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Uncivil Wars Bickering and disrespect abound whenever much-needed housing is proposed in Marin. What’s behind the shouting? p16

Theater Remodel p9

Miracle Fruit

p11

Pizza Punx p25

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Enrollment now open at all schools! Photo by d ennis Bolt

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Game Changer. FALL 2013

847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288 Editor Gabe Meline, ext. 202

Staff Writers Leilani Clark, ext. 106 Rachel Dovey, ext. 203 Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200

Copy Editor Gary Brandt, ext. 150

Calendar Editor Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200

Interns Anna Hecht, Nadav Soroker

Contributors Michael Amsler, Rob Brezsny, Dani Burlison, Richard von Busack, Jessica Dur Taylor, Gretchen Giles, Daedalus Howell, James Knight, Jacquelynne Ocaña, Bruce Robinson, Sara Sanger, Bruce Stengl, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow

Design Director Kara Brown

Production Operations Coordinator Mercy Perez

Senior Designer Jackie Mujica, ext. 213

Layout Artists Gary Brandt, Tabi Zarrinnaal

Advertising Director Lisa Santos, ext. 205

101 @ ROHNERT PARK

Advertising Account Managers Lynda Rael, ext. 204 Mercedes Murolo, ext. 207

Circulation Manager Steve Olson, ext. 201

GET CARDED.

Sales Operations Manager Deborah Bonar, ext. 215

Sign up today for a Graton Rewards card and enter to win a 4-pack of Lower Box seat tickets and a chance to throw out the 1st pitch at the Giants vs. Pirates game on Aug. 24th!

Publisher Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Third-class postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2011 Metrosa Inc. Rohnert Park, CA. © 2013 Graton Resort & Casino

Cover illustration by Bruce Stengl. Cover design by Kara Brown.

5

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‘Wine Ghost’ takes a close second, this is our favorite art at the Sonoma County Fair this year.

Submit your photo for publication to photos@bohemian.com, and follow us on Instagram at @nbaybohemian.

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‘Wanted: Gay Eskimos for Marin Affordable Housing Complex.’ COVE R STORY P16

Wells Fargo Center Remodel P9 Spirit Works Distillery P15 Bella Andre’s Big Deal P21

Jewelry Repurposing Specialist Expert Repairs Local Designers

Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p9 Dining p11 Restaurants p13 Wineries p14

Swirl p15 Cover Feature p16 Culture Crush p20 Arts & Ideas p21 Stage p23

Film p24 Music p25 A&E p29 ClassiďŹ ed p35 Astrology p35

ABOUT THE COVER ARTIST This issue’s cover art is by Bruce Stengl, an eerily unaging Santa Rosa artist and illustrator once known for inciting the attention of the local environmental crimes division for actions he would rather you did not ask about. When not completing panels for his epic comic book ‘Rabbit Boy,’ he can be found pumping iron, so to speak, to Ozzy Osbourne’s ‘Black Rain’ in an elusive goal to achieve perfectly toned pecs.

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6

BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies No Size Fits All

Up BLEEP Creek

Saving the BLEEPin’ Petaluma slough BY JONAH RASKIN

R

ecently, I mentioned to a couple of Petalumans that the waters that ebb and flow through their town are polluted—and watched them wince visibly. Ducking the facts won’t help to save the waters, the watershed and the wetlands. To protect the environment, it’ll help to know its history. For much of the past, humans haven’t cared a BLEEP about the beauty of the place. They widened what was once called a creek, dredged it and straightened it so boats could move up and down quickly. Time was money. They also filled in parts of the creek, and built docks and wharfs to unload and reload quickly. The citizens who want to “Save the Petaluma River” are my friends. Those in the know, however, usually refer to it as a tidal slough. Of course, “river” sounds sexier. If we’re going to preserve it, we might recognize that the tidal slough is sadly polluted, that it’s the most heavily polluted of all the waterways that flow into San Pablo Bay, that it has an excess of nitrogen, hot spots of copper and nickel, and low dosages of oxygen, which isn’t good for fish. We ought to make this place into a genuine national treasure. To do that, we’ll have to take individual responsibility for the environment. There’s too much pollution from cars and too much BLEEP from dogs that ends up in the tidal slough. I would hate to be up BLEEP’s creek without a paddle. To preserve the watershed we’ll have to start by being more conscious than we are now of the water we waste, the trash we manufacture, the toxins we add to the air and the earth. Hey, slow down, slow is beautiful. It might even be sexier. Jonah Raskin lives in Santa Rosa and writes about the environment. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

I agree with Jessica Dur Taylor (“Fear Factor”, July 31) when she says that cognitive behavioral therapy can be an effective treatment for social anxiety. However, her article glosses over a significant problem with the type of CBT discussed in her article, and it perpetuates a myth about talk therapy. Exposure therapy can be severely distressing—sometimes too distressing for a person to tolerate. For that and other reasons, studies have shown dropout rates averaging around 25 percent and as high as 50 percent or more. Someone may tolerate and respond better to another form of therapy, and it’s the therapist’s job to match the therapy to the individual. There’s no such thing as one-size-fits-all. Second, the article’s depiction of talk therapy as “lie-on-the-couch-andwhine” therapy doesn’t reflect the state of talk therapy today. Short-term psychodynamic therapy, for example, doesn’t rehash the past; it focuses on helping a client recognize when they’re repeating dysfunctional patterns they learned in the past so they can respond in new ways to what’s happening in the here and now. Finally, the writer defames talk therapists when she suggests that some therapists dislike CBT because they’d rather have long-term clients than provide the most effective treatment. Such unethical behavior could quickly lead to a therapist’s license being revoked. Disseminating knowledge about an effective therapy such as CBT is extremely helpful; perpetuating outdated stereotypes and making unwarranted accusations of unethical behavior by therapists who provide other, equally effective types of therapy is not.

DR. JOANNA PASHDAG, CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST Santa Rosa

Patriot Manning

Americans express horror at Germans for being silent during World War II and covering up atrocities. We are appalled at them when they say, “I was only following orders.” We believe those orders were unconscionable and should not have been followed. Since Bradley Manning released documents proving that the United States is committing war crimes, he has been pursued as a criminal. Now he has been convicted of charges that could lead to many years in prison. This is hypocrisy of a very ugly sort. Had a young German done the same in 1940, Americans would hail him as a hero. To prosecute Manning and put him in prison is a shameful and dangerous act. It sends a message to those who have access to important information that they are risking their careers and freedom if they break silence. Bradley Manning is a real patriot and has done us a great service. He should be free.

MOSS HENRY Santa Rosa

Efren Needs Better Nutrition There are two victims here, and one is clearly the woman who was being frightened by a crazed man (“Falling Star,” July 17). At the same time, it is important to realize that demented behavior is just that—demented. In other words, Efren Carrillo was not his usual—his real—self. Unlike a broken leg, mental illness is a fairly invisible malady. But it is not intentional. Nor is it strictly in the mind, but has a physiological basis. Prescription drugs for mental illness are based on that very physiology. Therefore, everyone can grasp the concept that rebalancing one’s biochemistry will result in improved health. No one is born with a need for Prozac, but everyone requires various nutrients that are scarce in our modern diet.

Rants

Carrillo will recover faster if he adds super-nutrition to his treatment plan. In fact, anyone w-ould regain their real selves faster with good nutrition. The computer axiom GIGO is also true for people: “Garbage In, Garbage Out.”

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

of the fountain in Santa Rosa’s Courthouse Square

2 Walking sociological

experiment Courtney Love to play the Phoenix Aug. 24

3 The billionaire and the

newsroom: Amazon’s Jeff Bezos buys ‘Washington Post’

4 George W. has heart

surgery; doctors surprised to find a heart in there

5 Miss Traverso’s, but that Luther Burbank Savings design on B St. still amazes

D E D E’S R ENTALS & Property Management, Inc.

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Via online

1 RIP Ruth Asawa, creator

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LAUREN AYERS

Top Five

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We are all victims of the food processing industry that “buys low and sells high,” putting cheap but addictive replacements for real food into pretty boxes and knowingly using the gateway drug of sugar to hook us on these nonfoods. These food corporations are no better than drug lords.

By Tom Tomorrow

SO

Carrillo can use willpower, prescriptions, talk therapy and group support, but those won’t compensate for the lack of omega-3s (DHA, EPA), vitamin D, magnesium, iodine, and so many more, in his diet.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 7–1 3, 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

THIS MODERN WORLD

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Nadav Soroker

Paper

As the hunger strike by California state prisoners protesting solitary-confinement conditions entered its third week, at least six activists blocked the entrance to the state building in downtown Oakland on Aug. 5. Around 300 prisoners continue to refuse food as part of a mass statewide protest that began at the Pelican Bay State Prison solitary unit, where some prisoners have been held for years (one inmate has been in solitary for 42 years, according to a recent Mother Jones article) without access to phone calls or family. Carl Patrick, a Petaluma-raised activist, told a reporter from CBS that the goal of Monday’s protest was to call on Gov. Brown and the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to enter into “meaningful negotiations with the prisoners.” By the end of the day, at least seven arrests had been made after activists entered the lobby of the building.

Occupy Media AMEN! In less than a week, all remnants of the Ruth Finley Person Theater’s former life as a chapel will be gone.

Nearly Showtime The Wells Fargo Center gets a $2.8 million remodel BY GABE MELINE

W

ith the extremely loud noise rumbling from the main theater, concrete dust in the air and 40-odd construction workers running around, one might think the Wells Fargo Center for the Arts would be clearing out its calendar. But in the lobby last week, wearing a hard hat and going over plans

amid the constant clamor, executive director Rick Nowlin casually mentions— in a raised voice to cut through the noise—“We have a wedding here on Saturday.” “Believe it or not,” adds Mark Hagenlocher, director of operations, “we’re in the home stretch here. Our first show is 16 days away.” In the midst of a $2.8 million remodel that will give the

main theater at the 30-year-old performing arts center new floor seats, a new sound system and a drastically overhauled stage and backstage area, the center’s staff is surprisingly calm. They’re confident that the center will reopen on schedule, with the changes boosting the center’s stature in an increasingly competitive industry. “All of our wish list has been checked off,” says Hagenlocher. ) 10

Want to learn how to get your point across to newspapers, radio and other media outlets? Peter Phillips, professor of sociology at Sonoma State University and former director of Project Censored, leads a basic media skills training on Aug. 12. Attendees will get tips on how to write press releases and public service announcements, how to organize a media campaign and how to develop interview skills and talking points. The preregistration deadline is Aug. 9; donations are requested. The event is sponsored by Occupy Sonoma County on Monday, Aug. 12 at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation. 547 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa. 6:30pm. $5–$20 donation. For more information, contact emerald@ocsoco.org. —Leilani Clark

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

9 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 7–1 3, 201 3 | BOH E MI A N.COM

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Going Hungry

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Remodel ( 9 For the main theater, this includes new seating on the ďŹ&#x201A;oor that can be removed for standingroom-only shows; new raised ADA platforms; a new sound system and speakers; and the removal of two bulky speaker towers and piano storage boxes on either side of the stage, resulting in unobstructed views from the â&#x20AC;&#x153;cheap seats.â&#x20AC;? New LED aisle lighting, a new color scheme of gray and burgundy and a raised stage are all coming in the next week. Behind the scenes are ďŹ xes that audiences may not notice directly, but will improve the booking capabilities of the center. A baptismal font from the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s former use as the Christian Life Center has been removed, and along with it a nine-foot platform that performers once needed to walk over to get to the stage. Crews loading in equipment had to do so through the front doors and down the aisle of the theater; now, new eight-foot doors allow load-in from the outside. For the ďŹ rst time, ďŹ re sprinklers will be installed, and a raised heating and air conditioning system means 10 feet of extra space above the stage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you have the Peking acrobats in here,â&#x20AC;? Hagenlocher says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not going to be scraping the ceiling.â&#x20AC;? The remodel comes at a pivotal time for the center, after what Nowlin calls â&#x20AC;&#x153;a rough few years,â&#x20AC;? echoing most nonproďŹ ts weathering the recession. A sale of land for the construction of Sutter hospital next door gave the center a ďŹ nancial cushion, but about 20,000 square feet of the building, rented out to a series of private and charter schools over the years, has been mostly empty since 2011. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The loss of the school was a signiďŹ cant hit. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s $700,000 of revenue,â&#x20AC;? says Nowlin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It helped fund a lot of what we do.â&#x20AC;? Then thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the new Green Music Center at SSU, which in its ďŹ rst year hosted several acts that in the past had played the Wells Fargo Center. But because the Green Music Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s specialty is in acoustic-based performance, Nowlin says, the Wells Fargo

Center can focus now on ampliďŹ ed shows. (Removable seats to create a dance ďŹ&#x201A;oor are long overdue; Hagenlocher predicts, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re gonna have a ballet one day, a hard rock band the next day and an educational show the next.â&#x20AC;?) The relocation of the Santa Rosa Symphony to the Green Music Center, too, allowed the Wells Fargo Center to rethink the acoustics of the theater, remove bulky choral risers and take over symphony storage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We really see ourselves as complementary to what they do,â&#x20AC;? says Nowlin.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re gonna have a ballet one day, and a hard rock band the next day.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Built in 1974 as the Christian Life Center before turning into a performing arts center in 1981, the former Luther Burbank Center entered into a naming-rights deal with Wells Fargo in 2005. Though that deal expires in 2015, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in discussions right now with Wells Fargo to extend it,â&#x20AC;? says Nowlin. Future phases of the centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s remodel include elevators, balcony and restroom renovation, landscaping, a new roof, new windows and doors, a paint job and repaving the parking lot. The total price tag for all phases is $10 million, to be raised from sponsors and community partners. (Like many performing arts centers, ticket sales pay for only a fraction of the centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s overall operating costs.) The ďŹ rst show in the renovated theater is set for Aug. 16 with Patti LaBelle, in a theater ďŹ nally distanced completely from its former life as a chapel. Reminded of the long tradition of artists joking about performing inside a church, Nowlin nods knowingly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hopefully,â&#x20AC;? he says, in the ďŹ nal stretch of renovations, â&#x20AC;&#x153;we wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hear that anymore.â&#x20AC;?

MALLEABLE MUNCHIES Up is down, day is night, and lemons aren’t sour with the power of one little tablet.

