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Bohemian

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Third-class postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2011 Metrosa Inc.

Cover design by Kara Brown.


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A MIRACLE FOR BREAKFAST

Waiting for coffee and the charitable beignets—like kings of old, or like modern Healdsburg gadabouts.

This photo was taken at the Parish Cafe in Healdsburg. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

nb

‘I will stand on the street corner with a tin cup when I know that the money will be used to restore library hours.’ FEATURE P17 Beavers, Beavers . . . in Glen Ellen? T H E PAP E R P 8

Summer Sippers, 7-Up Optional SW I R L P 15

Growing Up ‘Before Midnight’ F I LM P 2 3 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Dining p12 Wineries p14 Swirl p15

Cover Feature p17 Culture Crush p20 Arts & Ideas p21 Stage p22 Film p23

Music p24 Concerts & Clubs p25 A&E p27 Classified p31 Astrology p31

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies One by One

Restoring trust in politics with a grassroots resurgence BY STEPHEN GALE

T

his June, the 2014 election cycle officially began. Jim Wood announced his candidacy for Assembly District 2, and Jill Ravitch announced her bid for reelection as Sonoma County District Attorney. Now that next year’s primary is only a year away, who’s next? To this political observer, the resurgence of grassroots politics is the surprising news in this nonelection year. Since the slow-moving landslide last November, a staggering number of grassroots organizations have emerged, revitalized or been reborn. Citizens from all points on the political spectrum are interested again in issues and willing to engage. Say what you will, FOX News. Rank and file Democrats who worked the phones and walked precincts last year are making their mark, from city council chambers all the way to the halls of Congress, with renewed energy. If you listen closely, there is a note of hope in our community. At the Ravitch kick-off event, one city council member from a smaller city told me they had cheering from packed chambers in recent months. In Santa Rosa, the public has been engaged and excited by the level of respectful discourse from the dais as the council does the public’s business in public. The diversity of opinion coming forward from more than just “the usual suspects” is remarkable. The willingness of electeds to search for common ground rather than holding firmly to “ideological” or “special interest positions” is a hallmark of this nonelection year. Something is happening here, and you know what it is. Step forward and speak your mind. Join your homeowners association; speak up for the neighborhood. Join your local rotary or other service organization. Join one of the eight Democratic clubs in the county and talk about issues where you want to take a stand. Join one of the many focused organizations like Conservation Action, Jobs with Justice or the North Bay Organizing Project. Join one of the alphabet-soup-of-advocacy political action committees born from past presidential campaigns: OFA, from the Obama election; DFA, reborn from the Dean Campaign; or PDA, inspired by the Kucinich campaign. Volunteer for a board or commission. There is one way to restore trust to our politics—and this resurgence of grassroots involvement is where that path begins. Stephen Gale is Chair of the Sonoma County Democratic Party. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Tip Away!

I absolutely believe that tipping your wine host or hostess is appropriate (“Tipsy Turvy,” June 12). Having worked in the industry, I know that the hardworking folks with smiles, knowledge and a bottle in their hand are doing everything to get you as excited about the wines as they are— for $12 an hour. One would be foolish to not recognize that an average Denny’s employee is likely bringing in more income (not to denigrate Denny’s employees, by any means). If a wine steward gets you feeling the rush of history, fruit and the passion going into a wine that demands you have some for yourself, reciprocation is in order. No question.

WENDI CHERIE SCRUGGS Via online

Recent Gallup, CBS and FOX polls show 40 percent of Americans are comfortable with this revelation of extensive surveillance on law-abiding citizens. When their friends and acquaintances are arrested, indicted and imprisoned for assumed terrorist ideas based on accumulated data from their lives, maybe they will wake up.

Remember that prescient saying attributed to German pastor and theologian Martin Niemöller (1892– 1984): “When the Nazis came for the communists, I remained silent; I was not a communist. When they locked up the social democrats, I remained silent; I was not a social democrat. When they came for the trade unionists, I did not speak out; I was not a trade unionist. When they came for the Jews, I remained silent; I wasn’t a Jew. When they came for me, there was no one left to speak out.”

TERRA FREEDMAN, PEACE & JUSTICE CENTER OF SONOMA COUNTY Santa Rosa

Standing with Snowden I stand with Edward Snowden. And I stand with Bradley Manning, WikiLeaks, Daniel Ellsberg, John Kiriakou, Thomas Drake, Chris Pyle and all those whose moral conscience will not rest until they expose the illegalities and immoralities they have witnessed. Thank you, Bohemian, for so promptly publishing Norman Solomon and Tom Tomorrow’s important commentaries on this latest outrage. Wake up, America! Everyone’s calls and letters are of utmost importance now. Protest loudly and encourage each other to reject this latest revelation of the U.S. government’s atrocious scandal. If we do not stand with Edward Snowden now (and the others), then we are agreeing to the new rules of the game, where We the People freely give away our (constitutional) rights for the sake of . . . what? Security from terror? Lucrative profits for the weapons/surveillance/ prison complex?

Eartags Anonymous I was excited—and oh so hopeful—as I read the caption to the “Cows-ABlanca” photo (Table of Contents, May 15) and actually thought it was heading toward something like this: “Maybe not today, maybe not tomorrow, but soon, and for the rest of your life: we’ll never have cows wearing eartags that reduce them to a number, replacing their sentience, to numb our awareness of murdering living, breathing beings for a plate of food . . .” but—oops—I misread. Silly me.

MIRIAM WALD Santa Rosa

No Apologies As celebrities like Tom Cruise and Hugh Jackman celebrated Walmart at its annual meeting, workers and activists converged to demand sweeping changes


THIS MODERN WORLD

By Tom Tomorrow

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at the company’s U.S. stores and global factories. Around a hundred striking workers with the group OUR Walmart arrived in a caravan from across the country to protest what they allege to be retaliation against those seeking to change company practices on wages, safety and unions. Walmart is one of only a few major retailers that has refused to sign on to the new safety standards after the latest Dhaka tragedy. The Tazreen Fashion ďŹ re in 2012 killed 117 workers and left hundreds injured, and the recent building collapse in Rana Plaza killed 1,127 and left more than 600 or 700 injured. And at that shareholder meeting, no one gave any condolence to those families.

TED RUDOW III Palo Alto

Top Five 1 Snowden: “Being called a

traitor by Dick Cheney is the highest honor�

2

Crazy ďŹ re-spinning at the Arlene Francis Center parking lot on Monday nights

3

World’s ďŹ nal telegram to be sent July 14 somewhere in India STOP

4

Longtime Santa Rosa family doctor F. Scott Chilcott to retire—best of luck, ol’ pal

5 That insane video of the backwards-driving car in downtown San Rafael

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

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Rants

Fine Dining For Wild Birds


THE

Paper

Speaking Up

Cheryl Reynolds - Worth a Dam

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Jesus Guzman, chair of the North Bay Organizing Project’s immigration task force, has just flown back from a busy week in Washington, D.C. There in connection with the opening debates on the bipartisan immigration reform bill that would overhaul U.S. immigration laws, Guzman’s week included leadership trainings, a direct action outside of Speaker of the House John Boehner’s office, meetings with pepresentatives Jared Huffman and Mike Thompson and a press event with President Obama. Attendees were told they’d be able to ask questions at the event, says Guzman, but it turned out to be much more scripted than expected. In fact, President Obama basically repeated a performance from his Las Vegas appearance last January, he says. The president discussed border enforcement, brought out a DREAMer (shorthand for those brought to the U.S. as children but who have not been granted legal citizenship) and pushed for the pathway to citizenship.

A HARDY TAIL Popular beavers in Martinez set a game-changing precedent for a new family of dam-builders in Glen Ellen.

Beaver Fever In Glen Ellen, a colony of beavers arrives—and this time, they’re a little more welcome BY JAMES KNIGHT

I

n the mid-1990s, a family of beavers found their way up Sonoma Creek and settled in Glen Ellen. Although they were the first beavers that had been seen here since the animals were extirpated decades earlier, they got the same welcome that is traditionally offered to beavers: they were trapped and killed.

But recently, dams have again been observed in Sonoma Creek, and evidence suggests that some intrepid beavers have jumped watersheds and are headed toward the Laguna de Santa Rosa. The beavers are back, and this time, they just might get a fair chance. “Back in the ’90s,” says Brock Dolman, Watershed Advocacy, Training, Education and Research Institute director at the Occidental Arts and Ecology Center, “there

was no functional recognition that beavers were anything but a pain in the neck.” The Glen Ellen beavers became a pain in the neck when they felled 50 grapevines— Merlot, but still—with their famously effective incisors. The few people who protested the action could do little but complain after Fish and Game issued a routine depredation permit and the deed was done. To the beavers’ ) 10 disadvantage, they’re

Obama did not address a major concern of immigration-rights activists—the 400,000-person yearly deportation quota. “It’s problematic and hypocritical to continue to deport future citizens that would benefit from that future citizenship pathway,” Guzman says, “and to continue to deport people at a record rate.” After 150 leaders from the Gamaliel Network, a grassroots coalition of faith-based and community organizations, held vigil outside Boehner’s office, they did manage to get a meeting with his chief of staff. A face-toface with the speaker, where the group will ask him to support the adoption of the Senate’s immigration bill, is next on the agenda. Meetings with the SEIU, AFL-CIO and CWA were fruitful, says Guzman. “Labor has a very important role in immigration reform,” he adds.—Leilani Clark

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.


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listed as an exotic, nuisance animal only because of a brief period from the 1920s to the 1940s when the state “planted” beavers from Oregon and Idaho. But historical accounts from ship captains, explorers and General Mariano Vallejo tell of an abundance of beavers in North Bay waterways, and of heaps of beaver pelts shipped out during the California fur rush prior to 1849. Then in 2006, a mating pair wandered out of the Delta and constructed a dam on Alhambra Creek in the middle of Martinez. “You could sit at Starbucks and watch the kits play,” says resident Heidi Perryman. The city council, worried about flooding, first considered the quiet, businessas-usual approach. But with so many people watching and protesting, the beavers got a stay. Perryman formed the nationwide advocacy group Worth a Dam, to help people navigate similar situations. (Her next talk on the issue is Thursday, July 11, at San Francisco’s Randall Museum.) The solution in Martinez was simple. A flow device was installed that keeps the pond at a manageable level, while concealing the sound of flowing water. “The thing about beavers,” says Dolman, “is they’re a big rodent. They are nature’s great engineers—but they’re not that bright.” In one experiment, a boom box was placed near a dam, playing a loop of running water. Sure enough, beavers soon appeared and began piling mud and sticks on it. In Martinez, it isn’t just about beavers anymore. When the pond filled with fish, river otters returned to the area. Mink also turned up, along with a host of waterfowl and songbirds. That kind of result could improve habitat for the North Coast’s federally endangered coho salmon, says Dolman. “Having grown up in Idaho and back East, I loved to fish in beaver ponds because there were a lot of fish in there. So I got to thinking: Why aren’t we talking about beavers?” While state agencies

and landowners are trying to slow down stream flow and erosion with costly projects, “beavers can do it better, faster and way cheaper.” Dolman’s organization was invited to contribute beaver language to the 2012 Coho Recovery Plan.

As for costly erosion control, ‘beavers can do it better, faster and way cheaper.’ If beavers pop out of the creek into another vineyard, it may not play out the same as last time. In Siskiyou County, Dolman says, the Department of Water Resources had requested a trapping permit almost annually for 30 years, because beaver activity interfered with a data collection point. “Two years ago, they were doing the same thing, and the biologist said, ‘Wait a minute, we’ve got to talk about this.’ They had a community meeting, created a beaver technical group, and for the first time the DWR didn’t get that permit.” Beavers can be excluded from an area easily, according to Perryman, with a half-foot high, solar-powered electric fence. At Glen Ellen’s Hunter Farms, vineyard manager Chris Bowen says that trapping is something he “certainly would not be party to again. We decided that beavers aren’t great climbers, so we just improved the bottom of our fence that already existed.” It’s worked so far, Bowen says. If beavers can provide some of the environmental services that we need anyway, Dolman suggests, we ought to allow them to. “And they’re doing it for free. In these economically restrained times, why wouldn’t we think of partnering with them, if it’s benefiting us overall?”


