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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

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This photo was taken at Lytton Springs Salvation Army in Healdsburg. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

‘We’re seeing people dealing with the most aberrant aspects of what human beings can do to one another.’ FEATURE P19 After Sexual Assault, New Clothing T H E PAP E R P 8

Harvest Time’s Sharing Economy DI N ING P 13

Billy Cobham Talks ‘Spectrum’ MUS IC P 2 7 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Dining p13 Wineries p16 Swirl p16

Cover Feature p19 Culture Crush p23 Arts & Ideas p24 Stage p25 Film p26

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nb HOW DEEP IS YOUR LOVE

Poor Susie’s teenage dreams of marrying Barry Gibb have been pulled from the attic and donated to the thrift store.

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Libraries for All

Let’s give Latino populations a voice on the library commission BY KAREN GUMA

F

rom my childhood in the Deep South, I have disturbing memories of how black voters were disenfranchised. The South is still trying this, in stupidly and obviously discriminatory ways, such as voter ID laws that recognize gun permits but exclude student IDs. I expected Sonoma County to be liberal. Over time, I discovered that, while Latinos make up a quarter to a third of the population, they are scarcely visible in local government. More recently, I learned the mechanism. A large part of the Latino population lives in the unincorporated areas of the county. They don’t get to vote for the leaders. That’s more clever than the South ever was. The most recent example is the new proposed structure for the library, drawn up by Supervisor Mike McGuire’s committee with no representation from the public. Under the old structure, the unincorporated areas of the county contributed 45 percent of the library tax revenue but received less than 5 percent of the services. In the new structure proposed by the McGuire committee, the cities will each get a rep on the library commission, but the single county rep is not mandated to represent the unincorporated areas. The bulk of the library’s contributors will lose their representation, while McGuire’s district will get three reps. Committee member (and library commissioner) Julia Freis claims that this is fair because the commissioners don’t represent an area; they represent everyone in the county. One wonders, then, why the commission has never reviewed services to the Spanishspeaking, where Sonoma County lags behind other Bay Area libraries with significant Latino populations. The library commission backed an out-of-control director for eight years. It spent lavishly on outside consultants and designer furniture. It cut staff, Monday services and evening hours, but, in spite of deep public opposition, it has never put the Monday closures on its agenda. McGuire’s committee has proposed a new library governance structure that makes it easier for the cities to negotiate leases. For the public, it does nothing to ensure that the new director or the new commission will be any improvement over the old ones. Karen Guma is a retired Sonoma County librarian living in Petaluma. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Local Hops

I moved to Sonoma County two years ago, partly due to the fact that it’s the home of Bear Republic, Russian River and especially Lagunitas (“Getting Hopped Up—Again,” Sept. 17). Now I’ll have to seek out some HenHouse!

ANDY MARONEY Santa Rosa

Landlords Are Weird TAPS is my favorite place in Petaluma. Good luck, Eric! We’ll follow you wherever you end up (“Tapped Out,” Sept. 18). Too bad the landlord doesn’t see the long-term value in having the coolest spot in town be under his roof!

JUSTIN BULLOCK Petaluma

Forestville Open Space I am passionately in favor of eight acres of open space in downtown Forestville. Even with an extremely modest income, I was compelled to donate generously to the cause. I understand that a compromise has been made to designate one-plus acres of the eight to development. My first choice would be all park and no development, but given the time constraints we have to adhere to, I would definitely be in favor of the compromise that has been reached. I know there is a small spoiler group that is trying to delay and ruin the progress that has been made to come to a reasonable solution. But I’m a long-time Forestville resident, and all my friends and folks I know are in favor of all park or if not that, the compromise with oneplus acres of development.

I have every hope that our leaders in county government will do everything they can to speed the process along before our D-Day with the bank and all hope for something positive in downtown Forestville is lost.

LYNN NEWTON Forestville

Oh! Sheila I enjoyed the letter from the happy ticket winners who loved the George Thorogood concert at the Uptown Theatre in Napa (“Love the Uptown,” Sept. 18). Not only were they overly impressed with the audio, video, and lighting production value of the show, George and surprise guest Elvin Bishop sealed the deal with a kickass performance. The biggest factor in the success of the Uptown has got to be the person who books all the great talent into the theater, executive director and talent buye, Sheila Groves-Tracey. Sheila has been responsible for the stellar lineup at the Uptown Theatre since day one. If you ever wondered, or just need a reminder, who it was that, unbelievably, got all those acts to come to Napa and play BottleRock—thank you, Sheila!

MARK BARRY Santa Rosa

No to Big Hotels Sonoma County Conservation Action’s (SCCA) strong and unequivocal endorsement and support for Measure B, the provision that would limit new hotels to 25-rooms or less (until annual occupancy rates reach 80 percent) verifies exactly what proponents have been saying all along. In a Sept. 19 press release, SCCA’s board chairman David Keller expressed the following: “The issue of how our towns and cities are going to develop within the urban core is an important one, just as we are very concerned about developments in our rural lands. We are persuaded by arguments of preserving

Rants

town character and a small-growth approach that is more appropriate for a town the size of Sonoma.” SCCA president emeritus and former Sonoma County supervisor Bill Kortum adds that “we ultimately felt that preserving the small-town experience for both residents and visitors strikes the right balance for the city of Sonoma.” Three members of the Sonoma City Council—Brown, Rouse and Cook—are arguing for no limit to the size and number of new hotels, but despite their efforts in opposing Measure B and its going to a vote of the people, the issue will be decided in a city election on Nov. 19; a vote for the future of Sonoma. Yes on Measure B.

WILL SHONBRUN Boyes Hot Springs

By Tom Tomorrow

Top Five 1 KSRO expands to the

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5 Call 213.444.0102 and

Through October 18

Zero and Lansdale Station and kind soul, R.I.P.

Neil Young’s Bridge School Benefit Concert on Oct. 27

see if Susan Orlean reads you a @Horse_ebooks tweet

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

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THIS MODERN WORLD

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THE

Paper SAFETY & COMFORT Lisa Blanchard founded the Grateful Garment Project as a college project; it’s since spread into 20 counties.

Threads of Recovery The Grateful Garment Project supplies new clothing after sexual assault BY PAM MARINO

M

elissa walked along a dark stretch of Lake Merritt in Oakland, feeling a little woozy. She’d been drinking at an ’80s party hosted by a friend. She knew it was

late. Normally she wouldn’t walk alone. But she was only a few blocks from home. It was just a short distance. About a block from her apartment, a car pulled up and a man yanked her inside before speeding away. Melissa, who asked

that her name be changed for this story, watched her apartment building whiz by out of the corner of her eye. “I had a million things going through my head,” she says. “There was the fear I would never get back out of that car. And this is going to sound ridiculous, ) 10

First-Class Investigation

Considering that U.S. Postal Service revenue has been on a steady decline for several years, you’d think one of America’s largest federal agencies would try to recoup as much as possible when entering into real estate transactions. Not so, argues award-winning investigative journalist (and Bohemian contributor) Peter Byrne. In his new e-book, Going Postal: U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein’s husband sells post offices to his friends, cheap, the Petalumabased reporter uncovers the sordid results of the USPS’s 2011 decision to award an exclusive contract to CBRE, a commercial real estate firm headed by Richard Blum, husband of Sen. Dianne Feinstein. Motivated in part by the U.S. government’s astounding demand that the Postal Service pay $5 billion in employee benefits to cover the next 75 years, the agency has resorted to selling off offices, warehouses, parking lots and vacant land worth millions of dollars. But CBRE is selling some of these properties at “bargain basement” prices, writes Byrne, and sometimes to its own clients and business partners, including Goldman Sachs. (The 52 properties sold have a collective assessed value of $232 million, asserts Byrne, and yet CBRE sold them for $79 million less than what they were worth.) With information backed by expense reports obtained under the Freedom of Information Act, county records, deeds of sale, property tax databases and assessment data, Byrne has constructed a comprehensive look at the financial shenanigans going on behind the mail curtain. Byrne has gone after Dianne Feinstein and Richard Blum for conflicts of interest in the past, but this is the first time he’s thrown the (e)book at them. Going Postal is available for $2.99 exclusively at Amazon.com. —Leilani Clark

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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Garment Project ( 8 but to be honest, my number one prevailing thought—and I must have been a little bit crazy at the time—was that I had my dog at home, and there was no one who was going to come let him out.” The man stopped the car and raped Melissa, beating her in the face as she tried to fight back. About a half hour later, she thinks, he shoved her out of the car and peeled away. Shocked and dazed, Melissa’s bloody fingers dialed a friend, who immediately picked her up and rushed her to the hospital. The details of the hospital remain hazy, but she clearly remembers at least two things: they gave her two Power Bars during the more than three-hour exam, and they gave her new underwear, pants, socks, a long-sleeve pajama top and a hoodie sweatshirt. When Melissa’s friend dropped her off at her apartment building, she pulled the hood up and over her face, shielding herself, and walked the rest of the way. Her dog anxiously greeted her. “I can’t imagine leaving the hospital in any other state,” Melissa says. “It would have been horrifying and embarrassing, and I think that if I had been in a position where I had to walk home with my bits hanging out of a hospital gown, that’s the memory that would have stayed with me. And I didn’t have to do that. It’s because someone provided comfortable clothing for me.” That “someone” is San Jose resident Lisa Blanchard, who just one year before Melissa’s attack founded the nonprofit Grateful Garment Project (GGP). In less than three years, the organization has grown from collecting clothes for the Sexual Assault Response Team (SART) facility at the Santa Clara Valley Medical Center to equipping 20 other California counties, including Sonoma County, where Christine Castillo, executive director of Verity—which provides rape-crisis counseling and support—has been integral in establishing the project. The California Emergency Management Agency reported that in the 2010–2011 fiscal year—

the most recent available data— nearly 30,000 people accessed rape crisis centers statewide. The survivors range in age from infants to senior citizens, and include both females and males. Social workers say the numbers are probably much higher, since sexual assault remains widely underreported due to stigma, shame and victim-blaming. Unlike Melissa’s case, an estimated 75 to 80 percent of victims know their attackers, and there’s sometimes pressure from family and friends to keep quiet. Sexual Assault Response Team centers often run on what Blanchard calls “duct tape and Band-Aid budgets.” Counties are mandated by the state to have a SART facility, and yet the state allots just $45,000 annually to pay for them, according to advocacy agency California Coalition Against Sexual Assault. That amounts to just $775 per county. “It’s really kind of staggering to think that all these organizations had little or no resources to help survivors,” Blanchard says. “The nurses or advocates that support the survivors a lot of times bought stuff out of their own pockets.” In addition to new clothing and prepackaged food, GGP provides books, toys and DVDs for children, privacy screens, and even pieces of exam equipment when older gear breaks down. Sue Barnes, director of the YWCA’s rape crisis center, calls the GGP’s work “phenomenal.” “The clothing is huge, because very often the police have had to take them from the survivor because it is evidence,” Barnes says. Requests regularly come from out-of-state SART centers for information on how Blanchard started GGP and how it operates. She says the focus remains firmly on California for the moment, and she hopes to serve all 58 counties in the future. “I hope she keeps growing and growing,” says Melissa, who has since moved to Michigan to be near family. “I will be forever grateful.” For more information, go to gratefulgarment.org.

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Keynote Speaker Actor and Activist Danny Glover Bioneers Lifetime Achievement Award Presentation to Joanna Macy

Any and all aspiring change-makers and global citizens who want to ensure a sustainable and just future for all

Bohemian Readers get 20% Discount! Register before September 30 using code BOHO13.

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WASTE NOT, WANT NOT Online harvest exchanges utilize social media for good—i.e., not chucking perfectly fine fruit.

Want Some Figs? Guilty riches, the garden edition

I

t’s 9am on a late summer morning, and Leon and I are out in the backyard woefully examining our garden’s fecund bounty. “Hey, there,” a neighbor calls over the fence. “Want some figs?” We look at each other. We share two thoughts: fresh garden figs, how lovely! And: fresh garden figs, yet another perishable to protect, somehow, from perishing. “Of course!” I muster a fake

BY GRETCHEN GILES

heartiness. “We’d love them.” And of course we would. But we’d particularly love them if we didn’t have our own buncha too much of everything else. And so, when our neighbor comes around the fence with a colander full of sweet green figs just touched with purple blush, the kind of figs that people are paying $7 a basket for right this very minute, I mount a fierce exchange. “What can I give you?” I ask with urgency. “What do you

need? Tomatoes, basil, eggplant, zucchi—” She interrupts apologetically: “I’m going out of town.” “How about some basil?” I press. “You have tomatoes, don’t you? Couldn’t you use some basil?” Not waiting for her response, I rush into the house and grab a pair of scissors. She watches helplessly as I begin to cut tall, fragrant stalks and gather them into an unwieldy bouquet. As I snip, I understand that the basil

loves this kind of pruning and that my unwanted gift will just prompt it to produce more. “Are you sure you don’t need eggplant? Yellow squash? Peppers?” I pant a little bit, breathless with hope. “No,” she answers, backing slowly to the gate with her green bouquet. “I’m. Going. Away,” she repeats, as if I’m crazy or something. Truth is, I am kind of crazy. The weight, the burden, the immense outpouring of certain sections of the garden have made me nuts. I think about women of yore, furiously working in hot summer kitchens to save, catch, preserve and transform their food for the coming winter months. I know that each plum that hits the ground untasted, each blackberry that withers darkly on the vine, is an insult to hungry people everywhere. I am by no means alone in the glory of way too much, which has prompted the welcome new trend of online harvest exchanges. In February 2012, Santa Rosa’s Spring Maxfield began the “Farmers’ Black Market” invite-only exchange group on Facebook, which now has over a thousand members. Items are rarely sold, mostly bartered, and produce is by no means the only type of item up for grabs; a few recent examples include offers of wooden spools, kaffir lime leaves and goats for slaughtering. I read these posts with the rapt fascination of an urban novelist. Six meat goats? Opposed, I suppose, to six milk goats. Should I learn how to slaughter animals? It’s the old-new thing, after all. I wonder what a kaffir tree smells like. What would you do with a box of wooden spools? Still pondering, I wander into the kitchen, where a small cadre of fruit flies now form a short column above the neighbor’s gift of green figs. Shit.

