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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Spying on Occupy The big story that wasn’t—around here, at least BY MARY MOORE

T

he day before Christmas, a national story broke in the New York Times, CNN and most major mainstream outlets across the country. Unfortunately, it didn’t make it to our daily newspaper. A national civil rights group, the Partnership for Civil Justice, filed a Freedom of Information Act request and discovered that the U.S. government had spent this past year spying on the Occupy movement. Even before New York Occupy had moved into Zuccotti Park and set up their first tent, the local FBI field office had called for a meeting with the New York Stock Exchange to “discuss the planned anarchist protest.”

This was just the tip of the iceberg. In the Dec. 29 Guardian, a reporter wrote: “These documents . . . show a terrifying network of coordinated DHS, FBI, police and private sector activity so completely merged into one another that the whole is in fact one entity.” The story described how these entities were working for and with the banks to “target, arrest and politically disable peaceful American citizens.” On CounterPunch, Dave Lindorff wrote about one FOI document that showed an intent to “formulate a plan to kill the leadership by sniper rifles” in Houston. The internet was buzzing with this news, as were mainstream outlets across the country. But not here. The Press Democrat was silent, so I decided to find out why. After a week of phone calls, I finally got the answer from an abashed editor at the paper: he was off on Christmas Eve, and a fill-in editor was in charge of checking the wires for national stories. Although the PD is now “locally owned,” they still receive wires from several sources, including the New York Times, which reported the story. Believe it or not, there are still folks that do not get their news from the internet and/or watch TV. These folks may still not know about this, so I want to thank the Bohemian for this space. Of course, this story about the FBI spying on activists hardly comes as a surprise to anyone paying attention over the years. I hope all local occupiers will join me in thanking the Partnership for Civil Justice for its quick and dedicated work, and for keeping this story going. Mary Moore is a resident of Camp Meeker. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Farewell, Tinker

Stephen Gross

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

6

It was with great sadness to learn of the death of an old River staple, Alex “Tinker” Lazlo. I feel compelled to not let Tinker’s passing go overlooked or let his importance in our community’s history be overshadowed by his scarcity in his fading years. Tinker was a River icon, a man whose memory and words evoke a smile and a sense of being a part of something. He was the first person I met when I moved here over 30 years ago. He had his fix-it shop where the Gasco now stands, and I came to him with a broken chainsaw. I grew up with guys like Tinker. He was from South Philly, I was from industrial northern New Jersey—downwind from each other, he used to say. When I met Tinker in my first week as a River resident in the spring of 1981, I knew I was home. I knew Tinker through his lean years, during his golden ones after he married Jane and had his sons and beyond. I remember when he started his video store. This was back in the day where recorded VHS tapes were around $100. I had acquired a collection while writing for an underground free press in L.A. the year before I moved here. I loaned him the most bizarre ones I had to get his “Offbeat” section started. These movies were rated X—not for anything unsavory, mind you, but for their shocking content: Andy Warhol’s Frankenstein in 3-D, John Waters’ Multiple Maniacs and Mondo Trasho, replete with puke eaters and a giant homicidal lobster, to name a few. When the town flooded shortly afterward, I stopped by to check on Tinker’s store. Basically, all was lost. While helping him clean up, we found my movies floating in mud and debris. He stood next to me, bumped my shoulder with his, smiled and said, “Just between you and me, some things are just too disgusting to exist.” In the midst of a disaster, Tinker’s humor, as always, prevailed, and we laughed like crazy in agreement.

Years later, at his beloved Jane’s memorial service, he was adamant about interring her eyeglasses with her, as reading to her students and her sons was her favorite thing to do. In the eyeglass case, I noticed a piece of paper. When I asked Tinker what was written on it, he told me there were two pieces, one of which he told me was “Hopefully, the sweetest love letter she’s ever read. “ We can measure our true worth by the friends we acquire along the way, and define ourselves by those moments we’ve shared with them. Thank you, Tinker, and goodbye, my old friend. For some of us, you made all the difference in the world.

EDYE PRINCE Guerneville

Violence Against Women The issue of violence against women is critical. While the statistic for violence against women varies within each city, county, state and country, the United Nations states that, globally, one in three women on the planet will be raped, beaten or sexually abused in her lifetime. Do the math—that’s 1 billion mothers, daughters, sisters, aunts, grandmothers, nieces. This is an atrocity. VDay.org is inviting 1 billion women and those who love them to walk out, dance, rise up and demand an end to this violence on Feb. 14. One Billion Rising will move the earth, activating women and men across every country. V-Day wants the world to see our collective strength, our numbers, our solidarity across borders. One Billion Rising is a global strike; an invitation to dance; a call to men and women to refuse to participate in the status quo until rape and rape culture ends; an act of solidarity, demonstrating to women the commonality of their struggles and their power in numbers; a refusal to accept violence against women and girls as a given; a new time and a new way of being. While numerous One Billion Rising events are scheduled in the Bay Area,


THIS MODERN WORLD

By Tom Tomorrow

Dating! Ain’t it grand? Well, except when it ain’t. You know you’ve been there at some point: sitting in the car, walking home the next morning, or trying to flag a taxi to get-the-hell-outta-there. Your only consolation is texting your friend: “Worst. Date. Ever.” The other consolation lies in the fantastic leverage you now weild during “worst date” storytime, which, for the Bohemian, falls in our dating-themed Sex & Valentines issue, publishing Feb. 6. That’s right: we want you to spill the beans on your worst date ever. Tell us how terrible and awkward it all was, in grisly and humorous detail, and you may be selected as one of the top three winning stories to be published on Feb. 6! Stories should be no longer than 400 words and emailed to: letters@bohemian.com. Winners are chosen by an editorial panel and awarded prizes sufficiently tantalizing to hopefully cleanse your memory of the awful evening in question. Entries must be submitted by Wednesday, Jan. 30.

two, in particular, are scheduled for the North Bay: Dominican Rising (at Dominican University) and North Bay Rising (in Petaluma). To participate at the event nearest you, go to www.onebillionrising.org. Join us, along with over 182 other countries, in rising and saying “No more!” to the violence.

TRISHA ALMOND Petaluma

Think Positve I just wanted to send a gigantic thanks to Brian Thomas Gallagher for his terrific review of Oliver Burkeman’s new “antipositive thinking” book. I’ve been waiting forever for this!

JESSICA ZANE Santa Rosa Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

Top Five 1

Sure wish the Super Bowl could be played at Candlestick before it’s gone

2

Hell freezes over as Gawker links to a story in the Press Democrat

3

Roe v. Wade is 40 years old, and seven out of 10 Americans support it

4

Richard Blanco’s stunning inauguration poem, “One Today”

5 Meeting on new Napa skatepark takes place on Feb. 13 at Napa City Hall

Love & Kisses, The Bohemian

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Rants

WORST. DATE. EVER.

7


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

8

THE

Paper SPLITTING UP Currently planned is a move of a public school to Marin City while retaining a charter school in Sausalito.

A School Divided The self-segregation of a Marin County school district BY RACHEL DOVEY

A

proposal to consolidate two schools raises issues of racial segregation and equity with deep roots in southern Marin.

The Sausalito Marin City School District currently oversees three campuses. Two—Bayside Elementary and the Martin Luther King Jr. Academy middle school— are traditional public schools, while the K–8 Willow Creek Academy is a charter school. The district’s proposal would move

Bayside students from their current Sausalito campus, which they share with Willow Creek, to the Marin City MLK campus, creating two schools districtwide—a traditional K–8 in Marin City and a K–8 charter in Sausalito. Reasons for the move include dollars currently lost on doubledup administrative fees—up to $250,000 a year—and educational opportunities that could come with a larger student body, among others. But the landscape of the move concerned community members

at a meeting on Jan. 15. As anyone familiar with the history of southern Marin knows, Sausalito and Marin City share a zip code and little else. While Sausalito touts a median household income of $110,000, Marin City’s median is just over $46,000. And while the hillside city overlooking the Bay is roughly 93 percent white— ACS data through 2011 reports that there is one black person living in all of Sausalito—the unincorporated county pocket tucked away behind it houses the largest concentration of African

Americans in Marin County, at roughly 45 percent. To consolidate the two traditional public campuses, both with a black student majority, in Marin City while keeping the charter with a black minority on its current hillside campus in Sausalito would be a move that, some say, looks an awful lot like segregation. Sausalito resident Marie Simmons invoked a Jim Crow comparison, saying the move would create an educational system that was “separate but equal.” “How do you prepare [the kids] for an increasingly diverse society if you segregate them?” she asked the district board. “Studies have shown that children do better if you integrate them.” Another community member expressed her fears in starker terms. “From what I’ve seen, it looks like all the board wants to do is bring the kids down to Marin City and dump them,” she said. Board president William Ziegler acknowledged that the community has historically seen the charter and traditional schools in the district as competitors, but added that he believes this to be “a perception, not a reality.” The charter utilizes an interdisciplinary, project-based approach along with its textbook curriculum, and has scored the highest of the three schools on the last five California Academic Performance indexes. It’s expected to expand onto the campus vacated by Bayside. However, although Willow Creek is located in Sausalito, it doesn’t draw students solely from the wealthy city. Several Willow Creek parents pointed out that the charter is open to anyone in the district and draws more than a hundred students from Marin City. Its student body is far more racially diverse than the city in which it sits, with 30 percent Latino students, 20 percent African American students and 10 percent Asian students. “We are all 94965,” one parent said, referring to the zip code. “Anyone can go to Willow Creek.” But through back-and-forth between parents and administrators at the meeting, that statement,


ACS data through 2011 reports that there is one black person living in all of Sausalito. And superintendent Valerie Pitts made another point. Like many charters, Willow Creek requires a minimum of 50 hours of parental volunteer time. “Our parents are working,” she said, speaking for the traditional public schools. “They can’t necessarily come and volunteer.” Other community members stood up in support of the traditional schools. Julius Holtzclaw, an administrative assistant to the district and a graduate of Bayside and MLK, addressed what one community member labeled as an unfair attitude of shame toward the noncharter schools. “I feel like I’m always having to defend Bayside,” he said. The school’s API rose an impressive 56 points from 2011 to 2012, and now stands at 808, not far below Willow Creek’s 859. MLK’s score still lags below the two at 698, though it’s risen 60 points over the past five years. Pam Dake was one of several people who requested more time before the impending move. “We would have an opportunity to create collaborative dialogue between Sausalito and Marin City, which we don’t have now,” she said.

9

Adios, Gilardi Cotati City Councilmember Pat Gilardi has accepted a job as district director for county supervisor Susan Gorin. Gilardi had served on the Cotati City Council for 13 years and won reelection last November, but the lure of working for Gorin—a $73,000 annual salary helps—proved too strong to resist. This leaves the city with another vacancy, the fourth in the past four years. Each of the other spots has been filled by appointment rather than special election, which could cost the city upwards of $20,000. This is by far the most positive of the four vacancies, however; other open seats being caused by campaign finance scandal, special recall election and a sudden, unexpected death. But it leaves the city with another new face to get used to, with a first-time mayor on the dais. —Nicolas Grizzle

Co-Op Country On Jan. 26, the Share Exchange presents a workshop on co-ops, focusing on worker ownership. Coop developer and author of Holy Cooperation! Andrew McLeod will lead the presentation, which includes introductions to various cooperative forms and startups and envisions how Sonoma County could benefit from the unique business model. McLeod examines a cross-section of faith and cooperative economics, taking a hard second look at social practices that have fallen out of favor in mainstream business and religious circles. Sponsors include Summit State Bank, Alvarado Street Bakery, Community First Credit Union and others. Attendees are asked to bring their own bag lunch. The daylong workshop is on Saturday, Jan. 26, at the Share Exchange. 531 Fifth St., Santa Rosa. 9am– 4pm. $40–$50. 707.583.7667. —Rachel Dovey

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

though theoretically accurate, was revealed to paint an imperfect picture of the charter system. For example, although technically any child in the district can attend the high-performing school, it’s not possible for all children in the district to do so. Under school finance law, the district could not disband its traditional schools and still receive basic aid funding.


