Issuu on Google+

Go Local Independentss Month Guide Inside!

Faraway, So Close

Rebecca Solnit on ‘The Faraway Nearby,’ nature, and the world’s true shades of grey

Win tickets to the Santa Rosa Symphony’s S 4th of July J uly celebration at the t Green Music Center Centter bohemian.com

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Ŵ

ŵ NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

5A830H9d[h$! "()"_\

w w w. b o d e g a b ayc a . o r g

.I n s u r a n c e d o n a t e d b y C o m m u n i t y I n s u r a n c e A g e n c y

N

The County of Sonoma is our sponsor for this event.

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

4

Bohemian

           3          ##   !     1&/%$21)2 -*

 

,+%$21)2 -*

PETALUMA

%(# )

 "

 ',-'$01.%$21)2  -*

1&/%$21)2 -*

  

$))$%) $ Note: Start time has changed to 6:30pm! SANTA ROSA HIGH THEATER

Editor Gabe Meline, ext. 202

Staff Writers

MONTGOMERY VILLAGE

3   

847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288

Leilani Clark, ext. 106 Rachel Dovey, ext. 203 Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200

Copy Editor Gary Brandt, ext. 150

')(%%*'""( (%+' $ %*'%-.( $$' $)"" $

Calendar Editor

SEBASTOPOL

Interns

Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200 Anna Hecht, Nadav Soroker

1&/%$21)2  -*

 " WITH   

%$"%((  $#&%' '"( BEER GARDEN AT HOPMONK TAVERN

'1./%$21)2 -*

   

"&%+&/%$21)2 -*

Contributors

 WITH "  

Michael Amsler, Ronald Bailey, Rob Brezsny, Dani Burlison, Richard von Busack, Jessica Dur Taylor, Gretchen Giles, James Knight, Jenna Loceff, Jacquelynne OcaĂąa, Jonah Raskin, Sara Sanger, Bruce Stengl, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow

Pre-event Mixer at 6pm, Author Talk at 7pm | PETALUMA

Design Director

 #&%(( " +( % ')""(

HOT SUMMER NIGHTS WITH LOCAL AUTHORS

" ' ))$ )%# $ ,MONTGOMERY VILLAGE

1&/%$21)2  -* &_\ &_ \

 

!&) .( * )%) $ )*'%( $$$ $$%)""(%*)*'("+( SEBASTOPOL

     "                                   !   !     

Wednesday, July 10, 7 pm |  

Wednesday, July 17, 7 pm |   Wednesday, July 24, 7 pm |  

Wednesday, July 31, 7pm |   

"&%+&/%$21)2  -*

  WITH "  # $(-*)'(

Production Operations Coordinator Mercy Perez

Senior Designer Jackie Mujica, ext. 213

Layout Artists Gary Brandt, Tabi Zarrinnaal

Advertising Director Lisa Santos, ext. 205

Advertising Account Managers Lynda Rael, ext. 204 Mercedes Murolo, ext. 207

Circulation Manager Steve Olson, ext. 201

Sales Operations Manager Deborah Bonar, ext. 215

Publisher

Pre-event Mixer at 6pm, Author Talk at 7pm | PETALUMA

 #  LOCAL INDEPENDENT 

.(%$21)2  -*

 ! !"

Kara Brown

+ $)(%$%%!.(

* )% %#$$ $ !" $$'('+ $ MONTGOMERY VILLAGE

VISIT VI SIT OUR S STORES: TORES:

4&#"4501 4&#"45010-p1&5"-6."p)&"-%4#63( 10- p 1&5 5" "-6." p )&"-% ) 4#63( $ "-*450(" p /"1" p .0/5(0. .&3: 7*--"(& $"-*450("p/"1"p.0/5(0.&3:7*--"(& WWW W.. C O P P E R F I E L D S B O O K S . C O M

Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Third-class postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers Š2011 Metrosa Inc.

Cover photo of Rebecca Solnit by Sallie Shatz. Cover design by Kara Brown.

5

77"1&1&/4 " 1& 1& / 4 ''30. 30. 

nb GRAY SKIES

And there are gray skies above the house my baby lives in; and if that ain’t enough, it’s raining on a weekday in June.

This photo was taken by Erin Payton of Santa Rosa. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.





  0GG 0GG

BOZQVSDIBTF BOZ QVSDIBTF

We W eh have ave a H HUGE UGEE sselection election of of glass glass pipes, p ipes , XJUIUIJTDPVQPO

X JUI UIJT DPVQPO

4 PNFFYDMV T JPO TB QQM Z waterpipes, waterpipes, wood wood pipes pipes and and all all the the smoking smoking 4PNFFYDMVTJPOTBQQMZ &YQ

& Y Q   

accessories accessories you you want! w an t ! FFOUR OUR LOCATIONS: LOCATIONS: NEW N EW HOURS for SR: 9 9AM-10PM AM-10PM FRI & SAT SA AT 9 AM-9PM SUN-THUR S 9AM-9PM SUN-THURS

3372 SANTA 3372 SANTA ROSA ROSA AVE AVE SANTA ROSA, ROSA , 707-545-4975 7 0 7- 5 4 5 - 4 9 7 5 SANTA

OPEN OPE N 11AM-8PM MON MON-SAT -SA AT / 11A 11AM-7PM AM-7PM SUN SUNDAYS DA AYS Y

1099 44TH 1099 TH ST, ST, SAN S A N RAFAEL R A FA EL , 415-457-2 415- 4 57-24 420 20 116 6W WESTERN E S T E RN A AVE, VE, P PETALUMA, E TA LUM A , 7707.762.9 07.762.9 4 420 20 NAPA, 1110 10 SOSCOL SOSCOL AAVE, VE, N A PA , 7707-226-7 07-226-74 420 20

‘Sometimes you have to go through these things that aren’t so encouraging or aren’t so easy.’ COVER STORY P20 Shielding Yourself from the NSA T H E PAP E R P 8

Jewelry Repurposing Specialist

The Latest Food-Truck Trend: Buns!

Expert Repairs

D I N ING P 15

Malcolm Margolin Has a Mighty Beard

We trade or buy gold & platinum

Local Designers Branded Consignment Items

A RTS & IDEAS P23 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Dining p15 Wineries p18 Swirl p19

Cover Feature p20 Culture Crush p22 Arts & Ideas p23 Stage p24 Film p25

Music p26 Concerts & Clubs p28 A&E p31 ClassiďŹ ed p35 Astrology p35

Spend your day the Windsor way in Old Downtown Windsor 8JOETPS3PBEt8JOETPS $" 707 836 1840 markshimizudesign.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

11"91-00. " 9 1- 0 0.

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

6

BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Midnight in Samarkand Technology and isolation at an international hub BY MIKE HARKINS

R

ecently, while waiting between flights at the San Francisco Airport, I found myself sitting at the airport bar, as I normally do, imbibing a Harvey Wallbanger—as I normally do—watching the action on the tarmac, as well as admiring the general strangeness of the surrounding venue. In many ways, this place is a present-day Silk Road outpost, a crossroads and exchange of foreign ideas and peoples. One of the redeeming qualities of waiting in the airport has always been the opportunity to meet different people and have random conversations that go on about random things, in the process gaining a perspective on life I never otherwise probably would get. How often in your everyday existence, for example, have you encountered some dirt farmer named Joe from Lusk who struck it rich because of the vast petroleum deposits on his land, or a girl named Anemone from the Netherlands who was out of the Old World for the first time, let alone have an actual conversation with them? Some of the strangest conversations I have ever had occurred at airports, yet this veritable mosaic of multicolored views seems to be slowly but surely going the way of the buffalo. Looking around, I noticed virtually everyone was stoned on some sort of digital opiate—everyday people reduced to the stupor of Haight Street junkies, strung out on the marvels of modern communication devices, chasing dragons on their iPods. People live for the junk. People constantly have to update where they are, who they are with and what they are doing on the 36 different social media platforms they use, all for approval of their digital minions. People seem more excited about what someone else will say about what happened to them, rather than enjoying the raw insanity of what might actually happen. After a couple drinks, my flight was called, and I sifted my way through the sea of digital dope fiends, the absence of a stale-piss aroma the only thing assuring me I wasn’t in the Civic Center MUNI station at midnight. Mike Harkins is a guru of Nuristani shamanic rituals and a leading authority on small hand tools. He currently resides in a fortified compound near Santa Rosa. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Water, Water Everywhere

A big thank you to Rachel Dovey (“Wrung Dry,” May 29). I lived in Guerneville for 25 years, moving to Lucerne in March of ’02. In a burst of insanity, I sold my house in Guerneville and bought this one. At the time of my move, I was paying $1.17 per Ccf with a continual billing of $41.27 every two months. I now pay $7.79 per Ccf. I began both Lucerne Community Water Organization and FLOW. I found FLOW out of Monterey. They had just taken over their private water company. I remember back in the early ’80s and Sweetwater Springs in Guerneville. Armstrong Woods Road was a holdout, and now, sitting across from the Coffee Bazaar, is Cal Water! Additionally, there’s Freezeout Road by the Duncan Mills Bridge. The infrastructure between that site and Casini Ranch is typical of Cal Water. You should see our roads after they actually do any work! I guess Caltrans just repairs it! Anyway, thanks for the article.

LENNY MATTHEWS Lucerne

I was traveling through Sonoma County a few weeks ago and read this article in the paper. Very well written, on an important issue. Why don’t the residents being ripped off refuse to pay their water bill, send it to an escrow account managed by an impartial attorney or agency, and do so until these crooks change their billing practices? That would be a lot of power, and I doubt the company would cut off each and everyone’s water. Where are all the county supervisors here? Just some thoughts rambling up the coast.

RUDY NARENSKY Timberlake, N.C.

My name is Bob Daddi, I am a director of Ojai FLOW. We are in the process of removing our forprofit water company. They have sued to stop an election for a bond that will allow to us purchase and remove them. Please go to the ojaiflow.com and contact us if we can give you any help. The only answer is to have elected CPUC members, not appointed. Call your senator and assemblyperson and ask for support. They should have a vested interest.

BOB DADDI Ojai

Better Beavers Beaver value to streams and habitat is becoming better understood (“Beaver Fever,” June 19). Their impact on coho and bird life is just the beginning. Folks interested in learning more about their effect and managing their many challenges should come to Martinez for the sixth annual beaver festival in August.

HEIDI PERRYMAN Martinez

As progressive as California appears, its wildlife policies are antiquated and unfortunate. Glad to see some coverage. Looking forward to more great stories like this.

EMI KIGHT Via online

Library Hours Great article on library closures (“Long Overdue,” June 19). Thanks for digging deep into what has now become a perennial problem. And who winds up bearing the brunt of the “supes” inaction? We do. It’s not fair. And their favorite perennial byline, “We have no money,” no longer holds water, since they certainly don’t mind spending money conducting study after study to explore adding fluoride to our Sonoma County water supply—money which would be much better spent on something that so many Sonoma County residents could find

THIS MODERN WORLD

Woman-Owned Woman-Owned Family-Friendly Family-Friendly

By Tom Tomorrow

Tues-Fri 7:30-6:00 321 Second Street

769-0162

Petaluma

HONDA TOYOT A M AZ DA NI S SAN SUBARU

<]e=^S\ 4@33eOTTZSQ]\S 0cg5Sb4`SS ^S`Qcab][S`^S`dWaWb3f^W`Sa%"!

TSObc`W\U3Oab1]Oab4`]hS\1cabO`R VO\RQ`OTbSRg]Uc`bcaW\UZ]QOZ ]`UO\WQT`cWbaPS``WSa a]`PSbaO\R[OZbSRaVOYSa T`SaVROWZgeOTTZSQ]\SaP]eZa

truly beneďŹ cial: reopening our libraries to their full operating schedules. Again, much thanks.

TOM BONFIGLI

Sebastopol

Thank you for providing some insight on why our libraries arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t open as much as they used to be. It reminded me of the front-page article in the Press Democrat about the homeless population using the library, and the problems that some of them cause. Their article seemed to demonize the libraries by association, at a time when libraries need advocates. I know that many staff feel under pressure to not criticize library management or funding for fear of being next in line for cutbacks. Thank you for being their voice.

JAN SHEEHAN Via online

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

Top Five 1

Thrill rides at the Petaluma Fair blasting the Grateful Dead instead of AC/DC

2

Three Twins Ice Cream teams up with Sergio Romo: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;It Only Tastes Illegalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

3

Flyer for 9-11 memorial in Napa declares â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Celebrate Napaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 30-ton erection!â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

4

Sheep return across from Cotati City Hall; George Barich mad, for some reason

5 Lady who accidentally

gave pot cookies to young kids is clearedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fairfax!

;O`Z]eAOTSeOg1S\bS` ;O`Z]e5cS`\SdWZZS@]ORAO\bO@]aO @OZSg¸aB]e\1S\bS`@]V\S`b>O`Y

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Rants

7

THE

Paper

That’s Crafty

Bruce Stengl

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

8

According to a study released last month by the Sonoma County Economic Development Board, craft brewing now accounts for $123 million in annual economic impact. The study shows a 15 percent increase in craft beer sales nationwide last year versus a 41 percent increase in Sonoma County. The top dog is Lagunitas, which employs 52 percent of the county’s craft-beer industry and produces 73 percent of its beer. The Russian River Brewing Company’s release of Pliny the Younger, which drew 12,500 attendees in 2013, brought an economic impact of $2.3 million. —Nicolas Grizzle

Shelf Space

THE EYE IN THE SKY Smaller privacy-friendly browsers and encryption can help shield users from surveillance.

Dodging the Grid How to keep your government from spying on you BY RONALD BAILEY

‘D

oes the [National Security Agency] collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of Americans?” Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., asked James Clapper, the director of national intelligence, during a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing in March. Clapper replied, “No sir . . . not wittingly.”

We now know that was a baldfaced lie. Or as Clapper nicely parsed it later, it was the “least untruthful” statement. The NSA has been collecting telephone and telecommunications data from tens of millions of Americans for years now. The NSA claims this storehouse of data is never reviewed unless additional information prompts the department to winnow it—for instance, a letter from Russia warning about a couple of Chechens living

in Boston. But it hasn’t worked out that way. Christopher Soghoian, a policy analyst at the American Civil Liberties Union, likens the situation to having someone tell you that he wants to put a video camera in your bedroom but will not actually look at the stored footage unless something bad happens later. The NSA is able to obtain information because the dominant internet business model is set up to exchange free services

Who says bookstores are dying? Certainly not Paul Jaffe, co-owner of Copperfield’s Books, who plans to expand into downtown San Rafael this November. In the Fourth Street building that was slated to house the ill-fated Marin Rocks museum, the first-ever Copperfield’s store in Marin will also include a Taylor Maid Coffee cafe along with occasional author events and a large children’s section. “I’ve been looking around for a location in San Rafael ever since Borders closed,” Jaffe says, “and it’s a beautiful old building with a huge high ceiling.” So how does an independent bookstore expand in a world of e-readers? Jaffe says the American Booksellers Association has in fact reported a rise in membership, and mentions that the company hasn’t downsized, but “right-sized”—making certain stores more lean to create room for expansion elsewhere. “San Rafael is the biggest city in Marin County, and it has no general-use bookstore,” Jaffe notes. “With all the changes in the industry in the last 10 years, I didn’t know if there was another bookstore that was going to move in there.”—Gabe Meline

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

:FDG<K@K@M<GI@:<JÂ&#x203A;<OG<IKBEFNC<;><Â&#x203A;?FLJ<>8I;<EJG<:@8C@JKJ : F D G < K @ K @ M < G I @ : < J Â&#x203A; < O G < I K B E FN C < ; > < Â&#x203A; ? F L J <  > 8 I ; < E J G <: @ 8 C @ J K J

VOTED #1

?<8C;J9LI>$N<JKJ@;<<O@KÂ&#x203A;.'.%+**%+'-/ ? < 8 C;J 9L I> $N < J K J@ ; << O@KÂ&#x203A;. ' .% + * * % + ' - / 707.433.4068 7 0 7.4 3 3 .4 0 6 8 w w w.ThriveHydro.com www.ThriveHydro.com 30 3 0 A Mill Mill Street, St r e e t , H Healdsburg ealdsburg

WEILL W EILL H HALL ALL Sonoma at

University State University

presents p pr esents the

V VOTED OTED # #1â&#x20AC;&#x201D;BEST 1â&#x20AC;&#x201D; BEST H HYDRO Y DRO STORE S TO R E IIN N SONOMA SO NOMA COUNTY! COUNT Y!

Fine Dining For Wild Birds

The BIGGEST ďŹ reworks in Sonoma County!

Fourth ou t o of J July Ju y Celebration Celebra ra ation i

gmc.sonoma.edu

with the Santa Rosa wi Rosa Symphony FFamily-Friendly amilly-Friendly y Activities, FFood o & Fun! ood

866.955.6040

GREEN G REE N MUSIC M USIC C CENTER E N TER

FFestivities estivities begin at 4:30PM Concert at 7:3 7:30PM 0PM Fir Fireworks eworks to fo follow llow

MasterCard, Priceless and the MasterCard Brand Mark ar aree registered registered trademarks of MasterCard MasteerCard International Incorporated. Š2013 MasterCard.

