Issuu on Google+

SAUSALITO ART FESTIVAL GUIDE INSIDE!

ONO’Z, SPAM PALACE P14 JOYCE MAYNARD P22 48-HOUR FILM P25

DON’T LET

THE BLUES GET

YOU DOWN CLUBS AND PROMOTERS COME AND GO, BUT THE BLUES ALWAYS THRIVES IN THE NORTH BAY BY JONAH RASKIN P18

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | AUGUST 21-27, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Å´

presents pr esents the

WEILL W E I LL H HALL ALL at

Sonoma State University

73231%78%8)92-:)67-8= %<-7(%2')'314%2= *VMHE]7ITXTQ4IVWSR8LIEXIV %<-7LEWFIGSQISRISJXLI[SVPH«WQSWX EGGPEMQIHERHMRRSZEXMZIIRWIQFPIWSJ TIVJSVQIVW[MXLERH[MXLSYXHMWEFMPMXMIW%<-7 VIHIJMRIWXVEHMXMSREPRSXMSRWSJHERGIERH TVSZMHIWGLSVISKVETLIVW[MXLXSSPWXSI\TPSVI ERI[QSZIQIRXZSGEFYPEV]+IRIVEP

&),-2(,%44=*%')78%0/-2+%&398 1)28%0,)%08,[MXL6SWW7^EFS 1SRHE]7ITXTQ779'SSTIVEKI*6)) %[EVH[MRRMRKWTIEOIV6SWW7^EFS[MPPFILIVIXS WLEVILMWPMJIWXSV]ERHMQTSVXERGISJQIRXEPLIEPXL MRXLIGSPPIKI[SVPH7^EFS«WWXSV]VIWSREXIW[MXL XLIQMPPMSRWSJGSPPIKIWXYHIRXW[LSEVITYXXMRKSR ELETT]JEGIXSLMHIXLIMVXVYIIQSXMSRW

&-007%28-%+3 8LYVWHE]7ITXTQ-ZIW*6)) 'SQIHMER&MPP7ERXMEKS[MPPFITIVJSVQMRKLMWWXERH YT¨7TERKPMWL%8SXEP-QQIVWMSR'SQIHMG )\GYVWMSRMRXS0EXMRS97%©,I[MPPFITIVJSVQMRKMR LSRSVSJXLI0EXMRSWERHXLI0EXMRSGYVMSYWJSV ,MWTERMG,MWXSV]1SRXL

%WWSGMEXIH7XYHIRXW4VSHYGXMSRW7SRSQE7XEXI9RMZIVWMX] )EWX'SXEXM%ZI6SLRIVX4EVO'% 8-'/)87779&3<3**-')36320-2)%88-'/)8773231%)(9

SUUMMER MMER 2 2013 013 The Goat Goat Rodeo Ro odeo o Sessions Y o-Y o Yo Ma, Ma, Stuart Stuarrt Duncan, Yo-Yo Edgar g M eyer y r, Chris Ch hris Thile Meyer, with guest Aoife Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donovan O Friday, Friday y, August 23, 77:30pm IInside nside $55-$100 | Outs Outside side $25-$45

Jewelry Repurposing Specialist

We trade or buy gold & platinum

Expert Repairs Local Designers Chris Botti SSunday, undayy, August 25, 4pm IInside nside $45-$85 $45 $85 | Outside $2 $25-$45 25 $45 25-$45

Branded Consignment Items

Spend your day the Windsor way in Old Downtown Windsor TICKETS ON SALE NOW! TICKETS: TI ICK KETS TS: 1-866-955-6040

GREEN G GR EEN MUSIC MUSIC CENTE CENTER R gmc gmc.sonoma.edu c.sonoma a.edu

MasterCard Mas sterCarrd and d the Master MasterCard Card brand mark ar aree rregistered eg gistered trademarks of Master MasterCard Card IInternational nternational IIncorporated. ncorpo orated. ©2013 Master MasterCard. asterCard ard.

8JOETPS3PBEt8JOETPS $" 707 836 1840 markshimizudesign.com

ŵ

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 21-27, 201 3 | BOH E MI A N.COM

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 21–27, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

4

Elevatte Your Elevate E Your u Game. Ga ame. FALL F A ALL AL LL L 2013 20 201

Bohemian 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288 Editor Gabe Meline, ext. 202

Staff Writers Leilani Clark, ext. 106 Rachel Dovey, ext. 203 Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200

Copy Editor Gary Brandt, ext. 150

Calendar Editor Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200

Interns Anna Hecht, Nadav Soroker

Contributors Michael Amsler, Rob Brezsny, Dani Burlison, Richard von Busack, Jessica Dur Taylor, Gretchen Giles, James Knight, Ari LeVaux, Jacquelynne Ocaña, Jonah Raskin, Bruce Robinson, Sara Sanger, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow

Design Director Kara Brown

Production Operations Coordinator Mercy Perez

Senior Designer Jackie Mujica, ext. 213

Layout Artists Gary Brandt, Tabi Zarrinnaal

101 10 01 @ ROHNERT RO R OHNERT RT PARK PARK

Advertising Director Lisa Santos, ext. 205

Advertising Account Managers Lynda Rael, ext. 204 Mercedes Murolo, ext. 207

Circulation Manager Steve Olson, ext. 201

Sales Operations Manager Deborah Bonar, ext. 215

Publisher Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

CEO/Executive Editor

GET CARDED. $100 GIFT CARDS! WIN $ 100 GIF FT C ARDS! Sign up online today for fo or a chance to win $100 100 Graton Grato ton Gif ft C ards, d valid lid a h e incr iincredible edible dibl dining di i choice h ices: Gift Cards, att thes these choices:

Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Third-class postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2013 Metrosa Inc. Complete C omplete con contest test rules available online. R Rohnert ohnerrt P Park, ark, C CA. A. © 2013 Gr Graton aton R Resort esort & C Casino asino

Cover star: Charlie Musselwhite. Cover design by Kara Brown.

5

BBOZQVSDIBTF OZQVSDIBTF XJUIUIJTDPVQPO

XJUIUIJTDPVQPO

4PNFFYDMVTJPOTBQQMZ&YQ

4 PNF FYDMVTJPOT B QQM Z & Y Q 

11"91-00. " 9 1- 0 0.

77"1&1&/4 " 1& 1& / 4 ''30. 30. 

nb ON TOP OF THE WORLD

This photo was taken at Sugarloaf State Park. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com, and follow us on Instagram at @nbaybohemian.

Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nothing like a quick jaunt up to a hilltop to regenerate the senses.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The blues hurt you like a woman, and they also make you feel real good like a woman.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; COVER F EATURE P18





  vvaap po

or We h We have ave a H HUGE U sselection UGE election of of glass glass pipes, p ipes , pens w aterpipes, wood wood pipes pipes and and all all the the smoking s m ok in g waterpipes, a ccessories you you want! w an t ! accessories FFOUR OUR LOCATIONS: LOCATIONS: NEW N EW HOURS for SR: 9 9AM-10PM AM-10PM FRI & SAT SA AT

porriizzeerrss v po va

9 AM-9PM SUN-THUR S 9AM-9PM SUN-THURS

3372 SANTA 3372 SANTA ROSA ROSA AVE AVE SANTA ROSA, ROSA , 707-545-4975 7 0 7- 5 4 5 - 4 9 7 5 SANTA

OPEN OPE N 11AM-8PM MON MON-SAT -SA AT / 11A 11AM-7PM AM-7PM SUN SUNDAYS DA AYS Y

1099 44TH 1099 TH S ST, T, SAN S A N RAFAEL R A FA EL , 415-457-2 415- 4 57-24 420 20 116 6W WESTERN E S T E RN A AVE, VE, P PETALUMA, E TA LUM A , 7707.762.9 07.762.9 4 420 20 NAPA, 1110 10 SOSCOL SOSCOL AAVE, VE, N A PA , 7707-226-7 07-226-74 420 20

Fine Dining For Wild Birds

Hawaii Comes to Guerneville D I N IN G P 14

Revisiting the Trailside Killer A RTS & IDEAS P22

Cotati Actress in â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Fruitvale Stationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; STAGE P 24 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Dining p14 Restaurants p15 Wineries p17

Swirl p17 Cover Feature p18 Culture Crush p21 Arts & Ideas p22 Stage p24

Film p25 Concerts & Clubs p27 A&E p31 ClassiďŹ ed p35 Astrology p35

%URRNZRRG$YH6DQWD5RVD 0RQ¤6DWDP¤SP6XQDP¤SPÂ&#x2020;ZZZZEXFRPVDQWDURVD

%LUGVHHGÂ&#x2020;)HHGHUVÂ&#x2020;%LUGEDWKVÂ&#x2020;2SWLFVÂ&#x2020;1DWXUH*LIWVÂ&#x2020;%RRNV

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;27, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

0GG 0GG

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 21–27, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

6

BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Ban the ‘Boutique’ Proposed overpriced hotel would ruin Sebastopol’s small-town charm BY ALEXIS HEEMSTRA

I

am a single mother who works full-time, and I am on no government assistance. I scraped together enough money to qualify for a loan earlier this year to buy my first home, which I purchased at Bodega Avenue Townhouses, located just west of the French Garden Restaurant in Sebastopol. The owner of the French Garden is proposing to build a twostory, 18-room, 8,000-square-foot hotel between the restaurant and town homes on a small narrow sliver of land. I went to the planning commission meeting on Aug. 13, where the owner’s request to change the zoning for the hotel was heard. The hotel is planned in an area with 10 schools within a one-mile radius. There are two large parks right down the street from the proposed site. I have major concerns about the safety of the kids that ride bikes to and from school and the parks. All the hotels in Sebastopol (two hotels and four B&Bs) are marketed as “close to wineries.” How close to wineries do you want your kids to be when the hotel patrons are driving home after a day of winetasting? Also, I ask Sebastopol, do we need another hotel? There are six lodging establishments in Sebastopol, totaling 123 rooms. The Barlow is already adding 60 rooms in a 34,000-square-foot hotel less than three miles from this proposed site. The Barlow’s rooms will be $270 per night. Why do we need another expensive boutique hotel so close to this one? The planning commission approved the construction plans with a vote of four in favor and two against. Chair Evert Fernandez asked that the vote be postponed until more schools and interested parties could be contacted for comment, since the planning commission only provided one week of notice regarding the meeting. However, commissioner Colin Doyle was very vocal about not contacting any additional interested parties and pushing the vote ahead—even though the developer said he would wait. I urge all parents in Sebastopol to state their opposition to the construction. I also volunteer to be contacted by any interested parties. Let’s keep Sebastopol a true town and not turn it into Napa—a destination for overpriced boutique hotels for wine tasters! Alexis Heemstra lives in Sebastopol and can be reached at running7@hotmail.com. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Gabe’s SoCalled Music

Apparently, Gabe Meline personally does not mind watching his young child running around the aisles of Community Market, screaming about the motherfucking bitches that ain’t shit—what a cute little kid! (“Parental Advisory,” Aug. 14.) If Gabe could remove his hip-hop hat from his smug skull and see past his tattoos, he might begin to comprehend that one doesn’t have to be a conservative or a Christian to be dismayed by the precipitous collapse of any ethical sense at all in popular “culture,” enchanted as it is by worship of prison life and the “obnoxious bragging, anonymous sex, murderous gunplay, or rhyming with the F-word” he and his child enjoy so much. But that’s the so-called music he digs, and it will help create the future that he and his kid will live in. Good luck with that, Gabe. Why not try some Duke Ellington out on your little bundle of joy. That might open both your minds a bit. “The ‘c’ in ‘rap’ is silent.”—Johnny Otis.

JAY WILLIAMSON Santa Rosa

Omega-3 Scandal Letter-writer Lauren Ayers (“Efren Needs Better Nutrition,” Aug. 7) hypothesizes that Efren Carrillo’s “demented” behavior results from the “invisible malady” of mental illness. And, further, that it is a physiological cause at the root of such improbable behavior from a promising well-respected political savant. Whether or not this is true, can we not accept the warped disharmony between our bodies and minds as among the main culprits? Whoever you are, Lauren Ayers, my

two twenty-something sons and so many of their ilk would be applauding you. Only the other day I was soundly lectured on the mayhem caused by the unsolicited introduction of fluoride in our water, not to mention the daily warnings to panic if it’s not organic.

“Dad, do you have any idea what processed foods are doing to the essential makeup of our bodies?” Miss Ayers seems to know, recommending we substitute our steady diet of cheap addictive unnatural food products with more omegas, minerals and vitamins in natural foods. It might not have an effect on the political warts in the limelight these days, but then again, you never know.

BOB KLEIN Santa Rosa

The Kids, Fully Grown Dani Burlison says in her article about teenagers (“Mom! I Need a Ride!” Aug. 14) that “you’ll pour yourself a glass of wine, sit back and . . . enjoy the last few years together.” There’s another stage, beyond the one she’s talking about, when your children come back as their own adult selves, merging the lessons you tried to teach them with the lessons they’ve learned on their own. I get great fatherly joy from seeing what interesting, creative, rooted men my sons have become, and from learning from them—and, heck, they occasionally even still ask us for advice. It kind of pays back for those challenging teenage (and other) years.

BILL HOUGHTON Sebastopol

No-Cost Fun Thanks for the insightful parenting issue—I particularly enjoyed the short

Rants

Santa Rosa

Top Five 1

Napa Valley Opera House to undergo cabaretstyle makeover this year

2

Efren Carrillo returns to the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday—wearing pants!

3

Forty-two foot whale washes ashore at Stinson Beach, sadly dies hours later

4

Rohnert Park doubles fines for partying; SSU should recruit Andrew W.K. for help OM

CO U

A

Y

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

decision to not host the Tour of California in 2014

& Property Management, Inc.

NT

5 Santa Rosa announces

D E D E’S R ENTALS N

SARAH HADLER

By Tom Tomorrow

SO

and hilarious “Which One Should I Buy?” I was reading it and laughing out loud as my two-year-old son was playing in the front yard on his combo “swing” and “pull up bar,” which is something his dad set up in our apple tree. It’s a long stick, hung from a piece of rope and tied in the middle—our little guy grabs it with a hand on either side and swings all over. It provides hours of no-cost entertainment. Right next to it is a homemade “tetherball,” a hacky sack tied with another rope hung from same tree, and when hit with a stick, we call it “piñata practice.” Here’s to good old-fashioned and cheap fun!

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 21–27, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

THIS MODERN WORLD

7

CALIFORN

IA

REPUBLIC

A G R I C U LT U R E INDUSTRY R E C R E AT I O N

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 21–27, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

8

Paper THE

Asawa’s Fountain Ruth Asawa’s fountain in Santa Rosa’s Courthouse Square is such a landmark that it even has its own check-in page on Foursquare. Its exterior stone panels are a mural timeline of Santa Rosa up to 1987, created by the beloved Japanese-American artist who passed away this month. But a plan for the reunification of Courthouse Square shows the space without the fountain—and that has had some art lovers concerned. “The fountain is to be obliterated as part of the reunification of Courthouse Square,” says Francie Aguilera in an email to the Bohemian. “It beautifully shows, as only Asawa could, the area’s history,” Aguilera continues. “This fountain is part of our cultural heritage.”

EVENTUAL REALITY With GMOs here to stay, it’s time to ask what sort of labels should appear on packages.

Sticking to It GMO labeling: what now?

S

ince the narrow defeat last November of California’s Proposition 37, which would have mandated labeling of genetically modified foods, the sentiment behind the proposition has spread to similarly conceived bills in 26 other states. Proponents of such laws mostly argue that we have a right to know what’s in our food. However,

BY ARI LEVAUX

it’s probably fair to say that for many supporters, labeling would be a consolation prize in place of an outright ban on GMOs. But GMOs are so well established in the United States, and they don’t appear to be going anywhere. And based on the momentum of GMO labeling initiatives on the state level, as well as voluntary labeling programs by retailers like Whole Foods and Trader Joe’s, it’s

looking increasingly like a matter of when, and not if, some kind of nationwide labeling system is created. So instead of fighting about whether or not we need them, it makes sense for both sides to sit down and talk about how labels should look. In an April blog post for Discover magazine online, Ramez Naam argued for GMO food supporters to stop opposing labels: “I support GMOs. And we should label them. We should label them because that is ) 10

Not so fast, says Santa Rosa senior planner Erin Morris. Though the actual fountain would be demolished, Asawa’s art would remain intact. “The plan would be to put the three panels on a new freestanding wall near the fountain’s current location,” she says. The city is accepting public comment on the environmental impact report (EIR) through Sept. 16, including verbal comments at the Sept. 10 city council meeting. (The EIR is available for viewing on the city’s site.) As for reunification of Courthouse Square, “this is an idea that’s been coming up since at least the late ’90s,” says Morris. “Finally, a few years ago, the city council decided to put money toward an EIR.” The project may be years away—but a vote on the EIR may take place as early as January 2014. Santa Rosa councilwoman Julie Combs says she’s open to hearing what the public has to say about the plan. Any decisions, however, always include the bottom line. “Of course,” she says, “the final question is, ‘Where’s the money going to come from?’”—Nicolas Grizzle

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

Ż

In the Gravenstein Train Station

www.boutiquev.net 707.824.1167

Your vision… my resources, dedication and integrity… Together, we can catch your dream.

Realtor Coldwell Banker

Suzanne Wandrei

Eco Green Certified

cell: 707.292.9414 www.suzannewandrei.com

ACUPUNCTURE 15–$35

$

Sliding Scale No Verification Required AFFORDABLE CARE FOR ALL

www.WindsorAcupuncture.com

WINDSOR COMMUNITY

ACUPUNCTURE call 510.326.4209

Knitting K n it ti ng &C Crochet ro c Classes C lass e s

1111 11 4 4th th S Street, t ree t , R Railroad a i l roa d S Square q ua re S Santa anta R Rosa osa 7 707.546.YARN 0 7. 5 4 6 .YA R N CastAwayYarn.com C a s t Awa yYa r n . com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 21-27, 201 3 | BOH E MI A N.COM

6761 Sebastopol Ave Suite 400, Sebastopol

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;27, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

10

s&ULLSERVICEAUTOREPAIR s34!2CERTIFIEDSMOGSTATION s%NERGYEFFICIENTOPERATIONS s2EDUCE 2EUSE 2ECYCLE LEARNMORExGREENTECHAUTOMOTIVECOM With increased awareness of the environment and conservation, GTA delivers responsible, low impact repair alternatives. 5% DISCOUNT on labor for Go Local Rewards Card holders !#,%!.!002/!#(4/!$)249*/"

707.545.7076

501 BARHAM AVE SANTA ROSA -/.n&2)!-n0-s3!4"9!004/.,9 Certified Green Business

GMOs ( 8 OIL O IL CHANGE C A NG E CH SPECIAL S PE EC I A L PLUSA&2%%3EASONAL #HECK UP

$

2499

)NSPECTIONINCLUDES sInspect Brakes s)NSPECT,IGHTS sInspect Tires sInspect Belts & Hoses s)NSPECT!LL&LUID,EVELS s0LUSx2OAD4EST Shop supplies & taxes extra. Most cars/light trucks. Oil change includes up to 5qts of motor oil & new oil filter. Cannot combine with any other offer. Offer expires August 31, 2013.

greentechautomotive.com

the very best thing we can do for public acceptance of agricultural biotech. And we should label them because thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s absolutely nothing to hide.â&#x20AC;? According to most polls, the percentage of Americans that support labeling is in the low to mid 90s. To dismiss such popular sentiment would be to ignore the will of the vast majority. Naam further argues it could have counterintuitive side effects. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At best, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s condescending to consumers, sending a signal that â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;we know better than you what you should eat.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? By ďŹ ghting GMO labeling, he argues, â&#x20AC;&#x153;weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re persuading those who might otherwise have no opinion on GMOs that there must be something to hide.â&#x20AC;? One recent ABC poll showed that 57 percent of shoppers would be less likely to buy products that are labeled GMO, suggesting that a signiďŹ cant chunk of those who support labels arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afraid to eat GMO foods. Other common reasons for the support of labeling, according to polls, include opposition to GMOs for environmental reasons, the â&#x20AC;&#x153;right to knowâ&#x20AC;? and angst over corporate control of the food system. Polls may not ask it, but for many, genetic modiďŹ cation is more symbol than issue, just one part of the industrialized monoculturebased food system from which they wish to disengage. Clearly, those 57 percent of GMO-fearing shoppers would represent a signiďŹ cant cut to the revenue of biotech corporations, and of corporate farmers who use GMO seeds, and it isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t clear to what extent they will be able to make up the difference by squeezing processors, retailers and consumers. Such ďŹ nancial concerns are part of why Big Biotech shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be a part of the labeling discussion: it has too much at stake, and wields undue inďŹ&#x201A;uenceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;outspending the grassroots support of Proposition 37, for example, by ďŹ ve to one. Corporate recusal is something the pro-GMO contingent should get behind, too. Arguably, much of the grief felt by GMO supporters is inspired less by the technology itself than by the way itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been rolled out.

