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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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presents pr esentss the

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ultimate timate M Discoverr the ult MUSIC US IC EXPER EXPERIENCE RI ENCE in the heart off wine country y

Jon Batiste & Stay Huma Human n Sat, O Oct ct 26, 7:30pm

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The T he TakĂĄcs Ta akĂĄcs Quartet Quartet Sun, O Oct ct 27, 3pm

Their consummate artistryy and exquisite, award-winning rrecordings ecordingss place them in the top ranks of string qua artets worldwide. quartets In their W Weill eill e Hall debut, they t perform works by Mozart and Dvo oĆŽĂĄk.

The T he Silk Road Ro oad E Ensemble nsemble Tue, T ue, u O Oct ct 29, 7pm

FFounded ounded by Y Yo-Yo o o-Y Yo Ma, this innovat innovative ive ensemble includes musicians fr ro om more more from than twenty countries and has per rformed performed world. to critical acclaim all over the worl ld.

Mariza M ariza

Sat, N Nov ov 2, 7:30pm

Part of a new generation rreinvigorating Part einvigorating Portugal’s P ortugal’s fado—a singing style blending timeless P Portuguese ortuguese folk melodies m with Arabic cadences and Africa African an and Brazilian rhythms—her charismatic performances have won her legions of fa fans ans worldwide.

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Film Premiere San Rafael-Marin Center Nov 16, 8pm

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Sat, November 2 2013 Departs Willits and Fort Bragg Skunk Train Depots at 10:00 am and returns by 6:00 pm A BeneďŹ t for the

Mendocino County Museum

Mushroom Cook-off Wine, Beer and Mushroom Tasting Mushroom Walk and Talk In the heart of the redwoods at Camp Mendocino TICKETS

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Ĺľ NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

TEST RIDE

THE 2014

Bohemian 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288

Ray Mabry

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTO BE R 23 – 29, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

4 Editor

Gabe Meline, ext. 202

Staff Writers Leilani Clark, ext. 106 Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200

Copy Editor Gary Brandt, ext. 150

Calendar Editor Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200

Contributors Michael Amsler, Alastair Bland, Rob Brezsny, Dani Burlison, Richard von Busack, Rachel Dovey, Jessica Dur Taylor, Gretchen Giles, James Knight, Jacquelynne Ocaña, Jonah Raskin, Sara Sanger, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow, Ken Weaver

Intern Tara Kaveh

Design Director

Transcendence Theatre Company

Kara Brown

David Templeton

One Big Arts Party!

Live performances by Transcendence Theartre Company and David Templeton!

Celebrate our 16th Annual Boho Awards Recipients and rub elbows with artistic movers and shakers!

Sebastopol Center for the Arts, 282 S. High Street, Sebastopol | www.sebarts.org Thursday, November 7, 2013 | 5:30-7:30pm Enjoy appetizers, cash bar | $5 at the door

Contact the Bohemian for more information 707.527.1200

LOGO

Production Operations Coordinator Mercy Perez

Senior Designer Jackie Mujica, ext. 213

Layout Artists Gary Brandt, Tabi Zarrinnal

Advertising Director Lisa Santos, ext. 205

Advertising Account Managers Mercedes Murolo, ext. 207 Lynda Rael, ext. 204

Circulation Manager Steve Olson, ext. 201

Sales Operations Manager Deborah Bonar, ext. 215

Publisher Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2013 Metrosa Inc.

Cover illustration by Michael Houghton. Design by Kara Brown.

5 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 23–29, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

nb MIRACLES HAPPEN

‘O ye of little faith,’ said Denis Lindsay, ‘didst thou thinketh the shutdown would last forever?’

This photo was submitted by Courtney Harkins of Santa Rosa. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

‘Why not just get some cells in a Petri dish and pour in the cellular Miracle Grow?’ COVE R STO RY P1 6 The Wheels on the Bus P8 Halloween’s Perfect Cobweb Winery P1 5 ‘I and You’ Premieres at MTC P21 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Dining p12 Restaurants p14 Wineries p15

Swirl p15 Cover Feature p16 Culture Crush p20 Stage p21 Film p22

Music p23 Concerts & Clubs p24 A&E p27 Classified p31 Astrology p31

Woman-Owned Woman-Owned Family-Friendly Family-Friendly

ABOUT THE COVER ARTIST This issue’s cover art is by Michael Houghton, an illustrator, graphic artist and designer who lives and works in Santa Rosa. He has moonlighted as a designer since he was a teen, and recently decided to leave his comfy day job as an architectural draftsman and follow his long-held dream of doing design full-time. See more of his work at www.designedbymonkeys.com.

Tues-Fri 7:30-6:00 321 Second Street

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NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | OCTO BE R 23 – 29, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

6

BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Self-Checkout Blues Can a library be too modern? BY KATE JAMES

W

hen my family first moved to Novato from Ohio back in 1985, we delighted in the Novato library—so airy, pleasant and wellstocked, unlike our old library. Almost 30 years later, some exterior changes have been made to the library building where practicality has won out over aesthetics, but that is a small complaint. However, over the past several years, I have had to visit the Marin County Civic Center so often that I began to frequent that library instead. I began to prefer it, even when it became less convenient. Visits to the Civic Center library still give me that childlike library joy. I find myself leaving with such a heavy, teetering pile of books that I begin to feel a pleasant embarrassment at my greed. In contrast, visits to the Novato library had become slightly depressing. Finally, I realized what the Civic Center has that the Novato library no longer does: people. That is, the Civic Center library still uses the old-timey, “retro” method of patrons standing at the counter while an employee helps them check out books. In contrast, self-service stations at the Novato library have replaced human employees. I was truly surprised that this would matter so much, but it does. Perhaps cutting human interaction from our lives is the new “normal,” touted as convenient and faster, seen also in the rise of self-checkout lines at supermarkets and home-improvement stores. However, I believe that when we begin to subtract human interaction from our lives, we lessen our quality of life. Don’t get me wrong, I’m no Luddite. Computers have become indispensable to libraries, and I wouldn’t go back. It is almost unfathomable to me now that I was ever able to research books using only a card catalogue. But computers shouldn’t replace all aspects of the library. Therefore, I was dismayed to learn that the Civic Center library might also be replacing some employees with self-service stations. If that is true, I plan on driving to whatever library in Marin still employs people to check out books. And if those libraries also go the way of Novato? Well, I was thinking of moving anyway. Kate James is an avid reader living in Novato. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Cat Call

“Black Panther” by fall writing contest winner Don Stoddard (“It Showed Up on My Doorstep,” Oct. 16) was especially endearing; a special reminder of growing up in the ’50s. My 93-yearold mother still has her black panther proudly displayed.

VICKI S. FRENCH Via online

What’s a Forest? Artesa would clear-cut 1.25 million board-feet of redwood and Douglas fir at the site, based on 2004 inventory, according to what the project description in the EIR says would be logged (“Chainsaw Wine,” Oct. 16). That sure sounds more like a forest than “agriculture,” unless you define “forest” as “tree farming”—except that it’s a final harvest forever, converted to monoculture vineyards, not regenerating young forest after clear-cut.

BAYE Via online

Hemp, Not Wine There is not one original oak left in Oakland. For 75 years, we have been destroying our forests instead of growing hemp. How many golf courses and “vineries” full of pesticides and harmful chemicals do we need?

WILLIAM KOSINAR Via online

Refusing Waste Bea Johnson can fit her household’s annual trash inside a small jar because she defers her waste to someone else— sending back the plastic strip from her Netflix envelope is a great example of how she’s letting someone else clean up her mess (“The Simple Life,” Oct. 9).

It’s important for everyone and anyone to reduce their waste output, but ooh-ing and aah-ing over the antics of a material anorexic is not the point. Industrial and corporate waste is the prime source of our ecological crisis. If Bea Johnson wants to deprive herself and her family of everything except seven pairs of shoes, let her, but I’d personally rather see articles about p eople who are fighting the real actors in the environmental breakdown we’re witnessing: Big Oil, Big Ag, Big Pharm and Big Coal. Nothing Bea Johnson is doing, so far as I can tell, impacts that.

RACHEL KAPLAN Author, ‘Urban Homesteading’ Petaluma

Now is a good time to clarify that since 2011, the Johnson household has taken advantage of Netflix streaming, a fact that we neglected to mention in our original article.—The Ed.

No New Taxes It’s voting time again, and many cities are asking for a sales tax increase. When is the Sonoma County taxpayer going to take a stand and say no to any sales tax increases until cities start seriously reforming the gigantic pension hole that we taxpayers are burdened with? Should we just pay higher and higher taxes so public employees can retire on twice the amount we will? Vote no to our tax dollars going to fat county and city pension plans and lifetime medical benefits. Are you getting that when you retire?

LYNNE MORIN Santa Rosa

Willits Bypass I’m a one-year, eight-month resident of Willits, a community activist and ex-biology student. I’ve been protesting this bypass project by Caltrans for more than seven months. This project has not, cannot and will not help the

Rants

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environment. It will probably not affect “traffic” significantly, which in any case has almost never existed in Willits, especially if locals just get off Main Street. (Honestly, 99 percent of the time it sees less traffic than the average in West Los Angeles, where I lived for 28 years.) And it will cost $300 million to $600 million, that latter balloon figure reflecting the true adjusted-for inflation bond price(s). That’s why over one-third of all area residents have signed the petition against it. That’s why people contact their uncaring “representatives.” And that’s why people have and will continue to get arrested (some of us don’t need to, I joke, having been exposed heavily to poison oak, reducing our mobility heavily, along the way). This is bad, but we are peaceful.

ALEX HARTER Via online

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

Top Five

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1 Gary Wysocky calls out

Sheila Groves-Tracey buys the Twin Oaks Tavern, classic Penngrove roadhouse

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Chris Mortenson from St. Helena’s La Condesa on ‘Cutthroat Kitchen’

4 Ken Brown, Sonoma

mayor, decides at last minute to allow leaf blowers

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 23–29, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

THIS MODERN WORLD

7

Paper Pa P aperr ap THE

Gun n Club

Elizabeth Eliz abeth Seward Seward

NORTH NOR TH B BAY A Y BOH EM E MI A N | OC OCTO T O BE R 23– 23 – 29 29,, 20 0 1 3 | BO H E M I AN AN.COM .C O M

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NO TRANSF TRANSFERS FERS V Veolia eeolia Transdev Transdev has a history history of of polluting, lying and engaging engag ging in conflicts of of interest, interest, but county co ounty officials officials claim cannot takee business ethics in into account awarding contracts. claim they ca nnot tak to acc count when aw arding con tracts.