Green Zone

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

10

Power to Persuade

It takes salesmanship to preserve nature BY JULIANE POIRIER

P

Bring your Sweetheart for a Romantic Evening with

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reserving wildness takes certain skills. Many conservationists are lawyers, persuasive writers and speakers. But we can’t leave earth-saving to the professionals. “All hands on deck!” is the urgent cry. The internet gives us power to reach out, but to be effective in moving others, we need to take some tips from the radically altered world of . . . sales. Daniel Pink, author of To Sell Is Human: The Surprising Truth About Moving Others, claims that all of us are now in sales—a pursuit so changed from what it once was that it is hardly recognizable. If we loathe the very idea of sales (as the author did before he researched his book), it’s time to toss out obsolete stereotypes. Pink posits that the era of the sleazy used-car salesman is over—as irrelevant as the social structures that once gave him power to

exploit naïve buyers. The internet gives (almost) everyone the power of information, so whether it’s retail purchases or medical treatments, we are virtually immune to victimization by sleazes—who, by the way, no longer thrive in today’s marketplace. Most of us buy and sell online, but those of us who are not selling products or services for a living are nevertheless doing what Pink calls “nonselling sales”: moving others. We do it with every email we send, every pitch we make to friends or employers to entice them to see things or do things differently. Moving others demands skills entirely unlike the ones used in scripted, predatory sales. Nonsales selling requires cooperation rather than competition, and compassion rather than coercion. Even more surprising, the new practice of moving others is rooted not in money-grubbing but in service to others and to making the world a better place. Pink is not pushing an imaginary idealism here, but rather demonstrating the results of scientific research. Studies show that we do better work (including traditional product sales) when we are serving more than our own self-interest, and we perform at higher levels when we know we are serving a higher cause. To perform well in our work—as teachers, restaurant servers, doctors, shopkeepers, lawyers, health professionals, contractors and, yes, nature advocates—we must develop skills of attuned and empathic listening, seeing things from others’ perspectives, responding positively to the suggestions of others and measuring the success of our endeavors not upon whether we have sold an item or an idea but whether we have made things easier for another human being, and thus made the world a little better. “In wildness,” Thoreau wrote, “is the preservation of the world.” In moving others is the preservation of wildness.


PRIME CUT Sure enough, Anya Fernald was once a vegetarian; now, at Belcampo, she aims to do meat right.

Butchery by the Bay Belcampo Meat Co. poised for expansion, longevity in the sustainable-meat business BY JAMES KNIGHT

H

ere’s a fun survey to take in a room full of beef industry executives: How many of y’all went through that phase in high school when you went vegetarian, you know, for ethical reasons? Any hands? Count Anya Fernald, for one. Having read that it takes 12 pounds of grain to make one pound of beef, the earnest student

swore off meat. After college, she worked with cheesemakers in Sicily, coordinated Slow Food Foundation programs in Europe and directed San Francisco’s Slow Food Nation event. Now, as CEO of Belcampo Meat Co., she says, “I love meat, I love talking about it, love thinking about it!” Clearly, she’s comfortable with the ethics of this new venture. Belcampo is an ambitious “ranch to table” operation. Unlike smaller grass-fed operations that can only offer shares of animals

in frozen parcels, Belcampo has scaled up a vertically integrated production, processing and retail system that’s set to go statewide. The first in a chain of butcher shop and restaurant outlets opened in Larkspur in November 2012. Fernald was initially brought in as a consultant when investor Todd Robinson purchased land in Siskiyou County, she says, speaking a mile-a-minute from her Oakland office. Little wonder. She’s also developing a 20,000-acre sugar plantation in Belize with

a “farm to bottle” rum distillery powered by biomass, plus coffee and chocolate, and a 12-room agritourism lodge. “It’s bigger and more engaging in some ways than the California operation,” Fernald says. “There’s lots of chemical agriculture in Belize, and it’s a very, very delicate ecosystem in an amazing delta of rivers.” As if that wasn’t enough, Fernald also consults for Belcampo’s cattle ranch in Uruguay. That’s a commodity operation, and the beef will never be shipped to the California market, Fernald insists. “I don’t care about the math, it just doesn’t feel right.” Unlike Uruguay, however, lack of viable grass during summer months is a big issue in California’s grass-fed beef business. “I’ve seen enough of the shady side of grass farming,” Fernald avers. At Belcampo’s CCOF certified organic ranch, a crew of veteran ranchers and bright-eyed ecology graduates are able to keep the cattle on pasture for all but a one-and-a-half-month “bridge” during the year. The secret to their system is, it’s not just cows. It’s a mob. Cattle, sheep, goats, heritage pigs, ducks and chickens are rotated through the pasture inside electrically fenced enclosures. “Keeping all those animals is kind of a party trick,” Fernald says. “The animals look almost crowded.” Because the differing species graze at different levels, Belcampo’s farm managers can extract more productivity from this relatively poor range land. Following just three days of grazing, a particular area is rotated into one full year of rest. The contemporary farm buildings include a kitchen, where future events will be held—for instance, they’re talking with local author and Butcher’s Guild cofounder Marissa Guggiana about holding butchery classes there. “The whole production of food has been totally deskilled,” Fernald laments. “To get people to appreciate the quality, we need to re-professionalize the people who sell meat.” Belcampo opened its ) 12

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

James Knight

Dining

11


12 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Sweetheart Specials

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own slaughterhouse in Yreka, 20 minutes north of the farm. Animal Welfare Association–certiďŹ ed and designed according to the prescriptions of compassionin-butchery advocate Temple Grandin, the abattoir is a key link in a transparent, easily traceable system, all the way to the consumer. Echoing the farm’s Mount Shasta view, Belcampo’s Larkspur outlet is located at the Marin Country Mart, in the evening shadow of Mt. Tam, across from the Golden Gate ferry terminal. The big, red “Bâ€? painted on the building is hard to miss. Designed like an old-fashioned butcher shop, with white tile walls and marble counters, it’s a fairly straightforward space, with nothing stagey about it. The cold case is neatly stocked with popular cuts, eclectic cuts and discovery meat: dry-aged picanha and bavette steak, ground beef and ground steak, lamb sirloin, pork belly, lamb hearts and lardo butter by the pound; quail, squab, duck and goose, too. So far, the lamb hearts are mainly popular with Marin County dog owners, says head butcher Chris Arentz. Guardians of less gourmet dogs may be happy with the “dog grindâ€? from the freezer case, comprised of lamb lungs and, well, other stuff. Leaving little opportunity to waste the animals that they’ve so thoughtfully raised is integral to Belcampo’s retail model. If an item seems over-ordered, they can turn it around in the restaurant. The casual eatery adjacent the shop offers a short

menu that changes daily. Order at the counter, take a number and sit; the wait isn’t long, and meanwhile, you can watch your Belcampo cheeseburger ($11) sizzling on the grill in the open kitchen—if the kitchen fans drown out the already unobtrusive music, that’s part and parcel. The burger is the real deal—fresh, moist ground beef on a toasted sesame bun, with butter lettuce, aioli and chutney. It’s simple, original and focused on the meat. A savory side of petite, fried Brussels sprouts ($6) is grilled blackly, caramelized and doused in citrus juice. Menus change daily, and recently included a goat sandwich with Red Hawk cheese ($15), ham steak with honey and mustard ($11), beef tallow fries ($5) and several attractive-looking salads. It’s not surprising to ďŹ nd Anya Fernald at a business meeting in the restaurant, although she’s slowed her pace just a bit, with infant daughter Viola in her arms. She’s taken a liking to chewing on lamb bones and goose thighs already, says her proud mother. Belcampo plans a slow launch of shops in San Francisco and Los Angeles this year, topping out at 10 in California. They’re limited by what the farm can supply, and Fernald wants to make sure they’ll never be another sustainable-meat operation that ends up in the red. “I want to be the one who ďŹ gures it out and is here in 20 years,â€? she says. “And is thriving in 20 years.â€? Belcampo, 2405 Larkspur Landing Circle, Building 4, Larkspur. 415.448.5810.


Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OMA CO U N TY Buck’s American. $$. Small plates complement classic fare at Guerneville staple. Prime rib weekend nights! Dinner, Wed– Sat; brunch and dinner, Sun. 16440 Fourth St, Guerneville. 707.869.3608.

Charcuterie French Mediterranean. $$. Intimate bistro has casual European wine-bar feel. Lunch and dinner daily. 335 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.7231. El Coqui Puerto Rican. $-$$. Authentic and delicious Puerto Rican home cooking. Plan on lunching early–the place fills up fast. 400 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.542.8868. Highland Dell Lodge German-Californian. $$. Newly renovated, beautiful setting at the Russian River; locals’ nights Mon and Thurs. Dinner, Thurs-Tues; brunch, Sun. 21050 River Blvd, Monte Rio. 707.865.2300.

Hikuni Sushi Bar & Hibachi Japanese. $$$. Terrific teppanyaki plus a full sushi bar, tonkatsu, udon and bento. Lunch and dinner daily. 4100 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.539.9188.

Lily Kai Chinese. $$. An extensive array of bistro-chic dishes like mild curry lamb, spicy basil prawns and roast duck with steamed lotus buns. Hot and sour soup is stellar. Lunch and dinner daily. 3100 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma. 707.782.1132.

Monti’s Rotisserie & Bar California cuisine. $-$$. Small plates and a few larger entrées with emphasis on house-roasted meats. Lunch and dinner daily. 714 Village Ct, Santa Rosa. 707.568.4404.

Pongo’s Kitchen & Tap Thai. $$. Family-owned and operated with super-

fresh ingredients and a full kids’ menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 701 Sonoma Mt Pkwy, Petaluma. 707.765.9800.

Saddles Steakhouse. $$$$$$$. A steakhouse in the best American tradition, with top-quality grass-fed beef. Pies are made from fruit trees on restaurant property. Dinner daily. 29 E MacArthur St, Sonoma. 707.933.3191.

Sizzling Tandoor Indian. $-$$. A Sonoma County legend for almost 20 years, and for good reason. Of the more than 100 menu choices, all are worthwhile. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. 409 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.579.5999. Sizzling Tandoor II Indian. $-$$. Coastal gem offers a great view of the Sonoma Coast. Come for happy hour and stay through dinner. 9960 Hwy 1, Jenner. 707.865.0625.

Thai Issan Thai. $$. Popular full-spectrum Thai restaurant. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. 208 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.762.5966. Vineyards Inn Spanish. $$. Authentic foods from Spain, fresh fish off the fire broiler, extensive tapas, as well as paellas and more. Emphasis on organic. Open for lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon. 8445 Sonoma Hwy. (Highway 12), at Adobe Canyon Road, Kenwood. 707.833.4500.

Washoe House Roadhouse. $$. Since 1859, serving straightforward roadhouse grub and Italian fare. Canned green beans, buffalo burgers, amazingly satisfying pies. The bar alone is worth a trip. Lunch and dinner daily. Stony Point and Roblar roads, Cotati. 707.795.4544.

Yao-Kiku Japanese. $$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from Japan steals the show in this popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner

1809 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.4677.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

Robata Grill & Sushi

MA R I N CO U N T Y

N A PA CO U N T Y

Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $.

Boonfly Cafe California

Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Bay Thai Thai. $. Fresh Thai food with curries that combine the regions classic sweet and tart elements. Some of the best fried bananas to be found. Lunch and dinner, MonSat; dinner, Sun. (Cash only.) 809 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.458.8845.

Comforts Californian. $$. The Chinese chicken salad is beyond rapturous. Excellent celebrity sightings. Eat in or takeout. Breakfast and lunch daily. 335 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.454.9840.

Easy Street Cafe American. $. Take a gander at the extensive list of Easy Street specials and get a spot by the window to watch Red Hill shoppers wander by. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 882 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.453.1984.

Fradelizio’s Italian. $$. Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

Frantoio Italian. $$-$$$. Perennial winner of SF Chron’s “100 Best,” Frantoio also produces all of its own olive oil. Dinner daily. 152 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.289.5777.

Left Bank French. $$-$$$. Splendid, authentic French cuisine. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331.

Marin Brewing Co Pub food. $-$$. Excellent soups, salads, pub grub and awardwinning pork-beer sausage. Lunch and dinner daily.

Japanese. $$. Mmm. With thick slices of fresh sashimi, Robata knows how to do it. The rolls are big winners. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 591 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.381.8400.

cuisine. $-$$. Extraordinary food in an extraordinary setting. Perfect pasta and mussels. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 4080 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.299.4900.

Brannan’s Grill California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Celadon Global comfort food. $$. Relaxed sophistication in intimate neighborhood bistro setting by the creek. Superior wine list. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 500 Main St, Ste G, Napa. 707.254.9690.

Checkers California. $$. Perfect casual spot for dinner before the movie. Try the panéed chicken and butternut squash ravioli. Lunch and dinner daily. 1414 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9300.

Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen Eclectic. $$-$$$. As comfortable as it sounds, with a rich and varied melting pot of a menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 1327 Railroad Ave, St Helena. 707.963.1200.

