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INSIDE Volume 44, No.10 June 6-12, 2018

FROM CANADA, EH! BY THE BOOK Progress and snags in county’s library bond measure improvements P11

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THRILL SEEKER Santa Cruz journalist Peggy Townsend publishes new thriller P24

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FEATURES

3


OPINION

EDITOR’S NOTE I’ve long thought that what happened to the 1946 film adaptation of Raymond Chandler’s novel The Big Sleep is great illustration of two distinct ways of looking at the noir genre. The Howard Hawks-directed movie was originally completed in 1945 with a tight, clever narrative (adapted primarily by William Faulkner) that fully explained the case that Humphrey Bogart as Philip Marlowe had gotten himself wrapped up in. But as the pairing of Bogart with Lauren Bacall was becoming a national phenomenon, producer Jack Warner was convinced to add new scenes with the couple. The film that was finally released was only two minutes longer, but it had more than 20 minutes of different footage. It also made no sense, because what was cut out to allow for the new scenes was the explanation of what was actually going on. Most people didn’t care too much, because the Bogie and Bacall scenes feature some of the best

LETTERS

JUNE 6-12, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

MIND EXPLORERS

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Thank you for your article on Michael Pollan and his mind-altering experimentation (GT, 5/30). This is not new to Santa Cruz, however. Santa Cruz has been fertile ground for experimentation from the early 1960s to present day. Please reference the work Ralph Abraham and others have done in this regard at HipSantaCruz.org. In 1977, Linkage, a small group of futuristic visionaries, brought Dr. Albert Hofmann, the person who inadvertently discovered LSD, to UCSC for his first visit to the United States for a conference entitled “LSD - A Generation Later.” This was a time when many of the second generation of mind explorers laid the groundwork for what was erroneously mislabeled as the “New Age.” The process for mind exploration was laid by many professional people from all walks of life with much emphasis on the

onscreen chemistry in the history of film, and the released version’s quintessential noir attitude and atmosphere helped make it a huge hit. Only in 1997 did the public get to see the complete original version, sparking a debate about what is more important to successful noir: a great story, or incredible style? I put this question to Susie Bright and Willow Pennell, the editor and associate editor of the new Santa Cruz Noir anthology, and they came back with a split decision on The Big Sleep. Bright prefers the story-first approach of the original, untinkered-with film, while Pennell felt the added scenes between the co-stars are why we consider it one of the best noir films of all time today. I just like that this team of noir editors had a representative from both camps; it certainly helps explain why the resulting book is full of both tightly wound narratives and endless hardboiled atmosphere. In my cover story this week, they explain what it took to pull together this short-fiction walk through Santa Cruz County’s dark side. It’s a thrilling, whip-smart book that will dazzle local lovers of crime fiction, and I hope you enjoy this look at how it was made. STEVE PALOPOLI | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

pioneering work of Ralph Metzner, Richard Alpert (Ram Dass,) and Timothy Leary. (In spite of the controversial media coverage in those days precipitated by President Richard Nixon, who thought Leary was “The Most Dangerous Man in America.” He was arrested and imprisoned as a “political prisoner” for a half a joint found in his car!) There was a second conference at UCSC in 1981 that paved the way for the integration of the experimental and spiritual work that laid the foundation for Pollan’s recent successful explorations. This foundation was laid by many people in the Bay Area who maintained the unwavering belief that there is a different lifestyle that can bring love, peace, and nutriment to our planet and its peoples. It continues to this day. Thank you, Michael, for being a current champion and taking us another step forward toward the fifth generation. LYNDA FRANCIS | SANTA CRUZ

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PHOTO CONTEST BLACK DAHLIA The first dahlia to bloom in the photographer’s yard this year.

Photograph by Kim Delaney (@findkim). Submit to photos@goodtimes.sc. Include information (location, etc.) and your name. Photos may be cropped. Preferably, photos should be 4 inches by 4 inches and minimum 250 dpi.

GOOD IDEA

GOOD WORK

FLOWER POWER

SHINING A LIGHT

“Enchanting Gardens in the Mountains” will allow visitors to tour through seven magical gardens in Bonny Doon on Sunday, June 10. Tickets are $20, available for purchase at Valley Churches United, Scarborough Gardens, San Lorenzo Garden Center, the Garden Company, and Mountain Feed and Farm Supply. Proceeds will go to Valley Churches United to provide services to those in need. Gourmet lunches are available for $12. To reserve a lunch in advance call 831-336-8098. For more information, visit vcum.org.

Paul Eastman, owner of the Skylight Place in Capitola, has been recognized as one of the most promising remodeling professionals in the nation. Every year, through its “Forty Under 40 Awards Program,” the editorial staff of Pro Remodeler magazine recognizes young and promising industry professionals. The magazine honored Eastman for embracing the next generation of more efficient technology. Paul is the second-generation owner of the Skylight Place, which specializes in building and replacing windows and doors.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

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LOCAL TALK

What’s your perfect day? BY MATTHEW COLE SCOTT

Only The Sun Will Outlast Our Panels.

Homemade breakfast, journaling, taking in the ocean, time with friends and family, something creative like music, meditation and yoga. AARON CLEGG SANTA CRUZ | TEACHER

Connect with my children, find a good recipe, and then share it with somebody I haven’t met before. FRANK COHEN CAMPBELL | SOFTWARE DEVELOPER

Drive up Highway 1 with friends and a tent and different CDs, having fun and getting to know each other, and at the end of the night camp and enjoy the sunset. KATHIA DAMIAN SANTA CRUZ | BARISTA

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I’d like to do something with friends and then have a family activity. Maybe travel somewhere foreign. Then I’d wrap it up with some chocolate and dancing. ADRIANA LUGO SANTA CRUZ | TEACHER LIBRARIAN

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SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | JUNE 6-12, 2018

Enjoying something outside, where your adrenaline is pumping, and then finishing the day with something relaxing like reading a book and a glass of wine.

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ROB BREZSNY FREE WILL ASTROLOGY Week of June 6 ARIES Mar21–Apr19 According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you would be wise to ruffle and revise your relationship with time. It would be healthy for you to gain more freedom from its relentless demands; to declare at least some independence from its oppressive hold on you; to elude its push to impinge on every move you make. Here’s a ritual you could do to spur your imagination: Smash a timepiece. I mean that literally. Go to the store and invest $20 in a hammer and alarm clock. Take them home and vociferously apply the hammer to the clock in a holy gesture of pure, righteous chastisement. Who knows? This bold protest might trigger some novel ideas about how to slip free from the imperatives of time for a few stolen hours each week.

TAURUS Apr20–May20 Promise me that you won’t disrespect, demean, or neglect your precious body in the coming weeks. Promise me that you will treat it with tender compassion and thoughtful nurturing. Give it deep breaths, pure water, healthy and delicious food, sweet sleep, enjoyable exercise, and reverential sex. Such veneration is always recommended, of course—but it’s especially crucial for you to attend to this noble work during the next four weeks. It’s time to renew and revitalize your commitment to your soft warm animal self.

“Dear Dr. Astrology: In the past four weeks, I have washed all 18 of my underpants four times. Without exception, every single time, each item has been insideout at the end of the wash cycle. This is despite the fact that most of them were not inside-out when I threw them in the machine. Does this weird anomaly have some astrological explanation? - Upside-Down Scorpio.” Dear Scorpio: Yes. Lately your planetary omens have been rife with reversals, inversions, flip-flops, and switchovers. Your underpants situation is a symptom of the bigger forces at work. Don’t worry about those bigger forces, though. Ultimately, I think you’ll be glad for the renewal that will emerge from the various turnabouts.

SAGITTARIUS Nov22–Dec21

Between 1967 and 1973, NASA used a series of Saturn V rockets to deliver six groups of American astronauts to the moon. Each massive vehicle weighed about 6.5 million pounds. The initial thrust required to launch it was tremendous. Gas mileage was seven inches per gallon. Only later, after the rocket flew farther from the grip of Earth’s gravity, did the fuel economy improve. I’m guessing that in your own life, you may be experiencing something like that seven-inches-per-gallon feeling right now. But I guarantee you won’t have to push this hard for long.

CANCER Jun21–Jul22

CAPRICORN Dec22–Jan19

Mars, the planet that rules animal vitality and instinctual enthusiasm, will cruise through your astrological House of Synergy for much of the next five months. That’s why I’ve concluded that between now and mid-November, your experience of togetherness can and should reach peak expression. Do you want intimacy to be robust and intense, sometimes bordering on rambunctious? It will be if you want it to be. Adventures in collaboration will invite you to wander out to the frontiers of your understanding about how relationships work best.

You’re in a phase when you’ll be smart to bring more light and liveliness into the work you do. To spur your efforts, I offer the following provocations. 1. “When I work, I relax. Doing nothing makes me tired.” - Pablo Picasso. 2. “Opportunities are usually disguised as hard work, so most people don’t recognize them.” - Ann Landers. 3. “Pleasure in the job puts perfection in the work.” - Aristotle. 4. “Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep.” Scott Adams. 5. “Working hard and working smart can sometimes be two different things.” - Byron Dorgan. 6. “Don’t stay in bed unless you can make money in bed.” - George Burns. 7. “Thunder is good, thunder is impressive; but it is lightning that does the work.” - Mark Twain.

LE0 Jul23–Aug22

JUNE 6-12, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

SCORPIO Oct23–Nov21

As I sat down to meditate on your horoscope, a hummingbird flew in my open window. Scrambling to herd it safely back outside, I knocked my iPad on the floor, which somehow caused it to open a link to a Youtube video of an episode of the TV game show Wheel of Fortune where the hostess Vanna White, garbed in a long red gown, revealed that the word puzzle solution was USE IT OR LOSE IT. So what does this omen mean? Maybe this: You’ll be surprised by a more-or-less delightful interruption that compels you to realize that you had better start taking greater advantage of a gift or blessing that you’ve been lazy or slow to capitalize on.

GEMINI May21–June20

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endings to sad stories, and for the emergence of efficient solutions to convoluted riddles. I bet it will also be a phase when you can perform some seemingly clumsy magic that dispatches a batch of awkward karma. Hooray! Hallelujah! Praise Goo! But now listen to my admonition, Libra: The coming weeks won’t be a good time to toss and turn in your bed all night long thinking about what you might have done differently in the month of May. Honor the past by letting it go.

Which astrological sign laughs hardest and longest and most frequently? I’m inclined to speculate that Sagittarius deserves the crown, with Leo and Gemini fighting it out for second place. But having said that, I suspect that in the coming weeks you Leos could rocket to the top of the chart, vaulting past Sagittarians. Not only are you likely to find everything funnier than usual; I bet you will also encounter more than the usual number of authentically humorous and amusing experiences. (P.S.: I hope you won’t cling too fiercely to your dignity, because that would interfere with your full enjoyment of the cathartic cosmic gift.)

VIRGO Aug23–Sep22 According to my analysis of the astrological omens, a little extra egotism might be healthy for you right now. A surge of super-confidence would boost your competence; it would also fine-tune your physical well-being and attract an opportunity that might not otherwise find its way to you. So, for example, consider the possibility of renting a billboard on which you put a giant photo of yourself with a tally of your accomplishments and a list of your demands. The cosmos and I won’t have any problem with you bragging more than usual or asking for more goodies than you’re usually content with.

LIBRA Sep23–Oct 22 The coming weeks will be a favorable time for happy

AQUARIUS Jan20–Feb18 “There isn’t enough of anything as long as we live,” said poet and short-story writer Raymond Carver. “But at intervals a sweetness appears and, given a chance, prevails.” My reading of the astrological omens suggests that the current phase of your cycle is one of those intervals, Aquarius. In light of this grace period, I have some advice for you, courtesy of author Anne Lamott: “You weren’t born a person of cringe and contraction. You were born as energy, as life, made of the same stuff as stars, blossoms, breezes. You learned contraction to survive, but that was then.” Surrender to the sweetness, dear Aquarius.

PISCES Feb19–Mar20 Between you and your potential new power spot is an imaginary ten-foot-high, electrified fence. It’s composed of your least charitable thoughts about yourself and your rigid beliefs about what’s impossible for you to accomplish. Is there anything you can do to deal with this inconvenient illusion? I recommend that you call on Mickey Rat, the cartoon superhero in your dreams who knows the difference between destructive destruction and creative destruction. Maybe as he demonstrates how enjoyable it could be to tear down the fence, you’ll be inspired to join in the fun.

Homework: Confess your deepest secrets to yourself. Say them out loud when no one but you is listening. Testify at Freewillastrology.com.

© Copyright 2018


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CLEAN ENERGY

7


OPINION

There is a Better Way

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GUILT TRIPPING The city of Santa Cruz is currently considering where to put the next homeless camp, after River Street. At the Council meeting last Tuesday, after the public expressed passionate opposition to each of the sites under consideration, Councilwoman Cynthia Chase said that there would be opposition to any site. In other words, a camp is going somewhere—public be damned. I am part of the opposition to the Soquel Park and Ride site. Why would I not want a homeless camp near my house? Surely you have heard the arguments already.

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LETTERS POLICY

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So where should a homeless camp go? For me to propose another site would be to accept the city’s premise that there must be a homeless camp, and to say that someone else’s neighborhood is less worthy of protection than my own. Instead, I invite every resident to fearlessly and enthusiastically stand up for their own neighborhood. If you don’t, then who will? It is time that we all stand up to the guilt-tripping and intimidation from local government on the homeless issue. Enough is enough.

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10,000 10,000 • = Greenway petition signer

WHY GREENWAY REASONS REASONSWHY WHYGREENWAY GREENWAY

BETTER ISISAABETTER WAY BETTER WAY IS A BETTER WAY CAPITOLA

SANTA CRUZ

WATSONVILLE

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REASONS WHY GREENWAY

REASONS WHY 10,000 PEOPLE SIGNED THE GREENWAY PETITION THETHE REASONS WHY 10,000 PEOPLE SIGNED THE GREENWAY PETITION REASONS WHY 10,000 PEOPLE SIGNED THE GREENWAY PETITION

SAFE / Greenway safe, protected, contiguous off-street SAFE / Greenway offers contiguous off-street trail Greenway offersaoffers asafe, safe,aprotected, protected, contiguous off-street trailtrail that accommodates separate bike/e-bike and pedestrian lanes for safety that accommodates separate bike/e-bike and pedestrian lanes for safety

FUTURE OPTIONS Federal railbanking lawenables enables maximum FUTURE OPTIONS / Federal railbanking law enables maximum FUTURE OPTIONS / /Federal railbanking law maximum the corridor over the20next 20 while years preserving while preserving transportation use of use the of corridor over the next years transportation optionsoptions for for

that accommodates separate bike/e-bike and pedestrian lanes for safety use of the corridor over the next 20 years while preserving transportation options for and transit effectiveness. future generations. and future generations. and transit transit effectiveness. effectiveness. future generations. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

AFFORDABLE / Greenway a fraction of the railtrail withplan. trail plan. ENVIRONMENT ENVIRONMENT / Greenway provides an environmentally friendly AFFORDABLE //Greenway costs acosts fraction of the rail with / Greenway provides an environmentally friendly AFFORDABLE Greenway costs a fraction of theforrail with trail ENVIRONMENT / Greenway provides an environmentally friendly tons that’s not enough, is NO money currently available a so train, it’splan. nothing alternative alternative to driving and avoids down hundreds of heritage If that’sIf not enough, there isthere NO money currently available for a train, it’s so nothing to driving and avoids cuttingcutting down hundreds of heritage trees, trees, movingmoving tons

If that’smore not than enough, there is NOfantasy. money currently available for a train, so it’s nothing alternative to driving andextensive avoids cutting down hundreds of corridor. heritage trees, moving tons an unrealistic of earth, and building retaining walls along the more than an unrealistic fantasy. of earth, and building extensive retaining walls along the corridor. more than an unrealistic fantasy. of earth, and building extensive retaining walls along the corridor. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

TRANSIT / Greenway accommodates THOUSANDS bike and pedestrian BEAUTY / Greenway as a linear park showcasing the natural TRANSIT //Greenway easily easily accommodates THOUSANDS of bikeofand pedestrian BEAUTY /CruzGreenway servesserves as a linear park showcasing the natural beautybeauty TRANSIT Greenway accommodates of bike and for pedestrian BEAUTY / County Greenway serves as aprovides linear park showcasing the natural beauty a day, and serves as aeasily transportation alternative to Highway 1, particularly for trips of the Santa coastline and a peaceful oceanside escape users ausers day, and serves as a transportation alternative toTHOUSANDS Highway 1, particularly trips of the Santa Cruz County coastline and provides a peaceful oceanside escape for for

usersthan aless day, and10serves as a transportation alternative 1, particularly for trips county of the Santa Cruz County coastline and provides a peaceful oceanside escape for miles—reducing congestion on1 Hwy 1 to forHighway south county commuters. county residents. less 10than miles—reducing congestion on Hwy for south county commuters. residents. less than 10 miles—reducing congestion on Hwy 1 for south county commuters. county residents. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

who thethe train the least.a regressive sales tax which falls hardest on the poor, requires NOwill NEW TAXES, especially who will use theuse train least. who will use the train the least.

way residents and visitors live, work, and play in Santa Cruz County.

SAY NO TO A 10-YEAR FREIGHT AND TOURIST SAY NO AWITH 10-YEAR FREIGHT AND SAY NO TOTO A 10-YEAR FREIGHT AND TRAIN CONTRACT PROGRESSIVE RAIL! SAY NO TO A 10-YEAR FREIGHT AND TRAIN CONTRACT WITH PROGRESSIVE RAIL! TRAIN CONTRACT WITH PROGRESSIVE RAIL! Write to TOURIST RTCTOURIST Chairman John Leopold, your county supervisor and city councilperson and TOURIST TRAIN WITH PROGRESSIVE tell them that votersCONTRACT like you want Greenway—not ProgressiveRAIL! Rail! Write to RTC Chairman John Leopold, your county supervisor Write to RTC Chairman John Leopold, your county supervisor Write to RTC Chairman John Leopold, your county supervisor and city councilperson and them that voters like and city councilperson and telltell them that voters like and you city councilperson and tell them that Rail! voters like JOIN YOUR NEIGHBORS IN SIGNING THE PETITION FOR you want Greenway—not Progressive Rail!GREENWAY want Greenway—not Progressive sccgreenway.org you want Greenway—not Progressive Rail!

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | JUNE 6-12, 2018

EQUITY / Lower households thefrequent most frequent bike users. Greenway HEALTH / Greenway promotes safe, healthy community and changes EQUITY / Lower incomeincome households are theare most bike users. Greenway HEALTH / Greenway promotes a safe,ahealthy community and changes the the requires NO/TAXES, NEW especially a regressive sales tax which fallsusers. hardest on the poor, way residents and visitors live, work, and in Santa Cruz County. EQUITY LowerTAXES, income households aresales the most frequent Greenway / Greenway promotes a safe, healthy and changes the requires NO NEW especially a regressive tax which falls bike hardest on the poor, wayHEALTH residents and visitors live, work, and play inplay Santa Cruz community County.

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NEWS READING INTO IT From Felton to downtown Santa Cruz, where the library bond money’s going BY MALCOLM TERENCE

APP ON Electric scooters are available for rent in San Jose and other cities, from companies like Lime, based in San Mateo. The app-based rides have been met with exuberance, confusion, and a range of other emotions.

