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Volume 44, No.2 April 11-17, 2018

FROM CANADA, EH! DAMAGE DONE New local coalition for harm reduction around drug use P12

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OPINION

EDITOR’S NOTE For the last couple of years, we’ve been tracking the increased risk of fire danger facing Santa Cruz County. Our award-winning 2016 story about why wildfires are getting worse has, unfortunately, proven to be prescient. Since then, we’ve seen fires in Santa Barbara and Santa Rosa that have in many ways defied even the most dire warnings about California wildfires, and we’ve written, too, about what lessons we might learn from those. The news about wildfires only seems to get worse, and tracking this beat, I’ve gotten used to a rather bleak outlook from the firefighters and other experts whose job is to help all of us manage fire risk. Still, I find this week’s cover story by Malcolm Terence particularly unsettling.

LETTERS

APRIL 11-17, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

DATA MINING

4

The Draft EIR for the proposed (so-called) Student Housing West (GT, “Fielding Inquiry,” 3/28) is in, and logic is out the window. An EIR is supposed to base its conclusions and recommendations on the data. We want to live in an evidence-based culture, right? Well, someone forgot to tell whoever wrote the conclusions of the EIR that they need to follow all the data, not just the one single part of it that seems to support what the developer wants. Of the 24 environmental factors studied, only one favors the proposal over their Alternative #3. Eleven favor the alternative. That alternative, however, fails to destroy the meadow that we all see when we look up at the campus, that we all pass as we go up there. Wouldn’t it be a pity, they think, if the meadow is allowed to remain untouched, like the Long Range Development Plan requires?

First, because it clearly explains how easily the Bear Fire in the San Lorenzo uplands could have been far more devastating, and how canyons around the county could be hit by the same confluence of factors. And second, because it lays out how the intersection of weather and flames in the Santa Barbara and Santa Rosa fires have Cal Fire experts imagining the kind of wildfire that can sweep from the mountains into the city of Santa Cruz. I’d certainly never imagined such a possibility, but in the new reality of California wildfires it’s gone from a worst-case scenario firehouse joke to something state and local officials genuinely have to think about. The good news that the story delivers is there are things that can be done to reduce the fire risk in our neighborhoods, and I hope it inspires action, because one thing that’s abundantly clear is that there’s no time to waste. STEVE PALOPOLI | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

If you want to believe I’m exaggerating, don’t look at the Draft EIR at ucsc.edu. If you want to get involved, check out the East Meadow Action Committee at eastmeadowaction.org. DON WEISS | SANTA CRUZ

KILLING IT On hearing that Mountain Community Theater would present Julius Caesar as part of their 36th season, I couldn’t help but scratch my head (OK, perhaps scoff just a little). My hometown, Ben Lomond, was going to present one of the most difficult tragedies ever written? I was excited, but also hesitant, wondering how a local community theater was going to pull off one of the most challenging tragedies. Learning that Bill Peters, a renowned professor at San Francisco State known for his Shakespearean genius was going to be directing, my interest grew. I had studied theater arts at SF State, and though Bill had been my academic advisor, I had never had the privilege of working >8

PHOTO CONTEST HOW NOW, LOCAL COW? Grazing at Moore Creek. Photograph by Cristy Norian.

Submit to photos@goodtimes.sc. Include information (location, etc.) and your name. Photos may be cropped. Preferably, photos should be 4 inches by 4 inches and minimum 250 dpi.

GOOD IDEA

GOOD WORK

BALLOT INITIATIVE

BUILDING MOMENTUM

Santa Cruz County Clerk Gail Pellerin is hosting a candidate campaign-filing workshop from 7-9 p.m. on Thursday, April 12, in the Board of Supervisors chambers, located on the fifth floor of the county building at 701 Ocean St. in Santa Cruz. The workshop, designed for candidates and campaign treasurers, will cover initial campaign activities, contributions and expenditures, reporting requirements, advertising disclaimers and post-election tasks. To sign up, email info@votescount. com or call the clerk at 454-2060.

The newly launched Affordable Housing Santa Cruz County campaign has announced that it will be exploring public opinion on a possible $250 million bond measure for the November ballot. The group will hold five public meetings, one in each Santa Cruz County supervisorial district, to get community feedback. The first meeting will be 5:30-7 p.m. on Wednesday, April 11, at Twin Lakes Church in Aptos. The last will be 5:30-7 p.m. on Wednesday, May 2, at Felton Community Hall. For more information, visit affordablehousingscc.org.

