, art by Jessica Martin. 14045 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville.

Upstairs Art Gallery Nov 9-30, “Impressionistic Paintings,” works by Cynthia Jackson-Hein. 306 Center Ave (above Levin & Co bookstore), Healdsburg. Sun-Thurs, 10 to 6; Fri-Sat, 10 to 9. 707.431.4214.

History Center Through Feb 6, “Sculpture Trail,” outdoor exhibit with sculptures along Cloverdale Boulevard and Geyserville Avenue changing every nine months. 215 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Nov 6-25, “New Work by Guild Members.” 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. Wed-Thurs and SunMon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

Nov 9-Jan 5, “OCA Paintings,” works by Adam Wolpert, Tony King, Jack Stuppin and Bill Wheeler. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Charles M Schulz Museum

Nov 6-Jan 5, “New Work,” photography by Lance Kuehne. Nov 6-Jan 5, “Water, Water Everywhere,” photography by Gus and Sharon Feissel.

Through Apr 27, “Starry, Starry Night,” feautring Peanuts characters under the night

132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Riverfront Art Gallery

MARIN COUNTY Art Works Downtown Through Nov 22, “Dialogues with Nature,” works by Bob Nugent. Reception, Nov 8, 5pm. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

Bolinas Museum Through Nov 17, “The Architecture of the Invisible,” sculptures by Ned Kahn. Through Nov 17, “Land of a Thousand Birds,” photos by Tim Burns. Through Nov 17, “The Secret Life of Seaweed,” photos by Josie Iselin. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

Through Nov 14, “The Intimate Diebenkorn: Works on Paper 1949–1992,” pieces by Richard Diebenkorn. College of Marin, Fine Arts Building, 835 College Ave, Kentfield. 415.485.9494.

Community Congregational Church Through Nov 26, “Spirit of Place,” works by members of Golden Gate Marin Artists. 145 Rock Hill Dr, Tiburon.

Gallery Bergelli Through Nov 7, “Duet,” paintings by Jennifer Li and Nicholas Oberling. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Gallery Route One Through Dec 1, “Edges and Flows,” paintings by Mary Mountcastle Eubank. Through Dec 1, “For the Birds,” sitespecific installation by Jane Ingram Allen. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin MOCA Through Nov 17, “Legends of the Bay Area,” works by Robert Hudson. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

MINE Art Gallery Through Dec 1, BreathingLight,” sculptures by Sandra Cohn. 1820 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Nov 23, “Big and Small,” abstract and expressionistic mixed-media art works. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Seager Gray Gallery Through Nov 10, “Form and Place,” sculptures by Jane Rosen and Ann Hollingsworth. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

NAPA COUNTY di Rosa Through Feb 2, “Beatnik Meteors,” collaborative sculptures by regional artists. Through Dec 31, largest collection of contemporary Bay Area art. Tours daily. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

Downtown Napa Through Nov 30, 6pm, “Art on First,” the third annual

A FINE FAREWELL ‘Mark Perlman: A 25 Year Survey’

opens Thursday, Nov. 7, at the University Art Gallery at SSU. See Receptions, adjacent. exhibition bringing art to empty storefronts in downtown Napa. Includes work by 13 Bay Area artists on display through 2013. Through Jan 1, 2015, “Metamorphosis,” outdoor sculpture exhibit with self-guided tour. Main and Third streets, Napa.

Grand Hand Gallery Through Nov 30, “Found in Translation,” mixed-media by Thomas Morphis and ceramics by Hiroko Ishida. 1136 Main St, Napa. No phone.

Napa Valley Museum Through Nov 24, “Napa Valley: A to Z,” works from the museum’s collection featuring cultural, historical and artistic heritage of the Valley. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Tues-Sun, 10am to 4pm. 707.944.0500.

Comedy Comedy Night

Kids, featuring Ballet Folklorico Netzahaulcoyotl. Osher Marin JCC, 200 No San Pedro Rd, San Rafael 415.444.8000.

Raven Theater Nov 8, 7:30pm, Dancing With the Stars, local version of the popular TV dance show $25. 115 North St, Healdsburg 707.433.3145.

Events Bunco Fundraiser Dice game. Prizes awarded, refreshments served. Nov 10, 2pm. $15. Graton Community Club, 8996 Graton Rd, Graton.

