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Who Owns the Trees? p9 Sonoma County Museum p22 Reggae in the Redwoods p25

Always Greener Richard Heinberg fires back at the so-called petro-boom p18


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Bohemian

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847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288 Editor Gabe Meline, ext. 202

Staff Writers Leilani Clark, ext. 106 Rachel Dovey, ext. 203 Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200

Copy Editor Gary Brandt, ext. 150

Calendar Editor Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200

Interns Estefany Gonzalez, Anna Hecht, Nadav Soroker

Contributors Michael Amsler, Rob Brezsny, Tod Brilliant, Richard von Busack, Jessica Dur Taylor, Gretchen Giles, James Knight, Jenna Loceff, Jacquelynne OcaĂąa, Jonah Raskin, Bruce Robinson, Sara Sanger, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow

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Senior Designer Jackie Mujica, ext. 213

Layout Artists Gary Brandt, Tabi Zarrinnaal

Advertising Director Lisa Santos, ext. 205

Advertising Account Managers Lynda Rael, ext. 204 Mercedes Murolo, ext. 207

Circulation Manager Steve Olson, ext. 201

Sales Operations Manager Deborah Bonar, ext. 215

Publisher Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Third-class postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

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Cover photo of Richard Heinberg by Tod Brilliant. Cover design by Kara Brown.


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Summer’s here and the time is right for hitting up Johnson’s Beach, where the Harris family keeps snack-bar prices low.

This photo was taken in Guerneville. We are always accepting photos; send yours to photos@bohemian.com.

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6

BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Surveillance State Historic challenge to support Edward Snowden BY NORMAN SOLOMON

I

n Washington, where the state of war and the surveillance state are one and the same, top officials have begun to call for Edward Snowden’s head. After nearly 12 years of the “war on terror,” Snowden’s moral action of whistleblowing is a tremendous challenge to the established order of intensifying secrecy and dominant power that equates safe governance with Orwellian surveillance. How can we truly express our appreciation? A first step is to thank Snowden—publicly and emphatically—by signing the “Thank NSA Whistleblower Edward Snowden” petition, easily found online. But as Snowden faces extradition and vengeful prosecution from the U.S. government, active support will be vital in the weeks, months and years ahead. “I’m not going to hide,” he told the Washington Post on Sunday. “Allowing the U.S. government to intimidate its people with threats of retaliation for revealing wrongdoing is contrary to the public interest.” When a Post reporter asked whether his revelations would change anything, Snowden replied: “I think they already have. Everyone everywhere now understands how bad things have gotten—and they’re talking about it. They have the power to decide for themselves whether they are willing to sacrifice their privacy to the surveillance state.” And, when the Post asked about threats to “national security,” Snowden offered an assessment light years ahead of mainstream media’s conventional wisdom. “We managed to survive greater threats in our history,” he said, “than a few disorganized terrorist groups and rogue states without resorting to these sorts of programs. It is not that I do not value intelligence, but that I oppose . . . omniscient, automatic, mass surveillance.” He continued: “That seems to me a greater threat to the institutions of free society than missed intelligence reports, and unworthy of the costs.” With his actions and words, Edward Snowden has given aid and comfort to grassroots efforts for democracy. What we do with his brave gift will be our choice. Norman Solomon is co-founder of RootsAction.org and founding director of the Institute for Public Accuracy. His books include ‘War Made Easy: How Presidents and Pundits Keep Spinning Us to Death.’ Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Not Misleading

Hey, Cordell, Gabe here. You’re a good guy with a tough job, which is why I ran your op-ed last week in support of Sonoma Clean Power (“Moving Forward,” by Cordell Stillman, June 5). But I can’t get over one thing: your statement that Rachel Dovey’s overview of the four companies vying for the Sonoma Clean Power contract “misled” readers. Since you didn’t actually dispute any of the information in Dovey’s article, I assume you agree that it was accurate. You took no issue with the tone, which was plain and informational. So all I can gather is that you’re dismayed about the very existence of such an article. I understand that it’s your job to get Sonoma Clean Power passed, and that verifiable facts about power companies’ environmental violations, business practices and human-rights abuses probably don’t help you out. That information, though, is the very opposite of misleading. We vet our candidates for office, our schools, our cable companies, our ISPs, our electric-car choices—why would we not also vet our power company, with whom we are about to sign a very large contract? If finding a more ethical alternative to PG&E is one of Sonoma Clean Power’s main sales pitches, why not let the press do some reporting to help find the most ethical alternative? We’ve been big fans of Sonoma Clean Power since day one, but we’ve also kept a keen eye on where that power will come from, as you’re surely aware from several articles we’ve run over the last few years. We want to know as much as we can about the company supplying our power. We think it’s in Sonoma County’s best interest to know, as well. Call it misleading if you want— we call it doing our jobs.

THE ED. Yes, I Sometimes Make My PG&E Check Out to ‘Profit, Greed & Extortion’

Who Is This Ignoramus?

Who is this ignoramus Nicolas Grizzle? The fact that most school lunches suck is no reason to come down on a school that is trying to fix the problem (“Je ne sais whaaaaat?” June 5). From my understanding, the extra funding came in support of organic healthy food, not “fancy food.” I would also like to know why you were inclined to call it a “mostly white charter school”. Do you know what a charter school is? I won’t bore you with the answer but you should look it up. It is definitely not what you think it is. If you don’t like French, start your own charter school of your choice and raise the bar yourself. As far as I’m concerned, any second language is a good second language, and considering the number of local French schools, I would say they are in the minority. In closing, why don’t you stop your “economic-racial segregation in our already-segregated schools”? I hope that any other school that can’t stay afloat is lucky enough to get swooped up by someone with a dream of a better education.

BEN HAKALA Bodega

Feinstein: Busy If you wonder why so many Americans are alienated from politics, here’s more evidence: Several weeks ago, I sent a letter to Sen. Dianne Feinstein about the recent flap over the Transportation Security Administration’s (TSA) proposal to change its policy on the length of knife blades permitted through airport security checkpoints. I supported the change as a former TSA federal security director with experience on such issues. What I received in reply was a form letter acknowledging my opposition to the TSA change—the exact opposite of the position I outlined in my letter. Does anyone on the senator’s staff actually read constituent mail? Just to make a point, I wrote back complaining about the response and received another form letter saying, “The truth is, my office receives thousands of letters and telephone calls per week and regrettably,


THIS MODERN WORLD

in your case we made a mistake. I have made note of your comments and am aware of your point of view.” The truth is neither Sen. Feinstein nor any of her Senate colleagues would send such careless or dismissive responses to any of their big campaign contributors. This is because U.S. Senators have two classes of constituents: the masses like you and me, whose correspondence, opinions and concerns appear to be largely ignored or misinterpreted; and the big contributors who have the private phone numbers of senior staff to be used to personally discuss an issue of concern or to make an appointment with the senator to make special pleadings in person. Even for those of us whose political preferences align with Sen. Feinstein, we insist on not being taken for granted.

MARK RANDOL Santa Rosa

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

By Tom Tomorrow

Top Five 1

Amazon sales ranking for ‘1984’ skyrockets 7,000 percent in wake of NSA revelations

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Azar Lawrence exploring every cranny of ‘Afro-Blue’ at Healdsburg Jazz Festival

4

While last week, the God of Thunder poured down upon us with venegance . . .

5 . . . this week, look up

in the sky to the Hot Air Balloon Classic, June 15–16

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Paper

Jack London failed miserably as a father. He abandoned his first wife, Bessie, and their two daughters, Joan and Becky, but as a writer, farmer and adventurer, he’s been a father figure for generations. This Father’s Day, Richard Stull—better known as “Doc Stull”—a professor of kinesiology at Humboldt State University, holds forth on London as a consummate sportsman at Jack London State Park. A boxer, horseman, fencer and brilliant sports reporter, London aimed to win every contest that called to him. “He was a profoundly competitive human being,” Doc Stull tells me. “He was in competition with himself, but he was also a genius at life with a genuine Dionysian spirit.”

STUMPED How exactly did Ghilotti get away with selling taxpayer-owned redwoods back to taxpayers and pocketing the cash?

Highway Blues As Ghilotti Construction cuts down and sells state-owned redwoods for a profit, let’s look at how it’s going in Willits BY RACHEL DOVEY

T

he spoils of a bitter war between Caltrans and Mendocino County environmental advocates—5.9 miles of oak, fir and ash trees that will be leveled and chipped to make way for the Willits bypass—have again been ceded to the contractors

clearing them. But unlike redwoods that previously sat on public land in Sonoma County, these trees won’t turn a private profit. In January, we reported that Ghilotti Construction had cut down redwoods lining Highway 101 and sold a portion to the Sonoma County Water Agency for $98,000. Because these trees were planted

in Caltrans’ right-of-way, they belonged to the state, making the fact that a private construction company was able to sell them to another public agency alarming. Spokesmen for both the county department of planning and the water agency confirmed that this was standard practice for Caltrans projects: the contractor is responsible for clearing so-called debris and can ) 10

For Stoll, what’s essential isn’t whether you win or lose, but how you play the game. At House of Happy Walls—which London’s second wife, Charmian, built, and which serves now as a museum— Stull will talk about sports rivalries, frenzied fans and the allure of the professional athlete. “I’m not an expert on London, just a fan,” Stull adds. “But I identify with him thoroughly.” Richard Stull lectures on “It’s How You Play the Game: Jack London’s Timeless Themes in Sport” on Sunday, June 16, at House of Happy Walls, Jack London State Park. 2400 London Ranch Road, Glen Ellen. 5pm. $10, includes parking fee. 707.938.5216. —Jonah Raskin

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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THE

Old Sport


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Redwoods ( 9

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sell it if it has any value. (Ghilotti, who also donated a portion of the redwoods to Sebastopol’s Sturgeon’s Mill, did not return a call seeking comment.) A similar transaction is taking place in Mendocino County—but without private profit. Beniciabased Flatiron Construction and Dublin-based DeSilva Gates Construction are joint bidders in the $200 million project to bulldoze trees for a four-lane extension of 101 around Willits, through what the Environmental Protection Information Center has termed “major wetlands and endangered species habitats.” Now those same embattled trees— cleared in the path of Caltrans’ right of way, on taxpayer-owned land—become the property of the contractors felling them. “They own [the trees],” Caltrans spokesperson Phil Frisbie Jr. confirms. “They are responsible for them.” Echoing Sonoma County officials, Frisbie explains that this is common practice. “It allows the contractor to optimize their operations,” he says, adding that bidders can lower their overall fee if they are permitted to resell valuable timber, a theoretical money-saver for the state agency. This wasn’t part of the initial bid negotiation between Caltrans and the joint contractors in Willits, however, because unlike Ghilotti, Flatiron and DeSilva Gates won’t be selling any of the wood. Most of it will go back into the Caltrans project as bark chips around the freeway, and some will be donated to state parks and local nonprofits like the Brooktrails Fire Safe Council to be used as firewood. Frisbie says that 80 logs will go into Mendocino creek beds to provide shade and erosion control to endangered fish as part of the project’s environmental-mitigation agreement. Approximately 200 redwood logs that once lined Santa Rosa’s north 101 corridor have a similar fate, becoming structural enhancements along Dry Creek to benefit coho and steelhead. But in Sonoma County, those felled redwoods weren’t

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donated; they were sold back to a public agency at fair value lumber price of roughly $490 a log, with Ghilotti Construction pocketing the profits. “We had prior communications with some of these agencies up here,” Frisbie says of the donated logs. “We were able to make those arrangements and include them in the contract before it even went out to bid.” So what happened in Sonoma County? Did the presence of valuable timber lower Ghilotti’s initial bid, or was that nearly $100,000 sale of property that once belonged to the humble taxpayer simply a bonus? It’s difficult to say. The construction company, once again, did not return a call seeking comment. However, in Ghilotti’s initial project bid obtained by the Bohemian, there is no mention of the value of the redwood trees. And according to another Caltrans’ spokesperson, Jason Probst, assets that can be resold aren’t required to be itemized in the contract between Caltrans and private contractors. “Basically, it’s delineated on their side,” he says. Meanwhile, despite Caltrans’ mitigation efforts, environmental groups in Willits claim the fourlane freeway will damage nearly 100 acres of wetlands and hurt stream and riparian habitat for endangered Chinook and coho salmon and steelhead trout. With this in mind, the Willits Environmental Center’s Ellen Drell says determining the final ownership of the trees feels a little bit like “squabbling over carcasses.” However, she does believe their removal is indicative of a larger issue, in which private contractors pave the local landscape and can line their pockets with money from the “debris.” “These trees have been here for 150 to 300 years, and in three minutes they come crashing and crumbling to the ground,” she says of the construction. “Talk about exploitation. They’re living, breathing things contributing to coolness in the atmosphere, and then they just become goods—trash—that can be divvied up like spoils.”