Flavor Trippin’ The pleasures of putting one’s tongue in an altered state BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

H

ey, you. ’Sup? Do you party? Yeah, me too. Hey, I’ve got something I bet you’ve never tried. Wanna go into the kitchen and take a hit? Yeah, it’s just this little red tablet. Let it dissolve on your tongue— don’t rush it, or it won’t work. Now taste this lemon and try not to freak out, OK? Weird, right? It’s sweet! It’s

not sour at all! Here, try a lime. The tablet I gave you is Synsepalum dulcificum, sold as miracle fruit, a completely legal, organic berry that can be grown in your house, even. It turns sour into sweet, but preserves all other flavors that go into your mouth. That means that, though it will be sweeter, the banana will still taste like banana, the strawberry like strawberry and the snozberries taste like . . . well, you get the

picture. Cool, right? Keep eating stuff, try different things. It’ll last for about two hours or so, but be careful not to eat too many lemons—just because you can’t taste the sour acidity doesn’t mean it won’t burn a hole in your gut if you eat too much. Have you ever had pineapple—on miracle fruit? Oh, man, it’s, like, soooo much more intense. It’s like someone put a pineapple inside a pineapple and covered it with a pineapple-reduction sauce. The

sweetness is unreal, it’s like a different kind of sweet, like stevia or agave or something. It’s not quite like sugar, but it doesn’t taste fake like Splenda, either. Oh, and Greek yogurt is like soft serve ice cream. Just right out of the container. The best kind is the nonfat, because it’s a little more sour. The more sour something is, the sweeter it tastes when you’ve popped a miracle fruit. Let me warn you, though: everyone has a different reaction. Some feel a stronger flavor shift, and some apparently taste bitter foods as somewhat sweet. I don’t have that reaction. I tried balsamic vinegar, like someone suggested, and, damn, it was nasty. It was like taking a sip of really bad vinegar, like worse than normal. And onions? Forget it. It enhanced the spiciness and raw flavor of the onion. It was pretty much unbearable. Some people say Guinness beer is tastier on miracle fruit, but I think it still tastes like delicious Guinness beer, with little or no change. The berry comes from West Africa, and has been eaten there by indigenous peoples for hundreds of years. It was discovered by the Western world by explorers in the 18th century. It works through the protein miraculin, which binds to taste buds and induces sweetness when it comes in contact with acids. Sounds like a James Cameron movie, right? Too fake to be real, like mining an alien world for “unobtanium.” But it’s real, and I can get it for you whenever you want. Just give me, like, $2 per hit. That’s the friend price, you know. Of course there are other foods that change the chemistry of flavor. Anyone who’s eaten spicy food knows the relief that comes from sugar, especially dairy sugar. I once absentmindedly touched my finger to my lips after cutting habañero peppers, and spent the next hour with my face covered in yogurt and sour cream, moaning in pain and screaming at everyone, “This isn’t funny! It hurts!” Dairy was the only thing that helped. ) 12

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 7–1 3, 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Nicolas Grizzle

Dining

11

12

Italian Comfort Food

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | AUGUST 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1 3, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

â&#x20AC;Ś cooked to perfection

Dine with w ith us u s soon. s o on . Dine Č&#x2C6; Č&#x2C6;     Č&#x2C6;  Č&#x2C6;   

Â&#x2014;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Č&#x201A;Â&#x2014;Â?Č&#x2C6;ÍŁÍ&#x153;ͣǤͤ͢Í?Ǥͼͥͣ͠  Â&#x2014;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022; Č&#x201A;Â&#x2014; Â?Č&#x2C6;ÍŁÍ&#x153; ͣǤ ͤ ͢Í?Ǥͼͥ Í ÍŁ ͼͤͼÍ&#x153;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2030;Â&#x192; Â&#x2122;Â&#x203A;ÇĄÂ&#x2021;Â&#x201E;Â&#x192;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2018;Â&#x17D; ÍĽ ͤ ÍĽ Í&#x153;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2030;Â&#x192; Â&#x2122; Â&#x203A;ÇĄ ÇĄ Â&#x2021; Â&#x201E; Â&#x192; Â&#x2022; Â&#x2013; Â&#x2018; Â&#x2019; Â&#x2018;Â&#x17D; Â&#x2026;Â&#x2026;Â&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2026;Â&#x17D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;ǤÂ&#x2026;Â&#x2018;Â? Â&#x192; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2026;Â&#x17D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2020; Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;ǤÂ&#x2026;Â&#x2018;Â?

Thai House Lunch specials start at $7.95 Includes soup or salad Mon-Fri only

Open 7 days a week Sun-Th 11:30-9:30 Fri-Sat 11:30-10:00 525 4th Street(Upstairs) 707.526.3939

3883 Airway Drive Ste 145, Santa Rosa 707.528.3095 www.chloesco.com Mâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;F, 8amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm

angez Bien! Quiche Lorraine Squares Mini Croque Monsieurs Mini Savory Croissant Tray Pissaladiere Crotini Full Catering Menu Available

unwind on the coast Happy Hour 3-5 Daily

Assorted Indian snacks, Mixed Platters $6 Samosas $3. All Bottled Beer $3

Authentic Indian Cuisine & select American Summer Fare

Bombay style Indian Chinese entrees also Open for Lunch & Dinner 11:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm

Sizzling Tandoor II 9960 HWY 1 s 707-865-0625

Miracle Berry ( 27 And thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s salt to counteract bitterness. I used to get the weirdest looks when Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d go into the coffee shop by the office and put a dash of salt into my black coffee. But, hey, the coffee shop made bitter coffee and I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like cream, so this helped me get a caffeine ďŹ x without sacriďŹ cing too much taste. But, boy, this miracle fruit. Ya know how pot is used to help cancer patients and stuff? Miracle fruit could seriously help diabetics curb their sugar craving. Instead of satisfying a sweet tooth with a cookie-inspired insulin spike, pop a miracle fruit and eat some unsweetened Greek yogurt. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nutritious and has probiotic properties, which aids in digestion. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all good, right? Wrong. Even though itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s legal to buy, consume and sell, its extract is classiďŹ ed as a food additive and would be subject to USDA review, which would take years. In fact, in 1974 Robert Harvey was all set to launch a company selling the berryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s extract, primarily marketing it as a health product to diabetics. The USDA had been on his side, leading him to believe it would be labeled â&#x20AC;&#x153;generally recognized as safe.â&#x20AC;? He was all set to market products like â&#x20AC;&#x153;miracle berry lollies,â&#x20AC;? which tested better than regular ones with focus groups. But a week before the launch, the USDA changed its mind and classiďŹ ed it as an additive, requiring more years of testing. Harvey couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford it, and the company folded before it even beganâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;some say because of behind-the-scenes ďŹ nagling from the Sugar Association, a sugar-industry lobbyist (not a soul pop group from the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;70s, as I ďŹ rst suspected). But, hey, at least we can still get the tablets and berries for home use. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m gonna get some people together and have a ďŹ&#x201A;avor-tripping party. Put a bunch of sour stuff out and give everyone a hit of miracle berry. Wanna come? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just two bucks a hitâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;friend price.

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

Sports Bar. $$. Home of the almost-famous bacon cheeseburger. Seventeen beers on tap (wine list available). Fourteen flat screen televisions to watch all of the hottest sports events. Two great pool tables. Lunch and dinner daily. 3082 Marlow Rd # B8, Santa Rosa. 707.573.9453.

S O N OMA CO U N TY

restaurant property. Dinner daily. 29 E MacArthur St, Sonoma. 707.938.2929.

MARIN CO U N T Y

Cape Cod Fish & Chips

Sonoma-Meritage Martini California-French. $$$. The menu, which changes daily, is well-rounded with plenty of options, thanks in no small part to the fresh seafood bar. Dinner daily. 165 W Napa St, Sonoma. 707.938.9430.

Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $.

Fish and chips. $. A dingy hole in the wall–just like a real chippy! This popular lunch spot offers perfectly cooked fish and chips to eat in or take out. Open daily. 7530 Commerce Blvd, Cotati. 707.792.0982.

Farmhouse Inn & Restaurant CaliforniaFrench. $$$$. A splurgeworthy, romantic inn with an extensive wine list and highly polished service. Dinner, ThursMon. 7871 River Rd, Forestville. 707.887.3300.

Healdsburg Bar & Grill American. $-$$ Gourmet burgers and potent cocktails from the owners of Cyrus. It ain’t fancy, but it’s awfully good, with topnotch ingredients and low prices. Lunch and dinner daily. 245 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.3333.

Le Bistro French. $$. A tiny space, simple menu, excellent food–and a reasonable price. Dinner, Wed-Sun. 312 Petaluma Blvd S, Petaluma. 707.762.8292.

Monti’s Rotisserie & Bar California cuisine. $-$$. Small plates and a few larger entrées with emphasis on house-roasted meats. Lunch and dinner daily. 714 Village Ct, Santa Rosa. 707.568.4404.

Pub Republic Pub fare. $-$$. Pub grub from Petaluma’s southernmost tip, featuring Brussels sprout tacos and a hearty selection of brews. Lunch and dinner daily; weekend brunch. 3120 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma. 707.782.9090.

Saddles Steakhouse. $$$$$$$. A steakhouse in the best American tradition, with top-quality grass-fed beef. Pies are made from fruit trees on

Sushi Tozai Japanese. $$. Spare, clean ambiance and some of the freshest sushi you’ll ever eat. Lunch and dinner, TuesSun. 7531 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.9886.

Three Squares Cafe Cafe. $-$$. Home-style cooking in iconic Railroad Square location. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun.205 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.4300.

Tolay Californian. $$-$$$. Sonoma County cuisine is the specialty, with entrees focusing on local wild and farmed foods. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. In the Sheraton Sonoma County, 745 Baywood Drive, Petaluma. 707.283.2900.

The Villa Italian. $-$$. Spectacular views, superb service. Seafood, steak, poultry, seasonal specialties, pizza from wood-burning oven, patio dining. Open 7 days a week. 3901 Montgomery Drive, Santa Rosa 707.528.7755.

Vineyards Inn Spanish. $$. Authentic foods from Spain, fresh fish off the fire broiler, extensive tapas, as well as paellas and more. Emphasis on organic. Open for lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon. 8445 Sonoma Hwy. (Highway 12), at Adobe Canyon Road, Kenwood. 707.833.4500.

Viva Cocolat Dessert. $. After dinner in downtown Petaluma, stopping at this quaint chocolate shop is very nearly required. Open late on weekends; closed Wednesdays. 110 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. 707.778.9888.

Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Comforts Californian. $$. The Chinese chicken salad is beyond rapturous. Excellent celebrity sightings. Eat in or takeout. Breakfast and lunch daily. 335 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.454.9840. Copita Tequileria y Comida Mexican. $$. California-inspired preparation of traditional Mexican fare, including spit-roasted chicken, homemade tamales and “eight-hour” carnitas. Some ingredients are sourced from the restaurant’s own organic garden. Lunch and dinner daily. 739 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.331.7400.

Drake’s Beach Cafe Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Mon. 1 Drake’s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Finnegan’s Marin Pub fare. $$. Irish bar with the traditional stuff. Lunch and dinner daily. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.899.1516.

Marin Brewing Co Pub food. $-$$. Excellent soups, salads, pub grub and awardwinning pork-beer sausage. Lunch and dinner daily. 1809 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.4677. Mountain Home Inn American. $$-$$$$. Great summer sandwiches with a view atop Mt Tamalpais. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley. 415.381.9000.

Nick’s Cove Seafood/

contemporary American. $$$$. Fresh from the bay oysters, upscale seafood, some steaks and a great burger. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 23240 State Route 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033.

Sol Food Puerto Rican. $. Flavorful, authentic and homestyle at this Puerto Rican eatery, which is as hole-in-thewall as they come. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. San Rafael locations: 811 Fourth St. 415.451.4765. 901 & 903 Lincoln Ave. 415.256.8903. Mill Valley location: 401 Miller Ave, Mill Valley.

N A PA CO U N T Y Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. Alexis Baking Co Cafe. $-$$. Alexis excels at baked goods and offers killer breakfasts and sensible soup’n’-salad lunches. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1517 Third St, Napa. 707.258.1827.

Bouchon French. $$$. A Keller brother creation with a distinctly Parisian bistro ambiance, offering French classics. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 6534 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.8037. Brannan’s Grill California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

13

SMALL BITES

Me + Eat = Meat There are two ways to view Cochon 555 Heritage Fire in St. Helena. With closeup photos of chefs, maybe set to some Ratatouille-esque jazz and lots of posed, happy smiles, it looks like a highend, winery food event. But that wouldn’t be Cochon. No. It’s so tied to fire and meat that it used to be called “Primal.” Cochon tours 13 cities and crowns a “King and Queen of Porc” (won in 2011 by Santa Rosa’s Duskie Estes and John Stewart of Zazu). Because of this, it’s best imagined through photos of wide-eyed chefs in bloody butcher coats, knife in hand, laughing maniacally while staring at a flayedout side of beef on a makeshift cross tilted over a massive bonfire while huge, slow, doom-metal guitar riffs from Sunn o))) and Isis shake rib cages of the living. Specters of slaughtered pig, goat, squab, thresher shark, sturgeon, duck, cow, rabbit, lamb, lobster and chicken haunt the grounds, their spirits permeating the bones of all who consume them. Oh, and there’s wine, too. Like, really, really good wine. The chef list reads like a who’s who of cooking, with meat masters from the Thomas, A16, French Laundry, CIA at Greystone, Fifth Floor and many others. Cochon 555 Heritage Fire takes place Sunday, Aug. 11, at Charles Krug Winery. 2800 Main St., St. Helena. 3pm. $125–$200. 707.967.2200. —Nicolas Grizzle

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

French Laundry Definitive California Cuisine. $$$$. What else is there to say? Chef Thomas Keller’s institution is among the very best restuarants in the country. 6640 Washington St., Yountville. 707.944.2380.

Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner daily. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroir-informed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.251.1900. Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 7–1 3, 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Dining

West Side Bar & Grill

Wineries

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | AUGUST 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1 3, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

14

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;WCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N TY Fyqfsjfodf!gjof!cffs!boe!gsfti!Tpopnb!gppe (ITSX1G/MRPI]7X7IFEWXSTSP  [[[[SSHJSYVFVI[MRKGSQ JEGIFSSOGSQ[SSHJSYVFVI[MRK

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SQUARES

CAFĂŠ

Downtown Wine Casual spot with LP records on the turntable and relaxed vibe, founded by surfer-skater turned winemaker. Offers an eclectic range of wines from delicate, Thai-cuisineâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;inspired Banyan whites to rustic, brambly Hobo reds inspired by the open road. Folk Machine and Branham Estate Wines, too. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t skip the refreshingly dry Santa Lucia Highlands Riesling. Ramble on in. 132 Plaza St., Healdsburg. Open Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Monday, 11am to 6pm. Tasting fee, $5. 707.473.0337.

