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Bohemian

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A FAMILY FUNDRAISING RIDE FOR THE SEBASTOPOL UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT ARTS & MUSIC PROGRAM

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Third-class postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

At the Veterans Building 282 South High St. Sebastopol, CA 95472 707.829.4797 www.sebarts.org

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers Š2011 Metrosa Inc.

Cover photo by Sara Sanger. Cover design by Kara Brown.

5

nb THROWING SHADE

Hey, heat, how’s it goin’? Been a while! Yeah, I think I’m gonna get away and chill in the shade of some redwoods at Armstrong Woods. Cool?

This photo was submitted by Brad Lakritz of San Rafael. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.



 

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6

BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Rights Left Behind Our slow, sure chipping away of the Fourth Amendment BY PIETER S. MYERS

I

f you’re confused as to why it took an army of hundreds of militarized police to catch one wacko 19-year-old, then you’re not alone. Even my conservative, NRA-member brother-in-law who lives near the events in Boston has been radicalized. The defenders of our security put hundreds of bullet holes through houses along the street, miraculously avoiding civilian casualties, while it took some guy going outside to have a smoke to find the kid. Making a mockery of the Fourth Amendment, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) invaded and searched people’s homes, then questioned the suspect for 16 hours without reading him his Miranda rights. Strangely compliant, people then cheer and wave the flag. The original patriots would be appalled at this sad ending to a sad week in America. So would President Washington, who warned us about military takeover. So would President Eisenhower, who warned us about the military-industrial complex. The Supreme Court says that government drones can spy on your property without warrant, and federal judge Colleen McMahon has ruled that American citizens can be executed by the executive branch of our government without a hearing or public justification. Now the DHS has asked Congress to expand drone use in the United States to ensure “public safety.” Close to 5,000 people have already been killed by drones, a policy endorsed by President Barack (Nobel Peace Prize laureate) Obama, netting one terrorist for every 50 civilians. This occurs mostly in countries where we are not even at war, such as the latest terror bombing in Yemen. How can we not expect these misadventures abroad to harvest more bombings at home? The week’s events coincided with CISPA, the Cyber Intelligence Protection Act. Passed by the House, but blocked in the Senate for now, CISPA would allow wholesale harvesting of data from your phone calls and email for governmental and military use. If you want to fly your flag at half-mast this week, fly it for the death of the Fourth and Fifth amendments of the Constitution of the United States—torpedoed by our own drones. Pieter S. Myers is a printmaker living in Occidental. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Award Tour

At the annual California Newspaper Publishers Association awards luncheon on April 27, the Bohemian was honored to take home two awards. Competing in a category with 35 other weekly newspapers statewide, staff writer Leilani Clark won second place in the Best Feature Story category for her cover story detailing the crackdown on medical marijuana growers and dispensaries (“Smoked Out,” May 2, 2012). In addition, the Bohemian staff won second place in the Special Section category for our Best Of issue spotlighting longstanding local businesses that have thrived for 40 years or more (“Best Of: Legends,” March 21, 2012). Furthermore, Blue Ribbon certificates were awarded to William Smith and Sara Sanger for their Bohemian work in illustration and photography, respectively. This marks three statewide awards and seven national awards that the Bohemian has won in the last five years for excellence in journalism. Frankly, we’re honored and will continue to work hard to bring you the best paper possible.

THE ED. Blasting Sonny Rollins in joy

Why Buy Local? So goes the rant—buy local! But what’s in it for the local buyer, if it’s not a true local economy? Take local beer and wine, for instance. Why does beer imported from Germany or Ireland sell at the same price as beer made in Healdsburg or Petaluma? Why does wine from Italy and France sell for the same price—or less—as wine from Napa? This doesn’t happen in European cities, where the local economy is truly local; there, it benefits buyer and seller alike, where local products such as beer, wine, cheese and produce typically sell for one-fifth the cost of imports. The same goes for farmers market vs.

store-bought goods: the price difference greatly benefits the local consumer buying from local independent merchants.

Until that happens in the United States, until it happens here in Sonoma County, why pretend that local economy is great for everyone?

BRYAN FARRELL Sebastopol

Butter & Eggs Mania Highlights of working at a bar on Butter and Eggs Day? Where do I begin? (1) Dude getting knocked out by a kick to the face; (2) dude performing a notso-subtle handjob on his girlfriend on the couch in front of, like, 50 people; (3) me catching two dudes doing cocaine in the emergency exit hallway while I was taking out the trash, and, when I asked, “Hey, how’s it going?” them responding, “Oh, you know, just doing cocaine” (I kid you not); (4) person in a Chewbacca costume ordering drinks; (5) seeing a guy walk up to a girl at the bar, say something apparently very rude, and her immediately turning around and hitting him as hard as she could. I feel like I have a much better idea of what people mean now when they talk about “small-town values.” Basically, they mean handjobs, drugs and punching.

NAME WITHHELD BY REQUEST Petaluma

For the Birds “When the Swallows Come Back to Petaluma,” sung to the tune of “When the swallows Come Back to Capistrano”: When the swallows come back to Petaluma That’s the time you need to take down all those nets When you look at the bridge in Petaluma You will see poor little birds killed in the nets All the people on the ground are calling all around

Rants

The cruelty it astounds even hearts made of lead. When the swallows come back to Petaluma That’s the time you need to take down all those nets If you care about birds in Petaluma Please sign on, raise your voice, save the birds.

MONICA SCHWALBENBERG-PEÑA Via online

I have pledged $100 to Native Songbird Care & Conservation to help Veronica Bowers, her staff and her mission (“Bird Call,” April 24). I have signed the petition to remove the nets on the NSCC website. I have shared this horrible problem with over a hundred conservationists. If you can, please help. Please sign the petition at www.nativesongbirdcare.org, and please spread the word.

LARRY BRODERICK

West County Hawk Watch

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 1-7, 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

THIS MODERN WORLD

7

By Tom Tomorrow

Top Five 1 Renee Zellweger spotted

at Peet’s in downtown Santa Rosa, ordering a latte

2 Unknown dude with

a $200 Walmart bike dominates Sea Otter Classic

3 Wednesday Night Market set to return for the summer on May 8 in Santa Rosa

4 Good thing Moss hit that home run after 19 innings in Oakland, huh?

5 BottleRock BottleRock BottleRock BottleRock BottleRock BottleRock

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THE

Paper FAMILY TIES Jesús Guzmán with his sister, Diana; the two have been helping other immigrant youth and working for reform.

No More Risk The DREAM Alliance of Sonoma County works to keep families together BY RACHEL DOVEY

T

hey came with their entire lives in a folder.

That’s how Jesús Guzmán, one of the founders of the DREAM Alliance of Sonoma County, describes the 160-plus undocumented youth who came to the Deferred Action Application Fair on Aug. 18, 2012. “They had documents from anywhere they could get them, with a name and a date to show

where they’d been before age 16,” he recalls. The fair in the Roseland Elementary School gym was part of a national effort to turn these stacks of papers into social security numbers for those called “DREAMers,” children of undocumented immigrants under age 31 who came to the United States before age 16. Known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), the Obama

administration’s initiative was signed into law last June, offering two-year, renewable citizenship to DREAMers who have lived continuously in the United States for at least five years. On that Saturday in August, the room was full of volunteers and lawyers behind folding tables, with handmade signs directing applicants through the complex process. The application for Deferred Action costs $465 and asks second) 10

Fiesta Grande

Courtesy DREAM Alliance Sonoma County

NORTH BAY BOHEM I AN | MAY 1-7, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

8

Roseland is a 100-year-old neighborhood that’s only a mile from city hall, and yet it is not included in, though surrounded by, the city limits of Santa Rosa. Officially, the city’s reasons for failing to welcome the neighborhood into the city involve sales tax and redevelopment; coincidentally, it is home to the highest concentrated Latino population in the Santa Rosa area. Make no mistake: this is Santa Rosa’s biggest shame. But for one night, Roseland, the bastard child of city planning that for decades favored a sales-tax revenue base over the well-being of its residents, gets to rise above. The always-packed Cinco de Mayo celebration on May 5 is more than the mariachi bands, the tacos, the lowrider cars, the breakdance contest, the chicharrones. It’s the night Roseland gets to sing its presence, loudly, until the day that annexation into the city finally comes. The alcohol-free, familyfriendly party is free, on May 5, at the old Albertson’s parking lot on Sebastopol Road. 3pm-9pm.

Grinding Halt What if the stalled economy stays that way? It’s highly possible, according to Richard Heinberg, author of The End of Growth: Adapting to Our New Economic Reality. A frightening clarion call for environmental awareness, Heinberg’s latest argues that natural limits on fossil fuels, a growing population, high levels of debt and continued underemployment are all signs that the pipe dream of an ever-expanding GDP could be well over. Author of 10 books and a senior fellow at the Post Carbon Institute, Heinberg speaks on “Navigating the New Economic Reality” on Wednesday, May 8, at the Glaser Center. 547 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa. 6:30pm. $10. 707.568.5381. —Gabe Meline

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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10

DREAM ( 8 generation immigrants to provide a paper trail for years during which many of their families lived and worked under the radar. Still, Guzmán says the atmosphere in that elementary school gym was both powerful and full of hope. “It was the first time we recognized that everyone in the room was undocumented, everyone was an ally,” he says, adding that although some of the attendees had been brought together before—to look into college resources for immigrant youth, for example—the fair was an explicit acknowledgment of citizenship status. “It took a lot of courage for folks to come out and be in the same room,” he says. “We’re taught in our own families not to say we’re undocumented, because it’s dangerous. It makes us vulnerable to deportation.” This has been especially true under the very administration responsible for DACA. In its four years in office, the Obama administration has deported 2 million undocumented immigrants, the same number deported by the Bush administration over the course of eight years. And while Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) may focus on people who have broken criminal laws—according to its website— local numbers tell a different story. According to the Press Democrat, in 2011, for example, only half of the 921 inmates released to immigration officials over the course of a year had been convicted of the crime for which they were incarcerated, or had any criminal record at all. Home ICE raids in the city of Sonoma’s Latino neighborhoods were an early catalyst for Guzmán’s activism. The 23year-old grew up on a small dairy farm in Sonoma, the son of undocumented Mexican parents who emigrated when he was one year old. As a high school senior in 2007, he remembers classmates beginning to protest the seizures and deportations by quietly excusing themselves from class.

And while he knew what they were doing, their protest wasn’t made explicit to anyone else. “There was no message, so it just looked like truants walking out of school,” he recalls. “It pissed me off, because they were trivializing what we were going through.” So he helped organize a walkout. When the group of roughly 125 students left their classes en masse, he remembers telling anyone who asked that the group wasn’t cutting school; it was trading biology or English class for a course in social justice. At the Santa Rosa Junior College several years later, he continued organizing around immigration issues, such as vehicle checkpoints and car impounds when undocumented drivers couldn’t produce a license. In the spring of 2011, when the statewide Dream Network began mobilizing around the nascent Dream Act, he and his sister, Diana Guzmán, began rallying around the bill, which would allow DREAMers to apply for student financial aid. After Gov. Brown signed the bill in October, the student group, now known as the DREAM Alliance of Sonoma County, turned its attention toward Deferred Action. There are 1.4 million potential DACA beneficiaries nationwide, with nearly two-thirds (900,000) between the ages of 15 and 30, according to the Immigration Policy Center. The rest are “future beneficiaries” between the ages of five and 14, who will be able to apply in high school. California has the greatest population that could benefit from DACA, at 300,000, with Texas (150,000) and Florida (50,000) as distant runners up. But though the group sees DACA as a momentous victory for immigrant youth, Guzmán says their recent push has been around their families, whom he calls the real dreamers. Speaking of that auditorium full of hopeful students back in August of 2012, he says: “It was fantastic that we had legal protection, but it still left our families vulnerable to deportation. Our own families are still at risk.”

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SOUNDCHECK Gray Rollin has toured with and cooked for Kiss, Katy Perry, Linkin Park, the Black Eyed Peas and many others.