Hard to Handle

As Santa Cruz’s bike-share gains momentum, other cities grapple with rise of electric scooters BY LAUREN HEPLER

J

oape Pela isn’t your average lanky tech bro. Sure, the 30-year-old East Palo Alto native lives in downtown San Jose and works as a payment analyst at local startup Finxera. But the former University of Utah football player’s 6-foot-3, 320-pound stature made him wary of one trend quickly gaining traction with his startup brethren: electric scooters. “I was surprised. They have some jump,” Pela says of the devices that started to appear on San Jose streets this past February. “It felt pretty good, having the wind blow through my hair and all that.” The rental scooters represent the

latest trend in a sharing economy that’s changing the world of transportation. The city of Santa Cruz’s bike share system has seen more than 5,100 trips since the program’s unofficial launch on May 7. The pedal-assist electric Jump bikes allow riders to find, reserve and pay for them, all through an app on their phones. The bikes are $1 for the first 15 minutes and 7 cents for every minute after that, although $30 monthly plans are also available. Over the hill, meanwhile, cities like San Jose have zipped fullthrottle into the next frontier. And Pela is one of many San Jose

residents, commuters and business owners navigating the sudden emergence of hundreds of scooters available through two deep-pocketed app providers. San Mateo startup Lime has raised $132 million to offer on-demand shared bikes and scooters in San Jose and more than 50 other cities nationwide. Bird, a startup based in Santa Monica, is backed by $115 million and focused solely on e-scooters. New riders can set up an account in minutes by downloading the free app, uploading a credit card and agreeing to terms of service that include parking out of the public right-of-way and wearing a >12

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | JUNE 6-12, 2018

The construction project set to begin in Felton this summer isn’t your grandpa’s library building. There will be a park, a nature classroom, a cozy fireplace area, and plenty of high-tech amenities, including digital charging stations—all blended with an extensive book collection into a community center for the entire San Lorenzo Valley. In renderings, it almost resembles a ski lodge more than a hub for reading. Just a few steps from the library’s patio, the park will feature native plants, interpretive displays, accessible paths, benches, natural play areas for children to climb about, and even a small stage. “The emphasis is on environmental consciousness—opportunities for programs inside and outside. It’s going to be bigger, brighter and modern,” says Michelle Mosher, an organizer for the Felton library project. “We want it to appeal to people of all ages.” Landscape architects who are designing the outdoor portion will share the plans with the public on Thursday, June 14, at 6 p.m. at Felton Community Hall, located at 6191 Hwy. 9. Library director Susan Nemitz says linking of indoor and outdoor space is a common feature of modern libraries. Betsy Lynberg, the county’s capital projects manager, says $10 million from a $67 million 2016 bond measure is being spent on Felton’s new building, including furnishings and public art. The Capitola Library is also starting over from scratch, having shut down last month, and the next facility will double down with a new play area and state-ofthe-art technology. Although demand for print books from libraries has declined in recent years, Nemitz says demand for technology grew 50 percent in the last year. People come into libraries when they need to fill out a job application, tax forms and financial aid paperwork. The library bond measure, which got 70 percent voter support two years ago, is funding improvements to eight other county libraries as well, with cash >14

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helmet. Bird also requires users to scan a valid driver’s license. From there, users who pay a flat $1 fee, plus 15 cents per minute, can use the app’s map feature to find an available scooter and take a picture of a QR code to unlock the device. The scooters, controlled by a simple hand throttle and brake, can reach a speed of 15 mph and hold a charge that lasts up to 18 miles. In San Jose, which lacks quick transit options, the scooters alternately attract praise from loyal users, ire for clogging public sidewalks, skepticism about safety, and criticism as a perceived harbinger of gentrification—controversies that also surround sharing economy services such as Uber, Lyft and other programs. Claire Fliesler, a Santa Cruz transportation planner, says that Surf City has no plans to pursue a scooter system at this point—as leaders have their hands full trying to make bike share as robust as possible—but she adds that local officials have been following the issues as they unfold in other cities.

THROTTLE BEHAVIOUR The trick with scooters: They’re just obscure enough to make them tough to regulate. “There was no coordinated strategy for introducing the scooters to the street,” says Colin Heyne, a spokesman for the San Jose Department of Transportation. “Not surprisingly, we didn’t have a policy around e-scooters.” Concerns the city has heard mostly include illegally riding scooters down sidewalks, users discarding scooters on lawns at the end of the ride and riders not wearing helmets. As a result, scooters have emerged as the latest uniquely 21st century question of where a company’s responsibility ends and a city’s or consumer’s begins. “Riders are required to obey the law, but enforcement is difficult for us,” says Sam Dreiman, Lime’s director of strategic development for California. “In some ways, it’s an even bigger question of how much we can enforce or should enforce.”

If companies try to dodge enforcement responsibility, though, it’s not clear whether the city is ready to step in. Both San Jose and the state are hashing out first-ever attempts at regulations designed specifically for e-scooters, but San Jose’s aren’t due until September.

GRAY AREA Take a trip to Diridon Station during rush hour, and it’s clear that commuters in Silicon Valley are already seeking alternatives to the region’s decades-old mass transit systems. From foldable bikes and electric skateboards to the occasional pair of inline skates or old-fashioned Razor scooters, long commutes and already-overflowing BART and Caltrain cars have pushed the noncar-dependent to get creative. In some ways, Silicon Valley is late to the party that planning wonks refer to as “multimodal urban mobility,” where future transportation systems stand to encompass more options than 20th-century cars, trains and buses. Fast-growing cities in China, for example, have already spent the better part of the last decade trying to figure out how electric scooters of varying sizes can coexist with electric bicycles and other car alternatives. Automakers like Hyundai and Toyota have unveiled their own high-tech scooter prototypes in recent years, and Lyft in late May signaled an interest in rolling out e-scooters in San Francisco. “It’s just very costly to use cars to make short trips, especially in cities,” says Ratna Amin, transportation policy director for Bay Area urban planning think tank SPUR. The rise of scooters and other smaller-scale alternatives, she says, “require us to now think differently about our streets.” For the past several months, scooters have been a touchy subject in San Francisco, where a temporary ban on them went into effect on Monday, June 4, as the City by the Bay gets a permitting program in order. E-scooters’ more recent arrival in San Jose has been marked by a wide range of reactions. “Bros are racing app rental

electric scooters outside my apartment,” San Jose Sharks digital media coordinator Ann Frazier wrote on Twitter. “This is now normal everyday life in downtown.” Dueling opinions between people who either love or love to make fun of the service surfaced almost as fast as the scooters themselves. In San Jose, Lime scooters were the first to appear, in late winter, Heyne says. Soon after came Bird, which opted for same-day deployment instead of advance conversations with the cities. “That was shorter notice,” Heyne says. “As in, we got a call that they were going to be dropped off on our streets.” Kenneth Baer, a Washington, D.C.based consultant for Bird, declined to detail the company’s approach to entering San Jose or other new cities. “Obviously, we have a deliberative process,” he says. “I’m not going to get into the details.” Despite the unconventional rollout, demand has ramped up quickly for the scooters, sometimes making it difficult to find an available device near hubs like Diridon Station. In the meantime, though, business operators like Cafe Stritch’s Maxwell Borkenhagen say the largely unregulated devices can cause problems day to day.

SCOOTER COPS Spending months crafting detailed policies just for e-scooters might seem a bit excessive. At stake, though, are much bigger questions about who’s responsible for the lessdesirable side effects of the sharing economy. As venture capital-backed startups seek rapid growth with minimal costs, that tension can come to a head in multiple ways. First and foremost, Lime contends, e-scooter companies are providing cities with a publicly accessible transportation option at no direct cost to the city. All they ask is that municipalities pay for necessary taxpayer-funded elements, like bike lanes and road maintenance. “We provide the subsidy-free mobility,” Lime spokeswoman Emma Green says. “Cities provide >15


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NEWS

14

ADDED AMENITIES In some ways, Felton’s next library center—with its new fireplace and digital charging stations—feels more like a ski lodge than a hub for reading.

READING INTO IT <11 going to branches in Santa Cruz, Aptos, Live Oak, Scotts Valley, Boulder Creek, and La Selva Beach—replacing failing roofs, outdated bathrooms, electrical systems, and structurally damaged areas. The Capitola Library will go to bid by mid-summer, but Steve Jesberg, Capitola’s director of public works, warns that there is a high demand for contractors and subcontractors this year so it may make for a tight market. Jesberg says the new building will

replace temporary structures that have been in place for 14 years. Nearby libraries at Aptos and Live Oak will add hours while Capitola awaits its new facility. A book drop will be added at Jade Street Community Park and storytelling programs for preschoolers will be available at Porter Memorial Library in Soquel. Nemitz says the plans for replacing the main library in downtown Santa Cruz have been complicated because the bond measure provided only $23 million, but estimates for a new structure are $38 million. She says the $67 million total

offered to the voters in the bond measure “was based on what the public would pass—not what it would take to bring it into the 21st Century.” A special library committee looked at future possibilities for the library, including the idea of integrating the new library into plans for a long-discussed parking structure that would replace existing streetlevel parking on the corner of Cathcart and Cedar streets downtown. It would spare library officials from having to pay for the structure’s foundation, but sustainable transportation activists are fighting the

concept, leery to incentivize future car trips. The Santa Cruz City Council will study the issues when it looks at downtown parking issues in a meeting that’s tentatively scheduled for Tuesday, June 19. This past January, the Downtown Library Advisory Committee recommended a full remodel with a new parking structure, as it literally checks 13 of 15 boxes the group looked at, including one for cost. The committee’s next-favorite idea was a full renovation of the current facility, which checks three fewer boxes and comes in at an estimated $11.1 million more.


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the infrastructure.” But what happens if riders violate the company’s terms of service, or laws governing riding on sidewalks, parking scooters in the right of way or not wearing a helmet? State lawmakers are just now writing policies to govern bike lane usage for scooters. In San Jose, using traffic cops to police such low-level nuisances isn’t practical, Heyne says. “We are woefully understaffed for traffic enforcement,” Heyne says, noting one recent tally counted just a half dozen citywide traffic cops. Companies, too, are eager to avoid costly, on-the-ground scooter patrols. “That’s a big one, trying to hold people accountable for how they park,” Dreiman says. He noted that Lime now requires users to submit a photo of how they park their scooter in order for the trip to officially end and billing to stop. The company is also considering using riders to police each other, submitting photos of other riders’ parking fails, or offering yet-undefined “incentives” for good behavior, he says. Still, safety is another moving target. In San Francisco, a Twitter account registered to Facebook product manager Dan Grover in mid-May posted a screenshot from the Lime app alongside an X-ray showing a broken wrist. “Took a spill as they don’t handle uneven pavement well,” Grover tweeted. “Aside from broken bones, UX was good.” Though Lime keeps records of user-reported injuries, not all get reported. Green says the company carries business insurance mandated by each city it operates in. Lime has also started a helmet distribution center in San Francisco or done occasional helmet giveaways. Bird has sent some 22,000 helmets to users who request them, Baer says. In San Jose, Heyne says helmets and other safety rules will likely be included in the city’s September policy recommendations. “It’s like bring your own seat belts if you’re renting a car,” Heyne says. Still, he added, injuries are also difficult for the city to track: “Nobody calls the DOT if they get into a scooter crash.”

15


Santa Cruz

Goes Dark

Susie Bright’s ‘Santa Cruz Noir’ anthology sets its twisted crime tales throughout Santa Cruz County By Steve Palopoli

JUNE 6-12, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

T

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he manuscript arrived at Susie Bright’s house in Santa Cruz looking like any other package. The edges of the thick manila envelope in which it came seemed far more dirty and beat up than they should have been after a couple of days of travelling up the postal route from Malibu. Maybe it had slid around the floor of the filthiest mail truck in California, or maybe it had been re-used by the sender after having been stacked in a dusty, damp corner of the garage for a long time. An eternity. Susie was used to getting some very strange mail. After all, it was her sex advice column in On Our Backs—the first women-run erotica magazine, which she helped to found back in the ’80s—that had debuted her alter ego as “Susie Sexpert,” under the banner of which she would go on to become one of the world’s most progressive, provocative and controversial thinkers on sexuality in books like Susie Sexpert’s Sexual State of the Union, Susie Sexpert’s Lesbian Sex World and Big Sex, Little Death: A Memoir. As the editor of

more than 30 anthologies, including the popular Herotica series, she had received hundreds of manuscripts just like this one. But maybe not entirely like this one. As she pulled out the typewritten pages and started to read through them, something about it felt different. Darker. And too close to home. Susie finished reading. “Oh my god,” she thought. “What a psycho.” And then she smiled, rubbing her forefinger absent-mindedly over her lips. “It’s perfect.”

INTO THE BLACK OK, maybe it didn’t unfold with quite so much pulp-fiction melodrama, but that is exactly what Bright remembers thinking the first time she read “Buck Low,” the short story by Tommy Moore that opens Bright’s new fiction anthology Santa Cruz Noir, the latest in a long line of city-specific noir collections from Akashic Books. Though longtime locals will recognize the names of

many of the authors who penned the 20 original stories in it—from Lee Quarnstrom to Peggy Townsend to Elizabeth McKenzie to GT’s own Wallace Baine—Moore is one of four writers in the book who had never been published before, and his debut effort about a murderous druggie lowlife on Santa Cruz’s North Coast blew Bright away. “That was a gift,” says Bright. “In sails almost exactly what you see here. The first draft is so close to this.” Bright’s associate editor Willow Pennell, who grew up in Santa Cruz, couldn’t believe how creepily realistic the story’s narrator seemed. “That was one of the first stories to come in. And I was like, ‘I know that guy. I went to high school with that guy.’ Not because he was a jerk, but just the way he talks about the town. It’s local. He’s from here. Like force-feeding crabs into anemones [a habit the narrator discusses in the story]—that’s a kid that grew up with tide pools.” Santa Cruz Noir is teeming with other local details that will make

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behind ‘Santa Cruz’ noir. Photo shoot thanks to Brielle Machado at Faust Salon and Spa for hair; the Hat Company of Santa Cruz for Bright’s fedora; and Carlos de la Cruz of Kiss the Past Antiques for jewelry. PHOTO: KEANA PARKER

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | JUNE 6-12, 2018

WICKED CITY Susie Bright is the mastermind

17


SANTA CRUZ GOES DARK

“There were a couple of times when we got a manuscript and I said, ‘Oh you’re so sweet, it ends happily! No. Go back and break my heart.’ And they were like, ‘OK.’ Then they’d come back and we’d be like, ‘Whoa.’” — SUSIE BRIGHT

JUNE 6-12, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

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readers do similar double takes. It’s divided into three sections, the first of which is called “Murder Capital of the World,” as if to put any question of when Santa Cruz’s notorious serial killer lore is going to come up immediately to rest. Each story is set in a different neighborhood in Santa Cruz County—and not just the more obvious settings like Seabright, Mission Street, UCSC, Pacific Avenue, Aptos and Watsonville, but also Bear Creek Road, Grant Park, Soquel Hills, the Circles, Seacliff and Mount Hermon, among others. “I knew what would be more intriguing would be getting neighborhoods that not everybody knows about,” says Bright. “I explained to the publisher that this is not going to be Santa Cruz city limits, this is going to be countywide. The fact that the book begins in Davenport and works all the way down to San Juan Road on the borderline is extremely pleasing to me.” She also found endless amusement in the way these dark and twisted crime stories subvert the shiny, happy conventional narrative of Santa Cruz. “I probably laughed a little bit too much,” she admits. “Partly it’s because it’s tweaking the tourist information brochure. It’s not like, ‘Vacation in Santa Cruz!’ So I have to have my evil laughter. But also it’s

just that these characters are real. We’ve met them; we know them. They’re our families, they’re our friends and neighbors. And one way this is an interesting looking glass is that I think Santa Cruz is so often portrayed as a quirky utopia. Who’s seen beyond that? I’m just trying to think of who’s written about Santa Cruz in more sensitive or vulnerable or exposing ways. You don’t see it.” Bright credits Ariel Gore—who wrote the book’s second story, “Whatever Happened to Skinny Jane?”—with giving her the best summary definition of noir as a genre: “Often the narrator has her own agenda. The darker twist. Moral ambiguity. More cynicism. More fatalism. And the femme fatale, even if she’s Mother Nature herself.” At the narrative core of Gore’s story is the most widely known element of Santa Cruz’s dark side, possibly the very person who first made people realize Santa Cruz had a dark side at all: “Co-Ed Killer” Edmund Kemper. For a figure so famous, Gore wanted to find a new and different approach. “My mom worked on Death Row in San Quentin,” says Gore, “so she was haunted by serial killers. I wanted to look at it that way—how people were haunted by [what Kemper did]— rather than tell his story.” The short story focuses on a modern-day couple who become obsessed with Kemper, and takes

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SANTA CRUZ GOES DARK

CRIMINAL MINDS Three ‘Santa Cruz Noir’ authors, clockwise from top left: Tommy Moore, Ariel Gore and Dillon Kaiser.

JUNE 6-12, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

<18

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some crazy twists and turns. Gore wasn’t similarly obsessed with his legend, but she was affected by Santa Cruz’s reputation as a magnet for serial killers—although maybe not as affected as she should have been. “In the ’80s when I lived in Santa Cruz, we still hitchhiked, even though those guys had ruined it. We were stupid teenagers,” she says. Gore hadn’t written anything in a noir style until she contributed a piece to the Portland Noir collection. But she admits she’s gotten hooked on it, and is now editing a Santa Fe Noir book. For Santa Cruz Noir, she told Bright she only had one stipulation. “I told her, ‘I’ve got dibs on the Jury Room,’ she says, referring to Kemper’s famous hangout spot of choice. “That was my only thing.”

SECRET HISTORIES The Jury Room does play a pivotal role in Gore’s story, and she also drops references to Food Not Bombs serving meals downtown and Halloween at the Catalyst, among other things. Santa Cruz Noir features a lot of local touchstones like these—every dot from Santa Cruz’s designation as a “nuclear-free zone” to sign dancers on Mission Street gets connected over the course of the collection. Some bits of local history that come up are downright startling. How many people know, for instance, that Santa Cruz County was the center of cockfighting culture in the 1950s? That fact is a central point in Lou Mathews’ “Crab Dinners,” one of the anthology’s short stories that most closely

echoes the classic noir fiction of authors like Raymond Chandler and James M. Cain. In Mathews’ story, a mysterious woman walks into a detective agency in Seascape looking for help locating her father, a popular Chinese chef named Leonard Wong who spends most of his time outside the kitchen gambling on cockfights. Mathews—who teaches fiction writing and lit for the UCLA Extension Writer’s Program and is the author of the acclaimed novel L.A. Breakdown, about SoCal street racing in the ’60s—graduated from UCSC in 1973. He lived in Santa Cruz for more than a decade, and wrote for papers here like Sundaze and Good Times (which is referenced in “Crab Dinners”). He says the Chef Wong character is based on a real Santa Cruz County celebrity chef, Francis Tong.

“He introduced Szechwan cuisine to Santa Cruz County,” says Mathews from his home in Los Angeles. “He was a talented guy, but he was also an inveterate gambler.” The closing story of the collection, “It Follows Until It Leads” by Dillon Kaiser, tells the story of a Mexican immigrant who got caught up in the drug trade in his native country, and—like so many a noir protagonist—foolishly thinks he can leave his violent history behind him. He builds a new life in Watsonville, but when he discovers that his son is keeping a gun to style himself as a tough guy at Watsonville High, things begin to unravel. The story culminates in a gutwrenching conclusion, but besides its power as a piece of hardboiled crime fiction, it also sheds some light on how the influence of the drug cartels

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SANTA CRUZ GOES DARK

“In the ’80s when I lived in Santa Cruz, we still hitchhiked, even though those guys had ruined it. We were stupid teenagers.” — ARIEL GORE <20 reaches into field work and other corners of the immigrant Mexican community in South County. “It’s something that’s huge in Watsonville,” says Kaiser, who grew up there, and graduated from Watsonville High. “But the majority of Santa Cruz County doesn’t see it.”

JUNE 6-12, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

FIRST BLOOD

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Kaiser is another one of Santa Cruz Noir’s first-time authors. At the time that Bright was accepting submissions, he was working at Bookshop Santa Cruz, and was encouraged by his fellow staffers and writers Richard M. Lange and Aric Sleeper to enter his story. He says working with Bright as an editor was a revelation; though she worked with him on many changes, she had a way of understanding his vision and never compromising it. “I never felt like anything was being taken away from the essence of what I wanted it to be,” he says. For the fiction veterans, Bright simply drew on her long lists of contacts. “She knows everybody,” says Pennell. “She knows people with lots of other contacts. She just put out the Bat Signal.” She connected with Mathews, for instance, through their mutual friend Colin Wilson, author of the 1960s novel-slash-anthropologyclass phenomenon Crazy February. Mathews, in turn, introduced her to Moore, a Santa Cruz expat now doing film and video production out of Malibu who had literally no footprint in the lit world. “They said, ‘We really like your story, but we can’t find anything about you online,’” remembers Moore. “And that’s because there isn’t anything.”

Still, Bright found him, and as he worked with her on “Buck Low,” he was impressed by the fact that whenever he would want to take something out, thinking it might be too extreme, she would be the one who’d want to keep it in. In general, Bright says, one of the hardest things about working with authors was getting them to go as dark as the genre required. “They’re all people who have read a lot and watched a lot of blackand-white noir movies. So it wasn’t like I had to say ‘this is n-o-i-r,’ it wasn’t that basic. But thinking about existential loss, a lack of neat conclusions, the fear and mistrust, the femme fatale, it ain’t gonna end cute. That kind of thing,” she says. “There were a couple of times when we got a manuscript and I said, ‘Oh you’re so sweet, it ends happily! No. Go back and break my heart.’ And they were like, ‘OK.’ Then they’d come back and we’d be like, ‘Whoa.’ I mean, it was there all along.” “I think Jill Wolfson’s a good example,” Pennell says. “Because she writes teen books, and she just wasn’t ready for anybody to die. Somebody had to die. And she sure ran with that.” Other established authors were happy to oblige, like Vinny Hanson, a celebrated author in the “cozy mystery” genre known for its gentle and lighthearted approach to crime. “I was saying to Vinny, ‘Are you ready for everything to go very bad, and for your protagonist to have no moral compass?’” remembers Bright. “And she was like ‘Oh, yes.’”