Francis Coppola Winery A Coney Island

BSFUVSOUPXIPMFTPNF DPNGPSUGPPE 707.545.4300

ĂąGUITUSFFUrTBOUBSPTB thethreesquarescafe.com

of the wine that candidly promises fun for the whole family, from Rosso table wine to Directorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cut Pinot Noir; from poolside cabanas to an Argentinean-Style grill, plus movie memorabilia from The Godfather, Apocalypse Now, and more. 300 Via Archimedes, Geyserville. Tasting daily, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm; restaurant till 9pm. 707.857.1400.

Iron Horse Despite the rustic tasting room, Iron Horse produces sparkling wine and Pinots for the elite. A brilliant view for winetasting. 209786 Ross Station Road, Sebastopol. Open daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;3:30pm. 707.887.1507.

Sbragia Family Vineyards Ed Sbragia makes stellar Cab in Zin country. 9990 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5pm. 707.473.2992.

Talisman Wine Wineindustry husband-and-wife team play out their passion for Pinot in unassuming warehouse space. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss the taste test between the Dijon and Pommard clones. 21684 Eighth St., Sonoma. Limited tasting availability, by appointment. 707.996.9050.

Toad Hollow A humorous, frog-themed tasting room begun by Robin Williamsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; brother Todd Williams and Rodney Strong, both now passed. Refreshing and fun. 409-A Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. Open daily, 10:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30(ish)pm. 707.431.8667.

Vinoteca Vinify Wine Services is like a Russian doll of wineries within wineries making brands for still more clients. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in a generic industrial-park location, but with unique, single-vineyard wines from Frostwatch, Baker Lane, Bjornstad, Super Sonoman and others. 3358 Coffey Lane, Ste. C, Santa Rosa. Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sunday 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm. $10 fee. 707.542.3292.

N A PA CO U N TY

Nalle Winery Rising above the vineyards like some kind of New Age bunker, the rosemary-shrouded winery houses a down-toearth father-and-son team dedicated to low-alcohol Dry Creek Zinfandel. Greeters Lila and Pella present soggy tennis balls. 2385 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Saturdays, noonâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5pm. No fee. 707.433.1040.

Artesa Winery Yet

River Road Vineyards

Bennett Lane Winery

Russian River Pinot for $18 at no-nonsense, solid producer. 5220 Ross Road, Sebastopol. By appointment only, Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Friday. 707.887.8130.

The old trope â&#x20AC;&#x153;beer-drinking NASCAR fans vs. Chardonnaysipping highbrowsâ&#x20AC;? runs out of gas at a winery that sponsors an annual NASCAR race and

another treeless hilltop in the windswept Carneros turns out to be a striking, temple-like visitor center, with fantastic views. Spanish varietals Tempranillo and AlbariĂąo; Pinot, too. 1345 Henry Road, Napa. 10am to 5pm daily, $10â&#x20AC;&#x201C; $15 fee. Chocolate, cheese and food pairings by appointment. 707.224.1668.

has its own car, emblazoned with grapes. A Roman emperor who appreciated hearty vino as much as a good chariot race inspired Maximus White and Red â&#x20AC;&#x153;feasting wines.â&#x20AC;? 3340 Hwy. 128, Calistoga. 707.942.6684.

Cuvaison Estate Wines (WC) Producing some 65 percent of its product as Chardonnay, Cuvaison has a 22,000-square-foot cave. 4550 Silverado Trail N., Napa. By appointment. 707.942.6266.

Flora Springs Winery & Vineyards Napa Valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest geotectonic eruption on Highway 29 is a stylish place to explore famous Chardonnay, Meritage blend and winery-exclusive Italian varietals. Hip but not too cool, the 30-year-old family winery surely has a sense of humor as well as sense of place. 677 S. St. Helena Hwy., St. Helena. Open daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm. Tasting fees, $15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$25. 707.967.8032.

Madonna Estate Millennial contingent of multigenerational family winery, once known as Mount St. John, finds success running it old-school: touristy, oldfashioned, and wildly popular. Refreshing GewĂźrztraminer for summer picnics. 5400 Old Sonoma Road, Napa. Daily 10am to 5pm; $5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$10. 707.255.8864.

Nichelini Winery Take a joyride in the Napa backcountry and discover this rustic little winery thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been in the family for generations. See the only Roman wine press in the Western Hemisphere. 2950 Sage Canyon Road, St. Helena. Saturday and Sunday, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm. No fee. 707.963.0717.

Taste at Oxbow Discover refreshing white varietals AlbariĂąo and Vermentino in stylish setting across from Oxbow Market, then move on to Pinot Noir from Carneros pioneer Mahoney Vineyards; Waterstone Wines, too. 708 First St., Napa. Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Thursday, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;7pm; Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Saturday, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm. Tasting fee $10. 707.265.9600.

15

Craft distillery shakes and stirs the pot BY JAMES KNIGHT

G

in. Blamed for the ills of society in the 1700s, studiously eschewed by young drinkers today in imitation of a fictional secret agent’s preference for vodka martinis— shaken, not stirred—the spirit has hardly been hailed except as a melancholy pairing with an antimalarial tonic favored by British colonials. But, says a young couple now bringing craft-made gin to Sebastopol, you don’t know proper gin until you’ve sampled a dram of theirs. Husband and wife team Timo and Ashby Marshall recently opened Spirit Works Distillery in Sebastopol’s Barlow project after a four-year journey that began when they decided, “Let’s make gin.” Timo’s from southern England, where his family has made sloe gin for years. But it’s Ashby who became the master distiller, after the couple took distilling courses and apprenticeships to learn the craft. “We’re very lucky,” says Timo, who does much of the talking while Ashby covers most of the wry smiling. “She’s got the skills.” In distilling, they say, there’s a knack for it which mere instruction can’t provide. At first, the Marshalls cast about for a distillery to partner with, but they couldn’t find any in California up to their standards. “There’s a lot of smoke and mirrors in spirits,” says Timo. For instance, many craft distillers use bulk alcohol from a factory. The Marshalls decided to make theirs from grain to glass. With the help of family-andfriends investors, they installed a gleaming set of German-made tanks and copper rectification columns in their Barlow warehouse. Each batch starts with a one-ton pallet of organically grown, California red winter wheat. After being distilled to a purity of 95 percent, then cut with filtered water, it’s vodka, a small sample of which is as pure and creamy as straight booze can be on the palate. A signature blend of herbs and citrus rind, which Ashby zests on production days, go into the final gin cook. If you thought Bombay Blue Sapphire was as good as it gets, here is new territory on your tongue. With a deep note of citrus and ethereal notes of juniper and herbs, it’d be a shame to dirty this up with olives and whatnot, whether stirred or shaken. Under current law, Spirit Works cannot sell product out of the tasting room (“A Fair Pour,” Bohemian, April 3, 2013); it’s going for about $28 at Santa Rosa’s Bottle Barn. Luckily for the G&T crowd, yes, artisanal tonic made in California is now available. Straight wheat whiskey is on the way, which will be aged in charred American oak barrels, plus sloe gin— “Not the stuff,” says Timo, “you drank in high school.” Spirit Works Distillery, 6790 McKinley St., Ste. 100, Sebastopol. Thursday–Monday, 11am–4pm. No fee. 707.634.4793.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 7–1 3, 201 3 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Spirit Works

NORTH BAY BOH EMIAN | AUGUST 7–1 3, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

16

M

DROWNED OUT Even when

arinwood is a quiet suburb between San Rafael and Novato, where threebedroom homes with backyard pools circle green, undeveloped hills. On a Wednesday evening in June, it was also the setting for a town hall meeting that would later be likened to a lynch mob.

discussing mere proposals, Supervisor Susan Adams has been interrupted, taunted and accused of ‘volunteering Marin for the ghetto.’

Angry

Grousing About Housing Yelling, bickering, a costly recall—what the hell is going on in Marin? BY RACHEL DOVEY

Held by Supervisor Susan Adams, the gathering at the Marinwood Community Center on June 26 began with a simple presentation on proposed zoning changes but quickly devolved into hysterics. Residents packed the large room, standing in doorways and leaning in open windows, waving signs that said “Democracy, Not Autocracy” and showed apartment homes crossed out. Shouts of “No, no, no!” drowned out the official when she tried to speak. One woman commandeered the microphone, taunting Adams by pretending to hand it back again and again as the supervisor grabbed at air. Finally, in a line that would echo infamously through the fair-housing community, real estate agent Melissa Bradley told Adams she’d “volunteered Marin for the ghetto.” Throughout the hour and 45 minutes, Adams tried to answer questions, looking flustered as she lost control of the room. That housing is a big deal in no-growth Marin is hardly news. Spurred by the perceived threat of apartment complexes, communities in the wealthy county have so far neglected to zone for low-income housing, in violation of state law, and then been sued; zoned for low-income housing on the sites of existing businesses that may not intend to sell; and, in the case of Corte Madera, withdrawn altogether from the regional planning agencies that oversee this kind of zoning. Still, recent months have seen this polarized debate give rise to behavior that is downright

A

common theme at meetings in Marinwood and elsewhere is the notion that information is being withheld. Carol Sheerin, one of the founders of the Susan Adams recall effort, says the anger on display in Marinwood comes partly from a feeling of futility: suddenly there appears to be all this compounded development, without the type of public process neighbors feel that they deserve. “Just in general, people feel like they have not been made aware,” she says. Stephen Nestel, the founder of SaveMarinwood.org, seconds this. “Our community, like most around the Bay Area, should have been brought into the planning process at the very earliest time, about 10 years ago,” he writes in an email, adding, “This is undemocratic and an affront to citizens.”

17

NO GROWTH A pink dot marks a site under bitter debate for housing in Marinwood; the green areas of open space show just

how little room there is for any type of development off the 101 corridor.

So what, exactly, is being proposed in Marinwood? Is it the acres upon acres of concrete, high-rise slums that many speak of as though the first cinderblock is about to be laid? No, it isn’t. As Adams explained at the meeting, one developer has turned in an application to renovate the derelict Marinwood Plaza, and that application will be subject to all the public processes—EIR certification, design review—that developers are subject to under California law. But what has so many homeowners up in arms is a little thing called a PDA, or a priority development area, and that concerns zoning, not actual development. A word on zoning. Under state law, government entities are supposed to zone their communities cyclically to plan for future growth. (These same entities do not build housing, which is the domain of private or nonprofit developers.) One of the ideas behind housing element law is integration. Public entities are supposed to make sure that zoning does not “unduly constrain” development of multifamily housing, where

people who cannot afford to buy a three-bedroom home with a yard can live. Government is supposed to match projected growth for all income levels with fair zoning. This is a huge problem in Marin County, where, as one advocate wrote, the poor are “zoned out.” According to a county document prepared for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, multifamily housing is clustered in only a few areas like Marin City and San Rafael’s Canal District, where racial and ethnic minorities tend to live. According to a study funded by the Marin Community Foundation, 60 percent of Marin’s workforce lives out of the county and commutes in daily, holding jobs that tend to pay under $50,000, like residential care and retail. The study also notes the environmental hazards of such a freeway clog—an unnecessary 2.4 million pounds of carbon pouring into the atmosphere every day. This is a rough equivalent—daily—to the emissions produced by 42,000 U.S. households in a year. As Adams points out, none of the zoning in Marinwood

has been proposed in secret. Though audience members at the town hall shouted “You did not come to this community, you did not notice this community!” she replied that every meeting where potential zoning was discussed had been done in a public. Discussions over the housing element update—public. Board of supervisors meetings, where Marin’s 101 corridor was discussed as a place to concentrate future growth because so much of the rest of Marin is preserved as open space—public. “There have been public meetings, with audio streaming and webcasting, so you can see not only all the documents discussed, but the conversation around those documents,” she tells me on the phone. She’s right. I’ve been covering land-use issues in Marin for three years, and none of the zoning changes discussed at the Marinwood meeting were new to me. Still, audience members seemed to feel that public process wasn’t enough. “It’s not our full-time job!” one audience member yelled. “It’s your job as ) 18

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bizarre—not just in the form of meetings like the one described above, but also in a recall effort against Adams, which would cost as much as $250,000 and oust the supervisor from office only months before she faces a general election anyway. How did this happen? After all, as Carla Marinucci pointed out in a recent San Francisco Chronicle piece on the county’s current incivility, Bush-era Marin County was supposed to be a Greenpeace mecca of laissez-faire hippies soaking in backyard hot tubs. It continues to be caricatured as a rosy-vibe utopia policed by the handholding Kumbaya Patrol, not a place where mob mentality sweeps town halls. Is this chaotic mass opposition to housing the byproduct of top-down leadership on the part of local government, as some claim? Is it hysterical fear of Big Development in the wake of mortgage plummets, national bailouts and an economic machine that many no longer trust? Or is it really as ugly as it looks from the outside—wealthy suburban privilege at its worst, organizing to keep renters, low-wage workers and recent immigrants far, far away.

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | AUGUST 7–1 3, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

18 Susan Adams ( 17 supervisor to come to us when there are major land-use issues at stake in our community!” There was a chorus of applause. I asked Sheerin how she thought Adams should have “noticed” the Marinwood community. “I can’t say putting it in the newspaper, because no one reads the newspaper,” she says. “Maybe sending out postcards.” In a background conversation, another person at that meeting told me nearly the exact same thing: “Nobody reads the newspapers,” she said. “Maybe if it had been on TV.” As Adams says when I told her about these responses: “‘Notice’ is a two-way street.”