Belly Up Rock-star chef delivers worldly comfort food in downtown Santa Rosa BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

F

or as much rockand-roll hype a certain barbecuesushi joint in downtown Santa Rosa enjoys, its only connection to rock music is loud volume. To truly eat like a rock star, one needs simply to walk a few doors up the street. Gray Rollin, chef of the new downtown Santa Rosa restaurant Belly, has been a personal touring chef for bands Kiss, Motley Crüe,

T-Pain, Tori Amos and Linkin Park. His new restaurant serves what he calls “new American” cuisine; it’s a melting pot of styles from the 40 countries he’s visited while on tour. There is no central theme, other than using ingredients from the West Coast and making diners happy, and he knows the route to that goal. “When your belly’s full, you’re happy,” says Rollin. Belly’s offerings will change with the seasons. Menu staples, though, include the crispy pork belly ($20) and the Asian quinoa

and kale salad ($10). The pork belly is crusted with ginger, garlic, salt and pepper, seared, then braised for about six hours in sake and hoisin sauce. “It’s literally the first thing we do every day,” says Rollin. “We use about four bottles of sake for it.” The result is a big hunk of tender, almost pull-apart pork belly; the crust is crispy, and the pork flavor shines. Rollin has worked wonders with the belly, and he accomplishes a similar feat with pulled pork. It’s smoky, in a somewhat sweet sauce,

and again the pork flavor sits atop the palate, right out front where it should be. But putting it on a pizza ($13) diminishes its appeal. The pizza dough serves only as a sloppy vehicle for the meat—a pork hoopty, as it were—and the cheese dampens the overall flavor. It would be better on its own, served like the belly, or perhaps in a corn tortilla with fresh coleslaw. Elsewhere on the menu, however, comfort-food successes are plentiful. The delightful twohog mac and cheese ($10) features both Mexican and Spanish chorizo mixed in with every kid’s favorite TV dinner. Though presented in a grownup manner, the rush of nostalgia from eating mac and cheese is thankfully kept intact. Rollin calls his fare comfort food “with a twist”; that twist includes worldly influences and healthy salads like tuna nicoise and roasted beet with goat cheese. On tour, he has to keep at least one meal kosher and one organic, gluten-free and vegan, so he’s familiar with dietary restrictions. “I don’t cook with a lot of butter or too much fat,” adds Rollin. “I’ve been around these guys long enough, so I know what makes them happy.” Being on the road and making food for a superstar band like Linkin Park means Rollin knows good rock-band tour cooking isn’t just about what’s on the menu; it’s also about when meals are served. Upon arrival, Rollin will have at his disposal a few hundred dollars of local currency, a translator and transportation to make sure the band’s meals will be ready on time. Sometimes, he’ll get a call to have dinner ready in 15 minutes, and sometimes this happens when there isn’t much available. While on tour with Blink 182, Rollin got a request from guitarist and singer Tom DeLonge for ahi tuna, but it’s not exactly of the freshest quality in Saskatoon, Canada. A stickler for quality, Rollin suggested DeLonge wait until the band stopped in Vancouver a few days later. “Whatever happens to that band, if I feed them and ) 14 they get sick, that’s my

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 1-7, 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Nicolas Grizzle

Dining

13

Belly ( 13

NORTH BAY BOHEM I AN | MAY 1-7, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

14

Motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; s Day

Come join us for

Featuring a Special Lunch menu! Hours:11:00 to 4:00 Dinner 4:30 to 9:30

Small Plates

Tortelloni ai Porcini house made tortellini in a black truffle cream sauce .................................. 8 Bruschetta agli Scampi rock prawns, garlic, lemon sauce served over toasted sourdough ...... 9

Insalatas

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sandyâ&#x20AC;? Salmon Salad spring mix, salmon, pancetta, egg, polenta croutons, white balsamic vinaigrette ...................................................................................................................... 14

Pastas

Linguine agli Scampi rock prawns, frazzled garlic, cream, lemon & dry white wine reduction.... 15

Large Plates Capasante al Tartufo SautĂŠed Sea scallops in black truffle sauce, shiitake mushrooms, white truffle salt ...................................................................................................................................... 18 Angello Arosto Sebastopol Farms natural raised lamb, roasted rib rack with a black current demi-glace ...................................................................................................................... 25

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ass,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I mean, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d let down 60,000 fans because one guy got sick.â&#x20AC;? He himself would be one of those fans, most likely. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My ďŹ rst tour was with Motley CrĂźeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my favorite band,â&#x20AC;? says Rollin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And I used to listen to Linkin Park in college to get pumped up before playing baseball games.â&#x20AC;? Now he gets to watch each night from the stage. Dream job? â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is,â&#x20AC;? he responds coolly with a slight smile.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;My first tour was with Motley CrĂźeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my favorite band.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Between tours, Rollin now has a home base, a restaurant to try new recipes out and hang up memorabilia, like the autographed crash cymbal from Linkin Park that sits above the 28 tap-bar at Belly. The beer selection is an admirable list of local and wellknown microbrews, rotating based on availability and taste. Though their lifestyle brands are similar, Rollin doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fear competition from the frostedtipped, ďŹ&#x201A;ame-shirt-bedecked chef who owns the well-established Tex Wasabiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, located on the same block. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He and I actually had the same tour bus driver,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great chef, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve heard heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an awesome guy.â&#x20AC;? The buzz is that thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a chance Rollin will be on an episode of Chopped in the next couple months, and he says heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ elded calls about doing other television shows. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My nameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on the radar,â&#x20AC;? he says. In other words, watch out, Guy Fieriâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s another bona ďŹ de rock-star chef nipping your heels. Belly, 523 Fourth St., Santa Rosa. 707.526.5787.

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OMA CO U N TY Cape Cod Fish & Chips Fish and chips. $. A dingy hole in the wall–just like a real chippy! This popular lunch spot offers perfectly cooked fish and chips to eat in or take out. Open daily. 7530 Commerce Blvd, Cotati. 707.792.0982.

De Schmire Hearty continental. $$-$$$. Informal, with emphasis on seafood. Generous portions, open kitchen, outside dining. Dinner, Wed-Sun. 304 Bodega Ave, Petaluma. 70.762.1901.

El Coqui Puerto Rican. $-$$. Authentic and delicious Puerto Rican home cooking. Plan on lunching early–the place fills up fast. Lunch and dinner daily. 400 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.542.8868. Gaia’s Garden Vegetarian. $. International buffet with simple, homestyle food for just a few bucks, including curry and dahl, enchiladas, eggplant parmesan and homemade bread. Lunch and dinner daily. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491. Hikuni Sushi Bar & Hibachi Japanese. $$$. Terrific teppanyaki plus a full sushi bar, tonkatsu, udon and bento. Lunch and dinner daily. 4100 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.539.9188.

JhanThong BanBua Thai. $-$$. Sophisticated and delicate Thai cuisine. Fresh ingredients, packed with flavor. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Fri; dinner, Sat-Sun. 2400 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.8048.

Johnny Garlic’s California. $$. At Johnny’s, garlic is God–all dishes are infused with the glorious stinking rose. Lunch and dinner daily. 8988 Brooks Rd, Windsor. 707.836.8300.

Maguire’s Pub Irish pub. $-$$. Pub food–burgers, fish and chips, hearty salads. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch, Fri-Sun; dinner, Tues-Sun. 145 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.9800.

Phyllis’ Giant Burgers American. $. Come with a hearty appetite for an oldfashioned patty. Lunch and dinner daily. Four locations: 4910 Sonoma Hwy, Ste B, Santa Rosa. 707.538.4000. 1774 Piner Road #B, Santa Rosa. 707.521.0890. 924 Diablo Ave, Novato. 415.898.8294. 2202 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.456.0866.

Real Döner Turkish. $-$$. Casual, cafe-style ordering from a friendly staff. Get the coffee and buibal yuvasi dessert. Lunch and dinner daily. 307 F St, Petaluma. 707.765.9555. Sea Thai. $$. An oasis of exotic Bangkok with some truly soul-satisfying dishes. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Fri; dinner, Sat. 5000 Petaluma Blvd S. 707.766.6633.

Sugo Italian. $-$$. Bangup fresh food at prices that seem like a steal. Lunch and dinner daily. 5 Petaluma Blvd S, Petaluma. 707.782.9298. Thai Taste Restaurant Thai. $-$$. Lovely ambiance and daily specials showcase authentic Thai flavors. A hidden gem in Santa Rosa’s Montecito neighborhood. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Fri; dinner, Sat. 170 Farmers Lane #8, Santa Rosa. 707.526.3888.

Tonayan Mexican. $ Truly wonderful Sonoran-style classics at rock-bottom prices. The enormous El Jefe combination can’t be beat. Lunch and dinner daily. 500 Raleys Towne Center, Rohnert Park. 707.588.0893.

Toyo Japanese Grill Japanese. $$$. Well-crafted traditional Japanese with some modern extras like deep-fried mashed potato croquettes with

MA R I N CO U N T Y Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Avatar’s Indian-plus. $. Fantastic East-meets-West fusion of Indian, Mexican, Italian and American, with dishes customized to your palate. Lunch and dinner, MonSat. 2656 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.8083.

15

Mother’s Day Brunch Buffet May 12, 2013 10am–3pm Also serving Mother’s Day Dinner 5pm-8pm



On the Town Square Nicasio

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219 Take D St. to Point Reyes-Petaluma Rd. Left on Nicasio Valley Rd.

Roast Beef au Jus • Chicken Fricassee Wild Poached Coho Salmon with Champagne sauce Fresh Eggplant Parmesan • Baked Petaluma Ham Hickory Smoked Bacon & Applewood Sausage Potato Latkes with applesauce and sour cream Smoked Norwegian Salmon with bagels and cream cheese Seven Cheese Tortellini • Vegetable Tart Spring Vegetables grilled and roasted Herb Roasted Fingerling Potatoes Nicasio’s Cow Track Ranch Red Merlot Lettuce Salad Farm Fresh Scrambled Eggs • Buttermilk Pancakes Fresh Seasonal Fruit & Strawberries with créme friache Muffins, Croissants, Pastries & Breads, Cheesecake, Chocolate Decadence, and Brownies Coffee, Tea and Hot Chocolate

www.ranchonicasio.com

2695 ADULTS / $2295 SENIORS (65+) $1495 CHILDREN (UNDER 10)

$

Bubba’s Diner Homestyle American. $-$$. Comforting Momma-style food like fried green tomatoes, onion meatloaf and homey chickenfried steak with red-eye gravy in a restaurant lined with cookbooks and knickknacks. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun; breakfast and lunch, Tues. 566 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.459.6862.

Drake’s Beach Cafe Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Mon. 1 Drake’s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Fish Seafood. $$-$$$. Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner daily. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

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Frantoio Italian. $$-$$$. Perennial winner of SF Chron’s “100 Best,” Frantoio also produces all of its own olive oil. Dinner daily. 152 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.289.5777.

Il Piccolo Caffe Italian. $$. Big, ample portions at this premier spot on Sausalito’s spirited waterfront. Breakfast and lunch daily. 660 Bridgeway, Ste 3, Sausalito. 415.289.1195. Mountain Home Inn American. $$-$$$$. Great summer sandwiches with a view atop Mt Tamalpais. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley. 415.381.9000.

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 1-7, 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Dining

mayo. Lunch and dinner daily. 3082 Marlow Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.8871.

Dining ( 15

16 NORTH BAY BOHEM I AN | MAY 1-7, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Seafood/contemporary American. $$$$. Fresh from the bay oysters, upscale seafood, some steaks and a great burger. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 23240 State Route 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033.

Salitoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Crab House Seafood . $$$. Waterfront setting with extensive marine menu plus steak and other American staples. Lunch and dinner daily. 1200 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.331.3226.

Small Shed Flatbreads Pizza. $$. Slow Food-informed Marin Organics devotee with a cozy, relaxed family atmosphere and no BS approach to great food served simply for a fair price. 17 Madrona St, Mill Valley. Open for lunch and dinner daily. 415.383.4200.

7707.527.1200 07.527.1200 | ssales@bohemian.com ales@boh l emian.com

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16702 Coast Hwy One, Bodega 707-876-9818 www.scvilla.com

N A PA CO U N T Y Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Kellerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.4870. Boonfly Cafe California cuisine. $-$$. Extraordinary food in an extraordinary setting. Perfect pasta and mussels. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 4080 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.299.4900.

Busterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Barbecue Barbecue. $. A very busy roadside destinationâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;for a reason. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the hot sauce, available in two heats: regular and hot. And the hot, as the sign says, means â&#x20AC;&#x153;hot!â&#x20AC;? Lunch and dinner daily. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5606.

Cindyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Backstreet Kitchen Eclectic. $$-$$$. As comfortable as it sounds, with a rich and varied melting pot of a menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 1327 Railroad Ave, St Helena. 707.963.1200.