JJuly ully 4

%URRNZRRG$YH6DQWD5RVD 0RQ¤6DWDP¤SP6XQDP¤SPÂ&#x2020;ZZZZEXFRPVDQWDURVD

%LUGVHHGÂ&#x2020;)HHGHUVÂ&#x2020;%LUGEDWKVÂ&#x2020;2SWLFVÂ&#x2020;1DWXUH*LIWVÂ&#x2020;%RRNV

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

VISIT OUR FRIENDLY STAFF AT OUR NEW .)''JH=KN8I<?FLJ<

Ĺť

NSA ( 8

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

10

TTHE H E TTINY INN Y TTERROR ERRORR TTUBE U B E HHEAD EAD

TT-15 Lunchboxsized all-tube amp with 7 and 15 watt output levels • Connect one or two cabinets • Just 12¼ lbs! • British amp character from clean crunch to full-on overdrive • Massive gain! TM

B AANANAS NANAS

$57500 ATT A

L AARGE RGE

515 Ross Street, Brickyard Center Santa Rosa • (707) 542-5588

WWW WW WWW. W. BANA W. ANANAS A NANA NA NASMUS USIC IC. COM COM

0'' "OZ*UFN .FOUJPO #PIFNBJOBE

-PWFS¤T1MBZUIJOHT…4FOTVBM-JOHFSJF…(JGU$FSUJGJDBUFT…+FXFMSZ

®

for personal information, which enables targeted advertising. When I interviewed Soghoian, he suggested that the free market has delivered us into a world that is insecure by default; he also added that the telephone industry has been practicing surveillance for a hundred years already. Seeking technical steps that citizens might take to shield themselves from electronic snooping by the government, I talked with Mark Wuergler, a senior security researcher at the cybersecurity firm Immunity Inc. “I have bad news for the average citizen,” Wuergler tells me. In order to avoid monitoring by the government, citizens need to have control over their own hardware, networks and servers, and use encryption ubiquitously. Currently available methods for trying to maintain data privacy and security are so clunky and complicated, he says, that most Americans will simply not bother. “It boils down to less convenient, more secure; more convenient, less secure,” Wuergler says. “You just need to assume that your data is being watched.” Wuergler would know; he devised a program, Stalker, that can siphon off nearly all of your digital information to put together an amazingly complete portrait of your life and find out where you are at all times. So how can you hide this information? First, don’t put so much stuff out there in the first place. Use Facebook if you must, but realize you’re making it easy for the government to track and find you when it chooses to. A second step toward increased privacy is to use a browser search engine like DuckDuckGo, which doesn’t collect the sort of information— your IP address, for one—that can identify you with internet searches. If the government bangs on their doors to find out what you’ve been up to, DuckDuckGo has nothing to hand over. Third, a Tor relay, used by dissidents and journalists around the world, can shield your location

from prying eyes. Tor operates by bouncing your emails and files around the internet through encrypted relays. Anyone intercepting your message once it exits a Tor relay won’t be able to trace it back to your computer and your physical location.

‘You just need to assume that your data is being watched.’ Fourth, there is encryption. An intriguing one-stop encryption solution is Silent Circle. Developed by Phil Zimmerman, the inventor of the Pretty Good Privacy encryption system, Silent Circle enables users to encrypt text messages, video, phone calls and emails. Zimmerman and his colleagues claim neither they, nor anyone else, can decrypt messages across their network. This security doesn’t come free; Silent Circle charges $10 per month. One might also consider encrypting data using free encryption software offered by TrueCrypt. If you keep data in the cloud, you might use SpiderOak, which bills itself as a “zero-knowledge” company, which means it has no way to decrypt the data you store with it. However, SpiderOak will provide personally identifiable information about users to law enforcement if required to do so by law. The company offers two gigabytes of free storage for beginners. Now for some bad news: telephone metadata of the sort the NSA acquired from Verizon is impossible to hide. As the ACLU’s Soghoian notes, you can’t violate the laws of physics, and in order to connect your mobile phone, the phone company needs to know where you are located. For more information on evading government monitoring agencies, check out the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s guide to Surveillance Self-Defense at www.eff.org. This article originally appeared on Reason.com.

ųų

SATURDAY, JULY 13 AT THE ARLENE FRANCIS CENTER IN SANTA ROSA!

Live music will be provided by bands assembled totally at random just 24 hours before in the…

24-HOUR BAND CONTEST. Musicians and singers, here’s your chance to take part in a totally creative experiment. Here’s how it works: you sign up for the 24Hour Band Contest at www.bohemian.com. You tell us your name and what instrument you play. On Friday, we’ll meet and pick names at random, assembling bands made up of complete strangers. The bands will then have 24 hours to write two original songs and learn one cover song, and return to perform the next night at the NorBays! Are you in? Of course you’re in. Sign up at www.bohemian.com.

24-HOUR BAND PERFORMANCES! WINNERS ANNOUNCED! GOLD RECORDS AWARDED! BEER AND WINE! FUNK AND SOUL 45S! LOCAL ARTISTS! GET YOUR PHOTO TAKEN! A GREY CAT IMPERSONATING MEL TORME! LIVE PAINTING BY JULIA DAVIS AND JARED POWELL! IT’S ALL HAPPENING AT THE 2013 NORBAYS! Saturday, July 13, at the Arlene Francis Center. 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa. 8pm. $5. All Ages!

Final voting is now live for the 2013 NorBays! Vote for your favorites at www.bohemian.com. Voting ends Wednesday, July 10 at 5pm. BLUES / R&B Blues Burners Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs Lester Chambers Soulshine Blues Band Volker Strifler

FOLK / ACOUSTIC Foxes in the Henhouse Jen Tucker Mr. December Sally Haggard Timothy O’Neil Band

HIP-HOP / ELECTRONIC Frances Wolfe The Sandchild Tiny Pyramids Smoov-E Spends Quality

COUNTRY / AMERICANA David Luning The Easy Leaves Frankie Boots & the County Line Kyle Martin Band Travelin’ Soul

INDIE Anthony Presti & Leah Van Dyke Grace in the Woods The New Trust Manzanita Falls Trebuchet

PUNK / METAL Boo Radley’s House Creative Adult Our Vinyl Vows M Section Shotgun Harlot

DJ DJ Beset DJ Konnex DJ Lazyboy DJs Jacques & Guac, WBLK DJ Paul Timbermann

JAZZ The Gypsy Trio The Mighty Groove Dave McNab Nate Lopez Peter Welker

ROCK Dylan Chambers & the Midnight Transit Highway Poets John Courage & the Great Plains Kingsborough Steve Pile Band WORLD / REGGAE Cosmos Percussion Orchestra Dan Martin & the Noma Rocksteady Band IrieFuse Midnight Sun Thrive

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

ANNOUNCING THE 2013 NORTH BAY MUSIC AWARDS AND 24-HOUR BAND CONTEST!

ENTER TO WIN

STAYCATION ADVENTURES

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

ųŴ

Click DEALS & GIVEAWAYS bohemian.com

Cf!Fodiboufe-!Cf!Spnboujd-!Cf!Zpvstfmg-!ps!Kvtu!CfÊ Divsdijmm!Nbops!Cfe!boe!Csfblgbtu lgbtu 596!Cspxo!Tusffu!¦!Obqb!818.364.8844 364.8844 xxx/divsdijmmnbops/dpn

6761 Sebastopol Ave Suite 400, Sebastopol

In the Gravenstein Train Station

www.boutiquev.net 707.824.1167

Knitting K n it ti ng &C Crochet ro c Classes C lass e s

1111 11 4 4th th S Street, t ree t , R Railroad a i l roa d S Square q ua re Santa Rosa 707.546.YARN S anta R osa 7 0 7. 5 4 6 .YA R N CastAwayYarn.com C a s t Awa yYa r n . com

American Made or nothing at all. www.siloamericanmade.com

243 B Healdsburg Ave. Healdsburg 707.431.7456

SALE

2013 2 013 01

Loo C L Coco’s oco’s

Voted V ote ted Best Bes est Italia IItalian t a l ia n restaurant restau re staurant ant of of the the th North N orth Bay. ort Bay ay y..

C u c i n a R u s t iicc a

—North — North B Bay ay Bohemian B o h e m i an

3 months for $119 ($75 Savings!)

Summer Camp Vertical Week-long Camps 1 full day of climbing

Outside 7 0 7 * 5 7 3 * 1 6 0 8

climbing classes weight equipment and yoga 3358a Coffey Lane Santa Rosa www.vertexclimbing.com

LoCoco’s L oC oco’s iiss ev oCoco’ everythi everything er y th i ng aan n IItalian t a l ia n rrestauran talia restaurant est au ra nt ssho should houl u ld b be— be—boisterous, e—boisterous oi s t er ou s , busy, b usy, usy y, fun, ffu u n, w wit with ith excellent eexcell xcel lent aau authentic uthenti thent ic food ffoood of of the tth he best b beest quality: q quality ua l it y : fresh ffrres e sh sseafood, ea food eaf o d, m meat meats eat s aan and nd p pasta. a sta. as ta.

7077 707 0 77- 52 5 2 3 --2227 2 22 7 2227

SEERVING RV I NG L U UNCH NCH & D IINNER N N ER

H IISTORIC S T OR IC R AI AILROAD L ROAD S Q QUARE UA R E , 1 117 17 FOU OURTH RT H ST TREET R E ET T, SA ANTA N TA R OS OSA A R AATED T ED

Dinner & Dancing? A Des Destination tination Y Yarn arn & FFiber iber S Store tore YARN‰ ‰PATTERNS‰ ‰BOOK BOOKS S SPINNING & WEAVING SUPPLI SUPPLIES IES GIFTS‰ ‰READY-TO-WEAR‰ ‰K KILNILN NFORMED GLASS‰ ‰CLASSES BY AP APPT PPT

Conveniently located in Santa Rosa’s Railroad Square. Come for a lesson & then check out a nearby local restaurant!

3598 G Gravenstein ravenstein Hw Hwy yS So. o. ‰707.827.3618 Se Sebastopol bastopol‰ ww www.yarnitudes.com w.yarnitudes.com

JgXN\cce\jj Jg\Z`Xcj $50

Realtor Coldwell Banker

cell: 707.292.9414 www.suzannewandrei.com

F R E E P R I VAT E L E S S O N Eco Green Certified

G IF IIFT T CE ERTIFICATES RT TIFIC AT E S AV VAILABLE VA I L A BL E L OC OC OCOS OS . N NET ET

The Courtyard Spa

Your vision… my resources, dedication and integrity… Together, we can catch your dream.

Suzanne Wandrei

PG CFTU

µT J B O µT FN JB C P IIF UUII F C     CBBZZ  C P SU I I F OO UUI

Couples & Singles Welcome

Call 707-843-3447 415 Davis Street Santa Rosa, CA 95401

sonomadancesport.com

Off couples massage $20 Off any individual massage or treatment includes a Mediterranean foot bath

16702 Coast Hwy One, Bodega 888.404.2255 www.scvilla.com

ųŵ NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Summer Membership

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

ųŶ

ride the

in its natural habitat

Bicycle Extravaganza

FREE

Saturday, July 13, 10–5

Meet Bike Racers, Makers See all types of bicycles

HUGE SALE

OF USED BIKES Sale Continues Sunday, 10–5 at

SkunkTrain.com SkunkTrai n.com 707 964-6 964-6371 6371

Community Bikes 4009 Sebastopol Road Santa Rosa

Broadway and Hollywood performers in award-winning concerts with pre show picnicking and wine!

Opening this weekend!

Fly F ly Me Me To To The The Moon Moon June J une 2 28, 8, 2 29, 9, 30; 30 ; J July uly 5 5,, 6

Fantastical F anttastical Family Family Night Night July J uly 19, 19, 2 20 0

Dancing D Dancin ancing Through Throug Through Life Lif Life August A ugust 9, 9, 10, 10, 15, 15, 16, 16, 17 17

Gala G a la C Celebration elebration August A ugust 30, 30 31 31

Open July 4th Weekend 5pm Pre-Show Picnic, 7:30 pm Show Begins

WINNER

Best Special Theater Event Broadway World San Francisco

2012

www.BroadwayJackLondon.com

MOBILE MADNESS Bun Slinger fills traditional Chinese bao buns with various chicken, steak, pork or tofu combinations.

You Got Buns, Hon Jeff Tyler’s Bun Slinger, keeping it wheel

F

ive years ago, Jeff Tyler was working as a general contractor with 35 employees when he was blind-sided by the economic downturn. Years of forthcoming contracts dried up, and he was forced to sell his Hummer. Tyler spent the next two years working for other people, including a stint selling MonaVie juice, trying to figure out how to be his own boss again. Then late one night, as he was

Googling small businesses, an idea struck. “I woke my wife up early the next morning,” Tyler tells me recently, “and told her we were going into the hot dog business.” If her skepticism was understandable—“She thought I was nuts!”—it was also, it turns out, unfounded. “I parked my cart for breakfast, lunch and dinner,” Tyler says, “and didn’t come home until I sold enough hot dogs to provide for my family.” Within three months, he’d acquired a second hot dog cart, and started Palooza Catering, a mobile catering

BY JESSICA DUR TAYLOR company that now serves everything from paella to barbecue. Turns out, the leap from Chicago-style hot dog to Chineseinspired pork bun is relatively small. Tyler’s latest wheeled endeavor is the Bun Slinger, a converted taco truck that owes its name to the creative mind of his nine-year-old daughter, Sydney. Together with Sean Soberg, an out-of-work carpenter he found through his hairdresser, Tyler serves up traditional Chinese bao buns ($3.50 a pop) filled with all manner of locally sourced meat, slaw and

aioli. The menu offers a handful of choices: chicken with corn and jalapenos, steak with daikon, pork belly with mustard seed and onion. The requisite tofu option is so popular it sometimes sells out. A word to the hungry: one bun will whet your appetite; you’ll need two, even three, to get full. For a well-rounded sampling, the Dictator ($15) gives you a choice of three buns served with homemade kimchi and a generous side of garlic or liberally spiced “togarashi” fries. For Tyler, taste trumps authenticity. Blending accents of Chinese, Korean and Japanese (“togarashi” is Japanese for chili pepper), the loquacious selftaught chef is more inclined to cook with Coca-Cola (his pork belly braise) than, say, fish oil. His formal training is limited to a couple of classes at the SRJC, which he credits for inspiring him to think outside the (hot dog) bun. But despite his creative culinary chops—he’s served Pinot, Zinfandel and Chardonnay-infused hot dog flights to great acclaim—Tyler has never worked in a restaurant, nor does he desire to open one. “I’m too much of a free spirit,” says Tyler, who works when and where (permits withstanding) he wants to. Trafficking in both winecountry posh and business-park casual, the Bun Slinger regularly parks at Sonic.net, the Petaluma Farmer’s Market, Ragle Ranch Park, O’Reilly Media and an impressive fleet of local wineries. Tyler also enjoys the camaraderie of the mobile-food biz. He shares plenty of pavement, as well as a commercial kitchen, with Dave Musgrave of Fish On! Chips and Gabe Nahas of Awful Falafel. On a recent Wednesday afternoon, the ticket rail finally empty after the Sonic lunch rush, Tyler and Dave bandied between their food trucks, the music cranked loud. These days, Tyler is glad to have swapped his Hummer and “stupid jacked-up trucks” for the big yellow Bun Slinger. “This truck catches more looks than a Ferrari,” he tells me with a grin. “I’m definitely happier now, driving this thing around.”

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Nadav Soroker

Dining

15

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

16

Dining

MARIN CO U N T Y

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com.

Buckeye Roadhouse

COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y Bruno’s on Fourth American. $$-$$$. There’s real sophistication lurking in these upscale American comfort staples like flat-iron steak and fries, macaroni-ham casserole and stellar braised lamb shank. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Fri; dinner only, Sat; Sun, brunch and dinner. 1226 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.569.8222.

Dine poolside with us! Serving Daily LUNCH 11:30am–4pm DINNER 5–9pm Award-Winning SUNDAY BRUNCH 10:30am–2pm Happy Hour Monday–Thursday

Diavola Italian/Pizza. $$. From the folks of Taverna Santi, with artisan wood-fired pizzas and elaborate antipasti served in a rustic-chic old brick former smokehouse. Lunch and dinner daily. 21021 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.0111.

Hana Japanese. $$$-$$$$. An oasis of cool tucked away in the atmosphereless Doubletree Hotel complex. Reservations on the weekend a must. Lunch and dinner daily. 101 Golf Course Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.586.0270.

La Hacienda Mexican. $$. A family-style Mexican eatery with a Michoacan touch. Lunch and dinner daily. 134 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.9365. Murphy’s Irish Pub Pub fare. $. Casual, homey place serving no-nonsense pub grub like shepherd’s pie. Lunch and dinner daily. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Pub Republic Pub fare. $-$$. Pub grub from Petaluma’s southernmost tip, featuring Brussels sprout tacos and a hearty selection of brews. Lunch and dinner daily; weekend brunch. 3120 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma. 707.782.9090.

2777 4th Street, Santa Rosa www.flamingoresort.com | 707.523.4745

Speakeasy Tapas-Asian. $-$$. Small plates with a large vegetarian selection and an Asian fusion-leaning menu. And they’re open until 2am!

Dinner daily. 139 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.776.4631.

Stark’s Steakhouse Steakhouse. $$$$. Could be the best steak you’ll ever have. “Other than steak” menu changes seasonally. Happy hour, Mon-Sat, 3 to 6. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Fri; dinner, Sat. 521 Adams St, Santa Rosa. 707.546.5100.

Sushi to Dai For Japanese. $$$. A temple of sushi cool. Regulars rave about the rolls, in particular the dragon roll. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. Two locations: 119 Fourth St, Railroad Square, Santa Rosa. 707.576.9309. 869 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.721.0392.

Toyo Japanese Grill Japanese. $$$. Well-crafted traditional Japanese with some modern extras like deep-fried mashed potato croquettes with mayo. Lunch and dinner daily. 3082 Marlow Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.8871.

Willi’s Wine Bar Small plates/wine bar. $$$. Bistro dishes and extensive wine list. A terrific place to dine before a show at the Wells Fargo Center. Lunch, Tues-Sat; dinner daily. 4404 Old Redwood Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.526.3096.

Willow Wood Market Cafe Mediterranean. $$. Homey, eclectic foods. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; brunch, Sun. 9020 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.823.0233.

Wolf House Californian. $$. Stick with the simple, classics dishes, as they always shine. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 13740 Arnold Dr, Glen Ellen. 707.996.4401. Yao-Kiku Japanese. $$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from Japan steals the show in this popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180.

American. $$-$$$. A Marin County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless service, and a convivial atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, SatSun. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.331.2600.

Hilltop 1892 American. $$-$$$$. Casual dining with panoramic Marin views and a California-cuisine take on such classic fare as steaks, fresh seafood and seasonal greens. Complete with custom cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; Sunday brunch. 850 Lamont Ave, Novato. 415.893.1892.