13

SMALL BITES

Forks & Corks Just because the last of the Christmas trees have been plucked from the sidewalks and the Santa plates packed away for another year doesn’t mean we need to stop eating, drinking and making merry. Case in point: Forks and Corks, a four-part dinner series at Healdsburg’s Spoonbar that kicks off this Saturday, Jan. 26. Seven chefs a-cooking. Three sommeliers apairing. Even a mixologist with a rare recipe. Hosted by Spoonbar’s own executive chef, Louis Maldonado, each of the four themed dinners are co-created by top Bay Area chefs and wine experts. For the debut meal, Maldonado teams with Michelinstarred chef James Syhabout (pictured) to celebrate global influences and local Sonoma ingredients with dishes that include sea urchin and crab in a coconut bath, Guinea hen with green curry aromatics, and Parsnip milk tapioca with mandarins. “Where Land Meets Sea” is the theme for the dinner on Feb. 23, which will feature Outerlands’ chef Brett Cooper alongside Sommelier Kevin Wardell of Bergamot Alley. The series wraps up with an as-yet-tobe-decided themed meal prepared by chef Lauren Kiino and sommelier David Lynch on April 20. With the exception of March’s Swine and Wine Dinner, which is part of the Annual Pigs and Pinot Celebration package, all meals include six courses for $110. For more information and to reserve a seat, call 707.433.7222.—Jessica Dur Taylor

Cindy Pawlycyn’s Wood Grill & Wine Bar American. $$-$$$. Classic American fare that stays up on current mainstays like crispy pork belly, braised short ribs and crab roll but doesn’t skimp on the burger. Long wine list, kids menu, patio and more. Lunch and dinner, WedSun. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700.

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that

nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Gilwoods Cafe Diner. $$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1320 Napa Town Center, Napa. 707.253.0409. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224.6900.

Redd California cuisine. $$-$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222. Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.259.0633.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Dining

daily. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180.


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

14

Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N TY Deerfield Ranch Winery (WC) The finest wine caves this side of the highway. Twenty-thousand-square-foot underground lair is perfect for keeping wine and wine tasters cool on a summer’s day. Watch for giraffes. 10200 Sonoma Highway, Kenwood. Daily 10:30am–4:30pm. Tasting fee $10-$15. 707.833.2270.

Gourmet au Bay Seafood takes to wine even better than water. Wine bar and retail shop offers flights served on custom wooden “surfboards,” artisan cheese and cracker plate, and liberal bring-your-own picnic policy. Cold crab cakes and sparkling wine at sunset on the bay? Sounds like a date. 913 Hwy. 1, Bodega. Wine surfing, $8. 707.875.9875. Marimar Estate A great stop for locals on a Sunday drive. And the Pinot is fantastic. 11400 Graton Road, Sebastopol Open daily, 11am–4pm. 707.823.4365. Nalle Winery Rising above the vineyards like some kind of New Age bunker, the rosemary-shrouded winery houses a down-toearth father-and-son team dedicated to low-alcohol Dry Creek Zinfandel. Greeters Lila and Pella present soggy tennis balls. 2385 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Saturdays, noon– 5pm. No fee. 707.433.1040.

Quivira Winery Certified biodynamic producer that promotes creek stewardship and steelhead-salmon-habitat restoration. Dry Creek Zinfandel is a regular favorite; Mourvèdre and other Rhône varietals are outstanding. As the steelhead have lately rediscovered, Quivira is worth returning to year after year. 4900 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–5pm. 800.292.8339.

Seghesio Family Winery Delicious Italian varietals, many of them brought directly from Italy;

excellent Zinfandel. 14730 Grove St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.433.3579.

707.260.0514. Tasting at A Dozen Vintners, 3000 Hwy. 29, St. Helena. Daily, 10am-5pm. 707.967.0666.

Taft Street Winery

PlumpJack Winery

Award-winning Sauvignon Blancs are a great deal. 2030 Barlow Lane, Sebastopol. Monday–Friday, 11am–4pm; Saturday–Sunday, 11am–4:30pm. 707.823.2049.

Part of the huge empire in part helmed by Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom. Syrah, Merlot and more. 620 Oakville Crossroad, Oakville. Open daily, 10am– 4pm. 707.945.1220.

VML Winery Acronym of

Robert Sinskey Vineyards In the lofty,

Virginia Marie Lambrix, who practices organic and biodynamic winegrowing— the artist who created VML’s wacky new labels said, “Ah, so you’re a witch!” Bewitching Russian River Valley Chard and Pinot, to be sure. 4035 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am– 5pm. $10 fee. 707.431.4404.

N A PA CO U N TY Acacia Vineyard Acclaimed Pinot and Chardonnay; their biggest client is Costco, but the tasting room is a hole-in-the-wall in a drab beige facility. 2750 Las Amigas Road, Napa. Monday through Saturday, 10am–4pm; Sunday, noon–4pm. $15. 707.226.9991.

Flora Springs Winery & Vineyards Napa Valley’s latest geotectonic eruption on Highway 29 is a stylish place to explore famous Chardonnay, Meritage blend and winery-exclusive Italian varietals. Hip but not too cool, the 30-year-old family winery surely has a sense of humor as well as sense of place. 677 S. St. Helena Hwy., St. Helena. Open daily, 10am–5pm. Tasting fees, $15–$25. 707.967.8032.

Krupp Brothers Estates The story of Stagecoach Vineyards is of extremes: two miles end-toend. One billion pounds of rock extracted. Seventy wineries buy the fruit; the Krupps release 2,000 cases including Black Bart Marsanne. 3265 Soda Canyon Road, Napa. Tours by appointment, $25.

barnlike hall–as elegant as a theater, as solid as a ski lodge–visitors can take in the tank room action; at least, the gleaming stainless steel, framed by wood and stonework and brewpub-style chalkboard menus imbues the space with a sense of energetic immediacy. “Gluttonous Flight” pairs savory munchables prepared in the gourmet demonstration kitchen with biodynamically farmed Careros Pinot Noir and Bordeaux varietals. Not to worry: there’s no flight for ascetics offered, so go for it. 6320 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open 10am–4:30pm daily. 707.944.9090.

Saintsbury A contrarian enterprise in the 1970s, now a hallowed hall of Carneros Pinot Noir. Visitors may linger under shade trees in fair weather or sit down for a serious tasting adjacent the office. 1500 Los Carneros Ave., Napa. Monday– Saturday, by appointment. 707.252.0592. Smith-Madrone Riesling is Smith-Madrone’s main fame claim. Its Riesling has steadily gained fame while Napa Valley Riesling in general has become a rare antique. 4022 Spring Mountain Road, St. Helena. By appointment. 707.963.2283. Taste at Oxbow Discover refreshing white varietals Albariño and Vermentino in stylish setting across from Oxbow Market, then move on to Pinot Noir from Carneros pioneer Mahoney Vineyards; Waterstone Wines, too. 708 First St., Napa. Sunday– Thursday, 11am–7pm; Friday– Saturday, 11am–9pm. Tasting fee $10. 707.265.9600.

Forchini Winery On aerospace, Italy, and running out of gas BY JAMES KNIGHT

I

t’s been a long time since I’ve driven like an asshole down Dry Creek Road. There were times. There was that one time when, temporarily impaired by embarrassment over a trivial episode, I blew through the stop sign at Lambert Bridge Road. The usual crew perched on the porch of the Dry Creek General Store passed in a blur, but I could almost hear them tsk-tsking behind me.

It was the end of harvest, and I was chasing a shaky lead on some second-crop Zinfandel, hoping to make homemade hooch on the cheap. Up and down a little driveway I cruised in my beat-up Nova, knocking on doors, leaving notes, looking for my “contact.” It felt like some kind of shady drug deal. When I learned that I was in the wrong place, I decided that it was really, really important to go back and retrieve my note (I was just a nervous young shaver of, oh, twenty-something). That’s when one of the ranchers chased me down the road his truck. I can’t say that he said anything cross to me, but clearly, with one dismissive look, he wasn’t particularly impressed with my story. And that’s the whole sorry reason I never returned to Forchini Winery until just now. I have to say, I’m impressed with what they’ve done with the place. There’s a handsome Italianate tasting room, built since my last sortie. Proudly stocked with gold-medal-bearing bottles and tributes to winery dogs past and present, it’s a cozy little space where conversation strikes up easily among visitors. Jim Forchini looks the part of grizzled grape rancher with some justification, having been at it for four decades. Like many of his neighbors, however, he earned his dirt in another field, as an aerospace engineer in Southern California, and later Santa Rosa. “I just kept moving north until I ran out of gas,” Forchini explains to a couple of wine club members. The Italian theme plays through the 2009 Papa Nonno Tuscan-Style Red ($22), which is actually Zin, in the main. Rich in brambleberry and cocoa flavor, the 2009 Old Vine Zinfandel ($28) is classic Dry Creek Valley. The 2010 Russian River Valley Chardonnay ($20) is oddly floral a bit, but the vanilla and caramel finish is flavorful, cat-tongue dry and squeeze-of-lime tart; the 2008 Cabernet Sauvignon ($32), the kind of soft and round, chocolatecovered black cherry of a Cab that will be ready to drink at the end of the drive home—the responsible drive home. Forchini Winery and Vineyards, 5141 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Friday–Sunday, 11am–4:30pm. Tasting fee, $10. 707.431.8886.


Sonoma County ranks high for ‘disconnected youth’—those out of school and unable to find a job—and reversing the trend isn’t easy BY LEILANI CLARK

AGAINST THE WALL In Sonoma County, job opportunities are few for young adults like Bella Ortega.

Soft-spoken, dark hair pulled back into a low ponytail and dressed in a gray Oxford shirt and jeans, Ortega says the experience triggered a stark understanding of her life choices. “It made me open my eyes to do bigger and better things,” she explains. A student from Ridgway High School, Ortega graduated last December and immediately began a job hunt. She plans to attend Santa Rosa Junior College this fall, but it’s been a challenge to fill out the online financial aid application for various reasons, like access to computers and to her mom’s information. A job application to Kmart resulted in a call back for a group interview, where she was the youngest applicant. She didn’t get hired. “I thought it would be a little easier to find a job, but it’s not,” she says. Ortega admits that her arrest record—she’s on probation until Feb. 27—might pose an extra obstacle. But Ortega’s situation can’t be completely attributed to her past legal troubles. The reality is that the youth unemployment rate in the United States is at its highest since World War II. A new report by the Annie E. Casey Foundation finds that 6.5 million teens and young adults between the ages of 16 and 24 are neither in school nor in the workforce. These are the “disconnected youth”—and the rates are highest among black and Latino populations. The numbers are no better in Sonoma County, where 12.5 percent, or one out of eight youth between the ages of 16 and 19, are classified as “disconnected,” according to data from the American Community Survey listed at kidsdata.org. For teens in that age bracket who aren’t in school or working a job, Sonoma County ranks a dismal 22 out of 24 for California counties with populations over 250,000. Like Ortega, these young adults experience fierce competition from older workers for entry-level jobs. They lack the skill set needed for any higher level jobs that are available. Add poverty, lack of role models, low-performing schools and absent parents to the mix, and you get a recipe for disaster.

) 16

15 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Michael Amsler

Living In Limbo

B

ella Ortega didn’t spend her 18th birthday with family or friends. Instead, she was locked up in a Sonoma County Juvenile Hall cell on a violation charge, thinking hard about how she’d ended up in such a low place on such an important occasion.


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Leilani Clark

16 Youth ( 15

I

ncreased illegal behaviors and dependence on public aid are two common byproducts of a young adulthood spent “disconnected,” says Kellie Noe from the Sonoma County Department of Health Services. Noe is a coordinator of Cradle to Career, a new countywide partnership that connects all segments of the educational continuum—from prenatal, to early childhood, to K–12 and into college and technical training. “Any young person has the potential to become disconnected if they are not given the appropriate support and access to quality educational programs,” Noe says. “We also know that place matters, and that foster youth who age out of the system at 18 are at higher risk; we can’t let these facts dictate who is successful and who is not. Our community has a responsibility to all young people.” Fortunately, Sonoma County has a good number of nonprofit groups squarely aimed at building possibilities for younger residents. VOICES Sonoma, located in a gray Victorian house near the corner of Mendocino and College avenues in Santa Rosa, is a youth-centered nonprofit that provides transitional services, from food to employment to educational guidance, for foster, homeless and at-risk youth. “It’s a space to deconstruct and reconstruct,” says Jimmy Toro, a youth founder since the center opened in 2009. The bright-faced, 23-year-old operations assistant in a yellow-sleeved sweatshirt has a clear passion for his work, evident during a tour of the warm, welcoming space. Throughout the afternoon, the house buzzes with teens and young adults using desktop computers, sitting underneath colorful bulletin boards rife with employment and education resources; they eat healthy, donated food in the upstairs kitchen; they hang out chatting in the foyer and on couches in the cozy common room. Up to 24 youth may come through the

BRIGHTER DAY Jimmy Toro outside VOICES, which provides counseling and guidance to homeless and at-risk youth.

door in a given hour, looking for community, safety or just a bite to eat. Once inside, they discover tutoring and workshops on job readiness and development and financial aid assistance. Humans are physically and emotionally hard-wired for connection, writes Brené Brown, a research professor at the University of Houston’s Graduate College of Social Work. A 2011 study funded by the National Institute of Mental Health shows that the shame and pain of social rejection and disconnection is as real as physical pain—with potentially devastating effects.