SMALL BITES

Sausage Fest Hunky Masa Women want him. Men want to be him. But all he wants is a good tamale. This summer, Ben Flajnik is the Hungry Bachelor. As the star of one of the highest-rated seasons of ABCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The Bachelor, the Sonoma winemaker returns to the public eye in a nontelevised, non-aped episode of the hottest non-xistent reality show ever not made. On Cinco de Mayo, Flajnik must make a choice: which tamale will win his heart, and the last and final rose? From which Mexican state will it hail? Will it be made by a sweet, loving abuela with a generations-old recipe? Or a hot, young newcomer who watches a lot of Food Network? Univision news anchor Maria Leticia Gomez is also judging the tamales, reporting her findings accurately and without bias. And the panel is rounded out by Randy Jackson of American Idol, who will proclaim each tamale more fantastic than its predecessor by saying, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yo Dawg, that was literally da bomb.â&#x20AC;? (OK, OK, that oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fakeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Randy Jackson will not be there.) Will Flajnik take part in the ballet folklĂłrico? Will attendees agree with the panelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tasting results? Will the combination of bouncy houses and pork-filled masa torpedoes turn out to be a bad idea? Find out on Sunday, May 5, at Cornerstone Gardens. 23570 Arnold Drive, Sonoma. Noon to 5pm. $15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$25. 707.480.1805.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Nicolas Grizzle

Compadres Rio Grille Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

FumĂŠ Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch,

Sat-Sun. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.252.9250.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

ffor or Motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day Day

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;WCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

Cellars of Sonoma Topshelf winos will want to roll down the tracks and check out this Railroad Square coop that serves product from six small family wineries. The attractive shop features the massive wood bar from the old Mixx restaurant, constantly shifting scenery on an array of flat panel screens ensconced in wine barrel heads and aroma seminars. Check out the dry GewĂźrtz and Estate Pinots. 133 Fourth St., Santa Rosa. Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Wednesday 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm, Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Saturday 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;7pm. $10 fee. 707.578.1826.

Francis Coppola Winery A Coney Island

La Follette Wines Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve heard of the brands heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s helped to create or saveâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Flowers, La Cremaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but do you know Greg La Follette? Find out why the man behind â&#x20AC;&#x153;big-hair Pinotâ&#x20AC;? is reinventing himself at intimate monthly tastings. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Terroir Tour with Greg,â&#x20AC;? select Fridays, 10:30am to 12pm. 4900 West Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. $30; call for reservations. 707.395.3902. Nicholson Ranch (WC) Best known for its Chardonnays and a winery tour from the depths of the caves to the height of the propertyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grandmother oak. 4200 Napa Road, Sonoma. Open daily, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm; tours by appointment. 707.938.8822. Ramâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gate Winery Fireplaces blaze away, ceilings soarâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;if the vibe is more executive retreat than tasting

MARIN CO U N TY Bacchus & Venus A trendy place for beginners and tourists. Great place to learn the basics. 769 Bridgeway, Sausalito. Open daily, noonâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7pm. 415.331.2001. Point Reyes Vineyards The tasting room features many varietals but the main reason to go is for the sparkling wines. Open Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sunday, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm. 12700 Hwy. 1, Point Reyes. 415.663.1011.

Tam Cellars Spacious wine bar quietly distributes the soul-salve of the ages and, like its soul mate the coffee shop, passes the laptop test. Cheese plates, wine flights and comfortable seating arrangements make a nice place to convene with the companion or flat screen of oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s choice. Wine shop features international, eclectic selection at fair prices. 1803 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. Open Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Wednesday, 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm; Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Saturday, 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm. 415.461.9463.

N A PA CO U N TY Acacia Vineyard Acclaimed Pinot and Chardonnay; their biggest client is Costco, but the tasting room is a hole-in-the-wall in a drab beige facility. 2750 Las Amigas Road, Napa. Monday through Saturday, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4pm; Sunday, noonâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4pm. $15. 707.226.9991.

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Darioush Exotic locale, with giant columns and a Persian theme, Darioush is justly famous for its Bordeaux. 4240 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open daily, 10:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm. 707.257.2345.

TEA TE A 1100% 0 0% organic organic

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Freemark Abbey In 1881, Josephine Tychson was the first woman to own and operate a winery in the valley. Enjoy the Cabs. 3022 St. Helena Hwy. N. (at Lodi Lane), St. Helena. Open daily, 10am-5pm. 800.963.9698.

On the Edge A key stop for devotees of the cult to Charbono. 1255 Lincoln Ave., Calistoga. Open daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5:30pm. 707.942.7410.

PlumpJack Winery Part of the huge empire in part helmed by Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom. Syrah, Merlot and more. 620 Oakville Crossroad, Oakville. Open daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4pm. 707.945.1220.

Raymond Vineyards Burgundy scion Jean-Charles Boisset has put his stamp on staid Napa producer. See the Theater of Nature, depicting biodynamics; feel the Corridor of the Senses; luxuriate in the members-only Red Room, party in the gold-plated JCB Room; or just taste good Cab in the club-like Crystal Cellar. 849 Zinfandel Lane, St. Helena. Daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4pm. Fees vary. 707.963.3141.

Robert Sinskey Vineyards In the lofty, barnlike hallâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;as elegant as a theater, as solid as a ski lodgeâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;visitors can take in the tank room action; at least, the gleaming stainless steel, framed by wood and stonework and brewpub-style chalkboard menus imbues the space with a sense of energetic immediacy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gluttonous Flightâ&#x20AC;? pairs savory munchables prepared in the gourmet demonstration kitchen with biodynamically farmed Careros Pinot Noir and Bordeaux varietals. Not to worry: thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no flight for ascetics offered, so go for it. 6320 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4:30pm daily. 707.944.9090.

Coming to the Barlow Sebastopol, Summer of 2013â&#x20AC;ŚCome visit us!

Voted Best Voted Be s t C Chocolatier hocolatier iin nS onoma County C o unt y Sonoma

Voted Best Bakery of the North Bay Since 2008 Artisan Hearth Breads & Fine Pastry 4"/5"304"t 5PXO$PVOUSZ%SJWF 4&#"45010-t )FBMETCVSH"WFOVF $"-*450("t -JODPMO"WFOVF

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of the wine that candidly promises fun for the whole family, from Rosso table wine to Directorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cut Pinot Noir; from poolside cabanas to an Argentinean-Style grill, plus movie memorabilia from The Godfather, Apocalypse Now, and more. 300 Via Archimedes, Geyserville. Tasting daily, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm; restaurant till 9pm. 707.857.1400.

room, consider that a positive. Pairings from oysters to albondigas; crispy cured pork belly to seared gulf shrimp; goat cheese tart to nicoise salad. Great views, too. 28700 Arnold Drive, Sonoma. Open daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm. 707.721.8700.

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3883 Airway Drive Ste 145, Santa Rosa 707.528.3095 www.chloesco.com Mâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;F, 8amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm

California Thai Restaurant MOTHERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DAY Sunday, May 12

angez Bien! Quiche Lorraine Squares Mini Croque Monsieurs Mini Savory Croissant Tray Pissaladiere Crotini Full Catering Menu Available

Serving chef specialties Open Daily

707.573.4777 522 Seventh St, Santa Rosa Brickyard Center

17 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 1-7, 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Wineries

Treat T Tr Tre eeaat M Mom om

NORTH BAY BOHEM I AN | MAY 1-7, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

18

Pale, Paler, Pinkest Drink rosé while the sun shines BY JAMES KNIGHT

W

ord is that demand for the rosé wine category is strong, so there’s little need now to lecture on its virtues. The hot tip today is “bespoke rosé.” That’s the term of art at Bonny Doon Vineyard, anyway, describing their pink wine made-to-order like a tailored suit. These crisp quaffs capture the zippy acidity and peak freshness of grapes that were picked just to be pink.

Chocolates C ho co lates & D Dessert e sser t Cafe Ca f e 110 Petaluma Pe t a lu m a Blvd B l vd North Nor th 110 D ow ntow n P et aluma Downtown Petaluma

www.vivacocolat.com w w w.v i v aco co lat .co m

707.778.9888 7 07.778.9888

Thai House Lunch specials start at $7.95 Includes soup or salad Mon-Fri only

Open 7 days a week Sun-Th 11:30-9:30 Fri-Sat 11:30-10:00 525 4th Street(Upstairs) 707.526.3939

Bedrock 2012 ‘Ode to Lulu’ California Rosé ($20) Those unfamiliar with this style might think it suspiciously pale—pale like an arctic dawn that will not arrive, like a watered-down memory of salmon-pink, one part to 10. Like Blanc de Noirs. The nose is aggressively flinty, while calling up a memory of Baskin Robbins peach ice cream—the kind with the little frozen chunks of peach—at the same time. Surprising texture and stone fruit flavors hint at barrelfermented Roussanne, but the cool, crisp fruit and fleshiness are just a tease that keeps the sipper sipping. 12.3 percent abv. ++++ Slang Wines 2012 California Rosé ($16) Made by Argot Wines, this pale Grenache-based beverage has a bit more color than the Lulu, with wild, real rose aromas and strawberry daiquiri, as smelt at arm’s length away. Pink grapefruit and underripe strawberry flavors quiver on a crisp palate, and what’s this—kettle corn, toasty oak? If there’s sizzling subtlety, this is it. An incredibly low 11.3 percent abv. ++++ Bonny Doon 2012 ‘Vin Gris de Cigare’ Central Coast ($16) Identical color as the Slang, crisp and a bit bitter like a can of fruit cocktail after the fruit is gone. The Vin Gris was a trailblazer, but this one’s so subtle, there’s not much to it. 12.5 percent abv. +++ Mill Creek 2012 ‘Santa Rosa’ Dry Creek Valley Dry Rosé ($19) Confusing name, geographically speaking: “It’s just a name,” the winery tells me. But you better bet it’s dry. Familiar, bright pink color, a little floral, with bitter maraschino cherry flavor, it’s Merlot, Zinfandel, and Cabernet Franc picked especially for this result. 14.5 percent abv. ++++ Horse & Plow 2012 North Coast Rosé ($17) Sour cherry and scoury, like a Brut rosé without the sparkles. Much of the fruit comes from Testa Vineyards northeast of Ukiah, where they have made lemonade—pink lemonade—out of their roster of old-fashioned grape varieties. 68 percent Carignane. 13 percent abv. +++ Pedroncelli 2012 Dry Creek Valley Dry Rosé of Zinfandel ($12) Now, is this just an affected way of saying white Zinfandel? Nope, they’ve been making this since 1951. Bright pink, with sweet cherry chapstick aroma that builds in the glass, but ducks away as soon as it’s swirled. Dry, as advertised, with watermelon candy flavor. 13.9 percent abv. +++

Voices of

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 1-7, 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Ryan Rodrick Beiler / Shutterstock.com

19

Dreamers

With the introduction of Obama’s Deferred Action program, more and more immigrant youth are telling their stories BY ESTEFANY GONZALEZ

‘B

ut they choose to come here.”

It’s a common argument one hears in the ongoing debate about immigration—that because immigrants choose to come to the United States, they deserve to deal with the results of that choice. But what if they didn’t have a choice? The Immigration Policy Center estimates that there are 1.4 million immigrants currently under the age of 30 who were brought to the United States before the age of 16; have lived continuously in the

country for at least five years; have not been convicted of a felony, a “significant” misdemeanor or three other misdemeanors; and are currently in school, graduated from high school, have earned a GED or have served in the military. These are the “DREAMers”— young immigrants named for the DREAM Act who were brought here as minors and who dream of one day becoming U.S. citizens. Often, DREAMers go unnoticed. Many do their best to keep their undocumented status secret for fear of being deported. Many

have lived and worked in their community so long that their citizenship isn’t questioned. And although some were brought to the United States as young as one month old, they have no way of applying for citizenship here. After the DREAM Act failed to pass the Senate, Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano announced President Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program in June, 2012. The program prevents DREAMers from being deported and allows them a work permit and, in some cases, a driver’s

license. The catch? An application for Deferred Action costs $465, requires a massive amount of paperwork, takes roughly eight months or longer to be processed, and, if approved, expires after two years. While the program does help DREAMers buy time while Congress continues to debate Comprehensive Immigration Reform, it does not alter one’s immigration status, nor does it provide a path to citizenship. There are untold numbers of immigrant youth in Sonoma County who keep silent about their families. But because of Deferred

) 20

NORTH BAY BOHEM I AN | MAY 1-7, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

20 DREAMers ( 19 Action, and due to “Coming Out” advocacy efforts nationwide, more and more DREAMers are breaking that silence. Here are some of their stories.