Big Biotechâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history of unpopular moves, including lawsuits against farmers and a one-time opposition to voluntary GMO labels, has long posed a problem to GMO supporters, who often include a little Monsanto-bashing in their proGMO arguments as a means of communicating that Monsanto does not equal GMO. Perhaps these pundits would agree that it makes sense to exclude corporations from organizing and funding discussions about how labels should look. Concerns about corporate behavior and motivation can overshadow the examples of GM crops that exist not to sell more pesticides or otherwise generate corporate revenue. The ringspotresistant rainbow papaya, created at the University of Hawaii and Cornell University, was a publicsector effort that likely saved the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s papaya industry from being wiped out by the virus. Efforts like these are easier to support, and wholesale anti-GMO ideologues should be clear about what, speciďŹ cally, they oppose. An honest discussion about labeling could help tease apart distinct issues often lumped together. Critics of labeling frequently argue that a general label, along the lines of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Contains GMOs,â&#x20AC;? communicates very little, because there are so many different kinds of GMOs. Perhaps the pro-GMO side could help create a system that tells us something meaningful. Ramez Naam told me via email that he thinks GMO labels should be on productsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; back labels, not on the front, as might happen if GMO-food supporters donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come to the table. He also suggested how such labels might readâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Contains ingredients engineered to reduce pesticide useâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;Contains ingredients engineered to increase farm sustainability.â&#x20AC;? Given the apparent inevitability of labeling, a meaningful system should be the goal for advocates on both sides of the issue. Then, GMO skeptics could have their labels, GMO cheerleaders will have their nuance, and the will of the large majority of Americans will prevail. Doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t that sound like how democracy should work?

킬킬 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 21-27, 201 3 | BOH E MI A N.COM

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | AUGUST 21-27, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

ųŴ

A Look Insideâ&#x20AC;Ś

Z]\UOa aVS R]Sa 0 WY`O[ G]UO Z]\UOaaVSR]Sa0WY`O[G]UO bbV`SS]`[]`SbW[Sa^S`eSSYVS` V`S S ]` []`S bW[Sa^S ` eS S Y V S ` Y\SSabOgaab`]\UO\RQO\bOYSbVS Y \ S SabOgaab`]\UO\RQ O\bOYSbVS WW[^OQb]T`c\\W\U[]c\bOW\ [^OQb ]T `c\\W\U [ [ ] c \b O W \ PWYW\USbQÂŹEWbV`SUcZO`0WY`O[ P WYW\U SbQ ÂŹEWbV`S UcZO`0 WY`O[ G ]UO^`OQbWQS @S PS QQ O OZa] G]UO^`OQbWQS@SPSQQOOZa] \ ]bWQS RbVObVS `ab`SaaZSdSZP S UO\ \]bWQSRbVObVS`ab`SaaZSdSZPSUO\ bb]RSQ`SOaSO\RaVSeOaOPZSb] ]RS Q`SOaSO\RaVSeOaOPZSb] aaZSS^PSbbS`Ob\WUVb ZS S ^PSb bS ` Ob \WUVb

North Bay Business ProďŹ les

E]]RT]c` 0`SeW\U 1][^O\g 3f^S`WS\QS4W\S0SS` :]QObSRW\bVS\Se0O`Z]eO`SO ]TASPOab]^]ZbVWa/[S`WQO\ 0`SeS`gO\R@SabOc`O\bWaO T]]RWSaRSZWUVb3\X]gO\ SfbS\aWdSaSZSQbW]\]TR`OTbO\R P]bbZSRPSS`a>OW`WbeWbV SfQSZZS\bT]]Ra]c`QSRZ]QOZZg O\R^`S^O`SRT`SaVSdS`gROg E]]RT]c`eOaT]c\RSRPg ASbVE]]RO\R=ZOdDWS`be] PSS`S\bVcaWOabaeV]RSQWRSR b]bOYSPSS`P`SeW\Ub]O\Se ZSdSZASbVWaP`W\UW\U[]`S bVO\ORSQORS]TP`SeW\UO\R `SabOc`O\bSf^S`WS\QSb]bVS Q][^O\g=ZOdT`][5S`[O\g VOaacQQSaaTcZZgU`]e\aSdS`OZ dS\bc`SaRc`W\UVWaQO`SS`

$%&2S^]b;Q9W\ZSgAb ASPOab]^]Z

%%& !!"" eeee]]RT]c`P`SeW\UQ][

B]USbVS`bVSgO`SPcWZRW\U OP`SeS`gT]QcaSR]\VWUV _cOZWbgVO\RQ`OTbSRPSS` `S^`SaS\bW\UO\W\bS`\ObW]\OZ O``Og]TTZOd]`aO\RabgZSa

@SPSQQOVOa^`OQbWQSR0WY`O[ @ SPSQQO VOa^`OQbWQSR 0WY`O[ G]UOT]`\W\SgSO`aAVSVOaaSS\ G ]UOT]`\W\SgSO`aAVSVOaaSS\ V ]e [cQV 0WY`O[ G]UO VOa VSZ^SR V]e[cQV0WY`O[G]UOVOaVSZ^SR \ ]b]\ZgVS`aSZTPcbSdS` g]\SeV] \]b]\ZgVS`aSZTPcbSdS`g]\SeV] ^ `OQbWQSa O`]c\R VS` AVS VOa aSS\ ^`OQbWQSaO`]c\RVS`AVSVOaaSS\ bbV]aS]TOZZOUSaaWhSaO\ROPWZWbWSa V]aS ]T OZZ OUSaaWhSaO\R OPWZWbWSa PS\STWbU`SObZgT`][O`SUcZO` P S\STWbU`SObZgT`][O`SUcZO` 0 WY`O[ G]UO^`OQbWQS AVS VOa 0WY`O[G]UO^`OQbWQSAVSVOa aaSS\a][O\gabcRS\bab`O\aT]`[ SS\a][O\gabcRS\bab`O\aT]`[ bbVSW`P]RWSaO\R`SRcQSOQVSa VSW` P]RWSaO\R `SRcQS OQVSa O\R^OW\a0WY`O[G]UOW[^`]dSa O \R^OW\a 0WY`O[ G]UO W[^`]dSa aab`S\UbVS\Rc`O\QSTZSfWPWZWbg^]a b`S\UbVS\Rc`O\QSTZSfWPWZWbg^]a bbc`SO\RPOZO\QS7bOZa]`SRcQSa c`SO\R POZO\QS 7b OZa] `SRcQSa aab`SaaO\fWSbgO\R^OW\/\R]T b`SaaO\fWSbgO\R^ ^OW\ /\R]T Q ]c`aSbVS`S¸a bVS eSWUVb Z]aa  BVS Q]c`aSbVS`S¸abVSeSWUVbZ]aaBVS O dS`OUS abcRS\b Pc`\a %# QOZ]`WSa OdS`OUSabcRS\bPc`\a%#QOZ]`WSa @SPSQQOeOaP]`\W\'%&O\RU`Sec^W\ @ S P S QQ O eOa P]`\ W\  '%& O\RU U`Se c^W\ WW\SOQVaSaaW]\7b¸ab]cUVPcbbVS \SOQVaSaaW]\7b ¸ab]cUVPcbbVS ASPOab]^]Z1OZWT]`\WOAVSU`ORcObSRT`][ A S POab]^ ]Z 1 OZWT]`\WO  AV SU`ORcObS R T `][ P S\STWba O`S [O\g 7b Wa RSaWU\SR PS\STWbaO`S[O\g7bWaRSaWU\SR A]\][OAbObSC\WdS`aWbgeWbVORSU`SSW\ A ]\][OAbObSC \WdS `aWb geWbVO ORS U`S SW\ bb]e]`YSdS`g[caQZSZWUO[S\b ]e]`YSdS` g[caQZSZWUO[S\b 9W\SaW]Z]UgO\R>agQV]Z]Ug6S`^OaaW]\Wa 9 W\ SaW]Z]UgO\R >agQV]Z]Ug 6 S `^OaaW]\ Wa bbS\R]\]`UO\O\RUZO\RW\bVS S\R]\]`UO\O\RU U Z O \ R W \ bV S TTWb\Saa\cb`WbW]\O\RVSOZbV Wb\ Saa \cb`WbW]\ O\ RV SOZbV  P ]RgeVWZS VSZ^W\Ubb] ]fgUS\ObS P]RgeVWZSVSZ^W\Ub]]fgUS\ObS VSPZ]]RO\RW\Q`SOaSS\S`UgTZ]e @SPSQQOS\X]gaaeW[[W\U[]c\bOW\PWYW\U @ S P S QQ OS \X]gaaeW[[W\U [] c\bOW\PWYW\U  bbVSPZ]]RO\RW\Q`SOaSS\S`UgTZ]e bbV`]cUV]cbSOQVagabS[G]cR]\¸b V`]cUV]cb SOQV agabS[ G]c R]\¸b aaYWW\Ua\]eP]O`RW\U`]QYQZW[PW\UYWbS YWW\U a\]eP ]O`RW\U `]QY QZW[PW\U YWbS V OdSb]PSO\ObVZSbSb S ]^O` bWQW^ObS VOdSb]PSO\ObVZSbSb]^O`bWQW^ObS P]O`RW\USbQ¬a^]`ba]TOZZYW\Ra P ]O`RW\U SbQ ¬a^ ]` b a]TOZZYW\ Ra  WW\0WY`O[G]UO>S]^ZS]TOZZOUSa \ 0WY`O[ G]UO >S]^ZS ]T OZZ OUSa /TbS`RSab`]gW\UVS`ZSTbY\SSX]W\bT`][ / T bS `RSab`]gW\UV S`ZST bY\S SX]W\bT `][ O \R TWb\Saa ZSdSZa QO\ PS\STWb O\RTWb\SaaZSdSZaQO\PS\STWb ]dS`caSOT`WS\RW\b`]RcQSRVS`b]0WY`O[ ] dS `caS OT `WS \R W\b`]RcQS R V S ` b] 0 WY`O[ U `SObZgT`][bVSQZOaaSa3OQV U`SObZgT`][bVSQZOaaSa3OQV G]UOAVSeOaO[OhSRObeVOb^`OQbWQW\U G ]UO AVSeOaO[OhS RObeVOb^`OQbWQW\U aabcRS\bWaS\Q]c`OUSRb]^`]QSSR bcRS\b Wa S\Q]c`OUSR b]^`]QSSR 0WY`O[G]UORWRT]`VS`P]Rg6S`Y\SS 0 WY`O[G]UORWRT]`VS `P] Rg6 6 S `Y\S S O bVWa]`VS`]e\^OQS Q  ObVWa]`VS`]e\^OQS XX]W\baZ]eZgPSQO[Sab`]\US`O\Rab]^^SR ]W\b aZ]eZgPS Q O[ S ab`]\US ` O\R ab]^^S R S PS QQ O eS \b b] ] bSOQVS` ` b`OW\W\U U @SPSQQOeS\bb]bSOQVS`b`OW\W\U bbV`]PPW\UeWbV^OW\6S`P]RgaOZWU\[S\b V`]PPW\UeWbV^ V OW\ 6 6 S `P P]Rg aO a ZWU \ [ S \b  @ WW\/^`WZ \ / ^ `WZ    AVS OPa]ZcbSZg AVSOPa]ZcbSZg ^]abc`SPOZO\QSO\Rab`S\UbVW[^`]dSR ^ ]abc`S POZO\QS O\R ab`S \UbV W[^`]dS R ZZ]dSabSOQVW\U0WY`O[G]UOO\R ]dSa bSOQVW\U0 WY`O[G]UO O\R WW\Q`SRWPZg6S`ObVZSbWQOPWZWbWSaU`SObZg \Q`S RWPZg6 S `ObVZSbWQOPWZWbWSaU`SObZg [ ]bWdObW\UabcRS \b a b] abOgVSOZbVg []bWdObW\UabcRS\bab]abOgVSOZbVg WW\Q`SOaSRW\OZZ]TbVSa^]`baaVS^ZOga/a \Q`SOaS RW\OZZ]TbV Sa^]` b aaVS^ZOga / a O \Rab`]\U  O\Rab`]\U

#

EWZa]\AbAO\bO@]aO EWZa] ]\AbAO\bO@]aO

%%#"#'$" % %#" "#'$" eeePWY`O[g]UO]TaO\bO`]aOQ][ eeePWY Y`O[g]UO]TaO\bO`]aOQ][

Four F our Paws Paw ws Pet Pet Ranch Ranch Â? Aw ar d winning boarding, Â?Award boar di ng , daycare d y c ar e & grooming da gr o Â?5+ Â? 5+ acres acr es of Ć&#x2030;ĹŻÄ&#x201A;Ç&#x2021;Ç&#x2021;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x161;Ć?Î&#x2DC;ÄŽÄ&#x17E;ĹŻÄ&#x161;Ć?ĨŽĆ&#x152;running Ć&#x2030;ĹŻÄ&#x201A; Ç&#x2021;Ç&#x2021; Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152; Ä&#x161;Ć? Î&#x2DC; ÄŽÄ&#x17E; Ä&#x17E;ĹŻÄ&#x161;Ć? Ĩ Ĺ˝Ć&#x152; runni & playing Â?^Ć&#x161;Ä&#x201A;ÄŤŽŜͲĆ?Ĺ?Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;24/7 playy Â? ^Ć&#x161; Ä&#x201A; ÄŤ ŽŜͲĆ?Ĺ?Ć&#x161; Ä&#x17E; 24/7 with wi th supervised sup per vised pla Â?WÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ä?Ä&#x17E;ĨƾůÄ?ŽƾŜĆ&#x161;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x2021;Ć?Ä&#x17E;ĆŤĹśĹ? Â? W Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ä?Ä&#x17E; ĨƾůÄ? ŽƾŜ Ć&#x161;Ć&#x152; Ç&#x2021;Ć?Ä&#x17E; ĆŤĹśĹ? Â?^Ĺ˝Ä?Ĺ?Ä&#x201A;ĹŻĹ?Ç&#x152;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x;ŽŜÄ&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;Personalized Â? ^Ĺ˝Ä?Ĺ?Ä&#x201A;ĹŻĹ?Ç&#x152; Ä&#x201A; Ć&#x;ŽŜÄ&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161; P er sonaliiz ed care c ar e for for your y our pet pe t Â?Special Â? Special needs pets pe ts welcomed w elc om med Â? P er sonaliz ed and Group Gr oup training tr aining a a v ailaab Â?Personalized available Â?Ć&#x2030;Ĺ˝Ć&#x152;Ć&#x;ŽŜŽĨÄ&#x201A;ĹŻĹŻĆ&#x2030;Ć&#x152;Ĺ˝Ä?Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x161;Ć?Ĺ?Ĺ˝Ä&#x17E;Ć?Ć&#x161;Ĺ˝Ć?ĆľĆ&#x2030;Ć&#x2030;Ĺ˝Ć&#x152;Ć&#x161;ŽƾŜĆ&#x161;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x2021;Ć?Ĺ?Ä&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ZÄ&#x17E;Ć?Ä?ĆľÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;ŜŽŜͲĆ&#x2030;Ć&#x152;ŽĎĆ&#x161; Â? Ć&#x2030;Ĺ˝Ć&#x152;Ć&#x;ŽŜŽĨÄ&#x201A;ĹŻĹŻĆ&#x2030;Ć&#x152;Ĺ˝Ä?Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x161;Ć?Ĺ?Ĺ˝Ä&#x17E;Ć?Ć&#x161;Ć&#x161;Ĺ˝Ć?ĆľĆ&#x2030;Ć&#x2030;Ĺ˝Ć&#x152;Ć&#x161;ŽƾŜĆ&#x161;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x2021;Ć?Ĺ?Ä&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ZÄ&#x17E;Ć?Ä?ĆľÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ĺś ŜŽŜͲĆ&#x2030;Ć&#x152;ŽĎĆ&#x161; ZÄ&#x17E;Ć?Ä?ĆľÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ä&#x161;Ĺ˝Ć&#x2030;Ć&#x;ŽŜÄ&#x17E;ĹśĆ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Í&#x2DC;So pett plays another on one ZÄ&#x17E;Ć?Ä?ĆľÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ä&#x161;Ĺ˝Ć&#x2030; Ć&#x2030;Ć&#x;ŽŜÄ&#x17E;ĹśĆ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ć&#x152;Í&#x2DC;Í&#x2DC; So S while your y pe ne is saved!

Wee iinvite W nvite you you u to to stop stop by by and ttake ake a tour. tourr.

www.fourpawspetranch.com w w w.fourpawspetranch.ccom 707-542-3766 3410 Guerneville G Guerne vi lle Road R oad Santa San t a R Rosa, osa, CA 95 95401 5401

ųž NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 21-27, 201 3 | BOH E MI A N.COM

EVObWaÂľ4]]RaQO^W\UÂś4]]RaQO^W\UWaO^]b]Tab`OePS``WSa]\ g]c`^ObW]

4]]RaQO^W\UA]\][O1]c\bgWa VS`Sb]VSZ^g]cRSaWU\W\abOZZ 4]]RaQO^W\UWaO\O^^ZSb`SSW\g]c`gO`R O\R[OW\bOW\g]c`]e\^S`a]\OZ T]]RaQO^SEVSbVS`g]cXcab\SSR 4]]RaQO^W\UWaaWf`OWaSRUO`RS\PSRa VSZ^USbbW\UabO`bSR\SSRVSZ^eWbV ab`ObSUWQOZZg^ZOQSRbV`]cUV]cbg]c`gO`R bVSRW`bge]`Y]`eO\ba][S]\Sb] 4]]RaQO^W\UWag]c`]e\^S`a]\OZ1A/ bOYSQO`S]TbVSeV]ZSbVW\UeVWZS 4]]RaQO^W\UWabVScZbW[ObSW\SObW\UZ]QOZ g]cS\X]gbVSP]c\bg]TbVSVO`dSab 4]]RaQO^W\UA]\][O1]c\bgWabVS 4]]RaQO^W\UWaT]]RaSQc`Wbg O\aeS` 4]]RaQO^W\UWaeVObSdS`g]ceO\bWbb] 1OZZb]ROgb]RSaWU\g]c`TOZZO\R PSeVS\g]cW\QZcRSSRWPZS^ZO\bW\UaW\ eW\bS`UO`RS\]`b]^ZO\T]`\Sfb g]c`ZO\RaQO^S a^`W\U

%%"'"$!!