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Certification is made by the manufacb removed to be ove ed d under u nuffac aturer in this article are described in accordance with the tur rer e that the materials ma e law. laaw. Recommended Cleaning Instructions: To prevent overall soil, frequent vacuumR ecommended e C cuumbrushing to remove dust and grime is recommended. P Periodic ing g or light g br u e eriodic professional is strongly encouraged. Do cleaning li licen D not use e bleach. bleach. l i g by by licensed Repeated d use off steam may cause excessive shrinkage. Never R epea e atted ve remove ve guards guar g ds zippers or other types of covers. Replace brewi hb or attempt atttempt p to remove rem e ace only with br eweryy cer certified original parts. No user serviceable parts inside. Removal er tif g e. R em e all off ffactoactoified i d origin lid warranty. Tumble dry on cool setting rryy seall mayy invalidate invalid g for fo orr best results. results. 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For For o now however, howe g I want want h everr, the thing Who are werd Anyway? ewe h ar to know know iis: W ho e these h wer rd police? p li ? A An nyyway? y Who Who is the b boss,, e w we or the words? speling, dew words, l alone l wor ds? Huh? Huh? And besides, besides, what whaat dew de words, ds let d speling li g,, have ha hav ave to do with h ever beer anyway. an nyw y ayy. y. I mean,, who who eve er herd herd off some some namby namb by pamby p by pale pamb p lexiphile le exiiphile p curling buy warm good beer. This bussid beer b hi h cur ling g up pb uyy a w arm ffire ire with hag ood bookk and a cold r. T his h hole b ussiigone you h g d ness has one plenty pl y far far enouph, enoup ph, don't ph, yyo ou think? thinkk? Well, We ell, well, welll,, well. 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The The beer b could be too sweet sw weet if a degree degr g ee high, g , or too dryy if a nig niggling degree low. The ffuturre beer b that mild and dr ggling g g de g ee gr e too low w. T he character character of the e future thaat batch balance.. T The brewer ld b h i the balance this ba atch t would be hung in he br ewer w drew drew a bead on the temp-probe, temp-pr obe b , the h mash h tun waited, waited, and the world world held held its breath... brrea eatth...


Dining Nadav Soroker

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JUNE 1 2-1 8 , 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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RUNNETH UNDER Harvest Moon’s tasting-room tip jar is an aberration in the industry—but that may be changing (finally).

Tipsy-Turvy At long last, a trend toward tipping at the tasting room BY JAMES KNIGHT

W

hen a bartender pours a beer, he gets a buck. Maybe two or three, all but guaranteed, even if his service includes first ignoring the customer for several minutes, chatting it up with the little blonde who’s wriggled to the front of the line, and then, if time permits, pulling a tap for five seconds.

Compare it to the job of the tasting-room host. She greets everyone who wanders in, even if they’re peering in the doorway with much hesitation. If there’s no room at the bar, she makes room. She tells them the winemaker’s story and technical information on the vintage, including the percentage of each grape cultivar, their names pronounced correctly in French, Italian or German. There may be cheese pairings, concierge service and a long, informative conversation. The

customer might walk away with a $600 case of wine, while the employee punches the clock for a $12 hourly wage. Is it time to have a conversation about tips in the tasting room? Given that the grumbling over a tasting fee of any kind can still be heard in some corners of wine country, it may be a challenge. At Harvest Moon, employees even hung a cheeky little plea for tips to a discreet jar on the counter—like you’d see at any coffee shop. But their

supportive boss is right behind them. “Our staff spends 35 minutes passionately discussing winegrowing philosophies and vineyard-management techniques, pouring various samples of our tiny production wines, and we gotta fight—sometimes—for a lousy $10 tasting fee,” winemaker Randy Pitts explains. Comparing what they offer to the dining experience, Pitts asks, “Can one visit a restaurant and say, ‘I’m not sure if I’ll like your calamari—may I try some first?’” The proliferation of small plates and food pairings in tasting rooms brings the tip question forward. After sinking into deep cushions on Mumm Napa’s Oak Terrace, for instance, and enjoying a $40 flight of sparkling wine with gourmet snacks, the average person may feel uneasy not leaving a little extra for their host. Yet there is no tip line on Mumm’s credit card receipt. “If people ask,” says assistant visitor center manager Lauralee Larson, “we tell them it’s not expected. We don’t forbid it or encourage it.” Elsewhere, it’s expressly forbidden, according to Sean Beehler—or so he’s heard. Beehler slings Zin at St. Anne’s Crossing, where tipping is fine, just uncommon. Having grown up in wine country, that’s all right with him. But some visitors ask him what they should do, since at the last winery they were told, “Oh, no, we can’t. There are cameras everywhere!” while at another, there was a tip jar. That’s the case at Artesa, where management also added a tip line to receipts. Still, tipping varies from none to $40, says a tastingroom associate: “The benefit for us is it lets us know we’re on the right track.” St. Francis also recently added tips to its receipts for food service, like patio tasting with charcuterie plate. Even then, sometimes customers tip, sometimes they don’t. Sometimes they even cross out the tip line. The scene at Thumbprint is wine-lounge-chic. Flights for two run $25 to $35 and include local cheeses, honey, nuts and dried


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13 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 1 2-1 8 , 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

and fresh fruits—similar to St. Francis, but with no tip line. “It’s certainly not something that we expect,” says Thumbprint’s Daniel Webber, “but of course, it’s always appreciated.” At Westwood Winery’s tasting salon, where seated tastings are intimate and time-involving, winemaker and part-owner John Kelly doesn’t accept tips offered to him personally, but he leaves it up to his employees to decide for themselves how to respond. “One of my guys often gently declines on the grounds that he sees himself as an educator, not a server—and how often do you tip your teacher?” So who’s tipping at the tasting room? “Most of the time, it’s industry people,” says Erin Callahan at Red Car. Several others agree. Tasting room, restaurant and other hospitality folks understand. Plus, they’re usually getting the tasting comped and 30 percent off the wine. The only standard at tasting rooms, says Harvest Moon’s Brad Schroeder, is that employees generally receive commission for signing up wine club members. Besides that, don’t bet that they’re getting a dime on bottle sales, and it’s a safe bet that they’re not taking home the $100 a day in tips that Schroeder says his roommate gets from the good patrons of Napa Valley’s Silver Oak Cellars. As for formalized tipping guidelines, it looks like we’re not there yet, especially as winery staff can only agree among themselves that while tipping is nice, it’s absolutely not expected. That’s odd, says Callahan, because it’s almost the same thing as sitting down at a bar for a spell: “You’re serving the alcohol, you’re giving your time, you’re creating a friendship.” And with that, she returns to a couple of tourists at the bar, creates an entire day’s itinerary along the Russian River for them, while pouring their next Pinot Noir and deftly describing its floral, bright cherry character.

$


Dining

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JUNE 1 2-1 8 , 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

14

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

3&7)77-:)0=%98,)28-'-8%0-%2 03'%0%2(36+%2-'

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y Blu American Eatery American. $-$$. Perfect when looking for a great spot between cafe and restaurant. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Fri-Sun; lunch and dinner, TuesThurs. 140 Second St, Ste 100, Petaluma. 707.778.6965.

Located inside

OXBOW PUBLIC MARKET

610 First Street Napa, CA 707.257.4992

WWW.CAMOMI.COM

Dry Creek Kitchen American. $$$-$$$$. Refined and contemporary American menu with multicultural influence. Seafood and vegetables reign! Dinner daily; lunch, Fri-Sun. 317 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.0330.

Hang Ah Dim Sum Chinese-dim sum. $. Low prices and good variety make it pleasing. Buffet-style quality and greasiness can be a letdown. Lunch and dinner daily. 2130 Armory Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7873.

Low Cost Vaccination Clinics every Sunday, 9:30-11:30am

WESTERN FARM CENTER 707.545.0721 21 West 7th St., Santa Rosa

THAI MASSAGE ›`dgifm\pfli ]c\o`Y`c`kp ›`eZi\Xj\ pfli\e\i^p

La Hacienda Mexican. $$. A family-style Mexican eatery with a Michoacan touch. Lunch and dinner daily. 134 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.9365. Larry Vito’s BBQ Smokehouse Barbecue.

Sizzling Tandoor Indian. $-$$. A Sonoma County legend for almost 20 years, and for good reason. Of the more than 100 menu choices, all are worthwhile. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. 409 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.579.5999. Thai OrchidThai. $-$$. Rich Thai food made with crisp, fresh ingredients, reasonably priced. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. 1005 Vine St, Healdsburg. 707.433.0515. Tonayan Mexican. $ Truly wonderful Sonoran-style classics at rock-bottom prices. The enormous El Jefe combination can’t be beat. Lunch and dinner daily. 500 Raleys Towne Center, Rohnert Park. 707.588.0893.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

MARIN CO U N T Y

$-$$. Southern-style and slow-cooked from a chef who’s worked with Wolfgang Puck and Alice Waters. Zing! 6811 Laguna Park Way, Sebastopol. 707.575.3277.

Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $.

Old Chicago Pizza Pizza. $$. Extraordinary deep-dishstyle pizza with tasteful wine list in historic stretch of Petaluma. Delivery, too! 41 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.3897. Pick-up and delivery: 203 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.766.8600.

Boca South American. $$$-

Saddles Steakhouse. $$$-

MARGERY SMITH, CMT 707.544.9642

29 E MacArthur St, Sonoma. 707.938.2929.

$$$$. A steakhouse in the best American tradition, with top-quality grass-fed beef. Pies are made from fruit trees on restaurant property. Dinner daily.

Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990. $$$$. Enjoy flavorful and rich regional fare in the rustic décor of an Argentinean ranch. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 340 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.833.0901.

Citrus & Spice Thai/ Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices, and a great mango-duck summer roll. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.

Finnegan’s Marin Pub fare. $$. Irish bar with the traditional stuff. Lunch and dinner daily. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.899.1516.

Joe’s Taco Lounge & Salsaria Mexican. $. Mostly authentic Mexican menu with American standbys. Lunch and dinner daily; takeout, too. 382 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.8164.

Pine Cone Diner Eclectic. $$. Funky diner meets upscale bistro. Ambitious dishes, like cherry-wood-smoked pork loin with lavender gastrique, and steak au poivre with peppercorn brandy sauce are served in homey atmosphere. Breakfast and lunch daily. Closed Mon. 60 Fourth St, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1536. Sorella Caffe Italian. $$. The embodiment of Fairfax casual, with delicious, high-quality food that lacks pretension. Dinner, TuesSun. 107 Bolinas Rd, Farifax. 415.258.4520. Tommy’s Wok Chinese. $-$$. Tasty and filling Chinese fare without the greasy weigh-down. Nice vegetarian selections, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun; closed Tues. 3001 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.5818. Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N T Y Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. Angèle Restaurant & Bar French. $$$. Thoroughly French, but not aggressively so. Lunch and dinner daily. 540 Main St, Napa. 707.252.8115.

Bounty Hunter Wine country casual. $$. Wine shop and bistro with maverick moxie for the wine cowboy. Premium bottles for sale, also. Lunch and dinner daily. 975 First St, Napa. 707.266.3976.


Brannan’s Grill

Cindy Pawlycyn’s Wood Grill & Wine Bar American. $$-$$$. Classic American fare that stays up on current mainstays like crispy pork belly, braised short ribs and crab roll but doesn’t skimp on the burger. Long wine list, kids menu, patio and more. Lunch and dinner, WedSun. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700.

Cole’s Chop House American steakhouse. $$$$$. Handsome, upscale 1950s-era steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dryaged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a “nostalgia” cocktail. Dinner daily. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.224.6328.

Compadres Rio Grille Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

Gilwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1320 Napa Town Center, Napa. 707.253.0409. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner daily. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch and dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

15

SMALL BITES

Cooking the Books A couple of interesting cookbooks by local authors have been released recently, and both are well worth picking up. Vinaigrettes and Other Dressings, by Michelle Anna Jordan, takes on the deceptively difficult task of making one’s own salad-topping potions. (If I’m going to eat a salad, it better have a damn good dressing; I don’t want any of that squeeze-bottle crap.) Especially tempting is a dressing called Mina’s Tears, an absinthe, honeydew and cucumber dressing. Snacks, by Marcy Smothers (yes, Tommy’s wife), offers a peek into a cooking enthusiast’s—not a professional’s—thoughts on food. What makes this work is the rapport immediately established with the reader. Smothers, who once hosted a cooking talk show on KSRO, is a home cook, and she correctly assumes the reader is, too. The result is a practical book of tips and easy recipes that don’t talk down to home cooks but do bring fun tidbits and trivia. “What can a camel teach you about grilled cheese?” asks one of the chapters. The answer is a type of mnemonic device; camels live in the desert, and grilled cheese should be kept dry, with butter spread on the bread instead of melted in the pan. See? Cooking is fun. Jordan appears on Saturday, June 15, at the Petaluma Library (100 Fairgrounds Drive, Petaluma; 11am; free; 707.763.9801) while Smothers appears Wednesday, June 12, at Copperfield’s Books (775 Village Court, Santa Rosa; 7pm; free; 707.578.8938). —Nicolas Grizzle

Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.251.1900. Zuzu Spanish tapas.

$$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

Father’s Day New England Clam Bake ®

Sunday, June 16 $48 Per Person

Reservations Strongly Suggested 345 Healdsburg Ave. Downtown Healdsburg

707-433-BEER BEARREPUBLIC.COM

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 1 2-1 8 , 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.