A TIME FOR NOIR “Many people have asked me: do you think noir fits a certain moment that we’re in?’” says Bright. “And


SANTA CRUZ GOES DARK I’m like, ‘Well, I’ve never been in a moment where it didn’t feel right.” Certainly, though, there is plenty of relevance in this time of fakenews hysteria and reactionary backlash for a genre that features criminal antiheroes and no end of moral ambiguity. Bright sees something deeper, too, at a local level. “The famous noir films like The Big Sleep came post-World War II, but the literature came out of the Depression, and out of the sense of ‘nobody gives a damn about you, and nobody is coming to rescue you,’” she says. “The class conflict in Santa Cruz County today, which explodes into ethnic and community identities and localism identities of all kinds, is as strong today as it ever was, and so is that sense of ‘does anybody give a damn about these people?’ The working class voice of Santa Cruz in our book is something that is undeniable.” All of the heavy themes aside, though, the book is escapist crime fiction at heart, and a lot of fun for fans of the genre. It’s clear that the people behind it enjoyed making

it that way—especially Bright, who has a charming and hilarious enthusiasm for even the most obscure elements of putting together this collection. “I love chapter ordering. It’s like, ‘now let the melody unfold.’ I feel like you want to be bookended by two killer stories, pardon the pun, and in between you want these different emotional peaks, humor, being knocked sideways. The only part that was hard was the suspense of whether we’d get all our neighborhoods covered, and then having too many good stories, and the pain of telling somebody who’s just fabulous ‘we couldn’t include you this time.’ I’ll never get over that,” she says. The stories she wanted to publish but didn’t have room for could fill an entire second volume, says Bright. “I anticipate that in a small town like this, people who don’t see their story in here will be like, ‘Did you have to fuck Susie Bright to be in here?’ No … unfortunately! There were no sexual favors exchanged,” she says. “Maybe I’ll do a book like that in the future.”

‘SANTA CRUZ NOIR’ EVENTS There will be a number of events over the next few months around Santa Cruz Noir. The book’s launch, featuring authors, performance and signing, will be Tuesday, June 19, at 7 p.m. at Bookshop Santa Cruz, 1520 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz.

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There will be a “Latinx Santa Cruz Noir” writing workshop at noon on Saturday, Oct. 13, at the Museum of Art and History, 705 Front St., Santa Cruz. First Friday on Oct. 5 will feature Noir Shadow Puppets for all ages at 5 p.m. at MAH. A Santa Cruz Noir “Murder in the Stacks” Clue game for all ages will be held at 11 a.m. on Sunday, Oct. 21, at MAH.

2647 41st Ave, Soquel (Top of 41st Ave., at Highway 1) 831.464.2228 sc41.com

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | JUNE 6-12, 2018

The first library author talk for Santa Cruz Noir will be at 2 p.m. on Saturday, June 30, at the Santa Cruz Public Library - Scotts Valley Branch, 251 Kings Valley Road, Scotts Valley. The second is 6 p.m. on Thursday, July 12, at the Santa Cruz Public Library - Aptos Branch, 7695 Soquel Drive, Aptos.

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LITERATURE

RUN WITH IT Peggy Townsend’s new thriller ‘See Her Run’ comes out this week.

PHOTO: CAROLYN KLEIN LAGATTUTA

JUNE 6-12, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Burying the Lede

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Santa Cruz journalist Peggy Townsend brings her reporter’s instincts to some unsettling crime fiction BY WALLACE BAINE

T

he only thing missing from novelist Peggy Townsend’s new thriller See Her Run is a trigger warning. So here goes: If you’re looking for a sweet little whodunit that could have

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MUSIC Which one of the Mattson 2 is the evil twin, though? P26

“Ask any reporter who’s worked long enough,” begins one passage, “and they can tell you about the slideshow in their head: The dead man whose arms have been chainsawed from his body, the

skeletal remains of an eight-year-old girl who’d been chained in a closet and starved to death by her mentally ill mother. The body of a teenager in an alley with a needle in her arm.” Townsend was one of the most

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LITERATURE

promising career. Aloa’s selfloathing is stronger than any sense of recrimination from the outside world, so she lives a ghostly life with the only family she has, a collection of friendly misfits at a North Beach dive bar near her home. Aloa gets a chance to get back in the journalism game when she receives a call from an old flame, a wealthy tech entrepreneur running a respected news website. The story is an investigation into the death of a young woman, a trained athlete whose body was found in the Nevada desert and ruled a suicide. Aloa is not eager to take on the assignment, but eventually, with the help of a motley tribe of conspiracy-addled hippie burnouts called the Brain Farm, she jumps into a mystery that eventually reaches halfway around the world and into the highest levels of corporate misbehavior. The North American publication of See Her Run got a boost from promising early numbers in Australia and the U.K. and a glowing review in Kirkus. (The book is also available in audio.) Townsend, who now works as a writer for UCSC, says that she’s just finished her second installment in the Aloa Snow series, to be published in June 2019. And she’s set for teaching a workshop in detective fiction at this summer’s Catamaran Writing Conference in Pebble Beach. As for the permeable membrane that separates nonfiction from fiction, Townsend is not ready to declare she’s switched teams. “I like them both,” she says. “I just like figuring out human stories and what makes people tick.” The current chaos in the San Francisco housing market is a major subtheme in See Her Run, and Townsend promises that she’ll continue to make the city a central preoccupation in the series. “I have an idea for book three already,” she says. “And I still love [writing about] San Francisco. There’s just so much history to discover. Even now, the parallels with times past are really striking. It has a lot of possibilities I’ll continue to explore.” After a pause, she laughs. “Unless I can find a way to set it in Hawaii.”

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prominent names in Santa Cruz journalism for her 30-plus years as a reporter and editor for the Santa Cruz Sentinel. Until she left the newspaper in 2007, she was the Sentinel’s most illuminating feature writer, specializing in hard-nosed but empathetic portraits of people in the throes of struggle, be it homelessness, illness or tragedy. But before all that, back in the ’70s and ’80s, she covered the cops/ court beat, a job that’s not for the emotionally fragile. “I covered murders and murder trials,” says Townsend in the Pleasure Point home she shares with her husband, longtime former Aptos High head football coach Jamie Townsend. “In that job, I became really familiar with how detectives work, how police work, what happens in an autopsy, what a medical examiner would look for. I’ve seen things that as a civilian I would turn away from in horror. But as a reporter, you look at it in a whole different way—clinical, studied, looking for details.” All those chops have been brought to bear in Townsend’s first foray into fiction. By coincidence, the publication this month of See Her Run comes at the same time as the new anthology Santa Cruz Noir (see cover story, page 16), which includes Townsend on its roster of contributing writers. Her Santa Cruz Noir story, titled First Peak, is an eerie, quasi-supernatural take on the housing pressures taking place in Townsend’s neighborhood. But in See Her Run, Townsend wanted to get away from Santa Cruz. The book is set in tech-happy modern-day San Francisco. “It’s almost uber-California,” she says of San Francisco. “There’s just so much history, so much creativity, so much change, especially now. It mirrors the whole state and the frontier idea, being on the edge of so many things.” The novel’s protagonist is Aloa Snow, a haunted former newspaper reporter trying to outrun both an eating disorder and a crippling sense of shame from being caught fabricating sources in a story, a mistake that torpedoed a once

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MUSIC

OH BROTHER, WHERE AREN’T THOU? The Mattson 2 play two nights in Santa Cruz this week.

Twin Powered JUNE 6-12, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

The bond between Mattson 2 duo is biological

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J

onathan Mattson started providing a beat for his twin brother Jared about eight weeks after conception, a steady pulse that in one form or another has propelled their relationship onto international stages. It wasn’t until their mid-teens that they introduced the rest of the world to their preternatural rhythmic bond, and by that time Jonathan had expanded his rhythmic arsenal from the cardiac to the trap set, accompanying his brother’s turbo-charged electric guitar. What began in utero has evolved into Southern California’s avant-surf-jazz combo known as the Mattson 2, a mighty duo that generates a shimmering multilayered sound with Jared’s looped bass lines and chiming riffs.

The Mattsons bring their dynamic combo to Michael’s On Main on Thursday, and return Friday with Oakland guitar great Calvin Keys, an acid jazz patriarch esteemed by jazz legends like Pat Metheny and Ahmad Jamal. The identical twin brothers’ musical connection flows from “sharing the same DNA strands,” says Jared, speaking by phone from the family’s San Diego County ranch. “It’s the way we were designed and brought into this world. We communicate with this heightened level and use our twinship to our advantage.” Nature may have given them a boost in non-verbal communication, but the brothers have also been nurtured by some remarkable musicians. While earning Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in music

BY ANDREW GILBERT

from UC San Diego and UC Irvine, respectively, they studied with heavyweights like inventive trombonist/composer Michael Dessen, Silk Road Ensemble shakuhachi maestro Kojiro Umezaki, and flutist and Afro-futurist visionary Nicole Mitchell. “We had all these amazing resources to dive into,” Mattson says. “Nicole Mitchell said, ‘What I do is very similar to what you could be doing, mixing the known and the unknown.’” The brothers connected with Calvin Keys through his classic 1971 debut album Shawn-Neeq, which was reissued by Tompkins Square Records on vinyl in 2012. Though obsessed with the album, they didn’t realize that Keys was still very active on the Bay Area jazz scene

until visiting a cousin in the East Bay who happened to mention a regular jam session at Oakland’s now defunct 57th Street Gallery that the guitarist led for years. This spring, the Mattson 2 spent several months on the road opening for the popular Thai-inflected psychedelic funk trio Khruangbin. When the tour hit the Fillmore for two nights last month, the brothers invited Keys to come by and check them out. Duly impressed, Keys readily agreed to join them in playing the music from Shawn-Neeq track for track. “I like the energy they had, and they sure get a lot of music out of that duo,” says Keys, 75. “The drummer Jonathan is a monster. It’s going to be interesting to see how we come up with something. ShawnNeeq was written for my niece when she was like a week old, and we tried to capture the beauty of bringing a newborn baby into the household.” Born and raised in Omaha, Nebraska, Keys spent most of the 1960s on the road playing with various organ combos on the Midwest chitlin circuit. A rising force on the L.A. jazz scene in the early 1970s when he connected with Black Jazz, Keys created a soul jazz touchstone marked by his warm tone and slinky phrasing. Shortly after Shawn-Neeq’s release, Keys hit the road with Ray Charles on a Norman Granz-produced tour with the Count Basie Orchestra and the Oscar Peterson Trio. After two years with Charles, he honed his pianistic approach during a long stint in piano legend Ahmad Jamal’s quartet. He’s still part of Jamal’s extended musical family, but Keys has thrived as a guitarist’s guitarist, serving as a mentor or beacon for searing players like Mimi Fox, Bruce Forman, and Pat Metheny, who dedicated the tune “Calvin’s Keys” to his fellow Midwesterner on the 2008 album Day Trip (Nonesuch). Keys is “the real deal,” Metheny told me in an interview several years ago, and now the Mattsons are taking their first step into his ravishing musical world. The Mattson 2 perform at 8:30 p.m. on Thursday and 9 p.m. Friday at Michael’s On Main, 2591 S Main St., Soquel. Tickets for each show are $25. 479-9777.


events.ucsc.edu

JUNE 2 018

JOIN US AS W E SHA RE THE EXCIT EMENT OF LE ARNING

Mandel Lecture: Blazars—Nature’s Particle Accelerators JUNE 7, 7:30PM RIO THEATRE FREE ADMISSION

Inquiring into Other Minds

ONGOING EVENTS

JUNE 12, 5PM UC SANTA CRUZ DIGITAL ARTS RESEARCH CENTER (DARC) 108 FREE ADMISSION

Younger Lagoon Reserve Tours

A conversation about experimental music with Professor Amy C. Beal and Charles Amirkhanian, director of Other Minds, in conjunction with the exhibit Inquiring into Other Minds curated by graduate students in the Center for Archival Research and Training.

Dr. Jedidah Isler, the first African American woman to receive a Ph.D. in astrophysics from Yale, discusses blazars—supermassive, hyperactive black holes that are able to “spin up” streams of nearby charged particles moving at 99.9% of the speed of light.

JUNE 7, 10, 21, 10:30AM SEYMOUR MARINE DISCOVERY CENTER FREE WITH ADMISSION TO THE CENTER

A 90-minute, behind-the-scenes hiking tour. Younger Lagoon Reserve features a diverse coastal habitat and is home to birds of prey, migrating sea birds, bobcats, and other wildlife.

FOREST (for a thousand years)

Jennifer Egan: Manhattan Beach

Open Studios and Print Sale

JUNE 7, 7PM PEACE UNITED CHURCH $7–$20/PERSON

JUNE 8, NOON–4PM UC SANTA CRUZ ART DEPARTMENT FREE ADMISSION

Bookshop Santa Cruz and the UC Santa Cruz Humanities Institute present Pulitzer Prize–winning author Jennifer Egan for a reading and signing of her novel, Manhattan Beach.

Featuring student artwork in a variety of media. Prints available for purchase via cash or check.

THROUGH JUNE 30 TUES–FRI 12–5PM SAT–SUN 10AM–5PM UC SANTA CRUZ ARBORETUM & BOTANIC GARDEN $0–$5/PERSON

Social Documentation Thesis Screening

FOREST (for a thousand years...), the beguiling and uncanny audio installation by renowned Canadian artists Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller.

JUNE 13, 7PM DEL MAR THEATRE FREE ADMISSION

Social Documentation graduate student thesis documentaries represent the culmination of two years of intensive work in the art of documentary media, research and analysis, and nonfiction storytelling.

Fire & Grace & Ash Shakespeare to Go: Romeo and Juliet JUNE 8, 9AM AND 10:30AM UC SANTA CRUZ SECOND STAGE FREE ADMISSION

Shakespeare to Go presents its final 50-minute performances of Romeo and Juliet.

LE ARN MORE AT

JUNE 8, 7:30PM UC SANTA CRUZ MUSIC CENTER RECITAL HALL $5–$20/PERSON

William Coulter (guitar), Edwin Huizinga (violin), and Ashley Broder (mandolin) perform original compositions and premiere Partita Americana, a blend of J.S. Bach with traditional and contemporary American folk tunes.

events.ucsc.edu

JUNE 16, 10AM–2PM UC SANTA CRUZ ARBORETUM & BOTANIC GARDEN $45–$60/PERSON PLUS MATERIALS

Ceate prints inspired by nature, carving traditional blocks, and relief printing with flowers and leaves. Limited to 15 participants.

UPCOMING EVENTS JUNE 14–17

Commencements JULY 15–21

Dickens Universe Conference AUGUST 19

Farm to Fork Dinner

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | JUNE 6-12, 2018

Nature Craft Workshop: “Nature’s Prints”

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CALENDAR

GREEN FIX

See hundreds more events at santacruz. com.

WORLD OCEANS DAY WITH SAVE OUR SHORES June 8 is World Oceans Day—a time to recognize the dire impact of climate change on our seas. In celebration of the big blue, Save Our Shores is co-hosting a screening of the Sea of Life documentary, which focuses on the perils faced by the marine ecosystem, and the positive things that we can do to help. Following the documentary, there will be a discussion panel of local ocean experts. Proceeds benefit Save Our Shores. INFO: 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 6. Rio Theatre. 1205 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. 423-8209. riotheatre.com. $15.

ART SEEN

JUNE 6-12, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY SUMMER ART SERIES

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After a successful 2017 debut, the Santa Cruz Museum of Natural History’s summer art series is back for round two. This year’s series will feature one local artist per month, starting off with Tannery artist and Cabrillo College teacher Margaret Niven in June, then naturalist painter Diana Walsworth in July, and photographer Linda Cover in August. The show’s diverse content is inspired by nature and the great outdoors. Museum admission and artist receptions free on First Fridays. INFO: Show runs through August. First Friday receptions 5-7 p.m. on July 6 and Aug. 3. Santa Cruz Museum of Natural History. 1305 E Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz. 420-6115. santacruzmuseum.org. $4 general admission, $2 students/seniors, free children under 18. Image: Margaret Niven: “Olives”

Free calendar listings in print and online are available for community events. Listings show up online within 24 hours. Submissions of free events and those $15 or less received by Thursday at noon, six days prior to the Good Times publication date, will be prioritized for print (space available). All listings must specify a day, start time, location and price (or ‘free’ if applicable). Listings can be set to repeat every week or month, and can be edited by the poster as needed. Ongoing events must be updated quarterly. It is the responsibility of the person submitting an event to cancel or modify the listing. Register at our website at santacruz.com in order to SUBMIT EVENTS ONLINE. E-mail calendar@goodtimes.sc or call 458.1100 with any questions.

WEDNESDAY 6/6 FOOD & WINE DOWNTOWN SANTA CRUZ FARMERS MARKET In addition to a large variety of farm products, this market offers a great selection of local artisan foodstuffs, delicious baked goods, and lots of options for lunch and dinner. 1:30 p.m. Cedar and Lincoln streets, Santa Cruz. 454-0566. WEDNESDAY NIGHT TRIVIA Grab your smartest group of friends and get I ready for a challenge! We’ve got the rest. Wine. Beer. Cider. Tapas. 8-10 p.m. Cantine Wine Pub, 8050 Soquel Drive, Aptos. cantinewinepub.com.

HEALTH B12 HAPPY HOUR Come and get your Happy Hour B12 shot. Your body needs B12 to create energy and is not well absorbed from the diet or in capsule form. Everyone can benefit from a B12 shot. After B12 injections many patients feel a natural boost in energy. 3-6 p.m. Santa Cruz Naturopathic Medical Center, 736 Chestnut St., Santa Cruz. 477-1377 or scnmc.com. $29/$17. B12 HAPPY HOUR B12 deficiencies are common, as the vitamin is used up by stress, causing fatigue, depression, anxiety, insomnia and more. Not well absorbed in the gut, B12 injections can be effective in helping to support energy, mood, sleep, immunity, metabolism and stress resilience. Come get a discounted shot from 1:30-4:30 p.m. Thrive Natural Medicine, 2840 Park Ave., Soquel. thrivenatmed.com/b12-injections or 515-8699. $15.

THURSDAY 6/7 CLASSES REGIONAL SPANISH COOKING CLASS: PAELLA Take a culinary trip to Spain and learn to prepare traditional paella and pair it with Spanish red wine. Paella is a mix of Spanish rice, vegetables, meat, seafood, and aromatic spices. Enjoy this delicious dish in class along with paired wine. 6-8 p.m. New Leaf Market, 1101 Fair Ave., Santa Cruz.

SATURDAY 6/9 HOME/WORK THIRD ANNIVERSARY PARTY Maintaining a small business is no easy feat, and one of Santa Cruz’s most beloved home goods stores, Home/Work, knows it. The shop is celebrating three years in the community, and in an effort to celebrate and uplift other local artists and businesses, they asked over 15 locals to create work that represents what Santa Cruz means to them. The final works will be on display at the store’s third-anniversary party. There will also be cocktails and trunk shows from Blackbird Dagger jewelry, and local chocolatier Tiny House Chocolate. INFO: 2-6 p.m. Home/Work. 1100 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. 316-5215. shophomework.com. Free. Image: Miranda Powell.

newleaf.com. $45/$40.

FOOD & WINE

SPECIAL ARMCHAIR TRAVEL AND AUTHOR TALK What would you do if you could do anything in the world? Alesa Lightbourne’s son asked her this question, and two months later she was teaching in Kurdish Iraq. Her book, The Kurdish Bike, is based on her true story, especially friendships with women in a local village. 10:30 a.m. La Selva Beach Library, 316 Estrella Ave., La Selva Beach. santacruzpl.org. Free.

PLANT AND DRINK Local florist Cheri Lane presents Fancy Plants. Cheri will provide instruction and all materials needed to create this beautiful galvanized tin with six succulents and river rocks. Grab a bite, a cocktail, and get ready to be creative while laughing with friends. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Bruno’s Bar and Grill, 230G Mount Hermon Road, Scotts Valley. brunosbarandgrill.com.


CALENDAR ASTRONOMY ON TAP Astronomy on Tap is coming to Santa Cruz! Astronomy on Tap is a monthly gathering of space enthusiasts, professional astronomers, and anyone with a general curiosity about things otherworldly … all over delicious beer. 6:30 p.m. New Bohemia Brewing Co., 1030 41st. Ave., Santa Cruz. facebook.com/AstroUCSC. Free.

HEALTH B12 HAPPY HOUR B12 helps support energy, mood, sleep, immunity, metabolism and stress resilience. Since B12 is not absorbed well during digestion, and all B vitamins are depleted by stress, most Americans are deficient. Having B12 in the form of an injection bypasses the malabsorption problem, and people often feel an immediate difference. Every Thursday morning, we offer discounted vitamin B12 by walk-in or appointment. 9 a.m.-Noon. Thrive Natural Medicine, 2840 Park Ave., Soquel. thrivenatmed.com or 515-8699. $15.