Louis Thomas is fine men's clothing on a first name basis. For over 60 years we have specialized in bringing customers stylish and well made gentleman's apparel that fits the bay area lifestyle. We also create made-to-measure suits and custom dress shirts with a wide variety of gentlemanly accessories.

Peace in Medicine provides safe access to quality medicine for qualified patients in a professional and friendly environment. Peace in Medicine has successfully established itself as a role model for medical cannabis dispensaries and healing centers nationally. We at Peace in Medicine advocate and support a proactive and holistic approach to health management. In this spirit, we offer numerous services including therapeutic massage, acupuncture, guest speakers, peer counselors and empowering educational materials.

Look for long and short sleeve sportshirts from Georg Roth of Germany, fine gauge knits from Toscano of Italy and silk shirts from Burma Bibas. For your relaxed lifestyle we offer Agave Jeans, Alberto Denim, Tori Richard and Tommy Bahama shirts and slacks. Dress for success with Jack Victor and Petrocelli suits and sport coats with elegant shirtings by Haupt.

Peace in Medicine is a non-profit mutual benefit corporation with a unique business model firmly based in three overarching tenets: the importance of local support and supporting locally; the belief in patient access to alternative medicine, information and education; and an unwavering adherence to environmental integrity. Recognizing the importance of community, we reinvest a significant portion of any surplus income into local causes, community services, charities and social movements. With two locations in Sonoma County, it is easy to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Find Peace in Medicine.â&#x20AC;? Downtown Santa Rosa 1061 North Dutton Ave @ West College M, T, F, Sat 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm W, Th 12pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;7pm, Closed Sun

Downtown Sebastopol 6771 Sebastopol Ave @ Hwy12 Mâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;7pm Sun 12pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;7pm

707.843.3227

707.823.4206

Best Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Store

707-765-1715

150 Kentucky Street, Petaluma Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm, Sun 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4pm

www.louisthomas.com

415-924-1715

211 Corte Madera Town Center, Corte Madera Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Fri 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8pm, Sat 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm, Sun 12â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm

Dining Nadav Soroker

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 21–27, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

14

ALOHA David Nicholas at Ono’z, where food is served ‘island style’ on Guernevlle’s Main Street.

Spamalicious Ono’z brings Hawaiian flavors to Guerneville BY JESSICA DUR TAYLOR

J

ocelyn Nelson’s blood may run Filipino, Chinese and Spanish, but make no mistake: she is Hawaiian, born and bred. Growing up in Honolulu, she helped her mother in the family okazuya, a Japanese delicatessen that serves ready-made food. Tired of cleaning steam tables, she became a salesgirl when she turned 16, vowing never again to work with food.

Last June, Nelson broke her promise when she and husband Tim opened the Hawaiian restaurant Ono’z (translation: “delicious”), the latest addition to Guerneville’s gastronomically overhauled Main Street. “My mom is in heaven, cracking up laughing,” Nelson tells me over the phone recently. Chatty and forthcoming, Nelson first came to Sonoma County thanks to Tim, “a third-generation river rat” who grew up in San Francisco and spent his summers on his grandmother’s walnut farm in Forestville.

For the Nelsons, life’s twists and turns are often filled with fateful significance. Had Tim’s speech course not been canceled, he might never have landed in Jocelyn’s drama class at Kap‘iolani Community College in Honolulu, where the two met in the ’70s. Their decision to leave Hawaii was fueled in part by rock fever, and in part because they were spooked after two unrelated murders left them grieving the death of a close friend and having witnessed a brutal road-rage shooting. And the decision to open a restaurant? “I had all this

Hawaiian artwork and nowhere to put it!” Nelson says, laughing. A few other signs pointed the way: they’d sold their construction business, left San Francisco for Guerneville and were itching to start something new. Tired of “driving half an hour to get some decent fast food,” they opened a place similar to the delicatessen of Jocelyn’s childhood, where much of the food is prepared in advance. There are no plates; food is served “local island” style, in biodegradable to-go containers meant to be enjoyed at the beach or the river. The menu reflects Hawaii’s cultural melting pot of bold Pacific Rim flavors. The barbecue pork, served Filipino-style, is marinated in white vinegar, garlic and sugar, and offset with spicy pickled peppers. The Chicken Dad’s Way barbecue, meanwhile, enjoys a marinade of French dressing and white wine, and a garnish of mango relish. Both are served with rice and salad (either the light spring mix with lime vinaigrette or a creamy olive-and-celery-flecked macaroni) for just 10 bucks. For a taste of Japan, there’s the cold and crispy ramen noodle salad with mandarin oranges and green onions in a rice wine vinaigrette ($8), and Korea is represented by its fermented favorite, kimchi, which joins Spam in a delightful spicy fried rice ($10). “Spam is our steak,” says Nelson, explaining that the canned ham “never went away” after it was popularized on the island during the lean years of World War II. “We have jalapeno-flavored Spam, garlic Spam, hot and spicy Spam. We have definitely raised the bar with Spam.” Perhaps the most iconic menu item, however, is the Hawaiian shaved ice ($4.50–$6.50), which comes in a dizzying array of flavors, including guava, lychee, papaya, coffee and even dill pickle. Thirty years after leaving Oahu, Nelson still misses the place she will always call home. “Cooking keeps me connected to Hawaii,” she tells me. “In Hawaii, when you’re happy, you’re eating. And when you’re sad—you’re eating.” Ono’z, 16218 Main St., Guerneville. 707.604.7150.

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OMA CO U N TY Belly Californian. $$. When he’s not serving up crispy pork belly or healthy quinoa salads, owner/chef Gray Rollin tours with rock bands like Linkin Park as a personal chef. Lunch and dinner daily. 523 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.526.5787

Big Bottom Market Deli. $$. A stellar eatery in a modest storefront serving dual purposes: a market for local products, and an excellent comfort food and sandwich joint. Excellent biscuits and gravy, salads, cheeses, the works. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 16228 Main St, Guerneville. 707.604.7295.

Casino Bar & Grill California. $. Chef Mark Malicki is a true Sonoma County star, serving up a changing menu of locally sourced, inspired creations. Unpretentious, creative and affordable, Casino is a whispered-about landmark among locals in the know. Dinner nightly. 17000 Bodega Hwy, Bodega. 707.876.3185.

El Coqui Puerto Rican. $-$$. Authentic and delicious Puerto Rican home cooking. Plan on lunching early–the place fills up fast. Lunch and dinner daily. 400 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.542.8868.

Hamburger Ranch & Pasta Farm American. $. Old-fashioned, informal mom’n’-pop roadhouse. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 31195 N Redwood Hwy, Cloverdale. 707.894.5616.

Pongo’s Kitchen & Tap Thai. $$. Family-owned and operated with superfresh ingredients and a full kids’ menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 701 Sonoma Mt Pkwy, Petaluma. 707.765.9800.

Sea Thai. $$. An oasis of exotic Bangkok with some truly

soul-satisfying dishes. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Fri; dinner, Sat. 5000 Petaluma Blvd S. 707.766.6633.

Toyo Japanese Grill Japanese. $$$. Well-crafted traditional Japanese with some modern extras like deep-fried mashed potato croquettes with mayo. Lunch and dinner daily. 3082 Marlow Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.8871.

Willi’s Seafood & Raw Bar Seafood. $$. Delicious preparations of the freshest fish and shellfish. Lunch and dinner daily; dinner, Mon-Sat. 403 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.9191.

Willi’s Wine Bar Small plates/wine bar. $$$. Bistro dishes and extensive wine list. A terrific place to dine before a show at the Wells Fargo Center. Lunch, Tues-Sat; dinner daily. 4404 Old Redwood Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.526.3096.

Willow Wood Market Cafe Mediterranean. $$. Homey, eclectic foods. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; brunch, Sun. 9020 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.823.0233.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

MARIN CO U N T Y

M&G’s Burgers & Beverages American. $. The ultimate in American cuisine. Crispy fries, good burgers and friendly locals chowing down. Lunch and dinner daily. 2017 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. 415.454.0655.

Discover Sea Ranch Lodge and try

everything that is new from our recent renovation. Indulge at Black Point Grill with delicious fare from local ingredients and an award-winning regional wine list.

Pine Cone Diner Eclectic. $$. Funky diner meets upscale bistro. Ambitious dishes, like cherry-wood-smoked pork loin with lavender gastrique, and steak au poivre with peppercorn brandy sauce are served in homey atmosphere. Breakfast and lunch daily. Closed Mon. 60 Fourth St, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1536. Sol Food Puerto Rican. $. Flavorful, authentic and homestyle at this Puerto Rican eatery, which is as hole-in-thewall as they come. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. San Rafael locations: 811 Fourth St. 415.451.4765. 901 & 903 Lincoln Ave. 415.256.8903. Mill Valley location: 401 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. Sorella Caffe Italian. $$. The embodiment of Fairfax casual, with delicious, high-quality food that lacks pretension. Dinner, TuesSun. 107 Bolinas Rd, Farifax. 415.258.4520. Tommy’s Wok Chinese. $-$$. Tasty and filling Chinese fare without the greasy weigh-down. Nice vegetarian selections, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun; closed Tues. 3001 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.5818. Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N T Y

Citrus & Spice Thai/ Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices, and a great mango-duck summer roll. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.

Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487.

Frantoio Italian. $$-$$$.

Alexis Baking Co Cafe.

Perennial winner of SF Chron’s “100 Best,” Frantoio also produces all of its own olive oil.

$-$$. Alexis excels at baked goods and offers ) killer breakfasts

16

707.785.2371 SeaRanchLodge.com 60 Sea Walk Drive, The Sea Ranch, CA 95497

@kËjc`b\EGI¿ @kËjc`b\EGI¿ fe8Z`[ f e 8Z`[ ) G GFC@K@:J) FC@K@:J) C@M<DLJ@: C@M<D < DLJ@: GFG:LCKLI< ) :FD<;P) :FD<;P) G FG:LCK KLI< < ) NFIC;=8DFLJ>L<JKJ NFIC;=8DFLJ>L<JKJ

*K *KF-#N<<B;8P * KFF -#N<<B; # N<<B;8P 8P 8=K<IEFFEJ 8 =K<IEFFE =K<I EFFEJ FE(*,'8DBJIF F E (*, *,' 8D BJI BJIF &&A8OFE;I@M< A8O 8 OFE;I@M< F E; I@M< KfY\Zfd\X; i`m\jgfejfi KfY\Zfd\X;i`m\jgfejfi ZfekXZk:Xk_pIXkkfXk Z fekXZ k :Xk_pIXk kf Xk ZXk_p%iXkkf7pX_ff%Zfd Z Xk_p% iXk kf7pX_ff%Zfd

N@E N@E<N<;E<J;8P N @E <N<;E< < N<; E < J; J ;8P <M<IPN<<B8K, < M < IP N M<I N<< <<B 8K , N<J@G#N<C8L>?#N<C<8IE N <J J@G @G#N # N< C C8L>? 8L>? #N< # N< C<8I C< 8I E 

unwind on the coast Happy Hour 3-5 Daily

Assorted Indian snacks, Mixed Platters $6 Samosas $3. All Bottled Beer $3

Authentic Indian Cuisine & select American Summer Fare

Bombay style Indian Chinese entrees also Open for Lunch & Dinner 11:30am–9pm

Sizzling Tandoor II 9960 HWY 1 s 707-865-0625

SSanta a n ta Rosa Rosa

Sebastopol S e b a s to p o l

5528.3278 2 8 . 3 2 7 8 823.7492 8 2 3 .74 9 2

15 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 21–27, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Dining

Dinner daily. 152 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.289.5777.

Dining ( 15

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;27, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

16 Saturday, August 17 Korbel is everyone's 11:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;4pm favorite winery tour! Spend the Spend the day day at at Korbel Korbel C h a m p ag n e C ellars...taste Champagne Cellars...taste our o ur d delightful e li g ht f u l C California a l i fo r n i a champagnes, c hampagnes, tour tour o our ur h istoric wi ner y aand nd ga rdens historic winery gardens, aand nd e enjoy njoy a delicious delicious llunch unc h aatt our our gourmet gourmet Delicatessen. Delicatessen Complimentary C omplimentar y tours tours and a nd ttasting a s ting d aily. daily.

Korbel Tour Korbel Tour Schedule: S c he dule : MMondayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Friday: ondayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Friday : 111,1, 112, 2, 11,, 22,, 33,, 33:45 : 45 WWeekends eekend s & Holidays: Holida y s : 111,1, 112, 2 , 112:45, 2: 45, 11:30, : 30 , 22:15, :15 , 3, 3, 3:45 3 : 45 GGarden ar den Tour Tour ((Tuesâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sun/Aprâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Oct): Tuesâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sun / A prâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Oc t) : 11:00 : 00 and and 3:00 3 : 00 WWine ine SShop hop aand nd DDeli eli aare r e oopen pen ddaily ail y ffrom r om 110amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4:30pm 0 amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4 : 30 pm

and sensible soup-â&#x20AC;&#x2122;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;-salad lunches. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1517 Third St, Napa. 707.258.1827.

Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.4870. Brannanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grill California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Fazerratiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the gameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

French Laundry

PPlease lease ccall all 7707.824.7316 07. 8 24 .7316 oorr vvisit isit : WWW.KORBEL.COM W W W. KOR B E L .C O M

113250 3250 River River Road, Road, Guerneville G u e r n e v ille CCelebrate elebrate responsibly. responsibly.

Definitive California Cuisine. $$$$. What else is there to say? Chef Thomas Kellerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s institution is among the very best restuarants in the country. 6640 Washington St., Yountville. 707.944.2380.

Gilwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1320 Napa Town Center, Napa. 707.253.0409. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

Italian Comfort Food â&#x20AC;Ś cooked to perfection

Gottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

Di ne with w ith us u s soon. s o on . Dine    Č&#x2C6;  Č&#x2C6;    Č&#x2C6; Č&#x2C6; 

Â&#x2014;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Č&#x201A;Â&#x2014;Â?Č&#x2C6;ÍŁÍ&#x153;ͣǤͤ͢Í?Ǥͼͥͣ͠  Â&#x2014;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022; Č&#x201A;Â&#x2014; Â?Č&#x2C6;ÍŁÍ&#x153; ͣǤ ͤ ͢Í?Ǥͼͥ Í ÍŁ ͼͤͼÍ&#x153;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2030;Â&#x192; Â&#x2122;Â&#x203A;ÇĄÂ&#x2021;Â&#x201E;Â&#x192;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2018;Â&#x17D; ÍĽ ͤ ÍĽ Í&#x153;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2030;Â&#x192; Â&#x2122; Â&#x203A;ÇĄ ÇĄ Â&#x2021; Â&#x201E; Â&#x192; Â&#x2022; Â&#x2013; Â&#x2018; Â&#x2019; Â&#x2018;Â&#x17D;

La Toque Restaurant

Â&#x2026;Â&#x2026;Â&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2026;Â&#x17D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;ǤÂ&#x2026;Â&#x2018;Â? Â&#x192; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2026;Â&#x17D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2020; Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;ǤÂ&#x2026;Â&#x2018;Â?

Thai House

3883 Airway Drive Ste 145, Santa Rosa 707.528.3095 www.chloesco.com Mâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;F, 8amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm

French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner daily. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Miguelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mexican-

angez Bien! Lunch specials start at $7.95 Includes soup or salad Mon-Fri only

Open 7 days a week Sun-Th 11:30-9:30 Fri-Sat 11:30-10:00 525 4th Street(Upstairs) 707.526.3939

Quiche Lorraine Squares Mini Croque Monsieurs Mini Savory Croissant Tray Pissaladiere Crotini Full Catering Menu Available

Californian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast,lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $.

SMALL BITES

Four Play With over 50 restaurants participating, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not possible to list all that the Taste of Petaluma has to offer. But for a sneak preview, here are some appe-teasers. Speakeasy, a newcomer to the event, offers a cold melon soup shooter topped with crispy prosciutto and microgreens. Once the salty meat takes hold, the sweet, cool melon soup calms the aggressive flavor, making for an interesting twist on the classic combination. At fellow newcomer Social Club, chunks of applewood-smoked pork shoulder are crisped up and garnished with heirloom tomato salad, busting with flavor at the peak of the season. Corkscrew has a Europe-meets-Sonoma vibe, with a gorgeous bar fashioned to look like a flayed-out wine barrel. The pulledpork sliders are fine, but the chocolate truffles are divineâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;especially when paired with a deep, dark red wine. Andyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kitchen & Sushi Bar is more than just a sushi bar, though the satisfying deep-fried unagi, crab and avocado roll topped with unagi sauce (pictured) might indicate no need to expand the menu beyond its namesake. Andyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is also serving an interesting take on fries: mini corn sticks with sweet Thai chili sauce. They look like lumpy french fries, but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re actually corn kernels stuffed into wonton wrappers. Sweet, salty and fried just right. Taste of Petaluma takes place Saturday, Aug. 24, at restaurants throughout downtown Petaluma. Check-in at Putnam Plaza. 129 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. 11:30am. $40. 707.763.8920.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Nicolas Grizzle

Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch and dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.252.9250.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by

subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.251.1900.

Wineries

17

S O N OM A CO U N T Y Cotati Corner Fine Wines What a funky college town like Cotati needs in a wine shop is friendly, unpretentious, with a small but unique selection of under $20 wines. And that they have. Thursday tastings. 1818 La Plaza, Ste. 106, Cotati. Open Tuesday–Saturda; tastings, Thursday–Friday, 5–8pm. 707.793.9357.

Gourmet au Bay Seafood takes to wine even better than water. Wine bar and retail shop offers flights served on custom wooden “surfboards,” artisan cheese and cracker plate, and liberal bring-your-own picnic policy. Cold crab cakes and sparkling wine at sunset on the bay? Sounds like a date. 913 Hwy. 1, Bodega. Wine surfing, $8. 707.875.9875. Inman Family Wines Unique, single-vineyard Russian River Pinot Noir is a good reason to visit Inman Family Wine’s new winery and tasting room in genteel vineyard location; don’t miss the Thorn Road Ranch Pinot. 3900 Piner Road, Santa Rosa. Open 11am–4pm Thursday through Sunday. 707.293.9576.

Ram’s Gate Winery Fireplaces blaze away, ceilings soar—if the vibe is more executive retreat than tasting room, consider that a positive. Pairings from oysters to albondigas; crispy cured pork belly to seared gulf shrimp; goat cheese tart to nicoise salad. Great views, too. 28700 Arnold Drive, Sonoma. Open daily, 10am–6pm. 707.721.8700.