Il Piccolo Caffe Italian. $$. Big, ample portions at this premier spot on Sausalito’s spirited waterfront. Breakfast and lunch daily. 660 Bridgeway, Ste 3, Sausalito. 415.289.1195. Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Brewpub. $$. Pub grub gets a pub-cuisine facelift. Lunch, Wed-Sun; dinner daily. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Joe’s Taco Lounge & Salsaria Mexican. $. Mostly authentic Mexican menu with American standbys. Lunch and dinner daily; takeout, too. 382 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.8164.

Left Bank French. $$-$$$. Splendid, authentic French cuisine. Lunch and dinner daily. 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331. Small Shed Flatbreads Pizza. $$. Slow Food-informed Marin Organics devotee with a cozy, relaxed family atmosphere and no BS approach to great food served simply for a fair price. 17 Madrona St, Mill Valley. Open for lunch and dinner daily. 415.383.4200.

Sol Food Puerto Rican. $. Flavorful, authentic and homestyle at this Puerto Rican eatery, which is as hole-in-thewall as they come. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. San Rafael locations: 811 Fourth St. 415.451.4765. 901 & 903 Lincoln Ave. 415.256.8903. Mill Valley location: 401 Miller Ave, Mill Valley.

N A PA CO U N TY Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you can’t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.4870. Boonfly Cafe California cuisine. $-$$. Extraordinary food in an extraordinary setting. Perfect pasta and mussels. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 4080 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.299.4900.

Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen Eclectic. $$-$$$. As comfortable as it sounds, with a rich and varied melting pot of a menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 1327 Railroad Ave, St Helena. 707.963.1200.

Cindy Pawlycyn’s Wood Grill & Wine Bar American. $$-$$$. Classic American fare that stays up on current mainstays like crispy pork belly, braised short ribs and crab roll but doesn’t skimp on the burger. Long wine list, kids menu, patio and more. Lunch and dinner, WedSun. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700.

17

SMALL BITES

Losin’ It

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Sorella Caffe Italian. $$. The embodiment of Fairfax casual, with delicious, high-quality food that lacks pretension. Dinner, TuesSun. 107 Bolinas Rd, Farifax. 415.258.4520.

When it comes to losing weight, people do a lot of talking—about carbs, Gwyneth’s butt, treadmill desks, etc. Malene Comes, who has suffered with weight issues her entire life, doesn’t just talk the talk. She also plans to walk the walk—8,873 miles of it. On July 20, Comes, who weighs 300 pounds, will begin walking south from Bodega Bay, continuing around the entire circumference of the country. When she returns 14 months and 26 states later, she hopes to weigh half that. Walking against traffic on the smallest possible highways, Comes will push all of her gear in a sturdy jogging stroller, camping and couch-surfing her way south, east, north and west. To fund her trip, she is raising money for the nonprofit LiveFit Revolution, which, after paying her expenses, will devote all the remaining proceeds to empowering other obese people in their quest to lose weight. “Obesity is a painful medical condition,” Comes says, “that is made so much worse by the discrimination we face every single day.” Her wake-up call came when her biological mother died at the age of 56, weighing 450 pounds. “I’m 41,” Comes tells me over the phone, “and in 15 years I don’t want to wind up like that.” To donate, trace the route, or find out more about Comes’ trip, see www.traveltheunitedstates.wordpress.com. —Jessica Dur Taylor

Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner daily. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Miguel’s MexicanCalifornian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch and dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.252.9250.

3883 Airway Drive Ste 145, Santa Rosa 707.528.3095 www.chloesco.com M–F, 8am–5pm

Redd California cuisine. $$-$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

angez Bien! Quiche Lorraine Squares Mini Croque Monsieurs Mini Savory Croissant Tray Pissaladiere Crotini Full Catering Menu Available

Wineries

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

18

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

3&7)77-:)0=%98,)28-'-8%0-%2 03'%0%2(36+%2-'

SONOMA CO U N TY Foppiano Vineyards Over 100 years old, Foppiano produces wines that can be described as simple but delicious. 12707 Old Redwood Hwy., Healdsburg. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. 707.433.7272.

Homewood Homewood offers tasting in a small, somewhat disheveled indoor office or an outdoor deck. Indoors is where the tasty black olive and bread samples are, and the folks are lowpressure and friendly. Free tasting, anything you like. 23120 Burndale Road, Sonoma. Open daily, 10am–4pm. 707.996.6935.

Located inside

OXBOW PUBLIC MARKET

610 First Street Napa, CA 707.257.4992

WWW.CAMOMI.COM

Littorai Wines The future

Thai House

unwind on the coast Happy Hour 3-5 Daily

Assorted Indian snacks, Mixed Platters $6 Samosas $3. All Bottled Beer $3

Authentic Indian Cuisine & select American Summer Fare

Bombay style Indian Chinese entrees also Open for Lunch & Dinner 11:30am–9pm

Sizzling Tandoor II 9960 HWY 1 s 707-865-0625

Lunch specials start at $7.95 Includes soup or salad Mon-Fri only

Open 7 days a week Sun-Th 11:30-9:30 Fri-Sat 11:30-10:00 525 4th Street(Upstairs) 707.526.3939

California Thai

The Natural Process Alliance & Salinia Wine Co. A beige warehouse and a clean-cut, UC Davis–trained winemaker belie the wild-eyed truth: Unusual, fruity “natural wine” as fresh as next Friday, bottled in stainless steel Kleen Kanteens. Ask for Hardy. 3350 Coffey Lane, Santa Rosa. Friday–Saturday, 10:30am– 6pm, or by appointment. 707.527.7063.

Robert Rue Vineyard A new wave of Zin specialists helped keep small, old vineyards like this in production. Now, they’re making their own; refreshing Sauvignon Blanc, too. 1406 Wood Road, Fulton. Friday to Sunday, 10am–5pm, or by appointment. Tastings $5. 707.578.1601.

Restaurant

Especially…… for your light Summer palate Open Daily

707.573.4777 522 Seventh St, Santa Rosa Brickyard Center

of integrated, sustainable wine farms may be glimpsed through a window darkly, while Sonoma Coast Pinot and Chard are brilliant in the glass. Tour and tasting by appointment. In west Sebastopol, 707.823.9586.

Sheldon Wines GlobeSSanta a n ta Rosa Rosa

Sebastopol S e b a s to p o l

5528.3278 2 8 . 3 2 7 8 823.7492 8 2 3 .74 9 2

trotting harvest hoboes who caught wine fever like an express train and held on tight. New, industrial Urban

Winery Village location; same Rhône-style and offbeat varietals from small, family-run vineyards. 1301 Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa. Friday–Monday noonish to sixish; fees $5–15. Food carts join Thirsty Thursdays, 4–8pm. 707.865.6755.

Unti Vineyards Very friendly and casual with an emphasis on young Italianstyle wines. Yum. 4202 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. By appointment. 707.433.5590. Wine Tasting of Sonoma County A nice stop for a nibble and a sip on the way to the coast. Featured wines chosen from an eclectic local selection; prized allocations of Williams Selyem Pinot also for sale. Cheese plates, deck seating, and a pellet stove for chilly afternoons. 25179 Hwy. 116, Duncans Mills. Open Wednesday–Monday noon to 6pm. Closing varies; call ahead. 707.865.0565.

Woodenhead Damn good wine. Pinot, Zin–yum, yum, yum. 5700 River Road, Santa Rosa. Open Thursday– Monday, 10:30am–4:30pm. 707.887.2703.

MA R I N CO U N TY Bacchus & Venus A trendy place for beginners and tourists. Great place to learn the basics. 769 Bridgeway, Sausalito. Open daily, noon– 7pm. 415.331.2001. Point Reyes Vineyards The tasting room features many varietals but the main reason to go is for the sparkling wines. Open Saturday–Sunday, 11am–5pm. 12700 Hwy. 1, Point Reyes. 415.663.1011.

Tam Cellars Spacious wine bar quietly distributes the soul-salve of the ages and, like its soul mate the coffee shop, passes the laptop test. Cheese plates, wine flights and comfortable

seating arrangements make a nice place to convene with the companion or flat screen of one’s choice. Wine shop features international, eclectic selection at fair prices. 1803 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. Open Monday–Wednesday, 4–9pm; Thursday–Saturday, 4–10pm. 415.461.9463.

N A PA CO U N TY Castello di Amorosa Not only an “authentic Medieval Italian castle,” but authentically far more defensible than any other winery in Napa from legions of footmen in chain mail. In wine, there’s something for every taste, but don’t skip the tour of great halls, courtyards, cellars, and–naturally–an authentic dungeon. . 4045 N. St. Helena Hwy., Calistoga. 9:30am–5pm. Tasting fees, $10–$15; tours, $25–$30. Napa Neighbor discounts. 707.967.6272.

Monticello Vineyards Thomas Jefferson had no success growing wine grapes; happily, the Corley family has made a go of it. Although winetasting is not conducted in the handsome reproduction building itself, there’s a shaded picnic area adjacent. 4242 Big Ranch Rd., Napa. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. $15. 707.253.2802, ext. 18.

Quixote There is a sense of dignity to the colorful little castle that grows out of the landscape beneath the Stag’s Leap palisades, commensurate with the architect’s humanistic aspirations. 6126 Silverado Trail, Napa. By appointment. 707.944.2659.

Saintsbury A contrarian enterprise in the 1970s, now a hallowed hall of Carneros Pinot Noir. Visitors may linger under shade trees in fair weather or sit down for a serious tasting adjacent the office. 1500 Los Carneros Ave., Napa. Monday– Saturday, by appointment. 707.252.0592.

GROWN TM

LOCAL Sonoma County

www.golocal.coop

19 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

SHED Fermentation Bar A clean, well-lit place, teeming with bacteria (the good kind) BY JAMES KNIGHT

W

hat was it that food scribe Michael Pollan told us we should be doing in his most recent dietary dictum? “Drink weird stuff, mostly fermented, not too much”? Here’s the place to get started on that.

It doesn’t seem so long ago that the very notion of a “fermentation bar” would have sounded lavishly precious, possibly poisonous. In Portland, Ore., in the 1990s, my latter-day hippie neighbor showed off the exotic, glistening bacterial monster he kept in a jar in his kitchen. He said it was a “mother,” and that it would divide and multiply, like a hairless tribble. Was it . . . moving? It seemed vaguely risky to drink the brew in which it stewed. Yet today, kombucha is so mainstream that Healdsburg tourists drift off the street and order it up on tap ($4)—made by Windsor’s Revive—with nonchalance. If anyone has questions, bar manager Jordan Lancer (pictured) is there to answer them. Good thing, too, since the gleaming taps behind him are not topped with readable logos, instead being minimalistically labeled with stamped-tin dog tags. Lancer, an avid fermenter, has his own crock of kombucha secreted away on the modular shelves that line the walls. At SHED, which is billed as a “modern grange,” the dream of the 1890s is alive, too. One may stock up on provisions at the “larder,” shop for a hand-tooled spade and catch up with neighbors over a refreshing beverage whose popularity only lately reversed a century-long waning, all in a light-filled space that feels as if you’ve stepped into a Sunset magazine spread. A new awning makes the small deck overlooking Foss Creek the spot to be. SHED Shrubs ($4) are sweetened vinegars—haymaker’s punch—like lemon rice wine and purple sage champagne vinegars, topped with soda water. Popular with workers “coming off the fields” over the centuries, they’re nonalcoholic, as is creamy, nondairy kefir from Sebastopol’s Kefiry ($4). Think of dry hard cider ($5) from Murray’s Cyder of Petaluma as a European-style “sidra,” and you may enjoy its funky phenols all the more. Available by the bottle, Heidrun Meadery’s Sage Blossom mead ($25) is a noseful of decayed summertime, with a cidery, clean finish. Happy hour bites like deviled eggs, cheese platters and pizzas are available; beyond the taps, there are beekeeping kits, pith helmets and the swaying branches of an old walnut tree to stare at while socking away a big 20-ounce pour of Calicraft Buzzerkeley ($7)—no game screen here. Just drink local brews, not too much, and keep away from the sharp harvesting implements. SHED, 25 North St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 7am–7pm. 707.431.7433.

@kËjc`b\EGI¿ @kËjc`b\EGI¿ ffe8Z`[ e8Z`[ ) GGFC@K@:J) FC@K@: J) CC@M<DLJ@: @M< D LJ @ : ) ::FD<;P) FD<;P) GGFG:LCKLI< FG :LCKLI< ) N NFIC;=8DFLJ>L<JKJ FIC; =8DFLJ >L< J K J

*KF-#N<<B;8PJ * KF -#N<<B;8P # N<<B;8PJ FE(*,'8DBJIF F E (*,'8 E(*, ' 8DBJI D B JIF &&A8OFE;I@M< A8O 8 OFE;I@M< F E; I@M< Kf Y\Zfd\ X ; i`m\ jgfejfi KfY\Zfd\X;i`m\jgfejfi ZfekXZk:Xk_pIXkkfXk Z fekXZ k:Xk_pIXk kfXk ZXk_p%iXkkf7pX_ff%Zfd Z Xk_p% iXk kf7pX_ff%Zfd

;FEËKD@JJÈC8NP<IJ#>LEJ 8E;DFE<PÉN@K?9<E8;8DJ8E; A<I<DP=@<KQ›DFE;8PJ8K,1)'

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

20

Lost & Found Rebecca Solnit pulls together life’s loose threads in ‘The Faraway Nearby’ BY LEILANI CLARK

T

he National Gallery of Iceland sits at the eastern shore of Tjörnin lake in Reykjavík’s city center, overlooking both a modern city hall and the centuries-old Hólavallagardur cemetery. In late June, bright sunlight reflects off the surface of Tjörnin for 21 full hours every day, from 3am to midnight. But in 2008, a young Icelandic artist named Elín Hansdóttir built a labyrinth inside of the National Gallery, almost completely dark within. Path, made up of a series of panels set in a zigzag pattern, offered one person at a time the immersive challenge of finding his or her way back to the beginning. Sometimes, guides would have to go into the darkness and rescue visitors who had lost their bearings. It was an exhibit that San Francisco writer Rebecca Solnit returned to again and again during her months as an international resident at the Library of Water, 70 miles from Iceland’s capital, Reykjavík. Solnit looked to the labyrinth as a narrative toolbox for her latest book, The Faraway Nearby, she says over coffee and bread at a cafe on the downtown Sausalito waterfront. “A lot of books have these linear routes, like highways, let’s get from here to there,” she says. “I wasn’t in a rush to get from here to there.” Solnit appears June 30 at the New School and Commonweal in Bolinas and July 2 at Copperfield’s Books in Petaluma. A lover of works like Tristram Shandy, the 18thcentury novel where the narrator announces he’s going to tell his life story and then digresses to such an extent that he’s not born until halfway through the book, Solnit set out to create a work of “circuitous routes and byways” in The Faraway Nearby. In one respect, the book tells the story of her mother’s

W

e’ve met on Sunday morning near the rowing club where Solnit takes to the bay on a sleek, white scull three times a week. Today, she’s decided against going out, on account of the strong, cold wind blowing across the water, and it’s appropriate that the strange June weather has created a steelcolored sky, similar to what Solnit might have seen during her stay in Iceland—one of those symmetries that’s present in so much her work.

Wearing a gray, fitted blouse over a black skirt, Solnit’s appearance mirrors the dependable elegance of her sentences, whether she’s writing about Google buses driving through San Francisco—with their darkened windows and screen-immersed tech workers—or migratory birds flying to the Arctic from all over the world. She talks of exhaustion after this particular book tour, where she’s answered too many questions about a conflicted relationship with her mother, but it doesn’t show on her face, which glows with health underneath her long, blonde-gray hair. Throughout her career, Solnit has turned out more than 13 books and an impressive list of essays, including “Men Explain Things to Me,” wherein she coined the term “mansplaining.” In February of this year, Solnit contributed a piece to the London Review of Books taking on Google’s private buses and the erasure of the working class and creative communities in San Francisco as the city becomes a bedroom community for Silicon Valley’s tech elite. Solnit’s love of the city intertwines with a fascination with maps in 2010’s ambitious Infinite City: A San Francisco Atlas; in one example, a map of San Francisco interposes murder sites with locations of Cypress trees. (A New Orleans sequel to Infinite City, titled Unfathomable City: A New Orleans Atlas, comes out this fall.) Now in her early 50s, and a graduate of UC Berkeley’s journalism school, Solnit has written about visual arts, politics and the West Coast since 1988; she shares space with other California writers like Mike Davis and Joan Didion, those willing to take on the Golden State as a complex and serious topic of inquiry rather than a place of kooky mysticism, Hollywood superficialities and gridlock. River of Shadows, an examination of photographer Eadweard Muybridge and his groundbreaking experiments

with stop-motion photography, earned her a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Lannan Literary Award and the National Books Critics Circle Award in criticism. Solnit approaches the interaction between humans and the natural world—its puzzles, connections and symmetries— with a blend of precision and childlike wonder. That might stem from her early years as a child growing up in a northernmost subdivision of Novato. “It was not a particularly encouraging suburb, but there were wonderful things,” says Solnit. “A lot of kids on the block never left the asphalt, but my brothers and I were really fascinated by the natural world in different ways, and spent time there. I had fantasies about living like Native Americans, off the land and the plants. The landscape was my one good friend in elementary school.” Connection forms the literal core of The Faraway Nearby. As Solnit’s close friend, the artist Ann Chamberlain, was dying of breast cancer, she constructed a plaster wall map of topographical reliefs of islands connected by strands of fine red thread, “like flight routes for planes or birds or neural pathways or blood vessels,” writes Solnit. And it’s a young Icelandic man with leukemia, who dies before Solnit has a chance to meet him, who forges the connections leading to her residency. “That piece [by Ann Chamberlain] is essentially at the exact center of the book,” Solnit says. “The whole book could be conceived of as these islands of stories connected by threads.” This is the world Solnit reminds us we all live in, the world of “waves and not particles.” “Maybe that’s my form of mysticism, trying to see these complex patterns of influence, presence and possibility that we’re embedded in—you know, this kind of nonseparation, even when we’re supposed to be alone,” she adds. Though some have focused on the dysfunctional aspects of

‘The version of self we’ve been given feels really reduced to me.’