A

mber Twitchell, program director at VOICES, feels that it’s the responsibility of adults, employers and nonprofit agencies to foster a sense of connectedness between young adults and their greater community. If we don’t, she adds, then we really have lost our disconnected youth. “When we think of Sonoma

County,” says Twitchell, “we think of affluent communities, but there really is this undervalue of young people that either came out of the foster system or the probation system or just didn’t have good families or didn’t complete high school who are now just kind of hanging out there.” Part of the challenge lies in the fact that some youth don’t understand how to navigate work and educational systems, says Michelle Revecho, program manager at the Social Advocates for Youth (SAY) employment center. “Ask people when they got their first job, and a lot of times they say my parents knew somebody, or a coach or their parents helped with a résumé,” she says. “A lot of these youth don’t have those networks or those connections that they can tap into.” Jeramy Lowther ran away from home when he was 16 after his dad starting using drugs and they were evicted from their home. He ended up in foster care, and then homeless, before going to live at

the Hanna Boys Center in Sonoma. Now 18, Lowther is two days into his first semester at Santa Rosa Junior College and lives at the Tamayo Village, a transitional housing unit provided by SAY, where he pays $245 a month in rent to share a room. He gets no financial or emotional support from his parents; Lowther is learning to navigate the system on his own. This month he applied for jobs at Jack in the Box and Juice Shack, sans results. But he’s not giving up. “Without SAY or VOICES, I would have never graduated high school,” says Lowther. “I would have gotten myself into a much worse position. I don’t know where I would be now. I don’t know if I’d have a place to live.”

T

he importance of community resources and connections is finally being embraced by the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors. On Jan. 8, the board listened to two hours of presentations on efforts to ramp


Leilani Clark

17

UNTAMED HEART Visions and Dream Currents by Susan St. Thomas January 14 through March 3 SEBASTOPOL GALLERY 150 N. Main Street 829-7200

DECOMPRESSION A board game inside VOICES gets lively.

up educational and workforce opportunities for youth. The board voted to give $375,000 to education and workforce development programs, including $100,000 to Scholarship Sonoma County, which provides scholarships to college-bound students in need. It also adopted the community pledge for Cradle to Career. “We can continue to invest later in additional social services, or we invest now in our future workforce,” Supervisor Mike McGuire told the audience. “We must be focused on educational achievement, particularly as we see this county changing in demographics.” Those demographics have much to do with age. A county study recently found that 43 percent of high school graduates continue with postsecondary education and less than 25 percent of low-income youth graduate with degrees. At the same time, the retirement age population in the county (ages

60 to 69) increased 76 percent between 2000 and 2010. Meanwhile, Ortega continues to look for work and sort out her future. She hasn’t received much, if any, help from the family. Freshly sober, her mom struggled with addiction and abuse for years; her father is unemployed and comes around to visit only once in a while. For now, Ortega jumps among the houses of family and friends, never staying in one place for long. “I get stressed out, which is bad for me because my health isn’t too good,” she says. But walking helps, as does writing and drawing. She wants to get through this time intact, hopefully in school and with a job at the end of it. She’s leaning on SAY for now, and guidance from a 25-year-old mentor. “For me, being out of high school, being 18 and not having a job or too much support, is pretty hectic,“ Ortega says. “I want so much in life that I can’t really get right now.”

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

18

S A N TA R O S A

‘Classic’ Rock

The Calder Quartet started young. In college, the four connected well enough to take risks beyond the standard chamber music repertoire, and like well-known contemporaries the Kronos Quartet, they work with new composers, rock groups and even Andrew W.K.—without sounding forced. They’re comfortable playing music from a hundred years ago written by candlelight as they are playing music written in a Portland basement last week, possibly also by candlelight. For their Santa Rosa appearance in conjunction with the Redwood Arts Council, the program includes Ravel’s String Quartet in F Major, Bartok’s String Quartet no. 5 and the young composer Andrew Norman’s “. . . toward sunrise and the prime of light . . . ,” which premiered in October 2010. The Calder Quartet play Sunday, Jan. 27, at the Glaser Center. 547 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa. 4pm. $25. 707.874.1124.

M I L L VA L L E Y

Hoodoo That Voodoo The Hoodoo Rhythm Devils were one of those bands from the ’70s that really should have made it big. They were tight, sounded great, put on an awesome live show and could play all day long. They played funky country blues that instantly turned a lazy Sunday backyard

The week’s events: a selective guide

barbecue into a prime time event. They’re a nobullshit band, and maybe that’s why they didn’t make it to that next level in the music biz—it’s tough to make it without makeup and stage effects. They made five albums for Capitol, Blue Thumb and Fantasy records throughout the ’70s, and reunited last year when they released The Lost Album, apparently recorded in their prime but never released. Hoodoo Rhythm Devils play Sunday, Jan. 27, at Sweetwater Music Hall. 19 Corte Madera Ave., Mill Valley. 8pm. $20. 415.388.3850.

N A PA

Dead Set

When he’s not windmilling wildly signaling Buster Posey to go for home, San Francisco Giants third base coach Tim Flannery is windmilling his guitar like Pete Townshend. OK, maybe he doesn’t get crazy and smash guitars onstage, but he is a good songwriter with a voice of wisdom. He’s even sung harmony with the Grateful Dead’s Phil Lesh and Bob Weir before games at the Giants ballpark. The

real question is, after two World Series titles in three years, where the hell does he get the time to do all this? Tim Flannery plays Friday, Jan 25 at Sweetwater Music Hall. 19 Corte Madera Ave., Mill Valley. 8pm. $22. 415.388.3850. He also plays with friends Saturday, Jan. 26, at the Uptown Theater in a benefit concert for Bryan Stow. 1350 Third St., Napa. 8pm. $49–$100. 707.259.0123.

C O TAT I

Reggae Soul

The Redwood Cafe sure is becoming a legit music venue. This week, the Cotati cafe hosts the Melodians, a top-notch reggae band from Jamaica who’ve been around since 1965. They’ve been top billing at huge festivals like the Sierra Nevada World Music Fest, and “Rivers of Babylon”—you know it from The Harder They Come—has become one of the Rastafarian movement’s anthems. Singing in harmony with plenty of soul, sounding like a Motown version of the feel-good, bass-driven, upbeat style reggae fans are used to, the Melodians are backed by the erstwhile Yellow Wall Dub Squad on tours. Dan Martin and the Noma Rocksteady Band open, and the best part is, if you get the munchies, the cafe is open. The Melodians play Friday, Jan. 25, at the Redwood Cafe. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy., Cotati. 9pm. $10–$15. 707.795.7868.

—Nicolas Grizzle

ON A LARK ‘Larkspur Through the Eyes of an Artist,’ with paintings by Bryn Craig, opens Jan. 24 at Gallery Bergelli. See Openings, p25.


TEN-BY-TEN Over a hundred professional and amateur photographers were allowed access to every inch of the building.

Museum as Meta At ‘In My Back Yard,’ the Sonoma County Museum is star BY GABE MELINE

D

“

o you want to see the attic?�

I’ve been at the Sonoma County Museum for 45 minutes when Pat Lenz says the seven words I’ve been dying to hear. Of course I want to see the attic, and she leads me up a narrow staircase, twisting until, with a ick of a light switch, before me is an enormous part of the museum I’ve never seen before. Parts of the Museum You’ve Never Seen Before take center stage at “In My Back Yard,â€? an exhibit opening Jan. 25. During October and November, over a hundred photographers visited the museum, given free access to

every square inch; the result is an extensive series of 10-by-10-inch photos of the building, displayed inside the museum itself. “I think what’s going to be interesting is the mix of what we call professional versus amateur,â€? says Lenz, who, with co-curator Dominic Egan, ďŹ rst produced the “In My Back Yardâ€? idea at her SlaughterhouseSpace Gallery in Healdsburg. When photo ďŹ ltering services like Hipstamatic and Instagram rose in prominence, many professional photographers dismissed it as cheating. But “you can’t ďŹ ght it,â€? says Lenz, “and you have to kind of say, in a way, ‘This is good for photography.â€? Interestingly, the photos are displayed without labels, so that

professional photographers hang beside hair stylists popular on Instagram, tinkerers with Hasselblads, the clients of Becoming Independent and students from the SRJC. The prints are for sale at different prices, but how visitors react is based purely on the work itself. There is an old saying about photography stealing one’s soul, but “In My Back Yardâ€? serves instead to uncover the soul of the museum. Images were taken while lying at inside the elevator, balancing on a ceiling joist, craning beneath a thermostat. “I did actually hear the staff say, ‘Oh, wow—I’ve never seen that part of the museum before,’â€? notes Egan. The great stucco building, with

four giant columns and Spanishstyle roof tiles, was built in 1910 as the Santa Rosa Post Office and Federal Building, on Fifth Street. In the 1970s, misguided city planners negotiated construction of the mall, and the building was slated for demolition. In perhaps the most famed architectural preservation in the city’s history, historical architect Dan Peterson arranged for the building to be slowly towed for 800 feet, on railroad tracks, to its current site. In the show, subjects range from the lobby’s elegant chandeliers to unassuming piles of clutter in a back room. An image by Ned Kahn shows a splatter of water— from a fountain? a sink?—while others feature models walking, literally, on the walls of the space. There’s a Dadaist sculpture by Boris Landau, a large 45-by45-inch lenticular photograph by Margeaux Walter and Robin Lasser, and larger black-and-white prints by Bob Cornelis. Sausalito artist David Broom has a full wall, and Shanti Knapp, Hanya Popova Parker, Sara Webb, Mary Jarvis, Mario Uribe and Jan Nunn are but a handful of the participants in this encompassing, inviting show. From the attic, I ďŹ nd what I’ve been looking for. In the public staircase of the museum is a wall; about six feet up from the oor is a mysterious door with no steps or ladder leading to it, an awkward relic from the building’s former use. Like many museum visitors, I have often wondered where that door leads, and there in the attic, behind a chain, I ďŹ nd a similarlooking door. Could it be? I crack the door slightly, and see the staircase below . . . ‘In My Back Yard’ runs Jan. 25–Feb. 23, with an opening reception on Jan. 25 from 5pm to 8pm, at the Sonoma County Museum. 425 Seventh St., Santa Rosa. 11am–5pm, Tuesday– Sunday. $5–$7. 707.579.1500.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

ArtsIdeas

19


Stage

and Stoller’s best songs. Named for the song of the same title, itself originally written for the 1950s doo-wop band the Robins, Smokey Joe’s Cafe—which has just opened a three-weekend run at Sixth Street Playhouse—is a big bouncing ball of nostalgia, with no dialogue whatsoever. Just songs, songs, songs, flowing from one to the next like a jukebox stuck in overdrive. Directed by first-time director Alise Girard, who’s choreographed several of Sixth Street’s recent shows, the show features nine performers who take turns bringing this hit parade of tunes to life through Girard’s inventively kitschy chorography. The songs are a heady blend of less familiar works—“Pearl’s a LOVING YOU Dell Parker belts it out Singer,” “Neighborhood,” “Dance in this Leiber-Stoller throwback. with Me,” “I Keep Forgettin’”—and tunes that evoke an instantaneous jolt of affection and sentimental recollection—“On Broadway,” “There Goes My Baby,” “Spanish Harlem” and “Stand by Me.” Backed up by a first-rate band under the direction of Mateo Dillaway, the tunes unspool on a set that resembles a 1950s dance show. Girard keeps things spinning, with plenty of clever bits of BY DAVID TEMPLETON business worked into the performances of the songs, ongwriters Jerry Leiber spanning the emotional spectrum from puppy love to serious heartbreak. and Mike Stoller met Each performer is given an as teenagers in Los opportunity to display his or her Angeles, and were one of individual gifts—for belting out a rock ’n’ roll’s most prolific tune, dancing up a storm or songwriting team. engaging in wacky physical comedy— The legendary duo was responsible for ultimately transforming the rather hundreds of hit songs, many thin undertaking into a robust and considered among the greatest rock energetic young artist showcase. songs of all time. Eschewing simple After all, Smokey Joe’s Cafe is love-song formulas, Leiber, who died basically a celebration of an art in 2011, and Stoller borrowed playfully form born of youthful dreams, from the vernacular youth speech and designed to make us feel young, slang of the day, imbuing their songs or feel young all over again. In the with a potent theatricality that was words of the song that ends the more than just musically satisfying. show, baby, that’s rock ’n’ roll. From “Yakety Yak” and “Charlie Brown” to “Jailhouse Rock” and “Love Potion No. 9,” Leiber and Stoller’s ‘Smokey Joe’s Cafe’ runs Thursday– songs were pure, infectious fun. Sunday through Feb. 10 at Sixth Street In 1995, one of Broadway’s biggest Playhouse. 52 W. Sixth St., Santa Rosa. hits was Smokey Joe’s Cafe, a giddily Thursday–Saturday at 8pm; 2pm entertaining, thoroughly plotless matinees on Sundays. One Saturday matinee, Feb. 9. $15–$35. 707.523.4185. stage revue featuring 40 of Leiber Eric Chazankin