Sonoma Valley Portworks Although it’s a small-time crime to call a wine “port” what wasn’t made in Portugal, it’s all on the level here at the home of DECO California Port. Everybody gets a button: “Lick my glass!” 613 Second St., Petaluma. Thursday–Monday, noon to 5pm. No fee. 707.769.5203.

Unti Vineyards Very friendly and casual with an emphasis on young Italianstyle wines. Yum. 4202 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. By appointment. 707.433.5590.

Windy Hill Estate Like a riddle bottled up in a mystery, it’s all but hidden in plain sight above the 101 freeway’s Cotati Grade. Impressive view; mixed bag of low-alcohol, low-priced Pinots from quirky winery. 1010 W. Railroad Ave., Cotati. Saturday–Sunday noon–5pm. $5 fee. 707.795-3030.

N A PA CO U N TY Bouchaine Vineyards Venerable producer of estategrown Burgundian style wine in the rustic wind-scraped hills of Carneros. Pinot Noir and Pinot Meuier with a coolclimate, cherry-skin crispness that nearly crunches in the mouth, and Chardonnay with a “mouth of butter.” Patio service in fair weather, cozy hearthside tasting in cooler days; good-humored hospitality throughout. 1075 Buchli Station Road, Napa. Open daily, 10:30am–4pm; tasting fee $5. 707.252.9065.

Chateau Boswell Winery (WC) This small, boutique winery is open by appointment only, selling most its wine directly via post to club members. 3468 Silverado Trail, Napa. 707.963.5472.

Domaine Carneros Inspired by Taittinger’s Château de la Marquetterie of Champagne, this house of premium sparkling wine is a hard-to-miss landmark on the Carneros Highway. Enjoy a private Balcony Package for special occasions or taste sparkling and still wines paired with artisan cheese and caviar with the masses. Luxury bubbly Le Rêve offers a bouquet of hoary yeast and crème brûlée that just slips away like a dream. 1240 Duhig Road (at Highway 12/121), Napa. Wine flights $15; also available

Balverne Wines

by the glass or bottle. Open 10am–5:45pm. 800.716.2788.

Beak to the future: Windsor Oaks relaunches brand from the ’80s

Eagle & Rose Estate

BY JAMES KNIGHT

(WC) Tours of this small winery are led either by the winery owner or the winemaker himself. 3000 St. Helena Hwy. N., Napa. By appointment. 707.965.9463.

Krupp Brothers Estates The story of Stagecoach Vineyards is of extremes: two miles end-toend. One billion pounds of rock extracted. Seventy wineries buy the fruit; the Krupps release 2,000 cases including Black Bart Marsanne. 3265 Soda Canyon Road, Napa. Tours by appointment, $25. 707.260.0514. Tasting at A Dozen Vintners, 3000 Hwy. 29, St. Helena. Daily, 10am-5pm. 707.967.0666.

Round Pond Estate Estate Cabernet Sauvignon and Sauvignon Blanc served tableside on the terrace with scrumptious food pairings. Who can’t imagine cozying up next to the big gas-burning hearth, watching the sun set and savoring that Rutherford dusk? 875 Rutherford Road, Rutherford. Tastings by appointment daily, 11am to 4pm. $25. 888.302.2575.

Rubicon Estate Despite the celebrity hype, the wine is award-winning. 1991 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 800.782.4226.

Saintsbury A contrarian enterprise in the 1970s, now a hallowed hall of Carneros Pinot Noir. Visitors may linger under shade trees in fair weather or sit down for a serious tasting adjacent the office. 1500 Los Carneros Ave., Napa. Monday– Saturday, by appointment. 707.252.0592. Storybook Mountain Vineyards (WC) Jerry and Sigrid Seps and a few likeminded winemakers founded Zinfandel Advocates and Producers (ZAP), through which they continue to proselytize on behalf of “America’s heritage grape.” 3835 Hwy. 128, Calistoga. By appointment. 707.942.5310.

S

oaring across the Balverne label, a red-tailed hawk catches an updraft, wings spread wide. It wasn’t always so. Some 30 years back in the day, said red-tail was depicted in steep descent, talons grasping for prey—or the words “ Cabernet Sauvignon.” Surely a fine symbol for the over-leveraged project’s steep decline into receivership, as is the newer, gentler version of Balverne’s rising from the ashes. The question is not, hey, aren’t you talking about a phoenix, not a red-tailed hawk? The question is, hey, why relaunch a failed wine brand? Tricky question. The short and awkward answer, according to Windsor Oaks Vineyard proprietor Bob Stein, is because they were often confused with a different, highly successful brand. Stein, a creditor who ended up with the property in 1992, had no previous designs on owning a winery. To his credit, he traded in luxury home-site development rights for a Forever Wild designation from the Sonoma County Open Space District, while estate general manager Douglas Lumgair modernized the vineyards. Today, 17 cultivars are grown in 50 blocks on 225 rolling acres, closely monitored by a viticulturist and a cadre of interns. With such variety, “it’s almost like a party!” says winemaker Margaret Davenport, who was invited to relaunch Balverne (much of the yield is sold to other wineries, who make some 40 Windsor Oaks vineyard designates) along with Doug Nalle, who launched the first vintage in 1979 as a young gun out of UC Davis. After running a big show like Clos du Bois, as Davenport once did, “you get to try out a lot of coopers, and it makes a big difference,” she remarks. Indeed, the 2012 Russian River Valley Estate Reserve Chardonnay ($40) was barrel fermented but doesn’t hit you over the head with buttered lumber. Golden Delicious, candied lime, dried tropical fruit overtones lead to a cool, substantial palate of cider, with caramel in a supporting role. Also deftly played, the 2012 Estate Unoaked Chardonnay ($25) does not scream “ green apple” but rather whispers “pear cocktail” and “blanc de blancs.” Just looking at a map, you wouldn’t think to plant Pinot here. But with orange zest steeped in bright, early-ripeness Bing cherry, the 2012 Estate Reserve Pinot Noir ($50) is a silky, spicy, pretty thing. Still in barrel, the 2012 Red Blend promises serious sipping for the Cab crew. First, it needs a proprietary name, and they’re open to suggestions. Maybe they’ll take yet another cue from their mascot: “Scree-yah!” Windsor Oaks Vineyard and Winery, 10810 Hillview Road, Windsor. By appointment only. 707.433.3810.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 21–27, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

18 NORTH NOR TH BAY B A Y BOHEMIAN BOHE EMI A N | AUGUST A UGU S T 21–27, 21 – 27, 2 2013 0 13 | BOHEMIAN.COM BO H E M I AN . C O M

Rebirthing the Blues Every time the local blues scene hits a crossroads, it finds its way home BY JONAH RASKIN

CLARKSDALE AND BACK When he’s not sojourning in Mississippi to discover new artists, Bill Bowker is the most recognizable voice on blues radio in Sonoma County.

E

very v ery Sunday Sunday evening, evening, whether wheth e er the the sky’s sky’s blue blue or ccloudy, loudy y, Bill Bo wkerr, 69, bl asts th ues fr om Stud io Bowker, blasts thee bl blues from Studio “H H” at the the KRSH (95.9 (95.9 FM), FM), M the the station that that has has “H” llong lo ong played pllayed d the th he moody, moody dy, soulful soulful lf l music that th hat began b an beg Mississsippi and and traveled traveled north north and a d west an west to M emphis, in Mississippi Memphis, Chicago, Detroit D oit and Detr and California, California, morphing morphing all all the the way. way. Chicago,

““On On th thee K KRSH, RSH, Blues Blues Bowkerr,” he he says, say ys, hi with Bowker,” hiss m outh practically practtically ki ssing th mouth kissing thee micr ophone as as he he selects selects yet yet microphone an other tun by Bobby Bobby “Blue” “Blue” another tunee by Bl and, who who died d thi summer Bland, thiss summer att his his home home outside outside t id Memphis Memphi his at the the age age off 83. 83. Van Van Morrison, Morrison, th Band and and the the Grateful Grateful De ad thee Band Dead pop ularized Bl and’s big gest hits, popularized Bland’s biggest ssuch uch aass “It’ y Lif fe, Ba by” an d “It’ss M My Life, Baby” and “F arther Up Up the the Road.” Road.” An d ain’ “Farther And ain’tt th at th ay it’s it’s always always been with that thee w way th blues; somebody’s som o ebody’s aalways lways thee blues;

covering th covering thee origin originals als an and dm making akin k g a mint. F or two two h ours ttonight, onight, For hours B Bo wker’s in bl ues h eaven. S o Bowker’s blues heaven. So ar re listeners listeners w ho’ve le arned tto o are who’ve learned h ear the the diff erence, th anks in hear difference, thanks llarge a ge measure ar measure to to his his regular regullar S unday-night shows, shows, betw een a Sunday-night between rreally eally good English English translation translation n o ues an d th uthentic off th thee bl blues and thee aauthentic M Mi ssissippi sound. sound. Mississippi Lik ues aficionados aficionados almost almosst Likee bl blues eeverywhere verywhere th ese d ays, Bo wker these days, Bowker g ets hot hot and and bothered bothered about about the th he gets

state of th hat h loves state thee music th that hee loves and promotes. promotes. A mes, h ven and Att tim times, hee eeven sounds do wn aabout bout th al sounds down thee loc local blues scene. scene. After After aall, lll the ll, the Last Last blues Day Saloon, Saloon, a venerable venerable venue venue Day for the the blues, blues, just closed clo osed its doors. doors. for But one one club club closes closes an d an other But and another opens. At At the the newly newly ri sen F enix on opens. risen Fenix Fourth Street Street in San San n Rafael, Rafael, there there Fourth are blues blues jams jams with local local talent, talent, are and special special guests guests such such as as Lynn Lynn and Asher on ce a w eek on o W eednesday Asher once week Wednesday all year year long, long, plus plus a bar bar and and nights all gourmet food. food. Sounds Sounds like like blues blues gourmet heaven. heaven. Merl Saunders Saunders Jr., Jr.,, son son of M erl Merl Merl Saunders, th eem minent pi ano Saunders, thee pr preeminent piano player and and king king of the th he k eyboards, player keyboards, books the the shows shows at the t e Fenix. th Fenix. His His books father’s love love of music musiic rubbed rubbed off father’s long time time ago, ago, as as did a on him a long history. Born in San San lot of music history.

Mateo, S Mateo, Saunders aunders S Sr. r. ccollaborated ollaborated thee likes with th l es of Jerry lik Jerry Garcia, Garcia, Mickey Hart and Mick ey H art an d Bonnie Raitt. He He died in 2008, 20 008 but 008, but his his soul soul lives lives on me, at the the Fenix. Fen nix. Saunders Saunders Jr. Jr. tells tells m e, “Name any kind “Name an ny kin d of music. Go have aahead. head. We We h ave it all: all: jazz, jazz, bluegrass, classical bl uegrasss, ssoul, oul, cl assical and, and, of the blues.” ccourse, ourse, th he bl ues.” Band— In fact, fact, the the Fenix Fenix House House Ban d— drums, drum s, guitar, guitar u r, keyboard, keyboard, sax sax and and bass—wails b ass—waiils the the blues blues every every week. week. Saunders Saunders is is committed committed to to new new talent ta lent and and to to veteran veteran aall-stars. ll-stars. opening,” hee ““Six Si months Six montth hs after aft f er openin i g,” h me, ttells ells m e, ““we’ve we’ve aalready lready sshowed howed destination up on the the radar radar aass a destin ation ffor or touring tourin ng bands.” bands.” There heaps Th ere ar aaree h eaps of young young talent ta lent out out there, there, from from Marin Marin to to Mendocino, M endocin no, and and tucked tucked away away in thee hills th hills are are the the old masters: masters: ) 19

Blues ( 18

RED-HEARTED BLUES Owner Laura van Galen onstage at the Fenix

in San Rafael.

finger-licking barbecued ribs. Once again, after 22 years of helming the festival, he’s the genial host. Headliners include the hellacious harmonica player Charlie Musselwhite and his band, plus singer, songwriter and guitarist Johnny Rawls, who grew up in Mississippi and learned to play guitar from his blind grandfather. Also playing is Markus James, who combines down-home American blues with the music of Mali, and performs with drummer Kinney Kimbrough, son of legendary Mississippi bluesman Junior Kimbrough. The Hound Kings, an acoustic blues trio from San Francisco that includes Alabama-born Michael Benjamin, Scot Brenton and Anthony Paule, launch the fest at 2pm. Their show is free; James and Kimbrough are also free. What’s not to like? Back in the 1970s when Bowker first arrived in Santa Rosa fresh out of L.A., where he had his own show, he thought he’d be in and out of town fast. “In this business, where rapid turnover is the name of the game, I never planned on a long stint here,” he says, his hands moving rhythmically across the control panel, the instrument he plays like a pro. (Rapid turnover indeed: just last week, KRSH-FM morning DJ Brian Griffith was let go from the station; Bowker, for the first time in years, takes over the morning slot this week.)

Born in prosaic Passaic, N.J., where the only blues that he could hear was broadcast on WNBJ, Bowker is all about the roots of the music. He loves the Delta sound and the echoes of Delta music he hears in local groups such as Blues Kitchen, the all-woman band, with Nancy Wenstrom, Sarah Baker and Jan Martinelli. Blues Kitchen carries on the tradition of Ma Rainey, known as the “Mother of the Blues,” and the many blues sisters who have followed in her wake. Wenstrom, the band’s sultry lead singer and guitarist, hails from Texas and has performed for 40 years. She first heard the blues played by Eric Clapton and Jimi Hendrix, later from Otis Rush, famous for bending his notes brilliantly, and Magic Sam, who learned to play by listening to records of Muddy Waters. Little by little, she fell in love with the music that came out of Mississippi. “The blues is an elusive woman,” Wenstrom tells me at Sarah Baker’s tiny studio during a break in an afternoon rehearsal. Strumming her guitar, she adds, “The blues hurt you like a woman, and they also make you feel real good like a woman.” Baker, who plays keyboards and provides vocals, heard B. B. King and Rufus King growing up in both rural and urban Tennessee, her home state. “You would have to be blind, deaf and dumb not to see and hear the blues in

19 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 21–27, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

singer, songwriter and guitarist Nick Gravenites, and Charlie Musselwhite, who plays a mean harmonica and who hosts and boasts his own show on the KRSH. With all that talent, Bowker never gets down about the blues for long, if only because his own show has a steady stream of loyal listeners. He also sees hopeful signs close to home. Just the other day, he drove up to “Beverly Healdsburg,” as he calls it, to attend a free concert in the plaza by the North Mississippi Allstars. “The place was packed with the older wine crowd,” he tells me. “You know, the guys with the sweaters and the women fashionably attired. The blues isn’t their thing, but they were getting into it, starting to move their bodies. The blues are infectious and damned hard to resist. I went home feeling mighty pleased.” Bowker’s good friend and fellow aficionado of the blues Sarah Baker shares his upbeat outlook, though she, too, mourns the closing of the Last Day Saloon where she performed for years. “I think the blues are taking a downturn right now,” she tells me. “But they’ve taken downturns in the past and they’ve bounced back. The fact is that there are always blues lovers, just as there are always people who have the blues. The music will always speak to them and for them. It’ll always have an audience.” Baker and her band, Blues Kitchen, perform from Sonoma to Alameda, Contra Costa to Clear Lake, and she doesn’t intend to stop now. “Some blues performers, like Tommy Castro and Roy Rogers, are doing very well, and of course so is B. B. King, who never goes out of style,” she says. “It’s often a matter of luck who succeeds and who doesn’t. You have to persevere.” This Labor Day, Bowker Family Productions brings the rollicking Sonoma County Blues Festival back again by popular demand to Lagunitas Brewery in Petaluma. If Bowker’s regular Sunday show serves up a steady diet of biscuits and gravy, the Sept. 2 show—the “Coahoma to Sonoma County” festival—offers scrumptious,

Memphis,” she tells me. She adds, “The blues are not downer music. Rather, they provide a way out of feeling bad.” Baker, Wenstrom and Jan Martinelli, who plays standup bass, perform every variety of the blues, from Sippie Wallace and Bessie Smith to Miles Davis and Horace Silver. They also offer their own originals: Baker’s “Use it or Lose It” and Wenstrom’s “Brickyard Blues.” Martinelli began to perform in junior high. She had her own band that interpreted songs by Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix and Cream. “Blues Kitchen fans are mostly 40-plus,” she tells me. “We always have a great audience when we play at Armando’s in Martinez, but we’ve also had good listeners at the Redwood Cafe in Cotati.” For Bowker, the blues are an untamed force. “I like the blues raw,” he tells me in a tone of voice that’s raspy and smooth all at the same time. He adds, “I first heard the blues as a kid, and they really scared me. Howlin’ Wolf gave me goose bumps. He still does. The blues still scare me.” No mention of local blues is complete without the longrunning Russian River Blues Festival, which for over three decades has brought the music of the dark juke joint to the sunny shores of the river in Guerneville. This year’s lineup includes Boz Scaggs, Robert Cray, Los Lobos and the California Honeydrops. Once-a-year festivals are one thing; once-a-week jam sessions are another. John Ranis plays rhythm ’n’ blues on the guitar when he’s not selling insurance at Allstar West in Petaluma. The Sonoma County Blues Society, a nonprofit that he’s often carried on his own back, aims to keep the blues alive. “It’s an indigenous American art form,” Ranis tells me proudly. No one is more enthusiastic about the blues than he, and no one is more supportive of new talent. Every Wednesday night from 7 to 11, Ranis hosts a blues jam at Society: Culture House in Santa Rosa. To attend, one need not be from Mississippi, play like B. B. King or sing like Janiva Magness, the woman who lived the ) 20

Blues ( 19

20 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 21–27, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

blues as an orphan in foster homes before she learned to sing them. Ranis welcomes one and all, even if one’s musical skill is just finger snapping and hand clapping. This September, performers include Norman Greenbaum and the Mike Marino Band. Right now, Ranis is especially excited about the two young musicians who make up the Honey Dippers. “Corey Herve and Gonz Ochoa play because they love to play, not because they’re making big money,” he tells me. “For new blood in the blues scene, they’re phenomenal.” Dozens of locals—Bill Noteman, Sonny Lowe, Jody Counter, Levi Lloyd, the Scallywags and the Wilson-Hukill Blues Revue— express their love for the blues almost every night of the week, from the Willowbrook in Petaluma and the Tradewinds in Cotati to Aubergine in Sebastopol and the Blue Heron in Duncans Mills. Wineries showcase blues bands, too, and on KRCB, Mary Carroll hosts her heavenly program Lady Spins the Blues, with live musicians like Sarah Baker.

BRINGIN’ ’EM IN Merl Saunders Jr.

books the acts at the Fenix.

Whenever the local scene finds itself in the doldrums, Mississippi bluesmen come to the rescue. For his own blues fix, Bowker travels to Mississippi twice a year. He always comes home rejuvenated, and he always brings the blues back to the North Bay. “This year’s festival at Lagunitas will take listeners on a journey across the South, up Highway 61 to the Bay Area and the whole world,” he tells me. “People who come will be treated to a decidedly Mississippi feeling they won’t soon forget.”