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Dining Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y Belly Californian. $$. When he’s not serving up crispy pork belly or healthy quinoa salads, owner/chef Gray Rollin tours with rock bands like Linkin Park as a personal chef. Lunch and dinner daily. 523 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.526.5787

Casino Bar & Grill California. $. Chef Mark Malicki is a true Sonoma County star, serving up a changing menu of locally sourced, inspired creations. Unpretentious, creative and affordable, Casino is a whispered-about landmark among locals in the know. Dinner nightly. 17000 Bodega Hwy, Bodega. 707.876.3185.

Farmhouse Inn & Restaurant CaliforniaFrench. $$$$. A splurgeworthy, romantic inn with an extensive wine list and highly polished service. Dinner, ThursMon. 7871 River Rd, Forestville. 707.887.3300.

Hang Ah Dim Sum Chinese-dim sum. $. Low prices and good variety make it pleasing. Buffet-style quality and greasiness can be a letdown. Lunch and dinner daily. 2130 Armory Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7873.

La Gare French. $$$. Dine in an elegant atmosphere of Old World charm. Dinner, Wed-Sun 208 Wilson St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.4355. Mai Vietnamese Cuisine Vietnamese. $. Fresh and authentic, with a warm and breezy atmosphere. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 8492 Gravenstein Hwy (in Apple Valley Plaza), Cotati. 707.665.9628.

Phyllis’ Giant Burgers American. $. Come with a hearty appetite for an oldfashioned patty. Lunch and

dinner daily. Four locations: 4910 Sonoma Hwy, Ste B, Santa Rosa. 707.538.4000. 1774 Piner Road #B, Santa Rosa. 707.521.0890. 924 Diablo Ave, Novato. 415.898.8294. 2202 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.456.0866.

Rosso Pizzeria & Wine Bar Pizza. $-$$. Friendly, plentiful staff at outstanding and creative pizzeria. Excellent and affordable wine list. Lunch and dinner daily. Creekside Center, 53 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.544.3221.

Thai Pot Thai. $$. A local favorite for authentic Thai recipes with pad Thai, curries, exotic appetizers and entrées. Lunch and dinner daily. 2478 W Third St, Santa Rosa. 707.575.9296. 6961 Sebastopol Ave (across from West America Bank), Sebastopol. 707.829.8889.

Viva Cocolat Dessert. $. After dinner in downtown Petaluma, stopping at this quaint chocolate shop is very nearly required. Open late on weekends; closed Wednesdays. 110 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. 707.778.9888.

MARIN CO U N T Y Cafe Reyes Pizza. $$. At the end of the main drag in West Marin’s quintessential small town sits a wood-fired oven serving piping pizzas of perfection. Beer and oysters can be had as well. Lunch and dinner, Wed–Sun. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.9493. Fish Seafood. $$-$$$. Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner daily. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Brewpub. $$. Pub grub gets a pub-cuisine facelift. Lunch, Wed-Sun; dinner daily. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Marin Brewing Co Pub food. $-$$. Excellent soups, salads, pub grub and awardwinning pork-beer sausage. Lunch and dinner daily. 1809 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.4677. Pier 15 American. $$. Fun, tucked-away old-fashioned spot overlooking hidden harbor. Great place for breakfast at a bar, too. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, SatSun. 15 Harbor St, San Rafael. 415.256.9121. Robata Grill & Sushi Japanese. $$. Mmm. With thick slices of fresh sashimi, Robata knows how to do it. The rolls are big winners. Lunch, MonFri; dinner daily. 591 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.381.8400.

Salito’s Crab House Seafood . $$$. Waterfront setting with extensive marine menu plus steak and other American staples. Lunch and dinner daily. 1200 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.331.3226.

Station House Cafe American-California. $$. Innovative menu, fresh local seafood and range-fed meats. Outdoor dining; full bar. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Thurs-Mon. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1515.

Tommy’s Wok Chinese. $-$$. Tasty and filling Chinese fare without the greasy weigh-down. Nice vegetarian selections, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun; closed Tues. 3001 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.5818.

N A PA CO U N T Y Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. Angèle Restaurant & Bar French. $$$. Thoroughly French, but not aggressively so. Lunch and dinner daily. 540 Main St, Napa. 707.252.8115.

BarBersQ Barbecue/


Boonfly Cafe California cuisine. $-$$. Extraordinary food in an extraordinary setting. Perfect pasta and mussels. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 4080 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.299.4900.

Busterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Barbecue Barbecue. $. A very busy roadside destinationâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;for a reason. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the hot sauce, available in two heats: regular and hot. And the hot, as the sign says, means â&#x20AC;&#x153;hot!â&#x20AC;? Lunch and dinner daily. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5606.

Cindy Pawlycynâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wood Grill & Wine Bar American. $$-$$$. Classic American fare that stays up on current mainstays like crispy pork belly, braised short ribs and crab roll but doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t skimp on the burger. Long wine list, kids menu, patio and more. Lunch and dinner, WedSun. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700.

Coleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chop House American steakhouse. $$$$$. Handsome, upscale 1950s-era steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dryaged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a â&#x20AC;&#x153;nostalgiaâ&#x20AC;? cocktail. Dinner daily. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.224.6328.

13

SMALL BITES

The Courtyard Spa

Cheese for Breakfast Yeah, I took a trip to Europe once, after college, looking to see the world. We ate cheese for breakfast, cream sauce with dinner and croissants with every meal, made with more butter than I care to fathom. Upon returning to the States, my first life change was having cheese for breakfast every morning for the next week. Though it quickly became obvious why that would not become habit, as luck would have it, a local company made the perfect cheese for this experiment. Rouge & Noir, from Marin, had an eightounce package of â&#x20AC;&#x153;breakfast cheese,â&#x20AC;? which tasted like a mild camembert. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exactly what had been starting my days in France, and it turned out to be a perfect complement to half a baguette before lunch in Sonoma County. Had it been allowed to age an extra month, it would have been impossible to tell that it was made outside of France. Well, as much as things stay the same, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re bound to change. The flavor known as Rouge et Noir, the French cheese made in Marin County, is now changing its name to Marin French Cheese. Considering the authenticity of the taste, the new name is moreâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;how does one say?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;appropriĂŠ. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Nicolas Grizzle

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FumĂŠ Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Gilwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1320 Napa Town Center, Napa. 707.253.0409. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

Gottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

La Toque Restaurant

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $.

French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner daily. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch and dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Miguelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s MexicanCalifornian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast,lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nina, just a note of signiďŹ cant appreciation for your leadership, thoughtfulness and terriďŹ c client serviceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;quite unusual. The value added you and your colleagues have provided is very substantial, and, as I said, greatly appreciated.â&#x20AC;? Â&#x2030;$IBSMFT'(SFFOF &YFDVUJWF%JSFDUPS 5IF$FEBSTPG.BSJO 0OQBQFS IFBMUIDBSFJTEFTDSJCFEVTJOHUFSNTMJLFDPQBZT  EFEVDUJCMFT OFUXPSLT BOEBENJOJTUSBUPST"U'JMJDF XF VOEFSTUBOEZPVSCFOFĂśUTQSPHSBNNFBOTNPSFUPZPVS FNQMPZFFTBOEUIBUUIFCFOFĂśUTUIFZSFDFJWFJNQBDUUIFJSMJWFT FWFSZEBZÂ&#x2030;IFBEUPUPF CPEZBOENJOE

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California. $-$$. An upscale â&#x20AC;&#x2122;cue joint with a high-end chef and high-end ingredients. Gorgeous chipotle-braised short ribs and pulled pork. Lunch and dinner daily. 3900-D Bel Aire Plaza, Napa. 707.224.6600.


Wineries

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14

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;WCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N TY Bartholomew Park Winery A scenic locale for something that sounds like it belongs in a Henry James novel. Sauvignon Blanc and Cab are kings here. 1000 Vineyard Lane, Sonoma. Open daily, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4:30pm. 707.935.9511.

Gary Farrell The namesake is gone but the quality remains. Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. 10701 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4pm. 707.473.2900.

Hop Kiln Winery Both pleasant and rural, Hop Kiln has an extremely popular crisp white wine (Thousand Flowers) which sells out every year. The grounds are gorgeous, right on the Russian River. 6050 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm. 707.433.6491.

Michel-Schlumberger

Savory Lunch Menu Aromatic Loose Teas

Highly recommended, but by appointment only. The family has been making wine in France for 400 years. Wellknown for Chardonnay. 4155 Wine Creek Road, Healdsburg. 707.433.7427.

Tudor Rose English Tea Room

Robert Rue Vineyard

Traditional English Tea Room with a Slice of Silliness Reservations Recommended Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sunday, 11â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6

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A new wave of Zin specialists helped keep small, old vineyards like this in production. Now, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re making their own; refreshing Sauvignon Blanc, too. 1406 Wood Road, Fulton. Friday to Sunday, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm, or by appointment. Tastings $5. 707.578.1601.

Sapphire Hill Sharing a property with such as Camilla Cellars and other boutique wineries on a compound they simply call â&#x20AC;&#x153;Front Street 5,â&#x20AC;? production is mainly reds, with the exception of an estate Chardonnay. 51 Front St., Healdsburg. Open Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Monday, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4:30pm. 707.431.1888. Timber Crest Farms

887-3344 U corks116.com

Animal labels abound at Peterson Wineryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s expanded tasting room adjacent the

cellar. Is that a Jackalope, or is that just the Dry Creek Valley Zinfandel? Also on hand is Papapietro-Perry and the six Family Wineries of Dry Creek. Dashe Cellars crafts mainly powerful Zinfandels and other reds. At Kokomo Winery, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about the reds. Also look for Mietz Cellars, Lago di Merlo and Collier Falls. 4791 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Tasting rooms generally open daily from around 11am to 4:30pm. 707.433.0100. 707.431.7568.

Viansa Winery Large and filled with crosspromotional products, a deli and a pseudo-Italian marketplace. 25200 Arnold Drive, Sonoma. Open daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm. 707.935.4700.

Wilson Winery Scenic setting and rustic-modern tasting room makes for an atmospheric, recommended visit. Single-vineyard Zinfandels, Cabernet Sauvignons, Cabernet Franc, Syrah and Petite Sirah win awards for good reasonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; namely, even curmudgeons take one sip and turn into believers. 1960 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am to 5pm. Tastings are $5; $10 for reserves. 707.433.4355.

N A PA CO U N TY Beaulieu Vineyard History in a glassful of dustâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Rutherford dust. Somethingfor-everyone smorgasbord of solid varietal wines, plus library selections of flagship Georges de Latour Cab back to 1970. 1960 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm. Tastings $15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$20; Reserve Room, $35. 707.967.5233.

Del Dotto Vineyards (WC) Caves lined with Italian marble and ancient tiles, not to mention Venetian chandeliers and mosaic marble floors. They host candle-lit tastings, replete with cheese and chocolate, Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sunday. Opera resonates until 4pm; rock rules after 4pm. 1055 Atlas Peak

Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.963.2134.

On the Edge A key stop for devotees of the cult to Charbono. 1255 Lincoln Ave., Calistoga. Open daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5:30pm. 707.942.7410.

Summers Estate Wines Excellent Merlot and that rarest of beasts, Charbono. Small tasting room and friendly staff. 1171 Tubbs Lane, Calistoga. Open daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4:30pm. 707.942.5508.

Trefethen Winery Some critics claim Trefethenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heyday was in the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;60s, but the winery proves them wrong with dependable, delicious wines. Trefethen is one of the oldest wineries in Napa. 1160 Oak Knoll Ave., Napa. Open daily, 11:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4:30pm. 707.255.7700.

Uncorked at Oxbow Across from the Public Market, this remodeled house in Napaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historic â&#x20AC;&#x153;Little Italyâ&#x20AC;? is a casual and unaffected joint. Ahnfeldt and Carducci wines include estate Merlot, Syrah, Cab, vinted by Paul Hobbs. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ask about the horse. 605 First St., Napa. Open daily, noonâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;8pm; winter hours vary. Tasting fee, $10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$20. 707.927.5864.

V. Sattui Though a regular stop on the tourist circuit, it remains charming in the Italian style. With no distribution except via the Net, wines can only be purchased onsite. 1111 White Lane, St. Helena. Open daily, 9amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm. 707.963.7774.

Vincent Arroyo Winery Small, tasting room is essentially a barn with a table near some barrels, but very friendly, with good wines. 2361 Greenwood Ave., Calistoga. Open daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4:30pm. 707.942.6995.

The Wine Garage Defunct filling station with a mandate: No wines over $25. Well chosen from Napa Valley and beyond, plus half-gallon house jugs for $29.99. 1020-C Foothill Blvd., Calistoga. Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Saturday 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:30pm; Sunday to 4:30pm. Tasting fee $5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$10. 707.942.5332.