A

nother common theme at the Marinwood meeting, and others that I’ve covered, is more understandable. It’s the notion that the numbers governing this whole process are off. Two speakers addressed this eloquently. When Adams stated that a “low-income” designation in the wealthy county caps at around $65,000, one man protested, “We are that bracket.” Another man from the crowd called out, “That’s us!” It’s true. Just as the tech boom has wildly inflated rent in San Francisco, Marin County’s extremely high median earning— $130,000—has hiked the lowincome line past what many living in market-rate housing make. And the idea of somehow subsidizing families making more than you do in low-income apartments is hardly popular. The supposed “low-income” number comes from an organization called ABAG, which, lately, seems to be Marin County’s least favorite fourletter word. The acronym, short for the Association of Bay Area Governments, refers to the planning organization that puts out another acronym, the RHNA. This Regional Housing Needs Allocation is the all-holy number of units that each government

CAUSE OF ANGER A developer’s proposal for housing at Marinwood Plaza, now

a decaying strip mall, has some residents furious.

needs to zone for every few years, to match projected growth. If this number were some kind of omniscient data set, all would be well and good. But it’s not. Spurred by Mark Luce, the president of ABAG who called the process a “black box” when I interviewed him last summer, and Bob Ravasio, council member of Corte Madera and a member of ABAG who told me “If you find out how the RHNA works, let me know,” I drove to Oakland to visit ABAG. There, I sat in an office and looked over at least 10 sheets of paper as planning director Hing Wong explained the “formula” used to calculate RHNA. It took an hour. And it’s wasn’t a formula, really—it was determined by months and months of meetings, in which government officials, fair-housing lawyers, developers and transit workers decide the “fair share” of how much each region should get. But though ABAG has a reputation for strong-arming development onto unwilling towns, the RHNA process can be arbitrary in unexpected and troubling ways. Because housing, particularly affordable housing, has

historically been so unpopular in Marin, elected officials can push back against this fair-share mentality. And thus, despite its high in-commuting numbers, parts of Marin received unusually low numbers in the most recent cycle, compared to recent years. As we reported last year, Wong told me that in Novato, this was at least partly because “a councilwoman wanted very low numbers.”

T

he lack of good, unbiased data means that vast conspiracies have sprung up in which Marin’s lack of affordable housing and clogged freeways aren’t really problems— they’re considered smokescreens for developers who just want to make a buck. “Everyone says ‘You’re in the pocket of the developers,’” affordable-housing advocate Lynne Wasley says. “I’ve never been given a dime.” Op-eds are written in which supervisors, characterized as “well-to-do progressives,” and developers seem to be in cahoots. And during the Marinwood meeting, Bradley and several others alluded to

the study conducted by Marin County for HUD—which found that minorities and multifamily units had been clustered due to discriminatory zoning—as an affirmative action document, implying that it was a tool to bring in “underrepresented minorities [from] outside Marin County.” And so a strange and sour attitude comes into play at public meetings, which tend to be overwhelmingly middle-class and white. It’s an attitude that doubts the very existence of low-income workers and residents in Marin— an attitude that might explain something like the farcical post on Nestel’s SaveMarinwood.org. “Wanted” it reads. “Gay Eskimos for Marinwood Village Affordable Housing Complex.” At Novato’s affordable housing meetings, which I covered back in 2010, it took the form of comments like “I heard that we recruited people from Richmond to come here tonight to fulfill our need for affordable housing” and “All of these people who need a place to live, where are they now?” And the answer mirrors this systemic issue. They’re not at evening Marin meetings, because

19

though they work in Marin, they don’t live there. Or else, as a troubling press conference recently implied, they’re too scared to come.

A

t a very different meeting than the ones described above, a group of fairhousing advocates and grass roots organizers came together in the Marin Civic Center garden on a Tuesday morning. They spoke quietly, waited their turn to speak and punctuated each comment with well-mannered applause. No one hissed, booed or called the police. And the tenor of the gathering felt like a PTSD support group. John Young, leader of Marin Grassroots, recalled talking to a colleague during a public meeting—before someone called the sheriff and asked that he be kicked out. A black man who describes himself as a big guy, Young said he felt afraid. “This was a room full of 200plus European Americans,” he says. An Asian-American man shares a similar experience. He recalls getting up to speak in favor of affordable housing and being heckled with the words:

“You don’t belong here.” Wasley, who was in attendance, says she hasn’t been to a public meeting in Novato in two years, after being booed and hissed in numerous town halls. She was even hissed at the grocery store wearing a sticker in favor of affordable housing, she says. And then Gail Theller, a spokesperson for Community Action Marin, says something that does not bode well for the future of public discourse in Marin. “The public areas in which these discussions are taking place have gotten to be so threatening that I’m unable to organize a group of people who are lowincome to come,” she says. The group announced that it was going to write a letter to Gov. Jerry Brown about the fact that all sides of Marin’s housing debate are not being heard. But in the meantime, meetings take place in suburbs like the one described at the beginning of this piece, where homes sell for an average of $650,000 a pop and beautiful community halls are packed with angry people, holding signs and shouting about apartment buildings.

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VOICES SILENCED John Young says he’s had people call the sheriff’s department and ask that they kick him out of public meetings.

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CULTURE

Crush SA N R A FA E L

R O H N E R T PA R K

Large & In Charge

Happy Together

With his signature tall, curly coif and ensemble band in tow, Texas-based Lyle Lovett & His Large Band make their debut in Marin County this week. Lovett, a triplethreat songwriter, musician and actor, has garnered fans nationwide with his fusing of American music elements—country, swing, jazz and folk. With four Grammys under his belt, this eclectic performer has never been one to shy away from the spotlight. I mean, who can forget his quickie marriage-divorce to Julia Roberts? Fans nevertheless remain enthralled with Lovett’s greatest calling, music, and now he brings his band of 14 players on Tuesday, Aug. 13, at Marin Center Showcase Theatre. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. $50–$90. 8pm. 415.473.6800.

In 2003, director Safinez Bousbia discovered the story of a group of Jewish and Muslim artists separated by war more than 50 years ago. These musicians shared one quality, a passion for chaabi, a blend of Berber, Andalusian and Flamenco sounds. Bousbia and these artists came together to produce the 2011 documentary El Gusto, which chronicles the stories and musical production of the group, called The Buena Vista Social Club of Algiers. This week, the 20-piece orchestra provides a screening of the inspirational film and a lively performance for guests on Sunday, Aug. 11, at the Green Music Center. 1801 East Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park. $5. 4pm. 866.955.6040.

S A N TA R O S A

The week’s events: a selective guide

CORTE MADERA

Guitar Heaven

Tales Abroad

Guitars: strum, pick and slap these things, and out comes beautiful acoustic melodies or head-banging anthems. With this much amazing variation, is it really any surprise that there’s a threeday celebration dedicated to this single instrument? The 2013 Healdsburg Guitar Festival knows what’s up, because every year it’s dedicated to shining the spotlight on the guitar. Filled with workshop upon workshop, demonstrations, a showcase of hundreds of custom instruments and acoustic guitar summits featuring musicians like Walter Strauss, Teja Gerken, Peter Lang and Kelly Joe Phelps, the festival is a must for those who enjoy playing, listening or anything in between. The fest runs Friday, Aug. 9, to Sunday, Aug. 11, at the Hyatt. 170 Railroad St., Santa Rosa. $15–$149. 9am. 800.477.4437.

Think your travel stories are incredible to hear because they were adventurous, heroic and life-altering? Well, that just might make author Tim Cahill laugh. The acclaimed travel writer has faced every travel situation one could dream up, as well as ones never imaginable. If the titles of his books, including A Wolverine Is Eating my Leg and Pass the Butterworms: Remote Journeys Oddly Rendered, don’t provide enough explanation into his crazy travel adventures, skeptics (or fans) can listen to the author’s own accounts when he joins with National Geographic writer Don George in an evening of travel discussion and readings on Thursday, Aug. 8, at Book Passage. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. $10. 8pm. 415.927.0960.

—Anna Hecht

TO THE END OF LOVE Madeleine Peyroux sings at the Napa Valley Opera House on Aug. 9. See Concerts, p26.

BRIDGING BOTH WORLDS Bella Andreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contract allows her to retain all digital rights and royalties.

Rags to Romance Sonoma authorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seven-ďŹ gure print deal has the industry spinning BY DAEDALUS HOWELL

L

ike all mediabased industries, publishing has seen its share of digital disruption. Unlike the music and ďŹ lm biz, however, the seismic shifts caused by Kindles, iPads and their lot have had direct beneďŹ t for the creative people behind the work. Writers, who often have stopped just short of human sacriďŹ ce to score a traditional publishing

deal that would net a mere 7 percent royalty off the cover price, are now able to go it alone with little to no overhead and a worldwide market at their ďŹ ngertips. Among the thousands of authors successfully charting their own path is Sonoma-based author Bella Andre, who recently inked a seven-ďŹ gure deal with romance imprint Harlequin MIRA for her popular series The Sullivans. How, you ask, can Andre have

her indie publishing cred and a major contract, too? Andre is a â&#x20AC;&#x153;hybrid author,â&#x20AC;? the term publishing professionals use to describe writers whose careers straddle both the worlds of traditional and self-publishing. More to the point, as a hybrid, her deal represents only the print rights in the United States, Canada and Britainâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the ebook, audio book, ďŹ lm, TV and foreign-language rights remain resolutely hers. This is signiďŹ cant because most publishing houses try to sew up these often

lucrative rights, frequently leveraging the authorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ignorance of their worth in the process. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have done the deal otherwise,â&#x20AC;? says Andre, speaking by phone from a hundred-year-old log cabin in the Adirondacks, where her family spends their summers. Andre had already been published by three of the big six New York publishers, but in 2010, Random House elected not to pick an option on a forthcoming slate of books. A colleague suggested that the author publish directly to Kindle e-readers using Amazonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s self-publishing platform. She posted some works from her back catalogue and soon saw results. They werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t staggering numbersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;at ďŹ rstâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but they were sufficient for Andre to doubledown on the prospect of selfpublishing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I sold 161 copies that ďŹ rst month, and it was super-exciting. I was like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Hey, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m gonna do this thing,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? says Andre. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fast forward three years, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m right around the 2 million mark on selfpublished ebooks.â&#x20AC;? Last summer, Andre debuted on the New York Times bestseller list with three self-published ebooks from The Sullivan series simultaneously. All the major publishers expressed interest in working with her. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was just very clear with all of them from the outset that â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d love to see my books on bookshelves, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not giving up my digital rights,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? says Andre, who wryly adds, â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Really, you couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford them.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Harlequin MIRA â&#x20AC;&#x153;didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mess around,â&#x20AC;? says Andre. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They were like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;We get it. We understand that you are dead serious when you say that the only thing we can have are English-language print rights.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; So our negotiations from day one were just for that.â&#x20AC;? Since June, Andreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s series has been rolled out in continuous back-to-back ) 22

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Bella Andre ( 21 releases. The latest title, Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Help Falling in Love, just hit stores last week. Meanwhile, the ebook version of the tale about a San Francisco ďŹ reďŹ ghter with professional boundary issues who emotionally obsesses over a mother and daughter he saves, is available online at Amazon, iBooks and a bevy of online retailers as an ebook, with proďŹ ts going more directly to the author herself. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I really am committed to the digital business that I run, and I do it very well,â&#x20AC;? Andre says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I really like being in charge of that, and I just was not interested in passing that off.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Though excited early in her career to be published and have her books on bookshelves, the feeling waned as Andre grew frustrated with the lack of control she had over how her work was managed and marketed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was never the author that they threw the money behind, that they threw the marketing behind,â&#x20AC;? says Andre. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I started selfpublishing, it was just exciting to be in charge of the covers, writing whatever I want, the title, the book descriptions, all the pieces that I always felt that perhaps I could do better because I knew my readership. I am my readershipâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a romance readerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and I know them so well. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m with them on Facebook and Twitter all the time, and email.â&#x20AC;? Of course, the transition from author to a one-woman media empire takes a signiďŹ cant investment of time. By Andreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s estimate, she works 12 to 16 hours a day, seven days a week and has done so for the past three years. Somehow, she also manages to ďŹ t publishing conference keynote speeches into her schedule. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not gonna lie and say Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not tired, because I am. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m tired. But you know, when you have all these readers and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re so excitedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like, I put the book out, and by the end of that day theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re asking when is the next one? I just have to say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Soon, you know, because I have to write it!â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? says Andre. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never been a better time to be a writer.â&#x20AC;? For more info, visit bellaandre.com.

Elizabeth Craven

ISLE SETTING Samson Hood and John Craven (L–R) as Alonso and Prospero.

Magic Act Shakespeare’s enchanted ‘Tempest’ blows into Ives Park BY DAVID TEMPLETON

‘T

orture! That’s the best word for it. Torture!”

Rohnert Park actor and educator John Craven is describing the wildly complicated character of Prospero, the primary protagonist of William Shakespeare’s tragicomic play The Tempest. “And if torture is what Prospero is feeling, then that’s exactly what I’m feeling,” Craven says with a gentle laugh. “This is a very tough role, Prospero. It’s a real challenge, and every rehearsal brings huge new discoveries. It’s pretty tough.” Ah, the life of a Shakespearean actor. The Tempest—with Craven in the lead, Sheri Lee Miller directing and a crack team of local all-stars filling out the colorful cast—opens a three-week run this weekend at Sebastopol’s Ives Park, part of Main Stage West’s Sebastopol Shakespeare Festival. Of course, along with its complexity and

depth, and despite the sufferings of its central character, The Tempest is also one of Shakespeare’s sweetest, funniest, most magical, most emotionally satisfying plays. Once the Duke of Milan, the embittered magician Prospero has spent years on a mysterious island. Marooned long ago by traitors (Peter Downey, Anthony Abate), Prospero has raised a daughter (Rachel Quintana), all while mastering the art of magic, preparing for the day he might exact revenge on those who put him there. When those enemies, traveling across the sea, finally do sail within sight of his island, Prospero summons the tempest of the play’s title to shipwreck them all—and what begins as Prospero’s revenge turns into something different, as the old man discovers a long lost sense of hope, humanity and forgiveness. And then there’s some stuff about a drunken butler (Eric Thompson), a troubled monster

‘The Tempest’ runs Thursday–Sunday Aug. 9–25 at Ives Park. 154 Jewell Ave., Sebastopol. All shows 7:00pm. $7–$20. 707.823.0177.

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Stage

named Caliban (Keith Baker) and the beautiful spirit Ariel (Danielle Cain), who is smarter than everyone and does awesome magic tricks. Beneath it all, says Craven, the play is about growing old, but it’s also about growing up and growing wise. “Prospero,” Craven explains, “has come to a place where he’s wrestling with all kinds of different feelings, struggling with his own sense of wounded humanity. He knows he couldn’t survive without forcing the two residents of the island, Ariel and Caliban, to work for him, and that eats at him, it bothers him. And at the same time, he has a daughter to bring up, and the fear that he might die and leave her alone on this island—well, there’s the torture again.” Though Craven—long considered one of the best and most dependable actors in Sonoma County—has played many parts over the years, he’s only tackled Shakespeare twice. He played King Leontes in The Winter’s Tale at Cinnabar and the melancholy Jacques in As You Like It at the Sebastopol Shakespeare Festival. But he’s never faced a Shakespearean character as complex and rich as Prospero. It’s largely through the guidance of director Miller, Craven says—with whom he’s worked extra hard to dig beneath the surface—that he’s come to understand Prospero, whom he says he never really thought about playing until asked. “I’m part of a company,” he says simply, “and they decided to do this play, and I said yes. I never dreamed of playing this part, like some actors do, but now that I’m doing it . . . well, it’s like I said.” Yes, of course—torture. But, in this case, it’s the very best kind of torture. And just like Prospero, Craven knows that it is never too late to learn new things. “Every day, at every rehearsal,” Craven says, “I go in with a blank slate, ready to work with Sheri, ready to engage with the cast, ready to learn.”