The Thrill Ain’t Gone Upcoming blues festivals

Coahoma to Sonoma County Blues Festival Starring Charlie Musselwhite, Johnny Rawls, Markus James with Kinney Kimbrough and the Hound Kings. Monday, Sept. 2, at Lagunitas Brewing Company. 1280 N. McDowell Blvd., Petaluma. First two performances in the taproom, free. Tickets for Rawls and Musselwhite in the amphitheater, $10. Tickets available at the KRSH (3565 Standish Ave., Santa Rosa; Monday–Friday, 9–5), Lagunitas and online at www.lagunitas.com.

ON SALE ! W TOMORRO

October 17

Russian River Blues Festival

Wells Fargo Center for the Arts TICKETS ON SALE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, AUGUST 23 AT NOON s Wellsfargocenterarts.org s"ox Office s Phone 707.546.3600 :

A

B E A V E R

P R O D U C T I O N

:

Starring Boz Scaggs, Robert Cray (above), Los Lobos and the California Honeydrops. Sunday, Sept. 22, at Johnson’s Beach, Guerneville. Gates at 10am. $50. 707.869.1595. www.russianriverfestivalscom.

h s Crush u Cr The week’s events: a selective guide

HEALDSBURG

Bring That Gong Back

S T. H E L E N A

Groovy, Man

What is this American Idol and America’s Got Talent garbage on TV nowadays? I may be old, but these shows are just a pile of doggie doo-doo. What ever happened to the good ol’ days of contest shows that had liveliness and funny people? The Gong Show. Now that was a great ’70s show that persevered for many years. A contestant would perform an act before a panel of judges, who then decided whether or not to kill the performer’s chances by ringing a gong. Now The Gong Show comes to Sonoma County, where contestants can sign up and vie for the Golden Gong Award. The good times are back on Tuesday, Aug. 27, at Bergamot Alley. 328-A Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. Free. 8:30pm. 707.433.8720.

Hey man, have you checked out Mother Hips’ new album, Behind Beyond? It makes you feel gooood, man. Perfect ’70s nostalgia, am I right? Tim Bluhm and Greg Loiacono are the real deal, man. I mean, this band is two decades old but they’re still singin’, rockin’ and makin’ music. This stuff is actually heavy, man. They talk about political junk and real issues, but in a soothing, makes-you-wanna-zone-out way. Seriously, the songs talk to you, man. “Jefferson Army” is heavy with politics, but hypnotic and relaxing at the same time. “Behind Beyond” gives off the same vibe that makes you forget all your troubles, man, and just go with the flow. Ride that trippy wave, man, when Mother Hips perform at the summer concert series on Sunday, Aug. 25, at Long Meadow Ranch. 738 Main St., Saint Helena. $35–$45. 3:30pm. 707.963.4555.

BODEGA

Now Serving Octopus

M I L L VA L L E Y

BBQ Master Hey everybody, wait no more! Kermit’s back with barbecue in store! New Orleans jazz favorite, Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, is headed to Mill Valley once again for another crowd-pleasing performance. Fans who know Ruffins know to arrive with an empty stomach. With his band’s name a mix of his two favorite things—swing and food—Kermit is known to fire up the barbecue and cook for his fans between sets. Influenced by Louis Armstrong at a young age, Kermit’s passion for jazz has never ceased, and now he’s back to deliver jazz, barbecue and his lively personality to fans on Wednesday, Aug. 21, at Sweetwater Music Hall. 19 Corte Madera Ave., Mill Valley. $22. 8pm. 415.388.1100.

DOLL PARTS Courtney Love brings her band to the Phoenix Theater on Aug. 24. See Concerts, p27.

Fans of seafood, art and wine—welcome to the 19th Annual Bodega Seafood, Art & Wine Festival. Nonfans, get outta here! Only joking. But to really assess one’s love of this event, attendees may want to be ready to try some new cuisine. On the menu this weekend are plenty of seafood plates and vegetarian options, while new this year are octopus and swordfish dishes. Ever wanted to try the eight-legged creature of the deep? Now’s your chance. That leaves the art, which features over 70 artists displaying various beading, pottery, sculptures and paintings. Live music is provided by Gypsy swing band Beso Negro, street theater and gymnastics group Daredevil Chicken, Americana band Slim Jenkins and many others. The festival runs Saturday–Sunday, Aug. 24–25. 16855 Bodega Hwy., Bodega. $8–$15. 10am–6pm, Saturday; 10am–5pm, Sunday. 707.824.8717.

—Anna Hecht

NO R RTH TH B BAY A Y BO H E M I AN AN | A AUGUST UGU S T 21 21-27, - 27, 201 3 | BOH E MI A N N.COM .C O M

CULTURE

211

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 21–27, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

22

Arts Ideas SLITHERING HEIGHTS Joyce Maynard consulted with real-life Marinites who came of age in the 1970s for proper color.

Wolf Girls

Joyce Maynard’s latest takes on Mt. Tam, serial killers and adolescent angst BY LEILANI CLARK

M

t. Tamalpais is known the world over as a destination for a dose of nature and spirituality. But in 1979, the mountain, about which Gary Snyder once wrote “[it] gives us a crystal moment of being and a breath of the sky, and only asks us to hold the whole world dear,” became something else altogether:

the hunting ground for a walking terror nicknamed the Trailside Killer. It was this story, of a serial killer who roamed the mountain for more than a year and killed at least five women hikers, that provided the narrative spine for Joyce Maynard’s latest novel, After Her. Maynard’s home in Mill Valley— where she lived before a recent move to Oakland to be with her new husband—looks out over the mountain. “It was a big presence

in my life for 17 years,” Maynard says of Mt. Tam, on the phone from a New Hampshire highway as she heads to a friend’s wedding. “I had been aware that there had been a serial killer at large on those trails many years before, but I didn’t live in California then. It was a haunting knowledge that stayed with me.” After Her is the fictional tale of two girls, ages 11 and 13, who live on the side of a mountain rocked by murders committed by the Sunset Strangler. The plot is

loosely based on a true story told to Maynard by two sisters who attended a one-day writing workshop at her home. The sisters, now in their 40s and living in Ukiah and Novato, were the daughters of the homicide detective originally in charge of the Trailside Killer investigation, and they believed their father’s early death of lung cancer was caused by his deep grief at being unable to ultimately solve the case. (The killer, David Carpenter, was caught in another jurisdiction and eventually sentenced to life in San Quentin.) A former New York Times columnist, Maynard is probably best known for her 1998 memoir At Home in the World, which revealed her nine-month affair with J. D. Salinger when she was 18 and he 53. When Maynard sold the letters written to her by Salinger, she was roundly condemned for breaking an “unwritten law” and exposing the private idiosyncrasies of the famously reclusive author. At Home in the World is being rereleased by Picador on Sept. 3; Maynard appears at Book Passage on Aug. 26 and Copperfield’s Books in Petaluma on Aug. 27. “It’s a book that’s close to my heart,” explains Maynard. “When it was first published 15 years ago, it was enormously battled and condemned. I’m very happy to see it reissued in a different climate.” Beyond the Salinger connection, Maynard has forged a sizable writing career. Labor Day, her bestselling 2010 novel, is currently being adapted into a film starring Kate Winslet and Josh Brolin by Jason Reitman, the director of Juno. Over her 40-year career, Maynard has authored 15 books and countless magazine articles, including “Domestic Affairs,” a syndicated column that ran over the course of her first marriage, a relationship that produced three children but ended in divorce. The 59-year-old author describes

Joyce Maynard appears Tuesday, Aug. 27, at Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books (140 Kentucky St., Petaluma; 7pm; free; 707.762.0563) and at a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Literary Luncheonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; on Monday, Aug. 26, at Book Passage (51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera; noon; $55 includes lunch and signed book; 415.927.0960).

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

DIN N E R & A SHOW

HIL BERKOWITZ Aug 23 APND D TH HE D IRT Y CATS Fri

ATURING FEA

Rancho Debut!

WILLIAM BATY, PIANO

Classic Blues 8:00 / No Cover Sat Western Dance Party! Aug 24 BUCK NICKELS AND

LOOSE CHANGE

Original Songs, Great Harmonies 8:30 Fri

Aug 30

Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;BUNCHOVUS

SPECIAL GUEST BRUCE KU RN OW

Harmonious and Humorous 8:00 / No Cover Sat 1960s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Girl Groupâ&#x20AC;? Singing Sensations! Aug 31 THE COVERLETTES 8:30 Sat Dance Party! Sep 7 THE TICKETS BAND Locally Grown Rock and Roll 8:30  Sun

BBQs On The Lawn! 

Gates Open at 3:00, Music at 4:00

Aug 25 Beatle Q with THE S UN KIN GS Sun

Sep 1

THE SONS OF CHAMPLIN

PLUS

FROBECK

HE MAD HANNANS FEATURING Sep 2 JTERRY HANNAN & FRIENDS Mon Sun

Sep 8

BUTCH WHACKS AND

THE GLASS PACKS

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Pampered Feet Reflexology Center BVhhV\ZI]ZgVen

DcZ=djg;ddi IgZVibZci includes arms, shoulders, neck, & back and herbal foot soak

'*

dcan

L]dadkZh?Zhh^Z?^c\4 LdbZc!BZc! ;Vb^a^Zh;g^ZcYh <gdjehd[+dgbdgZeaZVhZXVaaV]ZVY#

<^[i8VgYh6kV^aVWaZ 9dlcidlcHVciVGdhV *'&)i]HigZZi!HVciVGdhV ,%,#*'+#&,-9dlcidlcEZiVajbV &+&@ZcijX`nHigZZi!EZiVajbV ,%,#,,-#,--lll#_Zhh^Z_^c\hbVhhV\Z#Xdb

23 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;27, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

After Her as a coming-of-age thriller, with a theme inspired in part by one of her favorite movies, Stand by Me, and her desire to provide an opportunity for two girls to have a â&#x20AC;&#x153;wonderful adventureâ&#x20AC;? along the lines of River Phoenix and his friends. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really set out to do this, but adolescence is kind of a goinginto-the-woods experience, and this book is very much about the combination of thrill, fascination, anticipation and fear of sexuality experienced by a lot of young girls at that age,â&#x20AC;? she explains. Maynard drew on her own youth growing up in New Hampshire, describing herself as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;girl who was always looking for trouble,â&#x20AC;? a trait shared by her latest novelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s narrator. Maynardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s previous books have an East Coast setting; this is her ďŹ rst set in California. Her research included an immersion in the history and culture of late 1970s Marin, a much more economically diverse community than the privileged enclave it has become. Laura and Janet, the two real sisters, ďŹ lled up a notebook with memories of their life on Mt. Tamâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;down to small details about the clothing and music that they lovedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;mixed with memories of their detective father. In the book, the main characters are children of a divorced household; they live with their mother, with little money, no television or parental guidance, and easy access to the wilds of the woods. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wanted them to have some sort of wolf-girl life,â&#x20AC;? says Maynard. In the end, while After Her takes on the complexities of family life and the sister dynamic, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also deeply about placeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;speciďŹ cally, the mountain that looms over Mill Valley and the San Francisco Bay. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my homage to Marin County,â&#x20AC;? adds Maynard. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love the outdoors and the wilderness around the county, and I really wanted to bring that to life on the pages of my book.â&#x20AC;?

Stage

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 21–27, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

24

COOKIN’ CATFISH Marjorie CrumpShears has a sweet scene in ‘Fruitvale Station.’

Stage to Screen 88/23 /23 – 88/29 / 29

HHonorable onor able

Prince P rince Avalanche Avalanche R (1 (1:00-3:45)-7:15-9:20 : 0 0 -3 : 4 5 ) -7:15- 9 : 20

The T he A Attack ttack

R ((10:15-12:45-3:30)-6:45-9:10 10 :15-12 : 4 5-3 : 30 ) -6 : 4 5- 9 :10 WWeds eds 88/28 / 28 & TThurs hur s 88/29: / 29 : ((4:15)-6:45-9:00 4 :15 ) -6 : 4 5- 9 : 00

Lee Daniels’ Lee Daniels’ The The Butler Bu tler PPG13 G13 (1 (10:45-2:00-5:00)-8:00 0 : 4 5-2 : 00-5 : 00 ) - 8 : 00 Blue B lue JJasmine asmine PPG13 G13

((11:15-1:30-4:00)-7:00-9:15 11:15-1: 30 - 4 : 00 ) -7: 0 0 - 9 :15

Fruitvale F ruitvale S Station tation

R Fri Fr i 88/23 / 23 oonly: nl y : ((4:15pm) 4 :15pm ) SSat a t 88/24 / 24 tthru hr u TTue ue 88/27: / 27: (4:15)-9:00 (4 :15 ) - 9 : 0 0 NNoo sshows ho w s WWeds eds 88/28 / 28 oorr TThurs hur s 88/29! / 29 !

The Th eW Way, ay, W Way ay B Back ack

PG13 P G13 (1 (11:00-1:20)-6:45 1: 0 0 -1: 20 ) -6 : 4 5 Fri Fr i 8/23, 8 / 23, WWeds eds 88/28, / 28, TThurs hur s 88/29: / 29 : (1 (11:00-1:20) 1: 00 -1: 20 )

20 Feet 20 Feet From From Stardom S tardom PPG13 G13 (10:30am) (10 : 30am) Closed C losed C Circuit ircuit R

((11:00-1:15-3:30)-6:45-9:05 11: 0 0 -1:15-3 : 30 ) -6 : 4 5 -9 : 05 Opens Opens Weds Weds 8/28 8 / 28

JJoin oin uuss ffor or tthe he 4488 HHour our FFilm ilm Festival Fes t ival oonn FFriday, r iday, 88/23 / 23 aatt 88pm! pm !

551 S 551 Summerfield ummer field Road Road Santa Rosa S an t a R osa 707.522.0719 707. 522 .0719

Cotati actress featured in ‘Fruitvale Station’ BY DAVID TEMPLETON

A

ctress Marjorie Crump-Shears, of Cotati, has been answering the phone all of her life—but never with a movie director, camera operators and crew of filmmakers standing around watching her do it. But last year, there she was, shooting a scene for the acclaimed film Frutivale Station, about the life and death of Oscar Grant. In the scene, Grant calls up his grandmother Bonnie (CrumpShears) just hours before he was tragically shot to death on a BART platform in Oakland. “It’s quite short,” she says of the scene. “I had to pick up the phone and answer it. I did this several times. And then Ryan Coogler, the

director, came up and quietly said, ‘So . . . you know, when you pick up the phone? You have to press the button that says Talk.’” “There are so many little things that one has to think about,” she laughs, “things we kind of take for granted in every day life. But I’d never answered a phone in front of a camera before,” she laughs, “with all of these people standing around looking!” Known primarily as a Bay Area stage actress, Crump-Shears was last seen in the North Bay in Intimate Apparel at Sixth Street Playhouse, directed by her daughter, Bronwen Shears. CrumpShears won the part after a single audition with director Coogler, who offered her the role on the spot. “I was stunned,” Crump-Shears admits. “I said, ‘Are you kidding? Really?’” The film features Michael B. Jordan (The Wire, Friday Night Lights) as Grant, and Oscar-winner Octavia Spenser (The Help) as Grant’s mother. Once she got over the jitters over working alongside an actress of Spenser’s renown, Crump-Shears says making the film was a remarkable and comfortable experience. There was, she describes, a strong emphasis on realism during the shoot, which took place in Oakland, near where the event occurred. “We were filming in an actual home in Oakland, of the same style that Oscar’s grandmother really had,” she says. “So it all felt very natural.” Cinematic thrills aside, CrumpShears is proud of the film for the story it tells, digging into the real-life hopes, dreams, loves and mistakes of a man most Americans know only as a symbol, or as flash of video on the news. “I think this movie is important,” she says. “Number one, it takes someone who was a victim and shows him as a human being. And it opens up the public’s eyes about this young man, who, on his death, had such a lot of media play. But nobody talked about who he was or where he came from. This movie does, and it does so beautifully.”

Nadav Soroker

+++++

A PERFECT MOVIE!” A PURE GEM… GRACED WITH SPARKLING ACTING.” “

SHAILENE WOODLEY IS MARVELOUS AND MILES TELLER IS EXCELLENT.”

A SUMMER LOVE STORY LOADED WITH POWER AND FEELING. I COULDN’ T STOP THINKING ABOUT IT.”

SALON

FROM THE WRITERS OF (500) DAYS OF SUMMER

AND . . . ACTION! Susie Heyden pulls her team’s film genre from a hat last Friday in Railroad Square.

A Film Frenzy

Santa Rosa’s own 48-Hour Film Project BY ANNA HECHT

I

t was Friday night. Pulling pieces of paper out of a hat, they received a genre, character, prop and piece of dialogue. Now they had no time to lose. Team Dropper had to put together a short film in just 48 hours.

Such was the hurried energy of this team, and many others around Sonoma County, when the 13th Annual 48-Hour Film Project last weekend put local filmmakers’ talents to the ultimate test. The results are judged and screened this weekend. Dropper Collective, one of the 15 teams representing Santa Rosa for the first time, includes Santa Rosa Junior College students Javier Martinez, Luc Londe, Chuck Starzenski, Sam Euston, Clay Atchison, Mario Morquecho, Athena Wheaton, Jonathan Morquecho, Miguel Sanchez, Sean Legier and Stephanie Shepherd. Dropper Collective finished the final editing touches on Sunday. Eight is a drama about a reunion between a father and son after the son has been released from prison. Martinez says the time

constraint both helped and hindered the creative process. “We had to think under pressure. We had to quickly discard ideas that clearly did not work or were not interesting enough. It allowed us to move faster, and we didn’t have to linger too much on one idea,” he says, noting also that “our actors only had a couple of hours to memorize their lines and their characters. That was hard on our actors.” At the screening, audiences will look for three recurring elements; each film must utilize a bandage, a former reality show contestant, and the line “Hold this. I’ll be right back.” With the project ready for viewing, Martinez says his team now feels more confident about their chances of winning. “We think it turned out really good,” he says, “considering the time constraint and everything, and this being our first time competing in the contest.” The 48-Hour films and winners are revealed on Saturday, Aug. 23, at Summerfield Cinemas. 551 Summerfield Road, Santa Rosa. $10. 8pm. 707.522.0719.