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Quencher Quibbling Which wine pairs with your gender, and other summer tips BY JAMES KNIGHT

I

n the heat of summer, choosing an optimal crisp white requires a cool head. Does a screw cap mean the wine’s cheap? Why does Pinot Gris cost more than Pinot Grigio? Concerning wine coolers, does the wine matter? In an almost totally random assortment of wines, I recently found some answers—more questions, too. Tasted non-blind. Method of wine cooler: 75ml each wine and 7-Up, two ice cubes.

Angeline 2012 Russian River Valley Sauvignon Blanc ($15) A promising value, appellation-wise. Melon rind, sour acidity not so much refreshing as hot. OK with 7-Up. +++ Francis Ford Coppola 2012 ‘Director’s Cut’ Alexander Valley Sauvignon Blanc ($21) Brisk aroma of lime rind and jasmine, and a sweet-spot, cool, balanced palate, like a good margarita. Zesty flavors of lime and melon. Nice with 7. ++++ Pedroncelli 2012 ‘East Side’ Dry Creek Valley Sauvignon Blanc ($14) Slight aroma of camphor might help keep bugs away. Crisp and dry, with oil of rosemary defining the palate. Exceptional with 7-Up. Muddle in some fresh mint, and you’ve got a low-alcohol mojito. +++ La Crema 2012 Monterey Pinot Gris ($20) What you often get with a Gris is a different style, aged in older barrels to give it texture, without overt oakiness. For their first-ever Gris, Noir et Chard standby La Crema skipped that and went all stainless, keeping the higher price point. I call foul, but still, with powdery pear cotlet aroma and a soft palate, it’s a nice wine. All but lost in 7-Up. ++++ Fat Cat 2011 Pinot Grigio ($8 approximately; suggested retail price not available) Smells interesting, Muscat and white raisin, but ends up the flavor of nondescript white wine. Try with 7-Up. ++ Flipflop 2011 Chardonnay ($7 approx.) Smart, screw-cap, gendered design. You can learn a lot from the label: that it’s medium dry, pairs with chicken caesar salad, should be stored away from direct sunlight, and proceeds benefit the shoeless. Oaky, buttery Chard in there somewhere—as if the blend was two barrels Rombauer, one tanker Thompson seedless. No on 7-Up. ++ Pepperwood Grove NV Chardonnay ($5 approx.) “Green” package, with “Zork” cork alternative. Exotic, oxidized, golden raisin, honeydrizzled apple. From a funky organic outfit, this I would expect, but weird coming from a major supermarket brand. Still weird in 7-Up. ++ Wild Hare NV Chardonnay ($5 approx.) Fun label from Rabbit Ridge, formerly of Healdsburg before they got a wild hair up theirs. Rather in the woody, buttery style, with a genuine pressed cork. Why, cheap wine with corks? Perhaps manufacturers are leery of die-hard consumer associations of “cheap wine” and screw caps. Oh, bitter palate of irony. It’s 2013, nearly all the best Pinots of Middle Earth (i.e., New Zealand) are screw-capped, and everyone’s just fine with it. Even the Elves. Ixnay Up-7-ay. +++

Best Of Winner Awards, Plaques and Window Decals are ready for you to display! AWARDS Go online to www.bohemian.com, click on Best of 2013 and then the awards link, find your award and print!

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NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | JUNE 1 9 -25, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

ųŸ

ANNOUNCING THE 2013 NORTH BAY MUSIC AWARDS AND 24-HOUR BAND CONTEST! SATURDAY, JULY 13 AT THE ARLENE FRANCIS CENTER IN SANTA ROSA!

Live music will be provided by bands assembled totally at random just 24 hours before in the…

24-HOUR BAND CONTEST. Musicians, here’s your chance to take part in a totally creative experiment. Here’s how it works: you sign up for the 24-Hour Band Contest at www.bohemian.com. You tell us your name and what instrument you play. On Friday, we’ll meet and pick names at random, assembling bands made up of complete strangers. The bands will then have 24 hours to write two original songs and learn one cover song, and return to perform the next night at the NorBays! Are you in? Of course you’re in. Sign up at www.bohemian.com.

Voting is now live for the 2013 NorBays! Vote for your favorite bands in nine different categories at www.bohemian.com. Preliminary voting will be live through June 19, when winners will advance to the final voting round on June 20. 24-HOUR BAND PERFORMANCES! WINNERS ANNOUNCED! GOLD RECORDS AWARDED! BEER AND WINE! FUNK AND SOUL 45S! LOCAL ARTISTS! GET YOUR PHOTO TAKEN! A GREY CAT IMPERSONATING MEL TORME! IT’S ALL HAPPENING AT THE 2013 NORBAYS! Saturday, July 13, at the Arlene Francis Center. 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa. 8pm. $5. All Ages!


Emergency funding has been found for roads, law enforcement and local power, but has been flatly refused for the library.

LONG OVERDUE Sonoma County’s libraries will remain closed on Mondays and evenings for the third year in a row. Why hasn’t anybody stepped up to restore hours? Nadav Soroker

BY JONATHAN GREENBERG

“I have such fond memories,” Finley says, recalling that the children’s librarian “taught me how to write my name before I entered school so that I could get a library card.” Even though the United States was in the midst of the Great Depression, Finley recalls, Santa Rosa kept its libraries open on Mondays—and it did so for 80 more years. But since Aug. 1, 2011, Sonoma County’s 200,000 library cardholders have been deprived of the use of 11 local libraries on Mondays and evenings. A 25 percent cutback in hours, first instituted to save just $310,000, has left long lines at libraries—where programs, computer use and circulation has steadily risen in Sonoma County for the past decade. Children, parents, seniors and those too poor to afford computers have been hit hardest by this failure to keep the doors open on Mondays for the first time in the public library’s 108-year history. And the end of the county’s library funding crisis is nowhere in sight. Last week, the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors voted to approve a robust $1.3 billion budget in record time. The county’s probation department, with a budget four times as large as the library’s, received a $2.7 million boost. Despite a continual drop in violent crime, the sheriff ’s department’s increase was $9 million, including a lastminute addition from the county’s contingency fund of $240,000 to retain a federal marijuanaeradication officer. Estimates of how much it would cost to restore library hours range wildly, from about $500,000 to reopen with extra staff to an unspecified number in excess of $2 million—a figure the library’s director Sandra Cooper insists it would take to “adequately” fund those days and restore staffing levels during ) 18 other hours.

17 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 1 9 -25, 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

D

r. Carmen Finley, a retired research scientist and genealogist, still remembers the “Juvenile Hall” of the Santa Rosa public library. During the 1930s, her mother worked at a shop near the library, dropping her off every day before work.

DOG-EARED


NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | JUNE 1 9 -25, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Yet appeals to county supervisors to direct emergency funding for restoring library hours have fallen upon deaf ears. As a result, for at least one more year, and possibly far longer, Sonoma County libraries will remain closed on Mondays and evenings. The story of how Sonoma County, the 12th wealthiest of California’s 58 counties, cannot remedy an unprecedented cutback in library hours offers a timely lesson about much of what is wrong with modern government.

A Funding Shortfall As per a 1975 joint powers agreement (JPA) between the county and its major cities, Sonoma County libraries are funded by a dedicated fraction of a percent of property taxes. The JPA agreement establishes an independent county library agency; seven unpaid library commissioners have the power to manage the budget, draw from reserves accumulated during flush years and, at least on paper, oversee the library director. The existing JPA also assures that the library will provide the same baseline of services, including hours, as existed in 1975, when the main libraries consolidated into the agreement stayed open at least 52 hours a week. The JPA provides the county with the authority to “annually levy” taxes to sustain the libraries, the ability to augment library budgets, and nominal oversight to make sure funds do not disappear. In 1975, nobody foresaw Proposition 13 limiting property tax increases, or the multibilliondollar drop in assessments that hit Sonoma County between 2007 and 2010. In April 2010, after receiving notice that its annual budget would fall from about $16.5 million to $15.9 million, the library revealed its plan to decrease hours to make up the shortfall. Public reaction was immediate. Within weeks, Sebastopol mayor Guy Wilson wrote to library director Sandra Cooper, urging the commission to not cut hours, but that

if it did, to allow the local Friends of the Library group to raise dedicated funds for keeping the local branch open. Meanwhile, Dena Bliss and a small group of supporters formed Save Our Libraries Sonoma County (SOCOSOL) and began circulating a petition urging the commission to retain library hours. Thousands signed it. They were ignored. The commission decided not to tap any of the $2 million in the “rainy day” fund or delay the hundreds of thousands being spent on new self-serve checkout terminals, and instead cut hours. The closures, which began Aug. 1, 2011, resulted in a savings of $310,000 per year in part-time salaries, as well as about $100,000 a year from reduced janitorial and energy usage. “Being forced to reduce hours is a symptom of a much bigger problem,” explains Cooper. That problem, Cooper argues, becomes evident when Sonoma County’s library operating income per capita of $28.91 (for fiscal year 2010–2011) is compared with operating income per capita for Alameda, Marin, Napa, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano and San Mateo counties. They average well over $50 in spending per capita, with a minimum of $42. Their staffing levels are at least 50 percent higher. In Marin and Napa counties, libraries enjoy more than double the staffing rate per resident as Sonoma County.

Monty Python’s Library Commission Circus The meeting at which the commission voted to cut library hours was attended by many members of the public, who suggested ideas for raising money and avoiding the closings. “None of this was ever talked about by the commissioners,” SOCOSOL’s Bliss recalls. “And since that time, they have been unwilling to engage in a process to bring back the hours.” Of particular concern to the commission’s critics was a decision made at the same June 20 meeting to spend a whopping $500,000 on a temporary relocation of the city of Sonoma’s library so that it could be upgraded with state

Courtesy Sonoma County Library History Annex

18 Library Hours ( 17

‘IT’S THE RECESSION’ Is it? Even during the Great Depression, children like

Carmen Finley, above, had daily access to the library.

redevelopment funds. The commission selected the social hall of the First Congregational Church—where Sonoma’s library commissioner Mary Evelyn Arnold was an officer—as the best site for the temporary library. It paid the church the equivalent of $14,100 per month for eight months’ rent, as well as about $400,000 for improvements, many of them permanent, to upgrade the church space. In contrast, later that year, when Sebastopol’s larger library needed a temporary home for its four-monthlong renovation, the commission was able to move services to Sebastopol’s Community Center— at a cost of just $10,000. “It should not cost $500,000 for a temporary library in Sonoma and just $10,000 in Sebastopol,” observes Bliss. “This is when I went crazy.” Arnold, in response to questions about the cost of the move, noted that she recused herself from the vote to approve the funding for the move to her church. (To this day, Cooper defends the expense, noting that “we probably spent less than we would have on other available spaces.”) Arnold also recently announced that restoring hours was not even on her “top 10” list of spending priorities. “The library has many pressing needs,” including increased staffing, technology, pension liabilities and materials, she

explains to the Bohemian. “I believe most communities, including Sonoma Valley, have made their peace with Monday closures. It is not a top priority of mine.” Tim May, the current chair of the library commission, explains in an email that he was “seriously ill” during the time of the June 20 hearing. He says that although it would have been legal to use the rainy-day funds to retain hours countywide instead of spending them on Sonoma’s temporary library, it would have been a bad idea; capital costs are one-time, he argues, while operating savings from hours recur annually. Dena Bliss disagrees, echoing commission criticism from county supervisors and, one year ago, a Sonoma County grand jury. The grand jury report found Cooper an “unresponsive” leader, noting that she made arbitrary decisions and even edited the minutes of public testimony at commission meetings to tone down criticism. Cooper defended her actions in a point-by-point rebuttal months later, and survived calls for her resignation from a position that pays $150,000 annually, plus $40,000 in benefits. The library commission’s recent budget discussion revealed just how dysfunctional and inactive a government agency can be. One baffled commissioner asked the group, “What has to happen before we can schedule a strategic plan?”


Supervisors Pass the Buck

JPA and observes, “It sounds like the board of supervisors does have a direct responsibility to see that the library is adequately funded.”