Solnit’s relationship with her mother, as documented in the book, she’d rather not dwell in that space for long. Like the piles and pounds of apricots, picked from a tree after her mother’s house is sold and then deposited in Solnit’s living room, their relationship was one of decay and preservation. “One of the things that’s been really difficult is that I went through this really beautiful seven-year journey with my mother that ended with her death,” Solnit says. “She was many people along the way, to whom I related in various ways, and everything that was difficult about the past was essentially shed in that process.”

J

ust a couple of weeks ago, on her way home from speaking engagements in Europe, Solnit stopped in Reykjavík to visit her friend Frida and found herself repeating the phrase “difficult but not bad.” “Easy” and “comfortable,” she says, are things that Americans have grown not only to desire but to expect. But, as Solnit touches on throughout The Faraway Nearby, death, pain, illness, aging and suffering are not exceptions in life; they are the rule—for everyone, not just the unlucky. And they just might lead a person to her ultimate destiny. But it takes a healthy dose of empathy, acceptance and interconnectedness to weather and survive these unskirtable conditions—if we survive them— with grace and dignity. “I’m not saying ‘Go have a completely uncomfortable and hideous life,’” Solnit explains, “but sometimes you have to go through these things that aren’t so encouraging or aren’t so easy. Sometimes you have to climb the mountains, and not just walk in the flat places, because that’s taking you to the view you need to see to know where you’re going.”

Rebecca Solnit appears in conversation with Michael Lerner on Sunday, June 30, at the New School at Commonweal (451 Mesa Road, Bolinas; 2pm; free with reservation; www.commonweal. org) and in a reading and discussion on Tuesday, July 2, at Copperfield’s Books in Petaluma (140 Kentucky St., Petaluma; 7pm; free; 707.762.0563).

21 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

descent into Alzheimer’s that ended with her death in June 2012, and what Solnit calls her “medical adventure” after precancerous cells were discovered during a routine mammogram. But these are but two threads on a journey that includes Che Guevara, the Snow Queen, Frankenstein’s monster, Mary Shelley, cannibalistic polar bears, cannibalistic mothers, Icelandic fjords, mountains of apricots, arctic explorers, Baby Jessica, Charlie Musselwhite, invasive surgery, 2.2-pound babies, leper colonies, Burmese monks and boys named after wolves. “If this was a straight route,” Solnit says, “it would be a really boring memoir of about 10,000 words, about: ‘My mom was really tricky, I got kind of sick but then I went to Iceland, The End,’—which is not that interesting to me, and I don’t think it would be that interesting to other people.” In fact, the British edition of The Faraway Nearby has been given a hyphenated genre: “memoir/ anti-memoir.” It’s a proposal that came directly from Solnit as part of her desire to articulate a “different sense of self.” “The version of self we’ve been given, in some ways, by psychology and therapy—that sort of post-40 thing—it feels really reduced to me,” Solnit explains. “The relationship to the earth itself gives you this depth and breadth and height and range. It gives you a kind of vastness; and then personal is right in the middle of it, and I absolutely value it and it absolutely matters, but to me, it’s like home. You come back to it. You’re not an agoraphobic who never leaves it.”

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

22

CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide LONG TALL DEXTER Maxine Gordon, widow of Dexter Gordon, appears at a special screening of ‘Round Midnight’ at the Lincoln Theater. See Film, p32.

N A PA

SONOMA

SEBASTOPOL

N O VAT O

Blues Brothers

Laffs & Quaffs

Folk Revival

Don’t BYOB

When you start hearing names like Norton Buffalo, Charlie Musselwhite, Watermelon Slim, Fingers Taylor, Lazy Lester and, yes, a man named Magic Dick, it can mean only one thing: the Blues Harmonica Blowout is back! Since 1991, founder Mark Hummel has been producing and performing at this oftentimes sold-out show. Joining Hummel onstage this year and paying tribute to the late, great Little Walter are Corky Siegel, James Harman and Little Charlie along with the Blues Survivors. Surround yourself with the bluesy sounds of the mouth harp on Thursday, June 27, at the Napa Valley Opera House. 1030 Main St., Napa. $27–$30. 8pm. 707.226.7372.

The name Chris Garcia might not ring any bells, but it deserves to. Originally from Los Angeles, Garcia moved to San Francisco and has since accumulated an impressive résumé of various festival appearances, such as Outside Lands and SF Sketchfest. He’s also worked alongside Aziz Ansari, Patton Oswalt and some newcomer named Robin Williams. Garcia is like a triplethreat with comedic skills, writing experience and hunky good looks (the Portland Mercury said this, not me). Garcia headlines with openers Matt Lieb and Bert Divietri on Friday, June 28, and Saturday, June 29, at Murphy’s Irish Pub. 464 First St. E., Sonoma. $20. Friday, 9pm; Saturday, 7pm and 9:30pm. 707.935.0660.

Reunited and it feels so good: that’s the sentiment shared by the members of the Jim Kweskin Jug Band. The band entered the music scene at the height of the American folk revival during the ’60s, and reintroduced some muchneeded fun amid the political protests and societal discord. Founder Jim Kweskin was eventually joined by others, such as Geoff Muldaur, Bill Keith and Maria Muldaur. This “one big happy family” split in 1968, but many of the original members have returned to provide the same fun folk sounds they delivered years ago in a 50th anniversary tour. The gang’s all here on Wednesday, July 3, and Friday, July 5, at Studio E. 2249 Schaeffer Road, Sebastopol. $40–$45. 8pm. 707.823.5316.

A beer-drinking bear as mascot? Sign me up! This week, the California Beer Festival churns out 70 beers on tap, live entertainment and a barbecue cook-off. Petty Theft, Metal Shop and Monophonics perform, and and brews include local and nonlocal beers from Lagunitas, Hopmonk, Widmer Brothers, Bruvado and others. What could be better than getting to sample such a robust selection while smelling the sweet scent of barbecue and listening to live music? Glug, glug, glug on Saturday, June 29, at Stafford Lake Park. 3549 Novato Blvd., Novato. $25– $65. 12:30–5pm. 805.351.5650.

—Anna Hecht

ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PERSONAL Malcolm Margolinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Heyday Books is â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;built on friendship,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; he says.

In His Heyday

Author and publisher Malcolm Margolin comes to Point Reyes BY DANI BURLISON

T

hat spark thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s felt somewhere at the intersection of rebellion and a belief in storytelling as medicine? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the essence of Malcolm Margolin and his independent publishing house, Heyday Books.

A Boston-area transplant, Margolin and his wife headed west in their VW bus in the Summer of Love. After camping and working in Canada, Mexico and the wilds

of 1960s Big Sur, Margolin settled in Berkeley where he founded Heyday in 1974. He appears in a discussion with author Wendy Johnson June 29 in Point Reyes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I began by typesetting and designing my own books in my own house with a light table that I made,â&#x20AC;? says Margolin by phone from his Berkeley office. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was an attempt at self-sufficiency. I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to work for anybody because I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hold a job. I wanted to create my own world.â&#x20AC;? The world he created involved authoring several books on California Indians, including

The Ohlone Way, which continues to be required reading in many of Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s college history classes. Heyday began publishing other writers, from John Steinbeck and William Saroyan to Gary Snyder and Rebecca Solnit. With about 25 new titles each year focusing on Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s complex and diverse heritage, the stories seldom heard through mainstream publishing outlets have found a platform. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These voices seem to come in through the window,â&#x20AC;? Margolin says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You open the door in the morning and they rush in and they

all sit around the table, and you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get rid of them.â&#x20AC;? Despite drastic changes in information sharing over the last four decades, Margolin, now in his 70s, refuses the notion that the world is changing for the worse. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In a way, this whole operation is built on friendship, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s built on people that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve known, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s built on networks of people that like each other. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personal,â&#x20AC;? he says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quite lovely. I come in in the morning, and I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe the place is still here. I keep expecting a vacant lot with some wheat growing out of it, and that this whole thing was just a big hallucination because I took too much acid in the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;60s.â&#x20AC;? Forty-year acid trip or not, the spirit of storytelling itself seems to keep Margolinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spark ignited. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I hang out on a lot of Indian reservations,â&#x20AC;? he says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and there is a kind of story that gets told thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so slow-moving and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so sensuous and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so connected; it moves in and out of place and it moves through people we know. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And,â&#x20AC;? he continues, â&#x20AC;&#x153;there are parts of it that are totally comprehensible and there are parts of it that just break your heart and there are parts of it that are so funny you have to beg somebody to stop. And it just goes on and on and on, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a set piece, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not like a professional storyteller with a beginning, middle and end; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s this art of talking to people, this art of hanging out on the back porch, this art of being comfortable in somebody elseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presence.â&#x20AC;? One could say Margolin has made a life of it. Malcolm Margolin shares stories with Wendy Johnson at a benefit for Heyday on Saturday, June 29, at Tobyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Feed Barn. 11250 Hwy. 1, Pt. Reyes Station. Dinner (price includes talk) at 6pm, $100; talk only at 7:30pm, $20. www.pointreyesbooks.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

ArtsIdeas

23

Stage Jenny Graham

Featuring: John Prine Angelique Kidjo Taj Mahal

Marianne Faithfull Greg Brown Iris Dement Irma Thomas Madeleine Peyroux Dave Alvin

PUNCH-DRUNK ‘The Unfortunates’ in Ashland contains surreal visuals.

Rebirth Brass Band Paul Thorn Band Brothers Comatose Elephant Revival Red Molly  Poor Man’s Whiskey Perla Batalla  Coyote Grace  Wavy gravy  The Sam Chase Alice Di Micele  Smokehouse Gamblers  and many more…

INDIVIDUAL DAY TICKETS AVAILABLE

AT BEAUTIFUL BLACK OAK RANCH • LAYTONVILLE Tickets & Info. 415-256-8499 (Inticketing) www.katewolfmusicfestival.com

Oregon Trail Ashland’s finest of the current Shakespeare fest

www.raventheater.org 6/26/13

433-6335

433-6335

BY DAVID TEMPLETON

www.raventheater.org

Presented by the Raven Players. The Raven is proud to offer wines from Selby Winery.

www.raventheater.org

115 North St., Healdsburg

433-6335

®

www.raventheater.org ventheater.org

EX T WE RA E AD KEN DE D Ju D! June 21 ly – 21

433-6335

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

24

I

n the writings of Shakespeare, someone’s always running off to the forest to escape the world. It’s fitting then, come summer, that so many North Bay culture-seekers should run away to the mountains of Oregon to drink in some of Shakespeare’s enduring poetry.

With the annual June opening of three new shows in the outdoor Elizabethan Theater, the Oregon Shakespeare Festival in downtown Ashland now has nine shows up and running, a mix of classics, originals and new twists on old favorites. Highly recommended are Bill Rauch’s riveting and brutal staging of King Lear (running through Nov. 3), the hip-hop-infused original musical The Unfortunates (through

Nov. 2), August Wilson’s luxurious Two Trains Running (closing July 7), and The Heart of Robin Hood, a nifty new swashbuckler (running through Oct. 12 at the Elizabethan Theatre), which lays on the Pythonesque humor in presenting a gender-bending backstory for the famous English outlaw. In Lear, two actors—Jack Willis and Michael Winters—alternate performances in the iconic role of the tragically failing monarch, each bringing a different energy and understanding to the part. As a result, each version feels like its own unique production, with the brilliant cast shifting to accommodate each Lear’s radically divergent interpretation. The Unfortunates, directed by Shana Cooper, was developed through a series of workshops and late-night sneak peeks. Occasionally baffling, but mesmerizing and deeply moving, The Unfortunates is a theatrical fantasia on the themes and characters from the American blues song “St. James Infirmary Blues.” Layering in elements from the seminal folk ballad “The Unfortunate Rake,” the musical begins with a group of soldiers waiting for execution, one of whom finds himself transported into the world of the song the soldiers have been singing as they await their fates. The visuals are gorgeously strange (Tim Burton strange), and the songs combine blues, rap, folk and rock to create a truly original, weirdly satisfying piece of musical theater. While it is August Wilson’s languorous use of authentic, livedin language that powers Two Trains Running, staged with elegant grace by director Lou Bellamy, it is writer David Farr’s understanding of action and twisty-turny plotting that drives The Heart of Robin Hood, a richly entertaining origin story unfolding on the Elizabethan stage. Easily the best show of the new outdoor openings, this Robin Hood reframes the myth from the point of view of Maid Marian, who encounters the famous thief when she, true to form, escapes to the woods, where magical things—and great theater— always seem to be happening. For full reviews on all currently running shows, see www.bohemian.com.

The Jim Kweskin Jug Band 50 year reunion tour Richard Greene

Bill Keith

Jim Kweskin Maria Mudaur

Geoff Mudaur

Two Nights Only! Wed ~ July 3 & Fri ~ July 5 $ 40 adv, $45 dos ~ 7pm doors / 8pm show ~ Tickets: Peoples Music 707.823.7664 & The Last Record Store 707.525.1963

CUE SMOOTH JAZZ Hello, Comcast? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to cancel myâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;NO, I CANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T HOLD!

Reservations ~ Will Call 707.823.5316/Jeffm5@sonic.net A Studio E Production

Yep, More Zombies

Brad Pitt rescues more than just his family in â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;World War Zâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

T

his is the way the world endsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not with a bang but with a gobble. Passable but essentially dumb, World War Z, about a zombie apocalypse, has a deceptively global scope. Korea, for instance, is represented simply as a rainy dark airport, while many of the aerial shots of Jerusalem are so synthetic itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like looking at some pastorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mockup for Sunday school. The ďŹ nale unfolds in Cardiff, Wales, where the metaphor for civilization destroyed is a milkmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s smashed electric truck. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like the Father Ted parody of the movie Speed: gape over the end of Western civilization or cry over spilled milk. Every big zombie movieâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and World War Z may be big enough to kill the genre for a few yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is an exercise in weird xenobiology. Here, the zombies go into power-saver mode when thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no one for them to bite. When human gameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s afoot, the zombies call to each other like velociraptors; when they charge, they roar so loudly they gobble, like angry turkeys. Brad Pitt, at least, knows who heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s supposed to be in the movie: a dropout former hellhole inspector for the United Nations turned stay-at-home suburban Philadelphia dad turned proactive hero. At one point in the ďŹ lm, severely wounded, he manages to go on a long, unlikely walk through zombie-plagued streets to ďŹ nd a laboratory heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never been to before. Presumably, GPS survived the invasion. The ďŹ lm cuts through Newark, South Korea, Israel, but what, exactly, interests director Marc Forsterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that is the puzzler. Mostly, World War Z isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t about anything but our stalwartness in the face of zombie attack. The mentions of degraded ecology and the weirdly Michael Crichtonesque monologues about the wanton killing power of nature are ludicrous when addressed to computer-generated hordes rushing around by the millions. Although the ďŹ lm is about as coherent as a street yammerer, the movie does exist to demonstrate the heroism of Brad Pitt and his willingness to go to the wall to save his semidirected, shoved-off-toone-side and pain-in-the-ass family. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;World War Zâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is in wide release.

handmade gifts, ďŹ ne & fashion jewelry /.BJO4USFFU 4FCBTUPQPMt artisanafunctionalart.com

s&ULLSERVICEAUTOREPAIR s34!2CERTIFIEDSMOGSTATION s%NERGYEFFICIENTOPERATIONS s2EDUCE 2EUSE 2ECYCLE LEARNMORExGREENTECHAUTOMOTIVECOM With increased awareness of the environment and conservation, GTA delivers responsible, low impact repair alternatives. 5% DISCOUNT on labor for Go Local Rewards Card holders !#,%!.!002/!#(4/!$)249*/"

707.545.7076

501 BARHAM AVE SANTA ROSA -/.n&2)!-n0-s3!4"9!004/.,9 Certified Green Business

OIL O IL CHANGE C A NG E CH SPECIAL SPE EC I A L PLUSA&2%%3EASONAL #HECK UP

$

2499

)NSPECTIONINCLUDES sInspect Brakes s)NSPECT,IGHTS sInspect Tires sInspect Belts & Hoses s)NSPECT!LL&LUID,EVELS s0LUSx2OAD4EST Shop supplies & taxes extra. Most cars/light trucks. Oil change includes up to 5qts of motor oil & new oil filter. Cannot combine with any other offer. Offer expires July 10, 2013.

greentechautomotive.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Film

25

Music

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

26

SURVIVOR Marianne Faithfull ďŹ ts

right in at the Kate Wolf Fest.