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Dining

13

Dining

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | SEPTE MBER 25 – O CTO BE R 1 , 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y Big Bottom Market

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The School of Shiatsu and Massage Recognized as one of the world’s premier learning institutes for aquatic and land-based healing arts. We offer: ∑ Certified Training Programs ∑ Individual Classes ∑ Personal Growth ∑ CE hours 800.693.3296 707.987.3801 bodyworkcareerinstitute.com registration@bodyworkcareerinstitute.com

Deli. $$. A stellar eatery in a modest storefront serving dual purposes: a market for local products, and an excellent comfort food and sandwich joint. Excellent biscuits and gravy, salads, cheeses, the works. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 16228 Main St, Guerneville. 707.604.7295.

Tolay Californian. $$-$$$. Sonoma County cuisine is the specialty, with entrees focusing on local wild and farmed foods. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. In the Sheraton Sonoma County, 745 Baywood Drive, Petaluma. 707.283.2900.

Casino Bar & Grill

$-$$. Excellent food in Petaluma’s Theater District, and a fun place to hang before or after a flick. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 151 Petaluma Blvd S, Petaluma. 707.773.4500.

California. $. Chef Mark Malicki is a true Sonoma County star, serving up a changing menu of locally sourced, inspired creations. Unpretentious, creative and affordable, Casino is a whispered-about landmark among locals in the know. Dinner nightly. 17000 Bodega Hwy, Bodega. 707.876.3185.

Flavor California cuisine. $-$$. Fresh and organic white-tablecloth food at paper-napkin prices. Lunch and dinner daily; breakfast, Wed-Sun. 96 Old Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa. 707.573.9695. JoJo Sushi Japanese. $-$$. Hip downtown eatery features fresh sushi, sashimi, teriyaki, and innovative specials. Lunch and dinner daily. 645 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.569.8588.

Nonni’s Ristorante Italiano Italian. $$. Hearty

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have. “Other than steak” menu changes seasonally. Happy hour, Mon-Sat, 3 to 6. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Fri; dinner, Sat. 521 Adams St, Santa Rosa. 707.546.5100.

family recipes served with neighborly hospitality. Familyowned. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Fri; dinner, Sat-Sun. 420 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.0222.

Russian River Brewing Co Eclectic. $. Decent pizza and excellent brews. Two words: beer bites! Lunch and dinner daily. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2337.

2404 2 404 Oli Olivet vet R Road, oad, S Santa anta Rosa Rosa

Stark’s Steakhouse

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Steakhouse. $$$$. Could be the best steak you’ll ever

Tres Hombres Mexican.

Willow Wood Market Cafe Mediterranean. $$. Homey, eclectic foods. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; brunch, Sun. 9020 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.823.0233.

Wolf House Californian. $$. Stick with the simple, classics dishes, as they always shine. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 13740 Arnold Dr, Glen Ellen. 707.996.4401. Yao-Kiku Japanese. $$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from Japan steals the show in this popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180.

small town sits a wood-fired oven serving piping pizzas of perfection. Beer and oysters can be had as well. Lunch and dinner, Wed–Sun. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.9493.

Citrus & Spice Thai/ Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices, and a great mango-duck summer roll. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.

Copita Tequileria y Comida Mexican. $$. California-inspired preparation of traditional Mexican fare, including spit-roasted chicken, homemade tamales and “eight-hour” carnitas. Some ingredients are sourced from the restaurant’s own organic garden. Lunch and dinner daily. 739 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.331.7400.

Drake’s Beach Cafe Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Mon. 1 Drake’s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Finnegan’s Marin Pub fare. $$. Irish bar with the traditional stuff. Lunch and dinner daily. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.899.1516.

Frantoio Italian. $$-$$$. Perennial winner of SF Chron’s “100 Best,” Frantoio also produces all of its own olive oil. Dinner daily. 152 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.289.5777.

Hilltop 1892 American. $$-$$$$. Casual dining with panoramic Marin views and a California-cuisine take on such classic fare as steaks, fresh seafood and seasonal greens. Complete with custom cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; Sunday brunch. 850 Lamont Ave, Novato. 415.893.1892.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

Il Piccolo Caffe Italian. $$. Big, ample portions at this premier spot on Sausalito’s spirited waterfront. Breakfast and lunch daily. 660 Bridgeway, Ste 3, Sausalito. 415.289.1195.

MARIN CO U N T Y

Insalata’s Mediterranean. $$$. Simple, high-impact dishes of exotic flavors. Lunch and dinner daily. 120 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.457.7700.

Cafe Reyes Pizza. $$. At the end of the main drag in West Marin’s quintessential

Marin Brewing Co Pub food. $-$$. Excellent soups, salads, pub grub and award-

high-quality food that lacks pretension. Dinner, TuesSun. 107 Bolinas Rd, Farifax. 415.258.4520.

Mountain Home Inn

Sushiholic Japanese. $$$$. A nice addition to the local lineup, with a lengthy and wellcrafted repertoire including uncommon dishes like nabeyaki udon, zaru soba, yosenabe and sea bass teriyaki. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Rowland Plaza, 112-C Vintage Way, Novato. 415.898.8500.

American. $$-$$$$. Great summer sandwiches with a view atop Mt Tamalpais. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley. 415.381.9000.

Nick’s Cove Seafood/ contemporary American. $$$$. Fresh from the bay oysters, upscale seafood, some steaks and a great burger. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 23240 State Route 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033.

Piatti Italian. $$-$$$.Rustic, seasonal, Italian food. Kidfriendly. Lunch and dinner daily. 625 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.380.2525. Pier 15 American. $$. Fun, tucked-away old-fashioned spot overlooking hidden harbor. Great place for breakfast at a bar, too. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, SatSun. 15 Harbor St, San Rafael. 415.256.9121.

Robata Grill & Sushi Japanese. $$. Mmm. With thick slices of fresh sashimi, Robata knows how to do it. The rolls are big winners. Lunch, MonFri; dinner daily. 591 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.381.8400.

Salito’s Crab House Seafood . $$$. Waterfront setting with extensive marine menu plus steak and other American staples. Lunch and dinner daily. 1200 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.331.3226.

Small Shed Flatbreads Pizza. $$. Slow Food-informed Marin Organics devotee with a cozy, relaxed family atmosphere and no BS approach to great food served simply for a fair price. 17 Madrona St, Mill Valley. Open for lunch and dinner daily. 415.383.4200.

Tommy’s Wok Chinese. $-$$. Tasty and filling Chinese fare without the greasy weighdown. Nice vegetarian selections, too. Lunch and dinner, MonSat; dinner only, Sun; closed Tues. 3001 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.5818.

The William Tell House American & Italian. $$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Lunch and dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N T Y Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. Bounty Hunter Wine country casual. $$. Wine shop and bistro with maverick moxie for the wine cowboy. Premium bottles for sale, also. Lunch and dinner daily. 975 First St, Napa. 707.266.3976.

Sol Food Puerto Rican. $.

Checkers California. $$.

Flavorful, authentic and homestyle at this Puerto Rican eatery, which is as hole-in-thewall as they come. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. San Rafael locations: 811 Fourth St. 415.451.4765. 901 & 903 Lincoln Ave. 415.256.8903. Mill Valley location: 401 Miller Ave, Mill Valley.

Perfect casual spot for dinner before the movie. Try the panéed chicken and butternut squash ravioli. Lunch and dinner daily. 1414 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9300.

Sorella Caffe Italian. $$. The embodiment of Fairfax casual, with delicious,

Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen Eclectic. $$-$$$. As comfortable as it sounds, with a rich and varied melting pot of a menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 1327 Railroad Ave, St Helena. 707.963.1200.

Cindy Pawlycyn’s Wood Grill & Wine Bar

15

American. $$-$$$. Classic American fare that stays up on current mainstays like crispy pork belly, braised short ribs and crab roll but doesn’t skimp on the burger. Long wine list, kids menu, patio and more. Lunch and dinner, WedSun. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700.

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

French Laundry Definitive California Cuisine. $$$$. What else is there to say? Chef Thomas Keller’s institution is among the very best restuarants in the country. 6640 Washington St., Yountville. 707.944.2380.

Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $-$$. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner daily. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Miguel’s Mexican-

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Californian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast,lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

20% Off all Meetings and Holiday Party bookings

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $.

See us for a tour!

Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch and dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.251.1900.

for parties up to 80 persons Valid until Sept 30

16702 Coast Hwy One, Bodega 888.404.2255 www.scvilla.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 25 - OCTOBE R 1 , 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

winning pork-beer sausage. Lunch and dinner daily. 1809 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.4677.

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | SE PTEMB ER 25 – O CTO BE R 1 , 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N T Y

long-lasting finishes. Wine caves. 8075 Westside Road, Healdsburg. 11am–5pm, daily. Tasting fee, $15. 707.431.8031.

D’Argenzio Winery

Trione Vineyards & Winery One-time owners

Much like the family-run, backstreet bodegas of the old country that the decor invokes. Sangiovese, Moscato di Fresco, and Randy Rhoads Cab. 1301 Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa. Daily 11am–5pm. $10 tasting fee. 707.280.4658.

Kamen Estate Wines Key lines from screenwriter Robert Kamen’s features are available on T-shirts, packaged in film cans. Cabernet Sauvignon with intense red fruit flavor over inky tannins. Insert chase scene, destination: 111-B E. Napa St., Sonoma. Monday–Thursday, noon–6pm; Friday–Sunday, 11am–6pm. Tasting fees, $20 and $35. 707.938.7292.

Repris Wines A new crew reignites a blast from the past at historic Moon Mountain Vineyard. A work in progress with fantastic views. 1700 Moon Mountain Road, Sonoma. By appointment only. 707.931.7701. St. Anne’s Crossing Another Zinfandelic brand from the stable of Ken Wilson. Yawn? No, more like yum. 8450 Sonoma Hwy., Kenwood. Daily, 11am–5pm. Tasting fee, $10. 707.598.5200.

Simi Winery Pioneered female winemaking by hiring the first female winemaker in the industry. The tastingroom experience is mediocre, but the wine is fantastic and worth the wait. Excellent Chard, Sauvignon Blanc and Cab. 16275 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.473.3213.

Thomas George Estates Pinot pioneer Davis Bynum hung up the hose clamp and sold his estate, but the good wine still flows in remodeled tasting room featuring a long bar and vineyard videos. Russian River Chard, Pinot and Zin; sweet berry flavors and

of Geyser Peak Winery now wear all the different hats that a small winery requires. A popular stop along a well-liked cycling route, where you’re likely to be greeted with a glass of crisp Sauvignon Blanc, or Bubba the bulldog. 19550 Geyserville Ave., Geyserville. Thursday–Sunday, 10am–5pm. Tasting fee, $5–$15. 707.814.8100.

VJB Estate Buon giorno! Aglianico, Nero d’Avola, Barbera! But first, for you, my friend, Prosecco! Espresso, gelato, pizzeria, deli sandwich! If Il postino rides his bicycle straight through the courtyard, don’t be the least bit surprised. 60 Shaw Ave., Kenwood. Marketplace open daily, 10am–5pm. Saturdays and Sundays through harvest, Sonoma Valley Tenors sing from the balcony at 2pm. Tastings $5–$10. 707.833.2300.

MARIN CO U N TY Bacchus & Venus A trendy place for beginners and tourists. Great place to learn the basics. 769 Bridgeway, Sausalito. Open daily, noon– 7pm. 415.331.2001. Point Reyes Vineyards The tasting room features many varietals but the main reason to go is for the sparkling wines. Open Saturday–Sunday, 11am–5pm. 12700 Hwy. 1, Point Reyes. 415.663.1011.