OUTDOOR SKYLINE TO THE SEA BACKPACKING ADVENTURE Hike spectacular ridgelines, old-growth redwood forests, to sandy shores with our knowledgeable team of backcountry naturalists. This three-night, four-day outing from Castle Rock to Waddell State Beach takes you on the legendary journey that has been a favorite of backpackers for 40 years. 9 a.m. Big Basin Redwoods State Park, 21600 Big Basin Way, Boulder Creek. Parks. ca.gov. $300.

FRIDAY 6/8 ARTS

‘JAVI’S HOME’ Come explore Javi’s new home! Puppets, masks, and music set the stage for this hour-long children’s show where you meet Javi, a shy little boy in foster care, and his two new moms as they adjust to life as a new family. 7 p.m. Broadway Playhouse, 526 Broadway, Santa Cruz.

TOXIC TOBACCO: WORLD OCEANS DAY ART PROJECTS AT THE MAH Cigarette butts are the number one litter item on California streets and beaches. In honor or World Oceans Day, join the Santa Cruz County Tobacco Education Coalition to have fun, get messy, and learn how you can support efforts to get rid of toxic cigarette butts. Draw. Write. Paint. Make art that makes a difference. 5-8 p.m. Santa Cruz MAH, 705 Front St., Santa Cruz. santacruzmah.org. Free. NIGHT MARKET It’s time for our monthly Night Market. Held on the second Friday of every month. Come out for this deliciously exciting evening of local food, craft cocktails and live music, all with about a dozen different food vendors. You won’t want to miss out. 4-9 p.m. Santa Cruz Food Lounge, 1001 Center St., Santa Cruz. scfoodlounge.com.

Japanese Cultural Fair 32nd Anniversary

Saturday, June 9 11am-6pm Free Admission Mission Plaza Park Santa Cruz jcfsantacruz.org

FOOD & WINE WATSONVILLE FARMERS MARKET This market is in the heart of the famously bountiful Pajaro Valley. Peaceful and family-oriented, the Latino heritage of this community gives this market a “mercado” feel. 2-7 p.m. 200 Main St., Watsonville.

(for more info) email information@jcfsantacruz.org

LOCAL BY LOCALS Every Friday we’re filling our halls and hearts with live music as well as creating craft cocktails and pouring local wines and beers. All made locally. Come celebrate the goodness created in Santa Cruz. 3-6 p.m. Hotel Paradox, 611 Ocean St., Santa Cruz. 425-7100 or hotelparadox.com.

HEALTH VITAMIN B12 FRIDAY Every Friday is B12 Happy Hour at Thrive Natural Medicine. B12 improves energy, memory, mood, immunity, sleep, metabolism and stress resilience. Come on down for a discounted shot and start your weekend off right! Walk-ins only. 3-6 p.m. Thrive Natural Medicine, 2840 Park Ave., Soquel. thrivenatmed.com/b12injections or 515-8699. $15.

MUSIC DIRTY CELLO AT ABBOTT SQUARE Enjoy high-energy music from Dirty Cello. Sip drinks and eat dinner at Abbott Square Market. Explore art and history at the Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History. 6:30 p.m. Abbott Square, Cooper St., Santa Cruz. abbottsquare.org/eventslist/. Free.

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SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | JUNE 6-12, 2018

SECOND FRIDAY Artist Reception featuring a local artist and musician! This Second Friday musician, Katie Ekin, will fill Solaire with her melodic voice. Trust us, you will walk away rejuvenated! Couple that with our locally inspired beverages and Second Fridays will become your favorite time of the month with us. 6-9 p.m. Hotel Paradox, 611 Ocean St., Santa Cruz. 600-4530 or hotelparadox.com.

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SATURDAY 6/9

ARTS GERBERA FESTIVAL 2018 Monterey Bay Greenhouse Growers Open House presents the ninth annual Kitayama Brothers Gerbera Festival. The event includes greenhouse tours, potted Gerbera plants and cut flowers for sale, flower arranging demonstrations, a farmers market, tacos, local beer and a PopUp ParkStore. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Kitayama Brothers Farm, 481 San Andreas Road, Watsonville. thatsmypark.org. Free/ Donation. FARMERS MARKET WORKSHOP (ACRYLICS) Roll up your sleeves and have fun learning basic techniques of acrylic painting. We will create a series of small paintings of items found at the farmers market. Focus will be on materials, color, light, shape and line. No experience is necessary. I will paint along with you demonstrating each step of the process and eliminating “painting anxiety.” 9:30 a.m. Santa Cruz Art League, 526 Broadway, Santa Cruz. scal.org. $45.

CLASSES DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT ADDITIONAL PUBLIC HEARINGS

JUNE 6-12, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

UC SANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING WEST PROJECT

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Members of the public and public agencies are invited to learn about the Student Housing West Project and provide oral comments on the Draft EIR. Merrill Cultural Center, UC Santa Cruz Main Campus Wednesday, June 6, 2018, 5–7 PM Louden Nelson Center, 301 Center Street, Santa Cruz Thursday, June 7, 2018, 6:30–8:30 PM For more information, call 459-3732 or visit: ches.ucsc.edu/housing/studenthousingwest. The Draft EIR is posted on the web at: ppc.ucsc.edu/planning/EnvDoc.html.

Furniture. Building Materials. Household Goods. Appliances 719 Swift St, Santa Cruz . 831.824.4704 Open to the public Wed - Sat 9am to 5pm habitatmontereybay.org/restore

SHRINKING SHORES The City of Santa Cruz and its local partner organizations will be hosting an informational event about sea-level rise at Cowells Beach. We will start off the day with a beach clean-up at Cowells Beach. 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Cowell’s Beach, Santa Cruz. Free.

FOOD & WINE APTOS FARMERS MARKET AT CABRILLO COLLEGE Voted Good Times best farmers market in Santa Cruz County. With more than 90 vendors, the Aptos Farmers Market offers an unmatched selection of locally grown produce and specialty foods. 8 a.m.-Noon, Saturdays, Cabrillo College. montereybayfarmers.org or akeller@montereybayfarmers.org. Free. WESTSIDE FARMERS MARKET The Westside Farmers Market takes place every week at the corner of Highway 1 and Western Drive, situated on the northern edge of Santa Cruz’s greenbelt. This market serves the communities of the west-end of Santa Cruz including Bonny Doon, North Coast, UCSC Campus and is a short trip from downtown. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Mission Street and Western Drive, Santa Cruz. 454-0566.


CALENDAR

Louden Nelson Community Center and SureThing Productions Present

SATURDAY 6/9 32ND ANNUAL JAPANESE CULTURAL FAIR Last year’s Japanese Cultural Fair (JCF) was almost their last. Because JCF didn’t get a number of anticipated grants this year, they faced a budget shortfall of $6,000. But this year’s fair will still happen, thanks to donations and sponsor support. In fact, the lineup is one of the best yet. Taiko, martial arts demonstrations, folk dancing, tea ceremonies, and kimono workshops are just a few of the live events and workshops on the list. INFO: 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Mission Plaza Park. 103 Emmet St., Santa Cruz. jcfsantacruz.org. Free.

SUNDAY 6/10 ARTS

SANTA CRUZ DOWNTOWN ANTIQUE STREET FAIRE Come down and celebrate your love for antiques, collectibles, and vintage treasures. This historic outdoor shopping and social destination promises great finds from dozens of vendors. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Downtown Santa Cruz, Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. downtownsantacruz. com. Free.

AVANT GARDEN ALOHA—A BENEFIT FOR NEWMUSICWORKS NewMusicWorks 39th season climaxes with its most beloved annual event. This year Avant Garden Party goes ALOHA. Come experience a panoramic experience for the senses with a scrumptious buffet of musical genres and performers. Ride on waves of oceanic music, dance and extraordinary cuisine, amid the bucolic gardens of Robert Eberle. 2-6 p.m. 2701 Monterey Ave., Soquel. newmusicworks.org. $38/$20.

OUTDOOR BONNY DOON GARDEN TOUR “Enchanting Gardens in the Mountains” showcases seven magical gardens. Enjoy vintage rose gardens, vegetable, succulent and flower gardens, a bonsai garden, garden sculptures, water features, and much more. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Valley Churches United, 340 Country Estates Drive, Bonny Doon. 336-8258 EXT. 228 or vcum.org. >32

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | JUNE 6-12, 2018

THE CHORAL PROJECT ‘EARTHSONGS: SONG & DANCE’ The Choral Project, the Silicon Valley-based choir, concludes its 22nd season with Earthsongs: Song & Dance. The concert, combining music and movement, features musical theater dancing, swing dancing, and the choir choralography in a theatrical concert marrying sight and sound. 5 p.m. Peace United Church of Christ, 900 High St., Santa Cruz. $25/$10.

MUSIC

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HELPING YOU TO

CALENDAR

ACHIEVE YOUR GOALS

2017

Dr. Juli Mazi is a Naturopathic Doctor, teacher and healer who empowers people of all ages to achieve an optimal and vibrant state of well-being.

The first lesson is free Piano, Didgeridoo, Drums, and More (831) 902-0650 Thomaspedersenmusic.com

Call to schedule a FREE 15 minute consultation! Herbal medicine, homeopathy, nutrition, IV therapy, hydrotherapy, lifestyle counseling. • Hormone Balancing • Digestive Health • Acute Care

FRIDAY 6/8 AND SATURDAY 6/9 44TH ANNUAL UCSC STUDENT PRINT SALE At the UCSC Student Print Sale, print media students get to sell their original artwork and the community gets to support budding artists while collecting beautiful one-of-akind art. Hundreds of original etchings, lithographs, woodcuts, digital prints, handmade books, and more will be on display and available for purchase (cash or check only). This is a unique opportunity to see and purchase high-quality handmade artwork, meet the artists and tour the UCSC arts facilities. The event is free and open to the public—all profits directly benefit the student artists and UCSC printmaking program.

2840 PARK AVE. SOQUEL, CA

831.515.8699 | THRIVENATMED.COM

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT

INFO: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. UCSC Elena Baskin Visual Arts Printmaking Studio, Room G-101. 1156 High St., Santa Cruz. 459-3686. artsites.ucsc.edu/printsale. Free.

JUNE 6-12, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Near 41st and Highway 1

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Open your new office inside a spacious, recently renovated health care clinic with plenty of parking. You need not work in the area of wellness but it would be complementary if you do.

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OPEN HOUSE SUN, JUNE 10, 1-4 8699 Empire Grade Jeannie C. Collins, Broker, License #01266932 (831)428.3135

Call 462.5777

READ US ONLINE AT

North Bay Physical Therapy 9000 Soquel Ave. Ste 101A, Santa Cruz

GoodTimes.SC

MONDAY 6/11

TUESDAY 6/12

ARTS

CLASSES

POETRY OPEN MIC A project of the Legendary Collective, the weekly Santa Cruz Word Church poetry open mic is a community of local writers who recognize the power of spoken word. They gather every Monday for a community writing workshop, then host a 15-slot open mic followed by a different featured poet each week. 4 p.m. Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History, 705 Front St., Santa Cruz. santacruzmah.org. Free.

INSPIRED SUMMER SNACKING Get ideas and inspiration for what to snack on throughout the summer. Try new foods, learn how to keep your blood sugar balanced, and take home delicious, healthy recipes. With Nutrition Consultant and New Leaf team member Madia Jamgochian. 1-2 p.m. New Leaf Market, 1101 Fair Ave., Santa Cruz. 426-1306 or newleaf.com. Free.

CLASSES

ALL THINGS TEA Join Hidden Peak Teahouse founder David Wright for a free tea tasting and discussion on the topic of “All Things Tea.” This is an opportunity to pass through the gate of the Hidden Peak, explore the tastes offered and ask questions about tea history, tradition, health benefits, rituals, and more. 6 p.m. Hidden Peak Teahouse, 1541-C Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. hiddenpeakteahouse.com. Free.

THICH NHAT HANH MEDITATION Santa Cruz Heart Sangha is a meditation group in the Thich Nhat Hanh tradition that meets every Monday. We welcome all to spend with us an hour in silent sitting and walking meditation followed by Dharma sharing. 7-8:45 p.m. Santa Cruz Zen Center, 113 School St., Santa Cruz. Free.

FOOD & WINE


SANTA CRUZ OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE

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1200 Pacific Avenue Ste. 250

+/- 3,463 s.f. $1.65 s.f./month NNN

introducing V-Shape Ultra

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Great, bright, beautiful suite in downtown Santa Cruz’s premier Redtree Plaza building. Over 3,400 s.f. of offices and open spaces with floor-to-ceiling glass, and great build-outs.

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1200 Pacific Ave., Ste. 390 Santa Cruz, CA 95060

831.454.9400 sheldonwiseman.com

THRIFT STORE

Fine handcrafted furniture

2018 CSA

Community Supported Agriculture

“The Carver’s Groove” Custom woodworking, antique care & restoration, architectural feature reproduction. SINCE 1989

ANDREW CHURCH 719 Swift Street #14, Santa Cruz (near Hotline Wetsuits)

831.818.8051

HOUSEWARES, ELECTRONICS, CLOTHING, HARDWARE, BOOKSTORE ———————————————————————————————————————————————————

THIS SATURDAY JUNE 9,10am-3pm Housewares, furniture,clothing and accessories, jewelry, art, sporting goods, hardware, tools, medical equipment, garden items, plus computers,TVs, audio-video, electronics, books, books on CD/tape, CDs/DVDS, vinyl and more. Fill a bag of clothes every Monday, and books every Friday for just $10.

OPEN EVERY DAY 10AM-3PM

Sign up for your share today! Invest in our farm and receive a share of our bounty of Vegetables, Herbs, Strawberries and a Flower Bouquet. shop.homelessgardenproject.org

———————————————————————————————————————————————————

Chanticleer Ave, Santa Cruz: RECYCLING 2710 Open Every Day, 7:30-3:30. Free Drop-off of e-waste, CENTERS appliances, metal, styrofoam (EPS#6) & more. Buena Vista Landfill: Open Mon-Sat, 7:30-3:30

2710 Chanticleer Ave, Santa Cruz 95065 (831)479-1055 greybears.org ———————————————————————————————————————————————————

Healthy Food for Seniors –Volunteer– Donate

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | JUNE 6-12, 2018

Fresh, Local, Certified Organic Produce

1/2OFF SALE

———————————————————————————————————————————————————

33


MUSIC CALENDAR

LOVE YOUR

LOCAL BAND

SHADY REST “Did you ever watch Petticoat Junction?” Shady Rest lead singer Cheryl Rebottaro asks me. Anyone remotely familiar with the show will recognize the band’s name as a reference (as in, the Shady Rest Hotel), and they chose it because of the two founding members’ names. The band originally started with Rebottaro and guitarist Joe Bac. The duo would play covers of the Tedeschi Trucks Band. Originally, they combined their first names, calling themselves “Cheryl Joe.” As new band members got enlisted, they gave them a “Joe” last name (Cheryl Joe, Pat Joe, Mary Joe), like on the show.

JUNE 6-12, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

“I don’t know how I got on this Petticoat Junction kick,” Bac says. “It was Cheryl Joe and the Shady Rest, then we felt bad that the rest of the people were the Shady Rest. So we dropped it. It’s just the Shady Rest.”

34

As more members joined, and the kinds of gigs they were offered changed, so did the song selection. Initially, leaning toward more obscure songs, they started to sprinkle in more hits so that more people would get up and dance. In many of the cases, they chose songs by female singers like Bonnie Raitt, Aretha Franklin and Sheryl Crow, who have a timbre similar to Rebottaro’s. “We had to bring in more recognizable things. Now we’re mixing it up,” Rebottaro says. I think we’re unique because we bring different sounds to the music. It’s the same classic stuff that people are hearing, but we spin it a little.” AARON CARNES INFO: 5 p.m. Friday, June 8. Michael’s on Main, 2591 S Main St., Soquel. Free. 479-9777.

NICKI BLUHM

THURSDAY 6/7 POST-PUNK

ICEAGE Danish post-punkers Iceage got their start a decade ago when the members were still in high school. In the past decade, the group has managed to insert something subtle into their mix of Birthday Party-meets-Bauhaus punk: gentleness. It sounds counter-intuitive, but the Danish rockers pound out guitar-driven songs with the delicacy of a flower falling slowly onto a bed of leaves. Without all of the aggression that normally comes from all-male bands baring their soul, the music catches you off guard in a spectacular way. AC INFO: 8 p.m. Flynn’s Cabaret & Steakhouse, 6275 Hwy. 9, Felton. $15/adv, $20/door. 335-2800.

EXPERIMENTAL

YEEK L.A.’s Yeek has a video for his tune “I’m Not Ready” that’s jam-packed with a lot of culturally potent imagery—everything from aged video footage of kids skateboarding inside of an empty pool to him on stage flying solo with just a mic and working the crowd

into a frenzy.You also see shots of him rocking a guitar punk-rock style. What the hell is this Yeek guy even doing? Let’s just say this video actually downplays the scatterbrain mass-attack of conflicting influences that is in his music. It’s lo-fi indie-pop, kind of rap, sort of R&B, a little bit of punk. Whatever he’s doing, it’s catchy, and is catching on. AC INFO: 9 p.m. Crepe Place, 1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. $12/adv, $14/door. 429-6994.

FRIDAY 6/8 AMERICANA

WILLY TEA TAYLOR Willy Tea Taylor comes through Santa Cruz a lot. He’s not exactly local, but comes from semi-nearby Oakdale— and Santa Cruz loves the kind of Americana-roots-heart-on-the-sleeve music he makes. Two things he’s known for are his epic beard, and his work as the frontman of Good Luck Thrift Store Outfit, which also rolls through town quite a bit. But to catch Willy Tea Taylor as a solo act is to see the singer in a much more intimate setting, and to get a more personal expression via his tender acoustic

side. There are some intensely emotional songs here that will move you to tears if you happen to be a human with a heartbeat. AC INFO: 9 p.m. Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $12/adv, $15/door. 429-4135.

SATURDAY 6/9 ROCK

NICKI BLUHM For years, singer-songwriter Nicki Bluhm and her husband Tim Bluhm were partners in music and in life. In 2015, however, the couple split up. The pain, loneliness and grief of that experience are all over Bluhm’s new album, To Rise You Gotta Fall. Bluhm turned to music to get through her own hard times, and, in turn, she shares her experiences on the album, which was recorded at the legendary Sam Phillips Recording Studio in Memphis. As she says in a trailer video for the record, “I’ve captured all those really intense emotions and put them into songs. If I can help someone else get through their pain, that’s my goal ... Music makes you feel less alone.” CJ INFO: 8 p.m. Moe’s Alley, 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz. $20/adv, $22/door. 479-1854.


MUSIC

BE OUR GUEST BERES HAMMOND

DEEP DARK WOODS

HIP-HOP

SMOKE DZA

INFO: 9 p.m. Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $15/adv, $18/door. 429-4135.

ROCKABILLY

CASH AND KING In 2018, musicians are back to releasing singles online just as previous generations did through seven-inch vinyl records. But to truly grasp what it was like during the fledgling days of rock ’n’ roll, look no further than Cash and King. For one exclusive night, Steven Kent and his band will rage through hit singles from two kings of pop music, Johnny Cash and Elvis Presley. For those of us who

INFO: 8 p.m. Rio Theatre, 1205 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. $28/gen, $40/gold. 423-8209.

MONDAY 6/11 JAZZ

BRIAN BLADE When Brian Blade released his first album with the Fellowship Band in 1998, the protean drummer occupied a singular space in American music—a swirling, grooving vortex that inexorably attracted artists like Bob Dylan and Joni Mitchell as well as powerhouse jazz improvisers like Joshua Redman, Kenny Garrett and Mark Turner. But it was joining saxophone legend Wayne Shorter’s all-star quartet in 2000 that lifted Blade into the jazz pantheon as one of the era’s definitive drummers. All the while he’s kept his love of folk and gospel music as the guiding force in the Fellowship, a passionately lyrical ensemble that released its fifth album last year, Body and Shadow (Blue Note). Blade performs the album’s cast, featuring newcomer Dave Devine on

guitar, and founding members Jon Cowherd (piano and harmonium), Chris Thomas (bass), Myron Waldon (alto sax and clarinet) and Melvin Butler (tenor sax). ANDREW GILBERT INFO: 7 p.m. Kuumbwa Jazz, 320-2 Cedar St., Santa Cruz. $31.50/adv, $36.75/door. 427-2227.

INFO: 9 p.m. Sunday, June 24. Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $25/adv, $30/door. 423-1338. WANT TO GO? Go to santacruz.com/giveaways before 11 a.m. on Friday, June 15 to find out how you could win a pair of tickets to the show.