X

isamena, a 19-yearold Santa Rosa Junior College student, has always known she was undocumented, but she felt it the hardest after turning 16. While others were taking driver’s ed and applying for jobs, she says she realized, “Oh—I can’t get that.” Xisamena arrived in the United States at the age of three, and she quickly adapted to American culture. Although Xisamena wasn’t born in the United States, she says, “I feel like I’m legal, even though I know I’m not.” She’s proud of her roots and what her struggles have taught her, but, she says, “I don’t remember anything about Mexico. I should say I’m Mexican, but what is my true culture?” It’s not easy for Xisamena to tell others about her story. One of the first times she did was during a school assignment that required her to write her own constitution. In it, she gave herself freedom from her legal status by assigning herself and her family Social Security numbers. When she turned her project in, she had a moment of remorse. “I didn’t know what to do, I was in shock that I basically just told [my teacher], ‘Yeah, I’m illegal.’” Though no harm came from it, Xisamena didn’t feel safe sharing again— until now. “It’s taken me a long time to accept it,” she says. Both Xisamena and her brother applied for Deferred Action in August. They have yet to hear back. She attended three different application workshops, but decided to seek help from a private law office after she found some errors while looking over her initial applications. Private help wasn’t cheap, but Xisamena and her family didn’t want to take the chance of filling out the application incorrectly. “One mistake and it’s rejected. The lawyer wanted $500 for helping me

fill it out,” Xisamena says, “but his secretary told me she would help me for $200.” Xisamena hopes that once she gets her paperwork, she can finally have a sense of security; right now, she has a one-hour commute to attend college, and she worries about being pulled over every time she gets into her car. But another thing she looks forward to is traveling. Although Deferred Action won’t grant Xisamena her lifelong dream of going abroad, she wants to spend her two years of Deferred status exploring the United States—the only country she’s ever remembered calling home.

W

hen Jorge was six, his mother discovered that his father had a separate family in a different town. His father left shortly after. “In Mexico, there is no child support,” Jorge explains. “We all had to live in one small room because my mom became a single mom.” After years of suffering and instability, Jorge’s mother left him and his sister with an aunt in Mexico so she could come to America to provide a better life for her children. While crossing the border, she was stripped of her clothes and robbed by the man she paid to help her cross. Eventually, after about a year of working as a janitor, Jorge’s mother had finally saved enough money to come back for him and his sister. In her absence, Jorge became angry without any parents to provide guidance, and he remembers missing her so much that when she came back, “it felt like Christmas when you wake up and find your toys.” When Jorge was 14, his family journeyed across the desert on a blazing hot day for what he considers the most physically demanding walk of his life. Although the walk was long and hard—and resulted in horrible sunburn—the night was worse. “Regardless of how hot it is,” he says, “you have to bring a jacket, because at night, you’re freezing.” Jorge’s mother paid $3,000 per person in order to be led though the desert, and now, Jorge says, “I hear it’s even more.” As he was walking across the hot desert with

PROUD FACE Pillo says he’s open about his status because he wants other

immigrant youth to know that ‘there’s a light at the end of the tunnel.’

the sun burning down on him, he remembers being warned by his mother not to trust anyone after her first crossing experience, and thinking, “I’m 14 years old. They can overtake me and my family.” It was two years before Jorge realized that what he did that day wasn’t legal. At the time, he was very involved in his school’s book club, and together with his classmates, helped fundraise for a class trip to Italy. Once it came time to prepare for the trip, Jorge was asked to bring in his passport, but when he asked his mom, he didn’t get the answer he was hoping for. “My mom was just like, ‘Mijo, you can’t. You don’t have papers,’” he says. “That’s when I

knew this was going to suck.” Since, Jorge has realized there’s a lot more he can’t do. After he graduated, he went to his school counselor for help applying to college. He dreamed of going to a UC but would have needed financial aid, and as an undocumented student, Jorge was ineligible, even though he had good grades. The counselor told him it would be a waste of time to apply. “I was completely devastated,” he says, “but she was right.” Through all of this, the scariest moment in Jorge’s life was when he was pulled over by a sheriff in Rohnert Park and taken into custody for driving without a license. He was then told that immigration

J

ose—or “Pillo,” as he prefers to be called—arrived in the United States with his mother and sister at the age of 12. His family entered with a visa, but after two years, when the visa expired, Pillo stayed. From then on, he began life as an undocumented student. Now in his 20s, Pillo has had to adjust to life after Deferred Action. He’s still not used to the perks. Sometimes he forgets that he can wave at police officers instead of avoiding eye contact. After receiving his driver’s license, he was pulled over around the corner from his house. When the officer asked for his license and registration, out of habit, Pillo replied that he didn’t have one. “When he repeated, ‘You don’t have one?’ I remembered, ‘Wait a minute, I do.’” Although Pillo is thankful for what Deferred Action has given him, he adds, “Its only temporary, it doesn’t fix anything. Who knows? Two years from now, I could be back in limbo.” As of now, Pillo’s main concern is to push for broader change. “They won’t hear one, but they’ll hear millions,” he says. Pillo is a member of the DREAM Alliance of Sonoma County, an organization dedicated

to helping pass immigration reform. “We’re not going to stop until it happens,” he says. Although Pillo has shared his story in Washington, D.C., it wasn’t easy for Pillo to “come out” as an undocumented student. The first time he did, he was in a political science class at Santa Rosa Junior college. Pillo had been the quiet kid in the back of the classroom who didn’t say much until one day, his class watched a film on immigration. The teacher asked for opinions from the class, and a girl in the front row went “off about how the illegals were taking all the scholarships,” he says. After sitting though her speech, Pillo had enough. He got up in front of the class and said, “Undocumented students don’t get any financial aid, everything is out-of-pocket. I’m not telling you from someone’s friend or someone’s cousin—I’m telling you from personal experience.” The girl was so ashamed she grabbed her stuff and walked out, and according to Pillo, the mentality of the class changed from that moment on. Pillo doesn’t always get positive reactions. A girl he had been friends with through high school once said she was disappointed in him for being “one of those people that she always hated.” And Pillo knows there are many young Latinos struggling with the same problems he did. “That’s why I speak,” he says. “Yes, it’s rough, but I want people to know there’s a light at the end of the tunnel.”

A

t his job and in his volunteer work, Rafael talks to hundreds of DREAMers every month, and sees firsthand the way their fear and their families’ fear is exploited. “There are individuals that are taking advantage of other individuals, and it’s all about making money,” he says. Rafael is head of the Extended Opportunity Programs and Services department at Santa Rosa Junior College. He devotes most of his time to helping DREAMers find scholarships and financial aid, and, since the announcement of Deferred Action, has ) 22

21

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enforcement would arrive at the jail at 6pm. From there, Jorge became emotionally destroyed. He used his one phone call to contact a bail bond agency, but the woman on the other end told him, “I’m sorry, we’ve been having a lot of these calls and we can’t do anything, even with a signer.” While in jail, Jorge kept thinking, “I’m not a criminal, and I work hard at shitty jobs, never take anything from anyone, that’s how I was raised.” Luckily for Jorge, someone took notice. He had made plans with a friend, and when Jorge didn’t show, his friend knew it was unlike him. He got worried and called the hospitals and, finally, the jail. By the time a police officer came to tell him that his friend had posted bail, Jorge was numb. “My name gets called at five, and I’m watching the clock,” he remembers, with relief. “My eyes were dry—I didn’t have tears anymore.”

22

DREAMers ( 21

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spent many unpaid hours helping hundreds of others apply. One of the youngest he helped was two months old when she came to the United States. “She has saluted the flag since she could,” says Rafael, “and yet now her fate in this country is one day here, maybe the next she’s gone.” Rafael has seen plenty of desperate families willing to pay hundreds and even thousands of dollars to have their applications for Deferred Action filled out by attorneys or other “experts” because they’re afraid of having their paperwork rejected. Hearing of these scams has motivated him and his team to hold three-hour application workshops; in an economy where many families are struggling, taking advantage of hopeful applicants is unjust, he says. Most have had to work more than one job in order to pay for school. Although Rafael does his best to warn DREAMers of scammers, he also tries to let them know that there is help out there. He says that for every con artist, there will also be churches and government officials “who just come together to provide a service that needs to happen. And I think that that’s what makes this country great from that point of view—that when there is a need, people come together and they help each other.” While the program has brought some people together, it has also caused sibling rivalry, Rafael says. “We are already seeing a little bit of conflict between younger siblings who say, ‘Why does she qualify, but I don’t?’” Not that this is new to him; Rafael has also seen many families where only some family members are American citizens. “It’s common where you bring children who are seven or eight years of age,” he explains, “and as soon as you get here you settle down and you end up having another child or two children.” What Rafael finds the most interesting is the fact that the immigrant child tends to be more successful than the one who is a citizen. “When you realize that you’re undocumented,” he says, “you see the need to work harder.” Not all families are divided by

citizenship status, however. In some households, Rafael has seen older siblings who aren’t eligible for Deferred Action willing to work extra to pay for a younger sibling who qualifies. Although Deferred Action doesn’t offer as much as Rafael would like, he notes how it’s brought people together. “Being undocumented is a solitude situation,” he says. “You don’t tell your friends, you don’t tell your enemies, you don’t tell anybody, really. It’s a very private, stressful, emotional situation.” As a result of his workshops, up to 80 people have been able to look around the room to see others in the same situation. “It is amazing to see that level of unity; where you get to see your neighbor, and this is the first time that you notice your neighbor is also undocumented.”

‘When you realize that you’re undocumented, you see the need to work harder.’ Rafael hopes that what he’s noticed as a change in attitude about immigration will continue. The younger generation, in particular, is more accepting of DREAMers. “They know that a lot of their friends are undocumented,” he says, “and if [ICE] was to come over and try to take their friend away, they would do whatever was necessary to prevent that from happening.” He credits this new attitude to the young DREAMers who have spoken up and fought for this change. “It was the youth who wrote in Time magazine,” he says, “it was the youth who have all those videos on YouTube where the students are telling their stories. They started this movement.”

CLOVERDALE

P E TA L U M A

Fiddlin’ Around

Cinema Soiree

Before popular music became impregnated with this bizarre old-timey decree that every hot new band must (a) have a banjo player, (b) dress like they’re associates of the Artful Dodger or whatever, and (c) embrace the patina, but not the core, of The Ghost of Tom Joad, there was the Cloverdale Fiddle Festival. Now in its 38th year, the festival awards prizes for competition in a variety of styles (Old-Time Style, Texas Style, Waltz, Twin) and age brackets (last year’s entrants spanned from age seven to 78). Entertainment by the Kathy Kallick Band and many others keep things moving, but it’s the competition here that shows Cloverdale’s All-American small-town charm at its best. Fiddle away on Saturday and Sunday, May 4–5, at the Cloverdale Fairgrounds. 1 Citrus Fair Drive, Cloverdale. 10am–6pm each day. $13. 707.894.2067.

Here’s a fun way to spend a Saturday: load up on coffee in the morning, and then, mid-afternoon, plunk down $25 and park your keister for nine hours of independent film shorts ranging in length from two to 21 minutes at Film Fest Petaluma. There’s truly too much good stuff on offer here: a film about handcrafted bikes; a man who builds a Viking ship; a woman (Judi Dench) who tries to find love via social networking; a stranded astronaut; a post-apocalyptic marriage; the spoils of an affair; sexual dysfunction, and more. Local filmmakers Jackson Rosenfeld, Max Prickey, Miles Pepper and others join the lineup, too. It all goes down Saturday, May 4, at the Mystic Theatre. 21 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. Blocks of films at 2:30pm, 7:30pm and 10:30pm. $10–$15 per block; $25 for all. 707.765.2121.

SEBASTOPOL

Purity Ring In the heyday of the never-forgotten Boogie Room, a house-garden-commune-barn-venue in Southwest Santa Rosa, it wasn’t uncommon to find a hardcore band like M.D.C. playing inside the barn, while outside, around the fire pit— always—a group of people jamming together on acoustic instruments. One resident campfire standby at the Boogie Room, named Kyle Martin, has just released a solo album that encapsulates a special, rural brand of idealism. See the upbeat song “Romance”, which contrasts the insidious nature of advertising (“TV tries to sell you that you are ugly, you smell bad, you’re hairy, hey, people think you’re scary”) with the natural onset of love, which “doesn’t cost a thing.” Martin has an adventurous band and a pure heart; he plays Friday, May 3, at Aubergine. 755 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. 8:30pm. $5. 707.861.9190.

GOIN’ FOR IT Nicki Bluhm & the Gramblers play May 2 at the Mystic Theatre. See Concerts, p27.

S A N TA R O S A

Talk Pretty At this point, in the year 2013, everyone knows the deal on David Sedaris—so much so that his new book, Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls (the most David Sedaris-y David Sedaris title in the history of David Sedaris titles), is subtitled Essays, Etc. In it, the celebrated NPR contributor and chronicler of his own little life, etc., writes about his unsupportive father, etc., his new job picking up trash on the side of the road, etc., nasty thoughts he writes daily in his journal, etc., drinking, etc., and, yes, owls, etc. With all this et cetera flying around, how can a diehard This American Life fan possibly experience it best? With an in-person appearance, naturally, in the company of similarly obsessed Sedaris fans. David Sedaris charms the pants on Friday, May 3, at the Wells Fargo Center. 50 Mark West Springs Road, Santa Rosa. 8pm. $45–$65. 707.546.3600.

—Gabe Meline

23 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 1-7, 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Crush CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide

Stage David Allen Studio

NORTH BAY BOHEM I AN | MAY 1-7, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

24

WAKING DREAM Emilie Talbot as Esther in this play staged inside a consignment shop.