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Heaven’s Cate

‘Blue Jasmine’ an awards season contender BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

ƌ Restaurants ƌ Events ƌ Clubs ƌ Museums ƌ Shopping Visit Deals & Giveaways on bohemian.com for details

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oody Allen’s Blue Jasmine, partially filmed in San Francisco and Marin, is more ambitious than his recent romcom travelogues—it’s a tragi-comic rephrase of A Streetcar Named Desire. (The play means a lot to Allen; 40 years ago, he personally burlesqued Blanche DuBois in Sleeper.)

Cate Blanchett, who recently toured as Blanche in revivals of Streetcar from Sydney to New York City, plays the penniless Jasmine. With no choices left, she descends into the San Francisco flat of her all-forgiving sister, Ginger (Sally Hawkins of Happy-GoLucky), a friendly grocery store clerk in the Mission. Allen shuttles through time so we can see Jasmine when she was riding high a few years previously as the pampered, bubble-bath-soaked wife of Wall Street baron Hal (Alec Baldwin). Jasmine trusted him utterly, even while an Alec Baldwin character is never to be trusted.

Jasmine works her way back from this plummet, finding a last chance at love with a gentleman caller. The new man (Peter Sarsgaard) is a Tiburon princeling with political ambitions. Allen splits the apish Stanley Kowalski figure into two separate men. Hawkins’ first husband is played in a comeback role by Andrew Dice Clay, who’s improved, though he’s still Andrew Dice Clay. Ginger’s later beau, Chili (Bobby Cannavale with an Italian version of a Human League haircut), is a garage mechanic who sees through Jasmine’s fancy airs and French perfume. The Spanish cinematographer Javier Aguirresarobe tries to visualize the dull compliments Allen’s characters pay the City: “It’s so Mediterranean,” they exclaim. “If you can’t fall in love here, you can’t fall in love anywhere.” When on the Marin bay shore, Allen has the sense to turn the camera for a long appreciative view of the water. But he gets no excitement from the Mission. It’s as if Allen envisioned the area as Queens, and once he did, he couldn’t unsee that vision. Jasmine is rich material for Blanchett. She doesn’t have Tennessee Williams’ language, nor the throbbing accent, but she gets to seethe with craziness, to mutter with it, to sweat through her Chanel suits. If Jasmine isn’t crushed, she gets mauled a little by a drippy pawing dentist, played richly by Michael Stuhlbarg: “You can learn an awful lot about people by looking at their mouths.” Such gags work—they’re what Allen does best. And Blanchett’s acting will be aptly described as forceful when awards season comes. Yet maybe the word “forceful” isn’t analyzed as it ought to be—doesn’t it define a performer taking something unworkable and trying to beat it into submission? ‘Blue Jasmine’ opens Friday, Aug. 9, at Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Road, Santa Rosa. 707.522.0719.

Music

Real Dough Pizza Punx give rock and roll a righteous home BY LEILANI CLARK

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e’re not just going to give anyone a back patch,” says 22-year old Nick O’ Rooney, aka Papa Pizza, the 22-year-old guitarist from local fuzz-garage duo Sharky Coast. “You start out as a ‘Dough,’ you gotta show up to see bands, you have to be willing to put up flyers and help promote it, to tell all your friends about it.” O’Rooney and 20-year-old Ian O’Connor, aka Sergeant Salami, along with O’Rooney’s girlfriend Denise Fraizer, are the forces behind the Pizza Punx, who tape oldschool cut-and-paste flyers for shows on light poles all over town. It’s not easy to become a pizza punk. To get fully initiated one must complete the herculean task of eating a large pizza in its entirety while watching Rock and Roll High School in one sitting. “If you can’t

do that, you can’t be called a Pizza Punk,” says O’Rooney. Beyond the PBR-and-pizza-grease haze, the two are dead serious about getting quality, underground bands to play in the often-overlooked locale of Sonoma County. At the Pizza Punx headquarters—a garage in a quiet neighborhood near the Sonoma County Fairgrounds, decorated with flyers, a few rescued pieces of furniture, a television and a drum kit—O’Rooney pulls out four large pieces of paper on which he’s meticulously written the names of over a hundred current, West Coast bands. He and the other Pizza Punx have reached out to every single one, asking them to come to Sonoma County with the guarantee of a place to sleep, do laundry, eat a meal, play a show and get a bit of gas money. The effort has produced five months of solid lineups, with headliners like Cool Ghouls, Indian Wars, White Mystery and Acid Baby Jesus, from Greece, playing shows at houses in South Park and at the “Ranger’s House” in Howarth Park, where shows have been surprisingly troublefree. (Only one band—CCR Headcleaner—was loud enough for the neighbors to call the police.) The next Pizza Punx show, on Aug. 8, features NoBunny, the creepy bunny-mask-and-underwearloving pop-garage persona of Justin Champlin (Like a “cuddly G.G. Allin,” says O’Rooney), along with Burger Records sweet pop duo Summer Twins, out of Riverside. The only rule is that it has to be allages because, really, in the end, they’re doing this for the kids. “The whole world is trying to absorb those kids, sell to them, try to get them to buy Hot Topic bullshit,” says O’Rooney. “And we’re the opposite of that,” adds O’Connor. Or as the Pizza Punx would say, “Keep it real, dough.” NoBunny, Summer Twins and Pookie & the Poodlez slice it up on Thursday, Aug. 8, at the Arlene Francis Center. 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa. 7pm. $8. 707.528.3009.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 7–1 3, 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

YEASTIE BOYZ The Pizza Punx have their own initiation ceremony.

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Music

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | AUGUST 7–1 3, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Backyard Concert Series Aug 8, the Sorentinos, Frankie Boots & the County Line. Every other Thursday through Sep 5. KRSH, 3565 Standish Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.588.9999.

El Gusto Performance by “The Buena Vista Social Club of Algiers,” the 20-piece El Gusto orchestra, and screening of documentary about the group. Aug 11, 4pm. $5. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Friday Night Live Weekly music series in conjunction with farmers market. Aug 9, Eddie Roberts’ West Coast Sounds. 5:30pm. Free. Cloverdale Plaza, Cloverdale.

Funky Fridays Live music in the park’s outdoor amphitheater. Proceeds support Team Sugarloaf. Aug 9, Streetwise with Blythe Klein. 6:30pm. $10. Sugarloaf Ridge State Park, 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood.

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

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Rockin’ Concerts Series Aug 10, Foreverland. 12pm. Free. Montgomery Village Shopping Center, Santa Rosa.

MARIN COUNTY Blues on the Lawn BBQ with Ron Thompson & the Resistors, Danny Click & the Hurricanes and Volker Strifler. Aug 11, 4pm. $20. Rancho Nicasio, Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Summer Music Series Aug 11, Wendy DeWitt and Kirk Harwood. 1pm. $8. Elk’s Lodge, 1312 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.721.7661.

NAPA COUNTY Gypsy Allstars Spawned from a recent collaboration in India featuring Gipsy Kings’ family, Mario Reyes and Georges Reyes. Aug 10, 8pm. $30. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Los Lonely Boys Acoustic show, rescheduled from March 8. Tickets from canceled show honored. Sarah Gwen opens. Aug 14, 8pm. $45$55. Uptown Theatre,

1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Madeleine Peyroux Her unique jazz voice can soothe the most chaotic soul. Aug 9, 8pm. $50. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe Aug 9, Euro Café Music. Aug 10, Down with May. Aug 11, Brulee. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Center Aug 8, Nobunny, Summer Twins, Pookie & the Poodlez. Aug 9, These Paper Satellites, Frankie Boots & the County Line, Tiny Pyramids, the Dandelion War, Wander, Bobcat. Aug 10, John Courage & the Great Plains, Secret Cat, Mr December, Rags, the Bad Apple String Band. Aug 14, Nikos Eliot, Heather Marie Van Cleave, Andrew Maurer. Mon, Fire Spinning. Wed, Open Mic. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Aubergine Aug 8, Steven Graves. Aug 9, 2Racks Original Singer Songwriters Contest. Aug 10,

Fri Aug 9

Anjelah Johnson Wed Aug 14

>ŽƐ>ŽŶĞůLJŽLJƐĐŽƵƐƟĐ Thur Aug 15 A Midsummer's Night with The Monkees

Sat Aug 17

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Wed Aug 21

Chris Isaak Fri Aug 30

Lisa Marie Presley Special Guest: The Deadlies

Sun Sept 1

Psychedelic Furs Special Guest: The Burning of Rome

Fri Sept 6

The Zombies plus E Tu Bruce Wed Sept 11

:ŽŚŶ,ŝĂƩ and the Combo Special Guest: Drew Holcomb

Come see us! Wed–Fri, 2–9 Sat & Sun, 11:30–8

Brewery Tours Daily at 3! 1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

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Fri Sept 13

tĂŶĚĂ^LJŬĞƐ Sun Sept 15

George Thorogood and the Destroyers Special Guest: The Iron Heart

Fri Sept 20

Michael Grimm -Grimm’’s Fairytale Tour Special Guest: Bill Carter

Sat Sept 21

Dr. John

Special Guest: Jenny Kerr

Planning an event? Contact us for rental info

1350 Third St, Napa | 707.259.0123 www.uptowntheatrenapa.com

WATTS UP Jazzman Ernie Watts plays Sonoma-Cutrer Vineyards Aug. 10.

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Barley & Hops Tavern

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Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

DIN N E R & A SHOW Nicasioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Favorite Mikesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Aug 9 LIPSKIN AND DUKE 8:00 / No Cover

Fri, Jen Tucker. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.874.9037.

Fri

707.829.7300 7 0 7. 829 . 7 3 0 0 S E B AS T OP OL 230 2 3 0 PETALUMA P E TA L U M A AVE AV E | SEBASTOPOL

Benziger Winery

Sat

EVERY TUES EVERY TUES AT AT 7PM 7PM WITH WITH EVAN EVAN FRI F RI A AUG UG 9

Aug 10

Aug 13, Carrie Manolakos. 1883 London Ranch Road, Glen Ellen. 888.490.2739.

DORE COLLER & BERMUDA GRASS Aug 16 Americana, Bluegrass, Reggae Release 8:00 / No Cover

ANNIE SAMPSON BAND Aug 17 Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Soulful Blues 8:30 Sat

Western Dance Party! Aug 24 BUCK NICKELS AND LOOSE CHANGE

Fri, Sat, Live DJs. 501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5643.

Original Songs, Great Harmonies 8:30



Cinnabar Theater Aug 14, Men of Worth. 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Aug 9, Crossfire. Aug 10, CT Cruisers. Tues, Swing Dancing with Lessons. Sun, 7pm, salsa with lessons. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Green Music Center Aug 10, pianoSonoma. Aug 11, El Gusto. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Heritage Public House Aug 10, Thick Soup. 1901 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

Hopmonk Sebastopol Aug 7, Freddy Todd. Aug 9, Jelly Bread. Aug 10, Dgiin, Koobi Fora. Aug 11, Healdsburg Guitar Festival After Party. Aug 12, Toussaint the Liberator. Aug 14, DJ Shotnez, Dub Gabriel, Dr Israel. Tues, 7:30pm, open mic night. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hopmonk Sonoma Aug 9, the Hellhounds. Aug 10, Jamie Clark Band. Aug 11, Craig Corona. Wed, Open Mic. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg Aug 10, Jesse Simpson Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Jack London State Park Aug 13, Leah Sprecherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Old at

CD rty! Pa

Sat

Chrome Lotus

Flamingo Lounge

Rancho Debut!

Fri

Sun, Live Music. 328-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8720.

Mon, 6pm, open mic. Sat, 2pm, bluegrass jam. First Wednesday of every month, Inner Piano Listenings with Jerry Green. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

DAN AND JIM ROM COU NTIN G CROW S FR

Americana/Roots Rock 8:30

Bergamot Alley

Coffee Catz

TENDER MERCIES

FEATU RI NG

OPEN O P E N MIC M I C NIGHT NIGHT

Sun

BBQs On The Lawn! 

Gates Open at 3:00, Music at 4:00

Aug 11 HANES STORM Things get nutty when the Manx

play a nu-bluegrass ball at the Phoenix Theater Aug. 9.

BLUES & BBQ

La Follette Wines at the Barlow Every other Friday through Aug 23, Ricky Alan Ray. 180 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.827.4933.

Lagunitas Tap Room Aug 7, Nate Lopez. Aug 8, Tim Farrell. Aug 9, Jason Bodlovich. Aug 10, Jinx Jones. Aug 11, Disorderly House Band. Aug 14, Gypsy Trio. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Main Street Station Aug 8, Slowpoke. Aug 9, Prisma Trova. Aug 10, Wendy DeWitt. Aug 12, Gypsy Cafe. Aug 7 and , Aug 13, Maple Profant. Aug 14, Pocket Canyon Ramblers. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Montgomery Village Shopping Center Aug 8, Bud E Luv Orchestra. Village Court, Santa Rosa.

Aug 7, Bad Apples String Band. Hwy 116 & Bloomfield Rd, Sebastopol.

Redwood Cafe Aug 7, Jason Bodlovich. Aug 10, Redwood Tango Trio. Aug 12, Brett Dennen. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

River Theatre Thurs, Thugz. 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.3194.

Riverside Bistro

Aug 11, Sean Carscadden. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Fri, Jazz on the River with the Peter Welker Sextet. 54 E Washington St, Petaluma. 707.773.3200.

Occidental Center for the Arts

The Rocks Bar & Lounge

Aug 9, Transcendental Soundscapes with David Helfand and Justin Lader. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Fri and Sat, Top 40 DJs hosted by DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. ) 707.782.0592.

Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

SUN SU NA AUG UG 1 11 1

AMERICANA A M ER I C ANA | R ROOTS O OT S | A ACOUSTIC COUSTIC

HEALDSBURG H EALDSBURG GUITAR GUITAR FEST FEST AFTER AFTER P PARTY ARTY $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 77PM/ALL PM /ALL A AGES GES

MON M ON A AUG UG 1 12 2

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DUB D UB G GABRIEL ABRIEL AN AND DD DR R IISRAEL S R AE L $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 10 10PM/21+ PM /21+

SSINGER INGER | SONGWRITER SONGWRITER | ACOUSTIC ACOUS TIC

JJONATHAN ONATHAN R RICHMAN ICHMAN N $$13/DOORS 13/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

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next n e x t eevent ve n t w with ith u us, s, u up p tto o2 250, 50, kkim@hopmonk.com. i m @ h o p m o n k . co m .

Monday ~ Open Mic Night with Austin DeLone 7:30pm :HG$XJĂŁSP

Mingo Fishtrap 7KXU$XJĂŁSP

with Midnight

North

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Michael Harper Lung Transplant Benefit featuring

Harvey Scales, Lester Chambers, Bill Vitt, Chief Enablers & More

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DGIIN D GIIN

$$12/DOORS 12/ DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

FRI F RI A AUG UG 1 16 6

Victoria George

The Red Barn

FFRENCH RENCH | GYPSY GYPSY | JAZZ JA Z Z

Another Beatle Q with Aug 25 THE SU N KIN GS

415.662.2219

Aug 9, the Manx, Solheen, the Parmesans, Hello Monster, Physical Suicide Deterrent System Project, Shadow and Substance, Arroyo Deathmatch. Mon, 7pm, young peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s AA. Tues, 7pm, Acoustic Americana jam. Wed, 6pm, Jazz jam. Sun, 5pm, rock and blues jam. Second Thursday of every month, writers workshops. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

SAT S AT A AUG UG 1 10 0

WED W ED A AUG UG 1 14 4

Reservations Advised

Phoenix Theater

JJELLY ELLY BREAD BREAD

$$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

RON THOMPSON & THE RESISTORS, DANNY CLICK & THE HURRICANES AND VOLKER STRIFLER Sun ZULU SPEAR PLUS FREDDY CLARKE 18 Aug World Music BBQ FEATU RI NG

Sun

Heartâ&#x20AC;?. 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen. 707.938.5216.

FFUNK UNK | SSOUL OUL | R AND AN D B

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave Mill Valley CafĂŠ 415.388.1700 | Box Office 415.388.3850

2 24 V 224 VINTAGE INTAG E W WAY AY NOVATO N OVA ATO | 41 415.892.6200 5 . 8 92 . 62 0 0

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WWW.HOPMONK.COM W WW.HOPMONK.COM Book yyour Book our next ne x t eevent vent with with us, us , u up p to to 150 1 50 p people, eople, kim@hopmonk.com kim@hopmonk .com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1 3, 201 3 | BOH E MI A N.COM

MC Radioactive. Mon, artist and model Mondays. Tues, Bluesy Tuesday. Wed, 7pm, open mic. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | AUGUST 7–1 3, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

28 Music ( 27 Russian River Brewing Co Aug 10, Key Lime Pie. Aug 11, Johnny Tsunami. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub Aug 10, the Rains. Sun, Evening Jazz with Gary Johnson. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Aug 11, New Horizons Band. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Society: Culture House Aug 7, Vickie Guillory. Aug 14, Sonny Lowe. Wed, North Bay Blues Revue. Thurs, Casa Rasta. Sun, Church on Sundays. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Sonoma Valley Regional Library Aug 10, Old Redwood Highway. 755 W Napa St, Sonoma. 707.939.0379.

Sonoma-Cutrer Vineyards Aug 10, Ernie Watts Quartet. 4401 Slusser Rd, Windsor. 707.237.3489.

Sunflower Center Aug 9, Summer Soul. Aug 10, Creation. Aug 14, Ashley Raines & the New West Revue. 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

Tradewinds Aug 9, Feral Moon. Aug 10, Crosscut Band. Mon, Donny Maderos’ Pro Jam. Tues, Jeremy’s Open Mic. Thurs, DJ Dave. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Aug 8, Fingerstyle Guitar Summit. Aug 9, Eoin Harrington. Mon, Open Mic with Derek Smith. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Fenix Aug 8, Will Russ. Aug 9, Bautista. Aug 10, Swing Fever. Aug 11, the Breedloves. Wed, Blues Night. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

George’s Nightclub Thurs and Fri, DJ Rick Vegaz. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Hopmonk Novato Aug 9, Sol Horizon. Aug 10, Rock Candy. Wed, Open Mic.

San Francisco’s City Guide

224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Kanbar Center for the Performing Arts Aug 10, Andre Thierry & Zydeco Magic. Osher Marin JCC, 200 No San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

19 Broadway Club Aug 7, the Ring. Aug 8, the Grain, Bobby Jo Valentine. Aug 9, Roach Gigz. Aug 10, Mystic Roots Band, I Sight, Sound Systems. Aug 13, Jeb Brady Band. Aug 14, Gail Muldrow. Mon, 9pm, open mic. Wed, Baker’s Dozen. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar Tues, 8:30pm, open mic with Damir. Fri, 9pm, Michael Aragon Quartet. Sun, 3pm, Mal Sharpe’s Dixieland. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Panama Hotel Restaurant Aug 7, Lorin Rowan. Aug 8, Wanda Stafford. Aug 13, James Moseley Quartet. Aug 14, Dale Polissar Trio. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Peri’s Silver Dollar Aug 7, the Weissmen. Aug 9, Swoop Unit. Aug 10, Zydeco Flames. Aug 14, Dr Mojo. Mon, acoustic open mic. Tues, John Varn & Tom Odetto. Second Sunday of every month, Sexy Sunday: Women Rockers. Second Thursday of every month, Mark’s Jam Sammich. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Pretty Lights

Rancho Nicasio

Can’t make it to Outside Lands? Walk “Around the Block” for this free in-store. Aug 8 at Amoeba SF.

Aug 9, the Two Mikes. Aug 10, Tender Mercies. Aug 11, Ron Thompson & the Resistors, Danny Click & the Hurricanes, Volker Strifler. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Outside Lands Festival A bazillion bands, and even more lifestyle brand marketers, all vying for your attention. Aug 9-11 in Golden Gate Park.

Sausalito Seahorse

Iveta Sangalo Oakland melts into puddle of Brazilian love, drains into Lake Merritt, rebounds in epic dance party. Aug 9 at Fox Theater.

Whitesnake Featuring the tireless David Coverdale, goin’ down the only road he’s ever known. Aug 9 at the Warfield.

Moses Ex-High on Fire, ex-Strychnine members rock summertime afternoon BBQ. Aug 11 at the Hemlock Tavern.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

Aug 8, Janet Lee and Kenny Ray. Aug 9, Doc Kraft Dance Band. Aug 10, Rolando Morales and Carlos Reyes. Aug 11, Pa’l Baillador. Tues, Jazz with Noel Jewkes and friends. Wed, Tango with Marcello & Seth. First Wednesday of every month, Tangonero. Sun, salsa class. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady Aug 7, Dirty Cello. Aug 8, Songbook Night. Aug 9, Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs. Aug 10, James Nash and Bobby Vega. Aug 11, Danny Uzilevsky. Aug 13, Amanda Addleman. Mon, 8pm, open mic with Simon Costa. Sat, Uke Jam. Sun, 2pm,

Irish music. Second Wednesday of every month, Finger-Style Guitar Showcase. Second Thursday of every month, Appleberry Jam’s Guitar Pull. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Smiley’s Mon, reggae. Wed, Larry’s karaoke. Sun, open mic. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Studio 55 Marin Aug 10, West My Friend. 1455 E Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.

Sweetwater Music Hall Aug 7, Mingo Fishtrap. Aug 8, Victoria George with Midnight North. Aug 9, Super Diamond. Aug 10, Newcomers. Aug 11, Peter Walsh. Aug 12, Harvey Scales, Lester Chambers and friends. Aug 14, Steep Ravine. Mon, Open Mic. Every other Wednesday, Wednesday Night Live. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads Aug 8, Telstar. Aug 9-10, Phil Lesh and friends. Tues, American Jubilee. Wed, Terrapin Family Band Bar Show. Fri, 4:20 Happy Hour with live music. Sun, Terrapin Family Band. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

Travis Marina Second Sunday of every month, the Lonestar Retrobates. Fort Baker, Sausalito.

NAPA COUNTY Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Wed, Jumpstart. Sun, DJ Night. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Molinari Caffe Thurs, Open Mic. 815 Main St, Napa. 707.927.3623.

Napa Valley Opera House Aug 8, De Corda EM Corda. Aug 8, Madeleine Peyroux. Aug 10, Gypsy Allstars. Second Tuesday of every month, Cafe Theatre Comedy Series. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Silo’s Aug 8, Michael Belair. Aug 9, Wendy DeWitt. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre Aug 14, Los Lonely Boys. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

‘Like a Zombie Movie’ Oddjob Ensemble survive wreck; tour cut short “We’re all very lucky to be alive,” says Kalei Yamanoha, accordionist for Gypsy-klezmer project Oddjob Ensemble, the day after a horrific car accident on I-80 in Nevada. The crash happened at about 5pm as the band, which features members of Church Marching Band and the Crux, headed to play some shows in Colorado. “The driver hit the rumble strip on the side of the road, veered off and overcompensated,” says Yamanoha. “The car started veering back and forth, lost control and we flipped four times into the median.” Everyone was wearing their seatbelts, and once the 1995 Mercedes station wagon stopped—landing upside down—all inside were able to walk away. “When we all crawled out of the car, we were covered with blood and dust,” explains Yamanoha. “It was like a scene out of a zombie movie.” Within minutes, about 10 Samaritans, including an off-duty EMT, stopped to help. Clarinetist Travis Hendrix busted his lip, fiddler Annie Cilley hit her head and cut her shoulder on a broken window, trumpeter Josh Jackson got minor abrasions to the head and arms, and Yamanoha suffered tissue damage in his back. An upright bass and violin were destroyed, and the car was left totaled in a Nevada tow yard. But the accident won’t stop the musicians from getting back out on the road. There’s a Crux tour in a month, and Church Marching Band plays the Wunderkammer Festival in Santa Rosa’s Railroad Square on Aug. 25. “The way the accident happened, I’m surprised we’re all walking and OK,” adds Yamanoha, the shock still evident in his voice. “This is what we do for a living, so we’re not going to stop.”—Leilani Clark

Galleries RECEPTIONS Aug 9 At 5pm. Art Works Downtown, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Transitions,â&#x20AC;? photography-based imagery from 32 Bay Area artists. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.451.8119.

Aug 10 At 5pm. Upstairs Art Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Exuberant Watercolors,â&#x20AC;? Patricia Barnettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s watercolor paintings. 306 Center Ave (above Levin & Co bookstore), Healdsburg. 707.431.4214.

Aug 11 At 1pm. Tobyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Feed Barn, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Exhibition 3D,â&#x20AC;? portraits and large nature photographs by Art Rogers and John Kaufman. 11250 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1223. At 2pm. Marin Society of Artists, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Trends and Impressions, Your Visionâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Your Way,â&#x20AC;? juried member show. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.454.9561.

SONOMA COUNTY Calabi Gallery Through Aug 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Summer Selection,â&#x20AC;? new selection of works by gallery artists as well as vintage art. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Sep 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art of the Line,â&#x20AC;? describing Schulzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s process, from the tools he used to the research he undertook. Through Oct 14, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Barking Up the Family Tree,â&#x20AC;? featuring comic strips with Snoopyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s siblings. Through Oct 27, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mid-Century Modern,â&#x20AC;? works of prominent post-war-era decorative, textile and furniture designers. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5;

Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

City Hall Council Chambers Through Sep 18, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Printmaking,â&#x20AC;? pieces by Catherine Atkinson. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Aug 10, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hodge Podge,â&#x20AC;? mixed-media exhibit by artists from Becoming Independent and the Barracks Studio. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Gallery One Through Aug 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Scapes, Scapes & Scapes,â&#x20AC;? handcolored photos by Laura Culver and oil scapes by Robin Burgert. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Gallery 300 Through Aug 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pieces,â&#x20AC;? art by Cat Kaufman and Mary Vaughan. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. Open Sat, 12 to 5, and by appointment. 707.332.1212.

Graton Gallery Through Aug 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Summer Songs,â&#x20AC;? works by Mylette Welsh and Maria-Esther Sund. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Aug 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Summer of 2013,â&#x20AC;? featuring pieces by Harley, Bill Shelley, Brian Wilson and Hugh Livingston. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center Through Sep 26, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Inspired by Nature,â&#x20AC;? quilted fiber arts by the Pointless Sisters. 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Local Color Gallery Through Aug 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Horizons,â&#x20AC;? paintings and drawings by Pamela Wallace and Linda Gamble. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.875.2744.

Occidental Center for the Arts Through Sep 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Light and Shadow,â&#x20AC;? original art. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

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Petaluma Arts Center Through Sep 15, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Undercover Genius: The Creative Lives of Artists with Disabilities,â&#x20AC;? curated by Janet Moore and Geri Olson. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Petaluma Historical Museum & Library Through Aug 25, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Changing Courses,â&#x20AC;? the history and future of the Petaluma river. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.

RiskPress Gallery Through Aug 25, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reverse Image,â&#x20AC;? printmakers show their process. Closing reception, Aug 25, 4pm. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Sep 8, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Juried Fine Art Show,â&#x20AC;? works from North Bay residents. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Through Sep 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Monoprints,â&#x20AC;? pieces by Harry Frank. Through Sep 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not Just Landscapes,â&#x20AC;? scenery in any style, from cityscapes to nature views. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sonoma County Museum Through Aug 18, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Margins to Mainstream,â&#x20AC;? seven contemporary artists with disabilities. Through Aug 18, Rodger Warnecke, Oakland artist, displays paintings after a 25-year hiatus from art. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. TuesSun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Aug 25, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Akin,â&#x20AC;? pieces by photographer Nicole Katano and painter Marc Katano. Artist talk, Aug 15, 5:30pm. Through Aug 25, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stand by Me,â&#x20AC;? photographs by Nicole Katano of the Sonoma Valley Mentoring Alliance. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Steele Lane Community Center Through Aug 15, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fantasy in Oils,â&#x20AC;? paintings by

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NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | AUGUST 7–1 3, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Music Events

Lydia’s Organics

AUG 9ƒ8–9:30pmƒ$10ƒSummer Soul Celebration Poetry: Raphael Block Music: Bhavani

Judith Tucker & Phil Lawrence

AUG 10ƒ7:30–10:30pmƒ$12, Under 21 $10 All Ages Reggae Dance Party Creation QUEEN OF DIAMONDS ‘The Manchurian Candidate’ screens Aug. 12 at the

AUG 13ƒ6:30–8pmƒFree Dr. Connie Sanchez, ND

Sebastiani Theatre in Sonoma.