TUESDAY 6/12 ROOTS

DEEP DARK WOODS An alt-country outfit from Saskatoon, the largest city in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan, Deep Dark Woods is one of the best kept secrets in roots music. Led by frontman Ryan Boldt, the band gracefully merges gothic folk, Appalachian music traditions and rock. The resulting songs are spooky, sad and lovely tales of plagues, murder, prison, loss, death—you know, all the stuff that makes good roots music so compelling. Bridging traditional sounds from across North America with a style that appeals to contemporary music lovers, Deep Dark Woods is an under-appreciated gem of the roots scene. CJ INFO: 8 p.m. Michael’s on Main, 2591 Main St., Soquel. $15. 479-9777.

IN THE QUEUE MONSIEUR PERINE

Latin Grammy winning gypsy jazz outfit. Thursday at Kuumbwa CHRIS TRAPPER

Singer-songwriter out of Boston. Friday at Flynn’s Cabaret KEZNAMDI

Rising star of reggae. Friday at Moe’s Alley LAURENCE JUBER

World-renowned guitarist. Sunday at Michael’s on Main ULI JON ROTH

Metal pioneer and former Scorpions lead guitarist. Tuesday at Catalyst

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | JUNE 6-12, 2018

Born and raised in Harlem, Smoke DZA is a product of ’80s and ’90s hip-hop living in the time of mumble rappers, and still delivering the solid beats and rhymes we deserve. Staying true to the classics of hip-hop that created the genre, he expands on new lyrical horizons and artists—collaborating with the likes of Kendrick Lamar, Schoolboy Q and Joey Bada$$ to create a sound that pushes towards the future while solidifying his roots in what made the music great. MAT WEIR

couldn’t be there from the beginning, this is an affordable time machine to capture the moments we wish we had witnessed. MW

In the 1970s, as rocksteady music made way for reggae, a music subgenre known as lovers rock was born. Popularized by artists like Ken Boothe, Johnny Nash and John Holt, lovers rock combined Chicago and Philly soul with the bass grooves of reggae. In the mid-’70s, Jamaicanborn Beres Hammond emerged as one of the rising stars of the genre, a soulful artist who captured international attention. Peaking in the 1990s, Hammond became one of the genre-defining voices of lovers rock, and remains a giant of Jamaican music. CAT JOHNSON

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LIVE MUSIC

Thursday June 7 - 8/8:30pm $10/15 Colorado Jam Favorites

EMINENCE ENSEMBLE Friday June 8 - 8/9pm $15/20 Live Reggae From Jamaica

KEZNAMDI

+ ONE-A-CHORD & DJ SPLEECE Saturday June 9 - 7/8pm $20/22 ((FolkYEAH!!! Presents)))

NICKI BLUHM

WED

6/6

FRI

6/8

SAT

6/9

Dirty Cello 6:30-9p

THE APPLETON GRILL 410 Rodriguez St, Watsonville

Son De Puebla & Soni- Pan Dulce, Pop Bottle do Cumbiambero 9p Bombers 9p

APTOS ST. BBQ 8059 Aptos St, Aptos

Al Frisby 6-8p

AQUARIUS RESTAURANT Santa Cruz Dream Inn 175 W Cliff Dr, Santa Cruz

SUN

6/10

AC Myles 6-8p

James Murray 6-8p

Lloyd Whitely 1p AC Myles Blues Mechanics 6-8p 6-8p

Jazz Free 7p

Jazz Free 7p

Jazz Free 7p

Comedy Night, ’80s Night Free 8:30p

Live Bands/Club 2000 Live VJ Dancing 9p Free 9p Karaoke Free 9p

Post Punk Dance Floor 9p

Funk Night w/ DJ Ed 9p

Karaoke Free 9p

Comedy Night 9p

Karaoke Free 9p Karaoke 6p-Close

THE GOOD BAD + RYE DAWN

BOARDWALK BOWL 115 Cliff St, Santa Cruz

Karaoke 8p-Close

Karaoke 8p-Close

John Michael Band 9-11:45p

Karaoke 6p-Close

Karaoke 6p-Close

BOCCI’S CELLAR 140 Encinal St, Santa Cruz

Zack Freitas & Hired Guns, When We Met Free 8p

Karaoke Free 9p

Swing Dance $5 5:30p Light 9p

Maximum BRS, Retrograde Soul 9p

SC Jazz Society Free 3:30p, Beat Weekend, DJ Earl Monk

Karaoke 9-12:30a

Karaoke 9-12:30a

TBA 7-10p

Frank Sorci 7-10p

+ STRANGE HOTELS

CAPITOLA WINE BAR 115 San Jose Ave, Capitola

ROYAL JELLY JIVE Saturday June 16 - 8/9pm $25/30

Classic Jamaican Reggae In 3 Part Harmony

THE MIGHTY DIAMONDS

Jon Pheloung 6:30-9:30p

Jul 13 Jul 15 Jul 19 Jul 21 Jul 25 Jul 26 Jul 27 Jul 28 Jul 29 Jul 29 Aug 3 Aug 4 Aug 10 Aug 12 Aug 19

BOOSTIVE, RAINBOW GIRLS BROWNOUT (GRUPO FANTASMA) FLAVIA COELHO + PAPIBA & FRIENDS FLOR DE CAÑA KATDELIC COMMANDER CODY (afternoon) FAREED HAQUE (eve) DREAD MAR I + El Arca & Fayuca WATER TOWER + AUSTIN SHAW NATTALI RIZE + Kelissa NAKED BOOTLEGGERS + COFFEE ZOMBIE B-SIDE PLAYERS ELECTRIC FLAG THE CHINA CATS JAMES MCMURTRY MR VEGAS + DJ SPLEECE NATHAN MOORE + MAGIC IN THE OTHER BOB SCHNEIDER ANDY T w/ ANSON FUNDERBURGH BOMBINO THE ABYSSINIANS DRUNKEN HEARTS + LAUREN WAHL SHAWN MULLINS THE SUBDUDES DAVE ALVIN & JIMMIE DALE GILMORE ALBERT CASTIGLIA (Afternoon) SUPERSUCKERS (Eve) JUNIOR BROWN SHOOTER JENNINGS FREDDIE MCGREGOR ANTHONY GOMES INDIGENOUS

MOESALLEY.COM

1535 Commercial Way Santa Cruz 831.479.1854

Karaoke 8p-Close Comedy w/ Shwa Free 8p

John Michael 3-6p

CATALYST 1011 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz CATALYST ATRIUM 1011 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Stellar Corpses, Willy Tea Taylor, The Ufomammut, White Hills Smoke DZA & Bodega Hillbilly Moon, Explosion Sam Chase & the $10/$13 8:30p Bam $15/$18 8:30p $13/$15 8p Untraditional $12/$15 9p

Jun 17 HOWELLDEVINE Jun 19 Jun 20 Jun 21 Jun 22 Jun 23 Jun 24 Jun 24 Jun 26 Jun 27 Jun 28 Jun 29 Jun 30 Jul 1 Jul 6 Jul 7 Jul 8 Jul 11

6/12

The Box (Goth Night) 9p

Wednesdays Unplugged w/ Monica 9p

BRITANNIA ARMS 110 Monterey Ave, Capitola

TUE

Jimmy Dewrance 6-8p

THE BLUE LOUNGE 529 Seabright Ave, Santa Cruz

((FolkYEAH!!! Presents)))

6/11

Broken Shades 6-8p

Thursday June 14 - 8/8:30pm $7/10

Friday June 15 - 8/9pm $10/15

MON

Tan Of Dreams 7:30-9:30p

Live Bands 9p

Bluegrass & Americana Double Bill

JUNE 6-12, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

6/7

BLUE LAGOON 923 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

+ MAPACHE

36

THU

ABBOTT SQUARE 118 Cooper St, Santa Cruz

the

crepe place open late - EVERY NIGHT!

advance tickets on ticketweb wednesday 6/6

kaz mirblouk w/ day trip and AIMS

Show 9pm $8 door

thursday 6/7 ****** noise pop presents ******

yeek w/ SLOAN

Show 9pm $12 adv. $14 door

friday 6/8

ANNA BURCH

w/ HONYOCK Show 9pm $10 adv. $12 door

saturday 6/9

MISS LONELY HEARTS w/ PETUNIA AND THE VIPERS

Show 9pm $10 adv. $13 door

sunday 6/10

open bluegrass jam free in the garden

TUESDAY 6/12

7 come 11

9 until midnight - $6 cheap wednesday 6/13

****** WESTERN WEDNESDAY #28 ******

MARGO CILKER & BAND w/ WHISKEY WEST

Show 8pm $10 door $7 WITH COWBOY BOOTS

thursday 6/14

BLUE WATER HIGHWAY w/ SPECIAL GUEST Show 9pm $10 door

MIDTOWN SANTA CRUZ 1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz

429-6994

Big Business $12/$14 8:30p

The Skull $12/$15 8p

Uli Jon Roth $20/$23 8:30p


LIVE MUSIC WED

6/6

THU

6/7

FRI

6/8

SAT

6/9

SUN

6/10

MON

6/11

CHAMINADE RESORT 1 Chaminade Ln, Santa Cruz

Hippo Happy Hour 5:30-7:30p

CORK AND FORK 312 Capitola Ave, Capitola

Open Mic Free 7-10p

KPIG Happy Hour 5:30-7:30p

CORRALITOS CULTURAL CENTER 127 Hames Rd., Corralitos

Levi Jack Free 7-10p

Hannah Smalltree & Friends Free 4-7p

Open Mic 7-10p

Acoustic Open Jam 3-5p

Miss Lonely Hearts w/ Anna Burch w/ Honyock Petunia & the Vipers $10/$12 9p $10/$13 9p

Open Bluegrass Jam Free 5-8p

Funk Night ft. 7 Come 11 $6 9p-12a

Live Comedy $7 9p

Stella by Barlight $5 8:30p

CREPE PLACE 1134 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz

Kaz Mirblouk w/ Day Trip and Aims $8 9p

Yeek w/ Sloan Evans $12/$14 9p

CROW’S NEST 2218 E. Cliff Dr, Santa Cruz

Yuji Tojo $3 8p

BBQ Beach Party w/ Sol Nova Soulwise $5 8:30p, Isaac $6 9p & The Haze $5 8:30p

DAV. ROADHOUSE 1 Davenport Ave, Davenport

DON QUIXOTE’S 6275 Hwy 9, Felton

Tsunami $7 9:30p

Chris Trapper w/ AJ Lee & Blue Summit $15/$20 8p

Mofongo Free 7-9p Monsieur Periné $31.50/$36.75 7&9p

SIN SISTERS BURLESQUE Tickets: eventbrite.com

Monday, June 11 • 7 pm

BRIAN BLADE & THE FELLOWSHIP BAND Celebrating twenty years and five albums of sublime, meditative, flowing music. BROKEN SHADOWS WITH TIM BERNE, CHRIS SPEED, REID ANDERSON & DAVE KING Kindred spirits communing over Ornette Coleman and others.

Long Train Runnin’ $15/$20 8p

1/2 PRICE NIGHT FOR STUDENTS! Monday, June 18 • 7 pm

THUMBSCREW WITH MICHAEL FORMANEK, TOMAS FUJIWARA & MARY HALVORSON Filled with musical twists and surging rhythms.

Dave Muldawer Free 2-4p JADe7-9p Sin Sisters Burlesque $20-$40 7:30p

Saturday, June 9 • 8:30 pm

Thursday, June 14 • 7 pm

Mike PZ & Associates Free 8p

GROUND CONTROL COFFEE HOUSE 10 Seascape Village Dr, Aptos

1/2 PRICE NIGHT FOR STUDENTS!

TIM FLANNERY & THE LUNATIC FRINGE Tickets: pulseproductions.net

Blind Rick Free 6:30-8:30p Iceage & Mary Lattimore $15/$20 8p

MONSIEUR PERINÉ Connecting 1930s Paris with the youthful spirit of moderrn-day Bogota.

Sunday, June 10 • 7 pm

Blue w/ Geoff Alan Free 6-9p

THE FISH HOUSE 972 Main St, Watsonville

KUUMBWA JAZZ 320-2 Cedar St, Santa Cruz

6/12

Honeytone 5:30p

CILANTROS 1934 Main St, Watsonville

DISCRETION BREWING 2703 41st Ave, Soquel

TUE

Thursday, June 7 • 7 & 9 pm

Tim Flannery & the Lunatic Fringe $26.50-$36.50 6p

Brian Blade & the Fellowship Band $31.50-$36.75 6p

1/2 PRICE NIGHT FOR STUDENTS! Thursday, June 21 • 7 pm 1011 PACIFIC AVE. SANTA CRUZ 831-429-4135 Wednesday, June 6 • In the Atrium • Ages 21+

UFOMAMMUT • WHITE HILLS

Thursday, June 7 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

HILLBILLY MOON EXPLOSION STELLAR CORPSES Friday, June 8 • In the Atrium • Ages 21+

WILLY TEA TAYLOR THE SAM CHASE & THE UNTRADITIONAL Saturday, June 9 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

SMOKE DZA & BODEGA BAMZ Sunday, June 10 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

BIG BUSINESS

plus Pins Of Light

Monday, June 11 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+ plus Earthride

ULI JON ROTH

Jun 16 Buckethead (Ages 16+) Jun 17 Stars/ Shamir (Ages 16+) Jun 22 Donavon Frankenreiter (Ages 16+) Jun 23 Petty Theft (Ages 16+) Jun 24 Beres Hammond (Ages 16+) Jun 29 Los Tigres Del Norte (Ages 21+) Jun 30 Shwayze & Cisco (Ages 16+) Jul 3 moe. (Ages 21+) Jul 6 Los Cafres (Ages 16+) Jul 7 Foreverland Tribute to Michael Jackson (Ages 16+) Jul 15 Ballyhoo! (Ages 16+) Jul 20 Snow Tha Product (Ages 16+) Jul 25 Rhye (Ages 16+) Aug 4 Femi Kuti (Ages 16+) Aug 9 Yuridia (Ages 16+) Aug 21 Anderson East (Ages 16+) Aug 28 Ben Harper & Charlie Musselwhite (Ages 16+) Aug 29 Mura Masa (Ages 16+) Sep 3 Common Kings (Ages 16+) Sep 6 Neck Deep (Ages 16+)

Unless otherwise noted, all shows are dance shows with limited seating.

Tickets subject to city tax & service charge by phone 877-987-6487 & online

www.catalystclub.com

1/2 PRICE NIGHT FOR STUDENTS! Friday, June 22 • 7 & 9 pm

ACOUSTIC ALCHEMY Beloved practitioners and pioneers of instrumental guitar performance. Monday, June 25 • 7 pm

ERIC REVIS QUARTET WITH KEN VANDERMARK, KRIS DAVIS & CHAD TAYLOR Four luminaries of modern jazz, led by acclaimed bassist/composer Revis. 1/2 PRICE NIGHT FOR STUDENTS! Thursday, June 28 • 7 pm

KUUMBWA SUMMER JAZZ CAMP CONCERT The culminating concert of our ten-day studentjazz camp. FREE!

Friday, June 29 • 7 & 9 pm

CHRISTIAN MCBRIDE’S NEW JAWN A hard-driving, new ensemble from the world-renowned bassist. Unless noted advance tickets at kuumbwajazz.org Dinner served one hour before Kuumbwa prsented concerts. Premium wines & beer available. All ages welcome.

320-2 Cedar St | Santa Cruz 831.427.2227 kuumbwajazz.org

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | JUNE 6-12, 2018

THE SKULL

Tuesday, June 12 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

LIVE & LOCAL: GARY MEEK QUINTET Monterey’s own saxophonist, celebrating a new album of original compositions.

37


LIVE MUSIC

International Music Hall and Restaurant FINE MEXICAN AND AMERICAN FOOD

FLYNN’S CABARET AND STEAKHOUSE will be presenting its Grand Opening soon! Farm-to-table, non-GMO with 40% Vegan, Vegetarian menu. Thu Jun 7

Iceage + Mary Lattimore Danish Punk Rock Band + American Classically Trained Harpist

$15 adv./$20 door Dance – ages 21+ 8pm Fri Jun 8

Chris Trapper w/AJ Lee & Blue Summit Grammy-nominated Singer/Songwriter + Local Bluegrass Favorites

Sat Jun 9

$15 adv./$15 door Dance – ages 21+ 7:30pm Thu Jun 14

Pat Hull w/Dan Too and MAJK A triple threat, not to be missed!

$15 adv./$15 door Dance – ages 21+ 7:30pm Fri Jun 15

Loose with the Truth w/Franklin’s Tower Come celebrate the music of the Grateful Dead

$15 adv./$18 door Dance – ages 21+ 8pm Sat Jun 16

Foreigner Unauthorized Undisputed Foreigner Tribute Band

$18 adv./$20 door Dance – ages 21+ 9pm Sun Jun 17

Barna Howard + Taylor Kingman

FRI

6/8

6/9

SAT Shady Rest Free 5p Hall Pass Mattson 2 & Calvin Keys $8/$10 8p $25 9p

SUN

6/10

Laurence Juber $25 2p Grateful Sunday Concert Series Free 5:30 Mark Hummel & Deep Basement Shakers Free 6p

Preacher Boy Duo Free 6p

Virgil Thrasher & Rick Stevens Free 6p

Lloyd Whitley Free 6p

Al Frisby 1p Gil De Leon Trio 6p

Eminence Emsemble $10/$15 8p

Keznamdi $15/$20 8p

Nicki Bluhm $20/$22 7p

The Good Bad & Rye Dawn $7/$10 8p

Libation Lab w/ Syntax, King Wizard & more 930p-1:30a

D-ROC 9:30p

Adam Cova 9:30p-1:30a

Rasta Cruz Reggae Party 9:30p

Luckless Pedestrians Free 7p

Matt Masih & the Messengers Free 7p

MOE’S ALLEY 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz

NEW BOHEMIA BREWERY 1030 41st Ave, Santa Cruz

Cosmic Twang Stomp Band

6/7

MISSION ST. BBQ 1618 Mission St, Santa Cruz

A Tribute to the Doobie Brothers

TV Mike & the Scarecrows

THU

Mattson 2 $25 8:30p

MOTIV 1209 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Long Train Runnin’

6/6

Ménage $12/$15 7:30p

$15 adv./$20 door seated <21 w/parent 8pm

$15 adv./$20 door Dance – ages 21+ 8pm Wed Jun 13

WED MICHAEL’S ON MAIN 2591 Main St, Soquel

99 BOTTLES 110 Walnut Ave, Santa Cruz

Hi Ya! By Little John 9:30p

Trivia 8p

MON

6/11

TUE

6/12

The Deep Dark Woods $15 8p Aki Kumar & Little Jonny Lawton Free 6p

Brother John Kattke Free 6p

Hip-Hop w/ DJ Marc 9:30p Taco Tuesday w/ Hivemind 6:30p

TBA Music Showcase Free 10p-12a

PARADISE BEACH 215 Esplanade, Capitola

Vinny Johnson Free 2p

POET & PATRIOT 320 E. Cedar St, Santa Cruz

Southern Pacific Free 9p

Breeze Babes Free 2p

Open Mic 4p Bog Iron Free 9p

Comedy Open Mic 8:30p

THE RED 200 Locust St, Santa Cruz

Open Mic 8p ‘Geeks Who Drink’ Trivia Night 8p

THE REEF 120 Union St, Santa Cruz

Acoustic Grooves 6:30p

Acoustic Grooves 6:30p

Traditional Hawaiian Music 6:30p

Featured Acoustic Hits 12:30 & 6:30p

RIO THEATRE 1205 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz

Save Our Shores: Film Screening 6p $15

Mandel Lecture Free 7:30p

The Wiggles $40 6:30p

Cash & King $28-$40 8p

ROSIE MCCANN’S 1220 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Comedy Night 9p

Featured Acoustic Hits 12:30 & 6p

Audition Night 6:30p

African World Acoustic 6:30p

Open Mic 7:30p

Deeply personal nostalgia

$15 adv./$15 door seated <21 w/parent 7pm Wed Jun 20

Clara & the Broken Barrel String Band Instrumentation and harmony woven together

$15 adv./$18 door seated <21 w/parent 7:30pm Thu Jun 21

Antsy McClain & the Trailer Park Troubadours

Wed June 6 7:30pm

$25 adv./$30 door seated <21 w/parent 7:30pm

Thu. June 7 8:30pm

Mattson 2

Fri. June 8 5pm

Shady Rest

Americana, Folkabilly, whatever. It’s music, man. Fri Jun 22

Romancing the West Legacy Tour Historic Documentary meets Live Concert Performance

$20 adv./$25 door seated <21 w/parent 8pm

JUNE 6-12, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Sat Jun 23

38

Sun Jun 24

Mira Goto

California acoustic - singer/songwriter

$15 adv./$18 door seated <21 w/parent 8pm

David Holodiloff

Acoustic frontiers of the mandolin

$15 adv./$18 door Dance – ages 21+ 7:30pm Tues Jun 26

Michael Blum

Named “Rising Star Guitarist” by DownBeat Magazine

$15 adv./$15 door seated <21 w/parent 7:30pm Wed Jun 27

Andre Thierry

Grammy-Nominated Accordion Soul Music $15 adv./$15 door Dance – ages 21+ 7:30pm

Fri Jun 29

Zeppelin Live

The Led Zeppelin Concert Experience

$20 adv./$20 door Dance – ages 21+ 8pm COMIN G RIGH T U P

Sat, Jun 30 Tues, Jul 3 Thu, Jul 5 Fri, Jul 6 Sat, Jul 7 Tue, Jul 10 Thu, Jul 12 Fri, Jul 13 Sat, Jul 14 Sun, Jul 15

California Beach Boys Experience Matt Dorian w/Faustina Masigat Steve Poltz Pride and Joy Heartless Hot Club of Cowtown Wheelhouse Lonesome Locomotive Nzuri Soul Runa

Tickets Now Online at www.donquixotesmusic.com Rockin'Church Service Every Sunday ELEVATION at 10am-11:15am

Ménage w/ Patti Maxine Americana with swing & verve

OVER 800 VARIETIES

In Santa Cruz

$12 adv./$15 door seated <21 w/parent

Surf, soul & neon jazz

Findings

$25 adv./$25 door Dance– ages 21 +

HAPPY HOUR NO COVER

Fri. June 8 9pm

Mattson 2 w/ Calvin Keys

Sat June 9 8pm

Hall Pass

Sun June 10 2pm

Surf, soul & neon jazz

$25 adv./$25 door Dance– ages 21 +

Keep the Party Rockin’

$8 advance / $10 door Dance– ages 21 +

Laurence Juber 2pm Matinee Two Grammy Award Winner

$25 adv./ $25 door seated <21 w/parent Sun June 10 5:30pm

Grateful Sunday

Tue June 12 8pm

The Deep Dark Woods

Grateful Dead Tunes w/ Aardvark NO COVER

Saskatoon, Canada Alt-Country

$15 adv./$15 door Dance– ages 21 + COMING UP Wed. June 13 Beach Cowboys Thu. June 14 The Low Spark of High Heeled Boys Music of Traffic & Stevie Winwood Fri. June 15 Eric Morrison & The Mysteries plus Magic In The Other Sat. June 16 Lyin’ I’s Eagles Tribute Band Wed. June 20 Jeremy Kittle Trio

HENDRICKS, AKA MAX

Hendricks, aka Max, is nice with all people and is happy to show off his big smile. He loves children and is ready to play. He ignores cats and chickens too. Hendricks is a 10-year-old large mixed breed at 65 pounds. Hendricks is looking for a new home after his guardian passed away. If you’d like to meet Hendricks, please fill out an adoption application.