The Saga Continues According to county budget experts, although property tax revenues for the library are expected to rise in the coming year, they will be offset by a reduction of state library dollars that have entirely dried up. The news will get worse when new accounting rules make it necessary to add huge sums to library expenses to account for future pension and healthcare costs. Cooper also believes the staff is being overburdened by increased usage during reduced hours. Adding staff would be her top priority for additional funding. When asked what would happen were the supervisors simply to direct $400,000 to rehire part-time substitute workers to work on Mondays and evenings, Cooper explains that’s not enough. “It would cost $1.7 million just to open again on Mondays, not including adding evening hours,” she says. “And I would want to see the package. Would they guarantee the funding for five years, or open the libraries on Mondays for one year then close them again?” Cooper dismisses such “bandaid” solutions, and hopes the JPA Nadav Soroker

As Sonoma County supervisors heard complaints about the libraries’ reduced hours, they went into action—at a snail’s pace. More than 14 months later, Supervisor Mike McGuire called the first meeting of the newly appointed Library Joint Powers Agreement Advisory Review Committee. Since that time, McGuire and his representatives from each of the county’s nine largest cities have been meeting to develop an improved JPA. When the committee’s recommendations are finalized (McGuire suggests by October), public hearings will be held, and cities will review the proposed revisions. Eventually, they, and the county, will vote for the revisions, and an improved JPA, with some mechanism for increased funding, will result. The process will take years. Meanwhile, not one of the county’s five supervisors, elected to manage our county’s $1.3 billion in spending, believes temporary funds to restore hours should come from the discretionary $381 million general fund budget. Since the library commission is an independent agency, county supervisors point out, correctly, that they have no legal obligation to augment library funding until a new JPA arrangement can be implemented. But do they have an ethical and professional obligation? This is the question they’ve been running away from. Supervisors are the ones who legally appoint five out of seven of the library commissioners. They are the government body named by the “tax levy” clause of the 1975 JPA to “annually levy” sufficient taxes for “the purpose of purchasing property for, establishing and maintaining the county library.” And it’s not as if the supervisors are unable to step in and provide money from the general fund

to county departments or agencies that technically rely on earmarked funding. For example, they took an extra $8 million from the general fund to add to the tens of millions in revenue that the county already receives in gas taxes for roads and bridges. As a concerned parent of young children who use the library, I first suggested this to my supervisor, Efren Carrillo, over a month ago. Like three other supervisors, he argued that the county had far more important things to do than temporarily restore library hours. Last week, Carrillo provided extensive written answers to questions for this story. On the subject of funding an emergency fix for library hours, he replied: “The library is not a county department and the reduction in hours is not related to any reductions in county funding. The county is one member of the library joint powers authority. Any additional government funding to restore hours should be a shared responsibility. Additionally, the library faces major longterm challenges with expenses. Restoring hours for one year would not address those problems. It is more appropriate to think strategically about addressing the long-term challenges than funding a one-year temporary fix.” Carmen Finley disagrees. She cites the “tax levy” clause of the

THE CHOSEN SPOT Library commissioner Mary Arnold’s church received a

handsome $500k to temporarily house the Sonoma branch during remodeling.

revision process endorses a new countywide parcel tax, dedicated to libraries. Only such increased structural funding, she believes, can restore the system’s financial foundation, staffing and hours. Another change in the JPA seems likely. Individual cities and supporters, like Sebastopol’s Guy Wilson, have proposed donating funds to restore their own local branches’ hours, but that’s not possible: any donations go into the countywide system to benefit all branches, as per the JPA. Efren Carrillo predicts that the JPA committee “will recommend removing the restriction in the current JPA that prohibits localized funding for expanding hours for a particular branch.” But Cooper disagrees that wealthier cities should be allowed to provide longer library hours than poorer ones, like Cloverdale. Sebastopol city council member Sarah Gurney, a mediator and member of the JPA review committee, is not holding her breath for shortterm emergency funding. “To protect our regional public library system, the nine cities and the county need to collaborate,” she says. “That means one of us can’t just foist the financial responsibility— such as for guaranteeing baseline services and restoring Monday hours—on the other.” As befitting a professional mediator, Gurney feels assured that a common-ground solution will be found. “I have confidence in this committee’s work, appreciate the sustained efforts of SOCOSOL, and hear our recent petitioners,” she says. Meanwhile, SOCOSOL wants a new JPA that has library commissioners elected by the public—with the power to fire the director. “I will stand on the street corner with a tin cup and raise money for the library when I know that the money will be used to restore hours,” Dena Bliss says. “But to hand Sandy Cooper more money would be insane. The library needs more money, a transparent budget and a management that can use the money responsibly. “Right now, it doesn’t have any of those things.”

19 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 1 9 -25, 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Sometime in the upcoming year, replied another, the commission will start its “information gathering” to “begin the process of planning the strategic planning process.” In other words: Making a plan to make a plan to make a plan.


NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JUNE 1 9 -25, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

20

CULTURE

Crush The week’s events: a selective guide

DENIM DAZZLER JD McPherson plays two shows this week, on June 20 at Sweetwater and June 21 at Hopmonk. See Clubs, p25-26. SEBASTOPOL

Emerald Triangle When Humboldt County comes to mind, one can’t help but grin at its infamous reputation. For decades, the livelihoods of the sometimessecretive residents and growers of the area have thrived on marijuana production. Journalist Emily Brady spent a year living in the county to research her latest book, Humboldt: Life on America’s Marijuana Frontier, in which she reveals a variety of characters encountered during her stay, and narrates a story of the past, present and future of the county that weed built. Get a contact high at an in-person reading by Brady on Wednesday, June 26, at Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books. 138 N. Main St., Sebastopol. Free. 7pm. 707.823.2618.

P E TA L U M A

Randomness Ensues In the Everyone Orchestra, conductor and founder Matt Butler shepherds willing participants both on- and off-stage to perform in an improvisational style. The rotating ensemble has accumulated members of the Grateful Dead, String Cheese Incident, the Flecktones and Maria Muldaur, as well as Tuvan throat singers, hula hoopers, fire spinners and jugglers. Together, these acts follow the lead of the conductor’s hand signs, whiteboard and various mime suggestions. Enjoy the randomness when the Everyone Orchestra performs on Friday, June 21, at the Mystic Theatre. 23 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. $23–$25. 9pm. 707.765.2121.

N A PA

S A N TA R O S A

P E TA L U M A

You’re On, E.

Rewind

Get Lucky

The Partridge Family, the Jackson 5 and, heck, even the Brady Bunch. These bands, whether real or fake, proved that forming a family band was the way to go—and still is, according to legendary Latin jazz percussionist Pete Escovedo and his family-member-comprised orchestra. California natives, Pete’s older and younger brothers have performed with the orchestra at different times. The group reached stardom with Carlos Santana in the late ’60s, and now, Pete works with his sons and daughter, longtime Prince collaborator Sheila E., to keep the family tradition alive. The gang’s all there on Saturday, June 22, at Silo’s. 530 Main St., Napa. $30–$40. 7pm and 9:30pm. 707.251.5833.

I said uh hip hop, uh hip hip hop, something else hippity hop hop, annnddd I am not the person to be writing this. This week, the Arlene Francis Center presents ‘What’s Good? A History of Hip-Hop,’ a storytelling of hip-hop history through turntable sets by DJs Noah D, Brycon, Fossil, Mr. Element, Shifty Shey, Max Wordlow and DJ BigJohnStud. The night begins with the DJ-led history of hip-hop, then moves to a celebration of the Summer Solstice—and ends with a scratch showcase by DJ Lazyboy, Brycon with an original beat set, live vocals by hosts Pure Powers and Spends Quality. Up jump the boogie on Thursday, June 20, at the Arlene Francis Center. 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa. $5. 6pm. 707.528.3009.

Man, I thought all these dudes and dudettes were listening to Loverboy’s Get Lucky, and that they’d finally caught on to what an awesome album it is. I mean, dudes, c’mon. Then the other day someone asked me “Have you heard ‘Get Lucky’?” and I was all, “Yeah, it’s flippin’ awesome! Loverboy rules!” But they said, “No, I mean the new Daft Punk song.” Daft Punk?! Yeah, I know. I couldn’t believe it either, dudes. Whatever, at least I know who the better band is, and that’s Loverboy, who play on Saturday, June 22, at the Sonoma-Marin Fair. 100 Fairgrounds Drive, Petaluma. $10–$15. 8pm. 707.283.3247.

—Anna Hecht


BETWEEN THE LEAVES Nicole Katano photographs nature in an abstact fashion, a counterbalance to her husbandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work.

Both Sides Now

Marc and Nicole Katanoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Akinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; exhibit strikes a rare, natural balance BY GRETCHEN GILES

S

he captures nature and makes it appear abstract. He makes abstracts that appear to come from nature. She laughs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of how we are in real life, too. We balance each other surprisingly well.â&#x20AC;? She is photographer Nicole Katano; he is artist Marc Katano. She did commercial work for years in Los Angeles, shooting for such studios as DreamWorks and American Girl, before turning

full-time to her own photography. He is represented by the Stephen Wirtz Gallery in San Francisco, and has work hanging in major institutions east from the LACMA to the MoMA. Married for some 30 years, the two see their creative lives combined in a new exhibition opening June 28 at the Sonoma Valley Museum of Art (SVMA). Titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Akin: The Art of Marc and Nicole Katano,â&#x20AC;? the show juxtaposes his emotive abstract forms with her montages depicting an intensely soft-focused world.

Having begun their careers in San Francisco, the Katanos lived in Los Angeles for more than two decades. When they were ďŹ nally ready to return to the Bay Area, they had the good fortune to retain a real estate agent who also sat on SVMAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s board. Executive director for SVMA Kate Eilertsen naturally sees it as a fait accompli that her institution would cinch the deal; Nicole assents that â&#x20AC;&#x153;we thought, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Well, this is a really nice little museum.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? The couple moved to Sonoma in 2010. And Eilertsenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life immediately

got easier. The SVMA hosts â&#x20AC;&#x153;a minimum of one show a year dedicated to local artists,â&#x20AC;? she says. Marc is an American born in Tokyo. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Japanese calligraphy is his inspiration,â&#x20AC;? Eilertsen explains. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The idea of making a mark is what he does. He uses expressive brush working; he does a lot of his work on the ďŹ&#x201A;oor so that he can move with it. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about gesture as much as anything else.â&#x20AC;? In a short homemade video that the Katanos have posted online, Marc is seen at work. Sheets of paper are on the ďŹ&#x201A;oor of his studio. Working quickly, he uses his hands to lay the ink down, making deft, intuitive touches with his ďŹ ngers that immediately soak into the handmade Nepalese or Japanese paper he favors. He then paints an overcoat that mostly obscures the ďŹ rst layer, so that the forms become darkly oblique. Finally, he makes swift calligraphic strokes with white ink using a bamboo stick. This is all done kneeling or bending down to the ďŹ&#x201A;oor, like a tidy Pollock. The resulting images are handsome and evocative, knowable and hidden. In his artist statement, Marc deďŹ&#x201A;ects the urge to imply, writing: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Each line represents nothing more than its own creation.â&#x20AC;? Nicoleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s photos are largely botanical. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I look for a point of view that maybe I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seen before and certainly my viewer might not have seen before,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just shoot what looks right to me, and it so happens that what looks right to me is very soft and has motion to it.â&#x20AC;? Soft and in motion. Some might suggest this could be another deďŹ nition of marriage. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Akin: The Art of Marc and Nicole Katanoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs June 29â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Aug. 25 at the SVMA, 551 Broadway, Sonoma. A members-only reception is slated for Friday, June 28, 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8pm. A mini-exhibit of Nicoleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s portraits of members of the Sonoma Valley Mentoring Alliance accompanies. 707.939.7862.

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Nicole Katano

ArtsIdeas

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Stage

NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | JUNE 1 9 -25, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

22

SEE â&#x20AC;&#x2122;EM BOTH Ana Laura Nicolicchia (above) and Laura Post alternate in the title role of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Evita.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

On This Night TM

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Thu, June 20 1 and 7pm

magine growing up in Argentina,â&#x20AC;? says John DeGaetano, â&#x20AC;&#x153;loving musical theater, knowing all about Eva Peron, hearing the soundtrack to Evita your whole lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a musical that is set in Argentinaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and hoping that someday, somehow, you would end up playing that role.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;That,â&#x20AC;? he says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;pretty much describes Ana Laura Nicolicchia.â&#x20AC;? Nicolicchia, who was born in Buenos Aires, is now one of the two actresses who will be playing Eva Peron in the Raven Playersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; enormous upcoming production of Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Riceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Evita. The other actress, alternating with Nicolicchia, is Lauren Post, of San Jose.