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ress ressure e ure is is growing growing in n ccommunities ommunities ar round the the world world around aagainst gainst Veolia Veeolia Transdev, th worldwide Transdev, thee worldwide i dustri in d ial solutions sollution i s firm fi industrial based in F rance, clouded clouded in based France, political and an nd environmental environmental political controverssy and and currently currently controversy the operator operattor of Sonoma Sonoma the County’s public public bus bus line. line. County’s But B ut the the 225-year 5-year ccontract ontract th that at

gives the gives the France-based France-based gi giant ant dollars year sseveral everal million doll ars eeach ach y ear a thee Sonoma County to o operate th Sonoma C ounty Transit T ransit bus bus fleet will come come to an n end and local en nd in mid-2014, an d loc al aactivists ctivi v sts aaligned l ed aagainst lign gainst the the company company due du ue to o its support support of Israel’s Israel’s presence presence Palestine in nP alestine want want the the county county to part ways p art w ays with Veolia. Veolia. Thee main Th main beef against against the the ccompany, o pany, which om which deals deals worldwide worldwid de waste and wastewater in nw aste an dw astewater management, m anagement, transportation transportation

and and industrial-scale industrial-scale ccooling ooling systems, thee ra racially systems, iiss th ciall l y ssegregated egregated bus in bus line line that that Veolia Veolia operated o Israeli-occupied Israeli-occupied Palestine Paleestine until last last month. month. On Aug. Aug. 8, 2012, the the Bohemian ran an op/ed op p/ed asking asking for for a boycott boycott of Veolia Veolia Transportation, Transportation, the the company’s company’s U.S. U.S. transport trransport division division and and the the employer emplo p yer of approximately approximately 100 people p in Sonoma Sonoma County. County. The The Sonoma Sonoma Alliance Alliance ) 10 for for a Fair Fair Ride has has led led

Columbin Columbine. ne. Newtow n.. Oak Cr eek. Newtown. Creek. Spark s. The T list of Sparks. w places wher wheree gunfueled tr ragedies tragedies have occ curred occurred gr ows w eekly—and grows weekly—and even dai lyy, if you live in the poor er daily, poorer sections of Chicago or Oakland. In responsee,, a group group of concerned response, Napa cit izens have or ganized Napa citizens organized County Gun G Saf ety Day y. Aimed at Safety Day. gun own ners, potential gun owners owners, thosse inter ested in learning and those interested more about about gun safety safety and more regulatioons,, the event off ers gunregulations, offers safety instruction instruction fr om the Napa safety from County Sheriff SSheriff’s ’s Office as well as fr ee gun lock or the first 300 free lockss ffor attendeees.. Mental heal th and attendees. health suicide-pprevention information information will suicide-prevention be availa able fr om the Napa County available from Heal th and and Human Services, Services, and at Health 10am,, Co ongressman Mike Congressman Thompso on off ers an update on his Thompson offers proposedd legislation to expand proposed backgr ou und check s. V oluntary and background checks. Voluntary anonymoous fir earm disposal anonymous firearm thr ough the Napa P olice through Police Departm ment will be off ered.. Gun Department offered. Saf ety D ay is on Satur dayy, Safety Day Saturday, Oct. 26,, between b Napa City Hall olice Department. and the Napa P Police 1539 Firs st SSt., t.,, Napa.. 9am–1pm. First Fr ee. 707 7..265.0200. Free. 707.265.0200.

Trailing T rra ailing Off The Arts Council of Sonoma County has laid off its ffour-person our-person staff and will be transitioning transitioning to an all-volunteer all-volunnteer organization, organization,, citing financial woes.. At At least four four board board memberss resigned resigned in the wake news. of the ne ews. Formed in 1984, ews. 1984, the council was w established as an umbrella organization umbrellaa or ganization for for the vast array array of visual, v , performing performing and literary county. liter ary arts a in the county y. The yearly ARTrails program AR RTrails pr ogram was one of the group’s moree successful pr projects. gr oup’s mor m ojects. Boardd ch chairman Boar hairman Tom Toom Lombardo Lombardo told the Pr Press ess ss Democr Democrat raatt that Jennif Jennifer er Sloan,, the group’s director, the gr oup’s executive dir ector, had withheld with hheld critical financial information informattion that ““could could have informed informedd decision making.” making ” Sloan, making. Sloan along with with staff members John Moran, Vickyy Mor an,, Courtney C Arnold and Vick weree given termination KKumpfer umpfer wer notices on o Oct.. 14.—Leilani Clark

The Bohemian Bohemian started as The Paper Paper in 1978. 1978.

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the anti-Veolia crusade on local soil. Lois Perlman, a member of the alliance, says she wants to see a U.S.-based ďŹ rm operate the buses, both to keep proďŹ ts within the country as well as to make a clear political statement that human rights violations, among other alleged offenses, will not be tolerated by local government. But the matter is not one of choice, according to Bryan Albee, transit systems manager for Sonoma County Transit. He says once a call is made for bidders on a new 10-year contract, â&#x20AC;&#x153;all qualiďŹ ed proposers will be given equal considerationâ&#x20AC;? and that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s illegal for a federally funded service like Sonoma County Transit to show preference for one bidder based on anything but the applicantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s capacity to carry out the job. First District supervisor Susan Gorin similarly told the Bohemian, â&#x20AC;&#x153;As a public body we are required to accept the lowest bidder, so itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s difficult to interject philosophical bias into an issue like this.â&#x20AC;? But early this year in Davis, public sentiment may have played a role in a Veolia defeat. Veolia had placed a bid to construct a watertreatment plant. A community outcry followed, after which Veolia withdrew its offer. Overall, a global rising tide of opposition against Veolia seems to be taking a ďŹ nancial toll on the giant, which has reportedly lost $20 billion in contracts in the past decade. Though Veolia quit operating its controversial buses in Palestine in September, it still runs a train line and manages a wastewater treatment plant in parts of Palestine that have been seized by Israel. Veolia operates a landďŹ ll, too, on the West Bank. In a damning episode of scandal, Veolia claimed in 2011 to have divested from the Tovlan LandďŹ ll, but later, the Israeli Ministry of Environmental Protection conďŹ rmed publicly that Veolia remained the owner of the facility. In the United States, Veolia Transportation operates a vast

network of transit services. According to Albee, Veolia runs public transportation lines in California in Napa County, Redding, Chico, Yolo County, Yuba-Sutter counties and Modesto. Across the country and in Canada, Veolia has numerous contracts and even owns the ubiquitous airport shuttle service SuperShuttle. In San Jose, the city council recently unanimously voted to renew Veoliaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contract to operate an airport shuttle for four more years. But pro-Palestine activists arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the only ones uneasy with Veoliaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presence. The corporation has run afoul of communities across the nation, mostly for wastewatermanagement-related violations. Locally, Veolia has been sued at least twice for dumping millions of gallons of sewage or contaminated water into San Francisco Bay. In each caseâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;one in Burlingame, the other in Richmondâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the company settled out of court. Veolia Transportation may have lost even more credibility during the summerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s BART strike, when its vice-president of labor relations Thomas Hock offered his services as a strike negotiator to the transit line. BART agreed to pay Hock $399,000 to help settle the disagreement between the train line and its workers. Veolia was meanwhile being paid to operate extra shuttle buses for commuters along BART routes while train operators refused to work. Allegations were made that Hock had a conďŹ&#x201A;ict of interestâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;being paid to help end a strike while his own company was paid for each day the strike persisted. The contract between Veolia and Sonoma County Transit ends on June 30, 2014. The county will then have the option of extending the contract for two years, until June 30, 2016, according to Albee at Sonoma County Transit. He says that ďŹ ve national ďŹ rms, including Veolia, have the resources and competence to manage Sonoma Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s public buses. Just when a call for bidders will be made is not yet clear.

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PRODUCE FOR ALL Rep. Jared Huffman visits Bloomfield Farms for a gleaning session organized by CropMobster.

Harvest Share CropMobster ensures that farmers with surplus produce don’t have to waste it BY RACHEL DOVEY

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ick Papadopoulos is a farmer now, but he has a professional background in conflict resolution. So, standing in a vegetable cooler on a Saturday night last March, surrounded by surplus produce that hadn’t been sold, his mind began to wander.

“We had all this food that wasn’t going to people,” the general manager of Bloomfield Farms in Petaluma recalls. “It’s edible and it’s grown for the purpose of feeding people, and we don’t make any money when it’s wasted.” Later that week, he posted a message on Facebook advertising farmers market leftovers at a reduced price. That was the beginning of CropMobster.com, a social media hub addressing local

farm waste and hunger—both issues hinging on a centralized, assembly-line food system that, according to Papadopoulos, is full of holes. The terms “food waste” and “food access” fill national headlines, but connections between the two are rarely made. In September, the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization released a report claiming that each year “food that is produced but not eaten guzzles

up a volume of water equivalent to the annual flow of Russia’s Volga River, and is responsible for adding 3.3 billion tonnes [sic] of greenhouse gasses to the planet’s atmosphere.” Environmental damage aside, food producers lose an annual $750 billion on goods that feed no one. Meanwhile, 842 million people are hungry worldwide. On a local scale, Papadopoulos saw the potential for overlap. A National Resources Defense Council study released last year states that waste occurs pre- and post-harvest, with variables like weather and labor shortages making it difficult to perfectly match a grower’s supply and demand. If farmers weren’t making money anyway, Papadopoulos reasoned, why not discount those surpluses, or just give them away? Gleaning operations, nonprofits like Respecting Our Elders and discount marts have come to similar conclusions. CropMobster aims to be a sort of virtual hub between such organizations and farms. Anyone can post an “alert”—a surplus of discounted blueberries, a need for gleaning volunteers—for free on its pages, which is then distributed via Twitter, Facebook, email and phone. For Papadopoulos, it’s a way of synching up the smallscale, local food scene that by nature is more decentralized than the one created nationally by factory farms. “We wanted to address food waste and loss, and help people who are hungry or just priced out of the good stuff,” he says. “But we also wanted to help people in the cottage food industry and the gleaning industry, and build trading relationships.” Laguna Farm in Sebastopol has used CropMobster several times. “We’re raising our families in Sonoma County, so we really need to be able to sell our produce at retail price,” says Jennifer

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Branham, co-owner of the farmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s CSA program. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But in the peak of summer months, when we have an abundance and are unable to move all of our produce, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unique because it opens up other channels. So even though we only sold $1,000 worth of produce for $500â&#x20AC;&#x201D;which doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make ends meetâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;they publicized us, which led to new customers.â&#x20AC;? She adds that Lagunaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s waste occurs mostly pre-harvest, in their ďŹ elds. If the staff knows theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have an abundance, they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford the labor required to pick their crops, so they let them rot. This fertilizes next yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crop, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s another step in the food cycle where hunger could be metâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; which is where gleaners come in. Suzi Grady is a program director for gleaning outďŹ t Petaluma Bounty. The nonproďŹ t connects farmers with abundance to low-income housing complexes and food pantries, and also maintains a network of community gardens and a farm. As a hub in its own right, Grady says the increased reach offered by CropMobsterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;thousands of eyes in 12 Northern California countiesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;has been helpful for commodities like produce, which are highly perishable. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need to mobilize very quickly when we get a call,â&#x20AC;? she says. With federal subsidies going primarily to large-scale farms, small organic growers often have to seek out a higher income bracket for their goods, which are not artiďŹ cially cheap. Also, selling their leftover produce at lower prices could be seen as devaluing their regular inventory. Papadopoulos acknowledges this, but says he sees the potential for a wider market with surplus. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the inherent conďŹ&#x201A;ict in the local food system,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The farmers have to demand a premium price. Meanwhile people are struggling and farmers are struggling, and food surplus isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t being traded or exchanged or sold.â&#x20AC;?

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTO BE R 23 – 29, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Dining Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OM A CO U N T Y Big Bottom Market Deli. $$. A stellar eatery in a modest storefront serving dual purposes: a market for local products, and an excellent comfort food and sandwich joint. Excellent biscuits and gravy, salads, cheeses, the works. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 16228 Main St, Guerneville. 707.604.7295.

Casino Bar & Grill California. $. Chef Mark Malicki is a true Sonoma County star, serving up a changing menu of locally sourced, inspired creations. Unpretentious, creative and affordable, Casino is a whispered-about landmark among locals in the know. Dinner nightly. 17000 Bodega Hwy, Bodega. 707.876.3185.

Gary Chu’s Chinese. $$. Fine Chinese food in elegant setting. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 611 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.526.5840.

1001 Westside Rd, Healdsburg. 707.433.4231.

The Red Grape Pizza. $-$$. Delectable New Havenstyle thin-crust pizzas with fresh ingredients and a dazzling array of toppings. Lunch and dinner daily. 529 First St W, Sonoma. 707.996.4103.

Simply Delicious Italian/ Mediterranean. $-$$. Tiny cafe with huge flavors. All dishes are homemade, with lots of organics. Fantastic lasagna, margherita pizza and meatball or chicken parm sandwiches. Dinner, Tues-Sun. 2780 Stony Point Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.579.2083.

Speakeasy Tapas-Asian. $-$$. Small plates with a large vegetarian selection and an Asian fusion-leaning menu. And they’re open until 2am! Dinner daily. 139 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.776.4631.

Vineyards Inn Spanish.

fusion of Indian, Mexican, Italian and American, with dishes customized to your palate. Lunch and dinner, MonSat. 2656 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.8083.

Bubba’s Diner Homestyle American. $-$$. Comforting Momma-style food like fried green tomatoes, onion meatloaf and homey chickenfried steak with red-eye gravy in a restaurant lined with cookbooks and knickknacks. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun; breakfast and lunch, Tues. 566 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.459.6862.