Wineries

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JUNE 1 2-1 8 , 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

16

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N TY De La Montanya Vineyards & Winery Small family winery turns out diverse small lots culled from the best of a large vineyard operation, just for kicks and giggles. Tucked under Westside Road in a casual barn setting, fun tasting room offers good wines and cheeky diversions: De La Montanya wine club members get both case discounts and the opportunity to pose in fishnets on “PinUp” series labels. 999 Foreman Lane, Healdsburg. Monday– Friday, 11am–5pm. Tasting fee $5. 707.433.3711.

Thai House

unwind on the coast Happy Hour 3-5 Daily

Assorted Indian snacks, Mixed Platters $6 Samosas $3. All Bottled Beer $3

Authentic Indian Cuisine & select American Summer Fare

Bombay style Indian Chinese entrees also Open for Lunch & Dinner 11:30am–9pm

Sizzling Tandoor II 9960 HWY 1 s 707-865-0625

California Thai Restaurant

201% OFF

Entire Bill, hr Free Parking Must show ad. Exp. 6/30/13

Open Daily

707.573.4777 522 Seventh St, Santa Rosa Brickyard Center

Lunch specials start at $7.95 Includes soup or salad Mon-Fri only

Open 7 days a week Sun-Th 11:30-9:30 Fri-Sat 11:30-10:00 525 4th Street(Upstairs) 707.526.3939

Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am– 5pm. 707.473.2992.

MA R I N CO U N TY Bacchus & Venus A trendy place for beginners and tourists. Great place to learn the basics. 769 Bridgeway, Sausalito. Open daily, noon– 7pm. 415.331.2001. Point Reyes Vineyards The tasting room features many varietals but the main reason to go is for the sparkling wines. Open Saturday–Sunday, 11am–5pm. 12700 Hwy. 1, Point Reyes. 415.663.1011.

Field Stone Winery

Tam Cellars Spacious

(WC) Popular with hikers and bikers passing through, Field Stone Winery is an idyllic 85acre visit-nature. It was also one of the first underground wine cellars, carved into the hill in the 1970s. 10075 Hwy. 128, Healdsburg. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.433.7266.

wine bar quietly distributes the soul-salve of the ages and, like its soul mate the coffee shop, passes the laptop test. Cheese plates, wine flights and comfortable seating arrangements make a nice place to convene with the companion or flat screen of one’s choice. Wine shop features international, eclectic selection at fair prices. 1803 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. Open Monday–Wednesday, 4–9pm; Thursday–Saturday, 4–10pm. 415.461.9463.

La Crema Winery Stylish salon offers hip urbanites limited-release country cousins of the top-selling restaurant brand. Pop in for the Pinot, stay for the Syrah. 235 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. Open daily, 10:30am–5:30pm. 707.431.9400.

Pellegrini Family Vineyards Why not take Olivet, and find some of the area’s best Pinot Noir and old vine Zinfandel. Family-owned winery offers well-priced Pinot from its Olivet Lane vineyard in the barrel room; local St. George cheese yours for the munching. Tasting appointments can generally be arranged upon sticking one’s head through the cellar door. 4055 West Olivet Road, Santa Rosa. Open 10:30am–4:30pm by appointment. No fee. 707.545.8680.

Sbragia Family Vineyards Ed Sbragia makes stellar Cab in Zin country. 9990 Dry Creek Road,

N A PA CO U N TY Chateau Boswell Winery (WC) This small, boutique winery is open by appointment only, selling most its wine directly via post to club members. 3468 Silverado Trail, Napa. 707.963.5472.

Domaine Carneros Inspired by Taittinger’s Château de la Marquetterie of Champagne, this house of premium sparkling wine is a hard-to-miss landmark on the Carneros Highway. Enjoy a private Balcony Package for special occasions or taste sparkling and still wines paired with artisan cheese and caviar

with the masses. Luxury bubbly Le Rêve offers a bouquet of hoary yeast and crème brûlée that just slips away like a dream. 1240 Duhig Road (at Highway 12/121), Napa. Wine flights $15; also available by the glass or bottle. Open 10am–5:45pm. 800.716.2788.

Raymond Vineyards Burgundy scion Jean-Charles Boisset has put his stamp on staid Napa producer. See the Theater of Nature, depicting biodynamics; feel the Corridor of the Senses; luxuriate in the members-only Red Room, party in the gold-plated JCB Room; or just taste good Cab in the club-like Crystal Cellar. 849 Zinfandel Lane, St. Helena. Daily, 10am– 4pm. Fees vary. 707.963.3141.

Stony Hill Vineyard In the 1940s, advisers from UC Davis told them, “Under no circumstances plant Chardonnay.” So they planted Chardonnay. Intimate tastings in the flagstone-studded, Eisenhower-era McCrea living room; Chardonnay and White Riesling are legends. 3331 St. Helena Hwy., St. Helena. By appointment, Monday through Friday, weekends when available. $25. 707.963.2636.

Truchard Vineyards (WC) No matter how attentive you are to the directions, no matter how much you study the quaint, hand-drawn map found online, no matter how vigilantly you watch the street addresses numerically climb along Old Sonoma Road, you will inevitably miss Truchard Vineyards. What follows is a three-point turn on a blind, two-lane road, with a single thought in your head: “This wine had better be worth the insurance deductible.” But with Cabernet this good, it is. 3234 Old Sonoma Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.253.7153.

Vincent Arroyo Winery Small, tasting room is essentially a barn with a table near some barrels, but very friendly, with good wines. 2361 Greenwood Ave., Calistoga. Open daily, 10am– 4:30pm. 707.942.6995.


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Jericho Canyon Vineyard Where aloha means ‘have a glass of Cabernet!’ BY JAMES KNIGHT

T

he minute I start to describe Jericho Canyon, I know what some readers are going to say: “Oh boy, here we go.� Boutique Cab from celebrity winemaker Michel Rolland and some Napa Valley folks who used to jet to Hawaii for the other half of the year? That’s what I thought also, when their press agent suggested I check them out. And that’s pretty much what founder Dale Bleecher thought to himself, too, when friends suggested that his family stay at their house in the island paradise.

Like many who once shunned Hawaii, says Bleecher—a onetime logger and tree planter who at long last made his way to college and a one-time career in finance—he had preconceived notions involving tourist hordes. But his family liked the island life so much that the Bleecher daughters stayed on for high school, while mother Marla Bleecher taught at a local school. So what about Napa? Long story short, another “Oh boy, here we go� moment, culminating in the purchase of a cattle ranch on Old Lawley Toll Road where, yes, old man Lawley used to collect toll from carriages. But he also provided refreshment in a bar inside his barn. The barn’s still standing, refreshments now being served in a handsome new redwood winery. Dale Bleecher’s son Nick, who, when we was a young sprout, liked to sleep under the vines while his older sisters did their mandatory summer work in the vineyards (his family likes to tease him about it today) eventually woke up from his nap and earned a winemaking degree from UC Davis. Nick and high school sweetheart Tara Katrina Hole, who tagged along when the family returned to Calistoga, run the hospitality angle—which includes an ATV tour up and down the steep vineyard terraces—with the unaffected enthusiasm of young folks who’ve lucked into a dream job. The Polaris cup holders are perfectly sized for a glass of 2011 Sauvignon Blanc ($30). Lychee fruit, melon, a nice middle—this is not a swirl-and-spit situation, so down it does. Likewise, the 2009 Jericho Creek Cabernet Sauvignon ($55). With a dusting of anise and leather, but plush, black cherry fruit, this and the 2009 Jericho Estate ($90) are not your overblown “mountain Cab� monsters, they’re fun to drink, and have some class. The wine, the landscape, the buzzards lazily gliding on thermals: it’s a coffee-table-book-perfect scene. But much of the vineyard is under contract, custom crush helps to pay the bills in the winery, and visitors roll in almost daily. This little corner of paradise is a real place, too, so it’s back to work for the Bleechers. Jericho Canyon Vineyard, 3322 Old Lawley Toll Road, Calistoga. Tour and tasting by appointment only, $30. 707.942.9665.

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WING MAN

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Heinberg lives out his own principles in his modest Santa Rosa home.

Charged Up The Post Carbon Institute’s Richard Heinberg on the so-called petro-boom, the folly of fracking and the ways we can get back on track BY LEILANI CLARK

R

Tod Brilliant

ichard Heinberg is surprisingly chipper for a man who, if projections by the U.S. government and global-energy analysts are to be believed, might just have seen the basis for his career virtually debunked.

The Post Carbon Institute senior fellow smiles easily in the art- and book-filled living room of the Santa Rosa home he shares with his wife, Janet, even as he talks about the implications of a fracking-fueled petro-boom from North Dakota to Pennsylvania that’s got U.S. energy executives crowing about abundant fossil-fuel-derived energy to last the next century or two. It’s a claim that directly flouts the concept of peak oil—the point at which global petroleum production goes into terminal decline—and Heinberg’s assertion that growth (as we know it) is headed into irreversible decline. Wearing a blue-checked Oxford shirt, jeans and house slippers, Heinberg’s relaxed demeanor could be due to time spent among the fruit trees and chickens in his backyard permaculture paradise. Maybe it’s the two hours of violin the self-described “violin junkie” plays each day. Or it could be the possible ace in his pocket—a February 2013 report by retired geo-scientist J. David Hughes and published by the Post Carbon Institute which claims to debunk the possibility that unconventional fuels


‘The conversation about how to get off fossil fuels has just been put on the back burner.’

W

e’re really being sold a bill of goods,” Heinberg says, handing over a copy of the Hughes report, “Drill, Baby, Drill: Can Unconventional Fuels Usher in a New Era of Energy Abundance?” Using data provided by a Texas company called DI Desktop, which analyzed production data for 65,000 fracked wells from 31 shale plays, the report examines natural gas as a commodity. According to their findings, production rates at many of these sites are already in decline. Operators then must drill more and more to keep overall production steady, and with that comes increased energy needs, making the whole endeavor more expensive. Aside from fracking, methane hydrates—the trapped natural gas molecules currently being scouted by Japanese research vessels and found in abundance on the sea floor—have been heralded as the next frontier. The speculative fossil-fuel goldmine forms the basis for Charles C. Mann’s May 2013 cover story for The Atlantic with the headline that declared, with the impact of a lightning storm in summer, “We Will Never Run Out of Oil.” But then there’s the problem

of net energy, Heinberg points out. “The vast majority of those resources we won’t burn for economic reasons,” Heinberg says, “because it just costs too much— not only investment capital, but it costs too much energy to get the stuff out of the ground to use it.” It’s a concept defined as EROEI— energy return on energy invested. Heinberg’s previous seven books, including The End of Growth: Adapting to Our New Economic Reality and Peak Everything: Waking Up to the Century of Declines, came out on traditional publishers. But for Snake Oil, the Post Carbon Institute turned to Kickstarter, raising $15,000 for selfpublishing costs. “The subject is so hot we just wanted to get it out as soon as we could,” Heinberg says. Snake Oil takes on what he calls dangerous oil-industry claims that the U.S. has enough tight oil to provide a decade’s worth of cheap, abundant gas. “Now, suddenly, with a bump in production of U.S. oil and gas, everyone is talking about, well, gee, isn’t this great?” Heinberg says. “And so the conversation about how to get off fossil fuels has just been put on the back burner.” It’s true. In his 2012 State of the Union speech, President Obama estimated that there’s enough gas “down there” to fuel the country for nearly 100 years. Daniel Yergin, considered one of the world’s foremost authorities on global energy, told Radio Free Europe on June 2 that the shale gas windfall “means that there is a rebalancing of world oil production that is now occurring, and it points to greater stability in the oil market and not that fear of shortage and peak oil that was causing so much difficulties for the global economy half a decade ago.” Even George Monbiot, The Guardian’s environmental columnist, conceded defeat after years of writing about peak oil. “There is enough oil in the ground to deep-fry the lot of us, and no obvious means to prevail on governments and industry to leave it in the ground,” he wrote in July 2012. Heinberg, on the other hand, appears unshaken. The increase isn’t something we should ) 20

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might turn the United States into an energy-independent petro-state. The report forms the foundation for Heinberg’s new book, Snake Oil: How the Fracking Industry’s False Promise of Plenty Imperils Our Future, out on July 1.


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Tod Brilliant

20 Heinberg ( 19 get used to, he says, pointing to the data uncovered by the Hughes report. What we should be doing, rather than looking for ways to extend and continue our fossil-fuel dependent lifestyle, is investing time and energy into building renewables, while there’s still the energy available to build wind turbines and solar panels. Heinberg is also a big supporter of the Sonoma Clean Power initiative, not only because it will allow the county the chance to get out from the grip of the PG&E monopoly, but because of its potential to function as a bridge to the other side: “It can speed up the rate at which we transition to renewables here in Sonoma County,” he adds.