Each brings her own individual interpretation and personality to the iconic roleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and as one might expect, Nicolicchiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s approach is especially personal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ana is totally connected to the history of Argentina,â&#x20AC;? says DeGaetano, director of the show. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Her family lived this story. They lived through the times that are staged in this show. Some of those scenes are really intense. So itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been quite an experience watching Ana take this role on.â&#x20AC;? In addition to having two different actresses alternating the lead roleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;which will surely inspire some Evita fans to see the show twiceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;DeGaetano explains that the Raven Players production is going to be very different from other stagings of the show, including the one the Raven did just six years ago. That one was spare and minimal, with a bare stage, simple costumes and a comparatively small cast. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is nothing small about this production,â&#x20AC;? he laughs, his voice conspicuously ragged after weeks of rehearsing a cast and crew of over a hundred people. Fortunately, the Raven has recently undergone a major renovation, expanding the size of the stage and making other physical and technical improvements. Those renovations were completed just in time for DeGaetano, who counts Evita as one of his favorite musicals of all time, to launch his epic vision. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is a big show, and I wanted it to look big,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I knew that my stage manager would be blown away when she heard that I wanted to put a hundred people in the Raven stage, so I took a picture of her at the moment I told her. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great picture! Her mouth is open wide, and her eyes are big. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;One hundred people!â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m hoping that same sense of wonder and surprise is what the audience feels when they see the show.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Evitaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sunday, June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 14 at the Raven Performing Arts Theater. 115 North St., Healdsburg. Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Saturday at 8pm; 2pm matinees on Sundays. One Thursday, June 27, 8pm. $25â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$30. 707.433.6335.


June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 14 433-6335 www.raventheater.org 433-6335

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Before Midnightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; advances loveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s messy saga

T

Celine and Jesse share a summerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s evening walk through the ruins, and are more unnerved by modern America than ancient Rome. They have an American-style tourist bed waiting for them in an upscale hotel, with complimentary wine and coupleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s massage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the Garden of Eden,â&#x20AC;? Jesse says, but this new Eve begs to differ. Delpy resembles Diane Keaton in the Woody Allen comedies, a bundle of nerves so snarled itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s impossible to keep from twisting one by accident. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a ditherer, her long eyebrows meeting in circumďŹ&#x201A;ex over anxious, hollow eyes. When this actor-director is ďŹ lming herself, she seems sort of bodiless; Linklater, however, sees Delpy as a physical being, sounding a note of lewdness, seeing the alluring qualities of the middle-aged spread Celine canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cease lamenting. Hawkeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jesse seeks a balance between manliness and boyishness, and he never feels at ease with either, particularly in the excellent ďŹ rst scenes where heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s saying goodbye to his son at the airport. Strange to see how Hawke, this handsome if lightweight bohemian, is turning out to sound like Tom Waits. Before Midnight is marred by a long dinner scene of allegedly literary talk, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an unconvincing, unnecessary side trip from the coupleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s woes. Their quarrel is where we want to beâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where things are witty, aggravating and romantic. Every couple is ultimately under the volcanoâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the ability to endure a petty, scab-picking ďŹ ght is the essence of a coupleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s survival in times when, as the cartoonist B. Kliban put it, â&#x20AC;&#x153;the wagon of love breaks down under the luggage of life.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Before Midnightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is playing in wide release.

Presented by the Raven Players. The Raven is proud to offer wines from Selby Winery.

6/12-26/13

BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

ÂŽ

115 North St., Healdsburg

www.raventheater.org

1030 Main Street S in downtown Napa N TTickets ickets & Infor Information m mation

NVOH.ORG NVOH.O ORG

707.226.7372 707.226.73 372

FATOUMATA F ATOUMA T ATA DIAWARA DIA AWA ARA A TThursday, hursday, June June 20, 20, 8 PM PM

"The Errant Tree of Life" by Easton, 2012

Open Wed thru Sun, 11 to 5pm 144 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma

707tcalabigallery.com

MARIACHI DIVAS DIV VAS A Saturday, S aturday, JJune une 2 22, 2, 8 PPM M Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss out on seeing thiss Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t G Grammy A Award-winning, ward-winning, d i i all female ensemble! TWEET @NVOH TO WIN TICKETS FOR A CHANCE TO rules. Visitit NVOH.org for con Vis

test

GREG BROWN

Saturday, S aturd day, JJune une 2 29, 9, 8 PPM M www.facebook.com/napavalleyoperahouse www .facebook.com/napavalleyoperahouse

At the Veterans Building 282 South High St. Sebastopol, CA 95472 707.829.4797 www.sebarts.org

433-6335

Time Is Tight

www.raventheater.org

Evita is a Cinderella story turned on its head â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the little girl from Los Toldos, a dirty, poor village far from Buenos Aires. But this Cinderella isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a pure, good girl winning her prince almost by chance; sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s driven to gain fame and power by any means, vowing to plow under anyone who would try to get in her way. The saga of Eva Peron is set to the music of Andrew Lloyd Webber.

433-6335

VACATION? Julie Delpy and Ethan Hawke bicker through burdensome times.

hose two young lovers of 1994â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Before Sunsetâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Celine, a Parisienne (Julie Delpy), and Jesse, a Chicagoan (Ethan Hawke)â&#x20AC;&#x201D;have aged. In Richard Linklaterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Before Midnight, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re successful but burdened middle-agers on vacation in Greece. He has a major child-custody problem back in the States. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s working out career challenges, and will have to start from scratch if she follows him back to America.

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Film

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Music

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Featuring: John Prine Angelique Kidjo Taj Mahal

Marianne Faithfull Greg Brown Iris Dement Irma Thomas Madeleine Peyroux Dave Alvin

Rebirth Brass Band Paul Thorn Band Brothers Comatose Elephant Revival Red Molly  Poor Man’s Whiskey Perla Batalla  Coyote Grace  Wavy gravy  The Sam Chase Alice Di Micele  Smokehouse Gamblers  and many more…

AT BEAUTIFUL BLACK OAK RANCH • LAYTONVILLE Tickets & Info. 415-256-8499 (Inticketing) www.katewolfmusicfestival.com

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

DIN N E R & A SHOW

MIKE LIPSKIN & DINAH LEE Jun 21 Great American Songbook Fri

8:00 / No Cover Best Album of the Year Jun 22 FROBECK Original Funk R&B and Rock 8:30 Sun HOBO PARADISE Rancho 23 Jun 1920s Ragtime Jazz Debut! 5:00 / No Cover Fri Jun 28 BUCK NICKELS Sat

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

AN D LOOSE CHA NGE

New Country Music 8:00 Sat STEVE LUCKY AND THE 29 Jun

RHUMBA BUMS WITH MISS CARMEN GETIT 8:30

 BBQs On The Lawn!  Jun 30 MARK HUMMEL’S BLUES Sun

Thur

Jul

Sun

Jul

Sun

HARMONICA BLOWOUT

Our Annual celebration with

4 THE ZYDECO FLAMES

PETER ROWAN’S 4th Annual 7 Bluegrass Birthday Bash featuring the PETER ROWAN BLUEGRASS BAND

and special guests THE ROWAN BROTHERS

Jul 14 CHUCK PROPHET AND THE MISSION EXPRESS PLUS TINY TELEVISION

Come see us! Wed–Fri, 2–9 Sat & Sun, 11:30–8

Brewery Tours Daily at 3!

Gates Open at 3:00, Music at 4:00 Reservations Advised

1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

w w w.L AGU N ITAS.com

415.662.2219

SENOR BLUES Bridging the gap

from the Summer of Love: Taj Mahal.

Mountain Hop After four decades, a return to Mt. Tam BY ANNA HECHT

S

teve Bajor was 17 when he stepped out into the hazy sea of stoned people crowded in the Mountain Theatre. Members of the Hell’s Angels had already escorted Jefferson Airplane to the stage atop Mount Tamalpais in Mill Valley, and the band proceeded to play its signature psychedelic rock songs. “Bring your own drugs and bring your own picnic lunch” was the message given to the crowd.

A rock concert to begin all rock concerts, the 1967 Fantasy Fair and Magic Mountain Festival came one week before Monterey Pop and two full years before Woodstock. It was those two days in 1967 that also

paved the way for this weekend’s Mount Tam Jam, presented by the Tamalpais Conservation Club. The concert’s lineup includes New Orleans funk outfit Galactic, blues legend Taj Mahal, wry Sacramento hit makers Cake, Marin-based Danny Click and the Hell Yeahs as well as Mike Farris and the Roseland Rhythm Revue. Though no brawls ever erupted at the original ’67 concert, take it from Bajor, now an event manager for Pacific Expositions, that it was indeed a “three-ring circus.” That’s what you get with around 30,000 people gathered in the Sidney B. Cushing Memorial Amphitheatre (aka the Mountain Theatre) for 33 bands, mostly of the hippie type. The lineup included the Doors, Jefferson Airplane, the Byrds, the Steve Miller Band, Tim Buckley, the Seeds and many more. (It’s probably the only time Captain Beefheart and Dionne Warwick shared a bill.) Tickets were a whopping $2, but the proceeds went toward a San Francisco charity. When the drugs of choice were pot and LSD, and the venue was much less restrictive than today’s standards, the Fantasy Fair represented a different time when, as Bajor remembers, “everyone just wanted to play.” This year’s Tam Jam is the first music festival on the mountain since the Fantasy Fair Festival. And with the Mountain Play celebrating its 100th year, and Mt. Tam its 85th as a state park, what better time to bring it back? Tickets, naturally, are pricier than they were decades ago, but the proceeds support another good cause: greatly needed revenue for the park. In fact, it’s the park’s hope that the revenue will help produce more jams in the future years. It’s a return that has plenty of the original attendees talking. Since he considers himself a “Mill Valley boy,” will Bajor attend this year’s concert? “I have a gig then,” he says, “but I’ll try to put in an appearance.” The Mt. Tam Jam is on Saturday, June 22, at Cushing Amphitheatre, Mt. Tamalpais State Park. Noon–7pm. $25–$100. www.tamjam.org.


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY The Everyone Orchestra Featuring Matt Butler, Steve Kimock, Trevor Garrod, Sunshine Garcia Becker, Eddie Roberts, John Kimock and Mike Sugar. Jun 21, 9pm. $23-$25. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Friday Night Live Jun 21, Tommy Castro & the Painkillers. 5:30pm. Free. Cloverdale Plaza, Cloverdale Boulevard between First and Second streets, Cloverdale.

Michael McDonald While he made his fame with the Doobie Brothers, the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best backup singer is a pretty good frontman, too. Jun 22, 5pm. $75-$115. Rodney Strong Vineyards, 11455 Old Redwood Hwy., Healdsburg. 707.431.1533.

Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Concerts Series Jun 22, Petty Theft. Noon. Free. Montgomery Village Shopping Center, Santa Rosa.

Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Good? A history of hip-hop with DJs Brycon, Noah D, Mr Element, Max Wordlow, Shifty Shey, BigJihnStud and more. Jun 20, 6-midnight. $5. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

members of his family, which includes singer Sheila E. Jun 22, 7 and 9:30pm. $30$40. Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Arlene Francis Center

Jun 21, Brandon Hasseur. Jun 23, Mae Ana. 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

Finley Community Center Jun 21, Steve Luther. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737. Jun 21, Groove Foundation. Jun 22, Jeff Edwins Dance Band. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530. Jun 21, Prisma Trova. Jun 22, Da Puna Bruddahs. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Aubergine

Jun 19, the Digital Connection. Jun 21, JD McPherson. Jun 24, Protoje with Indiggnation Band, Gappy Ranks with the Seventh Street Band. Jun 26, Stylust Beats. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Jun 22, Nate Lopez. 1901 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

Hopmonk Sebastopol

Hopmonk Sonoma

Jun 23, the Easy Leaves. 328-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8720.