Memories Remain Marianne Faithfull plays Kate Wolf Fest 66/28 / 28 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7/4 7/4

BY NADAV SOROKER

HHonorable onor able

TM

What W hat Maisie Maisie Knew Knew R (10:15-12:30-2:45-5:00)-7:10-9:20 (10 :15-12: 30-2: 45-5 : 00 ) -7:10-9 : 20

Much Ado Much Ado About About Nothing N othing PPG13 G13

Academy Award â&#x20AC;&#x153;Moore Gives Her BestNominee Performance Best Foreign Language Film!Stone In Years!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Box OfďŹ ce â&#x20AC;&#x153;Raw and Riveting!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Rolling ­£Ă&#x201C;\Ă&#x17D;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;\ÂŁxĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;x\ÂŁxÂŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;\ÂŁxĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\ÂŁxĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;, Demi MooreWITH DavidBASHIR Duchovny WALTZ A MIGHTY HEART (1:00) THE 3:00 5:00 iÂ?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;>Ă&#x160;V >Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;->Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x20AC;>Ă&#x160; Ă&#x2022;Â?Â?Â&#x153;VÂ&#x17D; (12:30) 2:45 JONESES 5:00 7:00 7:20 9:15 9:45 RR Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;`Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;iVĂ&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;BRIDESMAIDS (12:30) 2:40 4:50 7:10 9:20 R

/ Ă&#x160;  Ă&#x160;, 

(11:15-1:45-4:15)-6:45-9:10 (1 1:15-1: 45- 4 :15 ) -6 : 45-9 :10

Fill tthe Fill he V Void oid The T he E East ast PPG13 G13

0F.LQOH\6WÂ&#x2021;6HEDVWRSROÂ&#x2021; Â?Â?Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;>Â?Ă&#x160;*Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â?iVĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;}>Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;/Ă&#x2022;iĂ&#x192;`>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;fĂ&#x2021;°xäĂ&#x160;Â?Â?Ă&#x160;-Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; -VÂ&#x2026;i`Ă&#x2022;Â?iĂ&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x201C;nĂ&#x160;qĂ&#x160;/Ă&#x2022;i]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C; Bargain Tuesday - $7.50 All Shows

Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;iVĂ&#x152;i`Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x17E;Ă&#x160;-"Ă&#x160; "**" Bargain Tuesday $7.00 All Shows Schedule for Fri, Feb -16th 20th Thu, Feb 26th Schedule for Fri, April â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Thu, April 22nd Âş Ă&#x160;7/-" Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;- -/" tÂťĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;qĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;RS Schedule for Fri, June 22nd - Thu, June 28th

2 Academy Award Noms Including Best Actor!

PPGG (11:15am) (11:15am)

", Ă&#x160; /Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;

(10:45-1:15-3:50)-6:30-9:00 (1 0 : 45-1:15-3 : 50 ) -6 : 30-9 : 00

Before B efore Midnight Midnight

/ Ă&#x160; /Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;

â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Triumph!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; New â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Glorious Throwback ToYork The Observer More Stylized, THE WRESTLER ­£Ă&#x201C;\Ă&#x17D;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;\Ă&#x17D;äŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;\Ă&#x17D;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\£äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;,Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;No Passes Painterly Work Of Decades Past!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; LA (12:20) 5:10 9:45 R Times LA2:45 VIE EN 7:30 ROSE (12:45) 3:45 6:45OF 9:45 PG-13 THE SECRET KELLS Ă&#x2022;Â?Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x160; iÂ?ÂŤĂ&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x153;Â&#x17D;i 10 Academy Award Noms Including Best Picture! (1:00) 5:00 7:00 9:00 Âş7"3:00

,1tÂťĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;qĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;NY TimesNR SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE â&#x20AC;&#x153;ä&#x2013;&#x;ä&#x2013;&#x;ä&#x2013;&#x;ä&#x2013;&#x; â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Really, Truly, Deeply â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Superb! No One4:00 Could Make This 7:10 R Believable One of (1:15) This Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best!â&#x20AC;?9:40 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Newsday If It Were Fiction!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; San Francisco Chronicle ­£Ă&#x201C;\ääĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;\Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;{\{äŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;\£äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\{ä R ONCE

R

(1:30-4:00)-6:45-9:05 (1: 30- 4 : 00 ) -6 : 45-9 : 05

Love is Love is All All You You Need N eed R (1(10:30-1:00) 0 : 30 -1: 00 ) SSunday unda y 66/30 / 30 oonly: nl y : (1 0 : 30am ) (10:30am)

The T he G Great reat G Gatsby atsby PPG13 G13 ((4:30)-7:30 4 : 30 ) -7: 30 No No sshow ho w ttimes imes oonn TTuesday uesda y 77/2! /2!

Join uuss oonn SSunday Join unday 66/30 / 30 aatt 11pm pm aand nd Tuesday Tuesday 7/2 7/ 2 at at 66:30pm : 30pm ffor or sspecial pecial ppresentations r esen t at ions ooff AAliceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s l i c e â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s AAdventures d ven t ur es inin WWonderland onder land from f r om the t he RRoyal o yal BBallet! a lle t !

Summer field C Summerfield Cinema in e ma 551 5 51 S Summerfield ummer field Road Road Santa S an t a R Rosa osa 707-522-0719 707- 52 2- 07 719

8 Academy Award Noms Including PRODIGAL SONS R (1:00) 3:10 Best Picture, Best5:20 Actor7:30 & Best9:40 Director!

" -/ ,-Ă&#x160;1 6 ,-/9

(2:20) 9:10 NR No 9:10 Show Tue or Thu MILK ­£Ă&#x201C;\ääĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;\Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;{\{äŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;\ääĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\Ă&#x201C;xĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Haunting and Hypnotic!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Rolling Stone â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wise, Humble and Effortlessly (1:30) 4:10 6:45 Funny!â&#x20AC;? 9:30 R â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Newsweek >Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă?Ă?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2026;>Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;/>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;>}}Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x17E;Â?Â?iÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2026;>>Â?

THE GIRL THE TATTOO PleaseWITH Note: No 1:30 ShowDRAGON Sat, No 6:45 Show Thu WAITRESS

7/ Ă&#x160;"1- Ă&#x160; "7

(1:10) 4:30 7:30 NR (1:30) 4:00 7:10 9:30 Best R Picture! 5 Academy Award Noms Including ­£\ääĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;{\ääŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;\ääĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\{äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;*Â&#x2021;ÂŁĂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;No Passes â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;ŤŰşŰşŰşâ&#x20AC;Ź 1/2! AnFROST/NIXON Unexpected Gem!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; USA Today

WORLD WAR Z

(2:15)Mysterious, 7:20 R GREENBERG â&#x20AC;&#x153;Swoonly Romatic, Hilarious!â&#x20AC;? (12:00) 9:50 R â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Slant5:00 Magazine Ă&#x201C; \Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;­{\Ă&#x201C;äŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\Ă&#x17D;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D; \Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;­£\{xÂŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;\xäĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;*Â&#x2021;ÂŁĂ&#x17D; REVOLUTIONARY ROAD No Passes/Bargain Tues â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deliciously Unsettling!â&#x20AC;? PARIS, JE Tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;AIME (11:45) 4:45 9:50â&#x20AC;&#x201C; RLA Times (1:15)GHOST 4:15 7:00 9:30 R THE WRITER ­Ă&#x201C;\ääĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;x\ääŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;n\ääĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;*Â&#x2021;ÂŁĂ&#x17D; Kevin Jorgenson presents the California Premiere of (2:15) 7:15 PG-13

 Ă&#x160;"Ă&#x160;-/ Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; PURE: A BOULDERING FLICK "7Ă&#x160;9"1Ă&#x160;- Ă&#x160; Michael Mooreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Feb 26th at 7:15 THE Thu, MOST DANGEROUS ­£Ă&#x201C;\{xĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;\{xÂŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;\{äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\ÂŁxĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;*Â&#x2021;ÂŁĂ&#x17D;

SICKO MOVIES IN THE MORNING

MAN IN AMERICA Starts Fri, June 29th! /-Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x160;/ Ă&#x160;

Ă&#x160;No Passes Fri, Sat, Mon DANIEL ELLSBERG ANDSun THE&PENTAGON PAPERS

Advance Tickets On Sale Now at Box OfďŹ ce! ­£Ă&#x201C;\ÂŁxĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;\Ă&#x17D;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;{\{xÂŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;\£äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\Ă&#x17D;xĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;, 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 6:50 No7:30 6:50 Show Tue or Thu FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:30 NR 5:00 10:00 10:15 AM VICKY Their CRISTINA BARCELONA First Joint Venture In 25 Years! 10:20 AM CHANGELING Ă&#x20AC;i>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;"Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;-VĂ&#x20AC;iiÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;7i`]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;ÂŤÂ&#x201C;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; Venessa RedgraveAND Meryl CHONGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Streep Glenn CloseAM CHEECH 10:40 RACHEL GETTING MARRIED National Theatre Live presents HEY WATCH THIS 2009 LIVE ACTION SHORTS (Fri/Mon Only)) 10:45 AM EVENING 10:45 Sat, Apr17th at 11pm & Tue, Apr 8pmAM Helen in 20th 2009 ANIMATED SHORTS (Sun Only) Starts Fri,Mirren June 29th!

8 /" \Ă&#x160;1 Ă&#x160;ÂŁxä

The Audience

Encores Added! Click rialtocinemas.com

T

his week, music legend Marianne Faithfull ďŹ&#x201A;ies out from Paris to take the stage under the trees of Black Oak Ranch at the Kate Wolf Memorial Festival, bringing her nearly 50 years as a recording artist to the tightknit gathering in the woods.

Having experienced the ups of the swinging â&#x20AC;&#x2122;60s and the downs of drug addiction and depression, Faithfull has lived a life much more rough-and-tumble than that of the soothing-voiced Wolf, who while living in Sonoma County inďŹ&#x201A;uenced countless singer-songwriters. Yet Faithfull, in her ďŹ rst appearance at the festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and only one of two shows in the Bay Areaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;brings a worldliness that ďŹ ts right in with the annual celebration of Wolfâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life, now in its 18th year. After the soulful swing of her

early â&#x20AC;&#x2122;60s hit â&#x20AC;&#x153;As Tears Go By,â&#x20AC;? Faithfull eventually descended into drug addiction; she kicked heroin to make her comeback album Strange Weather in 1986, the same year Wolf died of leukemia. Faithfullâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ventures into blues, jazz and cabaret may be musically different than Wolfâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;remember Faithfullâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cameo on Metallicaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Memory Remainsâ&#x20AC;??â&#x20AC;&#x201D;but her spirit provides the perfect setup for an evening in the forest. The three-day festival itself is much like the experimental journey that Faithfull went through. Every year, fans make the annual pilgrimage north to the woods of Black Oak Ranch to relax, jam with friends old and new, dance and listen to great music. What started as a small event in Sebastopol has only gotten bigger after moving north. According to promoter Cloud Moss of Cumulus Productions, â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is a strong base of support in Sonoma County that followed it up there.â&#x20AC;? Headliners this year include AngĂŠlique Kidjo, Irma Thomas, Madeleine Peyroux and the Rebirth Brass Band, as well as returnees like John Prine, Iris DeMent, Greg Brown, Dave Alvin and many others. (Of special note is local band Poor Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Whiskey, who released Like a River: A Tribute to Kate Wolf last year.) On Friday, the front of the Music Bowl performing area is reserved for dancing; the festival also has a jam area and offers jam workshops. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This year we have a ukulele jam circle,â&#x20AC;? Moss says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and every day we have Jamming 101. We have late night jams and dancing.â&#x20AC;? The festival this year also includes Wolfâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s husband Don Coffin, who participates in a Kate Wolf song-and-story set alongside some of Wolfâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s other friends, Sherry Austin, Che Greenwood, Wavy Gravy, Alisa Fineman, Kimball Hurd and Hugh Shacklett. Amid all those she touched, there are sure to be stories of a life well-lived. The Kate Wolf Music Festival runs Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sunday, June 28â&#x20AC;&#x201C;30, at Black Oak Ranch in Laytonville. For full info, see www.katewolfmusicfestival.com.

ŴŹ

42/-"/.%3(/249/2,%!.3!6%.5%„RHYE „9/54(,!'//.„'!29#,!2+*2„BAAUER *%33)%7!2%„$),,/.&2!.#)3„+5246),%!.$4(%6)/,!4/23„%-%,)3!.$b „GRIZ 4(%-/4(%2()03„352&%2",//$„#(2/-!4)#3„4(%'2/7,%23„25$)-%.4!, 4(!/4(%'%4$/7.34!9$/7.„#!-0%26!."%%4(/6%.„3-)4(7%34%2.3 "/-")./„7!66%3„&)3("/.%„-),/'2%%.%„!4,!3'%.)53„!.5(%! 47%.49/.%0),/43„4(%(%!69„$!5'(4%2„)6!..%6),,%3$5-034!0(5.+ 7),$"%,,%„+).'45&&„4(%,/.%"%,,/7„-3-2„,)44,%'2%%.#!23 *!-%3-C#!24.%9„4(%3/&47()4%3)84)%3„$%!06!,,9„4(%-%. -)$)-!4),$!„CHERUB„+/0%#+9&!-),9"!.$„(/5.$-/54( &/96!.#%„BHI BHIMAN„,/#52!„.!)!+%4%„4(%%!39,%!6%3 34!.4/.7!22)/23„4(%0,5-0$*3„+2!&49+543„$*0)%22%„,!:92)#( '%.%&!22)3„$*3!-30)%'%,.!3! „!,,'//$&5.+!,,)!.#% $*3(/4.%:"!,+!."%!4"/8 „-/4)/.0/4)/.„$5"'!"2)%, 3,%)'(4/&(!.$3„7()4%./):%„'2)&&).#!-0%2„,%8%, GO TO

CHECK OUT THE FOOD, WINE & BEER LINEUP!

61 Local Restaurants, 36 Bay Area Wineries & 16 Breweries AND MORE TO BE ANNOUNCED!

*Lineup subject to change without notice

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

0!5,-C#!24.%9„2%$(/4#(),)0%00%23„.).%).#(.!),3„0(/%.)8 +!3+!$%„6!-0)2%7%%+%.$„02%449,)'(43„9%!(9%!(9%!(3 $!.'%,/„4(%.!4)/.!, „*52!33)#„7),,)%.%,3/.&!-),9 GRIZZLY BEAR„$!29,(!,,*/(./!4%3„9/5.'4(%')!.4 "!.$/&(/23%3„! 42!+„4(%(%!$!.$4(%(%!24„9%!3!9%2 -!44+)-„:%$$„4(%4!,,%34-!./.%!24(„&/!,3„$!7%3

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

28

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

with Austin DeLone 7:30pm :HG-XQHĂŁSP

DIN N E R & A SHOW Fri B NICKELS Jun 28 ANUCK D LOOSE CHA NGE New Country Music 8:00 Sat STEVE LUCKY AND THE 29 Jun

James Moseley Band 7KXU-XQHĂŁSP

Dave Alvin Acoustic Trio

RHUMBA BUMS WITH MISS CARMEN GETIT 8:30

5 AMY WIGTON PERFORMS â&#x20AC;&#x153;MOSTLY JONIâ&#x20AC;?

Fri

Jul

)UL-XQHĂŁSP

Joni Mitchell plus Originals 8:00 / No Cover Sat PELLEJO SECO Rancho 6 Jul Debut! Cuban Dance Music plus Salsa Lessons 8:00 Fri THE KEITH CROSSAN BAND Jul 12 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beatnik Rancho Jungleâ&#x20AC;? 8:30 t! Debu

 BBQs On The Lawn! 

MARK HUMMELâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BLUES Jun 30 H ARMONICA BLOWOUT featuring CORKY SIEGEL, JAMES HARMAN, & CHARLIE BATY Sun

Thur

Jul

Sun

Jul

Sun

Annual celebration with 4 Our THE ZYDECO FLAMES PETER ROWANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S 4th Annual 7 Bluegrass Birthday Bash

Jul 14

Monday ~ Open Mic Night

CHUCK PROPHET AND

THE MISSION EXPRESS PLUS TINY TELEVISION

Gates Open at 3:00, Music at 4:00 Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Greg Brown 6DW-XQHĂŁSP

Sylvia, a play by A.R. Gurney 6DW-XQHĂŁSP

Iris Dement 6XQ-XQHĂŁDP

Live Music Sunday Brunch FREE SHOW with

Elaine Ryan

6XQ-XQHĂŁSP

Sylvia, a play by A.R. Gurney :HG-XO\ĂŁSP

Lady Rizo )UL-XO\ĂŁSP

The Soul Jah Family Band with Lumanation www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave Mill Valley

Music Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Creative Elements Music by Sha One, Tazzy Taz, Deejay Lady Char and Big G. MC Battle for ages 16 and up. Jun 29, 1pm. $5-$10. Live Musicians Co-Op, 925 Piner Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.8845.

Elephant Revival Folk revival group has a bonafide washboard player. Kate Gaffney opens. Jun 28, 9pm. $13. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Friday Night Live Weekly music series in conjunction with farmers market. Jun 28, Monophonics. Fridays, 5:30pm. Free. Cloverdale Plaza, Cloverdale Boulevard between First and Second streets, Cloverdale.

Jim Kweskin Jug Band

in downtown Napa N

Fiftieth anniversary tour, featuring Maria and Geoff Muldaur. Two shows, Jul 3 and Jul 5, 8pm. $40-$45. Studio E, Address provided with tickets, Sebastopol.

TTickets ickets & Information Information m

Oliver Lake

CafĂŠ 415.388.1700 | Box Office 415.388.3850

1030 Main Street S

NVOH.ORG NVOH.O ORG

707.226.7372 707.226.73 372

MARK HUMMELâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MARK HU MMELLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BLUES BLUES E HARMONICA BLOWOUT: HARMONICA BLOWOUT: LITTLE LITT LE W WALTER ALTER TRIBUTE TRIBUTE Thursday, Thursday, June June 27 27, 8 PM PM

GREG BROWN

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

Saturday, June 29, 8 PM

Jazz saxophonist plays music that has been described as visual sound. Jun 29, 7 and 9pm. $20. Healdsburg Center for the Arts, 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1970.

Mac Dre Day Celebrate the short but bright life of Thizzle Washington, the first president of the Hyphy movement, with Husalah, Mac Mall and Mistah Fab. Jun 29, 8pm. $25. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Nicki Bluhm & the Gramblers Come see an unforgettable performance by this talented singer and songwriter!

Come see us!

TO PURCHASE TICKETS OR FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT NVOH.ORG

Wedâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Fri, 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9 Sat & Sun, 11:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8

ESTONIAN BALLET

Brewery Tours Daily at 3!

Sunday, S unday, June June 30, 30, 4 PM PM OK LIKE US ON FFAACEBO ERS! OFFFER IALL OF FORR SPECIA FO

www.facebook.com/napavalleyoperahouse www .facebook.com/napavalleyoperahouse

1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

w w w.L AGU N ITAS.com

This indie group covered a Hall and Oats song in a van. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Nuff said. Jun 30, 3:30pm. $30-$40. Long Meadow Ranch Winery, 738 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.4555.

Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Concerts Series Jun 29, California Beach Boys. Noon. Free. Montgomery Village, Santa Rosa.

Summer Concert Series Jun 28, Cloud & Quiles,

Whiskerman, Mr Kind. 6pm. $20-$25. VML Winery, 4035 Westside Rd., Healdsburg. 707.431.4404.