H

einberg’s obsession with energy began in 1972, at the age of 21, after reading The Limits to Growth, a controversial, statistics-driven study that projected possible scenarios for the 21st century based on world population, industrialization, pollution, food production and resource depletion. Dismissed as doomsday prophesying by the economics world, it triggered others to seriously consider resource depletion. The book sent the young writer into a period of thinking the apocalypse was just around the corner. He spent the ensuing years studying—acting as personal assistant to mythologist Immanuel Velikovsky and writing books that would help him sort out why “one species would be driving the whole world toward the precipice.” Heinberg’s first two books focused on mythology and summer solstice rituals around the world. It wasn’t until the late ’90s that he began to understand that the history of energy was the biggest story around. “As time has gone on and as I’ve studied the data, I’ve come to realize that it’s more of a process, not just falling off the cliff,” he explains. Part of the process, for those not

POWER OF IDEAS Heinberg with his books—and his beloved violin.

involved in the higher echelons of government and society where policy decisions are decided, is to live consciously. Heinberg and his wife Janet have started that process at the suburban Santa Rosa home they purchased 12 years ago. “We wanted to show that this could be done,” says Heinberg, as we tour the backyard. The backyard is a dreamy oasis—and one that you’d never guess existed from the street. Herb spirals bloom with thyme, rosemary and lemon balm; a vegetable garden overflows with greens; solar panels generate power, and a water catchment system harvests rain. Apple, pear plum and pomegranate trees shade the yard. In one corner, potatoes sprout in burlap sacks stuffed with straw. What Heinberg is most excited about, though, are Buffy, Scarlet and Azalea, his three chickens. The “pets,” he calls them, cluck around our feet, scrambling for insects and bits of scraps. Call it country living, with easy access to

a future SMART train station and the amenities of the city. It’s also in close proximity to Loveland Violin Shop in downtown. “I’m a bit obsessed with it, as my wife would tell you,” he says with a laugh.

L

iving here, with the garden, the chickens and the violins, Heinberg looks to be a man in his element, negotiating a careful balance between the heavy realization that life as we know it is headed for irrevocable change, and the simple joy of everyday living. If humans look honestly at the crisis at hand, begin sharing, using less, being nice to each other, there’s no reason we can’t have a perfectly acceptable future, he tells me. But that means facing facts. To make a true transition, the technical piece would be relatively easy, he explains; it involves building lots of solar and wind, prioritizing electric rail and redesigning cites for walking and bicycling. Heinberg mentions

his admiration of the Transition Town movement, which started in the United Kingdom and uses permaculture concepts to build resilience in communities to weather gracefully the coming economic and environmental upheavals. Of most concern is whether the “fossil fuel” industry is successful in making people believe that there’s enough oil and gas to keep us going for another century, in the style in which we’ve become accustomed, he emphasizes. The oil boom in North Dakota (and elsewhere) is going to be shortlived, but it’s bought us some time—a few short years—to get to work on renewables. “If we use that time—maybe it’s five or 10 years—to really invest in renewable energy and conservation, than so much the better,” he says. “But if we just take those five or 10 years and delay what we ultimately have to do anyway, at the end we’ll be in a much worse position than we already are.”


SEBASTOPOL

Beer & Boobs Hey, Cletus! Get yer beat-up truck ready for a wild ride! I know ya’ll been waitin’ for the White Trash Summer Bash, so dress in yer nice ol’ cutoffs and tuxedo T-shirt—there ain’t gonna be no hog tyin’ going on, dagnabbit, but there are other buck-wild contests, like biggest hair, best mullet, an’ you know I’m’a enter the men-only wet T-shirt contest! Ya’ll comprende how crazy them ladies will go for our sexy farmer tans! Then’s the rootin’-tootin’ good times with some perrty ladies, like the iCandy Burlesque Dancers, and dancin’ wit’ DJs Will Magid and Malarkey. Ya’ll better not miss it on Friday, June 14, at Hopmonk Tavern. 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. $10–$15. 8pm. 707.829.7300.

S A N TA R O S A

Can Men Be Funny? Ever heard that song “Where the Boys Are?” Well, I’ll tell you where they aren’t—and that’s in comedy. I mean, can men even be funny? Let’s be serious here. Males traditionally make a living in masculine, serious jobs, like business and sports. There’s nothing funny about the stock market or getting a concussion during football, so it’s no surprise that men simply aren’t the funnier of the sexes. It’s just not the environment they’ve been nurtured for. Though it’s sad that men can’t give laughter to others, hopefully someday they will. In the meantime, at least there’s the ladies: the All-Female Comedy Night hosted by Helen Pachynski is on Wednesday, June 19, at Gaia’s Garden. 1899 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa. $4. 9pm. 707.544.2491.

S A N TA R O S A

Hooligans Unite! This weekend, various street-marching brass bands join together for the 102nd Annual Hooligan Street Faire to produce some epic music on drums and horns. With a lineup of the Black Sheep Brass Band, Orchestra Euphonos, the Hubbub Club, the Dixie Giants, Soup Sandwich and Church Marching Band, the fair is a fundraiser for the Arlene Francis Center as well as a final send-off for Church Marching Band before they attend HONK! Fest West in Seattle. Dance barefoot in the street (who cares!), ‘cause Lagunitas IPA will be on tap. The fun starts on Friday, June 14, at Arlene Francis Center. 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa. $8–$12. 6pm. 707.528.3009.

CORTE MADERA

Apple a Day My total idiot of an editor soaked his iPhone in the ocean last week. He did the whole shebang with the bag of rice, then rinsed it, dabbed it with alcohol, threw it in rice again—and it worked! This allowed him to be thankful for all the hard work that Apple puts into—whoops! Scratch that. I meant to say the hard work that poor workers in China put into iPhones. Anyway, the company actually does important things, too, according to Adam Lashinsky, author of Inside Apple: How America’s Most Admired—and Secretive— Company Really Works, which explains the systems and strategies used by Steve Jobs that allowed Apple to accumulate a cult following. Lashinsky reads on Wednesday, June 12, at Book Passage. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. Free. 6pm. 415.927.0960.

—Anna Hecht

OMFG I <3 U, L.C. Lauren Conrad returns to Copperfield’s Books in Petaluma on June 18. See Readings, p32.

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CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide

21


ArtsIdeas Nadav Soroker

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YOOOU CAN COUNT ON US The old Conklin Bros. building will house the Sonoma County Museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new exhibition space.

Back on the Block Sonoma County Museum ready to expand in more ways than one BY GRETCHEN GILES

B

ack in dim old 2002, I enthused in these pages at enormous length about that unknown time ahead when star architect Michael Maltzan would transform the Sonoma County Museum (SCM) into a 44,000-square-foot, block-long international phenomenon including a James Turrell sky space, an Andy Goldsworthy nature installation and a Gaye LeBaron history room. Foie gras, now so very illegal, was even mentioned as a logical museum cafe food. It was all ďŹ gured to be completed in 2005.

OK, so big dreams donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always come true. The SCM returned Maltzanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s architectural models in 2006 and waited out the recession like the rest of us. Then came developers Hugh Futrell and Bill Carle, full of plans to renovate the maliciously ugly downtown AT&T building near Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s core, give the bottom space over to the SCM, lease the upper spaces and call the whole thing Museum on the Square. It sounded groovy then, and it still does, except now it wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be called Museum on the Square and the SCM wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be in it. Instead, the SCM has decided to go ahead with plans to take over the Conklin Brothers building it owns next door on Seventh Street

and turn it into an exhibition and new media space. The old Federalist post office that has housed the SCM since the turn of the last century will be devoted exclusively to Sonoma County history. And executive director Diane Evans is more than ready for this transition to begin. Speaking by phone while vacationing in Maui, Evans sounds relaxed and glad to have a decision made. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People were disappointed to some extent because we had waited so long,â&#x20AC;? she says of the reaction to letting the Museum on the Square idea go. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But it got harder to do that. We knew we needed to expand, so it feels great to be able to say that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re cleaning out the building and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right there, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right next door.â&#x20AC;?

She laughs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I went in there and started ripping off wallpaper. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very exciting!â&#x20AC;? But the shows, quite literally, must go onâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and the SCM has long planned to spend a good season featuring the work of differently abled artists supported by Creative Growth in Oakland, Becoming Independent in Santa Rosa, as well as NAMI and Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wellness and Advocacy Center. Evans spent time in Korea last September and was struck by the work of Korean and Japanese artists sheltered by Creative Growthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Asian network. Upon return, she selected painter Bob Nugent as a co-curator, and went to Creative Growthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oakland site, stunned by the offerings. The result, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Margins to Mainstream: Contemporary Artists with Disabilities,â&#x20AC;? opens June 15. Several of the artists are collected by New Yorkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s MoMA, and two in particularâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Dan Miller and William Scottâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;are full-ďŹ&#x201A;edged artworld darlings. Often, work by developmentally disabled or differently abled folks is put up for sale to beneďŹ t those nonproďŹ ts that serve them. This exhibit is different; the work is canonized, not sold. Nugent sees this as an exciting twist. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think that having people from Becoming Independent and Creative Growth participate in exhibits like this in a different setting gets the work appreciated in a different way,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you change the venue, you bring another quality to the work.â&#x20AC;? As the SCM prepares to change its own venue, it too will assuredly bring another quality to the work. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Margins to Mainstreamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs June 15â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sept. 15. It opens with a reception on Saturday, June 15, from 4pm to 6pm. 425 Seventh St., Santa Rosa. Free. 707.579.1500.


Four local plays justify their existence BY DAVID TEMPLETON

A

The Raven is proud to offer wines from Selby Winery.

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Evita is a Cinderella story turned on its head – the little girl from Los Toldos, a dirty, poor village far from Buenos Aires. But this Cinderella isn’t a pure, good girl winning her prince almost by chance; she’s driven to gain fame and power by any means, vowing to plow under anyone who would try to get in her way. The saga of Eva Peron is set to the music of Andrew Lloyd Webber.

6/12-26/13

“Well, we make it rain, live onstage, for one thing!” writes Laurie Glodowski, director of Singin’ in the Rain (June 14–July 7) at Sixth Street Playhouse, featuring Nick Chuba, Denise EliaYen and Trevor Hoffmann as Don,

June 21– July 14 433-6335

s if we North Bay residents didn’t already have too many entertainment opportunities every weekend, local theaters are making it even harder to decide what to do with our spare time. This weekend, four different theater companies open four new shows. Rather than choose one to preview, I invited all four to send a note telling me what their show has to offer that is unique and/ or outrageous enough to deserve theatergoers’ muchdivided attention.

www.raventheater.org

433-6335

Pick Me!

www.raventheater.org

King’ opens this week at Main Stage West.

433-6335

THAT’S ABSURD Ionesco’s ‘Exit the

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Stage

Kathy and Cosmo. The production, based on the beloved movie musical, features some of the best songs ever written, performed by a first-rate orchestra, and some pretty sensational tap-dancing. “And,” Glodowski adds, “our Cosmo really can do that runningup-the-wall thing!” At the Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, where the company is hard at work on Tennessee Williams’ Night of the Iguana (June 14–23), director Jim dePriest admits that the appeal of the new production is at least partly educational. “The local high school students and their teacher loved the idea of seeing this work by one of our greatest playwrights,” he says. DePriest also suggests that audiences will be impressed with the technical and visual detail of the play, about lost souls seeking a second chance at a run-down hotel in Mexico in the 1940s. “Scenically,” dePriest says, “we are producing the script with as much realism as possible.” With Eugene Ionesco’s Exit the King, running June 13–30 at Main Stage West, director Beth Craven gives the strength of her show’s performances as the chief reason to check out the rarely performed end-of-the-world absurdist romp. It is, she writes, “a master acting vehicle for its main character, King Berenger, played to the hilt by playwright and solo performer Fred Curchack. It is one of the few plays that Fred admits he’s always wanted to perform in. This will be a highly memorable moment in our regional theater.” The cast is also a big part of the appeal of Martin McDonagh’s Lonesome West (June 13–30), presented at the Sonoma Community Center by Narrow Way Stage Company. “The story centers around Valene and Coleman, two Irish brothers,” says director Chris Ginesi, “and we’ve cast Nick Christenson, our artistic director, and Jon Christenson, Nick’s brother in real life. Jon is bringing a fire from deep within him, and the explosive back-and-forth between him and Nick is absolutely riveting.”


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t’s not your father’s Superman, but is it your kid’s? Man of Steel reprises the plot of Superman II (1980), with Earth attacked by a squad of evil Kryptonians. Their leader, the fascist General Zod (Michael Shannon) sports a Mongol beard and a mark of Cain scar; he escaped from entombment in living fiberglass in the Phantom Zone.