El Carnaval de San Miguel Festival brings traditions of El Salvador. Music by Lemus y Su Grupo Algodón, Tito Mira, Mr Pelón 503 and Fuego Latino. Nov 10, 11am. $23-$30. Marin Center Exhibit Hall, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Adult content, hosted by Helen Pachynski. Sep 13, Sandy Stec headlines. Second Fri of every month, 9pm. $4. Gaia’s Garden, 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Horses R Art

Dance

Peacemaker Awards

Kanbar Center for the Performing Arts Nov 10, 4pm, Kids Dancing for

Featuring fine equine art, winetasting and live horses. Nov 9, 1pm. Free. Chanslor Guest Ranch, 2660 N Highway 1, Bodega Bay. 7078752721. Music by Jerry Green and De Colores in this fundraiser for the Peace & Justice Center. Nov 9, 5pm. ) $40. Sebastopol

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Arts Events

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Community Center, 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

Veterans Day Program honors veterans. Nov 11, 9:30am. Free. Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Veterans Day Celebration Speakers and banner-hanging ceremony. Nov 11. Free. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

Veterans Day Observance Featuring keynote speaker Staff Sgt Star Lara. Nov 8, 2pm. Free. Sebastopol Senior Center, 167 High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.2440.

culinary discussions and celebrity tributes throughout Napa, Yountville, St Helena and Calistoga. Nov 13-17. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372. Film, food and wine at over 12 screening venues in four cities. See www.NapaValleyFilmFest.org for details. Nov 13-17. Napa Valley Film Festival, Various Locations in Napa Valley, Napa.

National Theatre: 50 Years on Stage Live performances and glimpses from the archive of the National Theater, London, simulcast around the world. Wed, Nov 6, 7pm. $16-$23. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Northern Lights

Film

Drama about labor organizing among North Dakota farm workers in 1915. Filmmaker Rob Nilsson in person. Nov 10, 7pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Comet Ison & Other Visitors

The Rolling Stones: Hyde Park Live

Learn about one of the brightest comets we’ve ever seen, coming back into view this winter. Fri through Nov 22. $5-$8. SRJC Planetarium, Lark Hall 2001, 1502 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4465.

Foodie Films Nov 7, “Julie and Julia.” First 7pm. $20. Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, 551 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.939.SVMA.

Harvest of Empire Documentary based on journalist Juan Gonzalez’s book about the role of the US military in Latin America. Nov 8, 7pm. $5-$10. First United Methodist Church, 9 Ross Valley Dr, San Rafael.

Italian Film Festival Nov 9, “One Day More.” Sat, 5:30 and 7:45pm. $14-$91. Marin Center Showcase Theatre, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Jewish Film Festival Nov 7, “Dressing America”; Nov 14, “My Best Enemy”; 1 and 7:30pm. $10. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Napa Valley Film Festival Program of films honors veterans. Nov 11, 1pm. $16. Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.226.8742. Discover new independent films, meet filmmakers and enjoy wine tastings, film &

Summer 2013 concert shown in its entirety. Nov 7, 7pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Sonoma Film Institute Nov 8, “They All Laughed.” 4 and 7pm. through Nov 24. $7. Warren Auditorium, Ives Hall, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

The State of Arizona Documentary tracks multiple perspectives of Arizona’s immigration bill. Nov 12, 7pm. Free. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Food & Drink Debbie Adler Author of “Sweet Debbie’s Organic Treats” demonstrates her recipes. Includes book. Nov 9, 11am. $25. Cooking class with the author of “Sweet Debbie’s Organic Treats.” Includes book. Nov 9, 11am. $25. Whole Foods Market, 3682 Bel Aire Plaza, Napa. 707.224.6300.

dog rescue. Nov 10, 2pm. $40. Wilson Winery, 1960 Dry Creek Rd, Healdsburg. 707.433.4355.

Pasta Party Fundraiser for the Living Room featuring live music, food and a silent auction. Nov 10, 3pm. $20. Church of the Incarnation, 550 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.579.2604.

Sausage Making & Eating David Budworth of Marina Meat demonstrates sausage making and cooks a German dinner. Nov 7, 6:30pm. $55. Next Key Center, 1385 N Hamilton Pkwy, Novato. 415.382.3363, ext 211.