N A PA CO U N TY Benessere Vineyards Super Tuscan with a side of Zin, on the site of the original Charles Shaw, for you history buffs. Super Sangiovese, puckery Pinot Grigio, and

pretty, perfumed Aglianico, what the Romans enjoyed as the legendary “falernum.” 1010 Big Tree Road, St. Helena. Daily, 10am–5pm. Tasting fee, $20. 707.963.5853.

Frenchie Winery Every winery has a story: this one goes “bow wow wow.” It’s really just a bulldog-themed shed set amid Raymond Vineyard’s biodynamic gardens. While dogs snooze inside their own private wine barrels, or cavort with others in the gated kennel, their humans can keep an eye on them via video link. 849 Zinfandel Lane, St. Helena. Daily, 10am–4pm. Tasting fees vary. 707.963.3141.

Jericho Canyon Vineyard Oh boy, boutique Napa Cab from celebrity consultant Michel Rolland and high-rollers who used to spend half the year in Hawaii? Well, yeah, but they’re super nice, work hard, and their wines are tops. Cab and Sauv Blanc. 3322 Old Lawley Toll Road, Calistoga. Tour and tasting by appointment only, $30. 707.942.9665.

Mumm Cuvée Napa Californian-style fizz factory, all barn and no chateau, offers a robust account of how the bubbles get in the bottle. Sparkling winetastings offered on the patio, or take it to the next level in plush love seats on the Oak Terrace. Photography gallery includes Ansel Adams prints and other exhibits. 8445 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open 10am–5pm daily. Tasting $6–$20; Oak Terrace $30. 707.967.7700.

Opus One Future archaeologists may conclude that this earthen mound located in the center of Napa Valley was intended to inter this society’s finest bottles for the exclusive use of winepharaohs Baron Philippe de Rothschild and Robert Mondavi in their afterlife; meanwhile, it’s available to the teeming masses. 7900 St. Helena Hwy., Oakville. 707.944.9442. By appointment daily, 10am–4pm. Tour and tasting, $60–$90; tasting only, $40. 707.944.9442.

Banshee Wines Cry not over the good dead grape; be keen on Pinot BY JAMES KNIGHT

T

o some, the surprising part of this story is that a few wine country newcomers can grow a 10,000-case brand out of a 500-case lot of wine in less than four years. Even more surprising, they’ve managed to snag a storefront on what surely must be the last remaining block face in Healdsburg that didn’t already have a winetasting room.

Now that the permit has been granted and the lights are on, let’s see what all the wailing’s about. Cofounder Noah Dorrance’s part of the story begins with arriving in San Francisco for a new job at a startup in 2006, but it doesn’t end with a Google buyout and a vineyard mansion (not yet, says the Missouri native, who admits to having the conventional dreams of a starstruck wine country newbie). Two months later, the startup folded. So Dorrance got a production job at Crushpad, later joining up with Baron Ziegler and Steve Graf, whose taste for wine had drafted them into sales and distribution careers. Now, they’ve got a red-hot, fast-growing new brand and a second label, Rickshaw, to boot. The three wanted to create a setting similar to those in which people normally drink wine, so there’s no elbow fest at the wine bar here. Instead, a rough-hewn communal table, corner sofas and modish leather chairs provide a range of approaches to lounging around. Wines are poured by the flight or glass; small bites like lentil hummus and house-baked crackers from SHED will be available as soon as the kitchen gets the all-clear. The interior is a successful look, albeit in flux, because everything’s for sale. A pyramid of wooden crates displays antique odds and ends, while LP records spin on the turntable. There’s something about sitting around and sipping wine, Dorrance says, that puts people in the mood to buy. Including, it is hoped, the wine. The flagship 2011 Sonoma County Pinot Noir ($25) represents half of Banshee’s production. Here comes artisanal plum licorice, dried orange peel and cherry fruit leather—like the rest of the Pinot lineup, it’s a whiff of raspberry and red cherry perfume, largely absent in overt oak, with a not-too-dry, not-too-sweet finish. Trade up to the 2011 “Marine Layer” ($45) for more complexity and cranberries, or the 2011 Sullivan Vineyard ($50) for wild raspberries, brown spice and general plush fruit. On the crisp and cool slate, there’s 2012 Rosé of Pinot Noir ($20), 2012 Sonoma County Sauvignon Blanc ($18) and 2012 Anderson Valley Chardonnay ($40). They’re doing a nice job here. Banshee Wines, 325 Center St., Healdsburg. Daily, 11am–7pm. Tasting fee, $10–$20. 707.395.0915.

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battles a storm in ‘All Is Lost,’ screening Oct. 12 and 13.

Mill Valley Valle a ey Film Fest Fest packed packed e with tales tales ooff solitary solitary people

I

’ll fly fly aalone.” lon ne.”

That’s Th at’s what what poor, poorr, daydreamin daydreaming ng Walter Walter Mitty Mitt y says says tto o th thee imaginary im aginary sergeant sergeant who’s who o’s just informed that inf ormed him th at ““young young Raleigh” bombing Ra leigh” is is not not fit to to fly fly a bom bing mission enemy mission on a nearby nearby en emy dump. ammunition dum p. Movie M ovie fans fans don’t don’t yet yet e know know if that line, from James Thurber’s th at lin e, fr om J amess Thurber ’s ingenious “Thee in genious 1939 1939 short shortt story story “Th

Secret Life Secret Life of Walter Walter Mitt Mitty,” y,” will thee big-b big-budget movie aappear ppear in th udget m ovie version starring v ersion sta arring and and directed directed by b y Ben Stiller. Stiiller. But But when when the the film closes out thee 36th annua annuall Mill clos es o ut th Valley Film Festival, onee thin thing V alley F ilm mF estival, on g iiss ccertain: ertain: the th he epic tale tale of a sad sad man man who lives hiss life w ho li ves hi h liffe alone alone in his his own own head h ead will hardly hardly be aalone. lone. In fact, fact, thiss y year’s packed thi ear’s ffestival estival iiss p acked with filmss about film about u solitary solitary heroes, heroes, solo solo journeys, jo urneys, isolated isolated ccommunities ommunities and kinds. an d lonely lonely people of aall ll kin ds.

BY DAVID TEMPLE TEMPLETON ETON

“That wasn’t off “Th at w asn’t intentional, intentional, o Elton, longtime ccourse,” ourse,” llaughs aughs Zoë Elt on, lon g e gtim programmer thee Mill V Valley pr ogrammer of th alleey Film Festival, running 3–13 F ilm F esti e val, runnin g Oct. 3– –13 at various locations from Valley v arious loc ations fr om Mill V alley San Rafael. kinds tto oS an Rafa el. “These “These kin ds of o cconnections, onnections, these these unexpected unexpected rrepeating epeating themes—they themes—they often often n bubbling our start b ubbling up into into o ur thee ffestival cconsciousness onsciousness aass th estival program pr ogram eevolves: volves: ‘‘Oh, Oh, look att that!’ There aree a lot of film filmss aabout th at!’ Th ere ar bout iisolation solation and and aloneness, aloneness, whether wheth e er

they aree aalone inside th ey ar lone in siide of a llarger arger ccommunity ommunity or aall ll aalone lone on a sinking boat.” sin king bo at.” Thee sinking Th sinking boat boat a is is literal literal in writer-director J.. C. Chandor’s writ er-director J C Ch andor’s All Lost 12, and A ll Is L ostt ((Oct. Oct. 12 2, 3:30pm, an d Robert Redford Oct. 13, 8:15pm). R obert R edford thee middle of iiss seriously seriously aalone, lone, in th thee In Indian Ocean, without another th dian Oc ean, with out an other living li ving soul—or soul—or actor—in acttor—in sight. In display off hi hiss virtuosit virtuosity, a sskilled killed di splay o y, Redford R edford plays play ys a sailor sailor a ) 20 whose w hose tiny y ssailboat ailboat a iiss

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AGAINST THE ELEMENTS Robert Redford, all alone,

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‘It Showed Up At My Doorstep’ Thursday, October 17th 6-7:30pm ACRE Coffee 2365 Midway Drive @ Montgomery Village Santa Rosa

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sinking fast after a collision with a stray piece of floating debris. Desperate to fix the damage before it’s too late, Redford—with scarcely a word spoken aloud— goes through all the stages of fear, anger and last-minute problem solving in a film that stands as a tribute to the resourcefulness of solitary heroes. A different kind of solo survivor takes the spotlight in Capital (Oct. 4, 6:30pm), a multilingual thriller from legendary Greek director Costa-Gavras, who will be honored in a special onstage tribute after the film. Costarring Gabrielle Byrne as an unscrupulous American investor, the film follows a gleefully greedy but untested bank CEO (Gad Elmaleh) as he discovers he’s been set up to fail as the patsy in a major bank-industry power play. “I think it’s a Zeitgeist thing,” observes Elton. “I was speaking with director Steve McQueen about this, the way that certain events in the world give rise to art that takes a look at our condition. There are a number of films out in theaters now that deal with the subject of race, and perhaps that’s part of our examining ourselves after finally electing an AfricanAmerican president.” One extremely high-profile film, dealing deals with race and the issues of solitary survival, is British director McQueen’s critically acclaimed 12 Years a Slave, which recently took the top prize at the Toronto International Film Festival, the winner of which often goes on to win the Oscar for Best Picture. Based on the horrific but lyrical memoir of Solomon Northup, an accomplished violinist in New York City who was kidnapped and sold into slavery in Louisiana in 1841, 12 Years a Slave (Oct. 11, 6:30pm) shows a man (Chiwetel Ejiofor of Kinky Boots) prized for his intellect, who now finds intellect no match for the brutal reality of slavery. “It’s that solo theme, certainly,” notes Elton. “There is something powerful about the power of the individual and what they embody

when pitted against impossible odds. What I’m also noticing is that in several films, we are seeing people dealing with the most aberrant aspects of what human beings can do to one another.” A number of this year’s most buzzed-about films take place in Germany during the start of WWII, beginning with the openingnight film The Book Thief (Oct. 3, 7pm), about a young girl (Sophie Nélisse) who frequently finds herself alone amid nightmarish realities, and steals books as a way of asserting her own identity. The film features a major performance by Geoffrey Rush, who will be honored in-person on opening night with a special award. Similarly, the multi-part Generation War (full program, Oct. 6, 5pm; parts 1–3, Oct. 7, 8 and 9, respectively, 12:30pm each day) originally made for German television, looks at isolation in a time of crisis as five friends in 1941 go off to war, each taking his or her own solitary path, with tragic and emotionally powerful consequences. Then there’s Rithy Panh’s extraordinary Missing Picture (Oct. 12, 4:45pm, and Oct. 14, 5:30pm), in which the ingenious Cambodian filmmaker illustrates how he survived during the Pol Pot regime—telling the story through carved wooden figurines. “With all of these films,” says Elton, “the compassionate view of the filmmaker is the thing that makes us deeply connect with those people onscreen, people who are forced to stand alone against impossible odds. That’s the difference between great filmmaking and poor filmmaking—the ability to engage the heart and the head, to connect us intimately to people who are outside our normal experience and to find those little similarities. “In the end, of course, everyone can identify with being alone,” Elton adds. “The best films make us realize that, in an odd way, we aren’t alone in being alone at all.” The Mill Valley Film Festival runs Oct. 3–13 at various venues around Marin County. For full program and details, see www.mvff.com.

Star Power

21

AS SMART MART DECISION D ECISION

Ben Stiller Can the goofball from Meet the Fockers, Zoolander, Tropic Thunder, Dodgeball and Something About Mary succeed in a serious role? Screening is The Secret Life of Walter Mitty. Sunday, Oct. 13, 5pm, Rafael Film Center.

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Jared Leto The one all the teenage girls will be at due to Leto’s frontman status in the band 30 Seconds to Mars; expect Gen X-ers who loved My So-Called Life shouting out “Jordan!” as well. Screening is Dallas Buyers Club. Thursday, Oct. 10, 6:30 pm, Rafael Film Center.

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Dakota Fanning Beware, attendees of Fanning’s spotlight! As Jane Volturi in the Twilight series, she can cause intense pain in others with her mind. Screening is Effie Gray. Saturday, Oct. 12, 6:30pm, Rafael Film Center.

DISCLAIMER – THIS PRODUCT IS NOT AN AID FOR SMOKING G CESSATION. CESSATION . THIS THIS PRODUCT PRO DUC T IN IN NO NO WAY WAY INTENDS INTEN DS TO TO DIAGNOSE, DI AGNOSE , TREAT, TRE AT, CURE OR MITIGATE ANY DISEASE OR CONDITION. THIS PRODUCT O DUC T HAS H A S NOT N OT YET Y E T BEEN BEEN APPROVED A P P R OV E D B BY Y THE THE UNITED U NITED STATES STATES FFOOD OO D AND AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IN NO WAY CLAIMS L A IMS TO TO ASSIST A SSIST USER USER IN IN QUITTING QU IT TING OR O R LESSENING LESSENING FREQUENCY FREQU ENC Y OR OR SMOKING TRADITIONAL TOBACCO CIGARETTES. KEEP THISS PRODUCT PRO DUC T AND A N D ITS IT S COMPONENT COM PO N ENT PARTS PA RT S OUT OUT OF O F REACH RE ACH OF OF CHILDREN. CHILDREN. REFRAIN FROM USING THIS PRODUCT OF YOU ARE UNDER THE TH E LEGAL LEG A L SMOKING SM O K ING AGE AGE IN IN YOUR YOU R STATE. STATE .