© 2013 TSN VENTURES, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

EXCLUSIVE EN ENGAGEMENT NGAGEMENT STARTS ST TAR A TS FRIDA FRIDAY AY, AUGUST 23

SANTA RO R ROSA SA Roxy Stadium Stadium 14 (707) 522-0330 52 22-0330

25 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 21–27, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Film

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | AUGUST 21-27, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

ŴŸ

FZW4Sj3dWS e4[YYWef Technology conference + Music Festival 70+ Acts | 12+ Venues | 4 days | 1 wristband

Iggy and The Stooges FZWWAZEWWeÂ&#x2021;4ae`[S`DS[`Tahe

FZW>W_a`ZWSVeÂ&#x2021;FZW>[_age[`WeÂ&#x2021;6WSXZWSÄ&#x201A;W` A88Â&#x2021;?a`Va9W`WdSfadÂ&#x2021;FZW5agbÂ&#x2021;bSdfjTW` 63?8g`]6<EWfÂ&#x2021;E^WWbjEg` 9 8 B XWSfgd[`Y9dWY:Wfea`S`VFa`j3^Ä&#x201A;S

FZW4S`YÂ&#x2021;FadUZWeÂ&#x2021;5^Sh:S__WdÂ&#x2021;FS^]jf[`S 8Sfea<Wfea`Â&#x2021;FZW;USdge>[`WÂ&#x2021;4^SU]?[^]Â&#x2021;Ea`[Va5^SeZ FZWBZW`a_W`SgfeÂ&#x2021;7H=S[`Â&#x2021;EWfES[^ A`hSdV7fUÂ&#x2021;5gd[ageCgS[^Â&#x2021;FWdS?W^aeÂ&#x2021;EZ[`aTg FZW@WhFdgefÂ&#x2021;FZWEZW eÂ&#x2021;B[UfgdW3f^S`f[U 4dafZWd9dS`VÂ&#x2021;FZW8^S_WeÂ&#x2021;AUUg^fI[eVa_ More to be announced

conference Topics Include: Gi\cf_Â&#x;Mi]c[fÂ&#x;;oag_hn_^L_[fcns Q_[l[\f_=igjon_lmÂ&#x;Nl[hmg_^c[Â&#x;;C;jjm Mb[lcha?]ihigsÂ&#x;>cmlojncih Mi]c[fNl[hmjiln[ncihÂ&#x; Gil_ Speakers Include: Li\_lnM]i\f_Â&#x;D_``Mnc\_fÂ&#x;Hif[h<ombh_ff =blcm;h^_lmihÂ&#x;Mn_p_Eclm]bÂ&#x;[h^g[hsinb_lm San Jose McEnery Convention Center

Tickets Now on Sale @ c2sv.com/tickets

SEPT 26-29, 2013

Nqcnn_l4:=,MP:=,MPn_]b :=,MPgomc] @[]_\iie4=,MP`_mn =,MPn_]b

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Backyard Concert Series Aug 22, the Mother Hips, David Gans with the Thugz. KRSH, 3565 Standish Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.588.9999.

Chris Botti Jazz trumpeter has collaborated with Andrea Bocelli, Paul Simon, Sting and others. Aug 25, 4pm. $25-$85. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Friday Night Live

with full band. Aug 24, 8:30pm. $35. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Keiko Matsui New Age keyboard player has wide-ranging influences. Aug 23, 8pm. $33. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

The Melodians From the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rivers of Babylonâ&#x20AC;? come these reggae pioneers. Aug 23, 9pm. $20-$25. Redwood Cafe, 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Concerts Series

Aug 23, Maxx Cabello Jr; Aug 30, Chuck Prophet & the Mission Express. 5:30pm. Free. Cloverdale Plaza, Cloverdale.

Aug 24, Men N Black; Aug 25, Twang Ditty. Noon. Free. Montgomery Village Shopping Center, Santa Rosa.

Funky Fridays

Roy Rogers & the Delta Rhythm Kings

Live music in parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s outdoor amphitheater. Aug 23, Tommy Thomsen; Aug 30, Backtrax. 6:30pm. $10. Sugarloaf Ridge State Park, 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood.

The Goat Rodeo Sessions Cellist Yo-Yo Ma headlines this classical-bluegrass fusion group. Aug 23, 7:30pm. $25$100. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Courtney Love Frontwoman of Hole and controversy magnet appears

Slide guitarist is a blues master. Aug 24, 8:30pm. $20. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

US Air Force Band Grand reopening of theater. Aug 25, 3pm. Free. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

MARIN COUNTY Nicki Bluhm & the Gramblers Sexy, soulful and sultry songwriter leads her band of similar ilk. Aug 23, 8pm. $25.

27

NAPA COUNTY Chris Isaak Ohhhhhh, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wanna fall in love. Velvet-voiced crooner from the Bar Area returns. Jeffrey Halford opens. Aug 21, 8pm. $90. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

McNearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dining House "REAKFASTs,UNCHs$INNER FRI 8/23s7PM DOORSs SMOOTH JAZZ

3!4s0-$//23s COUNTRY

Castroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s his name, blues is his game. Aug 24, 8pm. $25. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Fri, Aug 23 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm Steve Luther hosts MOTOWN, DISCO, ROCK 'N ROLL

ROY ROGERS & THE DELTA RHYTHM KINGS PLUS THE INCUBATORS

Sat, Aug 24 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 10:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; SCOTTISH CHALLENGE with 12:30pm Gary Thomas

3!4s0-$//23s COUNTRY

DAN HICKS LICKS

AND THE HOT

Sun, Aug 25 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:25pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING

LIVE AT DAVIES CD RELEASE PARTY 3!4s0-$//23s R&B/MOTOWN HITS

SONOMA COUNTY

8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club

Thur, Aug 22 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm CIRCLES Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; SQUARES Square Dance Club

KEIKO MATSUI

Tommy Castro

Clubs & Venues

Wed, Aug 21 10:15amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12:45pm 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm

Aqus Cafe

AN EVENING WITH

Aug 23, Edge of Town. Aug 24, the Hillwilliams. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Mon, Aug 26 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am;5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:25pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING

&2)s8PM DOORSs NEW WAVE/ROCK

Tues, Aug 27 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 7:30pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

PRIDE & JOY THE FIXX

Arlene Francis Center Aug 23, Kirby Dominant, Pure Powers, DJ Fossil, Spends Quality, FCHB, Siras Worth D Mention, Jake Ward & Exacto, Shifty Shey, E-Money, MC, Honest D & J Skrilla. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Aubergine Aug 22, Grant Sabin & the Full Moon. Aug 23, Sherrie Phillips. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Flamingo Lounge Aug 23, Koncept. Aug 24, UB707.

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922

.O#HILDREN5NDERTO!LL!GES3HOWS 0ETALUMA"LVD 0ETALUMA

1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

7

WWWMCNEARSCOM

UUKE KE W WITH I T H BUI BUILT-IN I LT-INN SSPEAKER! PEAKER!

The VOX Ukelectric is a solid-body electric ukulele with built-in speaker and amp â&#x20AC;˘ Output jack â&#x20AC;&#x201D; use with bigger amp or sound system â&#x20AC;˘ Includes soft carry case â&#x20AC;˘ Adjustable volume â&#x20AC;˘ Use without power for nearsilent practice!

$299

) 28

Wed Aug 21

Chris Isaak Fri Aug 30

Lisa Marie Presley Special Guest: The Deadlies

99

B AANANAS NANAS

Sun Sept 1

ATT A

L AARGE RGE

515 Ross Street, Brickyard Centerr Santa Rosa â&#x20AC;˘Â (707) 542-5588

WWW WW WWW. W. BANA W. ANANAS A NANA NA NASMUS USIC IC. COM COM

Psychedelic Furs ÂŽ

Special Guest: The Burning of Rome

Fri Sept 6

The Zombies plus E Tu Bruce Wed Sept 11

:Ĺ˝Ĺ&#x161;Ĺś,Ĺ?Ä&#x201A;ĆŠ and the Combo Special Guest: Drew Holcomb

Fri Sept 13

Wanda Sykes Sun Sept 15

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a Beautiful Day Acoustic ^]cWT<PX]BcPVTPc

George Thorogood and the Destroyers Special Guest: The Iron Heart

Fri Sept 20

Michael Grimm -Grimmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fairytale Tour Season 5 Winner Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Got Talent

Dr. John

Sat Sept 21 Special Guest: Jenny Kerr

Fri Sept 27

Billy Cobhamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spectrum 40â&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;? featuring Dean Brown, Gary Husband & Ric Fierabracci Fri Oct 4

An evening with Tainted Love

Sun Oct 6

Bd]SPh 0dVdbc!$ &_\ 

WOMBAT NOT INCLUDED Yo-Yo Maâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Goat Rodeo Sessions play the Green

Music Center on Aug. 23. See Concerts, above.

Natalie Maines Fri Oct 11 

$fXcW$¸%)"3X]]TaATbTaePcX^] !2^]RTac^][h

'$1^STVP0eT]dTBTQPbc^_^[ ATbTaePcX^]b&&'!#!" 

LeRoy Bell and His Only Friends

plus Tim Hockenberry Planning an event? Contact us for rental info

1350 Third St, Napa | 707.259.0123 www.uptowntheatrenapa.com

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;27, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Music

Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

Music ( 27

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 21–27, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

28

2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

French Garden Aug 23, Organix. Aug 24, Blue Jazz. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Music / Events

Lydia’s Organics

AUG 27ƒ7:30–9:30pmƒ$10–20 Donation

Evening of Satsang with Pamela Wilson

Heritage Public House Aug 24, Brothers of Siren. 1901 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

Hopmonk Sebastopol Aug 21, the OriginalZ. Aug 22, Vokab Kompany. Aug 23, Achilles Wheel. Aug 24, Levi Lloyd & the 501 Band. Aug 28, Brainstorm: Yearning Man. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

AUG 30ƒ7:30–10:30pmƒ$10

Prema Love Songs SEPT 8ƒ2–5pmƒ$10–12ƒBlues Super Group

The Former Members Live!

Hopmonk Sonoma

SEPT 13ƒ9pm–12amƒ$10 All Ages Rock Reggae Showcase

TRINITI, Ras Indio, Ital Souls featuring Sky-I

Aug 23, Clay Bell. Aug 23, Dirty Cello. Aug 24, Dawn Angelosante. Aug 25, Lauren O’Connell. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

SEPT 14ƒ11am–3pm Products from Small Local Vegan Businesses

Jack London State Park

V.I.B.E. Vegan Shop-Up/Fundraiser

Aug 24, Stephanie Cadman. 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen. 707.938.5216.

PURCHASE TICKETS ONLINE AT W W W.LYDIASORGANICS.COM /.$%08&--#-7%t1&5"-6."t$"

707.792 . 530 0

Jasper O’Farrell’s Aug 24, the Business End, Illumignarly, I’m Too Dirty. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

La Follette Wines at the Barlow

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

Monday ~ Open Mic Night with Austin DeLone 7:30pm :HG$XJãSP

6WDURI+%2V7UHPH

Kermit Ruffins &

The Barbecue Swingers

with

The Bay Easy Brass Band 7KXU$XJãSP

Truth & Salvage Co.

with Song

Preservation Society, Wes Sheffield

)UL$XJãSP

Reckless in Vegas with

Pretending–Pretenders Tribute and Emily Rath 6DW$XJãDP

Live Music Brunch FREE SHOW with Wildflower Weed 6DW$XJãSP

Come see us! Wed–Fri, 2–9 Sat & Sun, 11:30–8

Brewery Tours Daily at 3! 1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

w w w.L AGU N ITAS.com

Stu Allen & Mars Hotel 6XQ$XJãDP

Live Music Sunday Brunch FREE SHOW with Steep Ravine 6XQ$XJãSP

Zigaboo Modeliste & the New Aahkestra Funkify Your Kids www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave Mill Valley Café 415.388.1700 | Box Office 415.388.3850

Aug 23, Ricky Alan Ray. 180 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.827.4933.

Lagunitas Tap Room Aug 21, Misner & Smith. Aug 22, Rivereens. Aug 23, Victor & Penny. Aug 24, Whisky Pills Fiasco. Aug 25, Maxx Cabello Jr. Aug 28, Junk Parlor. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Aug 22, Tony Gibson. Aug 25, Kith & Kin. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre Aug 23, Keiko Matsui. Aug 24, Roy Rogers & the Delta Rhythm Kings, the Incubators. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

The Sons Shine on the Bay Salvador Santana, Miles Schon team up Like father like son, Salvador Santana (next of kin to Mr. “Oye Como Va” himself) pairs with Miles Schon (offspring of Neal from Santana and Journey) this Friday for a night of guitar strummin,’ smooth singin’ and an eclectic mix of sounds. Though known mostly for his father, Salvador’s musical inheritance doesn’t stop there. With one grandfather blues pioneer Saunders King, and another famous violinist and mariachi bandleader Jose Santana, it’s clear that music runs in Santana’s veins. Building on his ancestry, the keyboardist and composer fuses hip-hop, jazz, rock, Latin and other sounds into a style all his own. Joining Salvador is musician and songwriter Miles Schon. Being the son of the guy who plays that epic guitar solo on “Don’t Stop Believin’” hasn’t stopped Miles from living out his own musical career. With a sound blending hard rock, blues, pop and R&B, Miles is a frequent performer in the Bay Area. Rooted in rock and roll, Schon grew up listening to Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton and, wouldn’t you know it, Carlos Santana. The pair perform on Friday, Aug. 23, at George’s Nightclub (842 Fourth St., San Rafael; $12; 9pm; 415.226.0262) and Saturday, Aug. 24, at Silo’s (530 Main St., Napa; 8pm; $20-$25; 707.251.5833).—Anna Hecht

Occidental Center for the Arts Aug 25, the Amaryllis Trio. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Phoenix Theater

Quincy’s

Redwood Cafe

Aug 23, J Stalin, Philthy Rich, D-Lo. Aug 24, Courtney Love. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Aug 23, SoulBlind. Aug 24, Da-Liverance, West One, Arze Poetic. 6590 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park. 707.585.1079.

Aug 23, the Melodians. Aug 24, Thugz. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

River Theatre Thurs, Thugz. 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.3194.

Aug 25, Sarah & the Tall Boys. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Sixth Street Playhouse Aug 23-24, Jason Serfling. 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Society: Culture House Aug 21, the Wilson-Hukill Blues Revue. Aug 28, Tom Finn Band. Wed, North Bay Blues Revue. Thurs, Casa Rasta. Sun, Church on Sundays. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Sprengerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tap Room Aug 22, Quarter to Four. Aug 23, the Wants, the Nervous. Aug 24, David Carter Band. 446 B St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8277.

The Sunflower Center Aug 27, Pamela Wilson. 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

Wells Fargo Center Aug 25, US Air Force Band. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Aug 22, Roy Zimmerman with Sandy and Richard Riccardi. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Fenix Aug 22, Keith Crossan. Aug 24, Mitch Woods & His Rocket 88s. Aug 25, Pellejo Seco. Wed, Blues Night. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub Aug 23, Salvador Santana and Miles Schon. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Hopmonk Novato

Taft Street Winery Aug 25, Bottleshock. 2030 Barlow Lane, Sebastopol. 707.823.2049.

Tradewinds Aug 21, Cougar & the Cubs.

Aug 23, Buck Nickels & the Third Rail. Aug 24, Beso Negro. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

19 Broadway Club Aug 21, 80 Proof, Oranguhtango. Aug 22, Extra

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

Simian Mobile Disco English electronic duo plays DJ set, no doubt featuring material from latest, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Unpaterns.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Aug 23 at Mezzanine.

Majical Cloudz Hypnotic and intimate, Devon Welshâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ian-Curtis-meetsJeff-Buckley voice acts like a drug. Aug 24 at Rickshaw Stop.

Ordinary Astronauts. Aug 23, Sashamon, Alcyon Massive. Aug 24, Vinyl. Aug 25, the Melodians. Aug 28, Bakerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dozen. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar Aug 23, Fighting Smokey. Aug 25, Brindl. Aug 28, Roadhead. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio Aug 23, Phil Berkowitz & the Dirty Cats. Aug 24, Buck Nickels & Loose Change. Aug 25, the Sun Kings. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sleeping Lady Aug 21, Angeline Sarisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Gypsy Jazz Trio. Aug 22, Maria Quiles & Rory Cloud. Aug 23, Eli & Javiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gypsy Jazz Night. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Aug 22, Spazzy T & the Aardvark Situation. Aug 23, TV Mike. Aug 24, This Old Earthquake. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Sweetwater Music Hall Aug 21, Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers. Aug 22, Truth & Salvage Co, Song Preservation Society, Wes Sheffield. Aug 23, Reckless in Vegas, Pretending, Emily Rath. Aug 24, Stu Allen & Mars Hotel. Aug 25, Zigaboo Modeliste & the New Aahkestra. Aug 28, Greg Johnson & Glass Brick Boulevard. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads Aug 22, Stu Allen & friends. Aug 23, Nicki Bluhm & the Gramblers. Aug 24-27, Acacia. Aug 28-29, Rob Barraco & Jeff Mattson. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

Swamp Dogg Soul legend celebrating re-release of cult LP â&#x20AC;&#x153;Total Destruction to Your Mind.â&#x20AC;? Aug 25 at Yoshiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SF.

Wed, Jumpstart. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Tom Krellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;weird R&Bâ&#x20AC;? project culminates with latest album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Total Loss.â&#x20AC;? Aug 26 at the Independent.

The Breeders The always-entertaining sisters Deal play both â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last Splashâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Podâ&#x20AC;? in their entirety. Aug 27 and 28 at the Fillmore.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

4VcR f\b_ PN_ N

Napa Valley Opera House Aug 24, Tommy Castro. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Aug 22, Robert â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hollywoodâ&#x20AC;? Jenkins. Aug 23, They Went Ghost, Pion 2 Zion. Aug 24, Salvador Santana & Miles Schon. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

1030 Main Street in downtown Napa Tickets & Information

NVOH.ORG

?\PXV[ÂŽ :NXR\cR_

707.226.7372

Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;7 "7Ă&#x160;/ / Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;

--", Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;* /Ă&#x160;*,"/ /" Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;

Open Mâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;F 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5, Sat 9â&#x20AC;&#x201C;3

707.254.0223

NAPA COUNTY Downtown Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewery & Restaurant

How to Dress Well

29 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;27, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Russian River Brewing Co

Aug 23, UnderCover. Aug 24, Sky Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Bannion. Aug 25, Cadillac Phil. Aug 28, the Nite Caps. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

684 Lincoln Ave, Napa

TOMMY CASTRO & THE PAINKILLERS Sat, Aug 24, 8 PM

BCD38>4  ?A4B4=CB

278? C0H;>A 5aXSPh0dVdbc!"

DREW CAREY

Featuring Guest BRENDON WALSH

Sat, Sep 14, 7 & 9 PM TUESDAY NIGHT FLICKS

TO HAVE OR HAVE NOT (1944) Tue, Aug 27, 7 PM

FILM:

THE BIG LEBOWSKI

Fri, Sep 6, 7 PM

Uptown Theatre

&)"_\S^^ab'_\bW^f!$PccWTS^^a

Aug 21, Chris Isaak. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

ATbTaePcX^]bFX[[2P[[)  9455<$/b^]XR]Tc&&'!"$" %

OPERA FILM:

GLINKAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RUSLAN AND LYUDMILA Sun, Sep 8, 4 PM

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | AUGUST 21-27, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

ŵŲ

707.829.7300 7 0 7. 829 . 7 3 0 0 S E B AS T OP OL 230 2 3 0 PETALUMA P E TA L U M A AVE AV E | SEBASTOPOL

OPEN O P E N MIC M I C NIGHT NIGHT

EVERY TUES EVERY TUES AT AT 7PM 7PM WITH WITH EVAN EVAN THUR T HUR A AUG UG 2 22 2 HIP-HOP H IP- HOP | EELECTRONIC LEC TRONIC | INDIE INDIE

VOKAB V OKAB K KOMPANY OMPANY $$88 A ADV/DOORS DV/ DOORS 9PM/21+ 9PM /21+

FRI F RI A AUG UG 2 23 3

JJAM AM | FFOLK O LK | R ROCK O CK

ACHILLES A CHILLES W WHEEL HE E L $$8/DOORS 8 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

SAT S AT A AUG UG 24

BLUES B LUES | C CLASSIC L A SSIC | ROCK R O CK

LLEVI EVI LLOYD LLOYD AND A ND T THE HE 5 501 01 BAND BAND $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

SUN SU N AUG AUG 25 25

AMERICANA A MERICANA | FOLK FOLK | ROCK R O CK

PREP RE- EARLEFEST EARLEFEST FUND FUND RAISER R AI S E R $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 2P 2PM/ALL M /ALL AGES AGES

MON M ON A AUG UG 26

RREGGAE EGGAE | D DANCEHALL ANCEHALL | H HIP IP H HOP, OP, BBLUES LUES | RROCK OCK | EEXP XP MONDAY M ONDAY N NIGHT IGHT E EDUTAINMENT DUTAINMENT W WITH ITH

DJJ S D SIZZLAK IZZLAK

$$8/ 8/ LADIES LADIES FREE FREE B4 B4 11/DOORS 11/DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM/21+

WED W ED A AUG UG 2 28 8

DUBSTEP D U BS T EP | W WEST EST C COAST OA S T | G GLITCH L I TC H

BRAINSTORM BR AINSTORM

YEARNING Y EARNING MAN MAN

ID DIDNT I D NT G GO O TTO O TTHE HE B BURN URN B BUT UT W WANNA AN N A P PARTY ART Y LLIKE IKE I D DID! I D!

$$5/DOORS 5/ DOORS 77PM/21+ PM /21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM W W W. H O PM ONK .CO M BBook ook yyour our

next ne x t eevent ve n t w with ith u us, s, u up p tto o2 250, 50, kkim@hopmonk.com. i m @ h o p m o n k . co m .