MARIN COUNTY Dave Alvin Acoustic Trio Former member of the Blasters considered to be one of the pivotal founders of the current Americana music scene. David Luning opens. Jun 27, 8pm. $22. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Arlene Francis Center Jun 29, Los Headaches, the Hot Toddies, Elvis Christ, Cumstain, Primitive Hearts, Pookie & the Poodlez, Buffalo Tooth, We are the Men, Pet Sounds. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Aubergine Jun 27, Truckstop Honeymoon, Stylites on Stage. Jun 28, Forrest Day. Jun 29, Shook Twins. Jun 30, Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Bunchovus. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Mark Hummelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blues Harmonica Blowout

Bergamot Alley

Featuring Corky Siegel, James Harman and Little Charlie. Jun 30, 4pm. $20-$25. Rancho Nicasio, Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Jun 30, Americano Social Club. 328-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8720.

Finley Community Center

James Nash

Jun 28, Carl Green Band. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

Guitarist for the Nomads and the NashVillains in a solo show. Jun 28, 8pm. $20-$35. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Summer Music Series Jun 30, the 7th Sons. 1pm. $8. Elks Lodge, 1312 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415-721-7661.

Terrapin Prom Music by David Martinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s House Party and Phil Lesh & the Terrapin Family Band. Jun 29, 6pm. $75. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

NAPA COUNTY Estonian National Ballet Performing Marina Keslerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Othelloâ&#x20AC;? and Tiit Helimetsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Time.â&#x20AC;? Jun 30, 4pm. $30-$35. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Greg Brown Seasoned songwriting, storytelling and music are deeply rooted in his Iowa upbringing. Jun 29, 8pm. $25-$30. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Mark Hummelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blues Harmonica Blowout Hummel, Corky Siegel, James Harman, Little Charlie Baty and the Blues Survivors pay tribute to Little Walter. Jun 27, 8pm. $25-$30. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Flamingo Lounge Jun 28, Crossfire. Jun 29, Metal Shop. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Frank & Ernieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Steakhouse Jun 29, Crazy Famous. 9 Mitchell Ln, Healdsburg. 707.433.2147.

French Garden Jun 28, Smilinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Iguanas. Jun 29, Out Of The Blue. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Gaiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden Jun 28, Greenhouse. Jun 29, Doug Blumer & Bohemian Highway. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts Jun 29, Oliver Lake. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1970.

Heritage Public House Jun 29, Simply Amazing. 1901 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

Hopmonk Sebastopol Jun 26, Stylust Beats. Jun 28, Free Peoples. Jun 29, Sol Horizon. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hopmonk Sonoma Jun 28, Megan Slankard. Jun 28, Salet. Jun 29, Jon Williams. Jun 30, Scott Foreman. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg Jun 29, Michael Coleman Trio.

CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

Lonestar Retrobates. 397 Aviation Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.765.2515.

29

Jun 29, the Raggedy Andys. 1400 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.529.5450.

Montgomery Village Shopping Center Jun 27, Foreverland. Village Court, Santa Rosa.

Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub Jun 27, Joyride. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre

Synesthesia Oliver Lake presents jazz multimedia show The lawn at Rodney Strong Vineyards is not a somber place, and yet itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the annual site of the end of the Healdsburg Jazz Festival, when the two weeks of world-class jazz comes to an end. Except it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really end. Throughout the calendar year, the indefatigable organization presents one-off shows of worthy jazzâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and one of the best, to my mind, was Oliver Lakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Trio 3 raising a holy sound inside the intimate confines of Flying Goat Coffee in 2009. Lake returns to Healdsburg this week in a unique solo show: heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be playing saxophone and flute as well as reciting poetry while surrounded by an art exhibit of his own paintings at the Healdsburg Center for the Arts. Just how much can a guy do with one saxophone? If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve heard Lakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recordings with the World Saxophone Quartet, you know that the answer is a hell of a lot. Complementing Lakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own artwork are pieces by other artists, inspired by the music and life of jazz. Catch the man in action in two shows on Sunday, June 29, at the Healdsburg Center for the Arts. 130 Plaza St., Healdsburg. 7pm and 9pm. $20. 707.433.4633. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Gabe Meline

Jun 28, Elephant Revival, Kate Gaffney. Jun 29, the Purple Xperience, Dr Fink. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Fri July 5 FREE SHOW Del the Funky Homosapien & Guests Sun July 7 J Boog plus <Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ä?Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;ÄŽĆ&#x152;Ä&#x17E;, Aaradhna & Hot Rain Thur July 18 & Fri July 19 Jewelâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Greatest Hits Tour Sat July 20 Mary Chapin Carpenter & Marc Cohn Sat July 27 Ladies Night In Napa~An Evening Of Comedy Presented By KGO 810 Featuring

Ĺ&#x161;Ć&#x152;Ĺ?Ć?Ć&#x;ĹśÄ&#x201A;WÄ&#x201A;Ç&#x152;Ć?Ĺ?Ć&#x161;Ç&#x152;ĹŹÇ&#x2021;Í&#x2022;dÄ&#x201A;žžÇ&#x2021;WÄ&#x17E;Ć?Ä?Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĹŻĹŻĹ?Í&#x2022; Mary Lynn Rajskub, Loni Love Fri Aug 2 :Ä&#x17E;ÄŤĆ&#x152;Ĺ?Ä&#x161;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;Ć? & The Abiders Sat Aug 3 Kenny Loggins plus Blue Sky Riders Fri Aug 9 SOLD O U T!

Jun 29, Orquesta Batacha. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Anjelah Johnson Wed Aug 14

>Ĺ˝Ć?>ŽŜÄ&#x17E;ĹŻÇ&#x2021;Ĺ˝Ç&#x2021;Ć?Ä?ŽƾĆ?Ć&#x;Ä? Thur Aug 15

Phoenix Theater Jun 27, Jugtown Pirates, Highway Poets, Jaunting Pirates (21+). Jun 28, Aenimus I of Helix, Ariabes, the Know Nothings, Incinerated Divinity. Jun 29, Mac Dre Day with Husalah, Mac Mall & Mistah Fab. Jun 30, Peck the Town Crier, Fox & Woman, PSDSP, We Are the Men. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

A Midsummer's Night with The Monkees

Sat Aug 17

:Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x2021;:Ä&#x17E;ÄŤtÄ&#x201A;ĹŻĹŹÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161; ^Ć&#x2030;Ä&#x17E;Ä?Ĺ?Ä&#x201A;ĹŻ'ĆľÄ&#x17E;Ć?Ć&#x161;Í&#x2014;ĹŠÄ&#x201A;ĹśĹ?Ĺ˝tÄ&#x201A;ĹŻĹŹÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;   

Wed Aug 21

Chris Isaak Planning an event? Contact us for rental info

1350 Third St, Napa | 707.259.0123 www.uptowntheatrenapa.com

707.829.7300 7 0 7. 829 . 7 3 0 0 SEBASTOPOL E B AS T OP OL 230 2 3 0 PETALUMA P E TA L U M A AVE AV E | S

OPEN O P E N MIC M I C NIGHT NIGHT

EVERY TUES EVERY TUES AT AT 7PM 7PM WITH WITH EVAN EVAN FRI F RI JJUN UN 2 28 8 IINDIE NDIE | FFOLK OLK | ROCK R O CK

FREE FR EE PE PEOPLES OPLES

$$12/DOORS 12/ DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

SAT S AT JJUN UN 29

ROOTS R O OTS | ROCK ROCK | REGGAE R EG G AE

SOL S OL H HORIZON ORIZON

$$12/DOORS 12/ DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

WED W ED JUL JUL 3

DUBSTEP D U BS T EP | W WEST EST C COAST OA S T | G GLITCH L I TC H

BRAINSTORM BR AINSTORM

JULY 3 JULY 3RD RD S SEBASTOPOL EBASTOPOL FIREWORKS FIREWORKS AFTER-PARTY AFTER-PARTY $$5/DOORS 5/ DOORS 110PM/21+ 0PM /21+

FRI F RI JJUL UL 5

ANYTHING A NY THING G GOES! OES!

SPECIAL F SPECIAL FRIDAY RIDAY N NIGHT IGHT OPEN OPEN MIC M IC W WITH ITH E EVAN VAN FFREE/DOORS REE/ DOORS 77PM/ALL PM /ALL AGES AGES

SAT S AT JUL JUL 1 13 3

JJAM AM | FFOLK OLK | ROCK R O CK

ROCK RO CK COLLECTION COLLECTION

LEBO, G LEBO, GREG R EG A ANTON, NTON, M MARK ARK K KARAN, ARAN, ROBIN ROBIN SYLVESTER SYLVESTER AND A ND S SPECIAL PECIAL GUEST G U EST

MELVIN M ELVIN S SEALS EALS

$$18/DOORS 18 / DOORS 77PM/21+ PM /21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM W W W. H O PM ONK .CO M

Book B ook your your next ne x t event event with with us, us , kim@hopmonk.com k i m @ h o p m o n k . co m

Quincyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jun 28, Boo Radleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s House. 6590 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park. 707.585.1079.

River Theatre Thurs, Thugz. 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.3194.

Russian River Brewing Co Jun 30, Rovetti & Meatballs. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Ruth McGowanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewpub

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

McNearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dining House "REAKFASTs,UNCHs$INNER FRI 6/28s8PM DOORSs FOLK/BLUEGRASS

ELEPHANT REVIVAL 3!4s0-$//23s PRINCE TRIBUTE BAND

THE PURPLE XPERIENCE:

THE WORLDS PREMIER PRINCE TRIBUTE

Jun 29, Greenhouse. Sun, Evening Jazz with Gary Johnson. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

DR. FINK FROM PRINCE AND THE REVOLUTION FRI 7/5s8PM DOORSs REGGAE

Society: Culture House

25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Hop Jam. 925 Piner Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.8845.

Jun 26, Linda Ferro. Jul 3, Ricky Alan Ray. Wed, North Bay Blues Revue. Thurs, Casa Rasta. Sun, Church on Sundays. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa.

Lagunitas Tap Room

Main Street Station

Spanckyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Jun 26, Royal Deuces. Jun 27, Critical Measures. Jun 28, Danny Montana. Jun 29, the String Rays. Jun 30, Dynamo Jones. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Jun 27, Slowpoke. Jun 28, Phil Edwards. Jun 29, Vernelle Anders. Jun 30, Cazadero Jazz Project. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Jun 28, McKenna Faith. Jun 30, Down Dirty Shake. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Mavericks

Live Musicians Co-Op

Jun 28, Smoke & Mirrors, the Rolling Blackouts. Jun 30,

Jun 27, Olio. Jun 29, Kingsborough. 446 B St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8277. )

Jun 29, Creative Elements Hip-

Sat June 29

Berlin plus Big Country

Sprengerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tap Room

30

MIDNITE

PLUS DJ JACQUES (WBLK), PURE ROOTS &2)s8:45PM DOORSs DANCE HITS/PARTY BAND

AN EVENING WITH

WONDERBREAD 5

3!4s0-$//23s AMERICANA/FOLK ROCK/ROCKABILLY

ANTSY McCLAIN AND THE

TRAILER PARK TROUBADOURS PLUS DAVE GONZALEZ AND THE

BRANDED MEN

.O#HILDREN5NDERTO!LL!GES3HOWS 0ETALUMA"LVD 0ETALUMA

7

WWWMCNEARSCOM

2 24 V 224 VINTAGE INTAG E W WAY AY 415 . 8 9 2 . 6 2 0 0 N OVA ATO | 415.892.6200 NOVATO

WEDNESDAYS WE DNESDAYS / VARIETY VARIET Y | GENERAL GENER R AL

OPEN O PEN MIC MIC NIGHT N I G HT

WITH W ITH D DENNIS ENNIS HA HANEDA NEDA FFREE/DOORS REE/ DOORS 7:30PM/ALL 7: 30PM /ALL AGES AGES

FRI F RI JJUN UN 2 28 8 / FFOLK O LK | A AMERICANA MERICANA | R ROOTS OOTS

THE T HE DEVIL DEVIL SHAKES SHAKES

WITH W ITH B BITCH ITCH FRANKLIN FR ANKLIN AND AN D YEAH. Y E AH . S SURE. URE . W WHATEVER. HA ATEVER . $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 77PM/21+ PM /21+

SAT S AT JJUN UN 29 / CCLASSIC LASSIC ROCK ROCK | ALT ALT | FFOLK O LK

SHANA M SHANA MORRISON ORRISON &C CALEDONIA ALEDONIA $$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

FRI F RI JJUL UL 5 / R AAND ND B | JJAZZ AZZ | B BLUES LUES

AGAPESOUL A GAPESOUL $$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

SAT S AT JJUL UL 6 / COUNTRY COUNTRY | R ROCK OCK | POP PO P

PETE P ETE STRINGFELLOW STRINGFELLOW $$10 10 A ADV/$15 DV/$15 D DOS/DOORS OS/ DOORS 77PM/21+ PM /21+

SUN SU N JJUL UL 7 / RROOTS OOTS | R ROCK OCK | REGGAE REGGAE

THE T HE IITALS TALS

$$12/DOORS 12/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM W WW.HOPMONK.COM Book yyour Book our next ne x t eevent vent with with us, us , u up p to to 150 1 50 people, people, kim@hopmonk.com kim@hopmonk .com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Monroe Dance Hall

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

30

Music ( 29

4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Studio E

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar

Jul 3 and 5, Jim Kweskin Jug Band. Address provided with tickets, Sebastopol.

Jun 26, Bedrock. Jun 28, Friends of Finch. Jun 29, Rusty Evans & the Ring of Fire. Jun 30, Now & Zen. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Sunflower Center

Music Events

Lydiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Organics

Jun 30, Landry. 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

Tradewinds

J UN 30Â&#x192;7pmÂ&#x192;Jazz CD Release Party The Bayouâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Soulful Jazz

Jun 26, Down with May. Jun 28, Rock Hounds. Jun 29, Levi Lloyd & the 501 Band. Mon, Donny Maderosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pro Jam. Tues, Jeremyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Open Mic. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

J azz Evening with Landry

J UL 5Â&#x192;8pmÂ&#x192;Jazz & flamenco guitarist

Gordon Rowland J UL 6Â&#x192;8:30pm

Benefit Reggae Concert

MARIN COUNTY

J oy of Learning, Qshan Deya, Rusty Zinn

142 Throckmorton Theatre

Culture Canute, Amha Selassie Baraka

Jun 27, Matt Jaffe & the Distractions, False Priest. Jun 28, James Nash. Jun 29, Greensill & Whitfield. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

J UL 13Â&#x192;8pmÂ&#x192;Master Percussionist & Team & Belly Dance Concert

Souhail Kaspar & Ziva Emtiyaz J UL 28Â&#x192;8pmÂ&#x192; Ecstatic Kirtan & Classical Indian Dance

Rasa Lila Jai Uttal & Nubia Teixeira

Dance Palace

PURCHASE TICKETS ONLINE AT W W W.LYDIASORGANICS.COM /.$%08&--#-7%t1&5"-6."t$"

707.792 . 530 0

Jun 29, La Mixta Criolla. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Fenix Jun 28, Wall Street. Jun 29 and 30, Box Set. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

Sweetwater Music Hall Jun 26, James Moseley Band. Jun 27, Dave Alvin Acoustic Trio. Jun 28, Greg Brown. Jun 29, Iris Dement. Jul 3, Lady Rizo. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads

Rancho Nicasio Jun 29, Steve Lucky & the Rhumba Bums, Miss Carmen Getit. Jun 30, Mark Hummelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blues Harmonica Blowout. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Jun 29, Terrapin Prom. Wed, Terrapin Family Band Bar Show. Thurs, Stu Allen & the Terrapin All Stars. Sun, Terrapin Family Band. Tues, American Jubilee. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

Sand Dollar Bar & Restaurant

NAPA COUNTY

Jun 29, Emma Lee. 3458 Shoreline Hwy, Stinson Beach. 415.868.0434.

Sausalito Seahorse Jun 27, Jonathon Korty. Jun 28, Doc Kraft & Company. Jun 29, Drew Youngs. Jun 30, Pacific Mambo Orchestra. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady Jun 26, Kathryn Claire and Hanz Araki. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jun 27, the Deadlies. Jun 28, Jimbo Trout. Jun 29, Black Water Gold. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Downtown Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewery & Restaurant Jun 26, Jumpstart. Jun 28, Memphis Exchange. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Lincoln Theater Jun 28, Max Bonick Quartet. 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.226.8742.

Napa Valley Opera House Jun 27, Mark Hummelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blues Harmonica Blowout. Jun 29, Greg Brown. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jun 29, Unauthorized Rolling Stones. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Fourth Street Tavern Jun 28, Jenny Kerr Band. 711 Fourth St, San Rafael.

Wed, Jun 26 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 10:15amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth 12:45pm and Family

Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub

Thur, Jun 27 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Circles Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Squares Square Dance Club

Hopmonk Novato

Fri, Jun 28 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm

8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise Steve Luther hosts a NIGHT CLUB TWO STEP PARTY

Jun 28, Romancing the Bass. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

At the Veterans Building 282 South High St. Sebastopol, CA 95472 707.829.4797 www.sebarts.org

Sat, Jun 29 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm North Bay Country Dance Society presents THE RAGGEDY ANDYS Sun, Jun 30 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:25pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING Mon, Jul 1 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:25pm

Jun 26, Dirty Hand Family Band. Jun 28, Swamp Angel, the Royal Deuces. Jun 29, High Lyfe Party. Jul 3, the Whiskey Sisters, Knight Drive, Makaela. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091. Jun 26, Noel Jewkes Duo. Jun 27, Passion Habanera. Jun 28, Tammy Hall Trio. Jun 29, James Moseley Trio. Jun 30, Marcelo Puig & Seth Asarnow. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Tues, Jul 2 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 7:30pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

19 Broadway Club

Osteria Divino

8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922

Jun 28, the Devil Shakes. Jun 29, Shana Morrison. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

"The Errant Tree of Life" by Easton, 2012

Open Wed thru Sun, 11 to 5pm 144 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma

707tcalabigallery.com

Panama Hotel Restaurant Jun 26, Dave Getz Trio. Jun 27, Lady D. Jul 2, Swing Fever 1934. Jul 3, Eldon Brown Band.

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

Tyrese, Ginuwine & Tank If you want it, you got it: three veterans of 1990s R&B ride the pony once again. Jun 26 at the Paramount Theatre.