Hope & Healing for Thyroid Disorders AUG 14ƒ7:30–9:30pmƒ$5ƒBlues, Folk-Rock Ashley Raines & The New West Revue Tour

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AUG 15ƒ7–9pmƒFree Peaceman Peace Talks: Marcia Chastain. 415 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 7; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.543.3282.

The Gospels of a 21st Century Carpenter AUG 24ƒ11am–3pm Products from Small Local Vegan Businesses

Towers Gallery

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Through Oct 6, “Hidden Treasures,” variety of styles from local artists. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

Upstairs Art Gallery

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for calendar of events & information

Wed, Aug 7 10:15am– 12:45pm 7–10pm

8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club

Thur, Aug 8 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–10pm CIRCLES N’ SQUARES Square Dance Club Fri, Aug 9 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7:30–10:30pm California Ballroom Dance FOXTROT lesson and dance Sat, Aug 10 10:30am– 12:30pm 7–11pm

8:30–9:30am Jazzercise SCOTTISH CHALLENGE DANCE with Gary Thomas Circle 'N Squares HOEDOWN

Sun, Aug 11 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 5–9:25pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING Mon, Aug 12 8:45–9:45am;5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–9:25pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, Aug 13 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7:30pm–9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

Through Aug 25, “Exuberant Watercolors,” Patricia Barnett’s watercolor paintings. Reception, Aug 10, 5pm. 306 Center Ave (above Levin & Co bookstore), Healdsburg. SunThurs, 10 to 6; Fri-Sat, 10 to 9. 707.431.4214.

MARIN COUNTY Art Works Downtown Through Aug 23, “Transitions,” photography-based imagery from 32 Bay Area artists. Reception, Aug 9, 5pm. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

Bolinas Museum Through Aug 25, “Birds of the Sierra Nevada,” paintings by Keith Hansen. Through Aug 25, “Celebrating 30 years,” featuring historical pieces from the museum’s past. Through Aug 25, “Constructed Surfaces,” color photographs by Andy Rappaport. Through Aug 25, “Consuelo Kanaga,” pieces by the American photographer from the collection of Susie Tompkins Buell. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

Falkirk Cultural Center Through Aug 17, “Splendid

Objects,” new works by 19 contemporary artists. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

appointment. 415.388.4331.

Osher Marin JCC

Through Sep 15, “Summer Group Show,” art by Bryn Craig, Phoebe Brunner and others. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Through Sep 2, “Nurture,” photos and stories midlife mothers with their families, written and created by Cyma Shapiro with photos by Shana Sureck and Tracy Cianflone. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Gallery Route One

Seager Gray Gallery

Through Sep 8, “Box Show,” 150 artists choose from three boxes and create a work of art. Closing party and live auction, Sep 8, 3pm. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Through Aug 31, “Summer Salon,” group exhibition of select gallery artists in various mediums. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

Marin Community Foundation

Toby’s Feed Barn

Gallery Bergelli

Through Sep 27, “Breaking Barriers,” featuring work by Bay Area artists with disabilities. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Marin MOCA Through Aug 25, “Out of Order,” a MarinMOCA member exhibition. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Marin Society of Artists Aug 11-31, “Trends and Impressions, Your Vision–Your Way,” juried member show. Reception, Aug 11, 2pm. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. MonThurs, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 415.454.9561.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Aug 26, “Bay Area Women Artists,” mixed-media artwork with emphasis on exploration and abstraction. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by

Through Aug 28, “Exhibition 3D,” portraits and large scale nature photographs by Art Rogers and John Kaufman. Reception, Aug 11, 1pm. 11250 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. MonSat, 9 to 5; Sun, 9:30 to 4. 415.663.1223.

NAPA COUNTY Blackbird of Calistoga Through Aug 31, “Vegetable Portraits,” photography by Lynn Karlin. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga.

di Rosa Through Sep 22, “External Combustion,” pieces by Sacramento sculptors Nathan Cordero, Julia Couzens, Chris Daubert and Dave Lane. Artist panel discussion, Aug 14, 7pm, $10. Through Dec 31, Largest collection of contemporary Bay Area art. Tours daily. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

ECHO Gallery Through Aug 31, “Sum Sum

Grand Hand Gallery Through Sep 29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Presence,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Michele de la Menardiere and sculptures by John Petrey. Reception, Aug 17, 6pm. 1136 Main St, Napa. No phone.

Comedy Comedy Night Adult content, hosted by Helen Pachynski. Second Fri of every month, 9pm. $4. Gaiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden, 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Anjelah Johnson Comedian became an internet sensation with her Bon Qui Qui character and nail salon video. Aug 9, 8pm. Sold out. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-and-comers. Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Events Antiques & Collectibles Show Only pre-1975 items are up for sale in this truly vintage market. Aug 11, 9am. Free. Windsor Town Green, Bell Road and McClelland Drive, Windsor.

Bayer Farm Tending All ages welcome to join LandPaths for garden care. Wed, 4-8pm. Bayer Farm, 1550 West Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.524.9318.

Cartoonist-inResidence Meet, watch and talk to a professional cartoonist. Aug 10, Joanna Sternberg. Free. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Center Literary Cafe Meeting of poets, writers and artists with rotating speakers and readings. Second Wed of every month, 7-9pm. Healdsburg Senior Center, 133 Matheson St, Healdsburg.

Gravenstein Apple Fair Celebrate the apple that made Sebastopol famous with entertainment and music from Zydeco Flames, California Honey Drops, Cahoots, Buzzy Martin & the Buzztones and others. Aug 10-11, 10am. $5$12. Ragle Ranch Park, 500 Ragle Rd, Sebastopol.

Open House Take a self-guided nature walk or a guide-led tour of the historic house and barn. Second Sat of every month. Free. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Public Star Party Three main telescopes plus others set up for viewing. Second Sat of every month, 9pm. $3. Robert Ferguson Observatory, Sugarloaf Ridge State Park, 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood. 707.833.6979.

Field Trips

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Marin Moonshiners Hike Monthly three-mile hike to experience sunset, moonrise, picnic and spectacular views. Pack your own picnic. Second Tues monthly at 7:30. $15. Pelican Inn, 10 Pacific Way, Muir Beach, RSVP. 415.331.0100.

Film Die Walkure Wagnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s incredible opera captured on film. Aug 11, 4pm. $7. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Don Quixote

Get info on housing, transit, food stamps and Medi-Cal. Wed, 11am-1pm. Free. Petaluma Health Center, 1301 Southpoint Blvd, Petaluma. 707.559.7500.

One of the most popular ballets ever takes on new brilliance in this reimagining by dance legend Rudolf Nureyev and the Paris Opera Ballet. Aug 10, 7pm. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

San Rafael Art Walk

Film Night

Resource Clinic

Second Fri monthly, 5 to 8, galleries and retailers host artists and artwork, receptions and entertainment. Second Fri of every month, 6-8pm. Downtown San Rafael, Fifth and A streets, San Rafael.

Aug 9, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being Thereâ&#x20AC;?; Aug 10, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lincolnâ&#x20AC;?; Aug 16, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Singletrack Highâ&#x20AC;?; Aug 17, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Avengers.â&#x20AC;? Fri-Sat, 8pm, through Aug 17. Free. Creek Park, Hub Intersection, Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, San Anselmo.

Senior Bridge

Girl Rising

Meet up and play a few hands, no partner required. Fri. Napa Senior Center, 1500 Jefferson St, Napa. 707.224.2055.

Solar Viewing Safely observe the sun through a solar telescope. Second Sat of every month-noon. Free. Robert Ferguson Observatory, Sugarloaf Ridge State Park, 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood. 707.833.6979.

Sonoma County Fair â&#x20AC;&#x153;Home Spun Funâ&#x20AC;? theme includes horse racing, dog shows, butterflies, tiny houses and more. Music lineup (separate tickets required) includes: Aug 7, Florida Georgia Line; Aug 8, Bridgit Mendler; Aug 9, Intocable. Tues-Sun, 11am-11pm. through Aug 11. $5-$20. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.545.4200.

Teen Health Clinic Thurs, 3:30-6pm. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1 3, 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Summer,â&#x20AC;? art by John Casey, Shawn Wisenhunt, Emma Higgens and Kim Ford Kitz. 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.

Documentary aims to prove that if women are educated the world will change. Aug 13, 5:30pm. $10. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Hava Nagila Documentary about the traditional Jewish song and its cross-cultural connections. Aug 14-15, 4:30 and 6:30pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Jewish Film Festival Several films shown, highlights include â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Zigzag Kid,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rue Mandarâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;First Cousin Once Removed.â&#x20AC;? Times vary. Aug 10-12. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

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The Manchurian Candidate Political thriller made in 1962 still holds weight today. Aug 12, 7pm. $8. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756. )

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NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | AUGUST 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1 3, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Food & Drink

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Ballroom & Dining Room One-hour dance lessons followed by a special threecourse menu created by chef Aaron Wright. Second Mon of every month. $40. Lark Creek Inn, 234 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur.

Civic Center Farmers Market Sun at 10am, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eat Local 101â&#x20AC;? provides walking tour with information, cooking advice and ideas inspired by locally grown foods. Thurs, 8am-1pm and Sun, 8am-1pm. Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 800.897.3276.

Cochon Heritage Fire BBQ Over 20 wineries and 1,200 pounds of meat on hand to satisfy all cravings. Aug 11, 3pm. $125-$200. Charles Krug, 2800 Main St, St Helena. 707.967.3993.

ONE-MAN HIT Brian Copeland brings â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Not a Genuine Black Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; to the Cinnabar Theater on Aug. 13. See Theater, adjacent.

Cocktails & Characters

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Sip on artisinal cocktails while costumed Raven Players present mini-scenes from select plays. Aug 11, 4:30pm. $75. Hotel Healdsburg, 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Fairfax Community Farmers Market Offering artisanal foods and locally grown and raised agricultural products. Wed, 4pm. through Sep 24. Free. Bolinas Park, 124 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax.

Cheryl Forberg Nutritionist for â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Biggest Loserâ&#x20AC;? demonstrates how easy it is to prepare a healthy meal. Includes dinner. Aug 8, 6:30pm. $55. Next Key Center, 1385 N Hamilton Pkwy, Novato. 415.382.3363, ext 211.

Healdsburg Farmers Market Wed, 4-7pm. Downtown Plaza, Healdsburg Avenue and Matheson Street, Healdsburg. Wed-Sat, 9amnoon. Healdsburg Farmers Market, North and Vine streets, Healdsburg. 707.431.1956.

Indian Valley Farmers Market Organic farm and garden produce stand where you bring your own bag. Wed, 10am-3pm. College of Marin, Indian Valley Campus, 1800 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.454.4554.

Kitchen Memories

Forestville Farmers Market

Fundraiser for upcoming Sonoma Valley Museum of Art exhibit. Wine and appetizers served. Aug 8, 6pm. $25. Ramekins Culinary School, 50 W Spain St, Sonoma. 707.933.0450.

Tues, 3-7pm. Russian River Vineyards, 5700 Hwy 116, Forestville. 707.887.3344.

Redwood Empire Farmers Market

Green String Herb Fling Afternoon of culinary and therapeutic herb samplings. Aug 10, 11am. Free. Green String Farm, 3571 Old Adobe Rd, Petaluma.

and 25 wineries, with live jazz and classical music. Aug 10, 1pm. Free. Falkirk Cultural Center, 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

Santa Rosa Original Certified Farmers Market Sat, 9am-1pm and Wed, 9am1pm. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

Tam Valley Farmers Market Local artisan food, flowers and crafts. Tues, 3pm. through Aug 27. Shoreline Shopping Center, 219 Shoreline Highway, Mill Valley.

Valley of the Moon Farmers Market Tues, 5:30-8:30pm. through Oct 29. Sonoma Plaza, First St E, Sonoma.

Wednesday Night Market

Sat, 8:30am-1pm and Wed, 8:30am-noon. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

Food, vendors, produce, live music and activities. Wed, 5pm. through Aug 21. Free. Downtown Santa Rosa, Fourth and B streets, Santa Rosa.

San Rafael Food & Wine Festival

West End Farmers Market

Sample from local restaurants

Rediscover the historic heart

Lectures

Medicinal Herb Workshop Herbalist Tina Tedesco talks about medicinal herbs as home-based first aid remedies. Aug 10, 10am. $10-$15. Sonoma Garden Park, 19990 Seventh St E, Sonoma.

Naomi Murakami Abstraction Then & Now Historian Ann Wiklund traces the introduction of abstract painting to the American audience. Tues, Aug 13, 2pm. $55. Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, 551 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.939.SVMA.

Peter Bowerman Commercial writer talks about how to make a living and build a writing portfolio. Aug 11, 3pm. $8. Flamingo Lounge, 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Burbank Lecture Series Aug 14, Tour the Prince Memorial Greenway with Bill Montgomery; Sep 11, Susan Hatch describes gardening with bulbs; Oct 9, Tour of Juilliard Park and the Church of One Tree with Bill Montgomery. $10. Luther Burbank Experiment Farm, 7781 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.9492.

CityZen Evening of sitting meditation, tea and dharma talk. All are welcome. Mon, 7pm. Free. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Death Cafe Talk about death in a calm and informal conversational setting. Aug 13, 6:30pm. Free. Aqus Cafe, 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

An Evening with Catherine Karnow Travel photographer talks about her work. Aug 10, 8pm. $10. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Beth Kephart University of Pennsylvania professor discusses memoir writing. Aug 11, 3pm. $8. Flamingo Lounge, 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Laguna’s Prehistory Archaeologist Tom Origer talks about the oldest dated artifact found in Sonoma County. Aug 10, 3pm. $10. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Art director for the Wellness and Advocacy Center gives a presentation. Aug 8, 7pm. $9. Sonoma County Museum, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Science Buzz Cafe

The True Story of a Blind Man, His Guide Dog & the Triumph of Trust at Ground Zero” with Michael Hingson. 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma 707.763.9801.