2 24 V 224 VINTAGE INTAG E WAY WAY NOVATO N OVA ATO | 41 415.892.6200 5 . 8 92 . 62 0 0

WEDNESDAYS WE DNESDAYS / VARIETY VARIET Y | GENERAL GENER AL

OPEN O PEN MIC MIC NIGHT N I G HT

WITH W ITH D DENNIS ENNIS HA HANEDA NEDA FFREE/DOORS REE/ DOORS 7:30PM/ALL 7: 30PM /ALL AGES AGES

FRI F RI A AUG UG 23 23 / CCOUNTRY OUNTRY | R ROCK O CK BUCK B UCK NICKLES NICKLES A AND ND LO LOOSE OSE CHANGE CHANGE A AND ND T THIRD HIRD RAIL RAIL $$12 12 A ADV/$15 DV/$15 D DOS/DOORS OS/ DOORS 77PM/21+ PM /21+

SAT S AT A AUG UG 24 / G GYPSY YPSY SWING SWIN G

BESO BE SO N NEGRO EGRO $$12/DOORS 12/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

FRI F RI A AUG UG 30 30 / BBLUES LUES | R A AND ND B | R ROCK O CK

COMMANDER C OMMANDER CODY CODY (EXCLUSIVE BAY (EXCLUSIVE BAY AREA AREA SHOW) S H OW ) $$25/DOORS 25/ DOORS 7:30PM/21+ 7: 30PM /21+

SAT S AT A AUG UG 31 31 / JJAM AM | B BLUES LUES | R ROCK O CK

FREESTONE F REESTONE PEACHES PEACHES (A T (A TRIBUTE RIBUTE TO TO DUANE DUANE ALLMAN) A L L M A N) $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

TH U R S THUR SEP EP 5 / FFOLK OLK | AMERICANA AMERICANA | ROOTS ROOTS 33 3 3 1⁄3 1⁄ 3 MILE MILE SHOWCASE SHOWCASE EEVERY VERY R

THE T HE ST STRING RING RAYS RAYS

$$8/DOORS 8 / DOORS 7PM/ALL 7PM /ALL AGES AGES

1ST & 3RD 1ST 3R D THURS T HURS

FRI F RI S SEP EP 6 / BLUES BLUES | FFOLK OLK | ROCK R O CK

RECKLESS R ECKLESS IN VEGAS VEGAS $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM W WW.HOPMONK.COM Book yyour Book our n next e x t eevent vent with with us, us , u up p to to 150 1 50 p people, eople, kim@hopmonk.com kim@hopmonk .com

31

Galleries RECEPTIONS Aug 21 At 4pm. Steele Lane Community Center, “AIARE Design Awards Exhibit,” winning entries from the Redwood Empire Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. 415 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3282.

Through Oct 2, “Scrap Metal Art,” works by James Selby. Reception, Aug 22, 5pm. Through Oct 3, “Scrap Metal Art,” works by James Selby. Reception, Aug 22, 5pm. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Oct 12, “Art Delicious,” work by artists from Becoming Independent and Studios on A. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Aug 22

Gallery 300

At 5pm. Finley Community Center, “Saints Misbehavin’,” art of saints by Grant Greenwald; “Scrap Metal Art,” works by James Selby. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

Through Aug 31, “Pieces,” art by Cat Kaufman and Mary Vaughan. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. Open Sat, 12 to 5, and by appointment. 707.332.1212.

Aug 25 At 4pm. Riskpress Gallery, “Reverse Image,” printmakers show their process. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

SONOMA COUNTY

Graton Gallery Through Sep 22, “In Pursuit of Happiness,” new work by Susan Ball and Frances Arnold. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. TuesSun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Aug 24, “Regenesis,” art, science and technology projects by Robert Michael Smith. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Calabi Gallery

New Leaf Gallery

Through Aug 31, “Summer Selection,” new selection of works by gallery artists as well as vintage art. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Through Sep 29, “Black, White, Red,” sculpture show. Cornerstone Place, 23588 Hwy 121, Sonoma. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.933.1300.

Through Sep 1, “Art of the Line,” describing Schulz’s process, from the tools he used to the research he undertook. Through Oct 14, “Barking Up the Family Tree,” featuring comic strips with Snoopy’s siblings. Through Oct 27, “Mid-Century Modern,” works of prominent post-war-era decorative, textile and furniture designers. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Finley Community Center Through Oct 2, “Saints Misbehavin’,” Bytantine art of saints by Grant Greenwald. Reception, Aug 22, 5pm.

Occidental Center for the Arts Through Sep 1, “Light and Shadow,” original art. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Join an exciting new movement in the healthcarLÄLSK

RiskPress Gallery Through Aug 25, “Reverse Image,” printmakers show their process. Closing reception, Aug 25, 4pm. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Sep 8, “Juried Fine Art Show,” works from North Bay residents. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Through Sep 7, “Monoprints,” pieces by Harry Frank. Through Sep 7, “Not Just Landscapes,” scenery in any style, from cityscapes to nature views. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Aug 25, “Akin,” pieces by photographer Nicole Katano and painter Marc Katano. Through Aug 25, “Stand by Me,” photographs by Nicole Katano of the Sonoma Valley Mentoring Alliance. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Be a Pioneer! You can make an impact in the emerging and changing U.S. healthcare systems. This growing profession is ranked high in a recent study of emerging careers in the health care field. And, the SSU Patient Navigator Certificate Program is one of the most comprehensive Patient Navigator programs in the country. We train graduates to support patients with information and resources for basic needs, navigate complex medical systems, and much more. This one year program is offered in partnership with the Integrative Medical Clinic Foundation (IMCF). The curriculum has been approved by the Nursing and Counseling Departments at SSU. Now with a 6-month internship opportunity, offering on-the-job experience. For more information or to apply visit us at www.sonoma.edu/exed/patient-navigator or call 707.664.2394

Steele Lane Community Center Through Oct 10, “AIARE Design Awards Exhibit,” winning entries from the Redwood Empire Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Reception, Aug 21, 4pm. 415 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 7; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.543.3282.

School of Extended & International Education

Viva Chocolat Through Sep 25, “The Art of Ricky Watts,” paintings by the local artist. 110 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Open late on weekends; closed Wednesdays. 707.778.9888.

Lots of Band Instruments for Rent for Your School Musicians

Petaluma Arts Center Through Sep 15, “Undercover Genius: The Creative Lives of Artists with Disabilities,” curated by Janet Moore and Geri Olson. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Petaluma Museum Through Aug 25, “Changing Courses,” the history and future of the Petaluma river. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.

MARIN COUNTY Art Works Downtown Through Aug 23, “Transitions,” photography-based imagery from 32 Bay Area artists. Through Sep 7, “Back to School?!” digital abstracts by Suzanne Bean. Through Sep 9, “Mary Macey Butler,” photographs. Through Sep 10, “Hollywood Holograms,” contemporary, postmodern multimedia paintings by Deanna Pedroli. ) 1337 Fourth St,

32

2SVXL1EMR7XVIIX7IFEWXSTSPˆ707.823.7664 TISTPIW$WSRMGRIXˆTISTPIWQYWMGSRPMRIGSQ

...................................................

Charles M Schulz Museum

Patient Na]PNH[VY*LY[PÄJH[L7rogram

ˆ;IQEMRXEMRXLI instrument ˆ:IV]VIEWSREFPI prices ˆ4YVGLEWITPERW EZEMPEFPI ˆ%PPKSSHXLMRKW ˆ'EPPYW Staffed entirely by accomplished musicians. Instruments of all sorts, lessons and good conversation. Since 1969

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 21–27, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Arts Events

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 21–27, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

32

ECHO Gallery

End of Summer Bash

Through Aug 31, “Sum Sum Summer,” art by John Casey, Shawn Wisenhunt, Emma Higgens and Kim Ford Kitz. 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.

Drum circle and music by Rhythm Child, many activities for kids. Aug 23, 4pm. $11. Bay Area Discovery Museum, Fort Baker, 557 McReynolds Rd, Sausalito. 415.339.3900.

Napa Valley Museum

Festival 2013 Independencia Salvadorena

Through Sep 29, “Date with the Devil,” new work inspired by the legend of Faust. Reception, Aug 30, 5:30pm. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Tues-Sun, 10am to 4pm. 707.944.0500.

Comedy Thai Rivera

El Salvadorian bands Aniceto Molina ,Los Hermanos Flores,El Zoruyo y Su Sonora, Las Bellas Indomables and Fuego Latino help celebrate the traditions and culture of their home country. Aug 25, 10am. $30. Marin Fairgrounds, Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael.

Politically incorrect comedian from Los Angeles. Chris Cruz opens. Hosted by Torio Van Grol. Aug 23, 9pm and Aug 24, 7 and 9:30pm. $20. Murphy’s Irish Pub, 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Forgotten Felines Mobile Adoption

Rafael Film Center on Aug. 25. See Film, adjacent.

Saturday Night Comedy Special

A E

Wayne Federman, Larry Miller and Mark Pitta. Aug 24, 8pm. $36-$50. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Sign up to participate in the contest that begs the question: for whom will the bell toll? Aug 27, 8:30pm. Bergamot Alley, 328-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8720.

MAKER OF MAGIC ‘Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan’ screens at the

( 31

San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

Bolinas Museum Through Aug 25, “Birds of the Sierra Nevada,” paintings by Keith Hansen. Through Aug 25, “Celebrating 30 years,” featuring historical pieces from the museum’s past. Through Aug 25, “Constructed Surfaces,” color photographs by Andy Rappaport. Through Aug 25, “Consuelo Kanaga,” pieces by the American photographer from the collection of Susie Tompkins Buell. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

Elsewhere Gallery Through Aug 31, “WabiSabi,” a taste of Japanese culture through craft with Kai Grover. 1828 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. Daily, 11 to 6. 415.526.2855.

Gallery Bergelli Through Sep 15, “Summer Group Show,” art by Bryn Craig, Phoebe Brunner and others. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Gallery Route One Through Sep 8, “Box Show,” 150 artists choose from three boxes and create a work of art. Closing party and live auction, Sep 8, 3pm. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt

Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Community Foundation Through Sep 27, “Breaking Barriers,” featuring work by Bay Area artists with disabilities. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Marin MOCA Through Aug 25, “Out of Order,” a MarinMOCA member exhibition. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Marin Society of Artists Through Aug 31, “Trends and Impressions: Your Vision–Your Way,” juried member show. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. Mon-Thurs, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 415.454.9561.

MINE Art Gallery Through Sep 29, “Unframed Freedom,” works by Bob Stang and Sunila Bajracharya. 1820 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Aug 26, “Bay Area Women Artists,” mixed-media artwork with emphasis on exploration and abstraction. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Osher Marin JCC Through Sep 2, “Nurture,”

photos and stories midlife mothers with their families, written and created by Cyma Shapiro with photos by Shana Sureck and Tracy Cianflone. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Seager Gray Gallery Through Aug 31, “Summer Salon,” group exhibition of select gallery artists in various mediums. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

Two Bird Cafe Through Sep 10, “Ripped,” new works by Marcus Uzilevsky. Valley Inn, 625 San Geronimo Dr, San Geronimo. Wed-Sun, 8am to 3pm, 5:30 to 9pm. 415.488.0528.

NAPA COUNTY Blackbird of Calistoga Through Aug 31, “Vegetable Portraits,” photography by Lynn Karlin. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga.

di Rosa Through Sep 22, “External Combustion,” pieces by Sacramento sculptors Nathan Cordero, Julia Couzens, Chris Daubert and Dave Lane. Largest collection of contemporary Bay Area art. Tours daily. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-and-comers. Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Ron White Blue collar and brown liquor comedian on his “A Little Unprofessional” tour. Aug 24, 8pm. $62. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Events Bodega Seafood, Art & Wine Festival Annual festival with 15 restaurants, 45 beverage providers, a juried art show and live music by Tom Rigney & Flambeau, Slim Jenkins, Dginn and others. Aug 24-25, 10am. $12-$15. Watts Ranch, 16885 Bodega Hwy, Bodega.

Pick up a furry, four-legged friend. Sat, 10am. Oliver’s Market, 560 Montecito Ctr, Santa Rosa. 707.537.7123.

The Gong Show

Reptile Expo Meet them, greet them, pet them and feed them. And maybe even take a new reptilian pet home. Aug 24, 10am. $2-$5. Petaluma Community Center, 320 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma.

Streets for People Street is closed off to vehicle traffic with live music, yoga, dancing, tacos and more. Aug 25, 11am. Free. Downtown Fairfax, Bolinas Road, Fairfax.

Wunderkammer Festival Taking a cue from the Handcar Regatta, this festival still has all the Steampunk flavor with music, vendors, games, costumes and more. Aug 25, 11am. $10. Railroad Square, Fourth and Wilson streets, Santa Rosa.

Wunderkammer Pre-Party Variety show with burlesque, fire dancing, belly dancing, music and more. Aug 24, 8pm. $10. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Day of Innovation Meet local designers, educators and artists and make and explore a variety of hands-on projects. Aug 24, 11am. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Film Brilliance of the Moment Documentary film on the life of

photographer Günter Rössler. Aug 23, 7pm. $5. Loveable Rogue Bookstore, 867 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.895.1081.

The Economics of Happiness Documentary based on the Happiness Index as practiced by Bhutan and other countries as a way of life. Aug 28, 6pm. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Ferris Bueller’s Day Off High schooler ditches class and thwarts authority in a stolen car with a suicidal friend in this ‘80s coming-of-age classic. Aug 23, 7pm. $7. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

History of the America’s Cup Documentary about the world’s oldest international sporting event narrated by Walter Cronkite. Aug 22, 6pm. $25. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Mountainfilm Aug 28, “El Capitan,” “What happened to the Climbers?” “Alone on the Wall” and “Skiing on Colored Snow.” 7:30pm. $12$15. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan Documentary about the visual effects pioneer who worked on “Jason & the Argonauts” and other films. Introduction by Oscar-winning friend Craig Barron. Aug 25, 7pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Rialto Classics Aug 28, “Jaws.” 7pm. $8. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

This Is Martin Bonner A warm and perceptive meditation on friendship, human connection and getting a second chance at life. Aug 24, 7pm. $10. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

To Have & Have Not Harry Morgan (Humphrey Bogart) must decide whether to help free the French in this 1944 film featuring the debut of Lauren Bacall. Aug 27, 7pm. $7. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Cheese & Beverages Sort through the basics of cheese and beverage pairing in this hands-on tasting with author Kirstin Jackson. Aug 28, 5:30pm. $50. SHED, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

Civic Center Farmers Market Sun at 10am, “Eat Local 101” provides walking tour with information, cooking advice and ideas inspired by locally grown foods. Thurs, 8am-1pm and Sun, 8am-1pm. Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 800.897.3276.

Clinic Ole Chili Ball Chili from professional chefs and music by the Silverado Pickups. Aug 24, 4:30pm. $75-$95. Charles Krug, 2800 Main St, St Helena. 707.967.3993.

Fairfax Community Farmers Market Offering artisanal foods and locally grown and raised agricultural products. Wed, 4pm. through Sep 24. Free. Bolinas Park, 124 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax.

Flights & Bites Appetizers and wine, with music by Jam Daddy. Aug 24, 1pm. $35. West Wind Winery, 333 Willow Rd, Nicasio.

Healdsburg Farmers Market

Sonoma Valley Certified Farmers Market Fri, 9am-12:30pm. Sonoma Plaza, First St E, Sonoma. 707.538.7023. Sample food and drink from over 50 Petaluma culinary establishments. Aug 23, 3pm. $35-$40. Helen Putnam Plaza, Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma.

Tomato Tasting Enjoy over 30 varieties of tomato and hear talks about them. Aug 25, 12pm. $20. Oxbow Public Market, 610 First St, Napa.

Wednesday Night Market Food, vendors, produce, live music and activities. Wed, 5pm, through Aug 21. Free. Downtown Santa Rosa, Fourth and B streets, Santa Rosa.

West End Farmers Market Rediscover the historic heart of Sonoma agriculture. Sun through Oct 27. Free. West End Farmers Market, 817 Donahue St, Santa Rosa.

Lectures The Fire at Jack London’s Wolf House Jonah Raskin talks about the 1913 fire that devastated Jack London’s mansion. Aug 22, 7pm. $7. Sonoma County Museum, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Greywater Workshop Training on installation of water recycling system includes free parts kit. Aug 24, 9am. Free. Windsor Council Chambers, 9291 Old Redwood Hwy, Bldg 400, Windsor.

Redwood Empire Farmers Market

James Fox of the Prison Yoga Project in conversation with Nick and Amanda Giacomini of Yoga Toes. Aug 22, 7pm. $10. Toby’s Feed Barn, 11250 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1223.

Santa Rosa Original Certified Farmers Market Sat, 9am-1pm and Wed, 9am1pm. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

Sebastopol Farmers Market Local produce, meat and artisan goods. Thurs, 5pm. through Oct 29. Sebastopol Plaza, McKinley St, Sebastopol.

Readings

Taste of Petaluma

Wed, 4-7pm. Downtown Plaza, Healdsburg Avenue and Matheson Street, Healdsburg. Wed-Sat, 9amnoon. Healdsburg Farmers Market, North and Vine streets, Healdsburg. 707.431.1956.

Sat, 8:30am-1pm and Wed, 8:30am-noon. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

Garden, 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Prison Yoga Project

Arlene Francis Center Aug 23, 7pm, Bars, Breaks & Stripes, MCs and poetry in fundraiser for Trayvon Martin’s parents. $10. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Book Passage Aug 22, 7pm, “The NYPD Tapes: A Shocking Story of Cops, Cover-Ups and Courage” with Graham Rayman. Aug 23, 6:30pm, “Fire with Fire” with Jenny Han and Siobhan Vivian. Aug 23, 7pm, “Headhunters on My Doorstep: A True Treasure Island Ghost Story” with J Maarten Troost. Aug 25, 4pm, “Expansion Mastery: The Practical Guide to Living a Fully Engaged Life” with Robert Bessler. Aug 26, 7pm, The Role of Fashion in “All’s Well That Ends Well” with Marin Shakespeare Company’s Robert Currier & Abra Berman. Aug 28, 7pm, “The Trauma of Everyday Life” with Mark Epstein. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Aug 22, 4pm, “Fire with Fire” with Jenny Han and Siobhan Vivian. Aug 27, 7pm, “After Her” with Joyce Maynard. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.0563.