Buckeye Roadhouse American. $$-$$$. A Marin County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless service, and a convivial atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, SatSun. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.331.2600.

Nick’s Cove Seafood/ contemporary American. $$$$. Fresh from the bay oysters, upscale seafood, some steaks and a great burger. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 23240 State Route 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033.

Piatti Italian. $$-$$$.Rustic, seasonal, Italian food. Kidfriendly. Lunch and dinner daily. 625 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.380.2525. Pier 15 American. $$. Fun,

Bistro. $$$. Country food with a French passion. Great wine bar, great patio. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 110 W Spain St, Sonoma. 707.938.3634.

$$. Authentic foods from Spain, fresh fish off the fire broiler, extensive tapas, as well as paellas and more. Emphasis on organic. Open for lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon. 8445 Sonoma Hwy. (Highway 12), at Adobe Canyon Road, Kenwood. 707.833.4500.

JhanThong BanBua

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly

Thai. $-$$. Sophisticated and delicate Thai cuisine. Fresh ingredients, packed with flavor. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Fri; dinner, Sat-Sun. 2400 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.8048.

executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

Truly transportive food, gives authentic flavor of the Old World. The cheaper way to travel Europe. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 777 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.7771.

The Girl & the Fig

Mac’s Delicatessen Diner. $. Large selection of Jewish-style sandwiches; excellent cole slaw. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Sat. 630 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.3785.

Madrona Manor Eclectic California cuisine. $$$$. Romantic fine dining in grand historic landmark mansion. Seasonal menu and superior wine list. Dinner daily.

MARIN CO U N T Y Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Avatar’s Indian-plus. $. Fantastic East-meets-West

tucked-away old-fashioned spot overlooking hidden harbor. Great place for breakfast at a bar, too. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, SatSun. 15 Harbor St, San Rafael. 415.256.9121.

Poggio Italian. $$-$$$.

Robata Grill & Sushi Japanese. $$. Mmm. With thick slices of fresh sashimi, Robata knows how to do it. The rolls are big winners. Lunch, MonFri; dinner daily. 591 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.381.8400.

Salito’s Crab House Seafood . $$$. Waterfront setting with extensive marine menu plus steak and other American staples. Lunch and dinner daily. 1200 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.331.3226.

Sorella Caffe Italian. $$. The embodiment of Fairfax casual, with delicious, high-quality food that lacks pretension. Dinner, TuesSun. 107 Bolinas Rd, Farifax. 415.258.4520. Station House Cafe American-California. $$. Innovative menu, fresh local seafood and range-fed meats. Outdoor dining; full bar. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Thurs-Mon. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1515.

The William Tell House American & Italian. $$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Lunch and dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N T Y Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. Boonfly Cafe California cuisine. $-$$. Extraordinary food in an extraordinary setting. Perfect pasta and mussels. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 4080 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.299.4900.

SMALL BITES

Heavy Medal Winners of the 2013 Great American Beer Festival competition were announced in Denver on Oct. 12, with multiple North Bay breweries being recognized. The competition is the largest of its kind in the country, with over 4,800 different beers competing this year in a diverse 84 categories. Besides the judging, the festival itself draws 49,000 people annually. Third Street Aleworks brought home the most hardware of any North Bay brewery in 2013, winning a gold medal for their Blarney Sisters Dry Irish stout in the Classic IrishStyle Dry Stout category and a bronze for their Bombay Rouge Red IPA in the Imperial Red Ale category. Moylan’s Brewing Co. also took bronze in the Classic Irish-Style Dry Stout category for their Dragoon’s Dry Irish stout. Additionally, Bear Republic earned a bronze medal for Heritage in the Scotch Ale category, while Russian River Brewing Co.’s Sanctification took the silver in the American-Style Brett Beer category. North Bay brewers received just three medals the year before (a silver to Russian River, and a bronze and silver to Bear Republic.) California took home a total of 52 medals, along with two 2013 Brewery of the Year awards for best mid-sized brewpub (Beachwood BBQ & Brewing, Long Beach) and mid-sized brewing company (Firestone Walker Brewing Co., Paso Robles). This latest marks Firestone Walker’s fourth award in that category over the past 10 years, following wins in 2003, 2007 and 2011. —Ken Weaver

Buster’s Barbecue Barbecue. $. A very busy roadside destination–for a reason. It’s the hot sauce, available in two heats: regular and hot. And the hot, as the sign says, means “hot!” Lunch and dinner daily. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5606.

Carpe Diem Wine Bar Californian. $-$$. Right in the heart of downtown Napa, Carpe Diem’s contemporary and innovative menu includes a variety of seasonal flatbreads, an ostrich burger, the famed short-rib sliders and much more. Over 45 wines by the glass, six draft beers and an impressive reserve

wine list round out this warm, inviting space. Dinner daily. 1001 Second St., Napa. 707.224.0800.

Checkers California. $$. Perfect casual spot for dinner before the movie. Try the panéed chicken and butternut squash ravioli. Lunch and dinner daily. 1414 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9300.

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $.

Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch and dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

Wineries

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S O N OM A CO U N T Y Ancient Oak Cellars Finally, you can taste wine and stock up on manila envelopes all in one place. Fine estate Pinot and Chard, but Pagnano Zinfandel is the jewel, packed with luscious boysenberry fruit. Step with care around the crystal outside the “No wine beyond this point” sign. 637 Fourth St., (inside Corrick’s stationery store) Santa Rosa. Monday–Saturday, 11am– 5pm, Friday 11am–7pm (live music), Sunday noon-5pm. $10 fee. 707.536.1546.

Cartograph Wines From a kayak in Minocqua Lake to the streets of Healdsburg, Alan Baker followed his muse. On-point Pinot Noir, Gewürztraminer with gravitas. 340 Center St., Healdsburg. By appointment; opening noon–6:30pm daily, in fall 2013. 707.955.5836. Karah Estate Vineyards Like a riddle bottled up in a mystery, it’s all but hidden in plain sight above the 101 freeway’s Cotati Grade. Impressive view; mixed bag of low-alcohol, low-priced Pinots from quirky winery. 1010 W. Railroad Ave., Cotati. Friday– Sunday 11am–5pm. $5 fee. 707.795-3030.

Martin Ray Focus is on mountain Cab. And continuing the old tradition, folks can pick up a gallon of hearty Round Barn Red for $13. 2191 Laguna Road, Santa Rosa. Summer hours, daily, 11am–5pm. 707.823.2404.

Moondance Cellars Dogs, Cabs and cars are the focus; when a supercharged 1965 Corvette is parked in front, the vintner is in the house. Also, Port and Sherry from Sonoma Valley Portworks. 14301 Arnold Drive, Glen Ellen. Daily 11am–6pm. $5 tasting fee. 707.938.7550.

Occidental Road Cellars High-end clients like Schramsberg and Radio-

Coteau buy most of the Prathers’ grapes; just 5 percent are made into their own wine, and at a comparative “grower’s discount.” Chard, Pinot, and cool-climate Syrah at its very best. 2064 Gravenstein Hwy. N., Building 7, Sebastopol. By appointment, Saturday 1–4pm. 707.874.9470.

Robert Hunter Winery Surprise–fine méthode champenoise sparkling wine hails from the warm “banana belt” of Sonoma Valley. Colorful history of estate once owned by a sugar heiress, and tour of gardens leads to sit-down tasting in far-from-the-crowds setting where visitors with a yen for the intimate rather than glitz find a hidden gem on the wine road less traveled. 15655 Arnold Drive, Sonoma. Tours by appointment only, $25. 707.996.3056.

Thomas George Estates Pinot pioneer Davis Bynum hung up the hose clamp and sold his estate, but the good wine still flows in remodeled tasting room featuring a long bar and vineyard videos. Russian River Chard, Pinot and Zin; sweet berry flavors and long-lasting finishes. Wine caves. 8075 Westside Road, Healdsburg. 11am–5pm, daily. Tasting fee, $15. 707.431.8031.

N A PA CO U N TY Bennett Lane Winery The old trope “beer-drinking NASCAR fans vs. Chardonnaysipping highbrows” runs out of gas at a winery that sponsors an annual NASCAR race and has its own car, emblazoned with grapes. A Roman emperor who appreciated hearty vino as much as a good chariot race inspired Maximus White and Red “feasting wines.” 3340 Hwy. 128, Calistoga. 707.942.6684.

Cain Think you know about what food to pair with Napa Valley “mountain grown” Cabernet Sauvignon? How

about sake-marinated poached cod in a light broth? Yeah, it is different up here. 3800 Langtry Road, St. Helena. Tour and tasting by appointment only, Monday– Friday, 10am and 11:30am; Saturday, 10am and noon. $35. 707.963.1616.

Darioush Exotic locale, with giant columns and a Persian theme, Darioush is justly famous for its Bordeaux. 4240 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open daily, 10:30am–5pm. 707.257.2345. Folie à Deux A good picnic or party wine, the Ménage à Trois–white, red and rosé–are tasty blends. 3070 N. St. Helena Hwy, St. Helena. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 1.800.473.4454.

Madonna Estate Millennial contingent of multigenerational family winery, once known as Mount St. John, finds success running it old-school: touristy, oldfashioned, and wildly popular. Refreshing Gewürztraminer for summer picnics. 5400 Old Sonoma Road, Napa. Daily 10am to 5pm; $5–$10. 707.255.8864.

Nichelini Winery Take a joyride in the Napa backcountry and discover this rustic little winery that’s been in the family for generations. See the only Roman wine press in the Western Hemisphere. 2950 Sage Canyon Road, St. Helena. Saturday and Sunday, 10am–5pm. No fee. 707.963.0717.

Opus One Future archaeologists may conclude that this earthen mound located in the center of Napa Valley was intended to inter this society’s finest bottles for the exclusive use of winepharaohs Baron Philippe de Rothschild and Robert Mondavi in their afterlife; meanwhile, it’s available to the teeming masses. 7900 St. Helena Hwy., Oakville. 707.944.9442. By appointment daily, 10am–4pm. Tour and tasting, $60–$90; tasting only, $40. 707.944.9442.

Prager Winery & Port Works See the web sensation, all denominations accepted BY JAMES KNIGHT

N

apa Valley is a place where people come to leave their money. They part ways with their wad in a hundred ways: hoarding hundred-dollar Cabs, padding around five-Benny rooms, and finally, bewitched by the lifestyle, plunking down millions for their very own slice of St. Helena sunshine. But I like best the tradition at Prager Port Works, where they simply staple-gun cash to the plywood walls and leave it at that.