Lectures Art Uncorked Recreate masterpieces in this fun painting class. First Thurs of every month, 6:30pm. $45. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Brief Lives of the North Bay Featuring the story of a man who was torn by a bear and whose body was found in the Laguna. Nov 7, 7pm. $7. Sonoma County Museum, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Creativity Talks Dr Stuart Brown discusses why play matters for kids. Nov 7, 7pm. Free. Bay Area Discovery Museum, Fort Baker, 557 McReynolds Rd, Sausalito. 415.339.3900.

Author in conversation with Jane Ganahl. Nov 13, 7:30pm. $12-$15. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Michael Pollan Author of “An Omnivore’s Dilemma” gives lecture. Nov 13, 7pm. $15. Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.226.8742.

No Limits Creative writing workshop led by Louise J Belle. Nov 8, 7:30pm. Donation. Songbird Community Healing Center, 8297 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.2398.

Pleasures of the Heart First Monday, women’s salon. Second Monday, coed discussion group. Second Mon of every month, 7pm. Pleasures of the Heart, 1310 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.482.9899.

Reclaim Your Time Frances Caballo demonstrates how to manage a social marketing platform. Presented by Redwood Writers. Nov 10, 3pm. Flamingo Resort Hotel, 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Science Buzz Cafe

Talk about death in a relaxed setting. Nov 12, 7pm. The Sunflower Center, 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

The Economics of Cooperation

75th Anniversary of Kristallnacht

Death Cafe

Philip Beard, Georgia Kelly, Marilyn Langlois and Keith Wilson speak in this presentation by the Praxis Peace Institute. Nov 10, 3pm. $15. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.579.ARTS.

Fall Lecture Series

“99 Bottles of Wine” author hosts winetasting. Nov 8, 5:30pm. $10. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Paella for Dogs

Andrew Jolivette

Eat paella in support of herding

Educator speaks on cultural

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Joyce Maynard

Nov 7, “Geological Evolution of the Earth Landscape” with Richard Ely; Nov 12, “Conversations with Bacteria: Women of Science Series” with Philip Harriman, PhD; Nov 19, “Life in the Universe: The Science of Astrobiology” with Carl Pilcher, PhD. Tues, 7pm. through Nov 19. $5. French Garden, 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

“Stop-Motion Animation Festival: Pupf-Phew!” with Sarah Klein and David Kwan. Sat, Nov 9, 7:30pm. $5-$10. Healdsburg Center for the Arts, 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1970.

David Schuemann

representation in Native America. Nov 13, 5pm. Free. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2880.

Featuring keynote speaker Dr Sergio La Porta. Nov 10, 3:30pm. Congregation Shomrei Torah, 2600 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.578.5519.

Sonoma County Beer, Cider & Spirits Conference

Space Oddity Chris Hadfield makes us all want to be astronauts Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield is one of the universe’s better-known space personalities, thanks to his version of David Bowie’s “Space Oddity” and its corresponding viral video, recorded while floating weightless with a guitar on the International Space Station. Likewise, Hadfield is a social-media maven, tweeting photos from space, hosting online Q&A sessions, posting videos about his work and traveling the world as a keynote speaker. In his interviews, he expresses a sentiment, similar to that of other astronauts, that life is precious. If NASA had a Chris Hadfield, there might not be so many budget cuts (or there would at least be more outrage at the current ones). When he’s back upon terra firma, Hadfield is a regular at speaking engagements, answering questions about everyday life in space. (How do you go to the bathroom without gravity? How do you sleep in space? What does space smell like?) Though he often waxes philosophical, possibly his most interesting comment was about his facial hair: he trims his awesome pushbroom mustache with scissors and a vacuum cleaner. Now that’s dedication to the ’stache. Chris Hadfield reads from his new book An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth on Saturday, Nov. 9, at Book Passage. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. 4pm. Free. 415.927.0960.—Nicolas Grizzle

Featuring Tony Magee of Lagunitas, Natalie Cilurzo of Russian River Brewing Company and others. Nov 12, 1pm. $50. Hyatt Vineyard Creek, 170 Railroad St, Santa Rosa.

Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Nov 13, 12pm. $110. Left Bank Restaurant, 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331.

Stargazing

David Tanis

To Walk in Harmony

Author of “One Good Dish” and former Chez Panisse chef cooks and talks about his book.

“Native American Lifeways in Sonoma County” with Dr Ben Benson. Nov 6, 7pm. Free.

Astronomers Mike Johnson and Andy Coffman talk about space. Nov 9, 7pm. $5.