Can Superman stop them? Maybe. Henry Cavill plays the part with simplicity. Director Zack Snyder prepares us for the circusy uniform by muting the colors and animating the cape so that it’s jaunty even in a dead calm. Longtime fans get a small taste of what we came for: a balletic pirouette as Superman glides to earth with Lois Lane (Amy Adams) in his arms. But mostly, Man of Steel is not a graceful movie, in form or subject. It is about things getting smashed. The filmmakers do the Christian

side of the story proud. Superman is 33, the traditional age of Jesus in his last year. In a moment of doubt, he poses in front of a stained-glass window depicting Gethsemane. There’s not so much of the Jewish side, though—the idea of Krypton as Superman’s Zion. Man of Steel gives us some of the most unhappiest sci-fi visualization of a planet since Prometheus. At one moment, the rise and fall of Krypton is illustrated in what looks like gilded debris from a 1930s World’s Fair pavilion. But is Earth any nicer? A muddy sepia tints Superman’s flights around the world; it’s “Spare the Air Day” even before the apocalypse begins. In Smallville, where Snyder tries to evoke something like the Kansas of Terrence Malick—an upended Radio Flyer; a torn, dying monarch butterfly—we seem to be viewing our world through a sheen of crankcase oil. ‘Man of Steel’ opens in wide release on Friday, June 14.


THE RETURN Les Nubians are at Reggae on the River, back at Frenchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Camp.

Northern Lights Getting out of town for the woodsier fests Ë&#x153; BY JACQUELYNNE OCANA

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ith summertime come festivals aplenty in Sonoma, Napa and Marin countiesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but what about the many just a short trip outside the immediate North Bay? Down south, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Outside Lands, Treasure Island and First City, but if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re like us, you ďŹ nd yourself headed up 101 North at least once a year in an annual migration.

A cherished music tradition on the West Coast and believed to be the ďŹ rst major reggae festival in the United States, Reggae on the River has ďŹ nally come home to Frenchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Camp. After years of controversy between the Mateel Community Center and outside organizers, ROTR has reclaimed its spirit and venue for this 29th anniversary party. Roots music is the foundation of the fest, and this year promises to mend old factions with positive vibes and incredible talent. Artists

include Morgan Heritage, Julian Marley, Anthony B, J Boog, Les Nubians, Tarrus Riley and others. The roots-to-fruits philosophy also brings back the Meditations, who played the very ďŹ rst ROTR in 1984. According to festival organizers, this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s event will be scaled back to restore the family vibe. Once hosting close to 15,000 attendees, there are only 6,000 tickets available this year. (Aug. 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;4, Frenchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Camp, Inyo. $190â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$250. 707.923.3368. www.reggaeontheriver.com.) What can we say about the Sierra Nevada World Music Festival, except that it has consistently provided one of the most impressive lineups every year since 1994? This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s artists include Damian Marley, Ghetto Youths Crew, Alpha Blondy, Max Romeo, Sister Carol, Gappy Ranks, Protoje and plenty others. (Alongside Gaudi and Jah Shaka, Sonoma Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own Comanche High Power will hold it down in the late-night dancehall.) Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s special about Sierra

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Fri, Sat, Sun &PENTAGON Mon DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THENow PAPERS Advance Tickets On Sale at Box OfďŹ ce! 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 6:50 No7:30 6:50 Show Tue or Thu FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:30 NR 5:00 10:00 10:15 AM VICKY Their CRISTINA BARCELONA First Joint Venture In 25 Years! Ă&#x201C; \Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;­£Ă&#x201C;\{äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;\Ă&#x17D;äŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;\Ă&#x17D;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;*Â&#x2021;ÂŁĂ&#x17D; 10:20 AM CHANGELING Venessa RedgraveAND Meryl Live Streeppresents Glenn CloseAM CHEECH CHONGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S National 10:40 RACHEL GETTING Theatre MARRIED HEY WATCH THIS 2009 LIVE ACTION SHORTS (Fri/Mon Only)) 10:45 AM EVENING Helen Mirren in 10:45 Sat, Apr17th at 11pm & Tue, Apr 20th 8pmAM 2009 ANIMATED SHORTS Only) Starts Fri,(Sun June 29th!

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 1 2-1 8 , 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

Nevada is the sheer variety of world music. While headliners ďŹ ll the Valley Stage, lesser-known bands from all over the globe play the Village Stage nestled in a shady grove of redwood trees. This is a family event, so kids are welcome everywhere, especially in the festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wildly eccentric Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parade. If you are bringing kids, make sure you choose quiet camping, since all-night sound systems have become the norm. (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;23, Mendocino County Fairgrounds, 14480 Hwy. 128, Booneville. $60â&#x20AC;&#x201C; $170. 916.777.5550. www.snwmf.com.) The Enchanted Forest Festival is taking root as the premier electronic music festival on the North Coast. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;intentional tribal gatheringâ&#x20AC;? deep within the redwoods of Mendocino Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;at a Boy Scout camp, no lessâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;offers an auditory banquet including Love & Light, Phutureprimitive, Andreilien and some 30 other DJs. Lasers and visuals from world-class designers create an otherworldly ambiance, as do elaborate altars formed around the trees. The festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deepest ritual takes its cue from the oldest traditions of sacred music, a dance-till-dawn ceremony thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been played out by pagan cultures for thousands of years. For many in our era, bass and tribal rhythms along with the deep whomp of dubstep are considered the organic, transformative sounds of modern sacred music. The amalgam of beats is like unraveling layers of sacred symbolism. Add this to the visionary art of Derek Heinemann and other live painters, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got one trippy forest gala. Remember: this event is 100 percent alcohol-free. (June 28â&#x20AC;&#x201C;30, Camp MasoniteNavarro, Highway 128, Navarro. $165. www.enchantedforestmendo.com.) Hip-hop . . . in Ukiah? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s true. The Cali Grown Festival features Roach Gigz, Rappinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 4-Tay and Mac Mall with reggae and dub artists. (July 20, Redwood Empire Fairgrounds, Ukiah. $20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$25.) And for the long trekkers among us, High Sierra has Robert Plant, Primus, Thievery Corporation, Steel Pulse and many others. (July 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7, Quincy. www.highsierramusic.com.)


NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | JUNE 1 2-1 8 , 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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CCALIFORNIA CA ALIFORNI N A NON-PROFIT NON-PROF O IT OR GANI NIZ IZZA IZ ATIONS AT ORGANIZATIONS

Music Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Fanny Ara Flamenco dancer appears with Manuel Gutierrez, Jason McGuire and Jose Cortes. Jun 16, 8pm. $20. Hopmonk Sebastopol, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Elvin Bishop The tireless performer sings his heart out in a special Father’s Day show. Ruthie Foster opens. Jun 16. $25-$28. Rancho Nicasio, Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Friday Night Live

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Weekly music series in conjunction with farmers market. Jun 14, the Magnolia Sisters. Fridays, 5:30pm, through Aug 30. Free. Cloverdale Plaza, Cloverdale Boulevard between First and Second streets, Cloverdale.

Hooligan Street Fair Featuring Black Sheep Brass Band, Orchestra Euphonos, Hubbub Club, Dixie Giants, Soup Sandwich, Church Marching Band and others. Jun 14, 6pm. $8-$12. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

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BLACK MA BLACK MARKET RKET BLUES B LUES $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

FRI F RI JJUN UN 2 21 1 / AACOUSTIC COUSTIC | JJAM AM | ANYTHING AN Y T H I N G G GOES OES !

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SAT S AT JJUN UN 29 / CCLASSIC LASSIC ROCK ROCK | ALT ALT | FFOLK O LK

SHANA M SHANA MORRISON ORRISON &C CALEDONIA ALEDONIA ALL S ALL SHOWS H OWS P PRESENTED RESENTED B BY Y THE T HE S SESSION E SS I O N R ROOM OOM U UNLESS N L E SS N NOTED OT E D

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Mozart Reqiuem & Bach Magnificat

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Performed by the Berkshire Choral Festival Chorus and the Santa Rosa Symphony. Conducted by Joshua Habermann. Jun 15, 7:30pm. $15-$35. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

HIP H IP HOP HOP | FUNK FUNK | SOUL SOUL

Rockin’ Concerts Series

$$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

Jun 15, Garratt Wilin & the Parrotheads. Saturdays at noon through Oct 12. Free. Montgomery Village Shopping Center, Village Court, Santa Rosa.

BURLESQUE B U R LE SQ U E | C CABARET A BA R E T | V VARIETY AR I E T Y

FREE/DOORS FREE/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

$$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

OPEN O P E N MIC M I C NIGHT NIGHT

EVERY TUES EVERY TUES AT AT 7PM 7PM WITH WITH EVAN EVAN FRI F RI JJUN UN 1 14 4

WITH W ITH D DENNIS ENNIS HA HANEDA NEDA FFREE/DOORS REE/ DOORS 7:30PM/ALL 7: 30PM /ALL AGES AGES

FRI F RI JJUN UN 1 14 4 / JJAM AM | P PSYCH SYCH | R ROCK O CK

7 0 7. 829 . 7 3 0 0 707.829.7300 S E B AS T OP OL 230 2 3 0 PETALUMA P E TA L U M A AVE AV E | SEBASTOPOL

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WHITE W HITE TRASH TRASH SUMMER SUMMER B BASH ASH SAT S AT JJUN UN 1 15 5

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FFANNY ANNY ARA ARA N NOCHE OCHE DE DE FLAMENCO FLAMENCO $$20/DOORS 20 / DOORS 7PM/ALL 7PM /ALL A AGES GES

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REGGAE R EGGAE | DANCEHALL DANCEHALL | HIP HIP HOP HOP

DJJ JJACQUES D ACQUES & D DJJ G GUACAMOLE UACAMOLE $$5/ 5/ LADIES LADIES FREE FREE B4 B4 11/DOORS 11/DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM/21+

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Cheap Trick Rockers who recorded the hits “I Want You to Want Me” and “Surrender” also penned the theme song to “The Colbert Report.” Jun 12, 7pm. $55-$75. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Jerry Douglas Dobro master from Alison Krauss & Union Station. Peter Rowan’s Big Twang Theory opens. Jun 15, 7pm. $35. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Arlene Francis Center Jun 13, Good vibes Hosted by DJ Kudjo. Jun 14, Hooligan Street Fair. Jun 15, Palasides, Conditions. Jun 16, Caterwauling Caravan featuring the Western Skies Orchestra. Wed, Open Mic. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Aubergine Jun 13, the Antiquators, Down North. Jun 14, Planet Booty, Chango B. Jun 15, J Boogie Dubtronic Science. Mon, artist and model Mondays. Tues, Bluesy Tuesday. Wed, 7pm, open mic. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Barley & Hops Tavern Fri, Jen Tucker. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.874.9037.

Burlesque celebration of tank tops, cutoffs, cheap beer and hot broads with Cabaret de Caliente. Jun 14, 8pm. $10-$15. Hopmonk Sebastopol, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Bergamot Alley

MARIN COUNTY

DeTurk Round Barn Jun 16, California Redwood Chorale. Decker and Prince streets, Santa Rosa.

Dutton-Goldfield Winery Jun 16, the Daves. 3100 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. 707.827.3600.

Epicurean Connection

NAPA COUNTY

White Trash Summer Bash

AMERICANA A M ER I C ANA | R ROOTS O OT S | A ACOUSTIC COUS TIC

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celebrating the music and spirit of Gypsy jazz featuring Tcha Limberger and the John Jorgenson Quintet. Jun 14-15, 8pm. $35-$50. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

6pm, open mic. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Jun 14, California Honeydrops. Jun 16, Alexa Wiley. 328-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8720.

Chrome Lotus Fri, Sat, Live DJs. 501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5643.

DjangoFest

Coffee Catz

Ninth annual festival

Sat, 2pm, bluegrass jam. Mon,

Jun 13, Dan Abella. Jun 15, Minor Birds. Jun 16, Ladies in Blouses . 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

Finley Community Center Jun 14, Steve Balich Band. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

Flamingo Lounge Sun, 7pm, salsa with lessons. Tues, Swing Dancing with Lessons. Jun 14, Cold Sol. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

French Garden Jun 14, Blue Jazz Combo. Jun 15, Maria Bija & Sebastian Link. Jun 17, New Skye Band. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Green Music Center Jun 15, Mozart Reqiuem and Bach Magnificat. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Heritage Public House Jun 15, Flyover States. 1901 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

Hopmonk Sebastopol Jun 12, Zeb Early. Jun 15, Flowerbox, Kingsborough, Marv Ellis & DJ DV, Dysfunctional Species. Jun 16, Fanny Ara. Jun 19, the Digital Connection. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hopmonk Sonoma Jun 14, Karen Joy Brown. Jun 15, Sean Carscadden. Jun 16, Sioux City Kid. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg Jun 14, Stephanie Ozer and Doug Lee. Jun 15, Mark Levine Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Jasper O’Farrell’s Jun 14, DJ Konnex. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Lagunitas Tap Room Jun 12, Dirty Cello. Jun 13, Jason Bodlovich. Jun 14, JimBo Trout. Jun 15, Pine Needles. Jun 16,


CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

1400 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.529.5450.