John Prager explains that it all started in the mid-’80s when his father received a dollar in the mail, free and clear—a junk mail type of promotion. He tossed the mail, but tacked the bill to the wall of the winery he started in 1979. Somewhere around 1988 an instigator type stopped by, said “I’m going to start a trend” and tacked up his own dollar. He must have moved up in the world, because he’s since added a five, 10, even a 20 to his collection, which is now surrounded by banknotes on the ceiling, walls and banisters; currency from around the world and across time, from the Dominion of Canada, Nationalist China and, from Zimbabwe, a $100 trillion note (worth upwards of $3 at one time). Most are small bills; one cryogenically frozen dollar is especially small. Making for a fun, dive bar effect, it says something more: people are saving up their rarest old banknotes to donate them to Prager’s walls well before they even leave for their Napa getaway. Hosted today by John Prager, his brother the winemaker, Peter, and their brother-in-law Richard Lenney, winetasting is conducted in the barrel room while they put the finishing touches on a long-overdue upgrade to the old room. But don’t worry about the threadbare oriental rug or Prager’s famous “web site,” a cobwebbed window that hasn’t been cleaned since 1985—they’re still there. Made from traditional port grapes, the 2009 Port ($55) sighs with aromas of dark raisin and desiccated fig, and gushes with black plum and chocolate flavor. All Petite Sirah, the 2007 Royal Escort Port ($72) shows its heady spirits (it’s fortified with 170-proof brandy) but lingers like blueberry syrup. The 2009 Aria ($48.50) white port is just a liquid bear claw, while the 10-year Tawny Port ($75) is sublime and difficult to describe—hazelnuts huddled at the bottom of a cool, murky pond dreaming that they’re sipping black tea spiced with orange rind, with sherry for afters, maybe. When touring the underdog wineries of the Napa Valley, Prager should be among one’s top stops. They’ve got something that money just can’t buy. Prager Winery and Port Works, 1281 Lewelling Lane, St Helena. Daily, 10:30am–4:30pm (from 11am Wednesday and Sunday). Tasting fee, $20. 707.963.7678.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 23–29, 201 3 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

NORTH NOR TH B BAY A Y BOH EM E MI A N | OC OCTO T O BE R 23 –29 – 29,, 20 0 13 1 3 | BO H E M I AN AN.COM .C O M

16

THE ORGAN TRAIL

New advances in bioengineering will one day give us 3D-printed livers, kidneys and hearts— with impacts on pharmaceuticals, surgery and more BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

T

hee year h year is is 2368, 2368, aand an dL t. Worf Worf o is is Lt. p aralyzed fr om paralyzed from a sspinal pinal column column in njjury. Th S SS E nterprise injury. Thee U USS Enterprise offic er would would u rath er die officer rather th an live live paralyzed, paralyzed, so so a than pr ototype m edical de vice prototype medical device ccalled alled th genitronic thee ““genitronic rreplicator” eplicator” iiss br ought on brought bo ard in an a attem pt to board attempt ssave ave him. Th vice iiss Thee de device

programmed to create programmed p create a new n ew spinal spinal column, column, which which h the starship’s th he stars hip’s ssurgeons urgeons would implant. w ould im plant. It has has not not yet yet humanoid b been tested on a hum anoid patient, likee th thee p atient but atient, but seems seems lik only way to save Worf. o ly way save Wo on orf. Thiss fictional Thi fictional scenario scenario takes takes place in an episode place episode of Star Star Trek: Trek: T Ne The xt Gener ation called called Next Generation “E Ethics,” w hich fir st air ed M arch h 2, “Ethics,” which first aired March 11992. 9 The 992. The genitronic genitronic replicator replicator iiss one o ne of those those fiction fictional al S Star tar Trek Trek e ttools ools

th at surely surely ccould ould n ever eexist: xist: a that never m achine that that scans scans a patient, patient, then then machine prints rreplacement eplacement body b parts ffor or parts im plantation. implantation. B But ut if advances advances in the t e world th world of 3D bioprintin g ccontinue ontin nue at th eir bioprinting their ccurrent urrent pace, pace, thi his ttechnology ecchn h olog l y will ill this be far past past the the prototype protottype sta stage ge b by y 22368—it 368—it will be commonplace. comm monplace. Th ng” a Thee ide ideaa of “printin “printing” vita vitall organ organ is is lifesaving. liffes e av ving. Over Over 120,000 people ar n th gan aree on thee Or Organ Pr ocurement an dT ran a splantation Procurement and Transplantation N Network etwork w waiting aiting li list st in th thee United United

States ((98,142 States 98 98,142 n need eed kidn kidneys eys an and d 15,839 15,8 39 need neeed livers), livers), and and many many y more more who w ho n need eed d tr transplants ansplants don’ don’tt qualify qualify because bec ause of o h health ealth ri risks, sks, ssuch uch as as the the risk ri sk of bodily bod dily rrejection. ejection. By By printing printing a kidney kidney from f om one’s fr one’s own own cells, cells, the the organ or gan is is more more likely likelly tto o be b accepted accepted d by thee bod body b y th dy and and thus function function normally. no rmally. Ass rrecently A ecent e ly aass fi five ve y years ears aago, go o, thee possi possibility eexperts xperts mused m ed on th mus bility of printing printing internal internal structur structures es likee heart lik heart valves valves or complex complex like thee p pancreas, ssystems ystems li ike th ancreas, or even even

How It Works Though similar in theory, 3D bioprinting is vastly different from the 3D printing which has exploded in popularity in the past few years.

structures alive until they integrate with the body after implantation.”

Growing vs. Printing Twelve years ago, Wake Forest University’s Institute for Regenerative Medicine, based in Winston-Salem, N.C., was the first group in the world to successfully implant a lab-grown bladder in a human. The same group announced in 2011 that it had grown a miniature liver, one inch in diameter, that functions, at least in the lab, as a human liver does. So if organs can simply be grown in a lab, what’s the fuss about 3D printing? Why not just get some cells in a Petri dish and pour in the cellular Miracle Grow? Well, for perspective, the first kidney transplant from a living donor happened a mere 59 years ago, with several unsuccessful attempts preceding it. Growing a complex organ from stem cells and then making it function normally when hooked up to the human body will take time to get right. As the process is perfected, it will need to become continuously faster and more streamlined, because organtransplant patients’ time is limited. As Wake Forest’s website puts it, “One challenge is to learn to grow billions of liver cells at one time in order to engineer livers large enough for patients.” This is where bioprinting comes in. Atala, a researcher at the forefront of tissue-engineering technology, explains the painstaking process of the 2001 bladder breakthrough. “The bladder scaffold was fashioned by hand and the cells were applied by hand with a pipette,” he tells the Bohemian. “With 3D printing, our goal is to make this process more precise. The scaffold would be printed using data from a patient’s medical scans, and the computer controls the placement of cells. This allows for the exact placement of multiple cell types.”

In other words, 3D printing makes an exact replica of a patient’s own organ using his or her own cells. It does this fast, with no breaks, and with precise execution—like an assembly line for organs.

Drugs & Surgery As the only publicly traded bioprinting company, San Diego– based Organovo has been making the most headlines in the industry. In April, Organovo announced it had printed a 1mm-thick functioning human liver, which had lived for almost a week. “It grew to about twice as thick as we would have expected,” says spokesman Mike Renard in a phone interview with the Bohemian. By printing cells that grew into blood vessels, in addition to ones that make the liver function, “it allowed nutrients to go deeper in than would normally be the case,” says Renard. Though this is still far away from being implantable in a human, it’s a big step in another facet of bioprinting: drug research. Organovo’s focus right now is making living tissue for use in pharmaceutical research, specifically cancer drugs. Only about one in 5,000 drugs currently in development will make it to market, with an average cost of $1.2 billion per product and 12 years in development. If drug companies were able to test prototypes on specific, living human tissue, time and money needed to produce effective pharmaceuticals would be reduced significantly. “Many drugs fail only after they get into humans,” says Renard. The ability to work on living, human tissue “helps make good decisions about safety and efficacy early in the process.” TeVido BioDevices, in Austin, Texas, is focused on another area of tissue structures: reconstructive surgery. Led by Dr. Thomas Boland, University of Texas in El Paso faculty member and one of

In April, Organovo announced it had printed a functioning human liver.

) 18

17 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 23–29, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Michael Houghton

a complete heart, on demand and with a patient’s own cells. The technology has the potential to revolutionize the way we view not only organ transplants, but drug research, cosmetic surgery and even space travel.

Standard 3D printing uses a variety of inorganic materials (mostly plastics) to print everything from bobbleheads to handguns. One cannot simply print out a living tissue structure at home with a downloaded CAD drawing and a MakerBot home 3D printer. (“Hobby” versions of bioprinters do exist—a co-op lab called Biocurious in Sunnyvale offers one—but they’re expensive and only print flat rows of cells.) A modern 3D bioprinter looks somewhat similar to a conventional 3D printer except it’s larger, has much more circuitry and uses multiple printing nozzles—one for modeling material, called “hydrogel,” and others containing cells called “bioink.” Early versions actually cannibalized inkjet cartridges, which were cleaned and sterilized, because human cells happen to be roughly the same size as older ink droplets (new ink cartridges are too fine for this). Since living tissue is composed of many cell types, the different print heads expel the correct amount of a specific cell type along with the biodegradable hydrogel to hold it in place. The biogel structure creates a skeleton of sorts, called a scaffold, which degrades once the cells grow into the right shape. The trick is to find the right scaffold material that will support each different organ, promote cell growth and degrade after the right amount of time. Because its cells regenerate on their own, the liver is a likely candidate to become the first bioprinted complex organ to be transplanted into a human. But as Wake Forest University’s Institute for Regenerative Medicine director Anthony Atala tells the Bohemian, “It is really impossible to predict when this technology would be available to patients through clinical trials.” He estimates it will take at least a decade, “and likely much longer.” One major hurdle scientists face is building the intricate blood vessel networks needed to keep an organ alive. “In efforts to engineer solid organs such as the kidney and liver,” says Atala, “it is a challenge to incorporate the large number of cells required and to engineer a vascular system that can keep the

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | OCTO BE R 23 – 29, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

18 Bioprinting ( 17 the founding fathers of bioprinting technology, the company is hoping its work on breast tissue will pay off. Recovery from lumpectomy or mastectomy surgery is often a painful process, physically and emotionally. As far as reconstructive surgery, “right now, there’s really no good option,” says Scott Collins, TeVido’s vice president of research and development. The best scenario may include a tissue graft from a patient’s belly, but that doesn’t allow nipple or areola reconstruction, and it doesn’t react or feel the same. TeVido is working on a process in which living tissue from a patient’s own cells could be printed to exact size and shape specifications within an hour, taking on the body’s natural functions after implantation. “The real work is being done by the cells,” says Collins. “We just have to put them in the right environment so they do what we want them to do.” This is good news for breast cancer patients and those with the risk-inherent BRCA mutation, which was brought to the wider public eye when actress Angelina Jolie chose to have a preventative double mastectomy after discovering she had an 87 percent chance of developing breast cancer. It’s also good news for plastic surgeons: what can be done to replace what’s been removed can also be done to add to what’s perceived to be lacking. TeVido was awarded a $150,000 federal grant from Small Business Innovation Research this year. It reads, “The results of this research will help the field move towards larger, clinically relevant tissues and potentially whole organs. The commercial impacts of this research will be the availability of an autologous option for women in the lucrative $10 billion market for breast augmentation.”

Burn Victims Rejoice The team at Wake Forest is also working on printing skin cells directly onto burn victims with severe injuries who otherwise might need skin grafts culled from their back or buttocks. Kyle Binder, a lab scientist at Wake

LIVER GIVER A system akin to this mock scenario of a 3D bioprinting setup could soon be in hospitals around the country.

Forest’s Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine, explains in a video from Lab TV that the process involves “taking a normal desktop ink-jet printer, and you load the cartridge with cells instead of ink, and just using the normal method . . . you can print out human tissue instead of ink.” The video shows a stunningly lo-fi version of a bioprinter, literally a home desktop printer with the cover removed, its guts modified to save lives instead of to print tax forms. Burns can account for 10 to 30 percent of all casualties on a battlefield, hence the Army’s interest in the technology, but it will also be able useful for treating burn victims on-site, like firefighters or other emergency personnel. How it works is pretty simple: a camera scans the wound, making a 3D map with lasers, and a computer sorts out where and what to print onto the skin. The wound is filled, and—presto—the cells grow into new skin. Though this already sounds futuristic, the video of this demonstration is three years old. Since then, the Wake Forest team has updated the machine and has had success working on mice, closing a wound in two weeks that normally takes five weeks to heal.

Most human victims of burns that severe will die within two weeks due to infection.

Life on Mars Sculptor and NYU art professor Robert Michael Smith is also involved in advancing bioprinting technology, but not for obvious reasons. “I want to be the first sculptor with a sculpture on Mars, except that it will be a created living form,” says the artist, who counts Montgomery High School and Santa Rosa Junior College among his alma maters. Smith, whose work was featured at Healdsburg’s Hammerfriar Gallery earlier this year, has already designed and printed 3D sculptures for this purpose, even integrating living cells using a bioprinter like the one at Wake Forest. His hope is to use the technology with his own DNA to perform tests on living, human cells during space missions to Mars. This would, in a way, make him the first human being to travel to Mars. Smith reached out to Dr. Atala, who was receptive to the idea. “When you are exploring new venues in science, you always have to break through dogma,” says

Atala in a discussion with Smith on YouTube. Atala says the idea is possible with current technology, though it would be an “expensive proposition.” Smith says his vision includes a version of Wake Forest’s bioprinter for further experiments on the Red Planet. Like testing new treatments in drug research, Smith sees the possibility of evaluating the effects of intense, prolonged space travel on a cellular level using living tissue systems created with a bioprinter. “Why should any sentient creature be sacrificed when we can be creating physical simulators?” he asks, citing reports of people already signed up for a one-way “suicide mission” to study the planet’s potential for colonization. “Human beings are going to do whatever human beings are going to do,” says Smith. “Whether I’m involved or not, this is going to move forward.”