Mykki Blanco Self-declared â&#x20AC;&#x153;illuminati prince/ssâ&#x20AC;? embraces the freaks, slays the haters and rules the club. Jun 27 at Mezzanine.

DeďŹ ance, Ohio Preciously DIY acoustic punk band raises fists and voices; with Japanther. Jun 28 at Bottom of the Hill.

La Luz Reverb-drenched girl group from Seattle creates intoxicating dream-pop. Jun 30 at Hemlock Tavern.

Big Freedia & DJ Assault Azz everywhere azz everywhere azz everywhere azz everywhere azz everywhere azz everywhere. Jun 30 at Public Works.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

31

Galleries RECEPTIONS Jun 29 At 3pm. Bolinas Museum, “Birds of the Sierra Nevada,” paintings by Keith Hansen. Also, “Celebrating 30 years,” featuring historical pieces from the museum’s past. Also, “Constructed Surfaces,” color photographs by Andy Rappaport. Also, “Consuelo Kanaga,” pieces by the American photographer from the collection of Susie Tompkins Buell. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.0330.

Jul 2 At 6pm. O’Hanlon Center for the Arts, ���Viewpoints II,” group show of photographs by members and artists. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.4331.

Finley Community Center

Peter Lowell’s

Through Aug 8, “Shared Vision,” paintings by Kathy Cia White and Gary Albright. Through Aug 8, “Small Works in Watercolor,” works by the “Friday Afternoon Class” of senior artists. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Through Jul 31, “A Day with Goats & Divine Deliciousness,” photos by Ananda Fierro. 7385 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily 707.829.1077.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Aug 10, “Hodge Podge,” mixed-media exhibit by artists from Becoming Independent and the Barracks Studio. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Gallery One Through Jul 13, “New Gallery,” oil paintings by Jennifer Jaeger and watercolors by Lucy Arnold. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Gallery 300 Through Jun 29, “Untitled,” juried exhibition of local and international artists. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. Open Sat, 12 to 5, and by appointment. 707.332.1212.

Graton Gallery

Jul 1-31, “Color Fuse,” fused glass and abstract paintings by Kate E Black and Suzanne Edminster. Reception, Jul 13, 6pm. 461 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa.

Through Jun 30, “Soo Noga & BK Hopkins,” paintings and digital art. Also featuring pieces by Nina Bonos and Sherri Ortegren. Jul 2-Aug 11, “Summer Songs,” works by Mylette Welsh and MariaEsther Sund. Reception, Jul 7, 2pm. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Calabi Gallery

Hammerfriar Gallery

SONOMA COUNTY Backstreet Gallery

Through Jul 13, “Intimate Enigmas,” abstract stone sculptures by Easton. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Sep 1, “Art of the Line,” describing Schulz’s process, from the tools he used to the research he undertook. Through Oct 14, “Barking Up the Family Tree,” featuring comic strips with Snoopy’s siblings. Through Oct 27, “Mid-Century Modern,” works of prominent post-war-era decorative, textile and furniture designers. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Through Aug 11, “The Summer of 2013,” featuring pieces by Harley, Bill Shelley, Brian Wilson and Hugh Livingston. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts Through Jun 30, “Flying Home,” artwork inspired by jazz. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

History Center Through Feb 6, “Sculpture Trail,” outdoor exhibit with sculptures along Cloverdale Boulevard and Geyserville Avenue changing every nine months. 215 N. Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale.

Quercia Gallery Jun 28-Jul 29, “Our Natures,” paintings, drawings and prints inspired by nature by Sandra Rubin and Alan Johnson. Reception, Jul 7, 3pm. 25193 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.0243.

VELOCITY & TRAJECTORY David Barker and Linda Shore discuss the

RiskPress Gallery

physics of baseball on June 30 at the Rafael Film Center. See Film, p32.

Through Jun 27, “Andrew Annenberg Masterworks,” abstract and surrealist paintings. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Towers Gallery

Gallery Route One

Through Jun 30, “Bright Summer Lights,” multimedia by Janet McBeen and oil paintings by Adele Pruitt. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

Through Jul 21, “GRO Artist Member Exhibition.” Salon, Jul 21, 4pm. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Jul 7, “The Faces of El Capitan,” fine art paintings by Jeffery T Williams. Through Jul 7, “Into the Deep,” underwater photography by Jeff Lemelin. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Russian River Art Gallery Through Jun 30, “Small Works,” art that’s little in size but not in stature. 16357 Main St, Guerneville. Daily, 10 to 6. 707.869.9099.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Through Jul 20, “Up, Up & Away,” expressing aspects of flight. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sonoma County Museum Through Aug 18, “Margins to Mainstream,” seven contemporary artists with disabilities. Through Aug 18, Rodger Warnecke, Oakland artist, displays paintings after a 25-year hiatus from art. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Jun 29-Aug 25, “Akin,” pieces by photographer Nicole Katano and painter Marc Katano. Jun 29-Aug 25, “Stand by Me,” photographs by Nicole Katano of the Sonoma Valley Mentoring Alliance. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Upstairs Art Gallery

Marin Community Foundation

Through Jun 30, Paintings by Henry White. 306 Center Ave (above Levin & Co bookstore), Healdsburg. Sun-Thurs, 10 to 6; Fri-Sat, 10 to 9. 707.431.4214.

Through Sep 27, “Breaking Barriers,” featuring work by Bay Area artists with disabilities. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Marin MOCA

MARIN COUNTY Bolinas Museum Jun 29-Aug 25, “Birds of the Sierra Nevada,” paintings by Keith Hansen. Reception, Jun 29, 3pm. Jun 29-Aug 25, “Celebrating 30 years,” featuring historical pieces from the museum’s past. Reception, Jun 29, 3pm. Jun 29-Aug 25, “Constructed Surfaces,” color photographs by Andy Rappaport. Reception, Jun 29, 3pm. Jun 29-Aug 25, “Consuelo Kanaga,” pieces by the American photographer from the collection of Susie Tompkins Buell. Reception, Jun 29, 3pm. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

Falkirk Cultural Center Through Aug 17, “Splendid Objects,” new works by 19 contemporary artists. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

Through Jul 14, “Summer National Juried Exhibition,” featuring 45 pieces selected from hundreds of entries. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Jun 27, “The Beauty of Imperfection,” 10th annual Wabi-Sabi show. Jul 2-30, “Viewpoints II,” group show of photographs by O’Hanlon Center members and artists. Reception, Jul 2, 6pm. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Seager Gray Gallery Through Jun 30, “Mysterious Barricades,” paintings by Devorah Jacoby. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

NAPA COUNTY

Gallery Bergelli

di Rosa

Through Jul 10, “Ten Years of Water,” paintings by Pegan Brooke. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Through Jun 30, “From Two Worlds,” photography by Linda Connor. Through Dec 31, Largest collection of

contemporary Bay Area art. Tours daily. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

ECHO Gallery Through Jul 6, “The Great Wall of Doof,” installation by Tim Sharman. Through Jul 6, “Touch of Nature,” juried exhibition exploring the wild and wonderful ways of nature in all media. 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.

Gordon Huether Gallery Through Jul 31, “Norcal Modern,” new paintings by Grace Slick. 1465 First St, Napa. 707.255.5954.

Grand Hand Gallery Through Jul 31, “American Juke Box,” photography by Christopher Felver. Through Jul 31, “Fruit Juice,” work incorporating or inspired by all things fruit. 1136 Main St, Napa. No phone.

Napa Valley Museum Through Jun 30, “Jazzland and Other Stories,” paintings by Edmund Ian Grant. Through Jul 28, “Miles Davis,” sketches and oil paintings by jazz pioneer Miles Davis. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Tues-Sun, 10am to 4pm. 707.944.0500.

Comedy Chris Garcia San Franisco native headlines, featuring Matt Lieb and Bert DiVietri. Hosted by Torio Van Grol. Jun 28, 9pm and Jun 29, 7 and 9:30pm. ) $20. Murphy’s Irish

32

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Arts Events

( 31

Pub, 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-and-comers. Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Events Cowgirl Tricks Children’s program featuring Karen Quest. Jun 26, 11am. Free. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Entrepreneurs’ Happy Hour Enjoy wine and hors d’oeuvres while socializing with local innovators, service providers and investors. First Tues of every month, 5pm. Free. Sonoma Mountain Business Cluster, 1300 Valley House Dr, Ste 100, Rohnert Park. 707.794.1240.

Italian Street Painting Festival Children through age 12 are invited to create a square of street art, chalk included. Jun 29, 10am and Jun 30, 10am. $10-$50. Downtown San Rafael, Fifth and A streets, San Rafael.

Marin County Fair Short but sweet, this year’s entertainment includes: Jul 3, “Weird” Al Yankovic; Jul 4, the Kingston Trio; Jul 4, Eddie Money; Jul 5, Zendaya; Jul 5, Ozomatli; Jul 6, Nitty Gritty Dirt Band; Jul 6, the Wailers; Jul 7, Mariachi Sol de Mexico de José Hernandez; Jul 7, the Pointer Sisters. Jul 3-7. Prices vary. Marin Fairgrounds, Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael.

National HIV/AIDS Testing Day Free, anonymous HIV test via oral swab. Jun 27. Free. Face to Face, 873 Second St, Santa Rosa.

Python Ron’s Reptile Kingdom Kids get the chance to get up close and personal with unusual members of the animal kingdom. Jul 3, 11am. Free. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Story Time for Wee Ones Stories and interactive multicultural folktales (some with Spanish) for children age 4 to 7 led by Cynthia Conway. Wed, 11am. through Jul 31. Sonoma County Museum, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Toy Con Cross between an old school toy show and an SDCC-like event. Jun 29, 10am. $15-$25. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.545.4200.

Film Film Night Jun 28, “Argo”; Jun 29, “Jurassic Park.” 8pm. Free. Creek Park, Hub Intersection, Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, San Anselmo.

Larger Than Life Opera Jun 29, “Falstaff.” 7pm. $20. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Laugh Out Loud Short Film Fest Nine short comedies from some of the world’s best unknown filmmakers. Jun 27, 7pm. Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.528.4222.

Live at the Met Opera Series Jun 29, “Il Trovatore.” 10am. $10-$14. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.5111.

Movie Nights Popup movie series. Jun 29, “The Princess Bride.” 8pm. Free. Corte Madera Town Center, West side of Highway 101 at Tamalpais exit, Corte Madera. 415.924.2961.

Munch 150 Documentary on the 150th birthday of Edvard Munch, painter of “The Scream.” Jun 27, 7pm. $12.50-$14. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Painting Bolinas Documentary about Peter Lee Brownlee will paint his way into your heart. Director Wendy Elkin in person. Jul 2, 6pm. Free. Bay Model Visitor Center, 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.3871.

Physics & Fastballs Exploratorium baseball experts

David Barker and Linda Shore utilize scientific and Hollywood evidence to examine the physics, bioneurology and biomechanics of baseball. Jun 30, 7pm. $12. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

’Round Midnight Jazz movie featuring presentation from Maxine Gordon, Dexter Gordon’s wife. Jun 29, 7pm. $10. Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.226.8742.

Food & Drink California Beer Festival Over 70 beers on tap from all over the Golden State, plus a barbecue cook-off and music from Petty Theft, the Monophonics and Metal Shop. Jun 29, 12:30pm. $40. Stafford Lake Park, 3549 Novato Blvd, Novato.

Celebrate Napa’s 30-Ton Erection Hey, they said it, not us! Wine and heavy hors d’oeuvres preclude a private tour of the I-beams from the World Trade Center being installed at Memorial Park. Jul 2, 5:30pm. $200. Cole’s Chop House, 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.224.6328.

Courtyard Cocktail Party Honoring Ewan Mcdonald and his efforts to restore the museum. Jul 3, 5:30pm. $25. Bolinas Museum, 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.0330.

Days of Wine & Lavender Festival Lavender in peak bloom with culinary pairings by Douglas Keane, beekeeping demonstrations, chair massages and live music. Jun 29, 12pm. $95. Matanzas Creek Winery, 6097 Bennett Valley Rd., Santa Rosa. 707.528.6464.

$55. La Condesa, 1320 Main St, St. Helena. 707.967.8111.

Wednesday Night Market Food, vendors, produce, live music and activities. Wed, 5pm. through Aug 21. Free. Downtown Santa Rosa, Fourth and B streets, Santa Rosa.

West End Farmers Market Brand spankin’ new farmers market in Santa Rosa, every Sunday, 10-2. Donahue St between Boyce and W 9th, Santa Rosa.

Lectures Making Healthy Financial Choices Jeff Stoffer, CFA, talks about understanding how unconscious beliefs about money influence our behavior. Jun 26, 6:30pm. Free. Sans Gluten Free Grocery, 821 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.8888.

Mardi Storm Multidisciplinary artist discusses the rich inner world of dreams in art. Jul 2, 7:30pm. Free. Petaluma Arts Center, 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Seaweed Harvesting Learn how to harvest from the salad bar of the sea, followed by Saturday morning exclusion to the Sonoma Coast. Jun 26, 7pm. $65. Work Petaluma, 10 Fourth St, Petaluma. 707.721.6540.

State of the Economy Talk by Dr John C Williams, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. Jun 28, 12pm. $70. Doubletree Hotel, 1 Double Tree Dr, Rohnert Park.

Readings

Farm Dinner Tour the farm and enjoy a dinner that spotlights the link between community farming and eating. Jun 29, 7pm. $100. SucherNova Farm, 900 West Sierra Ave, Cotati.

Aqus Cafe

Tequila Whisperer Master Series Dinner

Book Passage

Tequila paired with a threecourse meal. Jun 26, 6:30pm.

CRITIC’S CHOICE DJ Ashton

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

32 A E

Jul 1, 7pm, Rivertown Poets Presents Carol Dorf and Dawn McGuire. Mondays, 9:30am, Storytelling with Phaedra. 189 H St, Petaluma 707.778.6060. Jun 26, 12pm, “Revenge Wears Prada” with ) Lauren Weisberger,

34

Mad for Eames ‘Mid-Century Modern’ draws eyes at the Schulz You know how it is sometimes when Mad Men’s plot begins to drag but you’re not ready to stop watching though you are ready for something else to look at so you just sort of dream over Don’s furniture while you wait for the next lurid part? We thought so. The era’s furnishings are a worthy obsession—and an enduring one. Charles Schulz could be considered Don’s sober twin, at least in furniture. A new exhibit, “Mid-Century Modern,” running through Oct. 27 in the main gallery of his eponymous museum, celebrates Schulz’s environs as seen in his strips, enlivened as they were by clean severe lines, über-functionality and the work of Ray and Charles Eames. (A strip from the era shows Linus standing in a room of linear contemporary furniture wondering what the heck a rocking chair is.) “His wife was really into design,” explains Schulz Museum marketing director Gina Huntsinger, pausing by a Hassel Smith painting lent for the exhibition. “So he was drawing the stuff that was in the house.” In “Modern,” the museum staff has recreated Sparky’s strips right down to the curtain treatments and the rugs. Best of all? No lurid parts. A panel discussion on the enduring pleasures of the midcentury modern aesthetic featuring the editor of Dwell magazine, as well as an architect, a member of the Eames Foundation and an expert from Scandinavian Design is slated for Saturday, June 29, at the Charles M. Schulz Museum. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 4pm. Free with museum admission; $5–$10. 707.579.4452.—Gretchen Giles

žž NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Ayurvedic

Indian Head Massage â&#x20AC;˘ improves mobility in

neck and shoulders â&#x20AC;˘ relief from tension headaches, eyestrain, and sinusitis

ON SITE MASSAGE AVAILABLE

Margery Smith 707.544.9642

> Pers Personal ersonal Service ers Se > EEveryday day low p prices > Widest st selectio selection tion of edib tio edibles dibless dib >B Bonus for or new members me s & referra referrals rrals > Disc Discounts scounts for sc fo senior seniors ors and ve veteran veteranss M, T, F 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C; M 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5; 0â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5; W, Th 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7,, Sat S 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5 Highway Highw ghway 101 ghw 01 at Stee Steele eele Lane ee ne 2425 Cle Cleveland nd Ave, Su Suite 1755

707.526.2800 70 7.526.2 6.2800 6.2

$95

New Patients

COMPASSIONATE HEALTH OPTIONS Low Cost Vaccination Clinics every Sunday, 9:30-11:30am

WESTERN FARM CENTER 707.545.0721 21 West 7th St., Santa Rosa

Providing Compassionate Care and Medical Cannabis Evaluations Since 2004

E^][r=k'AZgrZ;Zkma K^Ze<Zk^K^Ze=h\mhkl +-(0LZ_^O^kb_b\Zmbhg MhmZeer<hg_b]^gmbZe

O]ddEYl[` Any Local Price

JnZebmr B=<Zk]l

1.707.568.0420

www.GREEN215.com

=hpgmhpgLZgmZKhlZ30-*.maLm9>Lm

$75

Renewals

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

34

.BTTJWF .BTTJWF*OWFOUPSZ F*OWFOUPSZ P G&$JHBSFUUFT PG&$JHBSFUUFT 5PQ2VBMJUZ5PCBDDP+VJDFT 5 PQ2VBMJUZ5 5PCBDDP+VJDFT "XBSE8JOOJOH4FSWJDF " XBSE8JOOJOH H4FSWJDF

A E

( 32

includes lunch and book $55. Jun 26, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Finding the Origins of Music in the Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wild Placesâ&#x20AC;? with Bernie Krause. Jun 27, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wear Your Dreams: My Life in Tattoosâ&#x20AC;? with Ed Hardy. Jun 28, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Silver Starâ&#x20AC;? with Jeannette Watts. Jun 29, 4pm, Afternoon of Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Literature with Deborah Underwood, Amy Novesky and Bethanie Murguia. Jun 29, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Contagious Optimism: Uplifting Stories and Motivational Advice for Positive Forward Thinkingâ&#x20AC;? with David Mezzapelle. Jun 30, 1pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mary Wrightly, So Politelyâ&#x20AC;? with Shirin Bridges. Jun 30, 4pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Impossible Lives of Greta Wellsâ&#x20AC;? with Andrew Sean Greer. Jul 1, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Skepticâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guide to the Mind: What Neuroscience Can and Cannot Tell Us About Ourselvesâ&#x20AC;? with Robert Burton. Jul 2, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Let the Water Hold Me Downâ&#x20AC;? with Michael Spurgeon. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

FROM THE DISCOUNT RACK Fashion and tattoo

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;iconâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ed Hardy appears June 27 at Book Passage.