Geoffrey Rush Rush’s depiction of David Helfgott in Shine, which screened at the 1996 MVFF, earned a commemorative postage stamp in his homeland of Australia. Screening Thursday, Oct. 3, 7pm, Century Cinema in Corte Madera is The Book Thief; on Saturday, Oct. 5, 9:15pm, Rafael Film Center, Rush appears again for a tribute. U R 2 7 th YE IN O

A R

Bruce Dern We imagine the actor from the 1970s version of The Great Gatsby will have something to say about this year’s remake. (As for us, we’re asking him about Smile, filmed in Santa Rosa.) SNL alum Will Forte also appears in person. Screening is Nebraska. Thursday, Oct. 3, 6:45pm at CinéArts Sequoia in Mill Valley.

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What Does It Mean? Metallica premieres admittedly ambiguous film at MVFF

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HONDA TOYOT A M AZ DA NI S SAN SUBARU

BY GABE MELINE

T

he climax of the new Metallica movie Metallica: Through the Never involves a boy vomiting, a fleet-footed CGI figure, a violent horseman in a gasmask, a man on fire, and the near-total destruction, via sledgehammer, of the band’s stage set. Amid shooting sparks and mechanical groans of steel, James Hetfield approaches the mic. “Should we keep playing?” he says. “That’s what I wanna do. Let’s get some amps up here, we don’t need all this fancy stuff anyway, right?” After a spare backline is constructed, Hetfield adds, “This is what it’s like in our garage.” Getting back to the garage is a running theme in the band’s career, going back to the 1987 EP Garage Days Re-Revisited. But Metallica is the world’s biggest metal band, and Through the Never is a big, overblown 3D experience. How can the members still appear like normal guys? In an onstage Q&A after a screening last week at the Mill Valley Film Festival—the U.S. public premiere—the band answered that question in action. Lars Ulrich slouched low into his chair. James Hetfield joked about trying to get his car into the film. Kirk Hammett said that, while shooting, he was just concerned

about getting blood on his boots. Through the Never is a concert film with an extra plot added, but what that plot is, exactly, audience members at the screening tried to grasp: What is inside the bag? What does the main character represent? Answers fell into one of two categories: the “We thought it looked cool” explanation and the more maddening “It’s whatever you want it to be, man” explanation. Asked why the film is named Through the Never—the title of one of Metallica’s songs—Hetfield responded that “it’s nice and vague. It can mean multiple things. How do you describe that? How do you describe what you just saw? I don’t know.” Ulrich chimed in, inadvertently summarizing the film: “We mined our catalogue for the most ambiguous title possible for the most ambiguous movie possible.” Ulrich himself is a familiar face at the Mill Valley Film Festival, and the band’s decision to premiere the movie here is a laudable nod to the festival’s stature and their hometown roots. But amid all the joking on stage, Ulrich couldn’t contain himself. “I’m just thinking about all the deep intellectual conversations about film that have happened on this stage over the years,” he said, looking out over the Rafael Film Center, “and how that seems like a distant memory now.” Drew Altizer

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‘Metallica: Through the Never’ opens in IMAX theaters on Friday, Sept. 27, and in 3D wide release on Friday, Oct. 4.

CULTURE

23

Crush

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The week’s events: a selective guide

R O H N E R T PA R K

Cantaloupe Island It’s the mark of a fine musician to be able to span decades and remain relevant. While an entire generation of turntable DJs grew up on Herbie Hancock’s “Rockit,” with its industrial beats and extended scratch outro, their parents were vibing out to the visionary pianist’s classic Blue Note albums like Empyrean Isles and Maiden Voyage (not to forget the big siblings in the club, dancing to acid-jazz samples of “Chameleon”). These days, Hancock’s live set is adventurous as ever, evidenced by a version of “Watermelon Man” in 17/8 time. Alternating between piano, synthesizer, vocoder and keytar, the jazz master plays “Plugged In: A Night of Solo Explorations” on Saturday, Sept. 28, at the Green Music Center. 1801 E. Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park. 6pm. $25–$85. 866.955.6040.

M I L L VA L L E Y

Old-Timey Mania If you’ve got one of those friends who still clings to his manual typewriter and Polaroid Land Camera, who extols the virtues of rotary phones and rub-on lettering, who distrusts anything made past 1978 and loudly proclaims so, have we got the gift for him: Michael Hurley’s 1984 album Blue Navigator, reissued in 2010 on 8-track! We’re not kidding! Nor are we kidding when we report that the initial pressing of 50 sold out, and one later sold on eBay for $46! It’s official, folks: the old-timey trend has reached “drooling weirdo” levels. Hurley, an avid 8-track fan and underground cult-folk hero, plays Thursday, Sept. 26, at Sweetwater Music Hall. 19 Corte Madera Ave., Mill Valley. 8pm. $22–$35. 415.388.3850.

O C C I D E N TA L

Oh God! From Michael Stipe and Woody Allen to Bill Maher and David Bazan, there exists a long line of art borne from men wrestling with their religious upbringing. Three years ago, ‘Wretch Like Me,’ the one-man show written and performed by Bohemian theater critic David Templeton, did this very thing with an added bonus: laughter. Now, in an updated revision, Templeton’s story about coming of age as a fundamentalist puppeteer with an overly devoted (to the Lord) girlfriend returns. Brush up on your New Testament verses and hark back to the weird world of the 1970s in two shows, Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 28 and 29, at the Occidental Center of the Arts. 3850 Doris Murphy Court, Occidental. 4pm. $10. 707.874.9392.

S A N TA R O S A

Stage Fright It starts with an electrical failure. The lighting buzzes, there’s a couple flashes, and then the camera finally opens on the Winterland stage. It’s The Last Waltz, the star-studded, Scorsesedirected documentary of the Band’s “last show” that would go on to cause short-circuits among band members while appearing on lists of the Greatest Rock Concert Films of All Time. Backstage, arguments ensued and cocaine was plentiful (a bit of the white stuff on Neil Young’s nostril was famously edited out), but the music remains incredible. In a partnership with KRCB and the Last Record Store, Summerfield Cinemas screens the film on Thursday, Sept. 26, at Summerfield Cinemas. 551 Summerfield Road, Santa Rosa. 7pm. $7–$10. 707.522.0719.

—Gabe Meline

BOW DOWN FOR BOWIE A live cast acts out ‘Labyrinth’ in a screening at the Phoenix Theater on Sept. 28. See Film, p33.

Arts Ideas Alejandro Cartagena

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‘BUSINESS IN A NEWLY BUILT SUBURB IN JUAREZ’ A 2009 photograph by Alejandro Cartagena finds beauty in the banal.

Shared Visions

Sonoma County Museum partners with SFMOMA for ‘Photography in Mexico’ BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

T

he San Francisco Museum of Modern Art is temporarily closed, and that’s good news for the Sonoma County Museum—it allows, for the first time, a collection of photographs from SFMOMA to appear north of the Golden Gate. The exhibit, “Photography in Mexico,” opening Saturday, Sept. 28, previously displayed at SFMOMA two years ago. In

San Francisco, the number of photographs was staggering, but SFMOMA photography curator Corey Kelley says she’s going to hang most of the exhibit in the smaller Sonoma County Museum. Arranged chronologically, the exhibit begins with Edward Weston’s work from Mexico in the 1920s. “I always loved the Westons, because he comes in with a foreigner’s eye to look at this culture that’s unfamiliar but really inspiring to him,” says Keller. “He so appreciates the shapes that were already there.”

From that time, photographers in Mexico started to embrace their own style. “There had been very painterly and pictorials before that, and so the direction of Mexican photography changed,” says Keller. “What the Mexicans really did is took the formal lesson, but they added the political aspect to it. The pictures really marry the aesthetics and the politics.” Mostly in black and white, some of the images show famous subjects like painters Frida Kahlo and José Orozco, and Rodrigo

Moya’s iconic photo of Che Guevara, but most are shots of everyday life. The 1979 photograph “Our Lady of the Iguana,” shows a Zapotec woman from southeastern Mexico with a crown of live lizards, and recent work in color shows the rolling hills of Mexico City covered with houses far as the eye can see. The diversity of the exhibit combines rural and urban, old world and new realities, young spirits and old souls, all from one country and almost entirely through the eyes of its own people. When SFMOMA reopens, it will be almost three times its former size, taking up an entire city block and rising to seven stories. As if taking a cue from its well-funded cousin, the Sonoma County Museum is also expanding. After abandoning plans to move into the long-delayed development at the former AT&T building in downtown Santa Rosa, the museum will expand into the old Conklin Brothers building next door, which it owns. “I think this is a better building,” says Sonoma County Museum executive director Diane Evans. “The space we were going to have there had a lot of challenges, and it was actually smaller.” When construction is complete, the current museum will house historical exhibits, with the new space dedicated to art. Beginning in December, the large warehouse space will house monthly pop-up art nights, for which the museum is currently accepting applications, promising a stipend and staff in exchange for ideas, organizing and, of course, art. (Applications can be accessed at sonomacountymuseum.org.) “There are a lot of creative people in this community,” explains Evans, “who maybe don’t have a venue to try something experimental.” ‘Photography in Mexico’ opens with a reception Saturday, Sept. 28, at the Sonoma County Museum. 425 Seventh St., Santa Rosa. 6pm. $7. 707.579.1500.

Eric Chazankin

RIBALDRY ENSUES Sixth Street’s

cast doesn’t mind being yelled at.

Try the Castle! Participation encouraged at ‘Rocky Horror’ BY DAVID TEMPLETON

‘C

all outs.” That’s how fans of The Rocky Horror Picture Show refer to the lines the audience shouts up at the screen during midnight showings of the perversely enduring 1975 spoof. At Sixth Street Playhouse, where director Craig Miller has staged a spirited production of the original 1973 stage musical (on which the movie was based), “call outs” from the audience are not only tolerated, they are encouraged. On the Sixth Street website, there’s even a link to the “official” call-and-response script. And though the traditional use of water guns and the tossing of rice, cards and toast is not allowed in the

‘The Rocky Horror Show’ runs Thursday–Sunday through Oct. 13 at Sixth Street Playhouse. 52 W. Sixth St., Santa Rosa. Thursday–Saturday at 8pm; Sunday, 2pm; Saturday matinee, Oct. 5 and 12. $15–$25. 707.523.4185.

9;J9RQJGDD=J;G9KL=JJA<=L@JGM?@GMJ GN=J%KLAEMD9L=<$OA%>A%G:K=KK=<;MDLMJ=

by Lisa Loomer Directed by John Shillington

OCTOBER 4, 5, 10, 11, 12 at 8:00 PM OCTOBER 5, 6, 12, 13, at 2:00 PM Burbank Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College 1501 Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa Campus TICKETS ONLINE www.santarosa.edu/theatrearts TICKETS $10-$15 BOX OFFICE 707.527.4343 RECOMMENDED FOR AGE 14 AND ABOVE. CONTAINS STRONG LANGUAGE

Distracted is presented by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc., New York.

25 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 25 - OCTOBE R 1 , 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Stage

Studio Theater (too dangerous for the actors), the cast is prepared to hear experienced Rocky followers shouting “Asshole!” and “Slut!” whenever stiff Brad (Braedyn Youngberg) and virginal Janet (Julianne Lorenzen) are named, and to cry “Say it!” when the sexually omnivorous Dr. Frank N. Furter (Rob Broadhurst)—to whose castle the wide-eyed newlyweds are lured—pauses with “antici . . . pation!” in the middle of a word. Such frat-party behavior might normally get one ejected from a theater. Here, such actions will win applause and admiration, and fans who show up in costume (also encouraged) might even win a prize at intermission. As with the film, which was crucified by critics but was embraced by fans anyway, it seems a bit beside the point to even attempt a traditional review of Sixth Street’s Rocky Horror Picture Show. The story is thin, the characters thinner, the logic of the “plot” is spotty at best, and what passes for a climax seems tossed together and disappointingly anti-climactic. But the songs by Richard O’Brien, who also wrote the script, still rock with silly, limit-pushing exuberance; the three-quarterthrust staging in the studio works quite well in bringing the audience close to the action; the cast tackles the show with a fresh sense of canyou-believe-we’re-actually-doingthis exhibitionism; and Miller’s direction emphasizes the joyful deviance of the whole undertaking. Cast highlights include Broadhurst and Lorenzen (both dazzlingly bold), a strong-voiced Shannon Rider as Magenta and Jake Turner as a peppy Riff Raff. The only real way to judge this Rocky Horror is by the contagiousness of the actors’ freedom-savoring fun, and despite some opening-night reserve in spots, it’s here in great supply. Rating (out of 5): ++++

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | SEPTE MBER 25 – O CTO BE R 1 , 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

26

Film

OFF THE MISSION Jonathan Groff, left, plays a young David Sedaris in ‘C.O.G.’