27

Wed, trivia night. Jun 14, Timothy Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neil Band. Jun 1520, Perfect Crime. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Occidental Center for the Arts Jun 14, Jen Tucker Band. Jun 16, Chappell and Dave Holt. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Phoenix Theater

Dig This Douglas Down-home dobro as Jerry Douglas plays Napa Wanna make it big in the music biz? Get a vest, some wool pants, old shoes and some kind of stringed instrument, sing about something nostalgic, andâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;boom! Get ready for a television appearance on a latenight talk show! All jest aside, for all the success the Americana genre has garnered recently, Jerry Douglas should be honored with a statue outside every general store in every small town in America. Douglas has been playing his dobro guitar on solo albums since 1979, and has 13 Grammy awards to his credit, including Album of the Year for 2001â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s O Brother, Where Art Thou? soundtrack. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s written songs for Mumford and Sons, and is an amazing producer and musician whose songs go deeper than most of those currently filling hipster iPod playlists. Douglas has played with Alison Kraus and Union Station since 1999, visiting Sonoma County with the group last year at the inaugural opening weekend of the Green Music Center at Sonoma State University. It was one of the most enchanting performances Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever witnessed, and Douglasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; solo songs were a highlight of the evening. He held the audience and the rest of the world in the palm of his hand without having to say a word. Jerry Douglas plays with Peter Rowanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Big Twang Theory on Saturday, June 15, at the Uptown Theatre. 1350 Third St., Napa. 8pm. $35. 707.259.0123.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Nicolas Grizzle

Sun, 5pm, rock and blues jam. Tues, 7pm, Acoustic Americana jam. Wed, 6pm, Jazz jam. Jun 15, Jakoff Jeff & friends, Maidens Sorrow, Maniacal Rejects, Speed/Wobbles, System Assault. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Quincyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jun 14, Cez. 6590 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park. 707.585.1079.

Redwood Cafe Jun 14, J&H Big Band. Jun 15, Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Bunchovus. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

River Theatre Thurs, Thugz. 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.3194.

Wed June 12

Cheap Trick

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Sat June 15

Jerry Douglas & Peter Rowanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Big Twang Theory Sun June 23

VAGABOND OPERA

An Evening With Classic Lily Tomlin

SIERRA NEVADA BREWING CO. PRESENTS:

Del the Funky Homosapien & Guests

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THE EVERYONE ORCHESTRA MATT BUTLER, STEVE KIMOCK, TREVOR GARROD, SUNSHINE GARCIA BECKER, EDDIE ROBERTS, JOHN KIMOCK AND MIKE SUGAR FRI 6/28s8PM DOORSs FOLK/BLUEGRASS

ELEPHANT REVIVAL FRI 7/5s8PM DOORSs REGGAE

MIDNITE

Sat June 29

Berlin plus Big Country Fri July 5 FREE SHOW Sun July 7

<Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ä?Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;ÄŽĆ&#x152;Ä&#x17E;plus J Boog, Aaradhna & Hot Rain Thur July 18 & Fri July 19

Jewelâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Greatest Hits Tour Sat July 20

Mary Chapin Carpenter & Marc Cohn Sat July 27 Ladies Night In Napa~An Evening Of Comedy Presented By KGO 810 Featuring

Ĺ&#x161;Ć&#x152;Ĺ?Ć?Ć&#x;ĹśÄ&#x201A;WÄ&#x201A;Ç&#x152;Ć?Ĺ?Ć&#x161;Ç&#x152;ĹŹÇ&#x2021;Í&#x2022;dÄ&#x201A;žžÇ&#x2021;WÄ&#x17E;Ć?Ä?Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĹŻĹŻĹ?Í&#x2022; Mary Lynn Rajskub, Loni Love Fri Aug 2

PLUS DJ JACQUES (WBLK)

:Ä&#x17E;ÄŤĆ&#x152;Ĺ?Ä&#x161;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;Ć? & The Abiders

&2)s8:45PM DOORSs DANCE HITS/PARTY BAND

Kenny Loggins plus Blue Sky Riders

AN EVENING WITH

WONDERBREAD 5 .O#HILDREN5NDERTO!LL!GES3HOWS 0ETALUMA"LVD 0ETALUMA

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WWWMCNEARSCOM

Sat Aug 3 SOLD OU

Fri Aug 9 T!

Anjelah Johnson Wed Aug 14

>Ĺ˝Ć?>ŽŜÄ&#x17E;ĹŻÇ&#x2021;Ĺ˝Ç&#x2021;Ć?Ä?ŽƾĆ?Ć&#x;Ä? Planning an event? Contact us for rental info

1350 Third St, Napa | 707.259.0123 www.uptowntheatrenapa.com

Riverside Bistro Fri, Jazz on the River with the Peter Welker Sextet. 54 E Washington St, Petaluma. 707.773.3200.

The Rocks Bar & Lounge Fri and Sat, Top 40 DJs hosted by DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.

Russian River Brewing Co Jun 16, Three Times Bad. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

Ruth McGowanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewpub

Monday ~ Open Mic Night with Austin DeLone 7:30pm :HG-XQHĂŁSP

Gina Sicilia

7KXU-XQHĂŁSP

New Orleans Suspects with PHPEHUVRIRads, Neville Bros, Dirty Dozen & James Brown Band IRRGIURPSusan Spicer's Bayona )UL-XQHĂŁSP

Pride & Joy Live

6DW-XQHĂŁDP Music Brunch FREE SHOW

with Hobo

Paradise

Sun, Evening Jazz with Gary Johnson. Jun 15, Josh Bishop. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

&ORVHGIRUSULYDWHHYHQWDWSP 6XQ-XQHĂŁDP

Society: Culture House

FREE SHOW with Matt Eakle 6XQ-XQHĂŁSP

Sun, Church on Sundays. Jun 12, Jami Jamison Band. Wed, North Bay Blues Revue. Thurs, Casa Rasta. Jun 19, Nate Lopez. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Sonoma Valley Moose Lodge the Grain. Jun 19, Grandpa Banana. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Pamela Rose and Tammy Hall. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Jun 15, Solo Flight. 20580 Broadway, Sonoma.

Main Street Station

Monroe Dance Hall

Jun 14, Susan Sutton. Jun 15,

Jun 15, Stompy Jones.

Jun 15, Peter Welker Bay Area

Sonoma-Cutrer

) 28

Live Music Sunday Brunch

Jason Crosby & Friends

Come see us! Wedâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Fri, 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9 Sat & Sun, 11:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8

Brewery Tours Daily at 3! 1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

w w w.L AGU N ITAS.com

IHDWXULQJDave Schools, Leslie Mendelson, Jay Lane, Jeff Chimenti & Very Special Guests 0RQ-XQHĂŁSP

Locals NightIHDWXULQJThe Emma Lee Project & Family Style Specials 7XH-XQHĂŁSPĂŁILOP ro*co films presents:

The Invisible War

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave Mill Valley CafĂŠ 415.388.1700 | Box Office 415.388.3850

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 1 2-1 8 , 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub


NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | JUNE 1 2-1 8 , 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

28

Open House

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Music ( 27

Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

All Stars. 4401 Slusser Rd., Windsor. 707.237.3489.

Sunflower Center

DIN N E R & A SHOW

MAURICE TANI’S 77 EL DEORA Jun 14 with PAM BRANDON

Jun 15, To Life. 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

Sat

Toad in the Hole Pub

Fri

Drop-in

Genre-Bending 8:30 DANNY CLICK & THE HELL YEAHS! Jun 15 Original Americana/Texas Blues 8:30 Fri MIKE LIPSKIN & DINAH LEE Jun 21 Great American Songbook 8:00 / No Cover Sat Best Album of the Year Jun 22 FROBECK Original Funk R&B and Rock 8:30

Boxing

Sessions

HOBO PARADISE Jun 23 1920s Ragtime Jazz Sun

Now Open! Meet the Trainers Tour the Gym

5:00 / No Cover

Fri

Jun 28

Rancho Debut!

BUCK NICKELS

AN D LOOSE CHA NGE

New Country Music 8:00

STEVE LUCKY AND THE Jun 29 R H UMBA BUMS WITH MISS CARMEN GETIT 8:30 Sat

 BBQs On The Lawn!  FATHER’S DAY BBQ WITH

Sun

Jun 16 ELVIN BISHOP & RUTHIE FOSTER

350 E St Ste 102 ground floor

707.5 40.0 185 Santa Rosa

Sun

Jun 30

MARK HUMMEL’S BLUES

HARMONICA BLOWOUT

Gates Open at 3:00, Music at 4:00 Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Jun 14, Chronic Town (REM Tribute), Add It Up (Violent Femmes Tribute). 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Tradewinds Mon, Donny Maderos’ Pro Jam. Tues, Jeremy’s Open Mic. Jun 12, Joe & Vicki Price. Thurs, DJ Dave. Jun 14, Johnny Tsunami & the Hurricanes. un 15, Ricky Alan Ray Band. Jun 19, Barnyard Stompers. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

MARIN COUNTY

Quartet. Jun 16, Dinnen & Lion Duo. Jun 18, Norris Clement. Jun 19, Jonathan Poretz. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Music School Spring Concert. Jun 15, Marble Party. Jun 15, Mazacote. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Sweetwater Music Hall

Jun 12, Bob Gordon. Jun 13, Wanda Stafford. Jun 18, Swing Fever. Jun 19, Dale Polissar Trio with Si Perkoff. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Jun 12, Gina Sicilia. Jun 13, New Orleans Suspects. Jun 14, Pride & Joy. Jun 15, Hobo Paradise. Jun 16, Matt Eakle. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Peri’s Silver Dollar Mon, acoustic open mic. Tues, John Varn & Tom Odetto. Jun 12, Soul Discipilz. Jun 14, the Soul Satellites. Jun 15, Tommy Odetto and friends. Jun 16, La Mandanga. Jun 19, Elvis Johnson Soul Review. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Terrapin Crossroads

Rancho Nicasio

Jun 13, Brian Cline. Jun 14, Levi Lloyd & the 501 Band. Jun 15, Mutha Cover. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Jun 14, 77 El Deora, Pam Brandon. Jun 15, Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs. Jun 16, Elvin Bishop, Ruthie Foster. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

142 Throckmorton Theatre

Sand Dollar Bar & Restaurant

Jun 14-15, DjangoFest. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Jun 16, Emma Lee. 3458 Shoreline Hwy, Stinson Beach. 415.868.0434.

Fenix

Sausalito Seahorse

Wed, Blues Night. Jun 13, Soul Power. Jun 14, Roger Glenn. Jun 15, Revolver. Jun 16, the Ugetsu Project. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

Jun 13, Curtis Woodman Trio. Jun 14, Buck Nickels & Loose Change. Jun 15, Crossroads

Jun 13-16, June Rambles. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

NAPA COUNTY Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant

Silo’s Jun 14 and , Jun 15, Garage Band 101 for Adults. Jun 16, San Francisco Jazz Quartet. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre Jun 12, Cheap Trick. Jun 15, Jerry Douglas, Peter Rowan’s Big Twang Theory. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

George’s Nightclub Jun 14, Rebel Yell. Thurs and Fri, DJ Rick Vegaz. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

STOMPY JONES Wed, Jun 12 10:15am– 12:45pm 7–10pm

Jun 14, Moonalice. Jun 15, Black Market Blues. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family SINGLES & PAIRS SQUARE DANCE CLUB

Thur, Jun 13 8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–10pm Circles N’ Squares Square Dance Club Fri, Jun 14 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7:30–10:30pm CALIFORNIA BALLROOM DANCE with Cha-Cha lessons and dance Sat, Jun 15 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 7pm–11pm Steve Luther brings STOMPY JONES! back to Monroe Hall Sun, Jun 16 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 5pm–9:25pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING Mon, Jun 17 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–9:25pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, Jun 18 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7:30pm–9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

San Francisco’s City Guide

Hopmonk Novato

Saturday, June 15

Mill Valley Library Jun 16, the Hipwaders. 375 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.389.4292.

6367 Sonoma Mtn. Road, Santa Rosa 707.545.8105 www.smzc.net

19 Broadway Club

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$399

Old Western Saloon

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515 Ross Street, Brickyard Center Santa Rosa • (707) 542-5588

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Mon, 9pm, open mic. Jun 12, Mari and the Monitors. Jun 13, Moetar. Jun 14, Manicato. Jun 15, Warrior King. Jun 16, the 7th Sons, the Eugene Huggins Band. Jun 18, Jeb Brady Band. Jun 19, Maka Roots, Stevie Culture. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

®

Jun 14, Fleeting Trance. Jun 15, Agency El 84. Main Street, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1661.

Osteria Divino Jun 12, Piro Patton Duo. Jun 13, Jay Standards Trio. Jun 14, Rob Reich Trio. Jun 15, Joan Getz

Snowden Band whose Google Analytics surely shot through the roof this past week. Jun 13 at Brick & Mortar Music Hall.

Tribute to Townes Van Zandt Chuck Prophet, Patrick Winningham, Sweet Chariot and seven others honor Townes. Jun 13 at Bottom of the Hill.