Jun 21, the Ruminators. Jun 22, Dirty Cello. Jun 23, Peter Chung. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Coffee Catz

Hotel Healdsburg

Last Wednesday of every month, Jerry Green. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Jun 22, Chris Amberger Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800. )

FREE SHOW with

LastCall Troubadours Live Music Sunday Brunch

Sat June 29

Berlin plus Big Country Fri July 5 FREE SHOW

Del the Funky Homosapien & Guests Sun July 7

J Boog plus <Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ä?Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;ÄŽĆ&#x152;Ä&#x17E;, Aaradhna & Hot Rain Thur July 18 & Fri July 19

Jewelâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Greatest Hits Tour Sat July 20

Mary Chapin Carpenter & Marc Cohn

FREE SHOW with

The Deadicated Maniacs 6XQ-XQHĂŁSP

Blue Star Music Camp Benefit featuring Jerry Harrison of Talking Heads & daughter Aishlin, Lester & Dylan Chambers, Narada Michael Walden, Shana Morrison-Danny Click-Tracy Blackman, Austin & Caroline de Lone, Jimmy Dillon Band with Ozzie Ahlers and more! :HG-XQHĂŁSP

James Moseley Band 7KXU-XQHĂŁSP

Sat July 27 Ladies Night In Napa~An Evening Of Comedy Presented By KGO 810 Featuring

Ĺ&#x161;Ć&#x152;Ĺ?Ć?Ć&#x;ĹśÄ&#x201A;WÄ&#x201A;Ç&#x152;Ć?Ĺ?Ć&#x161;Ç&#x152;ĹŹÇ&#x2021;Í&#x2022;dÄ&#x201A;žžÇ&#x2021;WÄ&#x17E;Ć?Ä?Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĹŻĹŻĹ?Í&#x2022; Mary Lynn Rajskub, Loni Love Fri Aug 2

:Ä&#x17E;ÄŤĆ&#x152;Ĺ?Ä&#x161;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;Ć? & The Abiders Sat Aug 3

Kenny Loggins plus Blue Sky Riders SOLD OU

T!

Fri Aug 9

Anjelah Johnson Wed Aug 14

>Ĺ˝Ć?>ŽŜÄ&#x17E;ĹŻÇ&#x2021;Ĺ˝Ç&#x2021;Ć?Ä?ŽƾĆ?Ć&#x;Ä? Thur Aug 15 A Midsummer's Night with The Monkees

Sat Aug 17

Dave Alvin Acoustic Trio

:Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x2021;:Ä&#x17E;ÄŤtÄ&#x201A;ĹŻĹŹÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave Mill Valley

Planning an event? Contact us for rental info

CafĂŠ 415.388.1700 | Box Office 415.388.3850

Special Guest: Django Walker

1350 Third St, Napa | 707.259.0123 www.uptowntheatrenapa.com

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

McNearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dining House "REAKFASTs,UNCHs$INNER 4(52s0-$//23s CABARET

VAGABOND OPERA &2)s8PM DOORSs ROCK

Austin & Caroline DeLone, Jimmy Dillon Band with Narada Michael Walden

SIERRA NEVADA BREWING CO. PRESENTS:

THE EVERYONE ORCHESTRA

BEST PAWN SHOP

Sonoma Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ysT Top o op p Choi Choice! ice! Come in and d meet us. Habla EspaĂąol EspaĂąol

707.872.7296 70 7.872.7296 1831 Guerne Guerneville ville Rd, Santa Ro Rosa osa

MATT BUTLER, STEVE KIMOCK, TREVOR GARROD, SUNSHINE GARCIA BECKER, EDDIE ROBERTS, JOHN KIMOCK AND MIKE SUGAR

Benefit for Blue Star Music Camp. Jun 23, 7pm. $77-$150. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

FRI 6/28s8PM DOORSs FOLK/BLUEGRASS

ELEPHANT REVIVAL 3!4s0-$//23s PRINCE TRIBUTE BAND

NAPA COUNTY

THE PURPLE XPERIENCE:

THE WORLDS PREMIER PRINCE TRIBUTE

Mariachi Divas

0'' "OZ*UFN .FOUJPO #PIFNBJOBE

DR. FINK FROM PRINCE AND THE REVOLUTION

All-female mariachi band formed in 1999 won a Grammy in 2009. Jun 22, 8pm. $25-$30. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Legendary Latin jazz percussionist often plays with

6DW-XQHĂŁDP

Live Music Brunch

Sun June 23 An Evening With Classic Lily Tomlin

26

MARIN COUNTY

Pete Escovedo & His Orchestra

Steep Ravine

6XQ-XQHĂŁDP

French Garden

Heritage Public House

Bergamot Alley

with Austin DeLone 7:30pm :HG-XQHĂŁSP FREE SHOW! 7KXU-XQHĂŁSP

JD McPherson

Flamingo Lounge

Mon, Fire Spinning. Jun 20, Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Good? A History of Hip Hop. Third Thursday of every month, Jazz & Coffee. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009. Jun 20, Lee Howardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Musical Universe, Exit Hercules, Rachel Bockover. Jun 21, Jupiter Band, Madrone Brothers, 1955. Jun 23, Honeydippers. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Monday ~ Open Mic Night

FRI 7/5s8PM DOORSs REGGAE

MIDNITE

PLUS DJ JACQUES (WBLK) .O#HILDREN5NDERTO!LL!GES3HOWS 0ETALUMA"LVD 0ETALUMA

TAKINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; IT TO THE WINERY Michael McDonald

plays June 22 at Rodney Strong. See Concerts, above.

7

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 1 9 -25, 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

25

Epicurean Connection


26 Music ( 25 NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | JUNE 1 9 -25, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Lagunitas Tap Room

River Theatre

Toad in the Hole Pub

Peri’s Silver Dollar

Thurs, Thugz. 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.3194.

Jun 22, the Nervous, Days like Nights. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Jun 19, Elvis Johnson Soul Review. Jun 21, Swoop Unit. Jun 22, Zydeco Flames. Jun 23, the Bamboozlers. Jun 26, Bedrock. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Jun 19, Grandpa Banana. Jun 20, the Rivereens. Jun 21, Staggerwing. Jun 23, Americano Social Club. Jun 26, Royal Deuces. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Rodney Strong Vineyards

Mavericks

Jun 23, Moonlight Trio. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Jun 21, Clear Conscience, Stranger, Kingsborough. Jun 23, Stax City. 397 Aviation Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.765.2515.

Mystic Theatre Jun 20, Vagabond Opera. Jun 21, the Everyone Orchestra. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Occidental Center for the Arts Jun 22, Greg Abel and David Luning. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Phoenix Theater Jun 21, Finit, the Grain, Liquid Kactus. Jun 22, Boogie the Mann, West-One, LOP, Solheen, When I’m Sleeping. Jun 23, Psychosomatic, Vicious Circle, Puke N Rally, Condemned. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Jun 22, Michael McDonald. 11455 Old Redwood Hwy, Healdsburg. 707.431.1533.

Russian River Brewing Co

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub

Tradewinds Jun 19, Barnyard Stompers. Jun 21, Stax City. Jun 22, Blues Defenders. Jun 26, Down with May. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre

Jun 22, Over Easy. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Jun 21, 3 Leg Torso. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Society: Culture House

Dance Palace

Thurs, Casa Rasta. Sun, Church on Sundays. Jun 19, Nate Lopez. Wed, North Bay Blues Revue. Jun 26, Linda Ferro. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Songbird Community Healing Center Jun 21, Solstice Sound Celebration. 8297 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.2398.

Sprenger’s Tap Room Jun 21, Jeff Walters Band. 446 B St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8277.

Jun 22, Debra Henson-Conant. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Fenix Wed, Blues Night. Jun 20, Groovality. Jun 21, Tony Lindsay. Jun 22, Morris LeGrande. Jun 23, Andre Thierry & Zydeco Magic. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

George’s Nightclub Jun 21, Paula West. Thurs and Fri, DJ Rick Vegaz. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Hopmonk Novato Jun 21, Matt Jaffe & the Distractions, One of Many, Blood & Dust, Alan Monasch, Shelby Lanterman. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

19 Broadway Club

San Francisco’s City Guide

Anya Kvita & the GetDown Voted best band at Silicon Valley Sound eXperience, with the sublime “Runnin.” Jun 20 at Great American Music Hall.

Father John Misty Prolific musician has played with Fleet Foxes, Damien Jurado, David Bazan and Kid Cudi. Jun 21 at the Fillmore.

The New Trust Record-release show for piercing new album “Keep Dreaming.” With Creative Adult. Jun 21 at Bottom of the Hill.

L. Subramaniam Indian violinist appears with Larry Coryell, Corky Siegel in show of global fusion. Jun 20 at Yoshi’s SF.

A Wilhelm Scream Long-running Massachusetts post-hardcore troubadors play with the Flatliners. June 23 at Thee Parkside.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

Jun 19, Maka Roots, Stevie Culture. Jun 20, Peach Street, IrieFuse. Jun 21, Vokab Kompany, Crush Effect, Radioactive. Jun 22, Cathy Cottens Summer Solstice Party. Jun 23, Judy Hall and Bill Vitt. Jun 26, Dirty Hand Family Band. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Old Western Saloon Jun 21, Merchants of Moonshine. Main Street, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1661.

Osteria Divino Jun 19, Jonathan Poretz. Jun 20, Groupo Buongiorno. Jun 21, Eric Markowitz Trio. Jun 22, Ken Cook Trio. Jun 23, MCH Trio. Jun 25, Chris Huson. Jun 26, Noel Jewkes Duo. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Panama Hotel Restaurant Jun 19, Dale Polissar Trio with Si Perkoff. Jun 20, Deborah Winters. Jun 25, Lorin Rowan. Jun 26, Dave Getz Trio. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Rancho Nicasio Jun 21, Mike Lipskin and Dinah Lee. Jun 22, Frobeck. Jun 23, Hobo Paradise. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sausalito Seahorse Jun 20, Curtis Woodman Trio. Jun 21, Beautiful Losers. Jun 22, Jamie Clark Acoustic Trio. Jun 23, Candela. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady Jun 21, David Luning. Jun 26, Kathryn Claire and Hanz Araki. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smiley’s Jun 20, Hogs of Change. Jun 21, High Tide Blues. Jun 22, Stages of Sleep. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Studio 55 Marin Jun 23, Jeana Leslie and Siobhan Miller. 1455 E Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.

Sweetwater Music Hall Jun 20, JD McPherson. Jun 22, Galactic. Jun 23, Austin & Caroline DeLone, Jimmy Dillon Band with Narada Michael Walden. Jun 26, James Moseley Band. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads Sun, Terrapin Family Band. Wed, Terrapin Family Band Bar Show. Thurs, Stu Allen & the Terrapin All Stars. Fri, 4:20 Happy Hour with live music. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

NAPA COUNTY Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Jun 20, Audio Farm. Jun 21, Kerouac. Jun 22, the Voltones. Jun 26, Jumpstart. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Lincoln Theater Jun 21, Tim Hockenberry. 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.226.8742.

Napa Valley Opera House Jun 20, Fatoumata Diawara. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Silo’s Jun 21, Close to You. Jun 22, Pete Escovedo & His Orchestra. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

‘Yeezus’ Season Kanye West’s new album Kanye, Kanye—petulant child, Kanye. By now we’ve sent Kanye West to his room so many times that he’d have to eventually emerge with the album of his career, right? Yeezus, out this week, is just that masterwork: abrasive, clever, narcissistic, at times repulsive, frequently silly. Making a case for the elimination of musical genres altogether, Yeezus combines raw industrial clatter (KMFDM and Nitzer Ebb come immediately to mind) with touchstones of West’s native Chicago: acid house, drill, trap. Sonically, it is gnarly and messy, and producer Rick Rubin’s job of stripping away most of the noise leaves a sharp, snarling stab in the gut. The angelic voice of Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon is slathered on top, dancehall vocal samples abound, and the guy from the Gap Band sings a few lines. Drums, hip-hop’s root ingredient, barely make an appearance at all. Lyrically, Kanye is in full sexual self-serving mode, with the hope of black nationalism hinted at in teaser singles “New Slaves” and “Black Skinhead” reduced to a line about fisting. Amid the dumb blowjob punchlines and full-speed-ahead grandeur (“I Am a God” is a real song title), though, the album’s blissful centerpiece, “Hold My Liquor,” finds Kanye in somber contemplation with a pensive hook from Chicago’s Chief Keef and a guitar solo that sounds like a billion dollars. The best storytelling comes via “Blood on the Leaves,” relating the swinging dead bodies in a Nina Simone sample of “Strange Fruit” to wealthy rappers mined by groupies for child support—a stretch, to be sure. But as with the rest of Yeezus, the visionary production saves it, turning a rant into a saga. It’s the bizarre transformation of the Swiftian interrupter: you might not like Kanye’s ego, but it’s foolish to fuck with his id. God help his newborn daughter.—Gabe Meline


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Galleries RECEPTIONS Jun 19 At 4:30pm. Marin Community Foundation, “Breaking Barriers,” featuring work by Bay Area artists with disabilities. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. At 6pm. Grand Hand Gallery, “American Juke Box,” photography by Christopher Felver. Also, “Fruit Juice,” work incorporating or inspired by all things fruit. 1136 Main St, Napa.