Mortal Coil Afterlife and healing in ‘The Dead Girl’ BY DAVID TEMPLETON

A

nn Brebner, who celebrates her 90th birthday this August, waited a very long time to write the bittersweet, supernaturally tinged drama The Dead Girl. Having directed hundreds of productions all over the world, it wasn’t until recently that the cofounder of the Marin Shakespeare Company began tackling the craft of playwriting. In 2008, she adapted Anne Lamott’s novel Hard Laughter. And now, at last, Brebner has written her first original play. Presented by San Rafael’s Alternative Theater Ensemble (a magnificently quirky company presenting top-notch original and classic plays in make-shift pop-up spaces—usually stores and galleries—along San Rafael’s

Fourth Street), The Dead Girl, directed by Brebner, is staged amid the tables and clothing racks of Avant Garde, a consignment shop. With a cast of four actors, the tale plays out around a tiny living room set, with the audience about as up close and personal as one will find in a live theater experience. Gloria (an effervescent Amy Marie Haven), six months after her death at the age of 30, finds herself back at home, a kind of watchful spirit as her mother, Esther (Emilie Talbot, achingly fragile), and stepfather, George (a superb Charles Dean), struggle with a mix of grief, loss and guilt while making plans for a long-delayed trip around the world. Her fiancé, Malcolm (David E. Moore), is also struggling with how, and when, to move on. These are people with no dark, third-act secrets to reveal, which is part of the power of this play. It all feels so painfully, accessibly real— two parents dealing with loss the way most of us would, with a simultaneous mix of courage and collapse, observing the same everyday routines while recognizing that nothing will ever be the same. Packed with local references, Brebner’s dialogue is wonderfully lived-in and natural, infused with intelligence and poetry while still managing to feel everyday and universal. When a grieving Esther says of herself and George, “This is my family tapestry. There are only two colors now. There used to be three,” the line resonates with gentle sadness. The script does feel a bit overextended, with a tad more explanation and resolution than is perhaps necessary, and Brebner’s use of music to underscore the emotion of some scenes was at times more distracting than intended. Still, for its sweet, intimate honesty and remarkable sense of battered beauty, Ann Brebner’s The Dead Girl was well worth waiting for. Rating (out of 5): ++++ ‘The Dead Girl’ runs Wednesday and Friday-Sunday through May 19 at Avant Garde. 1328 Fourth St., San Rafael. Wednesdays at 7:30pm; Fridays–Saturdays at 8pm; 2pm matinees on Sundays. $20–$25. 415.454.2787.

25 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 1-7, 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Film

CRIMSON TIDE Ah, the French cinema, and the madness a woman provokes . . .

Painted Up

In â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Renoir,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; the most important sense is sight BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

T

he commercial French ďŹ lms of today may not be breaking any aesthetic or narrative boundaries, but they still play well to those unnerved by the mayhem and loudness of American movies.

Director Gilles Bourdosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Renoir celebrates traditionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;even if it is a tradition critiqued from the point of view of the rebellious three sons of the master artist. The action takes place during World War I. Pierre Auguste Renoir (Michel Bouquet) is old and diseased in body, his hands almost too gnarled by arthritis to hold a paintbrush. The canvases are his last expression of summery idylls. In person, however, the artist has blunt, almost Germanic manners, even if old Renoir insists things worked out for the best. He started off as a painter on porcelain for the dishware industry, and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d still be doing that work if industrialization hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ended the craft. Ultimately, he reasons, life is best if you drift like a ďŹ&#x201A;oating cork down a stream. This passive, peasant viewpoint drives his three sons mad. The youngest, Claude (Thomas Doret), called Coco, is on the verge of open rebellion; heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been in a smoldering adolescent fury ever since his mother died. Coco has a new cause for his wrath: the arrival of a new model for the old manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brush, a tough yet refulgent demiactress named AndrĂŠe (Christa Theret). In one scene, Cocoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sexual jealousy at seeing this red-haired trollop nude on a daily basis worsens his mood, especially when asked to arrange props around her. AndrĂŠe also captures the interest of older brother Jean Renoir (Vincent Rottiers) when he returns from the battleďŹ elds with a scarlet Y-shaped scar on his thigh. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know him as a ďŹ lm director yet, just as thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no indication that Coco will someday be the cinematographer Claude Renoir. Lensed by Mark Ping Bing Lee (In the Mood for Love), Renoir believes that thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no underrating the pleasure of watching other people paint, and of seeing a sullen if nicely built woman posing in the humidity of the morning. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Renoirâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is playing at the Rafael Film Center and Summerfield Cinemas.

Spreckels Performing Arts Center 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park 6SUHFNHOV%R[2IÂżFHÂ&#x2021;VSUHFNHOVRQOLQHFRP

"

!"

The SHAPE of THINGS A Comedy by y e Neil LaBute Directed by David Lear

May 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 19, 2013 Thu â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sat @ 8:00 Sunday @ 5:00

7 707.823.0177 MainStageWest.com MainSta ageWest.com 104 4 N Main St, Stt, Sebastopol

NORTH BAY BOHEM I AN | MAY 1-7, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

26 TM

Music

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Levin & CÂş., Healdsburg Last Record Store, Santa Rosa

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THIS HOUSE

Thu, May 16 7pm Sat, June 1 10am

LETTING IT ROLL Bill Payne

recently teamed with Robert Hunter.

Reflected Notes

Little Feat keyboardist plays storytelling set 55/3 / 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 55/9 /9

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Summer field C Summerfield Cinema in e ma 551 5 51 S Summerfield ummer field Road Road Santa S an t a R Rosa osa 707-522-0719 707- 52 2- 07 719

BY BRUCE ROBINSON

F

orty years into a professional life as Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most versatile rock and blues keyboard player, Bill Payne is testing the waters as a solo performer. The Little Feat cofounder already has a personal creative outlet as an accomplished photographer, but musically, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d always been a collaborator. Until now. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought about it for a long time, to be honest,â&#x20AC;? Payne explains over the phone from his Montana home north of Yellowstone National Park. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just could not ďŹ gure out how to do it. Do I go out there and play a lot of old Little Feat songs that the band doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t play? What do I do?â&#x20AC;? The result is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tracing Footsteps:

A Journal of Music, Photography and Tales of the Road,â&#x20AC;? which stops off at Mill Valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sweetwater Music Hall next week, with Grateful Dead archivist and publicist Dennis McNally opening and facilitating a Q&A session with Payne and the audience. Payneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s answer began to emerge when he started writing songs with Grateful Dead lyricist Robert Hunter, four of which appeared on Little Featâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most recent recording, Rooster Rag. Payne credits the success of that partnership to their shared visual approach. â&#x20AC;&#x153;His lyrics provide a real cinematic approach for me as a guy trying to come up with melodies and chords. So itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good handshake.â&#x20AC;? With the band â&#x20AC;&#x153;on hiatus for a whileâ&#x20AC;? due to guitarist Paul Barrereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health, Payne says, the pieces seemed to fall into place. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lo and behold, I was in possession of a lot of songs. I was also singing more the last few years with Little Feat, so my conďŹ dence in that area grew.â&#x20AC;? But he also wanted to share more than his music. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought, why donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t I share my photography, why donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t I share stories from not only Little Feat and being a road warrior, [but] all the years of being in the studio and all the things that come [from] this curve of creativity Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been enjoying for the last . . . well, since I was ďŹ ve years old. It was at that tender age, he recalls, that he ďŹ rst found musical inspiration in the vista from his familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ventura home. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I lived up on a hill, I had a view of the PaciďŹ c Ocean, all the attendant weather patterns, and I would go from the big picture window and wander over the piano as a little kid and try to replicate what I just saw.â&#x20AC;? These days, as heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s able to capture those visions explicitly on ďŹ lm as well as musically, Payne has ďŹ nally found a way to combine it all, as he puts it, â&#x20AC;&#x153;under one tent.â&#x20AC;? Bill Payne and Dennis McNally present â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Tracing Footstepsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; on Wednesday, May 8, at Sweetwater Music Hall. 19 Corte Madera Ave., Mill Valley. 8pm. $22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$29. 415.388.3850.

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY American Philharmonic Turina’s “La Oración del Torero,” Hovhaness’ “Prayer of St. Gregory” and Rachmaninoff’s Symphony no 2 with guest conductor Cyrus Ginwala and Tom Hyde, trumpet. May 4, 8pm and May 5, 2pm. $5-$15. Santa Rosa High School, 1235 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

Carmina Burana Jenny Bent conducts three SSU choruses and the Maria Carrillo High School Women’s Chorus in Carl Orff’s powerful masterpiece. May 5, 4pm. $10$15. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Cloverdale Fiddle Festival Music by the Roustabouts, Kathy Kallick and others. Contestants battle with bows to see who’s the best there’s ever been. May 4-5, 10am. $5$13. Citrus Fairgrounds, 1 Citrus Dr, Cloverdale. 707.894.3992.

Nicki Bluhm & the Gramblers Country, folk, rock and soul

influence her songs. The Easy Leaves open. May 2, 8pm. $16. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Ernest Ranglin Eighty-year-old jazz-reggae guitarist is considered the father of ska. May 2, 8pm. $25. Hopmonk Sebastopol, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

MARIN COUNTY Ambicon Ambient music festival featuring Hans Christian, Stephan Micus, Jeff Pearce, Robert Rich, Steve Roach, Michael Stearns, Stellamara and Tim Story. May 3-5. Embassy Suites Hotel, 101 McInnis Pkwy, San Rafael.

Count Basie Orchestra Group performs music by the jazz pianist who was a pioneer of the big band sound. May 7, 6 and 8pm. $30. 19 Broadway Club, 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Marin Symphony Program of Debussy and Ravel, featuring Joyce Yang, piano. May 5, 3pm and May 7, 7:30pm. $10-$70. Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium,

Bill Payne After 40 years behind the keyboards of Little Feat, he’s got songs and stories to share. May 8, 8pm. $22-$29. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Pete Escovedo & His Orchestra Legendary Latin percussionist celebrates his 77th birthday. May 4, 8:30pm. $20-$30. George’s Nightclub, 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Richie Spice Reggae star’s song “Earth a Run Red” became an international hit. May 3, 10pm. $25. 19 Broadway Club, 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Clubs & Venues

Member

Annual Membership Includes: D12-month day-use parking pass DFree night of camping DMap to all county parks DProgram & merchandise discounts DLocal merchant discounts DAdmission to Tolay Fall Festival

Individual/Family Golden Years (60yrs+) Access

$69 $39 $23

(SHUPDQHQWO\GLVDEOHGDYDLODEOHDW3DUNV2I¿FHRQO\

sonomacountyparks.org

707/565-2041

SONOMA COUNTY Aubergine May 1, Charley Peach, DayLater. May 3, Kyle Martin Band. May 4, Stephanie Keys, Windshield Cowboys, Darren Nelson. Mon, artist and model Mondays. Tues, Bluesy Tuesday. Wed, 7pm, open mic. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

May 2, Bloody Ol’ Mule, Dry County Drinkers. 96 Old Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa. 707.528.8565.

WED W ED M MAY AY 1

DOUBLE D OUBLE D & WOBBLE WOBBLE FACTORY FAC TORY PRESENT PR E S E N T GLITCH G LITCH | DUB DUB STEP S TEP | EELECTRONICA LEC T R O N I C A

BRAINSTORM B RAINSTORM

WITH W ITH L LOVE OVE A AND ND L LIGHT I G HT PLUS P LUS IINI–DR NI – DR DYLON DYLON $$10 10 A ADV/$15 DV/$15 D DOS/DOORS OS/ DOORS 99:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

THUR T HUR M MAY AY 2

THE A THE ABBEY BBEY P PRESENTS R ESE NT S SSKA K A | ROOTS RO OTS | REGGAE R EG G AE

AN A N EVENING E VE NING W WITH ITH

$$25/DOORS 25/ DOORS 7PM/ALL 7PM /ALL AGES AGES

Fri, Sat, Live DJs. 501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5643.

FRI F RI A APR PR 26

JUKE JOINT~& JUKE JOINT~& DECADANCE DECADANCE PRESENT PR E S E N T D DOWNTEMPO OWNTEMPO | EELECTRONICA LEC TRONIC A | CHILL CH I L L

Devi Yoga Center May 6, Kaliji. 7151 Wilton Ave, Sebastopol. 707.318.6538.

Dhyana Center Lofts May 5, Jaya Lakshmi, Ananda and Sahar. 186 N Main St, Sebastopol. 800.796.6863.