Larkspur American Legion Hall Aug 23, 6pm, “Farmacology: What Innovative Family Farming Can Teach Us About Health and Healing” with Daphne Miller, MD. $30-$40. 500 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.6107.

Theater All’s Well That Ends Well

Lawrence Broderick gives a presentation on the resident birds of prey. Aug 23, 7pm. $10. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Marin Shakespeare Company presents the Bard’s romantic comedy. Dates and times vary. Fri-Sun through Sep 28. $20-$38. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, 890 Belle Ave, Dominican University, San Rafael.

Science Buzz Cafe

Blithe Spirit

Aug 27, “The Biomaterials Story: Taking a Cue from Nature” with Karen Frindell Teuscher, PhD. 7pm. $5. French

A medium summons a man’s first wife who does her best to disrupt his current marriage in this Noel Coward comedy.

Raptors of the Laguna

Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. Through Aug 25. $18. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

A Comedy of Errors Marin Shakespeare Company’s presentation of the Bard’s classic with a Texas twist. Fri-Sun, 8pm. through Sep 29. $20-$37.50. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, 890 Belle Ave, Dominican University, San Rafael.

The Dining Room Six performers delineate the dying lifestyle of wealthy WASPdom and the now neglected room which was once a vital center of family life. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 3pm. Through Aug 31. $12-$15. Russian River Hall, 20347 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.849.4873.

Good People Tony award-winning play about a South Boston single mother asking for help makes its Bay Area premiere. Times vary. Tues-Sun through Sep 15. $37$53. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

Romeo & Juliet Avalon Players presents “Shakespeare under the Stars.” Thurs-Sun, 7pm, through Aug 25. $25. Buena Vista Winery, 18000 Old Winery Rd, Sonoma. 800.926.1266.

Spamalot Musical comedy lovingly ripped from the 1975 film Monty “Python and the Holy Grail.” Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. Through Sep 22. $15-$35. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

The Tempest Prospero, the rightful Duke of Milan, plots to restore his daughter Miranda to her rightful place using illusion and skillful manipulation in this Shakespeare play. Thurs-Sun, 7pm, through Aug 25. $7-$20. Ives Park, Willow Street and Jewell Avenue, Sebastopol.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Bring a Parasol Curiosity satiated at analog invention Step right up! Come one, come all to the Wunderkammer, the steampunk celebration of mayhem and mischief. See death-defying feats of strength and ingenuity at the handcar races along the railroad tracks, painted ladies (and men) in full costume of a forgotten era in a parallel universe, and hear music, glorious music, fill the air like the Sirens’ song of mythology. Not old enough to remember the ancient Greek tales or 19th-century futurology? There’s still plenty of wonder and amazement in the children’s midway, with bounce houses of rare breed, a true Ferris wheel and the fantasmic Sonoma County Children’s Museum. And what celebration of imagined society would be complete without a full stage of music? The Church Marching Band makes merriment, and jubilation flows from the main stage courtesy of Araan Harris & the Farm Band, Dginn, Baby Seal Club and Mr. December and the Local Honey Swing Band, and the Hubbub Club makes more music most magnificently whilst traipsing about. Splendorous consumables abound, including dogs which are hot, cicles that are pop and artisan candies from Confounding Confections. Bubbly brew fermented by Lagunitas Brewery or Revive Kombucha provide a bodily buzz. The Wunderkammer goes old-timey on Saturday, Aug. 25, in Railroad Square, Santa Rosa. 11am–6pm. $10. For more, see wunderkammerfestival.com. —Nicolas Grizzle

33 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 21–27, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Food & Drink

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | AUGUST 21-27, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

žŜ

> Pers Personal ersonal Service ers Se > EEveryday day low pprices > Widest st selectio selection tion of edib tio edibles dibless dib >B Bonus for or new members me s & referra referrals rrals > Disc Discounts scounts for sc fo senior seniors ors and ve veteran veteranss M, T, F 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C; M 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5; 0â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5; W, Th 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7,, Sat S 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5 Highway Steele Highw ghway 101 ghw 01 at Stee eele Lane ee ne 2425 Cle Cleveland nd Ave, Su Suite 1755

$95

707.526.2800 70 7.526.2 6.2800 6.2

New Patients

$75

Renewals

COMPASSIONATE HEALTH OPTIONS Providing Compassionate Care and Medical Cannabis Evaluations Since 2004

E^][r=k'AZgrZ;Zkma K^Ze<Zk^K^Ze=h\mhkl +-(0LZ_^O^kb_b\Zmbhg MhmZeer<hg_b]^gmbZe

O]ddEYl[` Any Local Price

JnZebmr B=<Zk]l

1.707.568.0420

www.GREEN215.com

=hpgmhpgLZgmZKhlZ30-*.maLm9>Lm

BOHEMIAN

PLACE AN AD: Phone: 707.527.1200, Monday-Friday 8:30am-5:30pm Fax: 707.527.1288 | Email: sales@bohemian.com

A Wild Irish Rose

& Construction

Home Services Handy Jim Far West Restoration

carpentry, painting, structural work, stucco/concrete, gutter cleaning, roofing. 707.280.4891 FarWestConstr.com Jim Kennedy. CA License # 781689

g Adult Services Adult Massage

&

Mature, Independent in Marin. Call for photos. Please call before 11pm. No calls from blocked phone #. Kara, 415.233.2769.

Alternative Health Well-Being

g

A Safe Place To Be Real

Chiropractic

“Your pleasure, my business.” Holistic tantric masseuse/sur- Women, men, couples,..by a gentleman. Since 1991. rogate. Unhurried, private, heartfelt. Women — first time Aft/eve appts. visit, 50% discount. Mon–Sat. 707.799.4467(C) or 707.535.0511 (L) Jimmy. Please call after 10:30am. 707.793.2232.

g Healing & Bodywork

Relax!

VIVI

MASSAGE STUDIO FOOT REFLEXOLGY THERAPEUTIC BODY MASSAGE

707.981.7128

620 E. Washington St. Suite 208, Petaluma

Pleasure Pleasing

Relaxing massage and bodywork by male massage therapist with 13 yrs. experience. 707.542.6856.

Relax, Release, Rejuvenate Massage for men. Muscular, professional, mature. Clean, warm studio in the country, shower available. 707.696.1578.

SPIRITUAL

Connections Finding inspiration & connecting with your community

Unity of Santa Rosa An inclusive, spiritually-minded community. All are welcome. Workshops and events. Sunday School & Service 10:30am 4857 Old Redwood Hwy tel: 707.542.7729 www.UnityofSantaRosa.org

Full Body Sensual Massage

Body Work for Men & Women

With a mature, playful CMT. Strong, Thorough, Intuitive Comfortable incall location Dependable, Safe. near the J.C. in Santa Rosa. 30+ years experience. Soothing, relaxing, and fun. Colin CMT 707.823.2990 Gretchen 707.478.3952. www.colingodwin@blogspot.com Veterans Discount.

g

Wine Country Massage

Private Estate Studio in By Joe, CMT. Relaxing hot tub Kenwood. Shower Available and pool available. Will do Ayla 707.332.9370 outcalls. 707.228.6883.

Russian River Massage A Finer Touch Full body massage, Body Electric experience. In /Out. Body shaving/trimming available. Bob 707.865.2093.

BEIT AYIN brings you

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of August 21

ARIES (March 21–April 19) An Indian student named Sankalp Sinha has invented the Good Morning Sing N Shock. It’s an alarm clock that plays you a song and gives you a small electrical jolt when you hit the snooze button. The voltage applied is far less intense than, say, a taser, and is designed to energize you rather than disable you. I encourage you to seek out wake-up calls like the kind this device administers, Aries: fairly gentle, yet sufficiently dramatic to get your attention. The alternative would be to wait around for blind fate to provide the wake-up calls. They might be a bit more strenuous. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

If you google the statement “I can change overnight,” most of the results that come up are negative, like “It’s not something I can change overnight” or “I don’t think I can change overnight.” But there’s one google link to “I can change overnight.” It’s a declaration made by Taurus painter Willem de Kooning. He was referring to how unattached he was to defining his work and how easy it was for him to mutate his artistic style. I wouldn’t normally advise you Tauruses to use “I can change overnight” as your battle cry. But for the foreseeable future you do have the power to make some rather rapid and thorough transformations.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) “The artist is by necessity a collector,” said graphic designer Paul Rand. “He accumulates things with the same ardor and curiosity with which a boy stuffs his pockets. He borrows from the sea and from the scrap heap; he takes snapshots, makes mental notes and records impressions on tablecloths and newspapers. He has a taste for children’s wall scrawling as appreciative as that for prehistoric cave painting.” Whether or not you’re an artist, Gemini, this would be an excellent approach for you in the coming days. You’re in a phase when you can thrive by being a gatherer of everything that attracts and fascinates you. You don’t need to know yet why you’re assembling all these clues. That will be revealed in good time. CANCER (June 21–July 22)

Massage & Relaxation

Great Massage

Astrology

Swedish massage, body electric experience. Petaluma. Jack CMT. 707.888.8266. In/Outcall.

OPEN TO ALL!

Mystical, Meditative and Melodic Events "Into the Mystic" — A Morning of Deep Learning and Practice with Rabbi Lavey Derby Sunday Aug. 25, 9:30–11:00am The Journey Center of Santa Rosa, 1601 4th St

Yom Kippur Day of At-One-Ment Retreat Friday evening Sept. 13 and Saturday Sept. 14 *with Options for Day Only Attendance

The Lodge at Tiburon

10th Annual Beit Ayin Meditation and Chant Retreat Dec. 20–22 The Angela Center in Santa Rosa FOR INFORMATION ABOUT ANY OF THESE PROGRAMS & MORE visit: www.beitayin.org

email: beitayin@gmail.com or call 707.849.5944

Can you remember the last time you bumped up against a limitation caused by your lack of knowledge? What did it feel like? I expect that sometime soon you will have that experience again. You may shiver with worry as you contemplate the potential consequences of your continued ignorance. But you may also feel the thrill of hungry curiosity rising up in you. If all goes well, the fear and curiosity will motivate you to get further educated. You will set to work on a practical plan to make it happen.

LEO (July 23–August 22) “My story isn’t sweet and harmonious like invented stories,” wrote novelist Herman Hesse. “It tastes of folly and bewilderment, of madness and dream, like the life of all people who no longer want to lie to themselves.” As interesting as Hesse’s declaration is, let’s not take it as gospel. Let’s instead envision the possibility that when people reduce the number of lies they tell themselves, their lives may become sweeter and more harmonious as a result. I propose that exact scenario for you right now, Leo. There might be a rough adjustment period as you cut back on your self-deceptions, but eventually your folly and bewilderment will diminish as the sweet harmony grows. VIRGO (August 23–September 22) Novelist James Joyce once articulated an extreme wish that other writers have probably felt but never actually said. “The demand that I make of my reader,” said Joyce, “is that he should devote his whole life to reading my works.” Was he being mischievous? Maybe. But he never apologized or issued a retraction. Your assignment, Virgo, is to conjure up your own version of that wild desire: a clear statement of exactly what you really, really want in all of its extravagant glory. I think it’ll be healthy for you to identify this pure and naked longing. (P.S. I’m not implying that you should immediately try to get it fulfilled, though. For now, the important thing is knowing what it is.) LIBRA (September 23–October 22) Now and then a British Libra named Lloyd Scott dresses up in

funny costumes while competing in long-distance races. He does it to raise money for charity. In the 2011 London Marathon, he wore a nine-foot snail outfit for the duration of the course. It took him 27 days to finish. I suggest you draw inspiration from his heroic effort. From a cosmic perspective, it would make sense for you to take your time as you engage in amusing activities that benefit your fellow humans.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

What will you do now that you have acquired more clout and visibility? Will you mostly just pump up your self-love and bask in the increased attention? There’s nothing wrong with that, of course. But if those are the only ways you cash in on your added power, the power won’t last. I suggest you take advantage of your enhanced influence by engaging in radical acts of magnanimity. Perform good deeds and spread big ideas. The more blessings you bestow on your fellow humans, the more enduring your new perks will be.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) You’ve been pretty wild and uncontained lately, and that’s OK. I’ve loved seeing how much permission you’ve given yourself to ramble free, experiment with the improbable and risk being a fool. I suspect that history will judge a majority of your recent explorations as tonic. But now, Sagittarius, the tenor of the time is shifting. To continue being in alignment with your highest good, I believe you will have to rein in your wanderlust and start attending to the care and cultivation of your power spot. Can you find a way to enjoy taking on more responsibility? CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) “The person who can’t visualize a horse galloping on a tomato is an idiot,” said the founder of Surrealism, writer André Breton. I wouldn’t go so far as to call such an imagination-deprived soul an “idiot,” but I do agree with the gist of his declaration. One of the essential facets of intelligence is the ability to conjure up vivid and creative images in one’s mind. When daily life has grown a bit staid or stuck or overly serious, this skill becomes even more crucial. Now is one of those times for you, Capricorn. If you have any trouble visualizing a horse galloping on a tomato, take measures to boost the fertility of your imagination. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18)

“I want to be with those who know the secret things, or else alone,” wrote the eccentric ecstatic poet Rainer Maria Rilke. That wouldn’t be a good rule for you Aquarians to live by all the time. To thrive, you need a variety of cohorts and allies, including those who know and care little about secret things. But I suspect that for the next few weeks, an affinity for those who know secret things might suit you well. More than that, they may be exactly the accomplices who will help you attend to your number one assignment: exploratory holy work in the depths.

PISCES (February 19–March 20) To launch your horoscope, I’ll steal a line from a Thomas Pynchon novel: A revelation trembles just beyond the threshold of your understanding. To continue your oracle, I’ll borrow a message I heard in my dream last night: A breakthrough shivers just beyond the edge of your courage. Next, I’ll use words I think I heard while eavesdropping on a conversation at Whole Foods: If you want to cook up the ultimate love feast, you’re still missing one ingredient. And to finish this oracle, Pisces, I’ll say that if you want to precipitate the trembling revelation, activate the shivering breakthrough and acquire the missing ingredient, imitate what I’ve done in creating this horoscope. Assume the whole world is offering you useful clues, and listen closely.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

ŵŷ NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 21-27, 201 3 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Classifieds

FREE WILL

SANTA ROSA TREATMENT PROGR AM

We provide treatment for: Heroin, Oxy, Roxy, Norco and other Opiates using Methadone.

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here to help you help yourself.

QUALIFIED CANDIDATES WILL POSSESS THE FOLLOWING: â&#x2C6;&#x2018; High school diploma or equivalent. â&#x2C6;&#x2018; 1 year of merchandising experience in the beverage industry preferred. â&#x2C6;&#x2018; Must be at least 21 years of age. â&#x2C6;&#x2018; Must be able to lift overhead and stack products weighing 40 lbs. on a repetitive basis. â&#x2C6;&#x2018; Must be able to bend, lift, squat, sit, drive, and stand for prolonged periods of time. â&#x2C6;&#x2018; Must be able to work in refrigerated rooms for prolonged periods of time. â&#x2C6;&#x2018; Must have reliable transportation, maintain an acceptable driving record, valid CA driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license, and maintain auto insurance coverage in the minimum amount specified by the company. â&#x2C6;&#x2018; Must be able to follow directions and work independently with little or no supervision. â&#x2C6;&#x2018; Must possess excellent communication, time management, and customer service skills. â&#x2C6;&#x2018; Must be able to work weekends and overtime. Please send your resume and cover letter to jobs@mesabeverage.com, or fax it to 707.540.6700. Mesa Beverage is an equal opportunity and affirmative action employer.

BECOME A YOGA TEACHER or simply deepen your yoga practice at Ananda Seva Yoga Teacher Training. Starts in Oct. YA approved school. www.anandaseva.org/yoga/yoga-teacher-training OR 707.239.3650

B-12 Shots Happy Hour! â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Thursdays 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm Only â&#x20AC;&#x201C; $18 (30% off) WALK-INS ONLY. For energy, immune, fatigue, anxiety @ the Naturopathic Wellness Center @ the Integrative Medical Clinic of SR - Dr. Dana Michaels ND and Dr. Moses Goldberg ND â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 175 Concourse Blvd. 707.284.9200

ART PROGRAM MANAGER with Becoming Independent Looking for Manager to oversee our program for Artists with developmental disabilities. This includes analyzing the artistic needs of the programs and artists, coordinating Art gallery services, including sales and fiscal management. To view a full job description, and complete and application please visit our website: www.becomingindependent.org

SUBUTEX/SUBOXONE available for Safe Oxy, Roxy, Norco, Vicodin, Other Opiate Withdrawal! Confidential Program. 707.576.1919

â&#x20AC;˘ Providing Treatment since 1984 â&#x20AC;˘ Confidentiality assured

1901 Cleveland Ave Suite B â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa 707.576.0818 â&#x20AC;˘ www.srtp.net Mesa Beverage is currently seeking a Merchandiser to service our retail accounts in both Marin and Sonoma County. The Merchandiser is responsible for servicing assigned accounts by stocking, displaying, rotating and storing our products. This position is full-time, including weekends. The shift is 6am to approximately 2:30pm (end times vary). This position pays $12.00 an hour and also offers benefits.

â&#x20AC;˘ Subutex/Suboxone available

â&#x20AC;˘ MediCal accepted

PEACE IN MEDICINE IS NOW OPEN IN SANTA ROSA 1061 North Dutton Ave @ West College Ave. Santa Rosa CA 95401 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Great Prices! Visit our online menu at - www.PeaceinMedicine.org

weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here to help you help yourself.

"Barranca #11" by Robert McChesney, 1977

Open Wed thru Sun, 11 to 5pm 144 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma

707 t calabigallery.com

We provide treatment for: Heroin, Oxy, Roxy, Norco and other Opiates using Methadone. â&#x20AC;˘ Subutex/Suboxone available â&#x20AC;˘ Providing Treatment since 1984 â&#x20AC;˘ Confidentiality assured â&#x20AC;˘ MediCal accepted

SANTA ROSA TREATMENT PROGRAM 1901 Cleveland Ave Suite B â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa 707.576.0818 â&#x20AC;˘ www.srtp.net

SKIRT CHASER VINTAGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; BUY, SELL, TRADE 707.546.4021 208 Davis Street, RR Square, SR

DONATE A CAR

You know you want me. Fun, playful, sexy, and smart. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for someone like me. I do it all, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m into just about anything. I bet you can turn me on. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll let you push my buttons. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never had a relationship quite like this. I promise to treat you right and listen to your every need. Call me now, let me show you the world and more. You wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t regret it. 408-688-2220

Free towing. Running or not. Tax deductible. Help the Polly Klaas Foundation 800.322.4234.

Sonoma Co Chamber Singers Tryouts for bass, tenor. janicehall58@hotmail.com

3

Russian River Jazz & Blues Festival Sept. 21 & 22. Tickets On Sale Now! russianriverfestivals.com Box Office: 707.869.1595


NBB1334