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LOCAL TALK

Does radiation from cell phones concern you? BY MATTHEW COLE SCOTT

Only The Sun Will Outlast Our Panels.

No, because I don’t use a cell phone, I have a flip phone. I don’t know where the closest tower is—and I don’t do Wi-Fi. CHRIS MADDOX SANTA CRUZ | RETIRED

I think it’s dangerous. Hands free all the way, baby! DEEDEE CIOFFI SANTA CRUZ | X-RAY TECH

I never put the phone to my ear, because it gets hot, it makes you sweaty, and I don’t like it. KIM LONG SANTA CRUZ | PRICING COORDINATOR

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I think that electromagnetic radiation acts at a smaller range, so in order for it to do anything, you have to be really close to it. If you're sitting in a room with 10 people with cell phones, there is no issue. ALEX BOGERT SANTA CRUZ | RESEARCHER

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I think there is no real study out now that proves any harm done by cell phone radiation. I think it’s all for conspiracy people.

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ROB BREZSNY FREE WILL ASTROLOGY Week of April 11 ARIES Mar21–Apr19

LIBRA Sep23–Oct 22

Aries statesman Thomas Jefferson was the third President of the United States. He wrote one of history’s most famous documents, the Declaration of Independence. He was an architect, violinist, inventor, and linguist who spoke numerous languages, as well as a philosopher who was knowledgeable about mathematics, surveying, and horticulture. But his most laudable success came in 1789, when he procured the French recipe for macaroni and cheese while living in France, and thereafter introduced the dish into American cuisine. JUST KIDDING! I’m making this little joke in the hope that it will encourage you to keep people focused on your most important qualities, and not get distracted by less essential parts of you.

Your allies are always important, but in the coming weeks they will be even more so. I suspect they will be your salvation, your deliverance, and your treasure. So why not treat them like angels or celebrities or celebrity angels? Buy them ice cream and concert tickets and fun surprises. Tell them secrets about their beauty that no one has ever expressed before. Listen to them in ways that will awaken their dormant potentials. I bet that what you receive in return will inspire you to be a better ally to yourself.

TAURUS Apr20–May20 In the early 1990s, Australian electrical engineer John O’Sullivan toiled on a research project with a team of radio astronomers. Their goal was to find exploding mini black holes in the distant voids of outer space. The quest failed. But in the process of doing their experiments, they developed technology that became a key component now used in Wi-Fi. Your digital devices work so well in part because his frustrating misadventure led to a happy accident. According to my reading of your astrological omens, Taurus, we may soon be able to make a comparable conclusion about events in your life.

GEMINI May21–June20 In the fictional world created by DC Comics, the superhero Superman has a secret identity as a modest journalist named Clark Kent. Or is it the other way around? Does the modest journalist Clark Kent have a secret identity as the superhero Superman? Only a few people realize the two of them are the same. I suspect there is an equally small number of allies who know who you really are beneath your “disguises,” Gemini. But upcoming astrological omens suggest that could change. Are you ready to reveal more about your true selves? Would you consider expanding the circle that is allowed to see and appreciate your full range and depth?

APRIL 11-17, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

In the coming weeks, I suspect you will be able to find what you need in places that are seemingly devoid of what you need. You can locate the possible in the midst of what’s apparently impossible. I further surmise that you will summon a rebellious resourcefulness akin to that of Scorpio writer Albert Camus, who said, “In the midst of hate, I found there was, within me, an invincible love. In the midst of tears, I found there was, within me, an invincible smile. In the midst of chaos, I found there was, within me, an invincible calm. No matter how hard the world pushes against me, within me, there’s something stronger—something better, pushing right back.”

SAGITTARIUS Nov22–Dec21 In 1936, Herbert C. Brown graduated from the University of Chicago with a bachelor’s degree in science. His girlfriend Sarah Baylen rewarded him with the gift of a two-dollar book about the elements boron and silicon. Both he and she were quite poor; she couldn’t afford a more expensive gift. Brown didn’t read the book for a while, but once he did, he decided to make its subject the core of his own research project. Many years later, he won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his discoveries about the role of boron in organic chemistry. And it all began with that two-dollar book. I bring this story to your attention, Sagittarius, because I foresee you, too, stumbling upon a modest beginning that eventually yields breakthrough results.

CAPRICORN Dec22–Jan19

Playwright Tennessee Williams once spent an evening trying to coax a depressed friend out of his depression. It inspired him to write a poem that began like this: “I want to infect you with the tremendous excitement of living, because I believe that you have the strength to bear it.” Now I address you with the same message, Cancerian. Judging from the astrological omens, I’m convinced you currently have more strength than ever before to bear the tremendous excitement of living. I hope this news will encourage you to potentize your ability to welcome and embrace the interesting puzzles that will come your way in the weeks ahead.