Center for Spiritual Living Jun 28, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Magical Pathâ&#x20AC;? with Marc Allen. 2075 Occidental Rd, Santa Rosa 707.546.4543.

Malcolm Margolin Heyday publisher in conversation with Green Gulch founder Wendy Johnson. Jun 29, 6pm. $20-$100. Tobyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Feed Barn, 11250 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1223.

Â&#x2026;5POTPG'MBWPS Â&#x2026;5 POTPG'MBWPS Â&#x2026;4USFOHUIT3BOHJOHGSPNNH°NH Â&#x2026;4 USFOHUIT3BOHJOHGSPNNH°NH Â&#x2026;#FTU8BSSBOUZ4FSWJDFJOUIF#VTJOFTT Â&#x2026;# FTU8BSSBOUZ4 4FSWJDFJOUIF#VTJOFTT Â&#x2026;5XP(SFBU-PDBUJPOTUP4FSWF:PV Â&#x2026;5 XP(SFBU-PDBUJPOTUP4FSWF:PV &BTZJO &BTZJO P PVUBUUIFDPSOFSPG4BOUB3PTB"WF VUBUUIFDPSOFSPG4BOUB3PTB"WF 0BL4UKVTUOPSUIPG)XZPWFSQBTT 0 BL 4UKVTU OPSUI PG )X Z Z  PWF S Q B T T 3 3FEXPPE%S F E XP P E % S **O$PUBUJ SJHIUPGGUIFBU)XZ O $PUBUJ SJHIU PGG UIF  BU )X Z

0QFO-BUF&WFSZ%BZ 0 QFO -BUF &WFSZ%BZ

Santa Rosa Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books Jun 30, 1:30pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vacationâ&#x20AC;? with JC Miller. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Petaluma Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books Jun 27, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Huntedâ&#x20AC;? with Kevin Hearne. Jun 29, 1:30pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;C-Factorâ&#x20AC;? with David Ramirez. Jul 2, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Faraway Nearbyâ&#x20AC;? with Rebecca Solnit. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Sebastopol Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books

1FBDFQJQF 1FB DFQJQF

Jun 26, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Humboldt: Life on Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Marijuana Frontierâ&#x20AC;? with Emily Brady. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

-PDBUJPOT  - PDBUJPO T 4BOUB3PTB"WF 4BOUB3PTB  4B OUB3PTB"WF 4B OUB3PTB

    **OUIF#SJHIU#MVF#MEH OUIF# F SJHIU#MVF#MEH

Loveable Rogue Bookstore

(SBWFOTUFJO)XZ $PUBUJ (SBWFO TUFJO) X Z $PUBUJ

Jun 28, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;This Ainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t No Holiday Inn: Down and Out at the Chelsea Hotel 1980-1995â&#x20AC;? with James Lough. $5. 867 Grant Ave, Novato 415.895.1081.

        UIFQFBDFQJQFTNPLFTIPQDPN U I F QFB DFQJQF T NPLF T I PQ DPN

MMJLFVTPO J LF V T P O

Theater Broadway Under the Stars Professional stage actors from New York and Los Angeles perform pieces from Broadway favorites. Jun 28-30, Jul 5-6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fly Me to the Moon.â&#x20AC;? Fri-Sat, 5pm. $29-$117. Jack London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen. 707.938.5216.

Evita The story of Eva Peron, wife of the Argentine dictator, Juan Peron. Directed by John DeGaetano. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Jul 14. $25-$30. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

Exit the King Eugene Ionescoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s absurdist masterpiece starring Fred Curchack in the role of King Berenger. Thurs-Sat, 8pm. through Jun 29. $15-$25. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

The Lonesome West Two brothers in Ireland reconcile after their fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s death. Presented by Narrow Way Stage Company. Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Jun 30. $20-$28. Andrews Hall, Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

Scapino Saucy, slapstick comedy about a devious valet who helps two pairs of lovers overcome parental opposition. Thurs-Sun, 7:30pm. through Jul 13. $15$30. Redwood Amphitheatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross.

Singinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; in the Rain This 1920s-set romantic comedy is full of classic songs. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Jul 7. $15-$35. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Sylvia AR Gurney play about a dog, the couple who adopts her and the drama that results. Jun 29-30, 2pm. $20-$25. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

The BOHEMIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

BOHEMIAN

PLACE AN AD: Phone: 707.527.1200, Monday-Friday 8:30am-5:30pm Fax: 707.527.1288 | Email: sales@bohemian.com

Computer Market

Home Services

?8E;PA@D Â&#x2019;QO`^S\b`g^OW\bW\U Â&#x2019;aSWa[WQ`Sb`]TWb Â&#x2019;ab`cQbc`OZe]`Y Â&#x2019;abcQQ]Q]\Q`SbS Â&#x2019;UcbbS`QZSO\W\U Â&#x2019;`]]TW\U

1$Š

WJSVTSFNPWBM BEXBSFSFNPWBM TQZXBSFSFNPWBM EBUBSFDPWFSZ OFUXPSLJOTUBMMBUJPO CVJMEJOHDPNQVUFST FNBJMTFUVQ

4/@E3AB@3AB=@/B7=< 1=<AB@C1B7=<

$POUBDU /FJHICPSIPPE(FFL 3FQBJSTDPN

Business Opportunities Wine Country Massage â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Needs Sensual Female Massage Therapist Take over my established massage business â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Clean Studio â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Great Wine Country Location â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Nice Clientele. Call Gina â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 707.843.2550

%% &"&' 4O`ESab1]\ab`Q][



8W[9S\\SRg1 /:WQS\aS%&$&'

&g

Adult Services SPECIAL ADULT PROMOTION Full length XXX rated DVD FREE. Limit one per customer. Pay $1.00 processing fee. Visa/MasterCard only. Must be 21. 707.571.7601

g Adult Massage

A Wild Irish Rose Mature, Independent in Marin. Call for photos. Please call before 11pm. No calls from blocked phone #. Kara, 415.233.2769.

Alternative Health Well-Being

g Chiropractic

A Safe Place To Be Real

Holistic tantric masseuse/surrogate. Unhurried, private, heartfelt. Women â&#x20AC;&#x201D; first time visit, 50% discount. Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat. Please call after 10:30am. 707.793.2232.

Relax, Release, Rejuvenate

g

Massage for men. Muscular, professional, mature. Clean, warm studio in the country, shower available. 707.696.1578.

Healing & Bodywork

Massage & Relaxation

A Provider of Pleasure â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your pleasure, my business.â&#x20AC;? Women, men, couples,..by a gentleman. Since 1991. Aft/eve appts. 707.799.4467(C) or 707.535.0511 (L) Jimmy.

Full body massage, Body Electric experience. In/Out. Body shaving/trimming available. Bob 707.865.2093.

MASSAGE SPECIAL 50% off your first hour massage. Strong, Thorough, Intuitive 30 yrs. Experience Colin CMT 707.823.2990 www.colingodwin.blogspot.com

Relax! Relaxing massage and bodywork by male massage therapist with 13 yrs. experience. 707.542.6856.

Great Massage By Joe, CMT. Relaxing hot tub and pool available. Will do outcalls. 707.228.6883.

SPIRITUAL

Connections

Finding inspiration & connecting with your community

Unity of Santa Rosa An inclusive, spiritually-minded community. All are welcome. Workshops and events. Sunday School & Service 10:30am 4857 Old Redwood Hwy tel: 707.542.7729 www.UnityofSantaRosa.org

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of June 26

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) â&#x20AC;&#x153;To know when to stop is of the same importance as to know when to begin,â&#x20AC;? said the painter Paul Klee. Take that to heart, Aries! You are pretty adept at getting things launched, but youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got more to learn about the art of stopping. Sometimes you ďŹ nish prematurely. Other times you sort of disappear without ofďŹ cially bringing things to a close. Now would be an excellent time to reďŹ ne your skills. TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20) â&#x20AC;&#x153;The problem with quotes on the internet is that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to determine whether or not they are genuine.â&#x20AC;? So said Joan of Arc back in 1429, right before she helped lead French troops in the battle of Patay. JUST KIDDING! Joan of Arc never had the pleasure of surďŹ ng the web, of course, since it didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t exist until long after she died. But I was trying to make a point that will be useful for you to keep in mind, Taurus, which is: Be skeptical of both wild claims and mild claims. Stay alert for seemingly interesting leads that are really time-wasting half-truths. Be wary for unreliable gossip that would cause an unnecessary ruckus. GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) French impressionist painter Claude Monet loved to paint water lilies, and he did so over and over again for many years. Eventually he created about 250 canvases that portrayed these ďŹ&#x201A;oating ďŹ&#x201A;owers. Should we conclude that he repeated himself too much? Should we declare that he was boringly repetitive? Or might we wonder if he kept ďŹ nding new delights in his comfortable subject? Would we have enough patience to notice that each of the 250 paintings shows the water lilies in a different kind of light, depending on the weather and the season and the time of day? I vote for the latter view, and suggest that you adopt a similar approach to the familiar things in your life during the coming weeks. CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22)

VIVI

MASSAGE STUDIO FOOT REFLEXOLGY THERAPEUTIC BODY MASSAGE

707.981.7128

Russian River Massage

Astrology

620 E. Washington St. Suite 208, Petaluma

Full Body Sensual Massage With a mature, playful CMT. Comfortable incall location near the J.C. in Santa Rosa. Soothing, relaxing, and fun. Gretchen 707.478.3952. Veterans Discount.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;In order to swim one takes off all oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clothes,â&#x20AC;? said 19th-century Danish philosopher Soren Kierkegaard. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In order to aspire to the truth, one must undress in a far more inward sense, divest oneself of all oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inward clothes, of thoughts, conceptions, selďŹ shness, etc., before one is sufďŹ ciently naked.â&#x20AC;? Your assignment in the coming week, Cancerian, is to get au naturel like that. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time for you to make yourself available for as much of the raw, pure, wild truth as you can stand.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) Gertrude Stein was an innovative writer. Many illustrious artists were her friends. But she had an overly elevated conception of her own worth. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Think of the Bible and Homer,â&#x20AC;? she said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;think of Shakespeare and think of me.â&#x20AC;? On another occasion, she proclaimed, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Einstein was the creative philosophic mind of the century, and I have been the creative literary mind of the century.â&#x20AC;? Do you know anyone like Stein, Leo? Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the truth, in my opinion: To some degree, we are all like Stein. Every one of us has at least one inďŹ&#x201A;ated idea about ourselvesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a conceited self-conception that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t match reality. It was my turn to confront my egotistical delusions a few weeks ago. Now would be an excellent time for you to deal with yours. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be too hard on yourself, though. Just recognize the inďŹ&#x201A;ation, laugh about it, and move on. VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22) When I close my eyes, I get a psychic vision of you as a kid playing outside on a warm summer day. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re with friends, immersed in a game that commands your full attention. Suddenly, you hear a jingling tune wafting your way from a distance. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the ice cream truck. You stop what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing and run inside your home to beg your mom for some money. A few minutes later, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in a state of bliss, communing with your Fudgsicle or ice cream cone or strawberry-lime fruit bar. I have a feeling that you will soon experience an adult version of this scene, Virgo. Metaphorically speaking, either the ice cream man or the ice cream woman will be coming to your neighborhood. LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) During the past 10 months, you have been unusually adventurous. The last time you summoned so much courage and expansiveness may have been 2001. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m impressed! Please accept my respect and appreciation. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had

a sixth sense about knowing when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wise to push beyond your limitations and boundaries. You have also had a seventh sense about intuiting when to be crafty and cautious as you wander through the frontiers. Now hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of your assignments for the next 12 months: Distill all youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve learned out there in the borderlands and decide how you will use your wisdom to build an unshakable power spot back here in the heart of the action.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21)

Michael Faraday (1791â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1867) was one of the most inďŹ&#x201A;uential scientists in history. He produced major breakthroughs in both chemistry and physics. Have you ever used devices that run on electricity? You can thank him for playing a major role in developing that wonderful convenience. And yet unlike most scientists, he had only the most elementary grasp of mathematics. In fact, his formal education was negligible. I propose that we name him your role model of the week. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a striking example of the fact that you can arrive at your chosen goal by many different paths. Keep that in mind if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re ever tempted to believe that thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just one right way to fulďŹ ll your dreams.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) â&#x20AC;&#x153;The only thing that we learn from history,â&#x20AC;? said the German philosopher Georg Hegel, â&#x20AC;&#x153;is that we never learn anything from history.â&#x20AC;? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m urging you to refute that statement in the coming weeks, Sagittarius. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m pleading with you to search your memory for every possible clue that might help you be brilliant in dealing with your immediate future. What have you done in the past that you shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do now? What havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t you done in the past that you should do now? CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) According to my analysis of the astrological omens, now would be a pretty good time to talk about things that are hard to talk about. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily mean that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll ďŹ nd it easy to do. But I suspect it would be relatively free of pain and karmic repercussions. There may even be a touch of pleasure once the catharsis kicks in. So try it if you dare, Capricorn. Summon the courage to express truths that have previously been hard to pin down. Articulate feelings that have been murky or hidden. For best results, encourage those you trust to do the same. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18)

Are you familiar with quidditch? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a rough sport played by wizards in the ďŹ ctional world of Harry Potter. All seven books in the series mention it, so itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an important element. Author J. K. Rowling says she dreamed up the sport after having a quarrel with her boyfriend. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In my deepest, darkest soul,â&#x20AC;? she reports, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would quite like to see him hit by a bludger.â&#x20AC;? (In quidditch, a bludger is a big black ball made of iron.) I bring this up, Aquarius, because I suspect that you, too, are in position to use anger in a creative and constructive way. Take advantage of your raw emotion to make a lasting improvement in your life.

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

In his erotic poem â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your Sex,â&#x20AC;? Joe Bolton exults: â&#x20AC;&#x153;My heart simpliďŹ ed, I touch the bud of happinessâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in season. And whatever grief I might have felt before simply dies inside me.â&#x20AC;? You might want to write that down on a slip of paper and carry it around with you this week, Pisces. According to my understanding of the astrological omens, the bud of happiness is now in season for you. You have good reason to shed the undertones of sadness and fear you carry around with you. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll tell you the last lines of Boltonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s poem, because they also apply: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sometimes I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best just to take pleasure wherever we want and can. Look: the twilight is alive with wild honey.â&#x20AC;? (The full poem: tinyurl.com/JoeBolton.)

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

žš NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 26- JULY 2, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Classifieds

FREE WILL

SANTA ROSA TREATMENT PROGR AM

We’re here to help you help yourself.

Come celebrate bike culture with the community! Saturday, July 13th 11am–5:30pm – Community Bikes, Santa Rosa – 4009 Sebastopol Rd. – FREE

SUBUTEX/SUBOXONE available for Safe Oxy, Roxy, Norco, Vicodin, Other Opiate Withdrawal! Confidential Program. 707.576.1919

• Subutex/Suboxone available • Providing Treatment since 1984 • Confidentiality assured

1901 Cleveland Ave Suite B • Santa Rosa 707.576.0818 • www.srtp.net

Community Bikes Presents: The Bicycle Extravaganza

We provide treatment for: Heroin, Oxy, Roxy, Norco and other Opiates using Methadone.

• MediCal accepted

PSYCHIC PALM AND CARD READER Madame Lisa. Truly gifted adviser for all problems. 827 Santa Rosa Ave. One visit convinces you. Appt. 707.542.9898

HAPPY HOUR Daily 4:30-6:30pm Saturday June 29 Prince Tribute Band We’re proud to co-produce this show with Mystic Theatre

DONATE A CAR Free towing. Running or not. Tax deductible. Help the Polly Klaas Foundation 800.322.4234.

THE PURPLE XPERIENCE: THE WORLD’S PREMIER PRINCE TRIBUTE

B-12 Shots Happy Hour! – Thursdays 4–6 PM Only – $18 (30% off) WALK-INS ONLY. For energy, immune, fatigue, anxiety @ the Naturopathic Wellness Center @ the Integrative Medical Clinic of SR - Dr. Dana Michaels ND and Dr. Moses Goldberg ND — 175 Concourse Blvd. 707.284.9200

DR. FINK from PRINCE and THE REVOLUTION 8:30 doors/ $21 at Mystic Theatre Sunday June 30

SUNDAY SUPPER

with a live preformance by "America's Got Talent" Semi-Finalist

PEACE IN MEDICINE IS NOW OPEN IN SANTA ROSA

TIM HOCKENBERRY

1061 North Dutton Ave @ West College Ave. Santa Rosa CA 95401 — Great Prices! Visit our online menu at — www.PeaceinMedicine.org

6pm–9pm

132 KELLER ST, PETALUMA 707.238.0158 info@socialclubrestaurant.com

for calendar of events & information

SKIRT CHASER VINTAGE — BUY, SELL, TRADE

Napa Valley Museum

707.546.4021 208 Davis Street, RR Square, SR

Rodney Strong Summer Concert Series Live on the Green. Sat August 3 BWB: Rick Braun, Kirk Whalum & Norman Brown. Sun August 4 Dwight Yoakam. Box Office: 707.869.1595 rodneystrong.com

Jun 8–Jul 28, “Miles Davis,” sketches and oil paintings by jazz pioneer Miles Davis. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed–Mon, 10 to 5. 707.944.0500.

Russian River Jazz & Blues Festival

Sonoma-Cutrer Jazzy Summer Nights

Sept. 21 & 22 Tickets On Sale Now! russianriverfestivals.com Box Office: 707.869.1595

July 20, Alan Pasqua Trio—3 time Grammy Award Winning jazz pianist; August 17, Bill Champlin with Special Friends—2 time Grammy Award Winner. Information and Tickets: 707.237.3489 shop.sonomacutrer.com

Calabi Gallery Through Jul 13, “Intimate Enigmas,” abstract stone sculptures by Easton. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed–Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

A Bohemian approach to the web. The new Bohemian.com


NBB1326