831-718-9122 peaceofminddogrescue.org Ad sponsored by Buttons

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

835 Front St. (831) 316-5159

visit Tannery the

Arts Center

TA N N E R YA R T S C E N T E R . O R G

Full Concert Calendar : MichaelsonMainMusic.com

2591 Main St, Soquel, CA 95073 Ad sponsored by Graniterock (Use logo below)

World of Stones & Mystics

(If you’d like to sponsor our next ad, give us a call.)

1050 RIVER STREET SANTA CRUZ, CA


LIVE MUSIC WED

6/6

THU

6/7

FRI

6/8

SAT

6/9

Spun Free 8:30p-12a

Kenny Tommas & the Southern Baptists Free 8:30p-12a

SANDERLINGS 1 Seascape Resort, Aptos

Sambassa Free 7:30-10:30p

Yuji & Steve 7:30-10:30p

SEABRIGHT BREWERY 519 Seabright, Santa Cruz

Terri Londee, B4 Dawn Free 6:30p

THE SAND BAR 211 Esplanade, Capitola

John Michael Free 8-11p

Reggae Open Jam Free 7-11:30p

SEVERINO’S BAR & GRILL 7500 Old Dominion Court, Aptos

Don McCaslin & the Amazing Jazz Geezers Free 6-9:30p

Hot Fuse Free 8-11:30p

Mark Creech 1-4p Groovity Free 8-11:30p

SHADOWBROOK 1750 Wharf Rd, Capitola

Ken Constable 6:30-9:30p

Joe Ferrara 6:30-10p

Claudio Melega 7-10p

STEEL BONNET 20 Victor Square, Scotts Valley

SUN

6/10

Shawn Yanez Free 2-5p

AJ Lee & Jesse Fichman Free 5:30p

TUE

6/12

NoJoKen Free 6-9p

Dave Muldawer 5:30p

UGLY MUG 4640 Soquel Ave, Soquel

Open Mic w/ Steven David 5:30p

WHALE CITY BAKERY 490 Highway 1, Davenport

Steve Abrams Free 6-9p

WHARFHOUSE 1400 Wharf Road, Capitola

ZELDA’S 203 Esplanade, Capitola

6/11

Jeff Blackburn & Friends Hannah Cooper Free 5p Free 5p

SUSHI GARDEN S.V. 5600 Scotts Valley Dr. Scotts Valley

YOUR PLACE 1719 Mission St, Santa Cruz

MON

Dennnis Dove Open Jam Alex and Friends Free 7-11p Free 7-11p

Ziggy Tarr 6-8p

Willy Bacon 7:30-8:30p

Jimmy Dewrance Band

Live Again

Ziggy Tarr 7-9p

Ziggy Tarr 7-9p

Ziggy Tarr 11a-1p

The Joint Chiefs Free 9:30p

Blue Ocean Rockers Free 9:30p

Upcoming Shows

The Wiggles Cash & King The Kingston Trio Shawn Colvin Andy Irons: Kissed by God JUN 30 Ani DiFranco

JUN 08 JUN 09 JUN 15 JUN 22 JUN 23

JUL 09 JUL 13 JUL 15 JUL 16 JUL 20 JUL 21

Be Natural Music Camp The Weight Band The Del McCoury Band Be Natural Music Camp Paul Thorn Film: Great Highway

AUG 10 Ronnie Spector & the Ronnettes AUG 21 Ry Cooder SEP 15 Herb Alpert and Lani Hall SEP 22 The Head and the Heart SEP 26 Al Di Meola OCT 9 The Simon & Garfunkel Story OCT 13 Get The Led Out OCT 22 Ty Segall (Solo) NOV 10 Estas Tonne Follow the Rio Theatre on Facebook & Twitter! 831.423.8209 www.riotheatre.com

LOCATED ON THE BEACH

Amazing waterfront deck views.

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

See live music grid for this week’s bands.

STAND-UP COMEDY

Three live comedians every Sunday night.

HAPPY HOUR

Mon–Fri from 3:30pm. Wednesday all night!

VISIT OUR BEACH MARKET

Wood-fired pizza, ice cream, unique fine gifts.

BBQ BEACH PARTIES

Thursdays, 5:30pm. All are welcome.

NOW SERVING BREAKFAST

Open for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Daily

(831) 476-4560

crowsnest-santacruz.com

BUSINESSES FOR SALE Main Street Realtors FRANCHISED SANDWICH DELI $295,000 Capitola STAND ALONE RESTAURANT W/BAR $499,500 Santa Cruz POND & LANDSCAPE COMPANY $99,500 Santa Cruz RESTAURANT, ASSET SALE $99,500 Downtown, Santa Cruz SUCCESSFUL CAFE $99,000 Capitola

DATTA KHALSA

DATTA KHALSA,CABB BROKER/OWNER Cell 831.818.0181 Cell: 831.818.0181 BRE# 01161050

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | JUNE 6-12, 2018

Thursday Beach BBQ Parties have begun!

39


FILM

CRISIS OF FAITH Ethan Hawke stars in Paul Schrader’s ‘First Reformed.’

Protestant Revival JUNE 6-12, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Pastor seeks faith, purpose in despairing ‘First Reformed’ BY LISA JENSEN

40

I

n 1976, Paul Schrader wrote the incendiary script for Taxi Driver, about a troubled loner so disgruntled by the vice and corruption of modern life that he plots to stage a horrifying act of violence in protest. The state of the world has not improved much in the 42 years since then; we can now add the ongoing destruction of the planet to the list of humanity’s crimes—an issue Schrader now addresses through another troubled protagonist in his powerful new drama First Reformed. Directing his own script, Schrader crafts a slow-building drama of despair, loss, and attempted

redemption. At its center is a conflicted Protestant pastor whose tragic past and bleak present lead him to question his faith and his own purpose. Ethan Hawke plays the part with the desperate selfcontrol of someone who knows he’s teetering on the edge of the abyss. All the elements are in place as Schrader’s dark gears of story and sensibility grind toward what seems to be their inevitable climax. It’s not until the last few frames that the movie goes a little off the rails. The story revolves around a small First Reformed church in woodsy upstate New York, established in 1767. It’s now mostly a quaint, Dutch

Colonial tourist attraction (once a stop on the Underground Railroad, shepherding runaway slaves to freedom), with a tiny congregation ministered to by its pastor, Rev. Toller (Hawke). The plumbing leaks and the organ doesn’t work; all the action (and the funding) is at the flashy, modern Abundant Life church down the road, the organization that now also operates First Reformed. As plans are underway for the little church’s 250th anniversary, Rev. Toller starts writing a diary in longhand at night, fueled by bottle after bottle of hooch. This provides a voice-over narration to his daily activities, as well as a glimpse of

his tragic past—losing his only son in Afghanistan, and the subsequent break-up of his marriage. Toller is having crisis of faith, feeling he’s a fraud in his profession. “If only I could pray,” he says. Toller’s already shaky grasp on his duties is further challenged by Mary (Amanda Seyfried), a young parishioner whose eco-activist husband, Michael (Philip Ettinger) has just been released from jail. Mary is pregnant, but Michael doesn’t want to bring a child into a world with what he considers such a short expiration date. Michael pleads his case with a series of alarming statistics and videos, which only adds to Toller’s sense of despair. The nature of their conversation shifts to the question, “Can God ever forgive us?” for destroying His creation. The jolly, convivial pastor from Abundant Life (Cedric Kyle)—Toller’s opposite in every way—tells him that God “wants our obedience. Maybe destroying the Earth is God’s plan.” The industrial tycoon whose corporation owns the churches turns out to be one of the most venal polluters. Early on, Toller tells Michael “Courage is the answer to despair.” Toller is heading for some kind of breaking point, and Schrader keeps us on edge as to what form the pastor’s “courage” will take. And a sort of courageous act (although not the one we’re expecting) does conclude the movie. But while it works as metaphor, the practical logistics of these last few moments are so skewed, the movie loses focus when it most needs it. Schrader’s filmmaking is moody and atmospheric—small figures under vast, mottled grey skies; the silent, empty rooms, devoid of furniture, in Toller’s house, outside the shadowy, candlelit room where he writes and drinks away his nights. Portentous musical chords signal every emotional shift, ever deeper and darker as we head toward the finale. The effect is so rich and haunting overall, you might be tempted to forgive the poorly realized ending. FIRST REFORMED **1/2 (out of four) With Ethan Hawke, Amanda Seyfried, and Cedric Kyle. Written and directed by Paul Schrader. An A24 release. Rated R. 117 minutes.


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Listen local first! shopping for a cause • Women’s fashion • Top brands and labels • Gently used/high quality

Wednesdays 3-6 PM Saturdays 10AM-12PM Walk-Ins Welcome

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SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | JUNE 6-12, 2018

BOOST YOUR MOOD, ENERGY & WELL-BEING

41


FILM NEW THIS WEEK HEREDITARY It’s being called the scariest film of the year, and it stars … your mama! Well, not yours, exactly, unless you are Toni Collette. But like Get Out, It Follows and several other recent low-budget, high-concept horror movies, this one is out to make a point about how we all live in the shadow of our family history, as Collette’s character comes to realize after her matriarch mom dies and increasingly terrifying secrets are revealed. Co-starring Gabriel Byrne, Alex Wolff and Ann Dowd. Directed by Ari Aster. (R) 129 minutes. (SP)

JUNE 6-12, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

HOTEL ARTEMIS Jodie Foster stars as the Nurse, who runs a secret emergency room for criminals in near-future Los Angeles in this sci-fi feature debut from writer-director Drew Pearce. Co-starring Sofia Boutella, Jeff Goldblum, Zachary Quinto and Dave Bautista. (R) (SP)

42

OCEAN’S 8 Steven Soderbergh promised there wouldn’t be an Oceans 14, but apparently he discovered a sequel loophole, which is that there are other numbers. So he’s producing this sequel in which Sandra Bullock plays Debbie Ocean, sister of George Clooney’s Danny Ocean from the Ocean’s 11 films. And wouldn’t you know it, she’s into heists, too! Her all-woman team includes Cate Blanchett, Anne Hathaway, Rihanna, Mindy Kaling and Helena Bonham Carter. Directed by Gary Ross. (PG-13) 110 minutes. (SP) ON CHESIL BEACH Ian McEwan adapted his own novella for this film about a British couple in 1962 whose wedding night gets, uh, really awkward (in the novella, at least), becoming an examination of desire, intimacy and societal pressure. Starring Saoirse Ronan, Emily Watson and Billy Howle. Directed by Dominic Cooke. (R) 110 minutes. (SP) THE SEAGULL Awk! Awk! Awk! Awwwk! Awk! Oh sorry, I didn’t realize you don’t speak seagull language. Let me translate: This

adaptation of the Chekhov play stars Annette Bening as an aging actress who brings her entourage to her brother’s country estate. All sorts of romantic entanglements and jealousies ensue. The Seagull Film Times gave his movie four out of five “awks,” which is pretty good! Directed by Michael Mayer. Costarring Elizabeth Moss, Saoirse Ronan and Mare Winningham. (PG13) 110 minutes. (SP) CONTINUING EVENT: LET’S TALK ABOUT THE MOVIES Film buffs are invited Wednesday nights at 7 p.m. to downtown Santa Cruz, where each week the group discusses a different current release. For location and discussion topic, go to https:// groups.google.com/group/LTATM.

NOW PLAYING ACTION POINT This comedy about a jackass who gets to run his own theme park stars TV jackass Johnny Knoxville as the jackass, and co-stars another TV jackass, Chris Pontius. Both are best known for TV’s Jackass, where they do jackass stunts. This movie also features jackass stunts as part of the jackass story about the jackass. To sum up: this movie about jackasses was made by jackasses and is basically Jackass. Directed by Tim Kirkby. Co-starring Brigette Lundy-Paine and Johnny Pemberton. (R) 85 minutes. (SP) ADRIFT Never look up what the true story of a movie is before you see it! I saw the preview for this couple-stranded-in-the-ocean drama—which heavily pushed its “based on the incredible true story” angle—and couldn’t help myself. Based on what I read about the real story and what they showed in the preview, I’m pretty positive I know what the movie’s big twist is going to be. Don’t be like me! Stay off of Wikipedia! Spoiler ignorance is bliss! Directed by Baltasar Kormakur. Starring Shailene Woodley, Sam Claflin and Grace Palmer. (PG-13) (SP) AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR The flavors of this multi-movie sundae

blend beautifully. And there isn’t that sense of the ride coming to an end as soon as the big final fight commences. Directors the Russo brothers seemingly always have something to cut to—some new angle on this mad multiverse fight as big bad Thanos tries to gather essential jewels for the gauntlet he needs to complete his omnipotence. It is the first half of a two-parter—always a bringdown. The movie has infinity in the title, but there’s a sense of limits coming up. Given the roster of entertainments to come, we may be facing in 2018 what 1968 was to spy movies: a complete saturation, structures so big that they can’t be topped.Directed by Anthony Russo and Joe Russo. Starring Robert Downey Jr., Josh Brolin, Scarlett Johansson and Mark Ruffalo. (PG13) 139 minutes. (RvB) BEAST This dark, edgy drama has thrills to spare from the deft accumulation of detail. For his impressive debut feature, writerdirector Michael Pearce crafts an eerie mood of unspecified menace, in which anything might happen— and anyone might be capable of the most heinous actions. Trying to figure out whodunit—that weary cliché—is a puzzle that keeps us on the edge of our seats in Pearce's capable hands. Jessie Buckley conveys presence and vulnerability as the young woman at the center of the plot. Johnny Flynn is dynamic and unsettling as a mysterious outcast. ( R ) 107 minutes (***) (LJ) BOOK CLUB Man, I was really hoping we were done with anything having to do with Fifty Shades of Grey. But while the trilogy itself may be mercifully over, we’re still getting blowback like this comedy about a group of older women who read the book and try to spice up their sex lives. Diane Keaton, Jane Fonda and Candice Bergen are all in this movie, by the way. Maybe it’s only fair as sort of a counterpart (or counterpoint) to the films that male actors like Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau made late in their careers. Grumpy Old Men, meet Horny Old Women. Co-starring Mary Steenburgen,

Don Johnson, Richard Dreyfuss and Craig T. Nelson. Directed by Bill Holderman. (PG-13) (SP) DEADPOOL 2 If you don’t believe that this Deadpool series is genuinely weirding up Hollywood, take a minute to watch the trailer for this film in which Ryan Reynolds, in full Deadpool costume, plays cult painting icon Bob Ross. No, what I just wrote didn’t make sense, but it happened—which is also the story of Deadpool’s success. The movie was hilarious and ridiculous in all the right ways, and this sequel ups the ante. If you think comic book movies are too cookie cutter, this is the movie for you. Directed by David Leitch. Co-starring Josh Brolin, Morena Baccarin and Leslie Uggams. (R) 119 minutes. (SP) DISOBEDIENCE After his poignant transgender drama, A Fantastic Woman, filmmaker Sebastian Lelio turns again to the subject of freedom and identity vs. social conventions. The two women who dare to buck convention (Rachel Weisz and Rachel McAdams) are members of a strict Orthodox Jewish community in London, where every transgression — every disobedience, particularly from its female members — is a sin of epic proportions. The story explores gender roles unquestioned for centuries within this closed community, and their unacknowledged consequences roiling just beneath the surface. Lelio keeps us guessing about what the potential outcome will be, then applies his innate compassion to a conflict-resolution scenario that is both unexpected and perfect. Co-starring Alessandro Nivola and Anton Lesser. (R) 114 minutes. (LJ) FIRST REFORMED Reviewed this issue. Directed by Paul Schrader. Starring Ethan Hawke, Amanda Seyfried, Cedric Kyles and Victoria Hill. (R) 113 minutes. OVERBOARD Just last week, I was thinking, “You know what I wish they would remake? The forgotten 1987 Kurt Russell-Goldie Hawn romantic comedy Overboard. Except switch it so the wealthy guy gets amnesia

after he falls overboard, and then the woman convinces him they’re married.” And what do you know, here it is, starring Anna Faris and Eugenio Derbez! By the way, I’m obviously kidding about having wished for this remake last week. It was two weeks ago. Directed by Rob Greenberg. Co-starring Eva Longoria and John Hannah. (PG-13) 112 minutes. (SP) RBG Forget The Avengers Infinity War. Here’s a movie that’s really worth cheering about. This smart, sly, heartfelt documentary by directors Julie Cohen and Betsy West, enters the marketplace with the same quiet, unassuming, yet determined demeanor as its subject—legendary Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. As cunning as Loki, as grounded as Black Panther, she wields her opinion with the impact and precision of Thor's hammer, and achieves actual change, fighting for gender equality under the law as she has for five decades of groundbaking decisions. And nary a special effect in sight—unless you count her incredible stamina to keep fighting the good fight at age 84. (PG) 98 minutes. (LJ) SOLO: A STAR WARS STORY Apparently millions of Star Wars fans have always wondered what Han Solo’s life was like before he encountered Luke and Ben in that Mos Eisley cantina. Not me! I figured it out when I was six. Basically, his early life story is: he came out of a plastic and cardboard box; moved into a house made of Lincoln Logs; flew around in a LEGO ship; made friends with a bunch of little green army men, with whom he invaded the fortress Darth Vader had set up on the couch; briefly dated Barbie; and then got lost for about four years behind some shelves that were too hard to check behind because there was an aquarium on top. I’m basing this all on what I witnessed at my house in 1978, but I think it’s pretty accurate and I hope this movie is careful to recreate the details accurately. Directed by Ron Howard. Starring Alden Ehrenreich, Woody Harrelson and Emilia Clarke. (PG-13) 135 minutes. (SP)


MOVIE TIMES June 6-12

All times are PM unless otherwise noted.