In 20 B.C., Rome’s most famous poet was Quintus Horatius Flaccus, known to us today as Horace. He prided himself on his meticulous craftsmanship, and advised other writers to be equally scrupulous. Once you compose a poem, he declared, you should put it aside for nine years before deciding whether to publish it. That’s the best way to get proper perspective on its worth. Personally, I think that’s too demanding, although I appreciate the power that can come from marshalling so much conscientiousness. And that brings me to a meditation on your current state, Capricorn. From what I can tell, you may be at risk of being too risk-averse; you could be on the verge of waiting too long and being too cautious. Please consider naming a not-too-distant release date.

LE0 Jul23–Aug22

AQUARIUS Jan20–Feb18

Are you finished dealing with spacious places and vast vistas and expansive longings? I hope not. I hope you will continue to explore big, bold, blooming schemes and wild, free, booming dreams until at least April 25. In my astrological opinion, you have a sacred duty to keep outstripping your previous efforts. You have a mandate to go further, deeper, and braver as you break out of shrunken expectations and push beyond comfortable limitations. The unknown is still more inviting and fertile than you can imagine.

Luckily, you have an inventive mind and an aptitude for experimentation. These will be key assets as you dream up creative ways to do the hard work ahead of you. Your labors may not come naturally, but I bet you’ll be surprised at how engaging they’ll become and how useful the rewards will be. Here’s a tip on how to ensure you will cultivate the best possible attitude: Assume that you now have the power to change stale patterns that have previously been resistant to change.

CANCER Jun21–Jul22

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SCORPIO Oct23–Nov21

VIRGO Aug23–Sep22 Between Dec. 5 and 9, 1952, London was beset with heavy fog blended with thick smog. Visibility was low. Traffic slowed and events were postponed. In a few places, people couldn’t see their own feet. According to some reports, blind people, who had a facility for moving around without the aid of sight, assisted pedestrians in making their way through the streets. I suspect that a metaphorically comparable phenomenon may soon arise in your sphere, Virgo. Qualities that might customarily be regarded as liabilities could at least temporarily become assets.

PISCES Feb19–Mar20 May I suggest that you get a lesson in holy gluttony from a Taurus? Or perhaps pick up some pointers in enlightened self-interest from a Scorpio? New potential resources are available, but you haven’t reeled them in with sufficient alacrity. Why? Why oh why oh why?! Maybe you should ask yourself whether you’re asking enough. Maybe you should give yourself permission to beam with majestic self-confidence. Picture this: Your posture is regal, your voice is authoritative, your sovereignty is radiant. You have identified precisely what it is you need and want, and you have formulated a pragmatic plan to get it.

Homework: In what circumstances do you tend to be smartest? When do you tend to be dumbest? Testify at Freewillastrology.com.

© Copyright 2018


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OPINION

MS in Medical Product Development Management The biomedical industry needs leaders

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with him on a production. As luck would have it, I was moving back to the area; I knew I simply had to be a part of this production. I ended up landing a spot as Lucia, initially Lucias, servant to Brutus, and since then the process has been nothing short of thrilling. All in all I can say the cast and crew of Julius Caesar are killing it (at some points quite literally). I am so proud of my community and what we can and do achieve, for though we be but little we are fierce. Thank you Bill Peters for having

the vision and confidence in Mountain Community Theater to pursue this artistic endeavor, and thank you to our stage manager Susann Suprenant who had the resolve to get us through it. The experience and the education this production has brought me is one I’ll keep in my pocket for a long time. And although I was initially hesitant, I was wrong to underestimate the determination of artists and what we can achieve. The moral of the story? “Foul is most foul, being foul to be a scoffer. Fare thee well.” JOCELYN MCMAHON | BEN LOMOND

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WELLNESS

HYDRATION STATION While ice water is common in the Western world, it’s believed to have adverse effects on health in Eastern cultures.