PHUTUREPRIMITIVE P HUTUREPRIMITIVE ((ALBUM ALB U M R RELEASE E LE A S E E EVENT) V E NT)

LLAFA AFA TAYLOR TAYLOR - N NICOLUMINOUS ICOLUMINOUS PLUS P LUS M MALARKEY AL AR K E Y -

Z ACK DARLING DARLING - DAMIAN DAMIAN ZACK

$$15 15 ADV/$18 ADV/$18 DOS/DOORS DOS/ DOORS 9PM/21+ 9PM /21+

SAT S AT A APR PR 27 27

LLLE ... P LLLE... PRESENTS R ESENT S IINDIE NDIE | R ROCK O CK

LUVPLANET LU VPLANET

Dutton-Goldfield Winery May 5, Randy Cook. 3100 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. ) 707.827.3600.

707.829.7300 7 0 7. 829 . 7 3 0 0 S E B AS T OP OL 230 2 3 0 PETALUMA P E TA L U M A AVE AV E | SEBASTOPOL

ERNIE E RNIE RANGLIN RANGLIN

Chrome Lotus

Sweetwater and Hopmonk this week. See Clubs.

Sonoma County

Regional Parks

Get your Parks Membership: On-line at sonomacountyparks.org,or at Sonoma Outfitters, REI Santa Rosa, Oliver’s Markets, Sebastopol Hardware, Frizelle Enos Feeds, or staffed park entry stations

Christy’s on the Square

UPSTROKER Ernest Ranglin plays two shows at

BECOME A PARKS MEMBER

Phil Lesh & the Family Band Grateful Dead bassist leads a group of talented musicians at his club. May 5, 7:30pm. $25. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

27

Less than $6 a month!

PLUS P LUS A ALMA LMA DESNUDA DESNUDA &

SA RAH DEFORS DEFORS SARAH

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CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

Epic Social Lounge May 2, Randy Taylor Weber. 404 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

Fri May 3 An evening with Tainted Love

Sat May 18

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Finley Community Center

"REAKFASTs,UNCHs$INNER 7%$s7PM DOORSs POP/ FOLK

May 3, Larry Broderick Trio. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

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Adam Carolla & Dr Drewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Reunion Tour Sat May 25

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Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

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Amber Morris Voice Coaching

Acoustic 5:00 / No Cover

May 10 THE PINE NEEDLES

Sat

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Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

Fri

Jerry Joseph, Walter SalasHumara, and Steve Drizos with The Heavy Guilt

Mon

Green Music Center 1029

Hopmonk Sebastopol

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Sat

May 3, Santa Rosa Symphony Preparatory Orchestra. May 4, Youth Orchestra Ensembles. May 5, Carmina Burana. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

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May 1, Ted Shaferâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jelly Roll Jazz Band. SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2122.

.O#HILDREN5NDERTO!LL!GES3HOWS 0ETALUMA"LVD 0ETALUMA

Fri

May 3, Sugarfoot. May 4, Groove Foundation. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

PLUS RITA HOSKING 3!4s7PM DOORSs COUNTRY

JUNIOR BROWN

1350 Third St, Napa | 707.259.0123 www.uptowntheatrenapa.com

Monday ~ Open Mic Night

NICKI BLUHM THE GRAMBLERS

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415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

May 1, Love & Light. May 2, Ernest Ranglin. May 3, Phutureprimitive. May 4, Luvplanet, Alma Desnuda and Sarah Defors. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hotel Healdsburg May 3, Norris Clement and Gary Digman. May 4, Stephanie Ozer Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Last Day Saloon May 3, Pride & Joy. May 4, John Courage & the Great Plains, Shelby Cobra & the Mustangs, Frankie Boots & the County Line, E Minor & the Dirty Diamonds. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Main Street Station May 3, Prisma Trova. May 4, Yancie Taylor Trio. May 5, Vernelle Anders. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Grohlâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Coming Nirvana drummer to present film at Uptown Theatre Consider this your ďŹ nal heads up: BottleRock Napa Valley is coming to kick out the jams in wine country like never before. Kicking off with Macklemore on Wednesday, May 8, the festival continues through Sunday, May 12, with a lineup rivaling that of any other major festival: the Black Keys, Alabama Shakes, Flaming Lips, Jackson Browne, the Avett Brothers, Bad Religion, Janeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Addiction, Zac Brown Band, Dirty Projectors, Primus, Kings of Leon and many others. (Right before press time, Furthur canceled, citing Bob Weirâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health.) The comedy lineup includes Kristen Schaal, Tig Notaro, Jim Gaffigan, Rob Delaney and more, as well as tons of food and wine. This Monday, BottleRock presents Dave Grohl (Nirvana, Foo Fighters) in person at the Uptown Theatre, screening his film Sound City and conducting a Q&A. Tickets are $100, but in keeping with the BottleRock mission, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a benefit for autism causes. Dave Grohl in Napa? Announced at the last minute? Is there anything these crazy BottleRock guys canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do? Be in the presence of Nirvana royalty on Monday, May 6, at the Uptown Theatre. 1350 Third St., Napa. 6pm. $100. 707.259.0123.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Gabe Meline

Mavericks May 3, Chava Cruz & Trapezio. 397 Aviation Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.765.2515.

Mystic Theatre May 1, Bob Schneider. May 2, Nicki Bluhm & the Gramblers, the Easy Leaves. May 3, Petty Theft, Zoo Station. May 8, Carolina Chocolate Drops, Rita Hosking. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Occidental Center for the Arts May 4 and 5, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heaven and

Earthâ&#x20AC;? with the Occidental Community Choir. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Dorothy, Infex. 6590 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park. 707.585.1079.

Phoenix Theater

May 4, Foxes in the Henhouse. May 8, Sound Kitchen. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

May 4, Skitzo, Stomach, Seeds of Hate, Outrage. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Quincyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s May 3, Aftertayst, Disturbing

Redwood Cafe

River Theatre Thurs, Thugz. 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.3194.

Russian River Brewing Co

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub May 3, Fiddle Jam Session. May 4, Fiddle Jam. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Society: Culture House First Friday of every month, Neon with DJ Paul Timbermann & guests. Sun, Church on Sundays. Thurs, Casa Rasta. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Sausalito Seahorse May 2, Steve Nelson Trio. May 3, the City. May 4, Ian Franklin & Infinite Frequency. May 5, Orquesta La Moderna Tradicion. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady Mon, 8pm, open mic with Simon Costa. Second Wednesday of every month, Finger-Style Guitar Showcase. Sat, Uke Jam. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Stringdusters. May 5, Phil Lesh & the Family Band. Tues, American Jubilee. Wed, Terrapin Family Band Bar Show. Sun, Terrapin Family Band. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

The Trident May 2, Andoni. 558 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.331.3232.

NAPA COUNTY Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Sun, DJ Night. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Smiley’s

Molinari Caffe

Mon, reggae. Wed, Larry’s karaoke. Sun, open mic. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Thurs, Open Mic. 815 Main St, Napa. 707.927.3623.

Studio 55 Marin May 4, Maurice Tani, 77 El Deora. 1455 E Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.

May 4, Napa Valley Educational Jazz Festival. May 3 and 5, SF Opera Adler Fellows. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Sweetwater Music Hall

Silo’s

May 4, Mari Mack & Livin’ Like Kings. Wed, Blues Night. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

May 1, the Mashtones. May 3, Zepparella. May 4, Ernest Ranglin. May 5, the Heavy Guilt. May 8, Bill Payne. Mon, Open Mic. Every other Wednesday, Wednesday Night Live. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

May 4, Tori Anna. May 1 and , May 8, Silo’s Sing-a-Song. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

George’s Nightclub

Terrapin Crossroads

Sprenger’s Tap Room May 3, Central Station, Girls & Boys. 446 B St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8277.

Toad in the Hole Pub May 4, Restless Sons. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

MARIN COUNTY Fenix

Thurs and Fri, DJ Rick Vegaz. May 3, Richard Bean & Sapo. May 4, Pete Escovedo & His Orchestra. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

May 3, the Infamous

19 Broadway Club May 3, Richie Spice. May 5, 19 Broadway Good Time Band, Manicato. May 7, Count Basie Orchestra. May 8, The Royal Deuces. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Old Western Saloon May 3, Hookah Stew. Main Street, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1661.

Peri’s Silver Dollar May 1, the Weissmen. May 3, the Soul Satellites. May 4, Acacia. May 8, the Pickups. Tues, John Varn & Tom Odetto. First Thursday of every month, Biambu’s Groove Room. Mon, acoustic open mic. First Sunday of every month, Blues Jam. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio May 3, Jesse Brewster Band. May 4, Revolver. May 5, It’s a

THE SF OPERA ADLER FELLOWS WITH THE

SF CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

MAY 3 & 5

Napa Valley Opera House

Uptown Theatre

1030 Main Street in Downtown Napa

May 3, Tainted Love. May 8, Screening of film “Sound City” with Dave Grohl in person. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Tickets & Information 707.226. 7372 s NVOH.ORG

Hopmonk Novato May 3, Matt Jaffe & the Distractions, the Gold Standard. May 4, Baby Seal Club. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

29

San Francisco’s City Guide

Peaches Pants down, pelvis thrusting, booty dropped; it’s like electroclash never went away. May 1 at Mezzanine.

Robyn Hitchcock 60th Birthday

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

Os Mutantes No one else on Earth sounds like this group of psychedelic Brazilian Tropicalia royalty. May 4 at the Independent.

Jason Moran & Skateboarders Steven Wilson Cerebral founder of Porcupine Tree plays songs from “The Raven That Refused to Sing” for free in-store. May 8 at Amoeba SF.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

MAY 11 7:30PM

With guests Amanda Palmer, Colin Meloy, Rhett Miller, Sean Nelson and more. May 2 at the Fillmore.

Moran’s jazz trio plays with a miniramp in front of the stage featuring live skating. May 4 and 5 at SFJAZZ Center.

SATURDAY

Come see us! Wed–Fri, 2–9 Sat & Sun, 11:30–8

Brewery Tours Daily at 3! 1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

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May 5, Lost Dog Found. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Beautiful Day. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Arts Events

YOUR Y OUR IMAGINATION IMAG

NORTH BAY BOHEM I AN | MAY 1-7, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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GALLERY EXHIBITION G Ap 19–May 12 April Tue-Sat 12–8, Sun 12–6 T u 325 Corte Madera Town Center 32 guides & maps available gu

Galleries RECEPTIONS

GALA PREVIEW GA April 27, 5–8 pm Ap Meet the artists, M enjoy wine and lite bites en

May 3 At 6pm. Seager Gray Gallery, “Art of the Book,” books as medium for art. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. 415.384.8288. At 6pm. O’Hanlon Center for the Arts, “Open Studios,” six local artists’ work. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.4331.

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Charles M Schulz Museum May 4-Oct 27, “Mid-Century Modern,” works of prominent post-war era decorative, textile, and furniture designers. Through Sep 1, “Art of the Line,” describing Schulz’s process, from the tools he used to the research he undertook. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

At 3pm. Bolinas Museum, “Asia Then,” photographs by Alfred Palmer; “Historical Paintings of Coastal Marin,” featuring pieces by artists of the late 19th and early 20th centuries; and “Patricia Briceno: Dances with Wools,” art with felted wool, silk and dyes. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.0330

Ongoing, “The Doyle Collection,” 50 years of art created by SRJC faculty and staff. SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4614.

At noon. New Leaf Gallery, “Breaking Up is Hard to Do,” new sculpture by Gordon Halloran. 23588 Hwy 121, Sonoma. 707.933.1300.

99

Through May 30, “Silver & Oil,” silver prints and oil paintings by Rogers and Thomas Wood. 958 Gravenstein Hwy S, Sebastopol. 707.824.8881.

Finley Community Center

May 5

The Zoom H2n records digitally in four modes: Mid-Side (MS) stereo, 90° X/Y stereo, 2- and 4-channel surround sound • up to 555 hours recording time on 32GB SD/SDHC card (optional) • use as USB mic • Software included • 20 hr battery life!

Artlife Gallery

At 3pm. Quercia Gallery, “No Buoy Verboten,” childhood mythological memories by painter Jose Maro Alvarado. Reception, May 4, 3pm. 25193 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.0243.

At 5pm. RiskPress Gallery, “On the Edge,” abstract paintings and drawings by Bernadette Howard. Reception, May 4, 5pm. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol.

HHANDY ANDY RECORDER RECORDER WITH 5 MICS

SONOMA COUNTY

At 3pm. Gallery Route One, “Reliquaries for the Materials Inside,” art by Leah Jachimowicz; “Uninvited Guests,” art by Suzanne Parker. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1347.

May 7-Jun 13, Art at the Source Open Studio Tour Preview. . 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Frank P Doyle Library

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Jun 8, “Atmosphere,” works of art creating a space of being. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Graton Gallery Through May 19, “A Look Back,” paintings, block prints and wood engravings by Rik Olson. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. TuesSun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts Through May 5, “Scissors... Wax... Glue,” collages of found, painted or collected materials. May 8-Jun 2, “On Location: A Plein Air Show,” paintings done on-location in California. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

Local Color Gallery Through Jun 2, “Botanicals & Birds,” piaces by Victoria Kochergin, Elizabeth Peyton, Vi Strain and Nancy Wheeler. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.875.2744.