Dandy Warhols It’s been 13 years since their album “Thirteen Tales from Urban Bohemia.” Jun 15 at Amoeba SF and the Fillmore.

Fall Out Boy Pete Wentz reunites the band, continues the redemption of disco music. Jun 16 at the Fox Theater.

Camera Obscura Glasgow band who titled first album “My Maudlin Career” continues self-fulfilling prophecy. Jun 19 at Regency Ballroom.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.


29

Galleries RECEPTIONS Jun 13 At 4pm. Downtown Napa, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Metamorphosis,â&#x20AC;? outdoor sculpture exhibit with self-guided tour. Main and Third streets, Napa. At 6pm. Sebastopol Center for the Arts, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Up, Up & Away,â&#x20AC;? expressing aspects of flight. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Jun 15 At 4pm. Sonoma County Museum, Rodger Warnecke, Oakland artist, displays paintings after a 25-year hiatus from art. Also, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Margins to Mainstream,â&#x20AC;? seven contemporary artists with disabilities. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Sep 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art of the Line,â&#x20AC;? describing Schulzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s process. Through Oct 14, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Barking Up the Family Tree,â&#x20AC;? featuring comic strips with Snoopyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s siblings. Through Oct 27, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mid-Century Modern,â&#x20AC;? works of prominent post-war-era decorative, textile and furniture designers. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Finley Community Center Jun 18-Aug 8, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shared Vision,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Kathy Cia White and Gary Albright. Also, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Small Works in Watercolor,â&#x20AC;? works by the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Friday Afternoon Classâ&#x20AC;? of senior artists. Reception, Jun 20, 5pm. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Gallery 300 Through Jun 29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Untitled,â&#x20AC;? juried exhibition of local and international artists. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. Open Sat, 12 to 5, and by appointment. 707.332.1212.

At 5pm. Towers Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bright Summer Lights,â&#x20AC;? multimedia by Janet McBeen and oil paintings by Adele Pruitt. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

Graton Gallery

Jun 16

Healdsburg Center for the Arts

At 3pm. Gallery Route One, â&#x20AC;&#x153;GRO Artist Member Exhibition.â&#x20AC;? 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1347.

Jun 19 At 4:30pm. Marin Community Foundation, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Breaking Barriers,â&#x20AC;? featuring work by Bay Area artists with disabilities. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato.

SONOMA COUNTY Calabi Gallery Through Jul 13, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Intimate Enigmas,â&#x20AC;? abstract stone sculptures by Easton. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Through Jun 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Soo Noga & BK Hopkins,â&#x20AC;? paintings and digital art. Also featuring pieces by Nina Bonos and Sherri Ortegren. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Through Jun 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Flying Home,â&#x20AC;? artwork inspired by jazz. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

RiskPress Gallery Through Jun 27, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Andrew Annenberg Masterworks,â&#x20AC;? abstract and surrealist paintings. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Jul 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Faces of El Capitan,â&#x20AC;? fine art paintings by Jeffery T Williams. Through Jul 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Into the Deep,â&#x20AC;? underwater photography by Jeff Lemelin. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Jun 13-Jul 20, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Up, Up & Away,â&#x20AC;? expressing aspects of flight.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 1 2-1 8 , 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Arts Events Reception, Jun 13, 6pm. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sonoma County Museum Jun 15-Aug 18, Rodger Warnecke, Oakland artist, displays paintings after a 25year hiatus from art. Reception, Jun 15, 4pm. Through Aug 18, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Margins to Mainstream,â&#x20AC;? seven contemporary artists with disabilities. Reception, Jun 15, 4pm. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Jun 16, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art Rewards the Student,â&#x20AC;? work by elementary school students inspired by Roger Shimomura. Through Jun 16, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Minidoka on My Mind,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Roger Shimomura. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Towers Gallery Through Jun 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bright Summer Lights,â&#x20AC;? multimedia by Janet McBeen and oil paintings by Adele Pruitt. Reception, Jun 15, 5pm. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

1030 Main Street S in downtown Napa N TTickets ickets & Infor Information m mation

NVOH.ORG NVOH.O ORG

MARIN COUNTY

707.226.7372 707.226.73 372

Bolinas Museum Through Jun 23, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Asia Then,â&#x20AC;? photographs by photographs by Alfred Palmer. Through Jun 23, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Historical Paintings of Coastal Marin,â&#x20AC;? featuring pieces by prominent artists of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Through Jun 23, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Patricia Briceno: Dances with Wools,â&#x20AC;? art with felted wool, silk and dyes. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

TWEET @NVOH FOR A CHANCE TO WIN TICKETS Visit NVOH.org for contest rules.

"The Errant Tree of Life" by Easton, 2012

Open Wed thru Sun, 11 to 5pm 144 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma

707tcalabigallery.com

Gallery Route One

FATOUMATA F AT TOUMA ATA DIAWARA DIA AWA ARA A TThursday, hursday, June June 20, 20, 8 PM PM

Jun 14-Jul 21, â&#x20AC;&#x153;GRO Artist Member Exhibition.â&#x20AC;? Reception, Jun 16, 3pm. Salon, Jul 21, 4pm. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

MARIACHI DIVAS DIV VAS A Saturday, S aturday, June June 22, 22, 8 PM PM

Marin Community Foundation Jun 14-Sep 27, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Breaking Barriers,â&#x20AC;? featuring work by Bay Area artists with disabilities. Reception, Jun 19, 4:30pm. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon) Fri, 9 to 5.

32

MARK HUMMEL HUMMELâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BLUES HARMONICA BLOW BLOWOUT WOUT

At the Veterans Building 282 South High St. Sebastopol, CA 95472 707.829.4797 www.sebarts.org

LITTLE W WALTER A ALLT TER TRIBUTE TRIBUT TE TThursday, hursday, June J un e 2 27, 7, 8 PPM M

GREG BROWN

Saturday, S aturday, June June 29, 29, 8 PM PM


NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | JUNE 1 2-1 8 , 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

30 A E

( 29

Marin MOCA Through Jul 14, “Summer National Juried Exhibition,” featuring 45 pieces selected from hundreds of entries. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Seager Gray Gallery Through Jun 30, “Mysterious Barricades,” paintings by Devorah Jacoby. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

NAPA COUNTY di Rosa Through Jun 30, “From Two Worlds,” photography by Linda Connor. Largest collection of contemporary Bay Area art. Tours daily. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

Downtown Napa Jun 13-Jan 1, “Metamorphosis,” outdoor sculpture exhibit with self-guided tour. Reception, Jun 13, 4pm at Downtown Joe’s. Main and Third, Napa.

ECHO Gallery Through Jul 6, “The Great Wall of Doof,” installation by Tim Sharman. Through Jul 6, “Touch of Nature,” juried exhibition exploring the wild and wonderful ways of nature in all media. 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.

Gordon Huether Gallery Through Jul 31, “Norcal Modern,” new paintings by Grace Slick. 1465 First St, Napa. 707.255.5954.

Napa Valley Museum Through Jun 30, “Jazzland and Other Stories,” paintings by Edmund Ian Grant. Reception, June 20, 5:30pm. Through Jul 28, “Miles Davis,” sketches and oil paintings by jazz pioneer Miles Davis. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 707.944.0500.

Comedy All-Female Comedy Night Hosted by Helen Pachynski. Adult content. Jun 19, 9pm. $4. Gaia’s Garden, 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

a fast-paced variety show with sketch comedy and more. Jun 12, 11am. Free. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-andcomers. Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Events Father’s Day Fathers get in free. Jun 16. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Festa Italiana Sonoma Food, wine, art, entertainment, bocce ball tournament, car show and music. Jun 15, 11am. Free. Rohnert Park Community Center, 5401 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.665.9472.

Marin Art Festival Local artists display their works and stiltwalkers, clowns and musicians stroll through the park. Jun 15-16, 10am. $10. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Opera in the Garden Dinner and performance by the Adler Fellows from the San Francisco Opera. Jun 19, 5pm. $140. Madrona Manor, 1001 Westside Rd, Healdsburg. 707.433.4321.

Shollenberger Shindig Music by Maria Muldaur on the farm. Jun 15, 4pm. $25-$100. Tara Firma Farms, 3796 I Street, Petaluma. 707.765.1202.

Sonoma-Marin Fair Theme this year is “Dog Days of Summer.” Bands include: Jun 19, Marshall Tucker Band; Jun 20, Kellie Pickler; Jun 21, Kix Brooks; Jun 22, Loverboy. Jun 19-23. $10-$15. Petaluma Fairgrounds, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma.

Wine Country Hospitality & Event Trade Show Event, destination and meeting planner show with over 100 high-caliber exhibitors. Jun 18, 9am. $45-$115. Trentadue Winery, 19170 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.433.3104.

Mark & Dre

Women’s Power Strategy Conference

Children’s program featured

Featuring California Arts

Council Chair Malissa Shriver as keynote speaker. Jun 15, 8:30am. $100. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Film Priscilla, Queen of the Desert Australian drag classic. Jun 17, 7pm. $10. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Artesanos Documentary about the role of the artist in culture and the responsibility of artists in society. Jun 12, 7pm. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Food & Drink Bourbon Pairing & Small Plates Dinner Take a tour of five bourbons with accompanying munchables. Jun 13, 6pm. $60. Petaluma Arts Center, 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Meet Your Farmer Dinner Featuring food from Sonoma Heritage Farm and ciders by Tilted Shed. Jun 19, 6pm. $30. Epicurean Connection, 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

The Audience Helen Mirren reprises her role as Queen Elizabeth II in new play by Peter Morgan. Thurs, Jun 13 and Sat, Jun 15. $30. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.5111. Also running June 15 and 20 at Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. $23. 707.525.4840.

Free Angela Documentary chronicles college professor Angela Davis and how her name wound up on the FBI’s 10 most wanted list. Jun 18, 7:30pm. $12. Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.528.4222.

The Invisible War Documentary explores incidents of rape in the American military. Jun 18, 7pm. $10. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

The Magician Ingmar Bergman’s classic tale of a traveling mesmerist and peddler of potions who is put to the ultimate test. Jun 15, 7pm. $10. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Project Censored, the Movie The annual almanac of uncovered stories becomes a movie. Jun 17, 7pm. $10. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Someone Like Me A raconteur recalls the love of his life in a drama that blends youthful romance with prejudice and classism. Jun 18, 7pm. $7. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Lectures Burbank Lecture Series Jun 12, Cheri Kraus of the Neighborhood Watch Program; $10. Luther Burbank Experiment Farm, 7781 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.9492.

Geology of the Mayacamas Learn the basic concepts of geology, earth history and the rock cycle with Rebecca Perlroth, SRJC geology instructor. Jun 16, 9am. $25. Pepperwood Preserve, 3450 Franz Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.542.2080.

The Gospel of Mary Magdalene Dr Lynne Morrow previews and talks about the music, story and production of this new opera. Jun 13, 10:30am. $15. Kenwood Depot, 314 Warm Springs Rd, Kenwood.

Landscape Painting Workshop Learn a bit of local art history and bring home your own masterpiece. Jun 15, 10am. $20. Bolinas Museum, 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.0330.

Native Grassland Management Training for wildlands management program. Jun 15, 9am. $25. Occidental Arts and Ecology Center, 15290 Coleman Valley Rd, Occidental. 707.874.1557.

Tales from Antarctica Sune Tamm, a specialist in extreme wilderness survival, and climate ) scientist Carl

32

Big Ideas

TEDx brings lofty goals to Santa Rosa TED talks can be fascinating. Lectures on subjects ranging from neuroscience breakthroughs and motivation techniques to new musical languages dot the top 40 most-viewed talks, with the top one being watched over 16 million times. These conferences have inspired independently organized events, known as TEDx conferences, in smaller venues. The theme for this year’s TEDx Sonoma County is “More?” It features mostly locals—notably the cyclist Levi Leipheimer. Richard Heinberg, our cover star this week, will speak, as will James H. Carrott, author of a book on steampunk culture. The list of 15 speakers also includes a high school humanities teacher, the founder of a company that builds houses of less than 100square feet, a humanitarian philanthropist, a KPFA gospel radio show host, a former instructor at Top Gun Flight School, the recently appointed assistant director of human services of Sonoma County and other diverse personalities. But it will be most interesting to see what Leipheimer, the former Tour de France and Tour of California winner who was banned for the sport for six months and subsequently kicked off his racing team after admitting to doping and ratting out his former pal Lance Armstrong, has in store for his talk on the subject “More?” (the theme specifically includes a question mark). TEDx takes place Saturday, June 15, at Jackson Theater at Sonoma Country Day School. 4400 Day School Place, Santa Rosa. 1pm. $40. 707.284.3200.—Nicolas Grizzle


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June 15 Peter Welkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bay Area All-Stars Featuring Deborah Winters Tickets $35

July 20 Alan Pasqua Trio 3 time Grammy Award Winning jazz pianist Tickets $50

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August 17 Bill Champlin with Special Friends 2 time Grammy Award Winner Tickets $50

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Mears presents photos and stories of Antarctica. Jun 15, 4pm. $10. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

TEDx Sonoma County Talks from brilliant innovators on the theme “More?” Jun 15, 1pm. $25-$40. Jackson Theater, Sonoma Country Day School, 4400 Day School Place, Santa Rosa. 707.284.3200.