Jesus Wept

David Sedaris film adaptation misses Sedaris’ voice BY RACHEL DOVEY

I

n his essay “C.O.G.” (“Child of God”), David Sedaris muses about a group of born-again Christians: “There seemed to be some correlation between devotion to God and a misguided zeal for marshmallows.” Unfortunately, in the film adaptation of the same name, such wry observations are nowhere to be found. Screenwriter Kyle Patrick Alvarez’s C.O.G. contains no narration, only dialogue, which almost works with Glee’s Jonathan Groff portraying the memoirist’s arrogant younger self. But without the humorist’s narrative overlay, C.O.G. feels jarringly a-Sedaris—mostly because it’s just not funny. Young David has just finished grad school, so he boards a bus for rural Oregon, determined to find his inner Steinbeck. But the misty West is less idyllic than he’d hoped, and between an ex-con who mocks him for reading, a factory worker displaying dozens of dildos in a case and a caustic vet who hands out Jesus pamphlets and carves wall clocks shaped like Oregon, David whirls between crazies like a drunk with vertigo. All is fodder for comedy in Sedaris’ dark, self-lacerating essay, but not in the film. Without the author’s voice, it becomes pure plot—and the plot of this little story is tragic. Dildo man tries to rape him. He escapes in a woman’s bathrobe. He moves in with the vet, attends a tearful altar call and is then disowned by the congregation he comes to love for being gay. Coupled with a moody soundtrack and lingering shots of the Northwestern countryside, C.O.G. is a quiet meditation on many important themes: gender, sexuality, religion. And with his nuanced portrayal of a conflicted, lonely twenty-something, Groff lends even more gravity to the film. But there’s so much darkness, it’s hard not to miss that signature Sedaris tone—the one laughing when his own mother cruelly mocks his crippling OCD. It’s a voice that reminds you that you can laugh, too—and in fact, to stay sane, you must. ‘C.O.G.’ is playing through Sept. 26 at the Rafael Film Center in San Rafael, and opens Friday, Sept. 27 at Rialto Cinemas in Sebastopol..

BEAT REPEAT Originally, Billy Cobham didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Spectrumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; even charted.

Full â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Spectrumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Billy Cobham revisits fusion masterpiece BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

J

azz fusion is experienced on many levels. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the Van Halen level (it just plain rocks, and is met with a scrunched â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oh yeahâ&#x20AC;? face), the Rush level (technical ability drops jaws and bulges eyes) and the John Coltrane level (arrangements and chord progressions so out-of-thisworld they warrant an aural double take).

Billy Cobhamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1973 fusion masterpiece, Spectrum, hits on all of these, and adds a groove. The result is an album full of odd time signatures, ripping guitar solos and impressionistic synthesizer sounds with some of the most powerful, technical and musically grounded drumming ever heard. The albumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best song, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stratus,â&#x20AC;? features a solid drum groove until the end, when Cobham cuts loose with insane ďŹ lls in perfect time for

27 99/27 /27 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 110/3 0 /3

HHonorable onor able

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IIn naW World orld R ((10:45-1:00-3:30)-7:15-9:20 10 : 45-1: 00-33 : 30 ) -7:15- 9 : 20

Salinger PPG13 Salinger G13 (1 (10:45-4:15) 0 : 45- 4 :15 ) Short S hort T Term erm 12 12 R ((1:45)-7:00-9:15 1: 45 ) -7: 00- 9 :15

Austenland PPG13 Austenland G13 Lee L ee Danielsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Danielsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; P G13 T he B utler PG13 The Butler

((11:15-3:45) 11:15-33 : 45 )

(11:00-2:00-5:00)-8:00 (11: 00-2: 00-5 : 00 ) -8 : 00 T hur sday 110/3 0 / 3 oonly: nly : (1 1: 0 0 a m ) Thursday (11:00am)

Blue B lue Jasmine Jasmine

PPG13 G13

((1:30)-6:45-9:00 1: 30 ) -6 : 4 5- 9 : 0 0

Join uuss oonn TThursday Join hur sday 110/3 0 / 3 aatt 44pm pm aand nd 77pm pm ffor or tthe he MManhattan anhat t an Short Shor t Film Film Festival! Fes t i val !

Summer field C Summerfield Cinemas in e ma s 551 5 51 S Summerfield ummer field Road Road 3ANTA2OSAs707.522.0719 3 ANTA2OSAs 707. 522 .0719

Monday ~ Open Mic Night with Austin DeLone 7:30pm 7KXU6HSWĂŁSP (((folkYEAH!))) & Sweetwater present

Michael Hurley folk legend )UL6HSWĂŁSP

Creed Bratton from â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Officeâ&#x20AC;? 6DW6HSWĂŁDP

Live Music Brunch

DIN N E R & A SHOW

THE MACHIAVELVETS Sept 27 Reckless Futurism

Rancho

8:00 / No Cover Debut! Sat Dance Party! 28 Sept THE OVERCOMMITMENTS Rock and Funk 8:30 Sun Rancho Nicasioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s First Sept 29 FAR M TO TABLE

DINNER ON THE LAWN

Celebrating Local Farms, Vineyards and Cuisineâ&#x20AC;Ś WI TH JIMI Z AND THE GOOD TIME BAND 3:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7:00

Wendy DeWitt:

Queen of Boogie-Woogie Piano 6DW6HSWĂŁSP

The Mother Hips 6XQ6HSWĂŁDP

Live Music Sunday Brunch

FREE SHOW with Dan Frechette & Laurel Thomsen (Dan and Laurel) :HG2FWĂŁSP

Amendola vs. Blades 7KXU2FWĂŁSP

Rozzi Crane )UL2FW 6DWĂŁSP

featuring Dave Malone, Camile Baudoin

& Frank Bua from The Radiators plus John Gros (Papa Grows Funk/George Porter) & Dave Pomerlau

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave Mill Valley CafĂŠ 415.388.1700 | Box Office 415.388.3850

Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

Fri

FREE SHOW with

Raw Oyster Cult

Billy Cobhamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Spectrum 40 band makes its only California appearance at the Uptown Theatre on Friday, Sept. 27. 1350 Third St., Napa. 8pm. $30. 707.259.0123.

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

REVOLVER Oct 5 Songs from â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;66 8:30 Sat

DAN HICKS AND BAYSIDE JAZZ Oct 18 Dance to Danâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Favorite Standards Fri

8:00 Best Album of the Year Oct 26 FROBECK Original Funk, R&B and Rock 8:30 Sun Rancho Nicasio and KWMR present 27 Oct THE LEGENDARY LAURIE LEWIS Sat

WITH

NINA GERBER AND TOM ROZUM

â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the pre-eminent Bluegrass and Americana artists of our timeâ&#x20AC;? 7:00 Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 25 - OCTOBE R 1 , 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

what seems like an eternityâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and, since the song fades out, it might have been quite longer. The funny thing is that Cobham, who comes to Napaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Uptown Theatre on Sept. 27, didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t set out to make a record like that in the slightest. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I made that record so that I could hand it out to suitors close to New York City, where I was living at the time, to try to get a gig on the weekends, like a wedding or whatever,â&#x20AC;? says the celebrated drummer via phone from Florida, the night before kicking off Spectrumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 40th anniversary tour. When people told him it had made the Billboard charts, he didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe them. After all, when Spectrum was released (recorded on a $30,000 budget, start to ďŹ nish) the No. 1 song in the country belonged to Cherâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and, not long after, the Carpenters. So how did an album that was so far out there become one of the most celebrated and critically acclaimed fusion releases of all time? â&#x20AC;&#x153;People saw there was a possibility to combine the complex with the banal, to some degree, and come up with something very positive,â&#x20AC;? says Cobham. It was, perhaps, the shock of simplicity in a genre known for complexity that took hold of listeners. Cobham, whose intricate, powerhouse drumming propelled the chaotic world of the Mahavishnu Orchestra, lays down tight grooves on Spectrum, but the album also shows off his ďŹ erce chops with numerous drum solos. It displays, as Cobham puts it, â&#x20AC;&#x153;two separate personalities in one project.â&#x20AC;? Cobham has taught music in Napa through an online music school, and has visited several times, but this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s show marks his ďŹ rst performance in the North Bay. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m looking forward to this,â&#x20AC;? he says. Cobham adds that his feat isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t otherworldly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done can easily be done by anyone else,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People are people, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just a person. We all have it in us.â&#x20AC;?

Music

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | SEPTE MBER 25 – O CTO BE R 1 , 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

28

Concerts

2 24 V 224 VINTAGE INTAG E W WAY AY N OVA ATO | 415.892.6200 415 . 8 9 2 . 6 2 0 0 NOVATO

WEDNESDAYS WE DNESDAYS / VA VARIETY R IE T Y | G GENERAL ENER AL

OPEN O PEN MIC MIC NIGHT N I G HT

SONOMA COUNTY

WITH W ITH D DENNIS ENNIS HA HANEDA NEDA FFREE/DOORS REE/ DOORS 7:30PM/ALL 7: 30PM /ALL AGES AGES

EarleFest

FRI F RI S SEP EP 2 27 7 / EELECTRO LECTRO | FUNK FUNK | PSYCH PSYCH ROCK ROCK

ACORN A CORN PROJECT PROJECT

LIVE MUSIC. NO COVER.

SAT S AT S SEP EP 2 28 8 / FFUNK UNK | B BLUES LUES | R AND AN D B

Fri, Sept 27

$$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

THE T HE P PULSATORS ULSATORS $$13/DOORS 13/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

THUR T HUR O OCT CT 3 / CCONTEMP. ONTEMP. | R ROOTS OOTS | R ROCK OCK 33 3 3 1⁄3 1 ⁄ 3 MILE MILE SHOWCASE SHOWCASE

THE T HE IINCUBATORS NCUBATORS $$8/DOORS 8 / DOORS 7PM/21+ 7PM /21+

good mood gurus ACOUSTIC ROCK

Sat, Sept 28 > Free Admission

top 40 dj’s

FRI F RI O OCT CT 4 / SSWING WING | R A AND ND B | R ROCK O CK

TOP 40, ROCK & POP FROM 80’S TO TODAY

AN D H AND HIS IS R ROCKET OCKET 88'S 88' S $$13/DOORS 13/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

Sun, Sept 29

MIDNIGHT M IDNIGHT SUN SUN MASSIVE MASSIVE

PIANO VOCALIST

MITCH M ITCH WOODS WOODS

SAT S AT O OCT CT 5 / ROOTS ROOTS | ROCK ROCK | REGGAE R EG G A E $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

FRI F RI O OCT CT 1 11 1 / JJAM AM | P PSYCH SYCH | R ROCK O CK

CRYPTICAL CR YPTICAL

W ITH S WITH SPECIAL PE C I A L G GUEST U E ST S STU TU ALLEN ALL LEN $$13/DOORS 13/ DOORS 77:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM W WW.HOPMONK.COM Book yyour Book our n next e x t eevent vent with with us, us, up up to to 150 1 50 p people, eople, kim@hopmonk.com kim@hopmonk .com

National and regional Americana musicians including Robert Earl Keen, Ray Wylie Hubbard, Sonny Landreth with Cindy Cashdollar, and Frankie Boots & the County Line play annual benefit. Sep 28, noon. $30-$35. Earle Baum Center for the Blind, 4539 Occidental Rd, Santa Rosa.

Herbie Hancock

Happy Hour Daily

Pioneering jazz pianist has made over 60 recordings and earned 14 Grammys over a five-decade career. Sep 28, 6pm. $40-$85. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

4–6:30pm

Jazz Forum

Gentry Bronson

132 KELLER ST, PETALUMA 707.238.0158 info@socialclubrestaurant.com

for calendar of events & information

Popular concert series features informal sessions and concerts with masters and rising stars. Sep 25, Julian Pollack Trio; Oct 2, Matt Slocum Trio. 1pm. Free. Green Music Center 1029, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2122.