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

20

Don’t Talk Back ‘Smokey Joe’s Cafe’ a nostalgic revue

S


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ather startlingly, Quartet is the ďŹ rst movie to be directed by Dustin Hoffman. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d never guess in a thousand years he was behind the camera; thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s little trace of the actor whose against-the-grain, immersive performances changed movie acting in the 1970s. The ďŹ lm is a cattle call for every British thespian over the age of 60. When not repeating the maxim about old age not being for sissies, the retirees at a home for aging musicians instruct visiting music students. The place is in ďŹ scal trouble, and the hopes are that a charity gala might save the manor with the reunion of four singers whose performance in La Traviata is still cherished decades later. Billy Connolly plays Wilfred Bond, recovering from a stroke which has left him an erotomaniac. (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the stroke talking,â&#x20AC;? he says after delivering himself of some dirty reminiscences.) His good female friend and co-star Cissy (Pauline Collins) is drawn deeper into senility. And the most reluctant hold-out is the new arrival at the home, Jean Horton (Maggie Smith), once a heartbreaker, now so unnerved that even a passing cart full of laundry makes her jump. She makes a twofold refusal to perform music live: she canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t give a substandard performance because â&#x20AC;&#x153;I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t insult the memory of who I was.â&#x20AC;? But the other half of her reluctance is guilt: the fourth member of the proposed reunion is her ex-husband and former partner, already a resident when Jean arrived. Tom Courtenay, playing ex-husband Reginald, asks the question â&#x20AC;&#x153;Did she know that I live here?â&#x20AC;? with two different emphases; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a taste of his range. When this movie gets overfond of its cast, Courtenay cools it down. He shows the cold blue light of old age, the irreconcilable hurt. He thought he could count on â&#x20AC;&#x153;digniďŹ ed senilityâ&#x20AC;? in his last years, until the ex-wife who crushed his heart turns up to rekindle the pain. In a movie this essentially mushy, he stands tall. Quartet is ultimately a gathering of actors lining up for a curtain call; however deserved that applause is, they have so much more to give. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Quartetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; opens Friday, Jan. 25, at the Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St., San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

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Rohnert Park’s the hometown ‘boondox’ to Distant Relatives.

Blood Lines

Distant Relatives on ‘Re-soul’

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orth Bay rappers Distant Relatives consistently deliver as an emerging force in Bay Area underground hip-hop. Raised in Rohnert Park and Santa Rosa, lyricists Vocab Slick (Brian Gibson) and Maynee (Joseph Carter), along with Ireland native DJ Ricky Switch, are 10 years deep into representing the “Boondox” of Sonoma County. After releasing their second mixtape and fourth full-length album ReSoul, Distant Relatives join Bay Area hip-hop legends Blackalicious on Jan. 26 at the Phoenix Theater. The group’s lyrics are relevant, weighted with content and intentionally distanced from the

materialistic assault of the commercial rap game. On the title track, Vocab rhymes: “Makes no difference what your skin color is / or where your residence / town house or tenements / Long as your sentiments / are well thought like sentences / We all have dreams that outweigh our measurements.” “We speak a positive message,” says DJ Ricky Switch. “One song at a time, one person at a time makes a difference.” For the Re-Soul mix tape, the group took it back an era. “We were doing a lot of dubstep and getting burnt out on it,” says Vocab. “Maynee and I started rapping to these soul inspired hip-hop beats, to sharpen our songwriting and get into the next Distant Relatives album. We recorded a few songs, and it took off from there. It’s a nod to the old school.” Re-Soul is a beat-driven followup to Distant Relatives’ 2011 album This Changes Everything, an impressive live-instrument project produced by local audio wunderkind Rick Vargas, sound engineer for TRI Studios in San Rafael and producer for Carlos Santana, Furthur and Lauryn Hill. “I linked up with Rick at Laughing Tiger Studio [in San Rafael],” says Vocab. “After sessions ended for the day, we had the use of every instrument in the place, and he can play 90 percent of them. We have Hammond B3 organs on there, Wurlitzer keyboards, live drums, all kinds of shakers and guitars, trumpets. He was the brains behind what the sound was going to be, and pretty much scripted a movie score for us to rap to.” (The record features guests the Grouch & Eligh and Zion-I.) Even with several side projects and another album in the works, Distant Relatives are far from satisfied. While preferring to proceed without a formal label, the group continues to rise. “We are independent,” clarifies Vocab. “Strictly DIY, do-it-yourself. What you see is because we worked hard to do it.” Distant Relatives and Oregon’s Indubious open for Blackalicious on Saturday, Jan. 26, at the Phoenix Theatre. 8pm. $25. 201 E. Washington St., Petaluma. 707.762.3565.


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY

brings his guitar and voice to the stage. Jan 25, 9pm. $22. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Blackalicious

Hoodoo Rhythm Devils

Hip-hop duo from Sacramento made up of rapper Gift of Gab (born Tim Parker) and DJ/producer Chief Xcel (born Xavier Mosley). Distant Relatives open. Jan 26, 8pm. $25. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Bay Area blues funkers from the ‘70s come back in support of their “lost album.” Jan 27, 8pm. $20. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Calder Quartet String quarter plays program of Ravel, Bartok and Andrew Norman. Presented by the Redwood Arts Council. Jan 27, 4pm. $10-$25. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

MARIN COUNTY Dan Hicks & the Hot Licks Premiere performance of “I Feel Like Singin’” and new material. Jan 25, 8pm. $25$35. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Tim Flannery Giants third base coach

Terrapin Ramble Phil Lesh, John Kadlecik and Jeff Chimenti sit in with God Street Wine. Jan 24-26, 7pm. $65. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

NAPA COUNTY Shawn Colvin Her songs are slow-release works of craft and catharsis that become treasured, lifetime companions for listeners. Jan 26, 8pm. $35-$40. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

International Guitar Night Brian Gore is joined by Scotland’s Martin Taylor, Solorazaf from Madagascar, and Celso Machado. Jan 24, 8pm. $25-$30. Napa Valley

Third base coach for the Giants in fundraiser for Bryan Stow’s family. Jan 26, 8pm. $49-$100. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Arlene Francis Theater Jan 23, Hydrogen Collective. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Aubergine

RIDDIM OF THE NIGHT Sky I and Inner Riddim play Jan. 23 at 19 Broadway.

Jan 24, ILAM. Jan 25, Dginn. Jan 26, Free Peoples. Jan 27, Sonoma Songbirds. Mon, Art and Music with Stanley Mouse. Tues, Bluesy Tuesday. Wed, 7pm, open mic. Last Sunday of every month, Irish Seisun with Riggy Rackin. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

See Clubs, p24.

Barley & Hops Tavern Fri, Jen Tucker. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.874.9037.

Butcher & Cook Jan 25, Marty O’Reilly & Sean Carscadden. 112 4th St., Santa Rosa. 707.205.6695.

Epicurean Connection Jan 26, Vitamin Girl. 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

Finley Community Center Jan 25, Carl Green. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

First Presbyterian Church of Petaluma Jan 25, Mandolin Orchestra. 939 B St, Petaluma.

Flamingo Lounge Jan 25, Powerhouse. Jan 26, Crossfire. Tues, Swing Dancing with Lessons. Sun, 7pm, salsa with lessons. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

French Garden Jan 27, Nicholas, Glover & Wray. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Friar Tuck’s Fri, DJ Mike. Wed, Sat, karaoke. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.792.9847.

FOR THE CHILDREN Shawn Colvin plays the Napa

Valley Opera House on Jan. 26. See Concerts, above.

23

Tim Flannery & Friends

Glaser Center Jan 27, Redwood Arts Council Presents the Calder Quartet.

547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Hopmonk Sonoma Jan 25, Adam Traum. Jan 26, David Thom Band. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hopmonk Tavern Jan 24, Laura Low, Lafa Taylor. Jan 25, Kingsborough. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment with DJ Jacques and Guacamole. Tues, 7:30pm, open mic night. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hotel Healdsburg Jan 25, Robb Fisher and Matt Clark Duo. Jan 26, Mark Levine Trio Michael Glynn and Ron Marabuto. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Jasper O’Farrell’s Jan 24, Amha Baraka. Wed, Brainstorm. Last Saturday of every month, Good Hip-Hop. Sun, open mic. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Lagunitas Tap Room Jan 23, Jenny Kerr. Jan 24, Grandpa Banana. Jan 25, JimBo Trout. Jan 26, Dead Set. Jan 27, Danny Montana. Jan 30, David Thom Band. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Last Day Saloon Jan 25, Twang Ditty. Jan 26, Kingz Ambassadors. Mon, karaoke. Thurs, Open Mic Jam Night with the Boomers. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Ledson Lounge Jan 26, Dan Daniels and

Nicky DePaola. Ledson Hotel, 480 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9779.

Sun, 5pm, rock and blues jam. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Main Street Station

Redwood Cafe

Jan 24, Susan Sutton. Jan 25, Vernelle Anders. Jan 28, Gypsy Cafe. Jan 29, Maple Profant. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Jan 25, the Melodians. Jan 26, D’Bunchovus. Thurs, Open Mic. Fourth Sunday of every month, Old Time Music. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Mavericks Jan 25, Josh Abbott. 397 Aviation Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.765.2515.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Jan 24, Dan Martin & Noma Rocksteady. Jan 25, the Tonewoods. Wed, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre Jan 25, Pride & Joy. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Northwood Restaurant Thurs, 7pm, Thugz. 19400 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.865.2454.

Papa’s Taverna Fri, 7pm, live music. Sat, 7pm and Sun, 4pm, Kefi. Sun, 1:30 and 3:30pm, Greek dance lessons, live music and bellydance show. 5688 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma. 707.769.8545.

Phoenix Theater Jan 25, Shotgun Harlot, the King Must Die, the Connies, Thought Vomit. Jan 26, Blackalicious, Distant Relatives. Mon, 7pm, young people’s AA. Tues, 7pm, Acoustic Americana jam. Wed, 6pm, Jazz jam. Fourth Thursday of every month, writers workshops.

Riverside Bistro Fri, Jazz on the River with the Peter Welker Sextet. 54 E Washington St, Petaluma. 707.773.3200.

The Rocks Bar & Lounge Fri and Sat, Top 40 DJs hosted by DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.

Russian River Brewing Co Jan 27, Uncle Mark. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Society: Culture House Thurs, Casa Rasta. Sun, Rock ‘n’ Roll Sunday School. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. No phone.

Spancky’s Thurs, 9pm, DJ Dray Lopez. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Sprenger’s Tap Room Wed, Sonoma County Blues Society live music. 446 B St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8277.

Sunflower Center Tues, Sunflower Music Series. 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

Toad in the Hole Pub Mon, open mic with Phil the

) 24

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Music

Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.