Why Website Goals Matter Seminar focuses on making a functional website. Jun 13, 6:30pm. Free. O’Reilly & Associates, 1005 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. 707.827.7190.

Readings climbing classes weight equipment and yoga 3358a Coffey Lane Santa Rosa www.vertexclimbing.com

Featuring: John Prine Angelique Kidjo Taj Mahal

Marianne Faithfull Greg Brown Iris Dement Irma Thomas Madeleine Peyroux Dave Alvin

Rebirth Brass Band Paul Thorn Band Brothers Comatose Elephant Revival Red Molly  Poor Man’s Whiskey Perla Batalla  Coyote Grace  Wavy gravy  The Sam Chase Alice Di Micele  Smokehouse Gamblers  and many more…

AT BEAUTIFUL BLACK OAK RANCH • LAYTONVILLE Tickets & Info. 415-256-8499 (Inticketing) www.katewolfmusicfestival.com

Book Passage Jun 12, 6pm, “Inside Apple: How America’s Most Admired–and Secretive–Company Really Works” with Adam Lashinsky. Jun 13, 7pm, “The Son” with Philipp Meyer. Jun 14, 7pm, “Monkey Mind” with Dan Smith. Jun 15, 1pm, “Octopus Alone” with Divya Srinivasan. Jun 15, 4pm, “Ape: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur-How to Publish a Book” with Guy Kawasaki, includes book and appetizers $45. Jun 15, 4pm, “Yesterday’s Echo” with Matt Coyle. Jun 15, 7pm, “Mama’s Child” with Joan Lester. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960. Jun 17, 7pm, “The Attacking Ocean: The Past, Present, and Future of Rising Sea Levels” with Brian Fagan. Jun 18, 7pm, “The Magical Stranger: A Son’s Journey into His Father’s Life” with Stephen Rodrick. Jun 19, 7pm, “Transatlantic” with Colum McCann. $30. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Jun 12, 7pm, “Snacks” with Marcy Smothers. Jun 13, 7pm, “Here, Everything Is Dreaming: Poems and Stories” with Robert Moss. Jun 19, 7pm, “Safe Kids, Smart Parents: What Parents Need to Know to Keep Their Children Safe” with Dr. Rebecca Bailey. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Jun 15, 1:30pm, “Overcoming Fear” with Devin Lafferty. Jun 18, 7pm, “Infamous: A Fame Game Novel” with Lauren Conrad. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.0563.

Petaluma Library Jun 15, 11am, “Vinaigrettes and Other Dressings” with Michele Anna Jordan. 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Michael Pollan Jun 17, 7pm. SOLD OUT. Baker Creek Seed Bank. 199 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma 417.924.8917.

Toby’s Feed Barn Jun 15, 7:30pm, “Farmacology: What Innovative Family Farming Can Teach Us About Health and Healing” with Daphne Miller. $15. 11250 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1223.

Theater All My Sons Saga explores the changing sense of family, social responsibility and values. Thurs, 7:30pm, Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Jun 16. $10-$26. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

The Beauty Queen of Leenane Middle-aged, unmarried and embittered, Maureen is locked in a stalemate with her elderly mother in this comedy. TuesThurs-Sat, 8pm, Sun, 2 and 7pm and Wed, 7:30pm. through Jun 16. $36-$57. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

Carmen Georges Bizet’s classic opera. Cinnabar premiere. Dates and times vary. Fri-Sat, 8pm, Sun, 2pm and Wed, Jun 12, 7:30pm. through Jun 16. $25$35. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Exit the King Eugene Ionesco’s absurdist masterpiece starring Fred Curchack in the role of King Berenger. Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 5pm. through Jun 29. $15$25. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

The Foreigner Set in a fishing lodge in

Georgia, a British demolitions expert is trying to put his friend at ease. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 3pm. through Jun 16. $19-$25. Novato Theater Company, 5240 Nave Dr, Ste C, Novato. 415.883.4498.

Kimberly Akimbo Dark comedy about a family that puts the fun in dysfunctional. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 4pm. through Jun 16. $15-$30. Pegasus Theater Company, Rio Nido Lodge, Canyon Two Rd, Rio Nido.

The Lonesome West Two brothers in Ireland reconcile after their father’s death. Presented by Narrow Way Stage Company. Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Jun 30. $20-$28. Andrews Hall, Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

The Night of the Iguana Tennessee Williams play about a disgraced priest locked out by his own congregation. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Jun 23. $18. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

Prisoner of Love A single mom hooks up with a charming, intelligent guy who happens to be serving a life sentence for murder. Staged reading. Jun 12, 7:30pm. $10$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Singin’ in the Rain This 1920s-set romantic comedy is full of classic songs. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Jul 7. $15-$35. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

The Sound of Music What are a few of your favorite things? Sun, 2pm. through Jun 16. $20-$40. Mountain Theatre, Mt Tamalpais State Park, 801 Panoramic Hwy, Mill Valley.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.


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SATURDAY, JULY 13 AT THE ARLENE FRANCIS CENTER IN SANTA ROSA!

Live music will be provided by bands assembled totally at random just 24 hours before in the…

24-HOUR BAND CONTEST. Musicians, here’s your chance to take part in a totally creative experiment. Here’s how it works: you sign up for the 24-Hour Band Contest at www.bohemian.com. You tell us your name and what instrument you play. On Friday, we’ll meet and pick names at random, assembling bands made up of complete strangers. The bands will then have 24 hours to write two original songs and learn one cover song, and return to perform the next night at the NorBays! Are you in? Of course you’re in. Sign up at www.bohemian.com.

Preliminary write-in voting is now live for the 2012 NorBays! Vote for your favorite bands in nine different categories at www.bohemian.com. Preliminary voting will be live through June 19, when winners will advance to the final voting round on June 20. 24-HOUR BAND PERFORMANCES! WINNERS ANNOUNCED! GOLD RECORDS AWARDED! BEER AND WINE! FUNK AND SOUL 45S! LOCAL ARTISTS! GET YOUR PHOTO TAKEN! A GREY CAT IMPERSONATING MEL TORME! IT’S ALL HAPPENING AT THE 2012 NORBAYS! Saturday, July 13, at the Arlene Francis Center. 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa. 8pm. $5. All Ages!

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 1 2-1 8 , 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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Astrology

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of June 12

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) Irish poet Richard Brinsley Sheridan didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t conďŹ ne his lyrical wit to wellcrafted poems on the printed page. He used it to say things that would advance his practical ambitions. For example, when he ďŹ rst met the woman who would eventually become his wife, he said to her, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t you come into my garden? I would like my roses to see you.â&#x20AC;? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the kind of persuasive power I hope you will summon in the coming days, Aries. According to my analysis of the omens, you should have it in abundance. So whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the best use of this mojo? Is there anything you would really like to sell? What new resources do you want to bring into your sphere? Who do you want to convince? TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20)

In The Book of the Damned, Charles Fort revealed one of the secrets of power. He said that if you want power over something, you should be more real than it. What does that mean? How do you become real in the ďŹ rst place, and how do you get even more real? Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what I think: Purge your hypocrisies and tell as few lies as possible. Find out what your deepest self is likeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not just what your ego is likeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and be your deepest self with vigorous rigor. Make sure that the face you show the world is an accurate representation of whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on in your inner world. If you do all that good stuff, you will eventually be as real and as powerful as you need to be.

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) Long after the artist Amedeo Clemente Modigliani died, his paintings sold for millions of dollars. But while alive, he never got rich from doing what he loved to do. He expressed frustration about the gap between his ambitions and his rewards. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I do at least three paintings a day in my head,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the use of spoiling canvas when nobody will buy anything?â&#x20AC;? I hope you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t arrive at a comparable conclusion, Gemini. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crucial that you not keep your good ideas bottled up in your imagination. You need to translate them into practical actions, even if thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no immediate or obvious beneďŹ t in doing so. Expressing yourself concretely has rarely been more important than it is right now. CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22)

In 1967, dissidents dreamed up a novel way to protest Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s horriďŹ c Vietnam War. They marched to the Pentagon, the militaryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s headquarters, and performed an exorcism to purge the place of its evil. With the power of songs and chants, they invoked magic spells designed to levitate the 6.5 million-square-feet building into the air. Their plan didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t quite work in a literal wayâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the Pentagon remained ďŹ rmly ďŹ xed to the groundâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but the legend they spawned was potent. When I heard about it years later, it inspired me to become an activist. I see mythmaking as a worthy goal for you right now, Cancerian. Dream up an epic task or project that will fuel your imagination for a long time.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) In 1926, surrealist artist Max Ernst painted The Blessed Virgin Chastising the Infant Jesus in Front of Three Witnesses. It shows Mary vigorously spanking her son as he lies on her lap. Nowadays, the image doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seem nearly as scandalous as it did when it ďŹ rst appeared. Even some Christians I know ďŹ nd it amusing, welcoming the portrayal of Jesus as a genuine human being with lessons to learn. What would be your equivalent of creating a cheeky image like this, Leo? How could you achieve cathartic release by being irreverent toward something or someone you respect? I recommend it. (See the image: tinyurl.com/SpankingJesus.) VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22) Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prime time to promote cross-cultural liaisons and interspecies relationships, Virgo. I encourage you to experiment with hybrids and facilitate the union of diverse interests. You will be working in alignment with cosmic trends if you strengthen the connections between inďŹ&#x201A;uences that belong together, and even between inďŹ&#x201A;uences that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know they belong together. So see what you can do to facilitate conversations between Us and Them. Negotiate peace treaties between Yes and No. Look for legitimate ways to compare apples and oranges. LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22)

Gonzo

columnist Mark Morford wrote a list of liberated behaviors he wants to cultivate. Since youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in the emancipatory phase of your yearly cycle, I invite you to try some of his strategies. 1. Have a gentler grip. Let go of tight-assed attitudes. 2. Make deeper penetration. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be satisďŹ ed with surfaces. 3. Raise the vibration. Isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t it a waste of precious life energy to mope around in a sour and shriveled frame of mind? 4. Appreciate appreciation. Treat gratitude as an emotion of the same caliber as joy. 5. Cultivate ecstatic silliness. Develop a blissful ability to take everything less seriously. 6. Drink the awe. Allow astonishment to seep in. (More: tinyurl.com/morford joy.)

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21)

From an astrological perspective, now would be a good time to go on a meditation retreat for a few days or make a pilgrimage to your ancestral homeland. You would generate just the right shifts in your brain chemistry by doing something like that. Other recommended adventures: reviewing the story of your entire life from your ďŹ rst memory to the present moment; writing a brief letter to the ďŹ ve people you have loved best, telling them why youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve loved them; spending a day outside of time, when you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t consult a clock or use electronic media for the duration.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) Sagittarius comedian Steven Wright says he took a class in speed waiting. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now I can wait an hour in only 10 minutes,â&#x20AC;? he brags. I think you will have the same knack in the coming days, Sagittarius. Your patience is likely to be much more effective than usual. Results will come faster and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be more intense. The only catch is that you will really have to be calm and composed and willing to wait a long time. It wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re secretly antsy and only pretending to be imperturbable. CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) Let the boundaries blur a bit, Capricorn. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stick too rigidly to the strict deďŹ nitions. Play around with some good old-fashioned fuzzy logic. The straight facts and the precise details are important to keep in mind, but you shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cling to them so ferociously that they stiďŹ&#x201A;e your imagination. You need to give yourself enough slack to try open-ended experiments. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be smart to allow some wobble in your theories and a tremble in your voice. Magic will happen if thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plenty of wiggle room. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;One should be light like a bird, and not like a feather,â&#x20AC;? said French poet Paul ValĂŠry. How do you interpret that thought, Aquarius? In the book The Science of Self-Control, hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how Howard Rachlin expands on ValĂŠryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s idea: â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need to be spontaneous, but only in the context of some framework that allows us to attain higher levels of spontaneity; a feather is a slave to the wind, while a bird uses the wind.â&#x20AC;? Take heed, Aquarius! Your creative ďŹ&#x201A;ights will go further and last longer if you have a solid foundation to take off from.

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s call today Sigh-Day. Tomorrow, too, and the next day, and the two days after that. During these ďŹ ve Sigh-Days, you should feel free to let out big, deep sighs at a higher rate than usual. Allow yourself to be ďŹ lled up with poignant thoughts about lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s paradoxical mysteries. Give yourself permission to be overwhelmed with emotions that are midway between lamentation and reverent amazement. For even better results, indulge in some free-form moaning during your ďŹ ve Sigh-Days. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll help you release your full backlog of tension and give you more appreciation for the crazy beauty of your fate. (P.S. Try not to whine, though.)

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

žš NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 1 2-1 8 , 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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