Jazz It Up Concert Series

7 0 7. 829 . 7 3 0 0 707.829.7300 SEBASTOPOL E B AS T OP OL 230 2 3 0 PETALUMA P E TA L U M A AVE AV E | S

OPEN O P E N MIC M I C NIGHT NIGHT

EVERY TUES EVERY TUES AT AT 7PM 7PM WITH WITH EVAN EVAN THUR T HUR SEPT SEPT 26 EELECTRONIC LEC TRONIC | FOLK FOLK | DOWNTEMPO D OW N T E M P O

RISING R ISING APPALACHIA APPALACHIA

$$15 15 A ADV/$20 DV/$20 D DOS/DOORS OS/ DOORS 99PM/21+ PM /21+

FRI F RI S SEPT EPT 2 27 7

AMERICANA A MERICANA | FFOLK O LK | R ROCK O CK

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

DEAD D EAD W WINTER INTER C CARPENTERS ARPENTE ERS $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

CLOSED C LOSED FOR FOR A PRIVATE PRIVATE EVENT E V EN T NO N O SHOW SHOW IN IN ABBEY, ABBEY, TAVERN TAVERN OPEN O PE N

FRI F RI S SEPT EPT 29

LLIVE IVE | FLAMENCO FL AMENCO | DANCE DANCE

SOL S OL F FLAMENCO LAMENCO

$$5/ 5/ LADIES LADIES FREE FREE B4 B4 11/DOORS 11/DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM/21+

WED W ED O OCT CT 2

DUBSTEP D U BS T EP | W WEST EST C COAST OA S T | G GLITCH L I TC H

BRAINSTORM B R AINSTORM W WITH ITH M MOSE OSE $$5/DOORS 5/ DOORS 7PM/21+ 7PM /21+

THUR T HUR OCT OC T 3

NEW N EW O ORLEANS R LE ANS | B BRASS R A SS JJAZZ A Z Z | FFUNK UNK

RAW R AW OYSTER OYSTER C CULT ULT $$25/DOORS 25/ DOORS 7:30PM/21+ 7: 30PM /21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM W W W. H O PM ONK .CO M BBook ook yyour our

next ne x t eevent ve n t w with ith u us, s, u up p tto o2 250, 50, kkim@hopmonk.com. i m @ h o p m o n k . co m .

Folk legend recorded his first songs in 1965. Sep 26, 8pm. $22-$35. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

The Mother Hips Rock group sounds like it was ripped right out of the ‘70s, but with a modern twist. Sep 28, 9pm. $27. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

NAPA COUNTY Elvin Bishop Blues man has been playing his guitar since the ‘60s. Sep 27, 8pm. $35. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Billy Cobham Legendary jazz fusion drummer celebrates the 40th anniversary of his album “Spectrum.” Sep 27, 8pm. $30. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Aqus Cafe Sep 27, Planet Waves. Sep 28, Jeff Troiana. Sep 29, Ken Roy Berry. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Center Sep 30, Free Pussy Riot benefit with the Shes, the Wild Ones, Odd Bird, more. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Aubergine Sep 26, Tim Snider. Sep 27, Ukulele Night with Mr December, Jon Gonzales String Band, Uni & her Ukulele, Andy Dru Rogers, Brino Ism. Sep 28, the Bumptet. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Cloverdale Performing Arts Center Sep 29, Charged Particles. 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

Flamingo Lounge Sep 27, Beatles Flashback. Sep 28, Groove Foundation. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

French Garden Sep 27, Haute Flash. Sep 28, New Skye. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Rockin’ Concerts Series Sep 28, Mustache Harbor. Noon. Free. Montgomery Village Shopping Center, Village Court, Santa Rosa.

Summer Concert Series

Ruth Ann Swenson

$$15 15 SSTANDING/$25 TANDING/$25 FFRONT/DOORS RONT/DOORS 77PM/21+ PM/21+

MON M ON S SEPT EPT 3 30 0

DJJ JACQUES D JACQUES & D DJJ G GUACAMOLE UACAMOLE

Michael Hurley

SONOMA COUNTY

Sep 28, Tom Rhodes, Taylor Brown, River Shiver. Sep 28, 6pm. $20-$25. VML Winery, 4035 Westside Rd, Healdsburg. 707.431.4404.

SAT S AT S SEPT EPT 2 28 8

REGGAE R EGGAE | DANCEHALL DANCEHALL | HIP HIP H HOP OP MONDAY M ONDAY NIGHT NIGHT E EDUTAINMENT DUTAINMENT W WITH ITH

Sep 28, Bill Horvitz Trio. 4pm. Free. Seasons of the Vineyard, 113 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2222.

in exploration of new work by Michael Daugherty. Sep 29, 5pm. $29-$59. Osher Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Clubs & Venues

Come see us! Wed–Fri, 2–9 Sat & Sun, 11:30–8

Brewery Tours Daily at 3! 1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

w w w.L AGU N ITAS.com

Coloratura soprano made her debut with San Francisco Opera and continues her stellar career decades later. Sep 29, 3pm. $40-$85. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

MARIN COUNTY Daughtry Perspectives Violinist Nadja SalernoSonnenberg leads New Century Chamber Orchestra

ANDROID PORN Kraddy headlines at Hopmonk

Sebastopol on Sept. 25. See Clubs, adjacent.

CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

Hopmonk Sebastopol

ual! 6th Ann

29

Great Music | Great Food & Drink Great Vibes | & A Really Great Cause!

Hopmonk Sonoma Sep 27, Matt Bradford. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg Sep 28, Dick Conte Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

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Sep 28, Nate Lopez & Sean England. 1901 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

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Sep 27, Brodie Stewart. 397 Aviation Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.765.2515.

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Sep 28, the Art of the Protest Song. 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

$30 Advance/$35 Day of (Under 10 Free) Tickets: Last Record Store, Tall Toad Music, Peoples Music, www.earlefest.com

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Heritage Public House

TAVERNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BEST OF THE OPEN MICS!

E MINOR & THE DIRTY DIAMONDS â&#x20AC;˘ ALISON HARRIS â&#x20AC;˘ CHRIS HALIN â&#x20AC;˘ & MORE!

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Sep 26, Unauthorized Rolling Stones. Village Court, Santa Rosa.

Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub Sep 26, Sally Haggard Trio. Sep 29, Wind Up Monkeys. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre Sep 27, New Monsoon, Tom Finch Group. Sep 28, Foreverland. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Phoenix Theater Sep 27, SoulVent, Pushing the Sun, 26 MPH, Nescience, A Hero to Fall. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Redwood Cafe Sep 27, Synrgy, the Elephant Dub Brigade, Midnight Sun Massive. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Russian River Brewing Co Sep 28, Jounce, Kingsborough. Sep 29, Cameron Peterson. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Sep 27, Larry K Potts. Sep 28, Sticky Notes. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

) 30

Fri Sept 27 Billy Cobhamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spectrum 40â&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;? featuring

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

Dean Brown, Gary Husband & Ric Fierabracci

"REAKFASTs,UNCHs$INNER &2)s0-$//23s JAM BAND

An evening with Tainted Love

McNearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dining House

NEW MONSOON

PLUS TOM FINCH GROUP 3!4s0-$//23s MICHAEL JACKSON TRIBUTE BAND

AN EVENING WITH

Fri Oct 4 Sun Oct 6

Natalie Maines of The Dixie Chicks Sat Oct 12

Peter Murphy Mr Moonlight Celebrates 35 yrs of Bauhaus

Wed Oct 16

FOREVERLAND

^ŽůŽÄ?ŽƾĆ?Ć&#x;Ä?^Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ˝Ç Chris Cornell

THE ENGLISH BEAT

Sun Nov 10

Thur Nov 7

&2)s0-$//23s SKA/REGGAE/NEW WAVE

Dave Mason

4(52s0-$//23s ROCK/JAM BAND

Fri Nov 15

DARK STAR ORCHESTRA 3!4s0-$//23s TOM PETTY TRIBUTE BAND

Ruth McGowanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewpub Glaser Center

GE! 2nd STA HOPMONK

The

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I do a lot of rock shows, and I wanted to find local rock bands that were all-female,â&#x20AC;? says Ward, who put out a Facebook call for all-women rock bands in the North Bay that didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t result in many leads. Undaunted, Ward worked with the Arlene Francis Foundation and CMedia to put together a lineup of live music from the Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (sunny garage-pop from San Francisco teens, pictured above), the Wild Ones, Ashley Allred of Odd Bird and Slinky Minx. Local women artists Sara Davis, Julia Davis, Kaija Sabbah and others are creating new Pussy Riot and feminist-inspired art to be featured in a gallery setting. Speakers include Elaine Holtz, longtime host of Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Spaces, and information on the Free Pussy Riot cause will be readily available. Ward has high hopes of inspiring more women to take up instruments and start a damn band already. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m hoping that women who come to this show will think, wow, this could be a whole scene and maybe itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll grow from there.â&#x20AC;? The Free Pussy Riot Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Art Gallery and Music Showcase happens on Monday, Sept. 30, at the Arlene Francis Center. 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa. 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10:30pm. $7 (no one turned away for lack of funds). 707.528.3009.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Leilani Clark

Sep 25, Mike Compton. Sep 26, Grandpa Banana. Sep 27, Eric Cornforth & the Hicktown Homeboys. Sep 28, Jinx Jones. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

ROBERT EARL KEEN | RAY WYLIE HUBBARD SONNY LANDRETH & CINDY CASHDOLLAR FRANKIE BOOTS & THE COUNTY LINE

re e

After being questioned about the dearth of women artists at his events, local concert promoter Jake Ward was inspired by the Free Pussy Riot movement to put on a womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s art and music showcase.

Lagunitas Tap Room

4539 Occidental Road, Santa Rosa 11:30 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6pm (Doors 11am)

th

Event to support Pussy Riot at Arlene Francis Center

Earle Baum Center of the Blind

of

Scene Building

Last Saturday of every month, Good Hip-Hop. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

SEPTEMBER 28

PETTY THEFT

PLUS ZOO STATION: THE COMPLETE U2 EXPERIENCE &2)s0-$//23s ROCK

AN EVENING WITH

ZERO

.O#HILDREN5NDERTO!LL!GES3HOWS 0ETALUMA"LVD 0ETALUMA

7

WWWMCNEARSCOM

SOJA Reverend Horton Heat Sat Nov 16

Sylvia Browne Fri Nov 22

Eddie Money Sat Dec 7

Merle Haggard Special Guest The Malpass Brothers

Sun Dec 8 An evening with The Wailinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Jennys

Fri Dec 13

Craig Fergusonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Hot and Grumpy Planning an event? Contact us for rental info

1350 Third St, Napa | 707.259.0123 www.uptowntheatrenapa.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 25 - OCTOBE R 1 , 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Sep 25, Kraddy, Ini, Dr Dylon, Mose. Sep 26, Rising Appalachia, the Human Experience. Sep 27, Dead Winter Carpenters, Madrone Brothers. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | SEPTE MBER 25 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; O CTO BE R 1 , 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Music ( 29

Revolution. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1515.

Seasons of the Vineyard

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Sweetwater Music Hal

Sep 28, Bill Horvitz Trio. 113 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2222.

Sep 25, EmK. Sep 26, Wendy DeWitt with Kirk Harwood. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Society: Culture House

ÂĄPuro Alma Apachicano! by Emmanuel Catarino Montoya, 2010

Thurs, Casa Rasta. Sun, Church on Sundays. Wed, North Bay Blues Revue. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa.

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar

Sprengerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tap Room Sep 26, Susan Garcia & Lindsy Thomas. Sep 28, the Hots. 446 B St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8277.

Sep 27, the Machiavelvets. Sep 28, the Overcommitments. Sep 29, Jimi Z & the Good Time Band. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Taft Street Winery

Sausalito Seahorse

Sep 29, the Sorentinos. 2030 Barlow Lane, Sebastopol. 707.823.2049.

Sep 27, Dr Mojo. Sep 29, Pacific Mambo Orchestra. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Tradewinds

Sleeping Lady

Thurs, DJ Dave. Sep 27, Clean Slate. Sep 28, Levi Lloyd. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Sep 25, the Pickups. Sep 28, Breakin Bread. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio

Sep 25, Junk Parlor. Sep 26, Dirty Cello. Sep 27, Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

MARIN COUNTY Open Wed thru Sun, 11 to 5pm 144 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma

707tcalabigallery.com

142 Throckmorton Theatre Sep 29, Dustbowl Revival. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Sep 26, La Mandanga. Sep 27, the Incubators. Sep 28, Sol Doc. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Station House Cafe Sep 29, New Copasetics.

Sep 26, Michael Hurley. Sep 28, Mother Hips. Sep 29, Dan Frechette & Laurel Thomsen. Oct 2, Amendola vs Blades. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads Sep 26, Stu Allen. Sep 27, Walking Spanish. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

NAPA COUNTY Napa Valley Opera House Sep 26, Street Corner Symphony. Sep 27, Elvin Bishop. Sep 28, Ballet Folklorico de Napa. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sep 26, Michael Belair. Sep 27, Caravan of All Stars. Sep 28, Kellie Fuller. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre Sep 27, Billy Cobham. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Fenix Sep 26, Jimmy Dillon Band. Sep 27, Wall Street. Sep 28, Miles Schon Band. Sep 29, Amy Wigton. Wed, Blues Night. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

B_l[@Wpp 8bk[i D_]^ji

Fourth Street Tavern

Thursdays 6:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:00pm Beer, Wine & Pub Grub Pinkies Up!

Savory Lunch Menu Aromatic Loose Teas

Tudor Rose English Tea Room

&OURTH3TREETs3ANTA2OSA sTUDORROSETEAROOMCOM

Sep 28, Ned Endless & the Allniters. 711 Fourth St, San Rafael.

Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub Sep 27, the Unauthorized Rolling Stones. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Hopmonk Novato Sep 27, Acorn Project. Sep 28, the Pulsators. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

19 Broadway Club

At the Veterans Building 282 South High St. Sebastopol, CA 95472 707.829.4797 www.sebarts.org

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

The Dear Hunter Sweeping, bombastic chamber-rock band joined by a string quartet. Sep 26 at the Regency Ballroom.