Laws & Regulations Due to the United States’ regulatory system and insurance billing codes, Collins says TeVido’s breast-tissue research is likely to be implemented in the cosmetic market

19

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before the medical industry is able to take full advantage of it. Collins estimates that cosmetic procedures using this technology could be taking place within 10 years, while the FDA is looking at clinical trials and making up its mind on using the technology in medical applications. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Medical technology is getting a lot more complex very quickly, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re kind of overloading the system,â&#x20AC;? Collins says. Waiting for the tortoise-like government-approval process to ďŹ nalize means that, in the meantime, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no money coming in. One way to combat this is to license the technology for use in other countries. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That is not ideal,â&#x20AC;? says Collins, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the way many companies work in this space right now.â&#x20AC;? Just a few months ago, Hangzhou Dianzi University in China announced it had made a 3D tissue printer that successfully printed functional miniature liver samples and ear cartilage. An orthopedic surgeon in Southern California is working on a technique involving printing cartilage from a patientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own cells that might eventually replace dangerous and limiting spinal-fusion surgery. And perhaps most promising, a company in New England recently engineered a small kidney that produced a urine-like substance when implanted in a steer. The technology is here. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;making sure itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s safeâ&#x20AC;? phase. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Making sure itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s safeâ&#x20AC;? is a primary concern, even in the extreme, ďŹ ctional future. In the Star Trek episode, Lt. Worfâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s surgery was successful, but he technically died on the operating table; it was only his redundant Klingon anatomy, with backup systems of vital organs, that saved his life. Once the technology is shown to be safe, which is on track to happen in our lifetime, new organs will appear out of thin air more often than from another human. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;organ donorâ&#x20AC;? section on a driversâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; license application could become a whimsical nod to the past. The waiting list for transplants could be eliminated. In the world of 3D bioprinting, the future may be closer than you think.

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20 2

R O H N E R T PA R K

Routes of Music

This month, the FBI finally shut down the Silk Road, the infamous online black market where one could buy all manner of illegal contraband from around the globe. Just as worldly, but its moral opposite, Yo-Yo Ma’s Silk Road Ensemble traverses borders, just like the classic trade route, with a group of distinguished performers from over 20 countries. The crosscultural group’s latest recording, Off the Map, was nominated for a Grammy award; they come to town (note: without Yo-Yo Ma himself) on Tuesday, Oct. 29, for a performance at the Green Music Center. 1801 E. Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park. 7:30pm. $30–$70. 866.955.6040.

P E TA L U M A

Zero In On Aug. 15, Zero lead vocalist Judge Murphy passed away in his home surrounded by loved ones. After Murphy was diagnosed with liver cancer in 2011, Dennis Cook of JamBase profiled Murphy for a feature, with a final moving quote from Murphy: “Take what you get from this life, work hard for what you want and be happy with it, because if you don’t, you’re not going to be a very happy person.” His positive outlook and shining life will be celebrated at a benefit concert for his daughter’s college fund when Zero headlines on Friday, Oct. 25, at McNear’s Mystic Theatre. 23 Petaluma Blvd., Petaluma. 9pm. $30. 707.765.2121.

S A N TA R O S A

Scientific Eats Alton Brown’s Edible Inevitable Tour: standup comedy, talk show antics, multimedia lecture, live music, food experimentation and . . . ponchos? Brown’s

The week’s events: a selective guide

quirky humor and clever personality take the stage for a show that at one point requires ponchos to be distributed to people in the first few rows. Hmmm . . . As a renowned television personality and author of seven novels, Brown is sure to put on a good show. See Brown work his weird magic and enter the “poncho zone” on Friday, Oct. 25, at the Wells Fargo Center. 50 Mark West Springs Road, Santa Rosa. 8pm. $45–$85. 707.546.3600.

SA N R A FA E L

Space Tales If you thought Gravity kept you on the edge of your seat, try ‘The Right Stuff,’ Philip Kaufman’s film about Project Mercury, America’s first attempt at manned spaceflight. The film follows seven men who have the fearless character required to cross into the unknown threshold of space. Packed with action, romance and comedy, the film won four Oscars. This week, to celebrate the film’s 30th anniversary, writer-director Kaufman presents his film in-person followed by a Q&A on Saturday, Oct. 26, at the Rafael Film Center. 1118 Fourth St., San Rafael. 7pm. $15 (CFI members $12). 415.454.1222.

—Tara Kaveh

SPIRIT OF SONG Jon Batiste, with his band Stay Human, appears Oct. 26 at the Green Music Center. See Concerts, p23.

Ed Smith

ATTIC LIFE Jessica Lynn Carroll in Lauren Gundersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new play.

Defiant Frolic â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I and Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; a charming, thought-provoking surprise BY DAVID TEMPLETON

C

aroline (Jessica Lynn Carroll) is a typical teenage girlâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;except that sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spending her senior year at home, in need of a transplant, waiting for someone to donate a new liver. Seriously ill, but with plenty of sassy attitude, Caroline hangs out in her attic bedroom, deďŹ antly resenting her predicament. Anthony (Devion McArthur) is a sweet, poetry-loving basketball player whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been having a pretty rough day. When Anthony appears with a complicated lastminute English class assignment, informing Caroline that theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been paired up to present a deconstruction of Walt Whitmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Song of Myself,â&#x20AC;? the articulately

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I and Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sunday through Nov. 3 at Marin Theatre Company. 397 Miller Ave., Mill Valley. Times vary. $37â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$58. 415.388.5208.

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Stage

odd girl responds in a way that makes her new partner wonder if sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a little unhinged, or just colorful and eccentric. Reluctantly, even a bit suspiciously, Caroline accepts the challenge, though sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never read Walt Whitmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Leaves of Grass and is more interested in testing and teasing her baffled English buddy. In I and You, Marin Theatre Companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s world premiere of Lauren Gundersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sneaky, insightful two-person play, Whitmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s groundbreaking poetry is much more than just a plot point. The poem, a sensual celebration of the interconnectivity of all things, becomes a series of clues, as these two very different teens gradually discover the many things they have in common. Whitmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s use of the words â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;you,â&#x20AC;? and the way he shifts the meanings of those words throughout his poem, ultimately challenges the schoolmates to reexamine their own deďŹ nitions of who they are, to themselves as well as to each other. On a gorgeously detailed teenagegirl bedroom set by Michael Locker, the gently unfolding story seems like pretty slight stuff for a long time, during which audience members might wonder why Gunderson bothered to write a play about two nice kids doing homework. But as in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Song of Myself,â&#x20AC;? the power of the piece is in the way everything comes together, making sense of all that came before in a powerful, deftly accomplished feat of theatrical magic. Director Sarah Rasmussen is perhaps a little two careful, working hard to let each new revelation arise un-guessed-at, while it might have been more dramatically ďŹ&#x201A;uid to let the characters show the weight of the secrets they carry. Still, with loads of charm and a joyous embrace of what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like to be young, selfabsorbed and conďŹ dently clueless, MTCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s I and You is a sweet and lovely thing, a tiny little play that, miraculously, contains multitudes. Rating (out of 5): ++++

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GUIDING LIGHT Marjorie Mann, right, plays a mother whose son is trying to get right.

Who Art in Theaters Santa Rosa actress in ‘I’m in Love with a Church Girl’ BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

T

he independently made film I’m in Love with a Church Girl is a genre-blender, with Ja Rule lending his street cred to a story of born-again conversion. The film is materialistic enough for Not of This World gear shopping sprees, private planes and pricey real estate, but sacred enough that it literally credits God as an executive producer.

Church Girl had its world premiere last week to a packed house at San Jose’s California Theatre, an awe-inspiring picture palace where I caught up with Santa Rosa’s Marjorie Mann, who plays Ja Rule’s mother in the film. Not too long ago, Mann was playing a far bigger palace, the Radio City Music Hall. There, she did flying stunts, 50 feet off the stage, for a live production of The Wizard of Oz. Of her character, Mann says, “She’s warm, nurturing, trying to do right by her son, which is sometimes not easy because he hasn’t been on a very good path.” She and rapper Ja Rule have an easy chemistry onscreen for several scenes in the film, which was shot in San Jose. This isn’t the first film for the vivacious Mann—she also appeared in 1992’s Class Act, and onstage has done everything from Shakespeare to Andrew Lloyd-Webber. From Detroit originally, Mann went to the University of Michigan, where she and a student named Madonna Ciccone took a choreography class together. “I stayed in touch with Madonna after I moved to New York,” she tells me. “I used to get into her shows for free at New York’s Roxie Theater.” Lately, Mann’s been bringing history to life in performances at local schools, portraying Harriet Tubman and Coretta Scott King. But Mann is also working on a one-woman show, playing a series of characters, each under the influence of one of the Seven Deadly Sins. Her favorite? “Pride.” With Church Girl, Mann has a reason to be proud—and not the sinful kind. ‘I’m In Love with a Church Girl’ opens Friday, Oct. 25, at the Roxy Stadium 14 in Santa Rosa.

CAST OF CARDS The Crux donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let

the songs die when the curtain falls.

Libretto for Rats

The Crux revisit, record â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Ratcatcherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BY LEILANI CLARK

B

ertolt Brecht, the 20th-century Marxist playwright and poet, made him do it. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how Josh Windmiller, the voice behind Gypsypunk-Americana act the Crux, explains the origin of his bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s acclaimed collaboration with experimental theater troupe the Imaginists that resulted in the 2012 stage production The Ratcatcher. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d seen their production of The Wizard of Oz and I thought, this could work really well with what the Crux is doing,â&#x20AC;? says Windmiller. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Their style is not hokey. You can feel the experimentation. They are trying to do new stuff, and they show you the gears working.â&#x20AC;? Part social satire, part poignant

commentary on what happens to the children in a community when the creative arts are shoved into a dusty corner in favor of bourgeois branding and proďŹ t margins, The Ratcatcher took Sonoma County (and critics in the greater Bay Area) by storm during its month-long run. Subsequently, a successful Indiegogo campaign raised $5,000, allowing the band to release the songs as a new full-length Crux album, also titled The Ratcatcher. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t expect a cast recording of the original play, however; as Windmiller puts it, the album should be taken as another entry in the Crux discography, which also includes last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Be Merry and their debut, Now, Ferment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I consider this album an important step in the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s development,â&#x20AC;? says Windmiller, about the decision to sing songs himself that were voiced by different actors in the original production. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My voice being constant throughout the band is one of the few things I can have to keep that consistency going.â&#x20AC;? The strongest tracks include the haunting â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Gate (What the Children Saw),â&#x20AC;? written and sung by Annie Cillard, the Cruxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s saxophone and ďŹ ddle player. Another standout song is the epic â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dogs Made of Rust (The Mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ballad),â&#x20AC;? originally voiced by Imaginists cofounder Brent Lindsay as the townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mayor but given a wearier, heavier weight in Windmillerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s album interpretation, sounding like a lost track from Tom Waitsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Rain Dogs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The play is fantastic, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really great, but it just played for a month or so in this town,â&#x20AC;? adds Windmiller, who plans to take the songs on the road nationally for people who might never have seen the original play. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to put all this time and energy into this album, it needs to be able to stand on its own.â&#x20AC;? The Crux perform â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Ratcatcherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; in its entirety (with help from the Imaginists) as part of the All Hallowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Eve Multicultural Variety Showcase on Thursday, Oct. 31, at the Arlene Francis Center. 99 W. Sixth St., Santa Rosa. 7pm. $10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$15. 707.528.3009.