Markham Vineyards Through Jun 30, “The

Groupies,” work by Rolling Stone photographer Baron Wolman. 2812 St Helena Hwy N, St Helena.

New Leaf Gallery May 5-Jul 7, “Breaking Up is Hard to Do,” new sculpture by Gordon Halloran. Reception, May 5, noon. Cornerstone Place, 23588 Hwy 121, Sonoma. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.933.1300.

Occidental Center for the Arts Through May 5, “M for Mystique,” exploring the theme of intrigue. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Perdita Productions Through May 12, “Out Come the Divs,” paintings by Laine Justice. 21025 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville.

Petaluma Arts Center Through Jun 2, “Cosmic Terrain,” individual and collaborative works by Mars-1, Damon Soule, Oliver Vernon and Ricky Watts. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Quercia Gallery May 2-30, “No Buoy Verboten,” childhood mythological memories by painter Jose Maro Alvarado. Reception, May 4, 3pm. 25193 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.0243.

RiskPress Gallery May 4-26, “On the Edge,” abstract paintings and drawings by Bernadette Howard. Reception, May 4, 5pm. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through May 5, “Juried Photography Show,” featuring local artists. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Through May 10, “Flower Power,” using flowers as a central theme. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sonoma County Museum Through Jun 2, “Tools as Art,” collection of witty and light-hearted works based on familiar forms. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art

31

Towers Gallery Through Jun 30, “Bright Summer Lights,” multi-media by Janet McBeen and oil paintings by Adele Pruitt. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

JUNE 28-30

University Art Gallery

Featuring: John Prine Angelique Kidjo ◆ Taj Mahal Marianne Faithfull ◆ Greg Brown Iris Dement ◆ Madeleine Peyroux

Through May 11, “BFA Exhibition 2013,” featuring work from 15 art students graduating this spring. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

Irma Thomas ◆ Dave Alvin Rebirth Brass Band ◆ Brothers Comatose Poor Man’s Whiskey Paul Thorn Band ◆ Red Molly Elephant Revival ◆ Coyote Grace and many, many more

MARIN COUNTY Art by the Bay Weekend Gallery Through Jun 30, “Spring Show,” variety of media from West Marin artists. 18856 Hwy 1, Marshall. 415.663.1006.

Bolinas Museum May 4-Jun 23, “Asia Then,” photographs by photographs by Alfred Palmer. Reception, May 4, 3pm. May 4-Jun 23, “Historical Paintings of Coastal Marin,” featuring pieces by prominent artists of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Preview, May 3, 5:30pm, $20. Reception, May 4, 3pm. May 4-Jun 23, “Patricia Briceno: Dances with Wools,” art with felted wool, silk and dyes. Reception, May 4, 3pm. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

Elsewhere Gallery Through May 21, “Its Worser Than Louie Armstrong,” paintings, poetry and aphorism by Jack Carter. 1828 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. Daily, 11 to 6. 415.526.2855.

Gallery Route One May 5-Jun 9, “Reliquaries for the Materials Inside,” art by Leah Jachimowicz. Reception, May 5, 3pm. Artist talk, Jun 9, 4pm. May 5-Jun 9, “Uninvited Guests,” art by Suzanne Parker. Reception, May 5, 3pm. Artist talk, Jun 9, 4pm. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Headlands Center for the Arts May 5-Jun 9, “Present Tense,” graduate fellows exhibition. Reception, May 5, noon. Bldg

‘SOUGH’ Andrew Hayes and many other artists are

featured in the terrific ‘Art of the Book’ exhibition at Seager Gray Gallery. See Receptions, adjacent.

AT BEAUTIFUL BLACK OAK RANCH • LAYTONVILLE

Tickets & Info. www.katewolfmusicfestival.com

944, Fort Barry, Sausalito. SunFri, noon to 4. 415.331.2787.

Marin Community Foundation Through May 31, “Millennial Abstractions,” choice of color, form, shapes and mark making are transformational and inspiring in the deepest sense. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Marin MOCA Through May 25, “Altered Book Arts Show,” 150 artists draw inspiration from discarded books. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Marin Open Studios Saturdays-Sundays. through May 12, Marin Open Studios, artists throughout the county open their studios to the public. Various Locations, Marin. marinopenstudios.com.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts May 7-30, “Open Studios,” six local artists’ work on display. Reception, May 3, 6pm. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Seager Gray Gallery May 1-31, “Art of the Book,” books as a medium for art.

Reception, May 3, 6pm. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

NAPA COUNTY di Rosa Through Jun 30, “From Two Worlds,” photography by Linda Connor. Artist talk, May 29, 7pm. Largest collection of contemporary Bay Area art. Tours daily. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

Wed, May 1 10:15am– 12:45pm 7–10pm

8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family SINGLES & PAIRS SQUARE DANCE CLUB

Thur, May 2 8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–10pm Circles N’ Squares Square Dance Club Fri, May 3 7–11pm

8:45–9:45am Jazzercise Steve Luther hosts MOTOWN, DISCO & ROCK ‘N ROLL

Hess Collection Winery

Sat, May 4 6–11pm

8:30–9:30am Jazzercise SINGLE & PAIRS HOEDOWN

Through May 31, works by Alan Rath, digital multimedia artist. 4411 Redwood Rd, Napa. Daily, 10am to 5:30pm 707.255.1144.

Sun, May 5 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 5pm–9:25pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING

Yo el Rey Roasting “Mirabilis,” photos by Ann Trinca. Reception, May 4, 8 to 10pm. 217 Washington St, Calistoga. 707.942.1180.

Comedy Ronnie Schell “Duke” from TV series Gomer Pyle is also the honorary mayor of Encino, Calif. Johnny Steele opens. May 3, 8pm. $14-$25. Silo’s, 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833. )

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Yo el Rey Roasting and Arthouse

Mon, May 6 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–9:25pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, May 7 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7:30pm–9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

Best in Napa

1217 Washington St Downtown Calistoga www.yoelrey.com

707.321.7901

ECHO GALLERY

Yo Y oe ell R Rey ey A Arthouse r t h o us e P Presents r es e n t s

Mirabilis: M irabilis: Photos Photos by by Ann Ann Trinca Trinca Openi Opening n ng S aturday Saturday M ay 4 May 8:00 8: 00 also a lso ssee ee o our ur o other ther llocation o c a t io n a att 1 1348 348 LLincoln in c o l n A Ave ve

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 1-7, 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Through Jun 16, “Minidoka on My Mind,” paintings by Roger Shimomura. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

NORTH BAY BOHEM I AN | MAY 1-7, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Dance Frolic in the Rose Garden

May 3, noon-Sat, May 4, 10am and Sun, May 5, 10am. Free. Marin Center Exhibit Hall, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Job Fair & Hiring Event

May 4-5, 10am and 2pm, Upside Dance Company performs in the grass meadow. Donation. Russian River Rose Co, 1685 Magnolia Dr, Healdsburg. 707.575.6744.

Sponsored by Sonoma County Job Link and Employment Development Department. May 1, 11am. Free. Santa Rosa Veterans Memorial Hall, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.565.7176.

Un Cachito de Flamenco

May Day March & Rally

May 4, 7pm, dance concert featuring Fanny Ara, Jose Cortes, David Paez, Paloma Aspe and Sara Maria. $10-$20. 707.486.8381. 390 Morris St, Sebastopol.

March through downtown Santa Rosa to Juilliard Park in support of immigration reform. May 1, 3:30pm. Free. Roseland Shopping Center, 555 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa.

Mombo’s 2 Mombo’s

Events Chimera Open House Grand opening of nonprofit community arts and maker space. Live music, drinks and schmoozing. May 1, 6pm. Free. Chimera Art Space, 6791 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.861.0278.

Cinco de Mayo Celebration Music, dancing, food, kids area, lowrider cars and one huge party in this annual alcoholfree event in Roseland. May 5, 3-9pm. Old Albertson’s parking lot, Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa.

Conservatory Showcase Acting, singing and dancing from the Performing Arts Academy of Marin. May 5, 2 and 5pm. $14-$18. Marin Center Showcase Theatre, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Fam Jam Family dance party with DJs and games, contests, snacks, activity tables, performances and more. Tailored to families with children 10 and under. Sun, May 5, 1pm. $5. Live Musicians Co-Op, 925 Piner Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.8845.

Ken Garr Annual event features magic, comedy, mentalism, juggling and illusions for the whole family. May 4, 3 and 7:30pm. $7-$12. First United Methodist Church, 1551 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa.

Gem Faire Over 70 world-renowned importers/exporters and manufacturers on site. Fri,

Bike ride from Sebastopol pizza parlor to Santa Rosa pizza parlor. May 4, 10:30am. Mombo’s Pizza, 560 Hwy 116 N, Sebastopol. 707.823.7492.

Roller Derby Cinco de Mayo Celebration Carnival games, tamales and sweets in this fundraiser for the Sonoma County Roller Derby. May 4, 5pm. Donation. Spancky’s, 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Senior Expo Fair designed for active adults 50 and older, including health screenings, demonstrations and information. May 4, 9am. Free. Finley Community Center, 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

Film

nearly real time, the film tells the story of a town marshal forced to face a gang of killers by himself. Mon, May 6, 7pm and Wed, May 8, 8pm. $8. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

The Mongolian Dream Documentary chronicles the descendants of Genghis Khan since the 1990s who have faced rapid social and cultural change. May 7, 6pm. Free. Bay Model Visitor Center, 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.3871.

The Trouble with the Truth Independent film starring Lea Thompson, John Shea and Danielle Harris. May 8, 7:30pm. $12. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Wait Wait . . . Don’t Tell Me Invigorating quiz show jumps from NPR radio to the big screen. May 2 at 8pm. $20. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Food & Drink Art of the Cocktail Sample signature tequila cocktails and cast your vote for the top drink. May 5, 2pm. $40. Petaluma Arts Center, 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Cinco de Winetasting

May 3 at 7pm, “American Graffiti.” $5. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Cult Film Series

Distiller’s Dinner

May 2, double feature of ‘Christine’ and ‘Maximum Overdrive.’ 7pm, $10. Roxy Stadium 14, 85 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.522.0330.

Charbay Distillery spirits paired with five-course meal. May 3, 7pm. $125. Nick’s Cove, 23240 Hwy 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033.

Film Fest Petaluma

Mole Tasting

Short films and documentaries from around the world. May 4, 2:30-10:30pm. $25. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Six recipes of chicken mole from the states of Hildago, Jalisco, Michoacan and Puebla. May 5, 5:30pm. $20. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

High Noon Western noir starring Gary Cooper and Grace Kelly. In

Springtime Bonanza Barbecue lunch paired with

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Tamale Festival Variety of tamales and cold drinks. Music by Tudo Bem and dance by Ballet Folklorico Quetzalen. May 5, 12pm. $8$18. Cornerstone Sonoma, 23570 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.933.3010.

Lectures Art Uncorked Recreate masterpieces in this fun painting class. First Thurs of every month, 6:30pm. $45. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Burbank Lecture Series May 8, Jennifer Sloan of the Arts Council of Sonoma County. $10. Luther Burbank Experiment Farm, 7781 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.9492.

Community Listening Project

Tasting flight with five wines from five different appellations. Randy Cooks band plays May 5. May 4-5, 10am. $15. Dutton-Goldfield Winery, 3100 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. 707.827.3600.

Celebrate Sonoma County

wine and live music. May 5, 12pm. $55. Judd’s Hill Winery, 2332 Silverado Trail, Napa. 707.255.2332.

Creating acceptance of diversity through listening and sharing. May 4, 9am. Free. Volunteer Center of Sonoma County, 153 Stony Circle, Ste 100, Santa Rosa. 707.573.3399.

Day Under the Oaks Triumphant return of annual open house celebrates community and education, including interactive activities and tours of campus’ newest buildings. May 5, 10am. Free. Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 1.800.564.SRJC.

Healthy Marin Watersheds & Creeks Laura Chariton and Gordon Bennett talk about restoring watersheds and creeks. May 1, 7pm. Free. San Rafael City Council Chambers, 1400 Fifth Ave, San Rafael.