Jun 20 At 5pm. Finley Community Center, “Shared Vision,” paintings by Kathy Cia White and Gary Albright. Also, “Small Works in Watercolor,” works by the “Friday Afternoon Class.” 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737. At 5:30pm. Napa Valley Museum, “Jazzland and Other Stories,” paintings by Edmund Ian Grant. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Jun 22 At 5pm. Gallery of Sea and Heaven, “Hodge Podge,” mixed-media exhibit by artists from Becoming Independent and Barracks Studio. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.578.9123.

SONOMA COUNTY

guild members. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. Wed-Thurs and SunMon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

300 South A St, Santa Rosa. Open Sat, 12 to 5, and by appointment. 707.332.1212.

Calabi Gallery

Through Jun 30, “Soo Noga & BK Hopkins,” paintings and digital art. Also featuring pieces by Nina Bonos and Sherri Ortegren. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Through Jul 13, “Intimate Enigmas,” abstract stone sculptures by Easton. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Charles M Schulz Museum

Hammerfriar Gallery

Through Sep 1, “Art of the Line,” describing Schulz’s process, from the tools he used to the research he undertook. Through Oct 14, “Barking Up the Family Tree,” featuring comic strips with Snoopy’s siblings. Through Oct 27, “Mid-Century Modern,” works of prominent post-war-era decorative, textile and furniture designers. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Through Aug 11, “The Summer of 2013,” featuring pieces by Harley, Bill Shelley, Brian Wilson and Hugh Livingston. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Dutton-Goldfield Winery

Through Feb 6, “Sculpture Trail,” outdoor exhibit with sculptures along Cloverdale Boulevard and Geyserville Avenue changing every nine months. 215 N. Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale.

Through Jul 19, Bert Kaplan’s paintings on display. 3100 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. Daily, 10am– 4:30pm 707.827.3600.

Finley Community Center Through Aug 8, “Shared Vision,” paintings by Kathy Cia White and Gary Albright. Reception, Jun 20, 5pm. Through Aug 8, “Small Works in Watercolor,” works by the “Friday Afternoon Class” of senior artists. Reception, Jun 20, 5pm. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Jun 22-Aug 10, “Hodge Podge,” mixed-media exhibit by artists from Becoming Independent and the Barracks Studio. Reception, Jun 22, 5pm. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Annex Galleries

Gallery One

Through Jun 29, “Art & Life,” watercolors, block prints and intaglios by William Seltzer Rice. 604 College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Sat, 12 to 5. 707.546.7352.

Through Jul 13, “New Gallery,” oil paintings by Jennifer Jaeger and watercolors by Lucy Arnold. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Arts Guild of Sonoma

Through Jun 29, “Untitled,” juried exhibition of local and international artists.

Through Jul 1, “Invitational and New Work,” pieces by

Graton Gallery

Gallery 300

Healdsburg Center for the Arts Through Jun 30, “Flying Home,” artwork inspired by jazz. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

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Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922

History Center

John Denning Studio Through Aug 20, “Horse Play,” paintings and mixedmedia by John Denning. 23570 #D Arnold Dr, Sonoma.

Markham Vineyards Through Jun 30, “The Groupies,” work by Rolling Stone photographer Baron Wolman. 2812 St Helena Hwy N, St Helena.

New Leaf Gallery Through Jul 7, “Breaking Up Is Hard to Do,” new sculpture by Gordon Halloran. Through Jul 7, “Ice Break,” new sculpture by Gordon Halloran. Cornerstone Place, 23588 Hwy 121, Sonoma. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.933.1300.

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Arts Events


NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | JUNE 1 9 -25, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Russian River Art Gallery Through Jun 30, “Small Works,” art that’s little in size but not in stature. 16357 Main St, Guerneville. Daily, 10 to 6. 707.869.9099.

Santa Rosa City Council Chambers Through Jul 10, “Pinhole Photography,” works by Ira Meinhofer. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 9 to 5. 707.543.3282.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Through Jul 20, “Up, Up & Away,” expressing aspects of flight. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sonoma County Museum Through Aug 18, “Margins to Mainstream,” seven contemporary artists with disabilities. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Steele Lane Community Center Through Jun 20, “Waiting,” paintings by John Norall. Jun 25Aug 15, “Fantasy in Oils,” paintings by Marcia Chastain. 415 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 7; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.543.3282.

Towers Gallery Through Jun 30, “Bright Summer Lights,” multimedia by Janet McBeen and oil paintings by Adele Pruitt. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

Upstairs Art Gallery Through Jun 30, Paintings by Henry White. 306 Center Ave (above Levin & Co bookstore), Healdsburg. Sun-Thurs, 10 to 6; Fri-Sat, 10 to 9. 707.431.4214.

MARIN COUNTY Art by the Bay Weekend Gallery Through Jun 30, “Spring Show,” variety of media from West Marin artists. 18856 Hwy 1, Marshall. 415.663.1006.

Bolinas Museum Through Jun 23, “Asia Then,” photographs by photographs by Alfred Palmer. Through Jun 23, “Historical Paintings of Coastal Marin,” featuring

pieces by prominent artists of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Through Jun 23, “Patricia Briceno: Dances with Wools,” art with felted wool, silk and dyes. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

Gallery Bergelli Through Jul 10, “Ten Years of Water,” paintings by Pegan Brooke. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Gallery Route One Through Jul 21, “GRO Artist Member Exhibition.” Salon, Jul 21, 4pm. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Community Foundation Through Sep 27, “Breaking Barriers,” featuring work by Bay Area artists with disabilities. Reception, Jun 19, 4:30pm. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Marin MOCA Through Jul 14, “Summer National Juried Exhibition,” featuring 45 pieces selected from hundreds of entries. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Jun 27, “The Beauty of Imperfection,” 10th annual Wabi-Sabi show. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Seager Gray Gallery Through Jun 30, “Mysterious Barricades,” paintings by Devorah Jacoby. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

NAPA COUNTY di Rosa Through Jun 30, “From Two Worlds,” photography by Linda Connor. Through Dec 31, Largest collection of contemporary Bay Area art. Tours daily. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

Downtown Napa Through Nov 30, 6pm, “Art on First,” the third annual exhibition bringing art to empty storefronts in downtown Napa. Includes work by 13 Bay Area artists on display through 2013. Through Jan 1, 2015, “Metamorphosis,”

outdoor sculpture exhibit with self-guided tour. Main and Third streets, Napa.

ECHO Gallery Through Jul 6, “The Great Wall of Doof,” installation by Tim Sharman. Through Jul 6, “Touch of Nature,” juried exhibition exploring the wild and wonderful ways of nature in all media. 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.

Gordon Huether Gallery Through Jul 31, “Norcal Modern,” new paintings by Grace Slick. 1465 First St, Napa. 707.255.5954.

Grand Hand Gallery Through Jul 31, “American Juke Box,” photography by Christopher Felver. Through Jul 31, “Fruit Juice,” work incorporating or inspired by all things fruit. Reception, Jun 19, 6pm. 1136 Main St, Napa. No phone.

Napa Valley Museum Through Jun 30, “Jazzland and Other Stories,” paintings by Edmund Ian Grant. Reception, Jun 20, 5:30pm. Through Jul 28, “Miles Davis,” sketches and oil paintings by jazz pioneer Miles Davis. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 707.944.0500.

Comedy All-Female Comedy Night Hosted by Helen Pachynski. Adult content. Jun 19, 9pm. $4. Gaia’s Garden, 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Below the Belt Brandon Revels hosts this evening of standup comedy featuring local talent. Third Fri of every month, 9pm. $10. Jasper O’Farrell’s, 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Comedy Night Presented by Active 20-30 Club 656. Third Thurs of every month, 8:30pm. Free. Sally Tomatoes, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260.

Lily Tomlin One of the most versatile comedians in showbiz, she’s known for her wide array of characters. Jun 23. $65-$85. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

OVER AND OUT ‘The History of Future Folk,’ about two guys who perform music in

public wearing spacesuits, screens June 23 at Long Meadow Ranch Winery. See Film, p29.

Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-andcomers. Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

World’s Biggest Comedy Duo “Whose Line” style improv. Jun 22, 8pm. $10. Hopmonk Sebastopol, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Events Book & Bake Sale Children’s and Teen books on sale. Jun 22, 10am. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Circle of Life Program for children about the culture and history of Napa Valley Indians. Jun 20, 2pm. $7. Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Cowgirl Tricks Children’s program featuring Karen Quest. Jun 26, 11am. Free. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Garden Party Tour the gardens of Santa Rosa’s most iconic private residence in this 1920sthemed fundraiser for the

Living Room. Jun 23, 2pm. $100. McDonald Mansion, 1015 McDonald Ave, Santa Rosa.

Jazz Day for Kids Music-based activities geared toward grades K-12. Jun 22, 11am. Free. Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 7079440500.

Music in the Vines Food, wine and music by the Hellhounds. Jun 20, 6pm. $45$55. Paradise Ridge Winery, 4545 Thomas Lake Harris Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.528.9463.

Opera in the Garden Dinner and performance by the Adler Fellows from the San Francisco Opera. Jun 19, 5pm. $140. Madrona Manor, 1001 Westside Rd, Healdsburg. 707.433.4321.

Preschool Storytime A lap-sit program for infants, one day to 17 months old, accompanied by a parent or caregiver. Fri, 10:45am. free. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Sonoma-Marin Fair Theme this year is “Dog Days of Summer.” Bands include: Jun 19, Marshall Tucker Band; Jun 20, Kellie Pickler; Jun 21, Kix Brooks; Jun 22, Loverboy. Jun 19-23. $10-$15. Petaluma Fairgrounds, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma.

Summer Solstice Garden Party Tour the garden and enjoy a community-produced meal to

celebrate the longest day of the year. Jun 20, 6pm. Free. Harvest Market, 19996 Seventh St E, Sonoma. 707.996.0712.

Symphony of Food, Wine & Art Restaurants, wineries and artisanal foods producers showcase their best. Music by the Honey Swing Band and Roy Zajac & friends. Jun 23, 3pm. $45. Rohnert Park Community Center, 5401 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.584.7357.

Toddler Storytime High-energy storytime for toddlers 18 months to three years old. Fri, 10am. Free. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Film Adam’s Rib Successful attorney Amanda Bonner (Katharine Hepburn) decides to defend her client in this 1949 comedy. Jun 25, 7pm. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

A Fierce Green Fire Documentary on environmental causes has a host of famous narrators. Jun 23, 4pm. $10. Sunflower Center, 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

Film Night Jun 21, “Hugo.” 8pm. Free. China Camp State Park, N


San Pedro Road, San Rafael. 415.456.0766.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Documentary follows the founding of the International Council of Thirteen Indigenous Grandmothers. Jun 21, 6pm. $5-$10. Shambhala Meditation Center, 255 West Napa St Ste G, Sonoma.

History of Future Folk

Outside the Lines Artists with disabilities highlighted in four shows The unique art on display at the Gallery of Sea and Heaven, operated by Becoming Independent, is spreading to new locations this summer. Becoming Independent is the largest nonprofit services provider for the North Bay’s disabled, and one of is primary programs is ArtWorks. Between the seven studios that ArtWorks manages and the Gallery of Sea and Heaven, participants in the program get many opportunities to express themselves and communicate what they may have difficulty otherwise conveying. ArtWorks is now expanding its outreach and partnership efforts to other North Bay galleries and organizations for four concurrent shows: “Breaking Barriers: Bay Area Artists with Disabilities” at the Marin Community Foundation (June 14–Sept. 27; reception June 19, 4:30pm) features roughly 130 paintings and sculptures by patients with disabilities. The Sonoma County Museum hosts “Margins to Mainstream: Contemporary Artists with Disabilities” (June 15–Sept. 15; reception, June 15, 4pm), featuring Roger Warnecke and other artists. The Petaluma Arts Center hosts works from several disabled art programs in the area in the show “Undercover Genius: The Creative Lives of Artists with Disabilities” (July 12– Sept. 15; reception, July 13, 4pm). ArtWorks also hosts a show at its own Gallery of Sea and Heaven titled “Hodge Podge” (June 22–Aug. 10; reception, June 22, 5pm), featuring mixed-media pieces in conjunction with the Barracks studios in Santa Rosa.—Nadav Soroker

Documentary on acoustic duo in homemade space suits playing in public places. Jun 23, 8pm. $10. Long Meadow Ranch Winery, 738 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.4555.