Music ( 23

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

24

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD, TOO! "REAKFASTs,UNCHs$INNER &2)s0-$//23ss R&B/MOTOWN HITS

AN EVENING WITH

PRIDE & JOY

3!4s0-$//23ss WINE TASTING EVENT

THE PETALUMA GAP PRESENTS

WINTER WINE SOIREE

THE WOOD BROTHERS

142 Throckmorton Theatre

PLUS SETH WALKER 45%s6PM DOORSs!$6$/3s!,,!'%3 NEW ORLEANS R&B/FUNK/MARCHING BRASS TUNES

Jan 25, Dan Hicks & the Hot Licks. Mon, Open Mic with Derek Smith. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

THE 22ND ANNUAL MARDI GRAS MAMBOFEST

RHYTHMTOWN-JIVE

PLUS TRI TIP TRIO 35.s7PM DOORSs!$6$/3s AMERICANA/BLUEGRASS/BLUES

Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub Thurs and Fri, DJ Rick Vegaz. Jan 25, Wonderbread 5. Jan 26, Eric Martin. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

DAVID BROMBERG QUARTET .O#HILDREN5NDERTO!LL!GES3HOWS 0ETALUMA"LVD 0ETALUMA

7

Hopmonk Tavern Session Room

WWWMCNEARSCOM

Saturday Jan 26

DJ JOSH DUKES 9:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1:30 No Cover Sunday Jan 27

SUNDAY SUPPER with a live preformance by "America's Got Talent" Semi-Finalist

TIM HOCKENBERRY 6pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm, No Cover Sunday Feb 3

SUNDAY BRUNCH 9:30pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;2:30pm

SUPER BOWL XLVII Featuring a special Super Bowl bar menu & drink specials 3pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;7pm 707.238.0158 info@socialclubrestaurant.com

for calendar of events & information

Rancho Nicasio

MARIN COUNTY

45%s7PM DOORSs!$6$/3s COUNTRY

Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Fri 4:30-6:30pm

Tradewinds

Jan 23, Michael on Fire. Jan 24, Rushad Eggleston & Lily Henley. Jan 25, Tim Flannery. Jan 26, Monophonics. Jan 27, Hoodoo Rhythm Devils. Jan 28, the OMGs. Jan 29, Marble Party. Mon, Open Mic. Every other Wednesday, Wednesday Night Live. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Jan 26, the Caffeinators. 460 Eddie Lane, Sebastopol.

THE TAHOE ADVENTURE FILM FESTIVAL

HAPPY HOUR

Security Guard. Fourth Sunday of every month, Ian Scherrer. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Wischemann Hall

&2)s7PM DOORSss!,,!'%3 PRESENTED BY ROCK & ICE MOUNTAIN CLUB

132 KELLER STREET PETALUMA

Sweetwater Music Hall

Jan 23, the Stages of Sleep. Mon, acoustic open mic. Fourth Thursday of every month, Markâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jam Sammich. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Jan 25, Feral Moon. Jan 26, Levi Lloyd & the 501 Band. Jan 27, Timothy Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neil Band. Jan 30, Ricky Alan Ray Band. Mon, Donny Maderosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pro Jam. Tues, Jeremyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Open Mic. Thurs, DJ Dave. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

McNearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dining House

WITH

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Fireside Dining 7 Days a Week

DIN N E R & A SHOW â&#x20AC;&#x153;Double Troubleâ&#x20AC;? Jan 25 BESO NEGRO PLUS THIS OLD EARTHQUAKE 8:30pm Sat Dance Party! Jan 26 RON THOMPSON AND THE RESISTORS Blues and Rhythm & Blues 8:30pm Fri

W INTER LU â&#x20AC;&#x2122;AU Jan 27 L ED KAAPANA Sun

Slack Key Guitar & Ukulele Master 6:00pm

THE BLUE DEVILS Feb 1 Dance to Blues with a Feelinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Fri

8:00pm / No Cover

PETTY THEFT Feb 2 The Ultimate Tom Petty Tribute Sat

8:30pm

EL RADIO FANTASTIQUE Feb 9 Mardi Gras Masquerade Ball Sat

8:30pm Thur Celebrate Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day with Feb 14 THE BAGUETTE QUARTETTE 7:00pm

DANNY CLICK AND THE HELL YEAHS Feb 16 Original Americana/Texas Blues Sat

8:30pm

WENDY DEWITTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PIANO PARTY Feb 17 4:00pm / No Cover Sun

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Jan 25, Pepperland. Jan 26, the Sorentinos. Wed, Open Mic. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Jan 25, Beso Negro, This Old Earthquake. Jan 26, Ron Thompson & the Resistors. Jan 27, Led Kaapana. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sausalito Seahorse Jan 24, Christian Tulaman. Jan 25, the Taters. Jan 26, Michael LaMacchia. Jan 27, Candela. Tues, Jazz with Noel Jewkes & Friends. Wed, Tango with Marcello and Seth. Sun, salsa class. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady Jan 23, Jack Irvingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Songwriter Showcase. Jan 24, Danny Click. Jan 26, Wendy DeWitt. Jan 27, Namely Us. Mon, 8pm, open mic with Simon Costa. Sat, Uke Jam. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jan 24, Emma Leeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Birthday Bash. Jan 25, the Gravel Spreaders. Jan 26, Beso Negro. Mon, reggae. Wed, Larryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s karaoke. Sun, open mic. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Terrapin Crossroads Jan 24-26, Terrapin Ramble with Phil Lesh, John Kadlecik and Jeff Chimenti with God Street Wine. Sun, Terrapin Family Band. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

NAPA COUNTY Napa Valley Opera House Jan 24, International Guitar Night. Jan 26, Shawn Colvin. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jan 26, Sam Andrew Band. Jan 27, Noel Jewkes. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre Jan 26, Tim Flannery & Friends. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Marin Center Jan 27, Men of Worth. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

19 Broadway Club Jan 23, Phil Hardgrave & the Continentals. Jan 23, Sky I, Inner Riddim. Jan 25, Fenton Coolfoot & the Right Time. Jan 26, Freestyle Battle Royale Part 2. Jan 27, Open Mic Hip Hop & Karaoke. Jan 30, Diamond Jazz. Jan 30, Down with May. Mon, 9pm, open mic. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar Tues, 8:30pm, open mic with Damir. Fri, 9pm, Michael Aragon Quartet. Sun, 3pm, Mal Sharpeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dixieland. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Osteria Divino Jan 23, Jonathan Poretz. Jan 24, MCH Trio (Matthew Heulitt). Jan 25, Open Sky. Jan 26, James Moseley Trio. Jan 27, David Sturdevant & John Stafford. Jan 29, Michael Fecskes. Tues, Wed, Thurs, Fri, Sat and Sun, Live music. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

SFJAZZ Center Grand Opening A week packed with stars for opening of new downtown venue. See www.sfjazz.org for full schedule.

Jessie Ware Breathy British singer with tremendous debut album â&#x20AC;&#x153;Devotionâ&#x20AC;? plays Popscene. Jan 24 at Rickshaw Stop.

Reggie Watts & Robert Glasper The man youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d most love to smoke a bowl with appears with towering jazz pianist for SF Sketchfest. Jan 29 at Mezzanine.

Testament Hoping for the definitive documentary on Bay Area thrash to be made. Ken Burns, get on it! Jan 30 at the Fillmore.

Cody Chesnutt So, he made â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Seedâ&#x20AC;? and then disappeared for 10 years; now, with new album, he plays free in-store. Jan 30 at Amoeba SF.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.


Galleries OPENINGS Jan 24 From 5:30 to 7:30pm. Gallery Bergelli, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Larkspur Through the Eyes of an Artist,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Bryn Craig. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Jan 25 At 6pm. Buddhaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Palm Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Winter Gallery Showing,â&#x20AC;? different styles from local artists. 313 Main St, Sebastopol. 707.829.7256. At 5pm. Sonoma County Museum, â&#x20AC;&#x153;In My Back Yard,â&#x20AC;? photography group exhibition taking the Sonoma County Museum as subject. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Jan 27 At 2pm. New Leaf Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sisters,â&#x20AC;? ceramic sculptures by Jane and Tyler Burton. Cornerstone Place, 23588 Hwy 121, Sonoma. 707.933.1300.

the major holidays throughout the year and features the history of the Peanutsthemed balloons in Macyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Thanksgiving Day Parade. Through Apr 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Useable, Loveable Peanuts,â&#x20AC;? highlights from 33 years of Peanuts products plus the licensing and manufacturing stories behind them. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; SatSun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Finley Community Center Through Feb 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Monty Montyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Traveling Air Show & Aeronautical Wonders,â&#x20AC;? sculptures of fantasy flight contraptions. Through Feb 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nik Catalina: Photographs,â&#x20AC;? the magic and wonder of nature. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Feb 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Holiday Lights Exhibit and Sale,â&#x20AC;? Becoming Independentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s two- and threedimensional arts and crafts. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Gallery One Through Feb 21, â&#x20AC;&#x153;White Plus One,â&#x20AC;? open-juried multimedia exhibit. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Graton Gallery

SONOMA COUNTY Artlife Gallery Through Mar 10, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Storied Lives: The Art of Narrative,â&#x20AC;? mixed media from 14 artists. 958 Gravenstein Highway S, Sebastopol. 707.824.8881.

Buddhaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Palm Tattoo Gallery Jan 25, 6pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Winter Gallery Showing,â&#x20AC;? different styles from local artists. 313 Main St, Sebastopol. Tues-Wed and FriSat, noon to 8; Sun, noon to 4. 707.829.7256.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Feb 3, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Art of Peanuts Animationâ&#x20AC;? features 16 never-before-displayed Peanuts drawings and cels, including five cels rescued from Schulzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1966 studio fire. Through Apr 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Peanuts Celebrationsâ&#x20AC;? highlights 70 original strips which celebrate

Through Feb 24, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Invitational Exhibition,â&#x20AC;? fine art by wellknown Northern California artists. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Local Color Gallery Through Feb 3, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Science Route,â&#x20AC;? featuring colorful land and seascape oil paintings by Linda Sorenson. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. Daily, 10 to 5. Closed Wednesdays. 707.875.2744.

New Leaf Gallery Jan 27-Apr 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sisters,â&#x20AC;? ceramic sculptures by Jane and Tyler Burton. Reception, Jan 27, 2pm. Cornerstone Place, 23588 Hwy 121, Sonoma. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.933.1300.

Petaluma Arts Center Through Mar 10, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Four Weavers,â&#x20AC;? contemporary expressions of an ancient craft. Lecture, Feb 2, 1pm.

Workshops, Feb 9, 1pm and Feb 23, 9am. Demonstration, Feb 16, 2pm. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Petaluma Historical Museum & Library Through Jan 27, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wings in Space: Tribute to the Space Shuttle Programâ&#x20AC;? speaker series and exhibit. Featuring space shuttle astronaut Jose Hernandez Jan 26. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum music & Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim Book by Burt Shevelove & Larry Gelbart

Quercia Gallery Through Mar 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Free Flight,â&#x20AC;? paintings and sculptures with no restricted theme or size. 25193 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.0243.

RiskPress Gallery Through Jan 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Scenic Journey: Sonoma County and Beyond,â&#x20AC;? a series of landscapes by Terry SauvĂŠ. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Mar 3, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Winter,â&#x20AC;? photography by Lance Kuehne. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sonoma County Museum Jan 25-Feb 24, â&#x20AC;&#x153;In My Back Yard,â&#x20AC;? photography group exhibition taking the Sonoma County Museum as subject. Reception, Jan 25, 5pm. Gallery talk with artist Margeaux Walter, Jan 27, 11am. Panel discussion, Feb 7, 6:30pm. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

MARIN COUNTY Falkirk Cultural Center Through Mar 9, â&#x20AC;&#x153;BayWood Artists,â&#x20AC;? dedicated to painting and preserving Marinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s natural landscape. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

Spreckels Performing Arts Center 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park 6SUHFNHOV%R[2IÂżFHÂ&#x2021;VSUHFNHOVRQOLQHFRP 6SUHFNHOV%R[2IÂżFH H  VSUHFNHOVRQQOLQHFRP

Reverse Happy Hour in Lounge

10pm until midnight

Bohemian Drink Specials starts FRI, JAN 25

4)XU]T8U_GRÂ&#x160;Mention BOHO Drink

$

Terrace Grill

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4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm

Bar Specials start MON, JAN 28

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Gallery Bergelli Jan 24-Mar 5, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Larkspur Through the Eyes of an Artist,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Bryn Craig. Reception, Jan 24, 5:30-7:30. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Gallery Route One Through Feb 3, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Out of the Blue,â&#x20AC;?

FEBRUARY 8 - 17

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Â&#x160;all single liquor Well Drinks Â&#x160;*XGLZ(KKXÂ&#x160;.U[YK=OTK Â&#x160;Appetizers 9`KIN[GT=OTMYÂ&#x160;)GRGSGXO Â&#x160;)NOVUZRK9ROJKXY Rosemary Garlic Polenta Fries

FOR UPCOMING BANDS AND LINKS TO BAND WEBSITES: www.FlamingoResort.com/entertainment or call 707.545.8530 EXT. 727

25 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Arts Events

The NEW Spreckels Theatre Company Presents


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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THE AFTERMATH ‘Psycho’ opens Rialto Cinemas’ classic film series on Jan. 30. See Film, adjacent page.