Redwood Cafe Second Tuesday of every month, 8:30pm, Slamazon Poetry Slam, all-women’s open mic with competitive poetry and a headlining poet. $5-$10. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati 707.795.7868.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

“The Quiet Time Revolution: Stress & the Teenage Mind” with Kim Dierke; Aug 13, 7pm. $5. French Garden, 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Second Sunday of every month, 4pm, Westword Salon. $1. 707.829.1549. 282 S High St, Sebastopol.

Your Brain on Food

Second Thursday of every month, 7pm, “Why There Are Words,” reading series presents various writers on a theme. $5. 333 Caledonia St, Sausalito 415.331.8272.

Build understanding about hunger, neurobiology and neurochemistry with Sarah Josef, director of the Dietetics program at San Francisco State University. Aug 10, 9am. $40. Bergamot Alley, 328-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8720.

Readings Book Passage Aug 7, 7pm, “The Best Travel Writing, Volume 9: True Stories from Around the World” with authors. Aug 8, 8pm, “Pass the Butterworms: Remote Journeys Oddly Rendered” with Tim Cahill. $10. Aug 9, 8pm, “The Valley of Amazement” with Amy Tan. $10. Aug 12, 7pm, “Hope Conquers All: Inspiring Stories of Love and Healing from CaringBridge” with Sona Mehring. Aug 13, 7pm, “Griefprints: A Practical Guide for Supporting a Grieving Person” with Radha Stern. Aug 14, 1pm, “The Light Between Oceans” with ML Stedman. Aug 14, 7pm, “Heirs and Graces” with Rhys Bowen. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Studio 333

Theater Broadway Under the Stars Professional stage actors from New York and Los Angeles perform pieces from Broadway favorites. Aug 9-10, 15-17, “Dancing Through Life”; Aug 30-31, “Gala Celebration.” Thurs-Sat, 5pm. through Aug 17. $29-$117. Jack London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen. 707.938.5216.

The Cat in the Hat The story of a mischievous cat and his bottomless headpiece presented by Bay Area Children’s Theatre. Sat-Sun, 10:30am and 12:30pm. through Aug 18. $15-$20. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

A Comedy of Errors

Aug 12, 6pm, Dine with Local Authors. $4. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa 707.544.2491.

Marin Shakespeare Company’s presentation of the Bard’s classic with a Texas twist. Fri-Sun, 8pm. through Sep 29. $20-$37.50. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, 890 Belle Ave, Dominican University, San Rafael.

Hopmonk Sebastopol

The Dining Room

Second Sunday of every month, 9pm, North Bay Poetry Slam, Monthly poetry performance and competition. Aug 4, National Team Stockton. $5-$10. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol 707.829.7300.

Six performers delineate the dying lifestyle of wealthy WASPdom and the now neglected room which was once a vital center of family life. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 3pm. through Aug 31. $12-$15. Russian River Hall, 20347 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.849.4873.

Gaia’s Garden

Petaluma Library Aug 10, 11am, “Thunder Dog:

The Dixie Swim Club Sassy comedy about friendships between women that last a lifetime. Presented by Ross Valley Players. Thurs, 7:30pm, Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Aug 18. $22-$26. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Not a Genuine Black Man Brian Copeland recounts his 1970s San Leandro upbringing in this one-man comedy. Aug 13, 8pm. $35. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Rent (School Edition) Story about falling in love under the shadow of HIV and AIDS adapted for a younger audience. Fri-Sat, 7:30pm and Sat-Sun, 2pm. through Aug 18. $10-$15. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Shrek: The Musical Everyone’s favorite ogre has his life turned upside-down when a talking donkey and beautiful princess come calling. Thurs, 7:30pm, Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sat, 2pm. through Aug 10. $15-$25. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

The Spanish Tragedy Marin Shakespeare Company opens summer season with the play credited as the inspiration for “Hamlet.” Sun, 4pm and Fri-Sun, 8pm. through Aug 11. $20-$38. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, 890 Belle Ave, Dominican University, San Rafael.

The Tempest Prospero, the rightful Duke of Milan, plots to restore his daughter Miranda to her rightful place using illusion and skillful manipulation in this Shakespeare play. Thurs-Sun, 7pm. through Aug 25. $7-$20. Ives Park, Willow Street and Jewell Avenue, Sebastopol.

The Pirates of Penzance Gilbert & Sullivan’s classic tale of swashbuckling and singing on the high seas. Wed, Aug 7, 7:30pm. $15-$25. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is

Game Over Starbase Arcade to close, taking 32 years of memories Usually, whenever time is running out on the game, dropping a few extra quarters in the slot is all one needs to keep playing. But for San Rafael’s 32year-old Starbase Arcade—among the last ’80s-style video game arcades in the country—even the extra points from being a certified institution aren’t enough to qualify for one last bonus round. The venerable arcade cannot stand up to the skyrocketing rents in San Rafael, so at the end of the month, owner “Video Bob” Albritton will be shutting his doors for good. For Video Bob’s legion of fans, including middle-agers who still recall playing their first game of Centipede or Mortal Kombat at Starbase, news of the arcade’s closure is just one more nail in the coffin of a generation’s collective memories. Ironically, the news comes just as Starbase is about to be honored in an exhibition about the history of arcade culture, at Twin Galaxies in Fairfield, Iowa. There will be a ceremony marking the demise of Starbase, but it’s unlikely Albritton will be there. Instead, he’ll be busy figuring out what to do with 60-plus video games that are about to lose their home. For fans of Starbase, and video games in general, the countdown has begun. Starbase Arcade pulls the plug in just three weeks. Starbase Arcade, 1545 Fourth St., San Rafael. 415.459.7655.—David Templeton

produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY

BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

33 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 7–1 3, 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

of Sonoma agriculture. Sun through Oct 27. Free. West End Farmers Market, 817 Donahue St, Santa Rosa.

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General Notices North Bay Herpetological Society's REPTILE EXPO Variety of vendors and exhibitors offering hundreds of snakes, lizards, geckos, turtles, tortoises, tarantulas, scorpions, supplies, jewelry, and more. Not for the squeamish. Aug. 24, 10 to 5. Petaluma Community Center, 320 North McDowell Blvd.,

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A Wild Irish Rose Mature, Independent in Marin. Call for photos. Please call before 11pm. No calls from blocked phone #. Kara, 415.233.2769.

Alternative Health Well-Being

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Relaxing massage and bodywork by male massage therapist with 13 yrs. experience. 707.542.6856.

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FOOT REFLEXOLGY THERAPEUTIC BODY MASSAGE

By Joe, CMT. Relaxing hot tub and pool available. Will do outcalls. 707.228.6883.

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Full Body Sensual Massage With a mature, playful CMT. Comfortable incall location near the J.C. in Santa Rosa. Soothing, relaxing, and fun. Gretchen 707.478.3952. Veterans Discount.

SPIRITUAL

Connections

Finding inspiration & connecting with your community

Unity of Santa Rosa An inclusive, spiritually-minded community. All are welcome. Workshops and events. Sunday School & Service 10:30am 4857 Old Redwood Hwy tel: 707.542.7729 www.UnityofSantaRosa.org

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of August 7

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) â&#x20AC;&#x153;You have to participate relentlessly in the manifestation of your own blessings,â&#x20AC;? says author Elizabeth Gilbert. I recommend that you experiment with this subversive idea, Aries. Just for a week, see what happens if you devote yourself to making yourself feel really good. I mean risk going to extremes as you pursue happiness with focused zeal. Try this: draw up a list of experiences that you know will give you intense pleasure, and indulge in them all without apology. And please donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fret about the possible consequences of getting crazed with joy. Be assured that the cosmos is providing you with more slack than usual.

dwindled or drooped? The next few weeks will be an excellent time to take inventory of these things. Your own evaluations will be most important, of course. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to be the ultimate judge of your own character. But you should also solicit the feedback of people you trust. They may be able to help you see clues youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve missed. If, after weighing all the evidence, you decide youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re pleased with how your life has unfolded these past 10 to 11 months, I suggest you celebrate your success. Throw yourself a party or buy yourself a reward or climb to the top of a mountain and unleash a victory cry.

TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20)

Monmouth Park in New Jersey hosts regular horse races from May through November. During one such event in 2010, a horse named Thewifenoseeverything ďŹ nished ďŹ rst, just ahead of another nag named Thewifedoesntknow. I suspect that thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be a comparable outcome in your life sometime soon. Revelation will trump secrecy. Whoever is hiding information will lose out to anyone who sees and expresses the truth. I advise you to bet on the option thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s forthcoming and communicative, not the one thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s furtive and withholding.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am not washed and beautiful, in control of a shining world in which everything ďŹ ts,â&#x20AC;? writes Taurus author Annie Dillard, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but instead am wandering awed about on a splintered wreck Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve come to care for, whose gnawed trees breathe a delicate air.â&#x20AC;? I recommend you try on her perspective for size. For now, just forget about scrambling after perfection. At least temporarily, surrender any longing you might have for smooth propriety. Be willing to live without neat containment and polite decorum. Instead, be easy and breezy. Feel a generous acceptance for the messy beauty youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re embedded in. Love your life exactly as it is, with all of its paradoxes and mysteries.

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) Studies show that when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re driving a car, your safest speed is ďŹ ve miles per hour higher than the average rate of trafďŹ c. Faster than that, though, and the danger level rises. Traveling more slowly than everyone else on the road also increases your risk of having an accident. Applying these ideas metaphorically, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to suggest you take a similar approach as you weave your way through lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s challenges in the coming week. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t dawdle and plod. Move a little swifter than everyone else, but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t race along at a breakneck pace. CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22) The key theme

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this week is relaxed intensiďŹ cation. Your assignment, should you choose to accept it, is to heighten and strengthen your devotion to things that are important to youâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but in ways that make you feel more serene and self-possessed. To accomplish this, you will have to ignore the conventional wisdom, which falsely asserts that going deeper and giving more of yourself require you to increase your stress levels. You do indeed have a great potential for going deeper and giving more of yourself, but only if you also become more at peace with yourself and more at home in the world.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22)

Last year a young Nebraskan entrepreneur changed his name from Tyler Gold to Tyrannosaurus Rex Gold. He said it was a way of giving him greater name recognition as he worked to build his career. Do you have any interest in making a bold move like that, Leo? The coming weeks would be a good time for you to think about adding a new twist to your nickname or title or self-image. But I recommend something less sensationalistic and more in line with the qualities youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d actually like to cultivate in the future. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m thinking of something like Laughing Tiger or Lucky Lion or Wily Wildcat.

VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22)

AfricanAmerican jazz singer Billie Holiday was the greatgranddaughter of a slave. By the time she was born in 1915, black people in the American South were no longer â&#x20AC;&#x153;ownedâ&#x20AC;? by white â&#x20AC;&#x153;masters,â&#x20AC;? but their predicament was still extreme. Racism was acute and debilitating. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what Billie wrote in her autobiography: â&#x20AC;&#x153;You can be up to your boobies in white satin, with gardenias in your hair and no sugar cane for miles, but you can still be working on a plantation.â&#x20AC;? Nothing you experience is remotely as oppressive as what Billie experienced, Virgo. But Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m wondering if you might suffer from a milder version of it. Is any part of you oppressed and inhibited even though your outward circumstances are technically unconstrained? If so, nowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the time to push for more freedom.

LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) What resounding triumphs and subtle transformations have you accomplished since your last birthday? How have you grown and changed? Are there any ways you have

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21)

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) You have both a poetic and a cosmic license to stretch yourself further. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best not to go too far, of course. You should stop yourself before you obliterate all boundaries and break all taboos and smash all precedents. But youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve certainly got the blessings of fate if you seek to disregard some boundaries and shatter some taboos and outgrow some precedents. While youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re at it, you might also want to shed a few pinched expectations and escape an irrelevant limitation or two. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to get as big and brave and brazen as you dare. CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) When I was 19, a thug shot me in the butt with a shotgun at close range. To this day, my body contains the 43 pellets he pumped into me. They have caused some minor health problems, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m always queasy when I see a gun. But I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t experience any routine suffering from the wound. Its original impact no longer plagues me. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your own personal equivalent of my trauma, Capricorn? A sickness that racked you when you were young? A difďŹ cult break-up with your ďŹ rst love? The death of someone you cared about? Whatever it was, I suspect you now have the power to reach a new level of freedom from that old pain. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18) Want to take full advantage of the sexy vibes that are swirling around in your vicinity? One thing you could do is whisper the following provocations in the ear of anyone who would respond well to a dose of boisterous magic: (1) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Corrupt me with your raw purity, baby; beguile me with your raucous honestyâ&#x20AC;?; (2) â&#x20AC;&#x153;I ďŹ nally ďŹ gured out that one of the keys to eternal happiness is to be easily amused. Want me to show you how that works?â&#x20AC;?; (3) â&#x20AC;&#x153;I dare you to quench my thirst for spiritual sensualityâ&#x20AC;?; (4) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trade clothes and pretend weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s higher selves.â&#x20AC;?

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

Some people put their faith in religion or science or political ideologies. English novelist J. G. Ballard placed his faith elsewhere: in the imagination. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I believe in the power of the imagination to remake the world,â&#x20AC;? he wrote, â&#x20AC;&#x153;to release the truth within us, to hold back the night, to transcend death, to charm motorways, to ingratiate ourselves with birds, to enlist the conďŹ dences of madmen.â&#x20AC;? As you make your adjustments and reconďŹ gure your plans, Pisces, I suggest you put your faith where Ballard did. Your imagination is far more potent and dynamic than you realizeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;especially right now.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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Classifieds

FREE WILL

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Confidential Program. 707.576.1919

2013 Healdsburg Guitar Festival August 9–11, Santa Rosa, CA – 800.477.4437 — www.festivalofguitars.com

B-12 Shots Happy Hour! – Thursdays 4–6pm Only – $18 (30% off) WALK-INS ONLY. For energy, immune, fatigue, anxiety @ the Naturopathic Wellness Center @ the Integrative Medical Clinic of SR - Dr. Dana Michaels ND and Dr. Moses Goldberg ND — 175 Concourse Blvd. 707.284.9200

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Rodney Strong Summer Concert Series Main Street Reunion Car Show Live on the Green. Sat Aug 17 Dave Koz & Friends. Sun Sept 1 BB King. Box Office: 707.869.1595 rodneystrong.com

Sonoma-Cutrer Jazzy Summer Nights August 17, Bill Champlin with Special Friends. 707.237.348 shop.sonomacutrer.com

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