Tickets & Information

NVOH.ORG

707.226.7372

Roy Rogers & The Delta Rhythm Kings Fri, Nov 1, 8PM

HAWAIIAN SLACK-KEY GUITARIST

Makana

Sat, Nov 2, 8PM SINGERâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;SONGWRITER

Patty Larkin Fri, Nov 8, 8PM

neďŹ t Concert for NVRESET Sat, Nov 9, 7PM

Eroica Trio

RAMMYÂŽ NOMINATED CHAMBER MUSIC

Sun, Nov 10, 4PM

Monday ~ Open Mic Night with Austin DeLone 7:30pm :HG2FWĂŁSP

Jay's Happy Sunshine Burger Joint featuring Jay Lane with Elephant Listening Project 7KXU2FWĂŁSP

George Porter Jr

& the Runninâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Pardners with Mark Sexton Band )UL2FWĂŁSP

Jimmy Dillon Band EP Release Party for "6 String Man" featuring Jason Crosby, Tracy Blackman, & Miss Dee 6DW2FWĂŁDP

Live Music Brunch FREE SHOW with Carl Tilchen 6DW2FWĂŁSP

Jefferson Starship

40th Light Year Anniversary All Star Celebration 7KXU2FWĂŁSP

New Monsoon with Emily Yates

Halloween Costume Party www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave Mill Valley CafĂŠ 415.388.1700 | Box Office 415.388.3850

LIVE MUSIC. NO COVER. Fri, Oct 25

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132 KELLER ST, PETALUMA

707.238.0158 info@socialclubrestaurant.com

for calendar of events & information

23 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Music

in downtown Napa

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Fri Nov 22 Fri Nov 23 An evening with Pride & Joy

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Merle Haggard Special Guest The Malpass Brothers

Sun Dec 8

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An evening with The Wailin’ Jennys

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WWW.HOPMONK.COM W WW.HOPMONK.COM Book your Book yo u r n next e x t eevent vent with with us, us, up up to to 150 1 50 p people, eople, kim@hopmonk.com kim@hopmonk .com

Wed Dec 11 Fri Dec 13 Sat Dec 14

The Blind Boys of Alabama Christmas Show Sun Jan 12

Jonny Lang Planning an event? Contact us for rental info

1350 Third St, Napa | 707.259.0123 www.uptowntheatrenapa.com

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Sam Baker Songwriter can pen the story of an entire life, from bliss to disappointment, in a dozen lines that never feel crowded. Oct 25, 7pm. $25$27. Occidental Center for the Arts, 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Fort Ross Harvest Festival Featuring Kitka, Kedry and the Su-Nu-Nu Shinal Kashaya Pomo Dancers. Oct 26, 10am. $15. Fort Ross State Historic Park, 19005 Hwy 1, Jenner.

Vince Gill His pure tenor is a standout voice in country music. Oct 30, 8pm. $59-$79. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Jon Batiste & Stay Human Young jazz pianist has quickly ignited New York’s music scene. Oct 26, 7:30pm. $30$70. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Roach Gigz 707.829.7300 70 7. 829 . 7 3 0 0 SEBASTOPOL E B AS T OP OL 230 PETALUMA AVE 2 30 P E TA L U M A A VE | S

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FRI F RI O OCT C T 25 25

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

Hip-hop from the Bay with Husalah, J Stalin, Bobby Brackins, DJ Skimask, Marlow, Young Remedy and Pac B. Oct 25, 8:30pm. $22. Phoenix

40th light year anniversary tour. Oct 25-26, 9pm. $57. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Marin Symphony: From Russia with Love

The Silk Road Ensemble

Program includes Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninoff and Shostakovich with pianist Jon Nakamatsu. Oct 27, 3pm and Oct 29, 7:30pm. $10-$70. Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Founded by Yo-Yo Ma (but not featuring him in this appearance), this innovative ensemble draws together distinguished musicians from more than 20 countries. Oct 29, 7:30pm. $30-$70. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

The Takács Quartet Award-winning quartet’s program includes works by Mozart and Dvorák with guests Erika Eckert (viola) and Scott Pingel (bass). Oct 27, 3pm. $30-$70. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Moody Blues Poetic rock group once appeared on an episode of the Simpsons. “Cold-hearted Homer, ditching his wife, while ancient Ned runs for his life.” Oct 24, 8pm. $55-$115. Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Uptones Old-school Bay Area ska group reunited. Oct 25, 9pm. $10. Redwood Cafe, 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY

MARIN COUNTY George Porter Jr & Runnin’ Pardners Bassist of the Meters with his new group. Mark Sexton Band opens. Oct 24, 8pm. $20. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Jefferson Starship Psychedelic rock group on its

A’Roma Roasters Oct 25, Now & Zen. Oct 26, Disclaimer. 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Aqus Cafe Oct 26, Brooke & the Caterpillars, Rusty String Express. Oct 27, Sugar Moon. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

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STILL STRUTTIN’ Meters bassist George Porter Jr., the human definition of

‘in the pocket,’ plays the Sweetwater on Oct. 24. See Clubs, above.

Flamingo Lounge

25

CRITIC’S CHOICE

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 23–29, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Oct 25, Powerhouse. Oct 26, Jeff Edwins. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Forestville Club Oct 26, Ninja Slaughterhouse, Melvin Makes Machineguns, the Business End. 6250 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.2594.

French Garden Oct 25, Susan Comstock. Oct 26, New Skye. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Gaia’s Garden Oct 23, Celtic Session. Oct 25, Greenhouse. Oct 26, Kevin Russell. Oct 28, Neil Buckley Octet. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Green Music Center Oct 26, Jon Batiste & Stay Human. Oct 27, the Takács Quartet. Oct 29, the Silk Road Ensemble. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Heritage Public House Oct 26, Marshall House Project. 1901 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

Hopmonk Sebastopol Oct 23, Dr Dylon, Ini, Mose. Oct 24, Booty Band, Cherry Royale. Oct 25, Arann Harris & the Farm Band, Supermule & the T Sisters. Oct 26, Cirque du Sebastopol with Vibesquad, Jug Dealers, Bad Apple String Band. Oct 30, Smasheltooth. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Jasper O’Farrell’s Oct 26, Paulie Think. Last Saturday of every month, Good Hip-Hop. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Lagunitas Tap Room Oct 23, Junk Parlor. Oct 24, Slowpoke. Oct 25, Coffis Brothers. Oct 26, Moonlight Rodeo. Oct 27, the Shots. Oct 30, the Easy Leaves. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Live Musicians Co-Op Oct 26, Bläp Dëli, Lady Drii, Bars Impson, Subtle T, WoodBlok, Tony Manfre, Lifted Aquatic, Illamayne. 925 Piner Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.8845.

Main Street Station Oct 25, Jess Petty. Oct 26, Sang Matiz. Oct 28, Gypsy Cafe. Oct 23 and 30, Greg Hester. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Oct 25, the Mosey Boys. Oct 27, Poor Man’s Whiskey. Oct 30, Carrtunes. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Worldly Grasp Sam Baker’s hard truths In 1986, Sam Baker was on a train in Cuzco, Peru when a bomb exploded. The people he was sitting with were killed; Baker suffered a cut artery, blown-in eardrums and brain damage, and “should have died,” he says, but he didn’t. Baker, a smart, oftentimes sad songwriter, has resisted the impulse to weave his tragedy into a larger statement about the world. Then Boston happened. Then the images of the explosions, of the half-appendages, of the bloody rescue efforts. Then Sam Baker, the train passenger who lived while a small German boy sitting next to him did not, could stay silent no longer about the senselessness of it all. “It’s not OK to blow kids up, for any reason in the world,” he says in a recent video. “I’ve not been overly vocal about this, but I am now. I’m sick of it. This stuff has got to stop.” Baker’s new album, Say Grace, continues the artistic vision shown in his previous “Mercy Trilogy,” with economic prose and vivid imagery. But it’s Baker’s strong empathy that surfaces in everything he does. See him in person on Friday, Oct. 25, at the Occidental Center for the Arts. 3850 Doris Murphy Court, Occidental. 7:30pm. $25–$27. www.northbaylive.com.—Gabe Meline

Sunday October 27 Wed, Oct 23 10:15am– 12:45pm 7–10pm

Thur, Oct 24 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–10pm CIRCLES N’ SQUARES Square Dance Club

““(Wrembel ( Wrembel embodies) embodies) a John John Coltrane-ish Co l t ra n e - i s h search for for a moment moment of of musical musical nirvana…” nir vana…” search

Gypsy G ypsy Jazz Jazz Guitar Guitar Master Master

Stephane S tephane W Wrembel rembe el and a nd his his B Band and plus p lus

Mystic Theatre Oct 25, Zero. Oct 26, Wonderbread 5. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Occidental Center for the Arts Oct 25, Sam Baker. Oct 27, Stephane Wrembel & His Band. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Petaluma Library Oct 26, Los Gu’achis. 100

Guitar G uiitar Workshop Work shop h p

Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

3pm 3 pm ~ Guitar Guitar Method Method $20 5pm 5 pm ~ Concert Concer t $25 Both Both $3 35 5/R Reservations e s e r vatio ns o on nw website e b s i te

Phoenix Theater Oct 26, Arsonists Get All the Girls. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Fri, Oct 25 7–11pm

8:45–9:45am Jazzercise Steve Luther has MOTOWN, DISCO, & ROCK ‘N ROLL tonight

Sat, Oct 26 10:30am– 12:30pm 7–11pm

8:30–9:30am Jazzercise SCOTTISH CHALLENGE DANCE with Gary Thomas Positive Images

Sun, Oct 27 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 5–9:25pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING Mon, Oct 28 8:45–9:45am;5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–10pm NORTH WEST PACIFIC RAILROAD MEETING Tues, Oct 29 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7:30pm–9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

Redwood Cafe Oct 25, Uptones. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. ) 707.795.7868.

8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family SINGLES & PAIRS Square Dance Club

3850 3 850 Doris Doris Murphy Murphy Co Court, ur t , Occidental O cc i d e n t a l

707.874.9392 7 07. 874.9392

26

www.occidentalcenterforthearts.org w w w.occidentalcenter for thear ts.org

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | OCTO BE R 23 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 29, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

26

Music ( 25

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

DIN N E R & A SHOW

SARA LAINE AND FRIENDS ncho Oct 25 CD Ra Release Party ut! Fri

Grit and Twang from the Heart Deb 8:30 Sat Best Album of the Year Oct 26 FROBECK Original Funk, R&B and Rock 8:30 Sun Rancho Nicasio and KWMR present Oct 27 THE LEGENDARY LAURIE LEWIS WITH

NINA GERBER AND TOM ROZUM

â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the pre-eminent Bluegrass and Americana artists of our timeâ&#x20AC;? 7:00 Sat Celebrate Day of the Dead! 2 Nov EL RADIO FANTASTIQUE Otherworldy Fun 8:30 Fri

Nov 8

TOM FINCH GROUP

Funky Dance Grooves, Original Songs 8:30

Sat

The Legendary Queen of Rockabilly Nov 9 WANDA JACKSON PLUS RED MEAT 8:30 Sun

Grammy Nominated Singer-Songwriter Nov 10 RUTHIE FOSTER 8:00

RECKLESS IN VEGAS Nov 16 The Rat Pack Rocks Out 8:30 Sat

Rancho Debut!

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

River Theatre Oct 26, Jayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Happy Sunshine Burger Joint, Thugz. Thurs, Thugz. 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.3194.

Russian River Brewing Co Oct 24, Supersuckers. Oct 26, Brothers Horse. Oct 27, Pat Jordan Band. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Ruth McGowanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewpub Oct 25, John Roy Zat. Oct 26, Larry K Potts. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Sebastopol Community Center Oct 25, Quinn DeVeaux & the Blue Beat Review, the Sam Chase. 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

Tradewinds Oct 23, Cadillac Phil. Oct 25, Rockhounds. Oct 26, Levi Lloyd & the 501 Band. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Wells Fargo Center Oct 27, Symphony Pops: Benny Goodman. Oct 30, Vince Gill. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Oct 23, Munice, Voodoo Switch. Oct 24, Heavyweight Dub Champion, Ganga Giri, Liberation Movement. Oct 25, Ras Shiloh, Bobby Tenna. Oct 26, Lucia & Her Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Irish Band, Todd Denmon. Oct 27, the Reefer Twins, Setcho & Meese, Judy Hall. Oct 29, Another Day. Oct 30, Damn Legall Band, Nothing to Lose. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar Oct 23, Dr Mojo. Oct 25, Droptones. Oct 26, Honeydust, Jason Daniels. Oct 27, Moxie Music Songwriters Night. Oct 30, (W+T)J2. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio Oct 25, Sara Laine. Oct 26, Frobeck. Oct 27, Laurie Lewis, Nina Gerber, Tom Rozum. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sleeping Lady Oct 23, Angeline Saris Gypsy Jazz Trio. Oct 24, Kelly Peterson Band. Oct 30, Rattlebox. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oct 24, the Lady Crooners. Oct 25, Beso Negro. Oct 26, Swoon. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Station House Cafe Oct 27, the Easy Leaves.