Darwin 102, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Rinpoche will bestow the Green Tara empowerment. Nov 12, 6pm. Free. Kagyu Takten Puntsokling, 5594 Volkerts Rd, Sebastopol.

Readings Angelico Hall Nov 7, 7pm, “Aimless Love” with Billy Collins, includes book $30. Dominican University, 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael.

Book Passage Nov 6, 7pm, “Paris Was the Place” with Susan Conley. Nov 7, 7pm, “Sweet Debbie’s Organic Treats” with Debbie Adler. Nov 9, 4pm, “An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth” with Col Chris Hadfield. Nov 9, 7pm, “Bolinas Bongo” with Nicola Trwst. Nov 10, 1pm, “Wise, Happy and Feeling Good: Maxims on Life, Success and Well-Being” with Jarl Forsman & Steve Sekhon. Nov 10, 4pm, “Twice Heroes” with Tom Graves. Nov 10, 7pm, “Healing with the Arts” with Dr Michael Samuels & Mary Rockwood Lane, PhD. Nov 11, 7pm, “We Are Water” with Wally Lamb, includes book $33. Nov 12, 1pm, “Bellman & Black” with Diane Setterfield. Nov 12, 7pm, “Tatiana” with Martin Cruz Smith. Nov 13, 1pm, “Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between Us and Them” with Joshua Greene. Nov 13, 5pm, “Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Hard Luck” with Jeff Kinney. Nov 13, 7pm, “A Life in Books: The Rise and Fall of Bleu Mobley” with Warren Lehrer. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Charles M Schulz Museum Nov 12, 6pm, “Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Hard Luck” with Jeff Kinney. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa 707.579.4452.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Nov 12, 7pm, “Curtsies & Conspiracies” with Gail Carriger. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Dr Insomnia’s Coffee & Teas

Hopmonk Sebastopol Nov 12, 6pm, “Mr Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore” with Robin Sloan. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol 707.829.7300.

Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium Nov 13, 8pm, “Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls” with David Sedaris. $39-$42. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael 415.499.6800.

Napa Valley Museum Nov 7, 7pm, “Prohibition in the Valley: Castles Under Siege” with Lin Weber. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville 707.944.0500.

NapaStyle Nov 9, 12pm, “Model Bakery Cookbook” with Karen Mitchell & Sarah Hansen. 6525 Washington St, Yountville.

Redwood Covenant Church Nov 7, 7pm, “The Wife of Jesus: Ancient Texts and Modern Scandals” with Anthony Le Donne. 3175 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa.

Robert Louis Stevenson Museum Nov 9, 1:30pm, “Napa Valley Chronicles” with Lauren Coodley. 1490 Library Lane, St. Helena 707-963-3757.

Sebastopol Community Church Nov 8, 7:30pm, “ The World Until Yesterday: What Can We Learn from Traditional Societies?” with Jared Diamond. 1000 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol.

Theater Bram Stoker’s Dracula Classic vampire story. Times vary. Thurs-Sun. $10-$12. Montgomery High School, 1250 Hahman Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.528.5191.

Elephant & Piggie Show Local actors present shows based on books by Mo Willems in this children’s program. Nov 6, 4pm. Free. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Ghost Sonata

Second Monday of every month, 7pm, “Poetry Farm,” readings by local writers. 800 Grant Ave, Novato 415.897.9500.

Burton-esque Halloween tinge to this 1907 modernist play. Times vary. Wed-Sun through Nov 9. $10-$17. Person Theater, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Green Music Center

Inside Out

Nov 12, 7pm, “Knocking on

Solo show by Stephen

Kearin. Nov 9, 8pm. $20-$35. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Metamorphoses Modern adaptation of Ovid’s Greek myths by Mary Zimmerman. Original music by Wyatt Williams. Times vary. Fri-Sun through Nov 23. Analy High School, 6950 Analy Ave, Sebastopol.

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest A charming rogue contrives to serve a short sentence in an airy mental institution rather than prison in this play made famous by the 1975 movie starring Jack Nicholson. ThursSat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. $20$32. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Story Pirates Describes as “Monty Python” meets “Schoolhouse Rock.” Nov 13, 6:30pm. $12-$17. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Suddenly Last Summer Tennessee Williams’ play about the predatory nature of people. Times vary. Fri-Sun through Nov 23. $12-$15. Russian River Hall, 20347 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.849.4873.