Redwood Empire Farmers Market Sat, 8:30am-1pm and Wed, 8:30am-noon. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

Santa Rosa Original Certified Farmers Market Sat, 9am-1pm and Wed, 9am1pm. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

Mahler Third Symphony Ballet

Wednesday Night Market

Starring the Étoiles Premiers Danseurs and Corps de ballet. Conducted by Simon Hewetti. Jun 22, 7pm. $10. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Food, vendors, produce, live music and activities. Wed, 5pm. through Aug 21. Free. Downtown Santa Rosa, Fourth and B streets, Santa Rosa.

Money & Life Documentary asks whether the economic crises can serve as an opportunity to redesign our relationship to money at personal, community and global levels. Jun 20, 6:30pm. $5-$10. Share Exchange, 531 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.393.1431.

Food & Drink Barrel Tasting Opportunity to sample the future Madrone Vineyards wines. Jun 22, 1pm. $30. Valley of the Moon Winery, 777 Madrone Rd., Glen Ellen. 707.996.6941.

Civic Center Farmers Market Sun at 10am, “Eat Local 101” provides walking tour with information, cooking advice and ideas inspired by locally grown foods. Thurs, 8am-1pm and Sun, 8am-1pm. Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 800.897.3276.

Meet Your Farmer Dinner Featuring food from Sonoma Heritage Farm and ciders by Tilted Shed. Jun 19, 6pm. $30. Epicurean Connection, 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

Northern Sonoma Wine Tour Tour visits four wineries: Red

Lectures Dazzling Dragonflies Kathy Biggs presents the biology, life cycle, identification and ecology of dragonflies. Jun 21. $55. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Chris Durham The director of digital development for Uhuru Network talks about why writers can no longer afford to ignore social media. Jun 23, 2pm. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

LGBT Senior Discussion Group Fourth Tues of every month, 1pm. Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

Andy Ross Talk on finding and working with an agent, presented by the Petaluma Writers Forum. Jun 20, 7pm. $15. Petaluma Community Center, 320 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma.

Readings

Monkey” with Carl Hiaasen. Jun 23, 7pm, “The Wonder Bread Summer” with Jessica Anya Blau. Jun 24, 7pm, “Crime of Privilege” with Walter Walker. Jun 25, 7pm, Marin Poetry Center’s Summer Traveling Show. Jun 26, 12pm, “Revenge Wears Prada” with Lauren Weisberger, includes lunch and book $55. Jun 26, 7pm, “Finding the Origins of Music in the World’s Wild Places” with Bernie Krause. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

and Sun, 2pm. through Jul 14. $25-$30. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

Exit the King Eugene Ionesco’s absurdist masterpiece starring Fred Curchack in the role of King Berenger. Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 5pm. through Jun 29. $15$25. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

The Lonesome West

Jun 20, 7:30pm, “Courting Greta” with Ramsey Hootman. 326 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg 707.395.4646.

Two brothers in Ireland reconcile after their father’s death. Presented by Narrow Way Stage Company. Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Jun 30. $20-$28. Andrews Hall, Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books

The Night of the Iguana

Jun 19, 7pm, “Safe Kids, Smart Parents: What Parents Need to Know to Keep Their Children Safe” with Dr Rebecca Bailey. Jun 20, 7pm, “Leap” with Z Egloff. Jun 23, 1:30pm, “The Adventures of the Omaha Kid” with Nathaniel Robert Winters. Jun 25, 7pm, “World’s Ugliest Dogs” with Vicki DeArmon. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Tennessee Williams play about a disgraced priest locked out by his own congregation. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Jun 23. $18. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

Christopher Hill Gallery

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Jun 22, 1:30pm, “New White Sandals” with Toula Siakotos. Jun 24, 6pm, “We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves” with Karen Joy Fowler. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books Jun 25, 7pm, “My Animal, My Self: A Breakthrough Way to Understand How You and Your Animal Reflect Each Other” with Marta Williams. Jun 26, 7pm, “Humboldt: Life on America’s Marijuana Frontier” with Emily Brady. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

Theater Blackbeard the Pirate Final project of weeklong student theater class. Jun 22, 2 and 4:30pm. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Book Passage

Evita

Jun 19, 7pm, “Transatlantic” with Colum McCann. $30. Jun 20, 7pm, “Extra Yarn” with Mac Barnett. Jun 22, 7pm, “Bad

The story of Eva Peron, wife of the Argentine dictator, Juan Peron. Directed by John DeGaetano. Fri-Sat, 8pm

Scapino Saucy, slapstick comedy about a devious valet who helps two pairs of lovers overcome parental opposition. ThursSun, 7:30pm. through Jul 13. $15-$30. Redwood Amphitheatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross.

Singin’ in the Rain This 1920s-set romantic comedy is full of classic songs. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Jul 7. $15-$35. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

The Story Brother Sun Sister Moon Theatrical collage of word, music, storytelling and dance about transformation and the life of St Francis. Jun 21-22, 8pm. $15-$18. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

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Astrology

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of June 19

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) Maybe youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen that meme circulating on the internet: â&#x20AC;&#x153;My desire to be well-informed is at odds with my desire to remain sane.â&#x20AC;? If you feel that way nowâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and I suspect you might soon if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t alreadyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;you have cosmic permission, at least for a while, to emphasize sanity over being well-informed. Lose track of what Kim Jong-un and Kim Kardashian are up to, ignore the statements of every jerk on the planet, and maybe even go AWOL from the ďŹ&#x201A;ood of data that relentlessly pours toward you. Instead, pay attention to every little thing your body has to tell you. Remember and marvel at your nightly dreams. Go slow. Lay low. Be soft. Have fun with unspectacular inďŹ&#x201A;uences that make you feel at home in the world. TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20) I expect you will be called on to move ďŹ&#x201A;uidly between opposing camps or competing interests or different realities. Maybe youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll volunteer to serve as an arbiter between the crabby good guys and the righteous bad guys. Perhaps youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll try to decode one friendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quirky behavior so that another friend can understand it. You might have to interpret my horoscopes for people who think astrology is bunk. You may even have to be a mediator between your own heart and head, or explain the motivations of your past self to your future self. You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be perfect, of course. There will be details lost in translation. But if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re as patient as a saint and as tricky as a crow, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll succeed. GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) Pablo Casals was one of the greatest cello players who ever lived. Among his early inspirations was the music of Johann Sebastian Bach. Casals discovered Bachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s six cello suites when he was 13 years old, and played them every day for the next 13 years. Have you ever done something similar, Gemini? Devoted yourself to a pleasurable discipline on a regular basis for a long time? I invite you to try it. The coming months will be an excellent time to seek mastery through a diligent attention to the details. CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know that I am not a category,â&#x20AC;? said philosopher Buckminster Fuller. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am not a thingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a noun. I seem to be a verb, an evolutionary process.â&#x20AC;? Philosopher Norman O. Brown had a similar experience. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The human body is not a thing or substance, but a continuous creation,â&#x20AC;? he mused. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is an energy system which is never a complete structure; never static; is in perpetual inner self-construction and self-destruction.â&#x20AC;? Now is an excellent time to imagine yourself in these terms, Cancerian. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not a ďŹ nished product and never will be! Celebrate your ďŹ&#x201A;uidity, your changeableness, your instinctual urge to reinvent yourself.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) Renowned 20th-century theologian Karl Barth worked on his book Church Dogmatics for 36 years. It was more than 9,000 pages long and contained over 6 million words. And yet it was incomplete. He had more to say, and wanted to keep going. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your biggest undone project, Leo? The coming months will be a good time to concentrate on bringing it to a climax. Ideally, you will do so with a ďŹ&#x201A;ourish, embracing the challenge of creating an artful ending with the same liveliness you had at the beginning of the process. But even if you have to culminate your work in a plodding, prosaic way, do it! Your next big project will be revealed within weeks after youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve tied up the last loose end. VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22) Susannah Cibber was a popular 18th-century English contralto whose singing was expressive and moving. On one occasion, she performed Handelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Messiah with such verve that an inďŹ&#x201A;uential priest responded by making an extravagant guarantee. He told her that as a result of her glorious singing, any sins she had committed or would commit were forever forgiven. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to see you perpetrate an equivalent amazement, Virgo: a good or beautiful or soulful deed that wins you a ďŹ&#x201A;ood of enduring slack. The cosmic omens suggest that such an achievement is quite possible. LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) Johnny Appleseed was a 19th-century folk hero renowned for planting apple trees in vast areas of rural America. During the 70 years this famous Libra was alive, he

never got married. He believed that if he remained unwed during his time on earth, he would be blessed with two spirit-wives in the after-life. Have you ever done something like that yourself, Libra? Is there an adventure youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve denied yourself in the here and now because you think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the only way you can get some bigger, better adventure at a later date? If so, now would be an excellent time to adjust your attitude.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is kind of fun to do the impossible,â&#x20AC;? said Walt Disney, a pioneer animator whose cartoon innovations were remarkable. Judging from your current astrological omens, I think you Scorpios have every right to adopt his battle cry as your mantra. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got an appointment with the frontier. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re primed to perform experiments at the edge of your understanding. Great mysteries will be tempting you to come closer, and lost secrets will be teasing you with juicy clues. As you explore and tinker with the unknown, you might also want to meditate on the grafďŹ ti I saw scrawled on a mirror in a public restroom: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Only those who attempt the absurd can achieve the impossible.â&#x20AC;?

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) Astronauts on lunar expeditions have orbited the moon and seen its entire surface. But the rest of us have never seen more than 59 percent of it. As the moon revolves around the Earth, it always keeps one side turned away from our view. Isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t that amazing and eerie? The second most important heavenly body, which is such a constant and intimate factor in our lives, is half-hidden. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to propose that there is an analogous phenomenon in your inner world, Sagittarius: a part of you that forever conceals some of its true nature. But Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m pretty sure you will soon be offered an unprecedented chance to explore that mysterious realm. CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) Anglo-Irish novelist Laurence Sterne married his wife Elizabeth in 1741. Twenty-ďŹ ve years later he fell in love with another woman, Eliza. In composing love letters to his new infatuation, he lifted some of the same romantic passages he had originally written to Elizabeth when he was courting her. Try hard not to do anything remotely resembling that, Capricorn. Give your intimate allies your freshest stuff. Treat them as the unique creatures they are. Resist the temptation to use schticks that worked to create closeness in the past. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18)

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important that you not punish yourself or allow yourself to be punished for the sins that other people have committed. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also crucial that you not think nasty thoughts about yourself or put yourself in the presence of anyone whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prone to thinking nasty thoughts about you. Self-doubt and self-criticism may be healthy for you to entertain about 10 days from now, and at that time you will probably beneďŹ t from receiving compassionate critique from others, too. But for the moment, please put the emphasis on selfprotection and self-nurturing.

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

For over three decades, a man in Assam, India, has worked to build a forest. When Jadav â&#x20AC;&#x153;Molaiâ&#x20AC;? Payeng started planting and tending seeds at the age of 16, the sandbars bordering the Brahmaputra River were barren. Today, almost entirely thanks to him, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re covered with a 1,360-acre forest that harbors deer, birds, tigers, rhinos and elephants. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you could launch a comparable project in the next 12 months, Piscesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a labor of love that will require your persistent creativity and provide you with sanctuary for a long time.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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Jun 8–Jul 28, “Miles Davis,” sketches and oil paintings by jazz pioneer Miles Davis. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed–Mon, 10 to 5. 707.944.0500.

Rodney Strong Summer Concert Series Russian River Jazz & Blues Festival

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Live on the Green. Sat June 22 Michael McDonald. Sat August 3 BWB: Rick Braun, Kirk Whalum & Norman Brown. Sun August 4 Dwight Yoakam. Box Office: 707.869.1595 rodneystrong.com

July 20, Alan Pasqua Trio—3 time Grammy Award Winning jazz pianist; August 17, Bill Champlin with Special Friends—2 time Grammy Award Winner. Information and Tickets: 707.237.3489 shop.sonomacutrer.com707.237.3489

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Calabi Gallery Through Jul 13, “Intimate Enigmas,” abstract stone sculptures by Easton. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed–Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

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