DEL MAR THEATRE 831.469.3220 DISOBEDIENCE Wed 6/6, Thu 6/7 2, 4:30, 7:00,

9:35; Fri 6/8-Mon 6/11 4:30, 9:35; Tue 4:30

YOUTH ACTIVITIES HOST AN INTERNATIONAL STUDENT

HOST FAMILIES URGENTLY NEEDED NOW! HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS FROM FRANCE, ITALY, AND GERMANY

HEREDITARY Wed 6/6, Thu 6/7 7:00, 9:45; Fri 6/8

1:40, 2:40, 4:20, 5:20, 7:00, 8:00, 9:45, 10:40; Sat 6/9 11:00, 12:00, 1:40, 2:40, 4:20, 5:20, 7:00, 8:00, 9:45, 10:40; Sun 6/10 11:00, 12:00, 1:40, 2:40, 4:20, 5:20, 7:00, 8:00, 9:45; Mon 6/11, Tues 6/12 1:40, 2:40, 4:20, 5:20, 7:00, 8:00, 9:45 ISLE OF DOGS Wed 6/6, Thu 6/7 2:10, 4:40, 7:10;

9:30; Fri 6/8 2, 7:10; Sat 6/9 11; 2, 7:10; Mon 6/11, Tue 6/12 2:00; TULLY Wed 6/6 2, 7; Thu 6/7 2:20 A QUIET PLACE Wed 6/6 4:50; 9:40; Thu 6/7 4:50 NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: MACBETH

Sun 11AM; Tue 7

NICKELODEON

831.426.7500

FIRST REFORMED Fri 6/8 2, 4:30, 7, 9:25; Sat 6/9-

Sun 6/10 11:30; 2:00; 4:30; 7; 9:25; Mon 6/11-Tue 6/12 2:00, 4:30, 9:25 ON CHESIL BEACH FRI 6/8 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:30; Sat 6/9, Sun 610: 12:00, 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:30; Mon 6/11, Tue 6/12 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:30 THE SEAGULL Fri 6/8 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 9:35; Sat

6/9, Sun 6/10 12:10, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 9:35; Mon 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 9:35; Mon 6/11-Tue 6/12 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 9:35 BEAST Wed 6/6, Thu 6/7 5, 9:40 FIRST REFORMED Wed 6/6, Thu 6/7 2; 4:30; 7;

9:30; LET THE SUNSHINE IN Wed 6/6, Thu 6/7

2:30, 7:30 POPE FRANCIS: A MAN OF HIS WORD Wed 6/6, Thu 6/7 2:20; RBG Wed 6/6, Thu 6/7 2:10, 4:30, 7:00; Sat 6/8 THE RIDER Wed 6/6, Thu 6/7, 4:50, 7:20; 9:35

SUM M E R G RO UP S:

ITA LI A N S ~ TWO WEEK PROGRAMS IN JULY AND AUGUST Contact Jessica & Steve Wilson 462-0650 jlowewilson22@gmail.com or Sandi FR E N C H ~ JULY 21 - AUGUST 13 • Contact Sandi 2018-’19 SCHOOL YEAR & SEMESTER STUDENTS URGENTLY NEED HOMES Eager to become part of an American family & experience high school life. Make a life-long friendship between families! The time flies! Interests: Classical Dance, Video Production, Theatre, Volleyball, Cooking!! Languages, Music, Horseback-riding, Photography, Soccer, Basketball, Politics

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FOR MORE INFORMATION ON ALL THE STUDENTS & PROGRAMS CALL SANDI NOW! SANDI • 335-3088 • 419-9633 • sandispan@aol.com

SUMMER REGISTR ATION OPEN FOR

2018

TO A MORE PERFECT UNION: UNITED STATES V. WINDSOR Wed 6/8 7:00

GREEN VALLEY CINEMA 8 Call theater for showtimes.

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CINELUX SCOTTS VALLEY CINEMA 831.438.3260 Call theater for showtimes.

CINELUX 41ST AVENUE CINEMA 831.479.3504 Call theater for showtimes.

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SANTACRUZ.COM SANTACRUZ.COM || GOODTIMES.SC GOODTIMES.SC || JUNE JUNE 6-12, 6-12, 2018 2018

831.761.8200

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FOOD & DRINK percent alcohol, it is a robust standalone blend that almost begs to be carefully savored. Notes of allspice and leather fill the center of this opulent creation. Plums adorn the finish. Ritchey calls this wine “almost a field blend” in that the two varietals were harvested on the same day at the same vineyard. “The wine was pretty much made in the vineyard,” he says. The winemaker may be modest, but the California State Fair judges were blown away, awarding Bottle Jack’s Syrah-Grenache blend a Double Gold award and a 100 point rating. Fans of big reds, rejoice! Bottle Jack’s Zinfandel, Syrah, Cabernet Sauvignon, Super Tuscan blend, and Merlot are also yours to sample and purchase at the tasting room. 402 Ingalls St., Ste. 29, Santa Cruz. Open Friday from 3 -7 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, Noon-5 p.m. bottlejackwines.com.

BARGETTO LA VITA

YOU DON’T KNOW JACK John Ritchey in the Bottle Jack tasting room.

PHOTO: KEANA PARKER

JUNE 6-12, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Bottle Rocketeer

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John Ritchey of Bottle Jack Winery is winning top honors for his big reds BY CHRISTINA WATERS

A

s I sipped the supple Sangiovese along with dinner of pork loin and braised English peas, I realized that it was a very good idea for John Ritchey to showcase his Bottle Jack wines in the Surf City Vintners tasting complex. The more the wine opened, the more I liked it. And so will tasters who discover this and other Ritchey wines at the tasting room he began sharing with Silver Mountain Winery last month. “Before we opened the new tasting room, people had to really seek us out,” Ritchey admits.

“The increased visibility—and the response—has been great.” Filled with a robust and velvety mid-section of savory cherries, the 2014 Bottle Jack Winery Sangiovese—made from Machado Creek Vineyard, Morgan Hill grapes—has now become one of our house favorites. A Santa Cruz native, Ritchey found his way to winemaking by way of Italy (a year studying abroad in Florence) and Moldova (Romania) as a Peace Corps volunteer. “Moldova was my first experience in winemaking—I just fell into it by pure accident

since wine is such a huge part of the culture there.” It was in those Moldovan vineyards that Ritchey first began using a bottle jack to press the freshly harvested grapes. And after a stint with Beauregard Vineyards, then a degree in enology, Ritchey made the leap in 2012, and Bottle Jack was born. Taking a double gold in the recent State Fair competition, Ritchey’s big, peppery Rhone-style blend of Syrah and Grenache grapes, all from the high slopes of Zayante Vineyards, also pleased us, especially with after-dinner cheeses. At 14.5

Celebrating its 85th year, our region’s oldest winery is set to release its annual La Vita blend at a party on Sunday, June 10 from 3-5 p.m. at Bargetto Winery. Produced from a custom blend of 50 percent Dolcetto, 29 percent Refosco and 21 percent Nebbiolo, the grapes for this year’s La Vita were grown on the Regan Estate Vineyards. This year’s La Vita beneficiary is Pajaro Valley Community Health Trust, so come on down and enjoy the ceremonial unveiling of the new wine, plenty of tastings, live music and light appetizers. Tickets, $30, can be purchased online at bargetto. com or by calling Bargetto Winery at 831.475.2258 x10. La Vita retails for $60 per bottle.

CHANGES A LA CART

The bountiful UCSC Farm & Garden Market Cart is open! Located at the corner of Bay & High streets, the market cart will be open from noon to 6 p.m. on Fridays only this season. Stop by and explore the fragrant, organic world of such early season offerings as blueberries, strawberries, broccoli, lemons, arugula, salad mix, shallots, radishes, and a variety of greens including pac choi, spinach and chard. Flower bouquets will also be available, along with packaged quinoa grown on the UCSC Farm.


Celebrate with Your Grads and Dads!

2621 41ST AVE SOQUEL RESERVATIONS WELCOME 831-476-3801

ENJOY LIVE MUSIC AND DINNER TUESDAY NIGHTS ON THE PATIO!

OH, THE PLACES YOU’LL GO! All Guayaki - 2 for $4 - cans and bottles-

Good Crisp Company

Stacked Potato Chips-tall can Sale 2.50 (Reg 3.75)

HANDCRAFTED FOOD, BEER & WINE LUNCH & DINNER

B o th L o cati o n s O p en E ver y Day Sept 1 East End will start serving brunch starting at 10:30 sat and sun

WEST END TAP & KITCHEN EAST END GASTROPUB we s tendtap. com • S ant a C r u z

e aste ndp u b . co m • Ca p i tol a

Herb Room 9am - 10pm Every Day

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FOOD BIN & HERB ROOM 1130 Mission St. Santa Cruz

Food Bin • 831.423.5526 Herb Room •831.429.8108

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | JUNE 6-12, 2018

Bulk Organic Mango

Sale 9.99/lb (Reg. 12.99/lb)

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MIDTOWN

UNIQUE ORIGINAL MERMAID DESIGNS In-House Screen Printed and Embroidered Clothing, Hats, Home Decor “Shell” Phone: (831) 345-3162 • 718 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz

HOURS: MON-FRI 9-5PM, SAT 12-4PM Instagram.com/The_Mermaid_Shop_ Etsy.com/shop/SantaCruzMermaidShop Facebook.com/SantaCruzMermaidShop

FOODIE FILE

CACAO CONNECTION Gustavo Hilsdorf and Maiana Lasevicius started

Tiny House Chocolate two years ago.

PHOTO: KEANA PARKER

Tiny House McCARTY’S WINDOW FASHIONS 1224 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz

SILHOUETTE WINDOW SHADINGS AND LUMINETTE PRIVACY SHEERS ®

®

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Enjoy generous rebates on qualifying purchases of light-diffusing styles April 14–June 25, 2018.

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M-F: 10am-4pm Sat: By Appointment

831.466.9167

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McCarty's Window Fashions *Manufacturere’s mail-in rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made 4/14/18-6/25/18 from participating dealers in the U.S. only. Rebate will be issued in the form of 1224 Soquel Ave a prepaid reward card and mailed within 4 weeks of rebate claim receipt. Funds do not expire. Subject to applicable law, a $2.00 monthly fee will be assessed against card CA Additional limitations may apply. Ask participating dealer for details and rebate form. ©2018 Hunter Douglas. balance 6 months after card issuance and eachSanta month Cruz, thereafter. M-F:are 10:00 am - 4:00 pm Douglas or their respective owners. 18Q2NPS&LC1 All rights reserved. All trademarks used herein the property of Hunter

JUNE 6-12, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Sat: By Appointment Sun: Closed 831-466-9167 www.mccartyswindowfashions.com

46

*Manufacturer’s mail-in rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made 4/14/18–6/25/18 from participating dealers in the U.S. only. Offer excludes HDOrigins™ and Nantucket™ Window Shadings, a collection of Silhouette® Window Shadings. Rebate will be issued in the form of a prepaid reward card and mailed within 4 weeks of rebate claim receipt. Funds do not expire. Subject to applicable law, a $2.00 monthly fee will be assessed against card balance 6 months after card issuance and each month thereafter. Additional limitations may apply. Ask participating dealer for details and rebate form. ©2018 Hunter Douglas. All rights reserved. All trademarks used herein are the property of Hunter Douglas or their respective owners. 18Q2NPS&LC1

Chocolatiers explain why less is more with bean-to-bar BY GEORGIA JOHNSON

G

ustavo Hilsdorf, 35, and Maiana Lasevicius, 29, moved to Santa Cruz from São Paulo, Brazil more than three years ago, and brought with them an exquisite taste for quality-sourced chocolate. They started their company Tiny House Chocolate a year after the move, drawing from their experiences and techniques back home (Lasevicius’s father makes chocolate in Brazil). Together the couple roasts and grinds multiorigin cacao beans to make about 225 bars each week—an intentionally very small amount, they say, compared to other companies.

What’s unique about your chocolate? MAIANA LASEVICIUS: We want to keep it simple with two ingredients— cacao and sugar—so that you can taste the cacao. We have two lines; one is the single-origin that’s just cacao and sugar, and then the other has some inclusions. We add sarsaparilla, lemongrass, Earl Grey tea, or coffee. It’s a lot of work, especially with just us two, but it’s totally worth it. It’s what makes us happy at the end of the day.

GUSTAVO HILSDORF: The chocolate bar as we know it came from a big industry, Nestle or Hershey’s, and then between seven and 10 years ago there was a “bean to bar” chocolate movement in California, which sources the beans straight from farms with less processing. We are part of that, and we want to to educate people on how we make chocolate. There are a lot of people who don’t know the process. Some think that chocolate comes from cows—we don’t use milk at all.

What’s important about craft chocolate? HILSDORF: This new movement, bean to bar, is changing farmers’ lives. Years ago, they wanted volume, and to pay a little for a lot. Now we have co-ops across the world, and people are harvesting and picking and are treated much better. So we want to stay craft and local, not industrialized. The chocolate product is amazing, but behind it all it’s a community that is becoming better. Tiny House Chocolate is hosting a trunk sale at Home/Work from 2-6 p.m. on Saturday, June 9. tinyhousechocolate.com.


VINE & DINE

&

VINE TIME

Father’s Day June 17th Live Music & Bill the Oyster Man 24250 Loma Prieta Ave., Los Gatos (just 1/4 mile off Summit Road) Open Fri-Sun 11-5 408-560-9343 • wrightsstation.com

DRINK PRESS TIME Winemaker Marty Mathis operates the winery’s press.

WINE TASTING SATURDAYS ALL YEAR SUNDAYS ALL SUMMER

Kathryn Kennedy Sauvignon Blanc 2016 is a bright and crisp summertime staple BY JOSIE COWDEN

M

both online and in local stores. Visit kathrynkennedywinery.com for more info. There is no tasting room.

APTOS WINE WANDER The second Aptos Wine Wander is an afternoon of tasting delicious local Santa Cruz Mountains wines in the heart of Aptos Village. The event is 1-4 p.m. Saturday, June 9, and proceeds benefit Aptos-area elementary schools. Participating wineries are Armitage, Bargetto, Burrell School, Integrity, Loma Prieta, Nicholson, Stockwell Cellars, Windy Oaks, Wrights Station, and Krazy Farm Cider Co. The event is presented by the Santa Cruz Mountains Winegrowers Association, and tickets are $35. Visit scmwa.com for more info and a list of hosting businesses, which includes Cantine.

LA VITA RELEASE PARTY AT BARGETTO WINERY The always-fun release party features the unveiling of the new La Vita label. 3-5 p.m., Sunday, June 10. Cost of tickets is $30. For more info, visit bargetto.com.

Lunch

11:30am to 2:00pm Wednesday, Thursday, Friday

Cocktail Hour

4:30pm to 6:00pm Tuesday through Saturday $5-8 Bar Bites | $6 Wine $8 Cocktails | $8 Whiskey w/ Draft Beer

OswaldRestaurant.com 121 Soquel Avenue at Front Street, Santa Cruz 831.423.7427 CLOSED MONDAY

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | JUNE 6-12, 2018

ade with organic grapes, the 2016 Sauvignon Blanc ($24) from Kathryn Kennedy Winery is a lovely white wine that is perfect for summer, when it’s time to have a few lighter wines on hand. Winemaker Marty Mathis has crafted fruit from CCOF-certified organic vineyards in Napa, Lake, Mendocino, and Sonoma counties— each vineyard selected “for its exceptional viticultural care.” This Sauvignon Blanc smacks of bright fruit, sparkling flavors of key lime and honeydew melon, and has a succulent juicy finish. Its brightgreen screw cap hints at the crispapple-fresh flavors within. We ordered this easy-drinking wine and shared it with friends at Cantine Winepub in Aptos Village. The cozy Cantine has a good selection of wine and beer to pair with its delicious tapas-style menu. Mathis, son of the late Kathryn Kennedy, who started the winery in the 1970s and was a pioneer of women in the wine business, is one of the more respected winemakers in the Santa Cruz Mountains—and his wines are always in big demand,

420 HAMES RD. CORRALITOS 831.728.5172 | ALFAROWINE.COM

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H RISA’S STARS BY RISA D’ANGELES UPLIFTING THE EARTH Now that the forces (Restoration, Enlightenment, Reconstruction) invoked during the Three Spring Festival (Aries, Taurus, Gemini) have precipitated into the Earth, the New Group of World Servers (NGWS) is being asked by the Hierarchy to make plans for their distribution in order that humanity is aided and uplifted. We remind ourselves that Restoration, Enlightenment and Reconstruction must begin within and wherever we find ourselves. While under the influence of Gemini, mutable (fluid) air (intelligence) sign, humanity encounters much talk, reason, new ideas, revelatory and illuminating. Under Gemini and Mercury, we are asked to choose how we will speak with each other. Our

communications can create separations among and with each other, continuing a grave polarity in our country. Or our communications can create harmony in thought, words and speech which uplift the vital fluids, allowing for drops of blessings to stream forth upon everyone. These are Jupiter’s blessings (Ray 2 of Love/Wisdom and Gemini’s Ray). Under Gemini, Mercury and Venus, with harmony of communication, we help “uplift the Earth to the Kingdoms of Beauty.” Gemini asks us this question: “Why do reason, logic and truth seem to play a diminished role in our private and public discourses?”

ARIES Mar21–Apr20

LIBRA Sep23–Oct22

How is your communication network at home and with neighbors? Do you need a new phone (with no static?), computer upgrade, more reliable technology and sources of information? Mercury, the messenger, sitting in your living room, is looking around and assessing just how good your ability is to reach out, have Right Human Relations and make contact. Mercury reminds us that contact releases love.

Have your worldly plans worked out as expected? Has your daily life improved? For career advancement it’s good to gain a greater mastery in something you’re interested in. What would that be? All communications at work assume vital importance now. Careful not to make anything too complicated—from foods to exercise to expectations of others’ behaviors. Expectations create disappointments.

TAURUS Apr21–May21

SCORPIO Oct23–Nov21

You will be communicating on a higher more spiritual level. It’s already begun and if you observe yourself each day, notice you’re reading, speaking, teaching, thinking, planning, focusing your ideals and opinions, and sending out important messages in all directions. Though it’s unusual for this to occur, it’s greatly needed for the elimination of all illusions and distortions concerning the truth (which isn’t relative at all).

You seek the mysteries of life, the larger view of life and to know the puzzle of how all the complicated various parts fit together. Culture, art, religions (especially), the law, geography, journeys, pilgrimages, the plains, horses, and various philosophies call to you. The question always is what to choose? Do travel here and there, out and about. You need new exposure, new vistas to explore.

Esoteric Astrology as news for week of June 6, 2018

Free Birthday Meal

One item up to $25 value with two or more entree orders Must present ad with order. Cannot be combined with other offers. 1 offer per table, per visit. Dine in only. See store for more details. Good through July 4, 2018.

CAPITOLA

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Open 7 days Lunch 11:30 - 2:30 Dinner 5:00 - 9:30 Scotts Valley & Watsonville Lunch 12 - 3 (Sat & Sun Only)

GEMINI May 22–June 20 The themes to ponder are values, resources and money … themes, yes, that have been mentioned before. And with the retro next they’ll continue and deepen. It’s good to answer the following questions; 1) How are your finances? 2) What are your resources? 3) What’s of value to you? 4) Are you of value? 5) How and why? Write by hand the answers in your esoteric journal.

JUNE 6-12, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

CANCER Jun21–Jul20

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It’s a good idea, a healthy one, to begin a consistent exercise program carried out each day at the same hour. You might find yourself more excitable and nervous than usual. Exercise calms and diminishes these difficulties, focusing your mental abilities through daily planning. When asked “What is mine to do this day?” Your answer is “exercise.” Keep moving.

LE0 Jul21–Aug22 Many internal realities are occurring in the form of thoughts, ideas, revelations, aspirations and plans. In several months some of them will enter form and matter. Is the past presently taking up much of your thinking? Are you missing someone or thinking of people no longer in your life? Speaking with them is still possible. Visualize a line of light from your Soul to theirs. Meet them at the center of Light. Both hearts then open.

TM

VIRGO Aug23–Sep22

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It’s good to ponder upon what your ideals, expectations and goals in life are. Are these ideals and goals from your heart or the heart and mind of another? It’s good also to consider what your ethics and principles are, and what integrity means to you? In terms of principles, in the Aquarian Age there are three principles we are to abide by. Do you know what they are?

SAGITTARIUS Nov22–Dec20 Enter deeply into conversations beyond the self. Allow communication to deepen, so you can think and feel and be serious with someone. Allow it to be intellectual, philosophical and psychological (but not political). Allow the encounter (you and the other) to change your ways of thinking. You could discuss the interesting subject of death. What are your thoughts on death? Do you know what the Bardos are?

CAPRICORN Dec21–Jan20 Always come from the heart with those close to you. When speaking with family ask them to listen and not respond. Unless you want responses. Later, ask questions and allow dialogue to flow, back and forth, among everyone. It’s good to have others’ perspectives. At this time you also need beauty around you. Stand in a field of flowers. Stay within the nature, the most balanced kingdom. It teaches us harmony.

AQUARIUS Jan21–Feb18 Wherever you are, seek fun and friendship. Don’t have an attitude of competitiveness or expectations that you will be first. The planets are pulling you back and inward these days. The energies allowed are those of rest, relaxation, laughter, ease, all things comfortable and uncomplicated. If the experiences don’t support this, step back into the shadows and observe. Love holds you.