This Is Our Youth Kenneth Lonergan’s dark comedy about 1980s morality, youth and counterculture in America. Times Vary. Thurs-Sun through Nov 11. $15-$25. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

Whose Live Anyway? Improv comedy featuring actors from the TV show “Whose Line Is It, Anyway?” Nov 9, 8pm. $39-$59. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

The Wizard of Oz Family production by the Throckmorton Youth Performers. Times vary. Fri-Sun through Nov 17. $18-$35. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

33 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 6 –1 2, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of November 6

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not a big fan of fear. It gets far more attention than it deserves. The media and entertainment industries practically worship it, and many of us allow ourselves to be riddled with toxic amounts of the stuff. Having said that, though, I do want to put in a good word for fear. Now and then, it keeps us from doing stupid things. It prods us to be wiser and act with more integrity. It forces us to see the truth when we might prefer to wallow in delusion. Now is one of those times for you, Aries. Thank your fear for helping to wake you up. TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20)

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Poetry might be deďŹ ned as the clear expression of mixed feelings,â&#x20AC;? wrote W. H. Auden. If thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s true, then your job is to be a poet right now. You seem to be awash in a hubbub of paradoxical inclinations, complete with conďŹ&#x201A;icting desires and mismatched truths. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no shame or blame in that. But you do have a responsibility to communicate your complexity with honesty and precision. If you can manage that, people will treat you with affection and give you extra slack. They might even thank you.

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) What can you do to improve your ďŹ&#x201A;ow? Are there obstructions in your environment that keep you from having a more ďŹ&#x201A;uidic rhythm? Do you harbor negative beliefs that make it harder for life to bestow its natural blessings on you? Now is the time to take care of glitches like these, Gemini. You have more power than usual to eliminate constrictions and dissolve ďŹ xations. Your intuition will be strong when you use it to drum up graceful luck for your personal use. Be aggressive. Be bold. Be lyrical. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s high time for you to slip into a smooth groove. CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22)

In the beginning of his novel The White Castle, Orhan Pamuk offers this meditation: â&#x20AC;&#x153;To imagine that a person who intrigues us has access to a way of life unknown and all the more attractive for its mystery, to believe that we will begin to live only through the love of that personâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;what else is this but the birth of great passion?â&#x20AC;? How do you respond to this provocative statement, Cancerian? Here are my thoughts: On the one hand, maybe itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not healthy for you to fantasize that a special someone can give you what you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t give yourself. On the other hand, believing this is true may inspire you to take an intriguing risk that would catalyze invigorating transformations. Which is it? Now is a good time to ruminate on these matters.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) Canadians Tommy Larkin and Stephen Goosney are biological brothers, but they were adopted by different families when they were young. They lost touch for almost 30 years. Once they began looking for each other, it didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take long to be reunited. Nor did they have to travel far to celebrate. It turns out that they were living across the street from each other in the same small town in Newfoundland. I foresee a metaphorically similar experience in your future, Leo. When you get reconnected to your past, you will ďŹ nd that it has been closer than you realized. VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22) This will be an excellent week for you to talk with yourselfâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or rather, with yourselves. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m envisioning in-depth conversations between your inner saint and your inner evil twin . . . between the hard worker and the lover of creature comforts . . . between the eager-to-please servant of the greater good and the self-sufďŹ cient smarty whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dedicated to personal success. I think that in at least some of these confabs, you should speak every word out loud. You should gesture with your hands and express colorful body language. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prime time for your different sub-personalities to get to know each other better. LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) In the coming week you will probably have more luck than usual if you play keno, craps, blackjack, bingo or roulette. People who owe you money will be inclined to pay you back, so you might want to give them a nudge. I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be surprised if you ďŹ nd a $20 bill lying on the sidewalk or if a store cashier accidentally gives you way too much change. In the wake of these tendencies, your main assignment is to be alert for opportunities to