Regina Carter Master violinist plays residency with Jenny Scheinman, Kenny Barron and others. Sep 26-29 at SFJAZZ Center.

Lorde Slow-burning anthem â&#x20AC;&#x153;Royalsâ&#x20AC;? sticks it to the upper class with soul. Sep 27 at the Fillmore.

Sep 25, Ellis D & GU. Sep 26, Sophistafunk. Sep 27, Rocker-T, Indubious. Sep 28, Peach Street. Sep 29, Yerba Bruja. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Black Milk

Osher Marin JCC

L.A.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finest goth delivers hard-boiled deliverance on latest album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pain Is Beauty.â&#x20AC;? Sep 30 at Great American Music Hall.

Sep 29, Daughtry Perspectives. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Osteria Divino Sep 26, Open Sky. Sep 27, Rob Reich Trio. Sep 28, Ken Cook Trio. Sep 29, Classical

Before C2SV, Detroit MC debuts material from upcoming LP â&#x20AC;&#x153;No Poison No Paradise.â&#x20AC;? Sep 28 at Brick & Mortar.

Chelsea Wolfe

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

31

Galleries RECEPTIONS

Epicurean Connection

RiskPress Gallery

Through Oct 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bird & Flower,â&#x20AC;? poetic paintings by Wu Tianyu. 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

Through Oct 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Impressions of India,â&#x20AC;? photos by Patrick Brinton. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Finley Community Center

Russian River Art Gallery

City Hall Council Chambers, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oil Paintings,â&#x20AC;? works by Mark Jacobson. 5pm. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Through Oct 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Saints Misbehavinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;,â&#x20AC;? Byzantine art of saints by Grant Greenwald. Through Oct 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Scrap Metal Art,â&#x20AC;? works by James Selby. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Sep 28

Gallery of Sea & Heaven

Sep 27

Hudson Street Wineries, â&#x20AC;&#x153;50 Series,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Lori Mole. 3pm. 423 Hudson St, Healdsburg. Sonoma County Museum, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Photography in Mexico,â&#x20AC;? from the collection of the SF MOMA. 6pm. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Artistry in Wood,â&#x20AC;? Showcase of fine regional craftsmanship. 6pm. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Oct 1 Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hanlon Center for the Arts, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unfamiliar Landscapes,â&#x20AC;? abstract and expressionistic mixed-media works. 6pm 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.4331.

SONOMA COUNTY Calabi Gallery Through Sep 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Memento Mori,â&#x20AC;? art relating to themes of life and death. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Oct 14, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Barking Up the Family Tree,â&#x20AC;? featuring comic strips with Snoopyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s siblings. Through Oct 27, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mid-Century Modern,â&#x20AC;? works of prominent post-war-era decorative, textile and furniture designers. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

City Hall Council Chambers Through Oct 24, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oil Paintings,â&#x20AC;? works by Mark Jacobson. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Through Oct 12, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art Delicious,â&#x20AC;? work by artists from Becoming Independent and Studios on A. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Gallery One Through Oct 5, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anniversary Exhibit,â&#x20AC;? works by Clark Mitchell and Olga Storms. Through Oct 25, â&#x20AC;&#x153;ARTrails 3D Showcase Exhibit,â&#x20AC;? sampling of 3D art by local artists. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Guerneville Library Through Sep 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Celebration of Creativity,â&#x20AC;? artists of the lower Russian River area. 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Oct 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sculpture and Works on Paper,â&#x20AC;? pieces by Jann Nunn. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts Through Oct 5, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Red Dot 2013,â&#x20AC;? work by Laurent Davidson, Frieda Giolding and Michael Madzo. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

Hudson Street Wineries Sep 28-Oct 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;50 Series,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Lori Mole. 423 Hudson St, Healdsburg.

Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center Through Sep 26, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Inspired by Nature,â&#x20AC;? quilted fiber arts by the Pointless Sisters. 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

New Leaf Gallery Through Sep 29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Black, White, Red,â&#x20AC;? sculpture show. Cornerstone Place, 23588 Hwy 121, Sonoma. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.933.1300.

Through Sep 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Birds of a Feather,â&#x20AC;? personal interpretations of our feathered friends. 16357 Main St, Guerneville. Daily, 10 to 6. 707.869.9099.

Sheraton Sonoma County Sep 28, 6pm, Petaluma Art Trunk, Art flea market with collages, assemblages, art quilts, steam punk jewelry and altered art. 745 Baywood Dr, Petaluma.

Sonoma County Museum Through Oct 20, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Artistry in Wood,â&#x20AC;? Showcase of fine regional craftsmanship. Sep 28-Jan 12, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Photography in Mexico,â&#x20AC;? from the collection of the SF MOMA. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma State University Library Art Gallery Through Oct 13, â&#x20AC;&#x153;From Death to Life in Ancient Bahrain,â&#x20AC;? close-up view of ancient burial grounds. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Steele Lane Community Center Through Oct 10, â&#x20AC;&#x153;AIARE Design Awards Exhibit,â&#x20AC;? winning entries from the Redwood Empire Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. 415 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 7; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.543.3282.

Towers Gallery Through Oct 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hidden Treasures,â&#x20AC;? variety of styles from local artists. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

Upstairs Art Gallery Through Sep 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wine Country Art,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Laura Roney. 306 Center Ave (above Levin & Co bookstore), Healdsburg. Sun-Thurs, 10 to 6; Fri-Sat, 10 to 9. 707.431.4214.

Viva Chocolat Through Sep 25, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Art of Ricky Watts,â&#x20AC;? paintings by the local artist. 110 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. ) Open late on

32

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 25 - OCTOBE R 1 , 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Arts Events

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | SE PTEMB ER 25 – O CTO BE R 1 , 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

32

1030 Main Street

A E

in downtown Napa Tickets & Information

weekends; closed Wednesdays. 707.778.9888.

NVOH.ORG

707.226.7372

Wed, Sept 25 8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 10:15am– SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth 12:45pm and Family 7–10pm Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club Thur, Sept 26 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–10pm CIRCLES N’ SQUARES Square Dance Club

BLUES/ROCK MASTER:

ELVIN BISHOP Fri, Sep 27, 8 PM

Fri, Sept 27 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7–11pm Steve Luther hosts MOTOWN, DISCO & ROCK ‘N ROLL Sat, Sept 28 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 10:30am– SCOTTISH CHALLENGE DANCE 12:30pm with Gary Thomas

WORLD BLUES: TAJ MAHAL, VUSI MAHLASELA &

DEVA MAHAL WITH FREDERICKS BROWN Fri, Oct 4, 8 PM

CLASSICAL PIANIST:

JENNIFER KOH

Sat, Oct 5, 8 PM FILM:

SYMPHONY OF THE SOIL

Documentary film that explores the complexity and mystery of soil

Wed, Oct 2, 7 PM

( 31

Sun, Sept 29 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 5–9:25pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING Mon, Sept 30 8:45–9:45am;5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–9:25pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, Oct 1 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7:30pm–9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

MARIN COUNTY Art Works Downtown Through Oct 13, “Memento Mori,” art by Eddie Volla and D Young V. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

COM Art Gallery Sep 30-Nov 14, “The Intimate Diebenkorn: Works on Paper 1949–1992,” pieces by Richard Diebenkorn. College of Marin, Fine Arts Building, 835 College Ave, Kentfield. 415.485.9494.

Marin Community Foundation Through Sep 27, “Breaking Barriers,” featuring work by Bay Area artists with disabilities. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Marin MOCA Through Oct 6, “National Photography Show,” works by Simon Pyle, Chantel Beam, Douglas Ito and others. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137. Through Oct 5, “Fall Rental Show,” all pieces available to rent. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. Mon-Thurs, 11 to 4; SatSun, 12 to 4. 415.454.9561.

paintings by Michele de la Menardiere and sculptures by John Petrey. Oct 1-Nov 30, “Found in Translation,” mixedmedia by Thomas Morphis and ceramics by Hiroko Ishida. 1136 Main St, Napa. No phone.

MINE Art Gallery

Napa Valley Museum

FALL BACK TO BOOT CAMP

Through Sep 29, “Unframed Freedom,” works by Bob Stang and Sunila Bajracharya. 1820 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax.

Fast results for busy women

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts

Through Sep 29, “Date with the Devil,” new work inspired by the legend of Faust. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Tues-Sun, 10am to 4pm. 707.944.0500.

Marin Society of Artists

Tune into

“Swingin' with Sinatra”

PAPER TRAIL ‘The Intimate Diebenkorn: Works on Paper 1949–1992’ opens at College of Marin Art Gallery Sept. 30. See below.

Sebastopol California

Oct 21 – Nov 15

707.217.3795

www.SebastopolBootCamp.com

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Through Sep 26, “Symbols,” abstract and expressionistic mixed-media art works. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Osher Marin JCC Through Oct 6, “Street-Light,” oil paintings by Rabbi Lawrence Kushner. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Seager Gray Gallery Through Sep 29, “Awake and Away,” paintings, drawings and collages by Jane Hambleton. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

NAPA COUNTY -PWFS¤T1MBZUIJOHT…4FOTVBM-JOHFSJF…(JGU$FSUJGJDBUFT…+FXFMSZ

Grand Hand Gallery Through Sep 29, “Presence,”

Dance Center for Spiritual Living Sep 27, 7pm, Dances of Universal Peace. $10. 2075 Occidental Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.4543.

Hopmonk Sebastopol Sep 29, 8pm, Sol Flamenco, Spanish dance troupe with live music $15-$25. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Comedy Events

Cultivating Change

Scott Capurro Caitlin Gill opens. Sep 28, 8pm. $20-$35. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Food, wine, music and more in support of Global Student Embassy. Sep 29, 1pm. $50. Barlow Event Center, 6770 McKinley Ave, Sebastopol.

Fun with Dick & Bob

Lawn Party

Variety talk show hosted by Dick Bright and Bob Sarlatte. Sep 27, 8pm. $20-$35. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Music by Higher Ground, food from local restaurants and wineries. Sep 28, 6pm. $40$55. St Vincent’s School, 1 St Vincent Dr, San Rafael.

San Francisco Comedy Competition Semi-final round of annual amateur competition. Sep 28, 8pm. $45. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

100 Thousand Poets for Change Three days of music, art, spoken word and activism in coordination with the global event day. Sep 27-29. Free. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Roller Derby Bout Resurrection Roller Girls Cinderollas vs Santa Cruz Harbor Hellcats. Sep 28, 7:30pm. $12$15. Cal Skate, 6100 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park.

Film Behind the Orange Curtain Film on the prescription drug epidemic among California teens. Discussion follows. Sep 26, 6pm. $5. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Breakfast at Tiffany’s Holly Golightly (Audrey Hepburn) is a charming socialite with a youthful zest for life. Sep 25, 7pm. $8. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Culinary Cinema Sep 26, “Kings of Pastry”; Oct 3, “Ingredients: A Documentary Film”; Oct 10, Napa Valley Film Fest short film preview. Oxbow Public Market, 610 First St, Napa.

The Labyrinth A live shadow cast accompanies this ‘80s classic featuring David Bowie’s magic and Jim Henson’s puppets. Sep 28, 10pm. $10. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Larger Than Life Opera Sep 28, “Hansel and Gretel.” 7pm. $20. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

The Last Waltz Martin Scorsese-directed documentary about the Band’s last performance in 1976. Sep 26, 7pm. Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.528.4222.

Measuring Space A look at how astronomical distances compare to those we use in our everyday life. Sep 27, 7pm. $5-$8. SRJC Planetarium, Lark Hall 2001, 1502 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4465.

Mountainfilm Sep 25, “Fire on the Mountain,” “Code Red,” “Chasing Water”; Oct 2, “Eiger Sanction,” “Yosemite Falls High Line.” Wed, 7:30pm. $12-$15. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

National Theatre London Live in HD Live stage performances from London on the big screen. Sep 26, “Othello” with Adrian Lester and Rory Kinnear. 7:30pm. $24-$30. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.5111.

No Hard Feelings Four characters with hilarious encounters with their exes. Part of the Italian Film Festival. Sep 28, 5:30 and 7:45pm. $14. Marin Center Showcase Theatre, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Sonoma Film Institute Sep 27, “You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet”; Oct 4, “Hollywood Hair.” $7. Warren Auditorium, Ives Hall, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Still Moving: Pilobolus at Forty Documentary chronicles the life of the modern dance troupe Pilobolus. Sep 27, 4:30 and 7pm. $10. Sebastopol Center for the Arts, 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Symphony of the Soil Film portrays soil as a protagonist of the planetary story. Q&A with Filmmaker Deborah Koons Garcia after screening. Sep 27, 7pm. $10.75. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Wine Country Film Festival Outdoor projection at Deerfield, indoor screenings at other locations. See www.wcff.us for details. Times vary. Sep 25-29. Deerfield Ranch Winery, 10200 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood. 707.833.2270.