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annual juried show. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Community Foundation

Sebastopol Community Cultural Center

Upcoming Events

*''$#56121. 7+6#4 '56+8#. featuring concerts by master guitarists

Stevie Coyle & Mike Dowling

Saturday, February 2, Noon - 10pm A day of exhibits, workshops, talks & music! Presented by Kebtone Productions & The Sebastopol Community Cultural Center Use coupon code BOHO for a $25 all access pass Mr. Music and the Sebastopol Community Cultural Center present:

Friday Night Live

#4&+ 4#5

featuring The Pulsators

Friday, February 1, 7pm Don’t miss the Friday Night Live Music Series Hootnanny - March 8 Songs of the Beatles - April 12 Songs of the Rolling Stones - May 3 Tickets and Information: www.seb.org or 707-823-1511

Through Feb 5, “Works on Water” features the work of 30 artists exploring the aesthetics and politics of water. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Marin MOCA Through Feb 24, “State of Mind,” member art exploring the concept. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Marin Society of Artists Through Feb 7, “Passages (From Representational to Abstract),” non-juried member show. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. Mon-Thurs, 11 to 4; SatSun, 12 to 4. 415.454.9561.

MFA Art Space Through Jan 31, New Year show featuring pieces by Ann Cohen, Zenovía Limberakis, Amie Klute and George Gorner. 827 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.713.3087.

Seager Gray Gallery Through Jan 31, “Made up Stories from an Imagined Past,” paintings by Inez Storer. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

NAPA COUNTY di Rosa Through Jan 27, “Renaissance

on Fillmore” examines San Francisco’s upper Fillmore district from 1955 to ‘65 with the work of 17 artists who either lived or worked in the building at 2322 Fillmore. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

ECHO Gallery Ongoing, “Proof of Some Existence,” works by Maki Aizawa, Peter Hassen, Angela Willetts and Michelle Wilson. 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.

Hess Collection Winery Ongoing, outstanding private collection featuring work by Franz Gertsch, Robert Motherwell and other modern masters. 4411 Redwood Rd., Napa. Daily, 10am–5:30pm 707.255.1144.

Comedy Comedy Headliner Different headliner each month. Last Fri of every month. Heritage Public House, 1305 Cleveland Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

Jabari Davis Juan Carlos, Marty Carrion, Matt Lieb and Sarah Witmore also perform. Jan 26, 8pm. $10. Christy’s on the Square, 96 Old Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa. 707.528.8565.

Will Franken Bay Area funnyman appears as part of Back Alley Comedy series. Jan 26, 6pm. $20.

Murphy’s Irish Pub, 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-andcomers Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Dance RoCo Dance Jan 27, 4:30 and 7:15pm, RoCo Dance on Stage, Choreographers showcase hip hop, modern, jazz, ballet and break dancing styles. $20. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael 415.499.6800.

Rock the Ballet Jan 26, 8pm, Rasta Thomas’ classic ballet blended with the excitement of musical theater, hip-hop and other styles set to popular music. $47.50-$65. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa 707.546.3600.

Events Oxbow Birthday Party Five-year anniversary of market’s opening featuring daily specials, live music, nightly drawings for great prizes and other surprises. Through Jan 25. Free. Oxbow Public Market, 610 First St, Napa.


Fruit Gardeners Scion Exchange

Gem Faire Over 70 dealers from all over the world will be on hand. Jan 25-27. Free. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Love Me, Fix Me Low cost spay/neuter mobile clinic sponsored by Sonoma County Animal Control. Call 707.565.7100 for appointment. Jan 23. $15-$30. Western Farm Center, 21 West Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.0721.

Museum Monday for Little Ones Stories, movement games, art and craft activities, and a movie for children ages one to five. Mon, 10am-noon through Feb 25. $5. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Nature Walk Led by Petaluma Wetlands Alliance. Jan 26, 9am. Free. Ellis Creek Water Recycling Facility, 3890 Cypress Drive Ave, Petaluma.

Paper Collage Workshop Turn an ordinary sheet of paper into an artistic masterpiece. Jan 26, 1pm. $15-$20. Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Songbird Reopening Short talks and minisessions with practitioners, art, refreshments. Keynote speech by Dr Marcey Shapiro. Jan 26, 1pm. Free. Songbird Community Healing Center, 8297 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.2398.

Film Desk Set This 1957 rom-com stars Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn. Wed, Jan 23, 1pm. $8. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

The Edge of Heaven Overlapping tales of friendship and sexuality spanning two continents. Fri, Jan 25, 7pm and Sun, Jan 27, 4pm. $7. Sonoma Film Institute, Warren

Edible City Documentary about the “good food” movement in the Bay Area. Jan 27, 7pm. Aqus Cafe, 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

The Gateless Gate Michael Litle cast SSU students Jenna Cecil and Katrina Huber in a fantasy-adventure based on the Tibetan Wheel of Life. Q&A with filmmaker follows. Jan 25, 7pm. $10. Occidental Center for the Arts, 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Live for Life French tale is part of Mort Sahl’s film series. Jan 23, 7:30pm. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Psycho Hitchcock’s classic thriller kicks off classic film series. Jan 30 at 7pm. $8. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Rear Window Alfred Hitchcock’s 1954 movie starring a wheelchairbound James Stewart, armed with a pair of binoculars and an imagination that’s overactiive–or is it? Jan 29, 7pm. $7. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Rebels with a Cause Documentary about saving the Marin-Sonoma coast. Filmmakers in conversation afterward. Jan 24, 7pm. $15. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

The Salt Song Trail: Bringing Creation Back Together Again The Southern Paiute people create a physical and spiritual map of the sacred Salt Songs. Director Philip M Klasky participates in discussion after. Jan 23, 7pm. Free. Fairfax Library, 2097 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. 415.453.8092.

Shift Change Inspiring documentary about worker-owned businesses in Spain and the US. Filmmakers participate in discussion after screening. Jan 28, 7:30pm. $15. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756. True stories of dignified jobs in democratic workplaces Mondragon, Cleveland, Oakland, Madison, Boston

and Point Reyes. Jan 29, 7pm. $5-$10. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

27 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Fruit tree cuttings, scions and expert custom-grafted trees will be for sale to the public at low cost by the California Rare Fruit Growers. Jan 26, 10am. $5. Santa Rosa Veterans Memorial Hall, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.565.7176.

Auditorium, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2606.

Slumdog Millionaire Oscar-winning tale of Muslim tea-boy who wins big on the Indian version of “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire.” Sun, Jan 27, 4pm. $7. Sonoma Film Institute, Warren Auditorium, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2606.

Food & Drink Civic Center Farmers Market Sun at 10am, “Eat Local 101” provides walking tour with information, cooking advice and ideas inspired by locally grown foods. Thurs, 8am-1pm and Sun, 8am-1pm. Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 800.897.3276.

Feast of the Olive Each table has a dedicated team of five or six executive chefs who will prepare a fivecourse dinner of olive inspired culinary creations. Jan 26, 6pm. $150. Ramekins Culinary School, 50 W Spain St, Sonoma. 707.933.0450.

Fresh Starts Chef Event James Beard Award winnner and co-founder of the Copita Tequileria y Comida in Sausalito Joanne Weir prepares four-course meal. Jan 24, 6:30pm. $69. Next Key Center, 1385 N Hamilton Pkwy, Novato. 415.382.3363, ext 211.

Pop-Up Local Chef Dinner Butcher Berry Salinas invites her favorite cooks to create comfort cooking made with locally grown and organic foods. Fri, 7pm, through Feb 1. Butcher & Cook, 112 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.205.6695.

Redwood Empire Farmers Market Sat, 9am-noon and Wed, 9am-noon. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

Santa Rosa Original Certified Farmers Market Sat, 9am-1pm and Wed, 9am1pm. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. ) 707.522.8629.

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TOM RIGNEY with FLAMBEAU Saturday, Jan 26

Wed, Jan 23 8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 10am–12:15pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family 7–10pm SINGLES & PAIRS SQUARE DANCE CLUB Thur, Jan 24 8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–10pm Circles N’ Squares Square Dance Club Fri, Jan 25 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7–11pm Steve Luther hosts MOTOWN, DISCO & ROCK’ N’ ROLL Sat, Jan 26 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 10:30am–12:30pm SCOTTISH CHALLENGE DANCE with Gary Thomas 7–11pm Steve Luther hosts TOM RIGNEY with FLAMBEAU Sun, Jan 27 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 5pm–9:30pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING Mon, Jan 28 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 4:30–5:30pm; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–10pm NORTHWEST PACIFIC RAILROAD SOCIETY Tues, Jan 29 8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7:30pm–9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC DANCE

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

Sat January 26 ĞŶĞĮƚĨŽƌƌLJĂŶ^ƚŽǁĨĞĂƚƵƌŝŶŐ

dŝŵ&ůĂŶŶĞƌLJ & DĂŶLJ^ƉĞĐŝĂů&ƌŝĞŶĚƐ Fri February 1 ŶŝŶƟŵĂƚĞĞǀĞŶŝŶŐǁŝƚŚ Clint BlackƉůƵƐEĂƚĂůLJĂǁŶ

Wed February 6

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dŚĞĂŶĂŶĚ Planning an event? Contact us for rental info

1350 Third St, Napa | 707.259.0123 www.uptowntheatrenapa.com


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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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CRITIC’S CHOICE

Winter Wine Soiree Winetasting event. Jan 26, 6:30pm. $40. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

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Art as a Tool to Mediate Social & Political Conflict

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Panel discussion on gang conflict in Northern California with members of Santa Rosa Police Department. Jan 24, 3pm. Free. Sonoma County Museum, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

DIY Workshop: Owning the Economy

You are invited to the 14th Annual

Saturday, February 9, 2013 TOPMsFinley Community Center West College Ave. at Stony Point Road, Santa Rosa, California

Heartfelt art created by Shelter & Rescue Animals Live & Silent Auctions Wines by Kenwood and Mutt Lynch Gourmet Hors d’Oeuvres Admission: $40 Donation Adv / $50 At Door / VISA/MC accepted

For more information please visit: www.pawsforlove.info or email: Ellyn@pawsforlove.info or 707.799.6151 or 209.795.4575 All proceeds benefit Animals In Need

Spend a day immersed in the inspiring world of co-ops, with a special focus on workerownership. Jan 26, 9am-4pm. $40-$50. Share Exchange, 531 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.393.1431.

Personal Branding for Authors & Writers Personal branding is not just a single statement or a clever quip but a multilayered, congruent narrative. Jan 27, 4pm. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Pruning Fruit Trees Denny Pedersen demonstrates how to prune fruit trees for great fruit and healthy, beautiful trees. Jan 26, 10:30am. Free. Windsor Library, 9291 Old Redwood Hwy, Windsor. 707.838.1020.

Pruning Roses Jim Lang demonstrates the best pruning techniques for various kinds of roses. Jan 26, 10:30am. Free. Sebastopol Library, 7140 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.823.7691.

Science Buzz Cafe

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“Marija Gimbutas: Her Life & Theories,” with Joan Marler, Archaeomythologist, Jan 23. 6:30pm. $4. Coffee Catz, 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Siddhis & Spiritualism

www.SonomaCountyRestaurantWeek.org

ITPI presents “The Upsurge of the Supernormal in 19thCentury America,” with Frank Poletti, PhD. Jan 23, 7pm. $20. St Stephen’s Episcopol Church, 3 Bay View Ave, Belvedere.