Nonviolent Action Science and satyagraha for contemporary society. Facilitated by Karl Risher of the Metta Center for Nonviolence. May 5, 10am. Sunflower Center, 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

Singing Field Workshop Sing, chant, laugh and perhaps cry, as each unique voice will

Ride for Rhythm Mombo’s ride raises money for music in schools Three years ago, Fred Poulous discovered that his daughter’s school music program was in danger due to budget cuts. Determined to help raise funds, the owner of Mombo’s Pizza founded the Mombo’s to Mombo’s bike ride, which for the last two years has raised over $8,000 for music programs at Brook Haven school. For the third year, Poulous is also donating to Pine Crest, and has a goal of raising $12,000. “At Brook Haven, these kids love their music program so much that they are there at 7:30,” Poulous says, “an hour before school starts.” Along an easy, 20-mile flat route, the ride travels round trip from the restaurants in Sebastopol and Santa Rosa, where there will be plenty of pizza. If the 20-mile distance is too challenging, there’s a half-ride option, and new this year for those with toddlers is a four-mile “Mini Mombo” ride to BBQ Smokehouse Bistro in Sebastopol, with free pork sliders. For longtime locals, the event has sparked memories of the Brass Ass pizzeria’s famous “Ass to Ass Run” in the 1980s. “It’s wonderful that we can carry on the tradition,” Poulous says. The Mombo’s to Mombo’s ride is on Saturday, May 4, starting at 560 Gravenstein Hwy. N., Sebastopol. Registration is from 10:30am–1pm. $25 donation encouraged. 707.823.7492.—Taylor May

be heard. Bring a poem or short reading to share. May 4, 9:30am-5pm. $40. Songbird Community Healing Center, 8297 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.2398.

Splish Splash Techniques Joyce Hasselbeck demonstrates imaginative effects in watercolor. May 7, 7:30pm. Free. Petaluma Arts Center, 230 Lakeville St at

East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Book Passage May 1, 7pm, “A Short History of Nuclear Folly” with Rudolph Herzog. May 2, 5:30pm, “New Persian Kitchen” with Louisa Shafia, includes food tasting and signed copy of book $38. May 2, 7pm, “Bringing Mulligan Home: The Other Side of the Good War” with Dale Maharidge. May 3, 7pm, “Fit Quickies: 5Minute Targeted Body-Shaping Workouts” with Lani Muelrath. May 4, 1pm, “Making Your Creative Mark: Nine Keys to Achieving Your Artistic Goals” with Eric Maisel. May 4, 4pm, “The Aquarians: Awakening the True Self” with Curran Galway. May 4, 7pm, “Finding Right Work: Five Steps to a Life You Love” with Leni Miller. May 5, 4pm, “The Tiffany Box” with Kathleen Buckstaff. May 5, 7pm, “Plus One: An Outsider’s Photographic Journey into the World of Fashion” with Sharon Socol. May 6, 7pm, “The Vast Unknown” with Broughton Coburn. May 7, 7pm, “Yellow Birds” with Kevin Powers. May 8, 1pm, “A Constellation of Vital Phenomena” with Anthony Marra. May 8, 7pm, “Practical Classics: 50 Reasons to Reread Fifty Books You Haven’t Touched Since High School” with Kevin Smoker. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Dance Palace May 4, 6pm, “Common Wealth: The Hidden Economy That Makes Everything Else Work” with Jonathon Rowe. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Glaser Center May 8, 7pm, “The End of Growth: Adapting to Our New Economic Reality” with Richard Heinberg. $10. 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Hopmonk Sebastopol May 1, 6pm, “The Golem and the Jinni” with Helene Wecker. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books May 2, 7pm, West Marin Review. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.0563.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books May 6, 7pm, “The Yellow

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books May 2, 7pm, “The Golden Shore” with David Helvarg. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.2618.

Wells Fargo Center May 3, 8pm, “Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls” with David Sedaris. $45-$65. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Theater Boy Shoots Girl Staged reading of a new play by Lynne Kaufman. May 1, 7:30pm. $10-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Carmen Georges Bizet’s classic opera in which a woman will risk everything, including her own life, to live the life she desires. Cinnabar premiere. Dates and times vary. May 1-Jun 16. $25$35. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

The Full Monty Will these husbands go the “full monty” for their ladies? Times vary. Thurs-Sun through May 19. $23-$35. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

I Hate Hamlet A hot young TV star has been offered a role he despises. Hilarity ensues. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through May 12. $10-$20. Dance Studio, College of Marin, 835 College Ave, Kentfield.

Legally Blonde: The Musical Bubbly and stylish sorority president applies to law school to win back her boyfriend. Her exploits ensure that Harvard Law and the legal system will never be the same. Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 3pm. through May 5. $10-$18. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

Petaluma: The Musical v.3 ‘Chickenstock’ The story of a group of politically active young people in the “Age of Aquarius” living in Petaluma. Fri-Sat, 7pm and Sun, 4pm through May 12. $15$20. Petaluma Woman’s Club, 518 B St, Petaluma.

The Pirates of Penzance

33

What constitutes the “model of a modern Major-General?” The New York Gilbert & Sullivan Players try their hand at explaining. May 8, 8pm. $45$65. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 1-7, 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Readings

Birds” with Kevin Powers. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

The Real Americans Connecting the worlds of liberal and conservative. Written and performed by Dan Hoyle. May 3, 8pm. $22-$35. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Red A searing portrait of an artist’s ambition and vulnerability as he tries to create a definitive work for an extraordinary setting. Times vary. First ThursSun of every month. through May 26. $10-$25. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

The Shape of Things David Lear’s funny, controversial exploration of morality and gender roles in modern America. Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 5pm. through May 19. $15-$25. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

TMI: One Man’s Search for Happiness Don McMillan’s one man show. May 2, 8pm. $12. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

True West Two adult brothers, opposite in philosophy and personality, take their rivalry to another level in Sam Shepard’s dark comedy. Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 3pm. through May 12. $12$25. St Vincent’s School, 1 St Vincent Dr, San Rafael.

West Side Stories Five-minute true stories told live onstage without notes. May 1, “The Greatest Game Ever.” $5. Sonoma Valley Portworks, 613 Second St, Petaluma. 707.769.5203.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Best Of Winner Awards, Plaques and Window Decals are ready for you to display! AWARDS Go online to www.bohemian.com, click on Best of 2013 and then the awards link, find your award and print! TO ORDER A PLAQUE Go to www.bohemian.com, click on Best of 2013 and then Plaque Order Form, then fax! WINDOW DECALS Call the Bohemian 707.527.1200

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Self Realization Fellowship Santa Rosa Meditation Group 795 Farmers Lane #22 Schedule: 24/7 VM 707.523.9555 www.srf-santarosa.org

Astrology

FREE WILL BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of May 1

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) Are you afraid that you lack a crucial skill or aptitude? Do you have a goal that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re worried might be impossible to achieve because of this inadequacy? If so, now is a good time to make plans to ďŹ ll in the gap. If you formulate such an intention, you will attract a benevolent push from the cosmos. Why spend another minute fretting about the consequences of your ignorance when you have more power than usual to correct that ignorance? TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20) Imagine youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in a large room full of costumes. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like a masquerade store at Halloween plus a storage area where a theater troupe keeps the apparel its actors use to stage a wide variety of historical plays. You have free reign here. You can try on different masks and wigs and disguises and get-ups. You can envision yourself living in different eras as various characters. If you like, you can even go out into the world wearing your alternate identities. Try this exercise, Taurus. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll stimulate good ideas about some new self-images you might want to play with in real life. GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20)

Ray LaMontagne sings these lyrics in his tune â&#x20AC;&#x153;Emptyâ&#x20AC;?: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I looked my demons in the eyes / Laid bare my chest and said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Do your best to destroy me / Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been to hell and back so many times / I must admit you kind of bore meâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;.â&#x20AC;? I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be opposed to you delivering a message like that to your own demons, Geminiâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;with one caveat: Leave out the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Do your best to destroy meâ&#x20AC;? part. Simply peer into the glazed gaze of those shabby demons and say, â&#x20AC;&#x153;You bore me and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m done with you. Bye-bye.â&#x20AC;? And then walk away from them for good.

CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22)

I know a devotee of Tibetan Buddhism who got an unexpected message from her teacher. He told her she has made such exemplary progress in her quest for enlightenment that she has earned the ultimate reward. When she dies many years from now, the teacher said, she will enter nirvana! She will have no further karmic obligation to reincarnate into a new body in the future, and will be forever excused from the struggle of living in the material world. Although her teacher meant this to be good news, she was heartbroken. She wants to keep reincarnating. Her joyous passion is to help relieve the suffering of her fellow humans. Can you guess what sign she is? Yes: a Cancerian. Like her, many of you are ďŹ&#x201A;irting with an odd and challenging choice between selďŹ shness and selďŹ&#x201A;essness.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) A lawyer named John Keogh ďŹ led an application with the Australian Patent OfďŹ ce. It was for a â&#x20AC;&#x153;circular transportation-facilitation device.â&#x20AC;? His claim was approved. He thus became the owner of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ rst and only patent for the wheel. So far, he has not tried to collect royalties from anyone whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s using wheels. I nominate him to be your role model, Leo. May he inspire you to stamp your personal mark on a universal archetype or put your unique spin on something everyone knows and loves. VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22) This may be the best week in a long time to practice the art of crazy wisdom. And what is crazy wisdom? Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how novelist Tom Robbins described it to Shambhala Sun: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;a philosophical worldview that recommends swimming against the tide, cheerfully seizing the short end of the stick, embracing insecurity, honoring paradox, courting the unexpected, celebrating the unfamiliar, shunning orthodoxy, volunteering for tasks nobody else wants or dares to do, and breaking taboos in order to destroy their power. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the wisdom of those who turn the tables on despair by lampooning it, and who neither seek authority nor submit to it.â&#x20AC;? And why should you do any of that weird stuff? Robbins: â&#x20AC;&#x153;To enlarge the soul, light up the brain and liberate the spirit.â&#x20AC;? LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why should we honor those that die upon the ďŹ eld of battle?â&#x20AC;? asked Irish poet William Butler Yeats. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A man may show as reckless a courage in entering into the abyss of himself.â&#x20AC;? A woman may show similar bravery, of course. In my astrological opinion, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the noble adventure

beckoning to you, Libra: a dive into the depths of your inner workings. I hope thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the direction you go; I hope you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take your stouthearted struggle out into the world around you. All the best action will be happening in that fertile hub known as your â&#x20AC;&#x153;soul.â&#x20AC;?

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21)

Historical records suggest that ancient Greek philosopher Democritus went blind late in his life. There are different stories about why. According to one account, he intentionally did it to himself by gazing too long into the sun. That was his perverse way of solving a vexing problem: it freed him from the torment of having to look upon gorgeous women who were no longer interested in or available to him because of his advanced age. I hope you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do anything like that, Scorpio. In fact, I suggest you take the opposite approach: keep your attention focused on things that stir your deep attraction, even if you think you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have them for your own. Valuable lessons and unexpected rewards will emerge from such efforts.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) Search your memory, Sagittarius, and recall a time when you pushed yourself to your limits as you labored over a task you cared about very much. At that time, you worked with extreme focus and intensity. You were rarely bored and never resentful about the enormous effort you had to expend. You loved throwing yourself into this test of willpower, which stretched your resourcefulness and compelled you to grow new capacities. What was that epic breakthrough in your past? Once you know, move on to your next exercise: Imagine a new assignment that ďŹ ts this description, and make plans to bring it into your life in the near future. CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) Nairobi is Kenyaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s capital and home of over 3 million urbanites. A few minutesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; drive from the city center, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a 45-square-mile national park teeming with wildlife. Against a backdrop of skyscrapers, rhinos and giraffes graze. Lions and cheetahs pounce. Wildebeests roam and hyenas skulk. I suggest you borrow the spirit of that arrangement and invoke it in your own life. In other words, be highly civilized and smartly sophisticated part of the time; be wild and free the rest of the time. And be ready to go back and forth between the two modes with grace and ease. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18)

In the wild, a tigerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s diet consists entirely of meat. The big cat loves to feast on deer and wild boar, and eats a variety of other animals, too. The hunt is always solitary, never done in collaborative groups. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why the creatureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s success rate is so low. A tiger snags the prey itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seeking only about 5 percent of the time. It sometimes has to wait two weeks between meals. Nevertheless, a tiger rarely starves. When it gets what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s after, it can devour 75 pounds of food in one sitting. According to my astrological analysis, Aquarius, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re like a tiger these days. You havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t had a lot of lucky strikes lately, but I suspect you will soon hit the jackpot.

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20) The French word ďŹ&#x201A;âneur is a meme that refers to a person who strolls around the city at a leisurely pace, exploring whatever captivates her imagination. To the casual observer, the ďŹ&#x201A;âneur may seem to be a lazy timewaster with nothing important to do. But she is in fact motivated by one of the noblest emotionsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;pure curiosityâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and is engaged in a quest to attract novel experiences, arouse fresh insights and seek new meaning. Sound fun? Well, congratulations, Pisces, because you have been selected as the Flaming Flâneur of the Zodiac for the next two weeks. Get out there and meander!

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