Food & Drink Harvest Festival Potluck with performances by members of the Imaginists theater group. Sep 28, 2pm. Bayer Farm, 1550 West Ave, Santa Rosa.

Making Olives Edible Don Landis presents a workshop on how to de-bitter olives. Sep 29, 11am. $20. BR Cohn Winery, 15140 Sonoma Hwy (Highway 12), Glen Ellen. 707.938.4064.

Oktoberfest German grub and beer with polka dancing lessons. Sep 28,

3pm. $30. Windsor Community Center, 901 Adele Drive, Windsor. 707.579.ARTS.

Lectures Golf: Addressing the Mysteries of the Game Michael Murphy, Bobby Clampett and Glen Albaugh talk about the game’s finer points. Oct 1, 7pm. $25. Falkirk Cultural Center, 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

International Devilry Anthropologist Felicia Shinnamon explores customs about evil. Sep 26, 7pm. $15. Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

TEDx Marin Doctors, philosophers, entrepreneurs and other really smart people talk about new ideas with the theme of “Past Presents Future.” Oct 2, 6pm. $75. Kanbar Center for the Performing Arts, Osher Marin JCC, 200 No San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Comic Book Box Sep 25, 12pm, “The Other Dead” with Joshua Ortega. 189 Southwest Blvd, Rohnert Park 707.792.0100.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Sep 29, 2pm, “More Adventures with Annie in Santa Rosa” with Kay Voliva. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Sep 26, 4pm, “Al Capone Does My Homework” with Gennifer Choldenko. Oct 1, 4pm, “Boxers & Saints” with Gene Luen Yang. Oct 1, 7pm, “Killer Weed: An Ed Rosenberg Mystery” with Michael Castleman. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books

Chapter Two Semi-autobiographical story about love and second chances by renowned playwright Neil Simon. Presented by Ross Valley Players. Thurs, 7:30pm, Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Oct 13. $13-$26. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

A Comedy of Errors Marin Shakespeare Company’s presentation of the Bard’s classic with a Texas twist. Fri-Sun, 8pm. through Sep 29. $20-$37.50. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, 890 Belle Ave, Dominican University, San Rafael.

Driving Miss Daisy

Sep 26, 7pm, “ Clearing the Way to Health and Wellness: Reversing Chronic Conditions” with Dr Ellen Cutler. Sep 26, 7pm, “Clearing the Way to Health and Wellness” with Dr Ellen Cutler. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.2618.

A stubborn, aging Jewish widow in Atlanta has an African-American hired to be her chauffeur–in 1948. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 4pm. through Oct 6. $15. Pegasus Theater Company, Rio Nido Lodge, Canyon Two Rd, Rio Nido.

Lincoln Theater

Lilith Rogers as Rachel Carson

Readings

Sep 27, 7pm, “Proof of Heaven” with Dr Eben Alexander. $18-$45. 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.226.8742.

Angelico Hall

Sebastopol Gallery

Sep 25, 7pm, “Oil and Honey: The Education of an Unlikely Activist” with Bill McKibben. Dominican University, 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael.

Sep 28, 2pm, Sonnets in the Wind with Lee Slonimsky and Sandy Eastoak. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.829.7200.

Book Passage

Theater

Sep 26, 7pm, “Dissident Gardens” with Jonathon Lethem. Sep 27, 7pm, “Clearing the Way to Health and Wellness” with Dr Ellen Cutler. Sep 28, 1pm, “The American Way of Poverty: How the Other Half Still Lives” with Sasha Abramsky. Sep 28, 4pm, “Ivy & Bean Take the Case” with Annie Barrows. Sep 28, 4pm, “Walk in Their Shoes: Can One Person Change the World?” with Jim Zoilkoswki. Sep 28, 7pm, “The Polarized Mind: Why It’s Killing Us and What We Can Do About It” with Kirk Schneider. Sep 29, “Subtle Bodies” with Norman Rush. Sep 29, 1pm, “Bella Figura” with Jojo Capece. Sep 29, 4pm, “Burying Ben” with Ellen Kirschman. Sep 30, 7pm, “The Purchase” with Linda Spalding. Oct 1, 7pm, “Traveling Sprinkler” with Nicholson Baker. Oct 2, 7pm, “What Poets Are Like: Up and Down with the Writing Life” with Gary Soto. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

vary. Fri-Sun through Sep 28. $20-$38. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, 890 Belle Ave, Dominican University, San Rafael.

All’s Well That Ends Well Marin Shakespeare Company presents the Bard’s romantic comedy. Dates and times

Using Carson’s own words, Rogers brings to life the tragedies and triumphs of the founding mother of the environmental movement. Music by White Bear follows. Sep 29, 1pm. Free. Luther Burbank Experiment Farm, 7781 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.9492.

Mauritius Theresa Rebeck’s comedydrama that explores sibling rivalry, greed and the little known world of philately (stamp collecting). Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 5pm. through

Oct 13. $15-$25. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

33

People Show 121 Murder Mystery show with original music. Oct 1, 8pm. $75. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3946.

The Rocky Horror Show The sweet transvestite, Frankenfurter, dances the “Time Warp” in person with his motley crew. Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Oct 13. $15-$25. Studio Theatre, Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Water from the Welles Globetrotting actress-author Elizabeth Welles tells stories from one-woman shows she’s performed. Sep 27, 7:30pm. $15. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381

We Never Say Goodbye One-woman play by Sharon Caplan Cohen. Sep 26, 7pm. $10. O’Hanlon Center for the Arts, 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.4331.

Wretch Like Me Daid Templeton’s one-man play about a former teenage fundamentalist who was saved from being saved. Sep 28, 8pm and Sep 29, 4pm. $10. Occidental Center for the Arts, 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

MAN IN LANDSCAPE Jonathan Lethem reads from his new novel, ‘Dissident

Gardens,’ Sept. 26 at Book Passage. See Readings, this page.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 25 - OCTOBE R 1 , 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Participate in the largest global poetry reading. Sep 28, 2pm. Free. 19 Broadway Club, 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | SE PTEMB ER 25 - O CTO BE R 1 , 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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SPIRITUAL

Connections Finding inspiration & connecting with your community

Unity of Santa Rosa An inclusive, spiritually-minded community. All are welcome. Workshops and events. Sunday School & Service 10:30am 4857 Old Redwood Hwy tel: 707.542.7729 www.UnityofSantaRosa.org

MEDITATION CENTER OPEN HOUSE Tuesday, Oct 8, 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7pm. If you are new to Buddhism or Meditation and wish to find out what it is all about, please attend our free Open House. The evening will include a guided relaxation, breathing meditation and a short talk on Meditation & Buddhism as well as an introduction to the Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s programs. Everyone is welcome. Compassion Buddhist Ctr, 436 Larkfield Center, SR, 707.477.2264, www.meditateinsantarosa.org

Astrology

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of September 25

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a good feeling about your relationship with intimacy in the coming weeks. Judging from the astrological omens, I think you will have a good instinct about how to drum up interesting fun with your most important allies. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll just naturally know what to do to make your collaborative efforts synergistic. So by all means cash in on this potential. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just sit back and hope for the best; rather, call on your imagination to provide you with original ideas about how to make it all happen. TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20)

Would you be willing to go to extraordinary lengths to transform aspects of your life that you have felt are hard to transform? Now would be a good time to do that. Luck will ďŹ&#x201A;ow your way if you work on healing your number one wound. Unexpected help and inspiration will appear if you administer tough love to any part of you thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s addicted, immature or unconscious. Barriers will crumple if you brainstorm about new ways to satisfy your frustrated yearnings.

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20)

I bet your normal paranoia levels will decline in the coming weeks. Fears you take for granted wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make nearly as much sense as they usually seem to. As a result, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be tempted to wriggle free from your defense mechanisms. Useful ideas that your mind has been closed to may suddenly tantalize your curiosity. I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be surprised if you start tuning into catalysts that had previously been invisible to you. But here are my questions: Can you deal with losing the motivational force that fear gives you? Will you be able to get inspired by grace and pleasure rather than anxiety and agitation? I advise you to work hard on raising your trust levels.

CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sometimes people have nothing to say because theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re too empty,â&#x20AC;? writes author Yasmin Mogahed, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and sometimes people have nothing to say because theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re too full.â&#x20AC;? By my reckoning, Cancerian, you will soon be in the latter category. A big silence is settling over you as new amusements and amazements rise up within you. It will be understandable if you feel reluctant to blab about them. They need more time to ripen. You should trust your impulse to remain a secret and a mystery for a while.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Insight is not a light bulb that goes off inside our heads,â&#x20AC;? says author Malcolm Gladwell. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is a ďŹ&#x201A;ickering candle that can easily be snuffed out.â&#x20AC;? Take that as a constructive warning, Leo. On the one hand, I believe you will soon glimpse quite a few new understandings of how the world works and what you could do to make it serve you better. On the other hand, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to be extra alert for these new understandings and committed to capturing them the moment they pop up. Articulate them immediately. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re alone, talk to yourself about them. Maybe even write them down. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just assume you will be able to remember them perfectly later when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more convenient. VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22) After a storm, British wildlife lover Gary Zammit found a baby heron cowering in a broken nest. Its parents were dead. Zammit took the orphan under his wing. He named it Dude, and cared for it as it grew. Eventually, he realized that Dude was never going to learn to ďŹ&#x201A;y unless he intervened. Filling his pockets full of the food that Dude loved, Zammit launched a series of ďŹ&#x201A;ying lessonsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;waving his arms and squawking as he ran along a ďŹ&#x201A;at meadow that served as a runway. Dude imitated his human dad, and soon mastered the art of ďŹ&#x201A;ight. Can you see ways in which this story might have metaphorical resemblances to your own life, Virgo? I think it does. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time for your mind to teach your body an instinctual skill or self-care habit that it has never quite gotten right. LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) For four days twice a year, the East China Sea recedes to create a narrow strip of land between two Korean islands, Jindo and Modo. People celebrate the Sea-Parting Festival by strolling back and forth along the temporary path. The phenomenon has been called the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Korean version of Mosesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; miracle,â&#x20AC;? although itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more reasonably explained by the action of the tides. I foresee some

sweet marvel akin to this one occurring in your life very soon, Libra. Be ready to take advantage of a special dispensation.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21) The desire for revenge is a favorite theme of the entertainment industry. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presented as being glamorous and stirring and even noble. How many action ďŹ lms build their plots around the hero seeking payback against his enemies? Personally, I see revenge as one of the top three worst emotions. In real life, it rarely has redeeming value. People who actively express it often wreak pain and ruin on both others and themselves. Even those who merely stew in it may wound themselves by doing so. I bring this up, Scorpio, because now is an excellent time for you to shed desires for revenge. Dissolve them, get rid of them, talk yourself out of indulging in them. The reward for doing so will be a great liberation.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) Just for a few days, would you be willing to put your attention on the needs of others more than on your own? The weird thing is, your selďŹ sh interests will be best served by being as unselďŹ sh and empathetic and compassionate as you can stand to be. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean that you should allow yourself to be abused or taken advantage of. Your task is to express an abundance of creative generosity as you bestow your unique blessings in ways that make you feel powerful. In the words of theologian Frederick Buechner, you should go â&#x20AC;&#x153;to the place where your deep gladness and the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deep hunger meet.â&#x20AC;?

CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) Imagine a scenario like this: the CEOs of ďŹ ve crazily rich U.S. corporations, including a major defense contractor, stage a press conference to announce that in the future they will turn down the massive welfare beneďŹ ts and tax breaks the federal government has been doling out to them all these years. Now picture this: the Pope issues a statement declaring that since Jesus Christ never had a single bad word to say about homosexuals, the Catholic Church is withdrawing its resistance to gay rights. I am envisioning a comparable reversal in your life, Capricornâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a ďŹ&#x201A;ip-ďŹ&#x201A;op that seems equally improbable. But unlike the two I named, yours will actually unfold in the course of the next eight months. If it hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t already started yet, it will soon. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18)

Matteo Ricci was an Italian Jesuit priest who lived from 1552 to 1610. For his last 28 years, he worked as a missionary in China. Corresponding with his friends and family back home required a lot of patience. News traveled very slowly. Whenever he sent out a letter, he was aware that thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be no response for seven years. What would you express about your life right now if you knew your dear ones wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t learn of it until 2017? Imagine describing to them in an old-fashioned letter what your plans will be between now and then . . . what you hope to accomplish and how you will transform yourself. Right now is an excellent time to take inventory of your long-term future.

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20) The cosmos is granting you a poetic license to practice the art of apodyopsis with great relish. You know what apodyopsis is, right? It refers to the act of envisioning people nakedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;mentally undressing them so as to picture them in their raw state. So, yes, by all means, Pisces, enjoy this creative use of your imagination without apology. It should generate many ďŹ ne ramiďŹ cations. For instance, it will prime you to penetrate beneath the surface of things. It will encourage you to see through everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s social masks and tune in to whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really going on in their depths. You need to do that right now. Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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