Sonoma County: A Tapestry of Cultures Gaye LeBaron speaks on the

Unspoiled Land Thanking the ‘rebels’ who saved Pt. Reyes Instead of cows and native shrubs and grasses, imagine the scenic Marin Headlands or Point Reyes covered in little boxes made of ticky-tacky. The 1963 Pete Seeger hit “Little Boxes” (and the Malvina Reynolds version, from Weeds) is famously inspired by Daly City’s multitude of one-story architectural clones; if it weren’t for a few brave souls, that’s how most of the land north of the Golden Gate would look, too. “Everyone says they didn’t know this story,” says filmmaker Nancy Kelly of the proposed coastal development. “They thought it was always like this.” With her husband Kenji Yamamoto, she made a documentary to honor those who dedicated themselves to preserving the land in a post–World War II era, a time when development was king and owning a home meant believing in America. “The idea of having open-space parks near where people live was unheard of at the time,” she says. “Conservationalists,” as they were referred to, was a term on par with “communists.” Thanks to a few young, idealistic lawyers, the director of a nature conservatory and “two little old ladies,” as Kelly says, the only reminder of the Gulf Oil company looking to develop the land into a planned community named Marincello is the ironically named Marincello bicycle trail in the Marin Headlands. And now, an award-winning documentary. Rebels with a Cause screens Thursday, Jan. 24, at Rialto Cinemas. Q&A with filmmakers afterward. 6868 McKinley Ave., Sebastopol. 7pm. $15. 707.525.4840.—Nicolas Grizzle

stories of Sonoma County past as part of the 25th anniversary of the World Affairs Council of Sonoma County. Jan 25,

5:30pm. $30. Quail Inn, 7025 Oakmont Dr, Santa Rosa. ) 707.539.9215.

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Å´Å» NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Tillie Hardwick Lecture Series “The Journey of Elders: A Native American Experience,” Jan 26, 1:30pm. Donation. California Indian Museum & Cultural Center, 5250 Aero Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.579.3004.

Writing Workshop Marlene Cullen explores writing on significant events and art collage as personal discovery. Jan 27, 1pm. $25-$30. Sunflower Center, 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

Readings Book Passage Jan 23, 1pm, “Harold E. Stassen: The Life & Perennial Candidacy of the Progressive Republican” with John Rothmann. Jan 23, 7pm, “The Antidote: Happiness for People Who Can’t Stand Positive Thinking” with Oliver Burkeman. Jan 24, 7pm, “Martin’s Dream: My Journey & the Legacy of Martin Luther King Jr.” with Clayborne Carson. Jan 25, 6pm, “Sumo” with Thien Pham. Jan 26, 1pm, “The Death of Bees” with Lisa O’Donnell. Jan 26, 4pm, “Oms from the Mat” with Dana Damara. Jan 26, 4pm, “Standing in Another Man’s Grave” with Ian Rankin. Jan 26, 7pm, “Move Our Message: How to Get America’s Ear” with Susan C Strong. Jan 27, 4pm, “A History of the Present Illness” with Louise Aronson. Jan 27, 7pm, “Lost Kingdom: Hawaii’s Last Queen, the Sugar Kings, and America’s First Imperial Adventure” with Julia Flynn Siler. Jan 27, 7pm, “Queen of America” with Luis Alberto Urrea. Jan 28, 7pm, “Mother of Fire” with Jean Davidson. Jan 29, 7pm, “Animal Collection” with Colin Winnette. Jan 30, 7pm, “Packing for Mars” with Mary Roach. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Jan 27, 1pm, “The Lost Art of Mixing” with Erica Bauermeister. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Jan 23, 4pm, “Imogen: the Mother of Modernism & Three Boys” with Amy Novesky.

140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books Jan 24, 7pm, “The Fear Project: What Our Most Primal Emotion Taught Me About Survival, Success, Surfing... and Love” with Jaimal Yogis. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

Marin History Museum History Center Gallery Jan 24, 7pm, “So far From Home: Early Russians in Early California” with Glenn Farris. 1026 Court St, San Rafael.

Occidental Center for the Arts Jan 27, 4pm, ‘Footnotes’, Sonoma County Writing Practice reads from new anthology. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental 707.874.9392.

Petaluma Library Jan 26, 11am, “My Half of the Sky” with Jana McBurney-Lin. 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma 707.763.9801.

Point Reyes Presbyterian Church Jan 27, 3pm, “Island in Time: Half a Century of Point Reyes National Seashore” with John Hart. 11445 Shoreline Hwy, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1349.

Rebound Bookstore Jan 26, 4pm, “Hand to Mouth” with Albert Flynn DeSilver & Dana Lomax. 1641 Fourth St, San Rafael 415.482.0550.

Sebastopol Gallery Jan 26, 7pm, “Pythagoras in Love” with Lee Slonimsky. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.829.7200.

Whole Foods Market Jan 26, 5pm, “Hero Food: How Cooking with Delicious Things Can Make Us Feel Better” with Seamus Mullen. 3682 Bel Aire Plaza, Napa 707.224.6300.

Theater

by Carl Williams; “You Can’t Trust the Male” by Randy Noojan; and “Annajanska, the Bolshevik Empress” by George Bernard Shaw (adapted by Richard Edwards). Wed, Jan 30, 7pm. Free. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Old Time Radio Dinner Theatre Live performance of the George Burns and Gracie Allen Show. Jan 27-28, 5:30pm. $35. Murphy’s Irish Pub, 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

A Pack of Lies Cold War psychological thriller begins when Scotland Yard uses an English couple’s home to observe a Soviet spy ring. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Feb 17. $20-$26. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

Shirley Valentine A bored and disillusioned housewife finds herself talking to the walls. But on a trip to Greece she finds the adventure, hope, laughs and love she had been missing. Thurs-Sat, 8pm. through Feb 17. $15-$25. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

Smokey Joe’s Cafe In an idealized ‘50s setting, the classic themes of love won, lost and imagined blend with hilarious set pieces and sliceof-life emotions. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Feb 10. $15$35. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Waiting for Godot Though they admit that they do not know him well and won’t even recognize him when they see him, they wait. They wait for Godot. Directed by Jasson Minadakis. Tues-Thurs-Sat, 8pm, Sun, 2 and 7pm and Wed, 7:30pm. through Feb 24. $36$57. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

January Plays Directed by Richard Edwards: “A Matter of Husbands” by Ferenc Molnar; “In the Trap”

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of January 23

ARIES (March 21–April 19) The German government sponsored a scientific study of dowsing, which is a form of magical divination used to locate underground sources of water. After 10 years, the chief researcher testified, “It absolutely works, beyond all doubt. But we have no idea why or how.” An assertion like that might also apply to the mojo you’ll have at your disposal, Aries, as you forge new alliances and bolster your web of connections in the coming weeks. I don’t know how or why you’ll be such an effective networker, but you will be.

Germanic train-car constructions,” like “the disappointment of sleeping with one’s fantasy” or “the excitement of getting a hotel room with a minibar.” He delights in sensing “intimations of mortality brought on by aging family members” and “sadness inspired by failing restaurants.” In the coming days, Libra, I think you should specialize in one-of-a-kind feelings like these. Milk the nuances! Exult in the peculiarities! Celebrate the fact that each new wave of passion has never before arisen in quite the same form.

TAURUS (April 20–May 20) The United States

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

Congress spends an inordinate amount of time on trivial matters. For example, 16 percent of all the laws it passed in the last two years were devoted to renaming post offices. That’s down from the average of the previous eight years, during which time almost 20 percent of its laws had the sole purpose of renaming post offices. In my astrological opinion, you Tauruses can’t afford to indulge in anything close to that level of nonsense during the next four weeks. I urge you to keep time-wasting activities down to less than 5 percent of your total. Focus on getting a lot of important stuff done. Be extra thoughtful and responsible as you craft the impact you’re having on the world.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21)

GEMINI (May 21–June 20)

What if your unconscious mind has dreamed up sparkling answers to your raging questions but your conscious mind doesn’t know about them yet? Is it possible you are not taking advantage of the sly wisdom that your deeper intelligence has been cooking up? I say it’s time to poke around down there. It’s time to take aggressive measures as you try to smoke out the revelations that your secret self has prepared for you. How? Remember your dreams, of course. Notice hunches that arise out of nowhere. And send a friendly greeting to your unconscious mind, something like, “I adore you and I’m receptive to you and I’d love to hear what you have to tell me.”

CANCER (June 21–July 22) In his book Our Band Could Be Your Life, Michael Azerrad says that the Cancerian singer-songwriter Steve Albini is a “connoisseur of intensity.” That means he’s picky about what he regards as intense. Even the two kinds of music that are often thought of as the embodiment of ferocious emotion don’t make the grade for Albini. Heavy metal is comical, he says, not intense. Hardcore punk is childish, not intense. What’s your definition of intensity, Cancerian? I see the coming weeks as prime time for you to commune with the very best expressions of that state of being. Be a connoisseur of intensity. LEO (July 23–August 22) There’s a butterfly sanctuary at the Como Park Zoo and Conservatory in St. Paul, Minn. It’s called the Enchanted Garden. As you enter, you see a sign that reads, “Please do not touch the butterflies. Let the butterflies touch you.” In other words, you shouldn’t initiate contact with the delicate creatures. You shouldn’t pursue them or try to capture them. Instead, make yourself available for them to land on you. Allow them to decide how and when your connection will begin to unfold. In the coming week, Leo, I suggest you adopt a similar approach to any beauty you’d like to know better. VIRGO (August 23–September 22): Do you ever

A Couple of Blaguards Irish tunes and ballads sparkle in this musical comedy about the McCourt brothers’ escape from Ireland to America. Dates and times vary. Fri-Sun through Jan 27. $25-$35. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Astrology

FREE WILL

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

fantasize about a more perfect version of yourself? Is there, in your imagination, an idealized image of who you might become in the future? That can be a good thing if it motivates you to improve and grow. But it might also lead you to devalue the flawed but beautiful creation you are right now. It may harm your capacity for self-acceptance. Your assignment in the coming week is to temporarily forget about whom you might evolve into at some later date, and instead just love your crazy, mysterious life exactly as it is.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) Novelist Jeffrey Eugenides says he doesn’t have generic emotions that can be described with one word. “Sadness,” “joy,” and “regret” don’t happen to him. Instead, he prefers “complicated hybrid emotions,

After analyzing your astrological omens for the coming weeks, I decided that the best advice I could give you would be this passage by the English writer G. K. Chesterton: “Of all modern notions, the worst is this: that domesticity is dull. Inside the home, they say, is dead decorum and routine; outside is adventure and variety. But the truth is that the home is the only place of liberty, the only spot on earth where a person can alter arrangements suddenly, make an experiment or indulge in a whim. The home is not the one tame place in a world of adventure; it is the one wild place in a world of set rules and set tasks.”

My general philosophy is that everyone on the planet, including me, is a jerk now and then. In fact, I’m suspicious of those who are apparently so unfailingly well-behaved that they never act like jerks. On the other hand, some people are jerks far too much of the time, and should be avoided. Here’s my rule of thumb: How sizable is each person’s Jerk Quotient? If it’s below 6 percent, I’ll probably give them a chance to be a presence in my life—especially if they’re smart and interesting. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, Sagittarius, this gauge may be useful for you to keep in mind during the coming weeks.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) The French painter Cezanne painted images of a lot of fruit in the course of his career. He liked to take his sweet time while engaged in his work. The apples and pears and peaches that served as his models often rotted before he was done capturing their likenesses. That’s the kind of approach I recommend for you in the coming days, Capricorn. Be very deliberate and gradual and leisurely in whatever labor of love you devote yourself to. No rushing allowed! With conscientious tenderness, exult in attending to every last detail of the process. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) “Nobody can be exactly like me. Even I have trouble doing it.” So said the eccentric, outspoken, and hardpartying actress Tallulah Bankhead (1902–1968). Can you guess her astrological sign? Aquarius, of course. Her greatest adventure came from trying to keep up with all the unpredictable urges that welled up inside her. She found it challenging and fun to be as unique as she could possibly be. I nominate her to be your role model in the next four weeks. Your assignment is to work extra hard at being yourself. PISCES (February 19–March 20) The Dardanelles Strait is a channel that connects the Black Sea to the Mediterranean Sea, separating Europe from Asia. In some places, it’s less than a mile wide. But the currents are fierce, so if you try to swim across at those narrow points, you’re pushed around and end up having to travel five or six miles. In light of the current astrological omens, I’m predicting that you will have a comparable challenge in the coming days, Pisces. The task may seem easier or faster than it actually is. Plan accordingly.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.


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MEDITATE IN SANTA ROSA, WEDNESDAY 7:00- 8:15pm

Learn secrets of how honey bees live in community, cooperating together while benefiting life. Sun, Jan 27, 2-4:30p, 707.578.2121, www.journeycenter.org.

January 16 & 23: What is Meditation? January 30: Meditation & Me February: Death, Refuge, Reincarnation, & Karma March: Taming Tension $10 pr class, $35 pr month. Compassion Buddhist Center, 436 Larkfield Center www.meditateinsantarosa.org Everyone Welcome!

The Enneagram: A Tool for Transformation Free introduction to an ancient tool for personal and relational transformation. Wed, Jan. 30, 2013; 6:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm Journey Center, 707.578.2121, www.journeycenter.org.

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 23-29, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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