increase your cash ďŹ&#x201A;ow. For example, if you wake up in the middle of the night with an idea for boosting your ďŹ nancial fortunes, I hope you will have a pen and notebook by the bed to write it down.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not for all the whiskey in heaven,â&#x20AC;? begins a poem by Charles Bernstein. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not for all the ďŹ&#x201A;ies in Vermont. Not for all the tears in the basement. Not for a million trips to Mars. Not for all the ďŹ re in hell. Not for all the blue in the sky.â&#x20AC;? Can you guess what heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s driving at? Those are the things he will gladly do without in order to serve his passion. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No, never, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll never stop loving you,â&#x20AC;? he concludes. According to my understanding of your astrological cycle, Scorpio, now is a good time for you to make a comparable pledge. What is the one passion you promise to devote yourself to above all others? And what are you willing to live without in order to focus on that passion? Be extravagant, pure, wild and explicit.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) Dmitri Razumikhin is a character in Fyodor Dostoyevskyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s novel Crime and Punishment. His surname is derived from the Russian word for â&#x20AC;&#x153;reason.â&#x20AC;? At one point, he makes a drunken speech that includes these observations: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s by talking nonsense that one gets to the truth! Not one single truth has ever been arrived at without people ďŹ rst having talked a dozen reams of nonsense, even ten dozen reams of it.â&#x20AC;? Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s make this a centerpiece of your current strategy, Sagittarius. Just assume that in order to ferret out the core insights that will fuel your next transformations, you may need to speak and hear a lot of babble.

CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) At the 2013 Grammy Awards, actor Neil Patrick Harris introduced the band Fun this way: â&#x20AC;&#x153;As legendary gangster rap icon Katharine Hepburn once said, if you follow all the rules, you miss all the fun.â&#x20AC;? Everything about that vignette is a template for the approach you can use now with great success. You should gravitate toward festive events and convivial gatherings. Whenever possible, you should sponsor, activate and pave the way for fun. Toward that end, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s totally permissible for you to tell amusing stories that arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t exactly factual and that bend the rules not quite to the breaking point. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18)

Some spiritual traditions regard the ego as a bad thing. They imply itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the source of sufferingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a chronically infected pustule that must be regularly lanced and drained. I understand this argument. The ego has probably been the single most destructive force in the history of civilization. But I also think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s our sacred duty to redeem and rehabilitate it. After all, we often need our egos in order to get important things done. Our egos give us the conďŹ dence to push through difďŹ culties. They motivate us to work hard to achieve our dreams. Your assignment, Aquarius, is to beautify your ego as you strengthen it. Build your self-esteem without stirring up arrogance. Love yourself brilliantly, not neurotically. Express your talents in ways that stimulate others to express their talents.

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

Dr. Seuss wrote his childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s books in English, but he liked to stretch the limits of his native tongue. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be surprised what there is to be found once you go beyond â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Zâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and start poking around,â&#x20AC;? he said. One of the extra letters he found out there was â&#x20AC;&#x153;yuzz,â&#x20AC;? which he used to spell the made-up word â&#x20AC;&#x153;yuzz-a-ma-tuzz.â&#x20AC;? I recommend that you take after Seussâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not only in the way you speak, but also in the ways you work, play, love, dream and seek adventure. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to explore the territory beyond your comfort zone.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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Seminar on Hormones and our Bodies Estrogen, Progesterone, Testosterone, Thyroid, and Adrenals â&#x20AC;&#x201C; How our bodies need these crucial hormones to help us feel healthy, vibrant, and alive. Dr. Moses Goldberg and Dr. Dana Michaels â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Tuesday November 19 @ Health First Pharmacy â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 707.837.7948 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; $20 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Pre-registration Required

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For your favorite North Bay businesses! Oct. 9 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dec. 10 Go to www.bohemian.com

The Bohemianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best Of The North Bay will be revealed March 2014!

Bohemian | Lagunitas Brewing | Warren Miller's Ticket to Ride pre-party Wed, Nov. 13! NEW Shop â&#x20AC;&#x201D; My Chic Boutique In the Windsor Town Green! New & Consignment â&#x20AC;&#x201D; affordable womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clothing & accessories. Plus sizes available with plenty to choose from. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 9121 Windsor Road 707.480.2269

Join us for our annual pre-party at Lagunitas 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8pm! Big prizes include Squaw Valley trip for 2, GoPro Hero3 helmet cam, Skull Candy Headphones, Winter gear and DVDs, plus 10 pairs of tickets to the Nov. 16 film release of Ticket to Ride!

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The Nueva School for the Performing Arts at Windsor High School will perform a new musical Sent from Nov. 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9. This drama follows a postal carrier who has been delivering packages for 22 years in her community. Through the medium of delivering packages, the rich tapestry of the community is explored. Theatre opens at 7pm on Friday November 8, and 6pm on Saturday November 9. Cost is $8 adults, $5 for students.

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