11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1515.

Studio 55 Marin Oct 26, Erin Inglish, Evie Ladin Band, Kendl Winter & the Lowest Pair. 1455 E Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.

Sweetwater Music Hall Oct 23, Jayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Happy Sunshine Burger Joint. Oct 24, George Porter Jr & Runninâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pardners, Mark Sexton Band. Oct 25-26, Jefferson Starship. Oct 27, Hobo Paradise. Oct 29, Jonathan Warren & the Billygoats, TV Mike & the Scarecrowes, El Cajon. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads Oct 24, Acacia. Oct 25, Walking Spanish. Oct 26, Stu Allen Band. Oct 27, Midnight North. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

NAPA COUNTY Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oct 24, Michael Belair. Oct 25, Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sing a Song. Oct 26, Mr December. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre Oct 26, the Deadlies, the Rebobs, Deluna. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Oct 25, Marty Balin. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600. DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

McNearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dining House "REAKFASTs,UNCHs$INNER &2)s8PM DOORSs ROCK

AN EVENING WITH ZERO 3!4s8:45PM DOORSs DANCE HITS/PARTY BAND

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ALEJANDRO ESCOVEDO & THE SENSITIVE BOYS

PLUS AMY COOK &2)3!4s8PM DOORSs HARD ROCK/HEAVY METAL

Y&T

PLUS ERIC MARTIN

.O#HILDREN5NDERTO!LL!GES3HOWS 0ETALUMA"LVD 0ETALUMA

7

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Fenix Oct 24, the Overcommitments. Oct 25, James Moseley Band. Oct 26, Mari Mack & Livinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Like Kings. Oct 27, Will Russ Band. Wed, Blues Night. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub Oct 25, Pop Fiction. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Hopmonk Novato

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

Best Coast Breezy band starts own label, releases new EP, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fade Away,â&#x20AC;? plays free in-store. Oct 23 at Amoeba SF.

ACS Trio Pianist Geri Allen leads spry new group with Esperanza Spalding and Terri Carrington. Oct 24 at SFJAZZ Center.

J. Cole Note to rappers hoping to expand female following: study the song â&#x20AC;&#x153;Crooked Smile.â&#x20AC;? Oct 27-28 at the Warfield.

Oct 25, Dedicated Maniacs. Oct 26, Dread Zeppelin. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Earl Sweatshirt

Marin Center

Mark KnopďŹ&#x201A;er

Oct 24, the Moody Blues. Oct 27 and 29, Marin Symphony: From Russia with Love. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

The Music Box Oct 26, Revolver. 500 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur.

19 Broadway Club

Least aggro member of the Odd Future crew tours behind pensive, subtle new album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Doris.â&#x20AC;? Oct 28 at Slimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.

Enduring and tasteful guitarist adds second show after previous nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sellout. Oct 28 at the Fox Theater.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

27

Galleries RECEPTIONS Oct 26 Healdsburg Center for the Arts, “A Measure of Light,” photography exhibit. 5pm. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

Oct 27 Gallery Route One, “Edges and Flows,” paintings by Mary Mountcastle Eubank, and “For the Birds,” sitespecific installation by Jane Ingram Allen. 3pm. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1347.

SONOMA COUNTY Charles M Schulz Museum Through Oct 27, “Mid-Century Modern,” works of prominent post-war-era decorative, textile and furniture designers. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Gallery One Through Oct 25, “ARTrails 3D Showcase Exhibit,” sampling of 3D art by local artists. Through Nov 10, “25th Anniversary Exhibit,” multimedia works by Judith Klausenstock and Birgit O’Connor. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Gallery Route One Oct 25-Dec 1, “Edges and Flows,” paintings by Mary Mountcastle Eubank. Oct 25Dec 1, “For the Birds,” sitespecific installation by Jane Ingram Allen. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts Through Nov 17, “A Measure of Light,” photography exhibit. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

Occidental Center for the Arts Through Nov 3, “Earth, Wind and Fire,” gallery exhibit. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Petaluma Museum Through Nov 2, “Victorian Mourning Customs,” see how our predecessors honored their deceased. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Nov 3, “Inspired in France,” paintings and photos by Karen Spratt. Through Nov 3, “Just Need a Little Love,” paintings by Christine Kierstead. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Oct 24-Nov 30, “Fiber Art VI,” large, international, juried fiber art exhibition. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sonoma County Museum Oct 26-Dec 1, “Day of the Dead Altars,” pieces made to honor lost ones who have passed. Through Jan 12, “Photography in Mexico,” from the collection of the SF MOMA. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Dec 1, “Delicious Images: Art About Food,” paintings and works on paper by Wayne Thiebaud and Joseph Goldyne. Goldyne in conversation, Oct 24, 7pm. Through Dec 1, “Kitchen Memories,” culinary art and equipment collection of Kathleen Thompson Hill. Gadget demonstration, Nov 9, Nov 22, 5:30pm, $12. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Studio Blomster Through Oct 29, Works by David McGraw. 14045 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville.

MARIN COUNTY Bolinas Museum Through Nov 17, “The Architecture of the Invisible,” sculptures by Ned Kahn. Through Nov 17, “Land of a Thousand Birds,” photos by Tim Burns. Through Nov 17,

“The Secret Life of Seaweed,” photos by Josie Iselin. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

COM Art Gallery Through Nov 14, “The Intimate Diebenkorn: Works on Paper 1949–1992,” pieces by Richard Diebenkorn. College of Marin, Fine Arts Building, 835 College Ave, Kentfield. 415.485.9494.

Marin MOCA Through Nov 17, “Legends of the Bay Area,” works by Robert Hudson. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Oct 31, “Unfamiliar Landscapes,” abstract and expressionistic mixed-media works. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Seager Gray Gallery Through Nov 10, “Form and Place,” sculptures by Jane Rosen and Ann Hollingsworth. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

NAPA COUNTY di Rosa Through Dec 31, largest collection of contemporary Bay Area art. Tours daily. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

Napa Valley Museum Through Nov 24, “Napa Valley: A to Z,” works from the museum’s collection featuring cultural, historical and artistic heritage of the Valley. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Tues-Sun, 10am to 4pm. 707.944.0500.

Comedy Keith Lowell Jensen Comedian with many TV appearances and two albums under his belt. Jules Posner and Jesse Hett open. Oct 26, 7 and 9:30pm. $20-$25. Murphy’s Irish Pub, 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

BODIES ALIVE The MOMIX dance company reimagines physical space and pushes boundaries at the Marin Center on Oct. 25. See Dance, below.

Mort Sahl Comedian has been taking the stage since the ‘60s. Oct 24, 8pm. $23-$35. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Dance Glaser Center Oct 26, 6:30pm, Halloween Bellydance Hafla. $14. 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa 707.568.5381.

MOMIX Botanica Props, puppetry and athletic dancing. Oct 25, 8pm. $20$45. Marin Center’s Veterans Auditorium,10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael 415.499.6800.

Events Blind Scream Haunted House Interactive haunted house will scare you to death. Through Nov 2, 7pm. $5-$20. Blind Scream Haunted House, 1400 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park, Judy@winecountryhaunts.com.

Chamber of Horrors Bingo Costume contest, finger food, silent auction and a zombie sing-along. Oct 26, 7pm. $25. Guerneville Veteran’s Hall, First and Church streets, Guerneville.

Changing the Future for Children Inspirational breakfast with speakers Mary Jane

Burke, Dana King and Doug McConnell. Oct 24, 8:15am. Free. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

Fall Fling Fundraiser for American Philharmonic features food, wine and music. Oct 24, 6pm. $50-$65. Paradise Ridge Winery, 4545 Thomas Lake Harris Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.528.9463.

Frankenswine Puppet show tells story of Frankenstein with pigs. Oct 26, 2pm. Free. Sonoma Valley Regional Library, 755 W Napa St, Sonoma. 707.939.0379.

Golden Dragon Acrobats Troupe combines awardwinning acrobatics, traditional dance and spectacular costumes. Oct 24, 6:30pm. $16$24. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Haunted Halloween Party CElebrate the 50th anniversary of “The Birds” and the 140th anniversary of the first party held in the schoolhouse. Oct 26, 7:30pm. $100. Potter Schoolhouse, 17110 Bodega Ln, Bodega.

Into the Vault Behind-the-scenes tour of the museum’s permanent collection. Oct 24, 7pm. $15. Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Mystical Masquerade Wine, desserts and masks. Oct 25, 6pm. Boho Lifestyle, 1238 First St, Napa. 707.337.5870.

Trick or Treat Day Kids invited to dress in costume and get candy from businesses. Oct 27, 12pm. Free. Corte Madera Town Center, West side of Highway 101 at Tamalpais exit, Corte Madera. 415.924.2961.

Gun Safety Day

Tween Trick or Treat Pumpkin Decorating

Learn more about firearms or turn in your own gun, no questions asked. Oct 26, 9am. Free. Napa Administrative Offices, 1539 First St, Napa.

Come in costume. Oct 26, 1pm. Free. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Zombie Walk

Halloween at Howarth

Meet in-store dressed as a zombie, then lumber through town and return to the store for a party. Oct 26, 10am. Free. Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books, 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938. Oct 26, 2pm. Petaluma Copperfield’s Books, 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.0563. Oct 27, 11am. Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books, 138 N Main St, Sebastopol.707.823.2618. )

Dress in costume and trick-ortreat at various locations around the park. Oct 26, 11:30am and 1:30pm. $6-$10. Howarth Park, 630 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa.

Halloween Drumming Childrens’ music program. Oct 26, 11am. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

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Arts Events

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NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTO BE R 23 – 29, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Film

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Brazil Terry Gilliam’s 1985 masterpiece. Oct 23, 7pm. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Creature Features Documentary on the beloved TV program. John Stanley and Tom Wyrsch in person. Oct 29, 7pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Gold Fever Documentary about the arrival of Goldcorp Inc in a remote Guatemalan village. Oct 25, 7pm. $5-$10. First United Methodist Church, 9 Ross Valley Dr, San Rafael.

Halloween & Halloween 2 Classic horror films. Oct 25, 7pm. $10. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Italian Film Festival Oct 26, “The Red and the Blue”; 5:30 and 7:45pm. $14. Marin Center Showcase Theatre, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

The Nose Shostakovich’s opera performed at the Met. Oct 30, 1 and 7pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Nosferatu Classic 1922 adaptation of Bram Stoker’s “Dracula.” Oct 30-31, 6:30pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Poltergeist Screenwriter Michael Grais discusses the movie after screening. Oct 25, 7:30pm. $10. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Psycho Hitchcock’s 1960 masterpiece made at the height of his popularity. Oct 29, 7pm. $7. Napa Valley Opera House, |1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

The Right Stuff Screen adaptation of Tom Wolfe’s book on the first US astronauts. Filmmaker Philip Kaufman in person. Oct 26, 7pm. $15. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Sonoma Film Institute Oct 25, “Women of the Night.” 4 and 7pm. $7. Warren Auditorium, Ives Hall, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

UN Association Film Festival Films include: “Someplace with a Mountain“; “The Choice”; and “Show for Going to School.” Oct 26, 10am. Free. Newman Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4372.

Young Frankenstein Mel Brooks’ parody of 1930s Universal horror movies starring Gene Wilder, Cloris Leachman and Peter Boyle. Oct 30, 7pm. $8. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Food & Drink Alton Brown Celebrity chef is part scientist, part chef, part comedian and always entertaining. Oct 25, 8pm. $45-$85. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Anne Burrell TV Chef talks about her new book, “Own Your Kitchen: Recipes to Inspire and Empower.” Oct 25, 5pm. $120. Peju Winery, 8466 St Helena Hwy, Rutherford. 707.963.3600.