PISCES Feb19–Mar20 Express your deepest thoughts and feelings. Write them down. When possible, communicate to others your wants and needs. If no one’s listening, enter the information into your esoteric journal. Draw what you want and need. This is a very creative time. The arts— seeing them, reading about them, visiting museums, ballets, symphonies, botanical gardens, etc.—will strengthen your heart, which at times seems sad these days. Maintain prayer and visualizations.


Classifieds classifieds PHONE: 831.458.1100 | EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@GOODTIMES.SC | DISPLAY DEADLINE: THURSDAY 2PM | LINE AD DEADLINE: FRIDAY 2PM

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 20180000740. The following Limited Partnership is doing business as HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS, HOTEL WATSONVILLE CA. 1855 MAIN ST., WATSONVILLE, CA 95076 County of Santa Cruz. LOTUS MANAGEMENT, INC. 6030 HELLYER AVE. SUITE 150, SAN JOSE, CA 95138. ALT#922422 This business is conducted by a Limited Partnership signed: MARIA ARROYO. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is 7/1/1999. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on April 24, 2018. May 16, 23, 30 & June 6.

WILLIAMS CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO.18CV01327. THE COURT FINDS that the petitioner AUSTIN TAYLOR WILLIAMS has filed a Petition for Change of Name with the clerk of this court for an order changing the applicants name from: AUSTIN TAYLOR WILLIAMS to: AUSTIN TAYLOR HAMBY. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING June 25, 2018 at 8:30 am, in Department 5 located at Superior Court of California, 701 Ocean Street. Santa Cruz, CA 95060. A copy of this order to show cause must be published in the Good Times, a newspaper of general circulation printed in Santa Cruz County, California, once a week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: May 11, 2018. Paul P. Burdick, Judge of the Superior Court. May 23, 30, June 6, & 13.

CA 95066. County of Santa Cruz. ALEXANDER ELECTRIC, INC. 440 KINGS VILLAGE RD., SCOTTS VALLEY, CA 95066. AI# 2891160. This business is conducted by a Corporation signed: ERNEST ALEXANDER. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 6/19/2006. Original FBN number: 2013-0000994. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on April 23, 2018. May 23, 30, June 6, & 13.

business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on May 17, 2018. May 30, June 6, 13, & 20.

Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be

granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING July 5, 2018 at 8:30 am, in Department 4 located at Superior Court of California, 701 Ocean Street. Santa Cruz, CA 95060. A copy of this order

GARDENING SERVICES Happy Gardens Rototilling (831) 234-4341

real estate

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0000791 The following Individual is doing business as BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CONSULT. 501 MISSION STREET STE. 103, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. HOLLY HUGHES. 401 BANCIFORTE UNIT B, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: HOLLY HUGHES. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on May 2, 2018. May 16, 23, 30, & June 6. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0000823 The following Corporation is doing business as DAY'S MARKET. 526 SEABRIGHT AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. S&C CHATHA, INC. 526 SEABRIGHT AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. Al# 4134071. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: SHAWN DUHRAA. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on May 8, 2018. May 16, 23, 30, & June 6.

REFILING OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0000731 The following Corporation is doing business as ALEXANDER ELECTRIC, STATE ELECTRIC GENERATOR. 440 KINGS VILLAGE RD., SCOTTS VALLEY

HAVE A LIFE… Your Way!

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0000872 The following Individual is doing business as BLOT. 980 17TH AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. OLIVIA BARNEY. 1755 48TH AVE., CAPITOLA, CA 95010. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: OLIVIA BARNEY. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 5/21/2018. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on May 21, 2018. May 30, June 6, 13, & 20. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0000856 The following Individual is doing business as GOLDEN STATE PRESSING. 228 NORTH AVE., APTOS, CA 95003. County of Santa Cruz. THOMAS THOMPSON. 228 NORTH AVE., APTOS, CA 95003. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: THOMAS THOMPSON. The registrant commenced to transact

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0000721 The following Individual is doing business as HANDMADE BY ANDI. 3382 MISSION DR., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95065. County of Santa Cruz. ANDREA GAY ROWE. 3382 MISSION DR., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95065. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: ANDREA GAY ROWE. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 4/20/2018. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on April 20, 2018. May 30, June 6, 13, & 20. CHANGE OF NAME IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA CRUZ. PETITION OF ARI THROCKMORTON CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO.18CV00860. THE COURT FINDS that the petitioner ARI THROCKMORTON has filed a Petition for Change of Name with the clerk of this court for an order changing the applicants name from: ARI STATLER THROCKMORTON to: ARI STATLER. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted.

Kathleen M. Pouls LAc,CMP ~ Acupuncture ~ ~ Refined Bodywork ~ ~ Combination Treatments ~

A Family Practice, Pre/Postnatal Care

Job & Career Transition Coach careers@havealife.com

www.havealife.com (831)476-4078

Mission Gardens Apartments 90 Grandview Street Santa Cruz, CA 95060

Mission Gardens Apartments is a Federally Subsidized HUD property and State Tax Credit property for low income seniors, disabled and families. The property consists of 26 One Bedroom units specifically for 62+ or disabled persons, 16 Two Bedroom units, and 7 Three Bedroom units. Applications for the wait lists for all unit sizes will be accepted starting Monday, June 4, 2018 at 9:00am and will close Friday, June 8, 2018 at 4:00pm. You must bring a valid ID with your birth date. All applicants will then be placed into a lottery system for placement on the Wait List. Applications may be picked up in person between 9am and 4pm daily at 90 Grandview Street starting Monday, June 4, 2018. No phone calls please! One application may be submitted for each wait list.

David Thiermann

Self-assessment Explore career options n Determine your focus n Market yourself n Career management n n

831.475.8885 • 3335 Mission Drive (Doctors Plaza by Dominican Hospital) Serving Santa Cruz since 1984 Insurance accepted kpoulshealingarts.com

Landscape/Maintenance Full or Part-time. General maintenance and landscaping duties. $13 hr (831) 475-0888 Direct Care Career Opportunities $14 per hour to start. D.O.E. No experience? We train. Hiring bonus to successful candidates! Call (831) 475-0888, M - F 9 am - 3 pm.

MASSAGE Call Curt feel good now! Muscles relaxed and moods adjusted. De-stress in my warm safe hands. Days and Evenings, CMP. Please call (831) 419-1646 or email scruzcurt@gmail. com. Delightful Massages! Body to body sensual touch. Amy 831.462.1033 to show cause must be published in the Good Times, a newspaper of general circulation printed in Santa Cruz County, California, once a week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: May 21, 2018. Paul P. Burdick, Judge of the Superior Court. June 6, 13, 20, & 27. CHANGE OF NAME IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA CRUZ. PETITION OF CAROLE LORRAINE KOSLOSKY CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO.18CV01515. THE COURT FINDS that the petitioner CAROLE LORRAINE KOSLOSKY has filed a Petition for Change of Name with the clerk of this court for an order changing the applicants name from: CAROLE LORRAINE KOSLOSKY to: CAROLE BISHOP. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the

petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING July 13, 2018 at 8:30 am, in Department 5 located at Superior Court of California, 701 Ocean Street. Santa Cruz, CA 95060. A copy of this order to show cause must be published in the Good Times, a newspaper of general circulation printed in Santa Cruz County, California, once a week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: May 29, 2018. Paul P. Burdick, Judge of the Superior Court. June 6, 13, 20, & 27.

CAREER CONSULTATION Career Services

• Find a new career! • Get a better salary! • Find passion in your work! • Successful career change! • Start up a business!

John Axel Hansen, MA, JCTC Career Counselor

Notice of Open Wait List

HELP WANTED

Since 1987

No charge for Initial Consultation santacruzuniversity.com 831.435.9321

• Antique Restorations • Furniture Design & Repair

• Wooden Boat Works • Musical Instruments • Unique Projects

831-251-0377 isaiahwilliams13@gmail.com mastercraftsman.webs.com

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | JUNE 6-12, 2018

CHANGE OF NAME IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA CRUZ. PETITION OF AUSTIN TAYLOR

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0000756 The following Individual is doing business as HOWLING MOON ORGANICS. 123 BETH LANE, FELTON, CA 95018. County of Santa Cruz. JUSTIN GROSSMAN. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: JUSTIN GROSSMAN. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on April 27, 2018. May 23, 30, June 6, & 13.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0000860 The following Corporation is doing business as PIZZAUCE. 412 E. RIVERSIDE DR., WATSONVILLE, CA 95076. County of Santa Cruz. AGAPE BRANDS CORP. 1255 38TH AVE. #80, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. Al# 4125111. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: DAVID DELGADO. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on May 17, 2018. May 23, 30 June 6, & 13.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0000863 The following Individual is doing business as CHIESTA, CHIESTA 360, CHIESTA.COM, & CHIESTA360.COM. 7960 SOQUEL DR., SUITE B, APTOS, CA 95003. County of Santa Cruz. PHILIP GRANTHOM. 427 MONTEREY DR., APTOS, CA 95003. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: PHILIP GRANTHOM. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 5/18/2018. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on May 18, 2018. May 30, June 6, 13, & 20.

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JUNE 6-12, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

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From now until June 20th, 20% of the purchase price of all SCN Brand Flowers will be donated to charitable organizations to help those affected by lava flows in Hawaii

Mahalo!


Cannabis for you. Meet Brooke • 37 • Part time student • Jewelry maker • Full social schedule • Cannabis user “Long summer days allow me to catch up with friends I’ve been too busy to see. Cannabis allows us to relax, laugh and enjoy our time together.” To find your summer fun see our full menu at

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SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | JUNE 6-12, 2018

TWO LOCATIONS OPEN DAILY 3600 Soquel Ave Santa Cruz (831) 471-8562 8am – 10pm

140 Dubois St, Suite C Santa Cruz (831) 824-6200 10am – 7pm

ID Required | Recreation 21+ | Medical 18+ Licenses: M10-17-0000003-TEMP • M10-17-0000002-TEMP • A10-17-0000003-TEMP • A10-17-0000002-TEMP

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Where the locals shop since 1938. VOTED BEST BUTCHER SHOP BEST WINE SELECTION BEST CHEESE SELECTION BEST LOCALLY OWNED GROCERY STORE BEST MURAL /PUBLIC ART

Family owned & operated 80 years. 622 Soquel Avenue, Santa Cruz

OUR 80 TH YEAR

WEEKLY SPECIALS Good th r u 6/12/18

BUTCHER SHOP ALL NATURAL USDA Choice beef & lamb, only corn-fed Midwest pork, Rocky free-range chickens, Mary’s air-chilled chickens, wild-caught seafood, Boar’s Head products. BEEF

WINE & FOOD PAIRING

CRUMB-COATED PACIFIC RED SNAPPER Ingredients

LUNCH MEAT ■ BOAR’S HEAD BOLOGNA/ 6.59 LB ■ BOAR’S HEAD CHICKEN BREAST/ 8.98 LB ■ BOAR’S HEAD MORTADELLA/ 6.49 LB

1/2 cup dry bread crumbs 2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese 1 teaspoon lemon-pepper seasoning 1/4 teaspoon salt 4 red snapper fillets (6 ounces each) 2 tablespoons olive oil

MARINATED TUMBLED MEATS

Directions 1. In a shallow bowl, combine the bread crumbs, cheese, lemon pepper and salt; add fillets, one at a time, and turn to coat. 2. In a heavy skillet over medium heat, cook fillets in oil, in batches, until fish just begins to flake easily with a fork, 4-5 minutes on each side. Yield: 4 servings.

Zaca Mesa 2015 Z Blanc White

WINE & SPIRITS

Local, Organic, Natural, Specialty, Gourmet

Best Buys, Local, Regional, International

Compare & Save

Beer

■ NOOSA FINEST YOGHURT 8oz (Reg 2.89)/ 1.99 ■ C2O COCONUT WATER/ 1.99 ■ LA CROIX SPARKLING WATER, 8 Pack 12oz Cans/ 3.99 ■ HUMBOLDT CREAMERY ICE CREAM, Pint (Reg 4.49)/ 3.99 ■ BEN & JERRY’S ICE CREAM, Pint (Reg 5.29)/ 4.29 ■ CLOVER SONOMA EURO STYLE BUTTER, ½ Lb/ 2.99

■ PABST BLUE RIBBON, 12 Pk Cans, 12 oz/ 7.99 +CRV ■ UINTA BREWING CO., Grapefruit or Orig. IPA, 6 Pk Cans, 12 oz/ 8.99 +CRV ■ LAGUNITAS BREWING, IPA, 12 Pk Bottles, 12 oz/ 14.99 +CRV ■ NORTH COAST BREWING CO., “Pranqster” or “Old Rasputin” 4 Pk Bottles, 12 oz/ 7.99 +CRV ■ ANDERSON VALLEY, Asst. 6 Pk Bottles, 12 oz/8.49 +CRV

Local Bakeries “Fresh Daily”

■ BLUE ICE “G”/ 9.99 ■ DEEP EDDY “Handcrafted, Small Batch”/ 12.99 ■ ELIT By Stoli, “Ultra Luxury” (98WE, Reg 45.99)/ 19.99 ■ HANGAR 1 “Made in Alameda”/ 19.99 ■ BELVEDERE, “Naturally Smooth”/ 22.99

■ BECKMANN’S, Three Seed Sour Loaf, 24oz/ 3.89 ■ BLACK PEPPER LONDON BROIL/ 5.98 Lb ■ WHOLE GRAIN, Whole Wheat, 30oz/ 4.19 ■ SANTA MARIA LONDON BROIL/ 5.98 Lb ■ GAYLE’S, Whole Grain, 32oz / 4.59 ■ CAJUN CHICKEN BREASTS, Boneless, Skinless/ ■ KELLY’S, Sour Cheddar, 16oz/ 4.09 5.98 Lb ■ SUMANO’S, Rosemary Sourdough Loaf, 30oz/ 3.99 ■ LEMON DIJON CHICKEN BREAST, Boneless, Delicatessen Skinless/ 5.98 Lb ■ DiSTEFANO, Fresh Burrata, “New Package” 4oz/ 2.99 FISH ■ KITE HILL, Vegan Ricotta, “Made from Almond Milk” ■ PACIFIC RED SNAPPER FILLET/ 6.49 Lb 8oz/ 9.79 ■ SALMON LOX TRIMMINGS/ 10.98 Lb ■ COOKED PRAWNS, Peeled & Deveined/ 12.98 Lb ■ BRILLAT-SAVARIN AFFINÉ, “Whole Brie Wheel” 7oz/ 6.99 ■ TILLAMOOK CHEDDAR BARS, “All Varieties” California Fresh, Blemish-Free, 30% Organic, 8oz/ 3.09 Arrow Citrus Co., Lakeside Organics, Happy ■ GALLO SALAME, “Light” and “Regular” 7oz/ 3.99

PRODUCE

Boy Farms, Route 1 Farms

■ AVOCADOS, Always Ripe/ 1.59 Ea ■ FRESH CORN, White and Yellow/ .69 Ea ■ MANGOES, Ripe and Firm/ 1.49 Ea ■ CLUSTER TOMATOES, Ripe on the Vine/ 1.69 Lb ■ PEACHES & NECTARINES, White & Yellow/ 2.99 Lb ■ BROCCOLI CROWNS, Fresh from the Field/ 2.29 Lb ■ STRAWBERRIES, 1 Lb Clamshell/ 2.99 Ea ■ TOMATOES, Roma and Large/ 1.39 Lb ■ LEAF LETTUCE, Red, Green, Romaine, Butter & Iceberg/ 1.19 Ea ■ PINEAPPLE, Sweet & Ripe/ 1.09 Lb

91 Points Wine Enthusiast Reg 24.99 Amazing Value at 9.99!!! Well integrated aromas of Meyer lemon skins, beeswax, Bosc pear, nectarine, lime blossom and crushed chalk show on the nose of this blend of 68% Grenache Blanc, 27% Roussanne and 5% Viognier. Tightly wound flavors of cantaloupe rind, key lime pith and lemon peels lead into a squeaky finish.

S HOPP ER S POTLIG HT

■ TOP SIRLOIN STEAKS, USDA Choice/ 7.98 Lb ■ LONDON BROIL, USDA Choice/ 5.98 Lb ■ CARNE ASADA, Boneless, Thin Sliced/ 6.49 Lb

GROCERY

Cheese - Best Selection in Santa Cruz ■ WISCONSIN SHARP CHEDDAR, “rBST-Free” Average Cuts/ 5.49 Lb Loaf Cuts/ 5.09 Lb ■ DOMESTIC SWISS “A Mild Swiss”/ 4.09 Lb ■ BLACK LABEL BLUE BRIE, “Creamy & Strong/ 15.19 Lb ■ DRY JACK, Rumiano Brand/ 7.69 Lb

Vodka 750ml

BBQ Reds ■ 2011 BV COASTAL ZINFANDEL (Reg 11.99)/ 4.99 ■ 2013 WILD HORSE GSM (Reg 23.99)/ 7.99 ■ 2013 TRUVÉE RED BLEND Central Coast (Reg 20.99)/ 8.99 ■ 2012 CANTO DE APALTA (91WE, Reg 24.99)/ 9.99 ■ 2013 ANGOVE RED BLEND (92TP, Reg 17.99)/ 9.99

Crisp and Refreshing ■ 2014 FOLONARI PINOT GRIGIO/ 4.99 ■ 2016 CHATEAU STE JEAN “Crisp Chardonnay” (Reg 14.99) 8.99 ■ 2015 VILLA BARBI Orvieto (90WE, Reg 18.99) 9.99 ■ 2015 CAROL SHELTON ROSÉ Rendezvous (91WE) 13.99 ■ 2014 TERLATO CHARDONNAY Russian River (90WE, Reg 33.99) 13.99

Connoisseur’s Corner- White Burgundy

■ 2015 DOMAINE GUEGUEN “Vaucoupin” Chablis Premier Cru (92WE)/ 37.99 ■ 2012 LOUIS MICHEL & FILS Chablis Premier ■ OUTLAND JAVA COMPANY, 12oz/ 7.69 Cru (91BH)/ 41.99 ■ MALABAR CHAI BLENDS, 5oz/ 15.99 ■ 2014 DOMAINE FERRET Pouilly-Fuissé (91WS)/ 44.99 ■ MEEK’S WILDFLOWER HONEY, Grade A, 24oz/ 13.99 ■ 2015 JEAN MARC PILLOT Chassagne-Montrachet ■ FARMER FREED CULINARY SALTS, 3.5oz/ 10.49 (90V)/ 58.99 ■ BURN CHILE POWDER, Organic, 4oz/ 6.49 ■ 2013 DOMAINE MATROT Meursault (90WS)/ 59.99

Shop Local First

JAN CLAIR ULLMER, 37-Year Customer, Santa Cruz Occupation: Electrician, Pacific Gas & Electric; artist Hobbies: Reading, hiking, painting, beading/jewelry, cooking Astrological Sign: Sagittarius Who or what first got you shopping here? Alan Lan brought me here the first week I moved to Santa Cruz. I was impressed with Shopper’s wooden floors and how lovely the food looked. I liked buying meat directly from a butcher, instead of pre-packaged products. Shopper’s changed my whole way of shopping. I enjoy cooking fresh vegetables so I usually come here every other day. I like the feel and the texture of handling produce. It’s a pleasurable experience for me. Whether it’s the produce or other items, I prefer organic. Everything they carry is quality with fantastic pricing!

What do you like to cook? Usually simple and good — but always fresh such as pasta or meat. I like Shopper’s collate steaks, Mary’s chicken, and sometimes their fresh meatloaf. I’m actually buying a lot more of their fish these days. I appreciate the many local foods they carry — breads, eggs, coffees, produce, salsas and those super-fresh tortillas — plus their amazing chocolate section, that is always changing, and their wines. I enjoy wine with my meals and there’s always someone to consult with on choosing your wine selection. Love their everyday specials!

You have a favorite aspect of Shopper’s? I like the people. There’s a lot of community here at Shopper’s. It’s a local market with a fine selection, and it’s like a meeting place. I feel well taken care of and acknowledged by the lovely checkers, and the butchers know me by name. There’re a lot of fun interactions going on around the store at any given time. Thanks to Jim (Beauregard), I think his own-site ownership makes a difference in how Shopper’s is run — it always seems to be running smoothly. Shopper’s has changed the way I shop. I’m so grateful to Alan for bringing me here!

“I like buying meat directly from a butcher… Shopper’s changed my whole way of shopping.”

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Corner: Soquel & Branciforte Avenues 7 Days: 6am-9pm

| Meat: (831) 423-1696 | Produce: (831) 429-1499 | Grocery: (831) 423-1398 | Wine: (831) 429-1804

Superb Products of Value: Local, Natural, Specialty, Gourmet ■ Neighborly Service for 80 Years

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June 6-12, 2018

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June 6-12, 2018