Chili Cook-Off Sample different varieties of homemade chili. Oct 26, 12pm. Free. Carneros Brewing Company, 22985 Burndale Rd, Sonoma. 707.938.1880.

Patricia Wells “French Kitchen Cookbook” author has won four James Beard awards. Oct 29, 6:30pm. $120. Left Bank Restaurant, 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331.

Toro Bravo Authors John Gorham & Liz Crain of the cookbook from the Portland restaurant of the same name. Samples included. Oct 24, 7pm. Free. Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books, 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Lectures Affordable Care Act Forum Ask questions and

get information about “Obamacare.” Oct 29, 6pm. Free. Guerneville Veteran’s Hall, First and Church streets, Guerneville.

Crop Circle Update UFO expert Jim Ledwith talks about new crop circles. Oct 29, 7pm. $5-$10. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.579.ARTS.

Fall Lecture Series Oct 24, “Color Story: A Visual Examination of How Our ColorSaturated Culture Influences Color Forecasting in the Fashion Industry” with Penny Rosenthal; Nov 1, “Working at Disney” with director George Scribner; “Stop-Motion Animation Festival: PupfPhew!” with Sarah Klein and David Kwan. Thurs, Oct 24, 7:30pm. $5-$10. Healdsburg Center for the Arts, 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1970.

Readings Book Passage Oct 23, 7pm, “The Family: Three Journeys into the Heart of the Twentieth Century” with David Laskin. Oct 24, 1pm, “The Goldfinch” with Donna Tartt. Oct 24, 7pm, “Life at the Speed of Light: From the Double Helix to the Dawn of Digital Life” with J Craig Venter. Oct 25, 7pm, “Moments That Made the Movies” with David Thompson. Oct 26, 1pm, “The New World Champion Paper Airplane Book” with John Collins. Oct 26, 4pm, “Longbourn” with Jo Baker. Oct 26, 7pm, “Death at the Movies: Hollywood’s Guide to the Hereafter” with Tom & Lyn Genelli. Oct 27, 2pm, “The Oracle of Stamboul” with Michael David Lukas. Oct 27, 4pm, “Getting to 50/50: How Working Parents Can Have It All” with Sharon Meers & Joanna Strober. Oct 28, 6pm, “Battle Bunny” with Mac Barnett & Jon Scieszka. Oct 29, 7pm, “Stitches: A Handbook on Meaning, Hope and Repair” with Anne Lamott. Oct 30, 7pm, “Quiet Dells” with Jayne Anne Phillips. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Brian’s Comics Oct 23, 11am, “The Other Dead” with Joshua Ortega. 1 Fourth St, Petaluma 707.765.2068.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Oct 29, 6:30pm, “Quiet Dell” with Jayne Anne Phillips.

Oct 27, 1pm. $15-$45. Marin Center Showcase Theatre, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

29 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 23–29, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

I & You Two teens learn how to work together in this world premiere performance. Times vary. Tues-Sun through Nov 3. $37$53. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest A charming rogue contrives to serve a short sentence in an airy mental institution rather than prison in this play made famous by the 1975 movie starring Jack Nicholson. Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Nov 10. $20-$32. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

RAW Festival

CROSSED ‘Women of the Night’ screens as part of a

Les Blank series at SSU on Oct 25. See Film, adjacent.

Ross Alternative Works Festival features four short plays by Bay Area writers. Times vary. Fri-Sun through Oct 27. $15-$45. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

Terra Nova 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Oct 23, 3pm, “Now I’ll Tell You Everything” with Phyllis Reynolds Naylor. Oct 23, 7pm, “League of Denial: The NFL, Concussions and the Battle for Truth” with Mark Fainaru-Wada & Steve Fainaru. Oct 30, 3pm, “Battle Bunny” with Mac Barnett & Jon Scieszka. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books Oct 29, 7pm, “The Story of Matt” with Stephen Jimenez. Free. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

Petaluma Arts Center Oct 25, 5:30pm, Poetry of Rememberance. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma 707.762.5600.

Petaluma Library Oct 25, 7pm, “More Scenes from the Rural Life” with Verlyn Klinkenborg. 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma 707.763.9801.

Point Reyes Presbyterian Church Oct 25, 7pm, “More Scenes from the Rural Life” with Verlyn Klinkenborg. 11445 Shoreline

Hwy, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1349.

Theater Almost, Maine Nine short plays explore love and loss. Presented by JustinSienna High School. Times vary. Oct 24-27. $12-$20. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Blur Melanie Marnich’s whimsical comedy tells the story of a young woman losing her sight due to a genetic disease. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Oct 26. $10-$17. Ives Hall Studio 76, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Brigadoon A mystical Scottish village, which only appears one day every hundred years, is discovered by two American tourists in this rarely performed Broadway musical. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Oct 27. $22-$26. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

Hansel & Gretel Presented by Golden Gate Opera. Fri, Oct 25, 7pm and Sun,

True story of the 1911 race to the South Pole. Times vary. Fri-Sun through Oct 27. $18. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

Dr Evil's House of

Horrors

Witchie Poo Halloween Extravaganza The 33rd annual installation of this variety includes zany characters and a black light “Willie Wonka” performance. Sat-Sun, 2pm. through Oct 27. $7-$10. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Wretch Like Me “Bohemian” contributor David Templeton’s one-man show about a teenager getting saved from salvation. Fri, Oct 25, 7:30pm. $10. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

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ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m greedy,â&#x20AC;? says painter David Hockney, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not greedy for moneyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I think that can be a burdenâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m greedy for an exciting life.â&#x20AC;? According to my analysis, Aries, the cosmos is now giving you the go-ahead to cultivate Hockneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s style of greed. As you head out in quest of adventure, hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an important piece of advice to keep in mind. Make sure you formulate an intention to seek out thrills that educate and inspire you rather than those that scare you and damage you. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up to you which kind you attract. French philosopher Simone Weil described the following scene: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Two prisoners in adjoining cells communicate with each other by knocking on the wall. The wall is the thing which separates them but is also their means of communication.â&#x20AC;? This muted type of conversation is a useful metaphor for the current state of one of your important alliances, Taurus. That which separates you also connects you. But Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m wondering if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to create a more direct link. Is it possible to bore a hole through the barrier between you so you can create a more intimate exchange?

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had tended to view waiting as mere passivity,â&#x20AC;? says author Sue Monk Kidd in her memoir. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I looked it up in my dictionary, however, I found that the words â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;passiveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;passionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; come from the same Latin root, pati, which means â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;to endure.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Waiting is thus both passive and passionate. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a vibrant, contemplative work. . . . It involves listening to disinherited voices within, facing the wounded holes in the soul, the denied and undiscovered, the places one lives falsely.â&#x20AC;? This is excellent counsel for you, Gemini. Are you devoted enough to refrain from leaping into action for now? Are you strong enough to bide your time? CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22)

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MEDITATION CENTER OPEN HOUSE Free talk & guided meditation. If you have wondered if meditation is for you, please join us 6:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7:00pm, Nov. 5. The evening includes a guided meditation, a short talk on meditation & Buddhism and a brief introduction to the Center's programs. Compassion Kadampa Buddhist Center 436 Larkfield Ctr, SR www.meditateinsantarosa.org

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Venice is to the man-made world what the Grand Canyon is to the natural one,â&#x20AC;? said travel writer Thomas Swick in an article praising the awe-inciting beauty of the Italian city. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I went to Venice,â&#x20AC;? testiďŹ ed French novelist Marcel Proust, â&#x20AC;&#x153;my dream became my address.â&#x20AC;? American author Truman Capote chimed in that â&#x20AC;&#x153;Venice is like eating an entire box of chocolate liqueurs at one go.â&#x20AC;? I bring this up, Cancerian, because even if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make a pilgrimage to Venice, I expect that you will soon have the chance, metaphorically speaking, to consume an entire box of chocolate liqueurs at one go. Take your sweet time. Nibble slowly. Assume that each bite will offer a distinct new epiphany.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) Do you have any interest in reworkingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;even revolutionizingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;your relationship with the past? If so, the coming weeks will be an excellent time to do so. Cosmic forces will be on your side if you attempt any of the following actions: 1. Forgive yourself for your former failures and missteps. 2. Make atonement to anyone you hurt out of ignorance. 3. Reinterpret your life story to account for the ways that more recent events have changed the meaning of what happened long ago. 4. Resolve old business as thoroughly as you can. 5. Feel grateful for everyone who helped make you who you are today. VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22) â&#x20AC;&#x153;As a bee seeks nectar from all kinds of ďŹ&#x201A;owers, seek teachings everywhere,â&#x20AC;? advises the Tibetan Buddhist holy text known as the Dzogchen Tantra. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your assignment, Virgo. Be a student 24 hours a day, seven days a weekâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;yes, even while youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re sleeping. (Maybe you could go to school in your dreams.) Regard every experience as an opportunity to learn something new and unexpected. Be ready to rejoice in all the revelations, both subtle and dramatic, that will nudge you to adjust your theories and change your mind. LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t you wish your friends and loved ones would just somehow ďŹ gure out what you want without you having to actually say it? Wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t it be great if they were telepathic or could read your body language so well that they would surmise your secret thoughts? Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a news bulletin: IT AINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T GOING TO HAPPEN! EVER! Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why I recommend that you refrain from resenting

people for not being mind readers, and instead simply tell them point-blank what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re dreaming about and yearning for. They may or may not be able to help you reach fulďŹ llment, but at least they will be in possession of the precise information they need to make an informed decision.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21)

Scorpios are obsessive, brooding, suspicious, demanding and secretive, right? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what traditional astrologers say, isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t it? Well, no, actually. I think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a misleading assessment. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s true that some Scorpios are dominated by the qualities I named. But my research shows that those types of Scorpios are generally not attracted to reading my horoscopes. My Scorpios tend instead to be passionately focused, deeply thoughtful, smartly discerning, intensely committed to excellence, and devoted to understanding the complex truth. These are all assets that are especially important to draw on right now. The world has an extraordinarily urgent need for the talents of you evolved Scorpios.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) â&#x20AC;&#x153;If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in pitch blackness, all you can do is sit tight until your eyes get used to the dark.â&#x20AC;? That helpful advice appears in Norwegian Wood, a novel by Haruki Murakami. Now Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m passing it on to you, just in time for your cruise through the deepest, darkest phase of your cycle. When you ďŹ rst arrive, you may feel blind and dumb. Your surroundings might seem impenetrable and your next move unfathomable. But donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry. Refrain from drawing any conclusions whatsoever. Cultivate an empty mind and an innocent heart. Sooner or later, you will be able gather the clues you need to take wise action.

CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) Have you thought about launching a crowdfunding campaign for your pet project? The coming weeks might be a good time. Have you fantasized about getting involved in an organization that will help save the world even as it feeds your dreams to become the person you want to be? Do it! Would you consider hatching a benevolent conspiracy that will serve as an antidote to an evil conspiracy? Now is the time. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in a phase of your astrological cycle when you have more power than usual to build alliances. Your specialties between now and Dec. 1 will be to mobilize group energy and round up supporters and translate high ideals into practical actions. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18)

In 2008, writer Andrew Kessler hung out with scientists at NASAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission control as they looked for water on the planet Mars. Three years later, he published a book about his experiences, Martian Summer: Robot Arms, Cowboy Spacemen, and My 90 Days with the Phoenix Mars Mission. To promote sales, he opened a new bookstore that was ďŹ lled with copies of just one book: his own. I suggest that you come up with a comparable plan to promote your own product, service, brand or personality. The time is right to summon extra chutzpah as you expand your scope.

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

Right now you have a genius for escaping, for dodging, for eluding. That could be expressed relatively negatively or relatively positively. So for instance, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t recommend that you abscond from boring but crucial responsibilities. You shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ignore or stonewall people whose alliances with you are important to keep healthy. On the other hand, I encourage you to ďŹ&#x201A;y, ďŹ&#x201A;y away from onerous obligations that give you little in return. I will applaud your decision to blow off limitations that are enforced by neurotic habits, and I will celebrate your departure from energy-draining situations that manipulate your emotions.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

žų NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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