Ice, Ice, Maybe Is chilled water really a more healthy choice? BY ANDREW STEINGRUBE begs the question: from a health perspective, which is best? Is one type or temperature of water better or worse than the others? There is evidence that different temperatures can confer both health benefits and drawbacks. Especially during exercise, scientific evidence suggests that cool water may be best. A 2013 study published in the International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine found that 16 degree Celsius water (that’s cool tap water of about 61 degrees Fahrenheit) led to less sweating and higher water consumption in the exercising and dehydrated subjects, leading the authors to conclude that this temperature was best at mitigating dehydration. While drinking ice water may

help with weight loss, because the body uses energy (in the form of calories) to heat this water up to the homeostatic 98.6° F, the effect is quite small. Estimates, including one by the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and the University of Washington, state that the body will burn about eight more calories heating up a glass of ice water relative to a glass of roomtemperature water. Multiplied over, say eight-10 glasses a day, this adds up to about 70 calories a day, or the equivalent of one egg. Eastern medicine has long advised against cold water, as it may actually have adverse effects on wellness. Although common in America, ice water isn’t consumed nearly as much in other parts of the world.

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 11-17, 2018

‘G

ood evening and welcome folks, I will be your waiter tonight,” I say to my guests as I greet them and pass out menus. “Can I get everyone started with some water?” “Sure, I’m fine with regular ice water,” says the first patron to speak up. “Water is fine for me, too, but can I please have no ice?” another guest asks. “I’d actually like a hot water with lemon,” another guest chimes in. “And I’d like sparkling water,” requests the final person at the table. It seems personal preferences for drinking water are just as strong as they are for the type of liquor, cocktails, or wine that people like, or how one’s steak is cooked. Which

Both Ayurvedic and Traditional Chinese Medicine practitioners recommend drinking warm to hot water on a regular basis. This is based on the belief that warm water helps with digestion, and improves blood flow and circulation, whereas cold water constricts the muscles and blood vessels in and around the stomach, leading to sluggish digestion and other potential health problems. Cold water may also solidify fats in the stomach, further impeding proper digestion. Beyond the temperature of water, another bubbling trend right now is sparkling water; industry data shows a major increase in U.S. consumption over the past decade. According to statista.com, a leading provider of consumer and market data, U.S. sparkling water sales were more than $3 billion in 2015, and are projected to double to more than $6 billion by 2021. This has been spurred largely by Americans’ desire for the pop of a carbonated beverage without the added sugar and calories in soda. But what are the pluses and minuses of sparkling water from a wellness perspective? Well, if sparkling water is replacing a sugaradded beverage like soda in the diet, that’s like hitting the equivalent of a health home run right off the bat. Beyond that, sparkling water may provide multiple health benefits. A randomized double-blind 2002 study in the European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology found that carbonated water was more likely to ease both constipation and indigestion than tap water. But the jury is still out on whether carbonated water increases or decreases feelings of satiety (fullness). The above-mentioned 2002 study found that carbonated water increased appetite, and other research suggests that carbonated water may raise levels of the appetite-stimulating hormone ghrelin. On the contrary, a 2012 study published in the Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology found that carbonated water increased feelings of satiety in subjects. Perhaps more research is needed to truly determine an answer to the seemingly simple question: which type and temperature of drinking water is healthiest for our systems?

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NEWS GENETIC RIFT Genomics isn’t offering the bright new world we’d hoped for says UCSC’s Jenny Reardon, a former researcher, in her new book

APRIL 11-17, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

BY JACOB PIERCE

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When Jenny Reardon was 11 years old, her father, a former Jesuit priest, told her, “Jenny, genetics is the future.” Encouraged by her intellectually curious dad, she dove head first into the sciences, winning a prize from the General Motors International Science and Engineering Fair at age 14. Reardon double-majored in molecular biology and politics at the University of Kansas, and she fell into genomic research, as many molecular biologists did in the 1990s, before going on to get her doctorate. Now a sociology professor at UCSC, Reardon has authored her second book, The Postgenomic Condition: Ethics, Justice and Knowledge After the Genome. Reardon was among the scholars who responded to a controversial New York Times opinion piece that had suggested it was time to start a serious discussion about genetic differences among races—lest the whole conversation get co-opted by bigots. “Arguing that no substantial differences among human populations are possible,” wrote genetics professor David Reich, “will only invite the racist misuse of genetics that we wish to avoid.” An open letter from Reardon and 66 others argued that Reich dangerously misrepresented the science of genomics. I talked to Reardon, who’s currently in Germany, about ethical issues around genetic studies and the field’s complicated relationship with race—stemming partly from a history of white supremacy and eugenics. Reardon says that many people of color have been understandably hesitant to participate in research. “When scientists have been interested in studying African Americans, it’s usually not because they’re interested in improving their health,” she explains. “It’s usually because they’re a helpful research tool.”

What was your experience as a genomics researcher? JENNY REARDON: I researched DNA when it was still pouring hot liquid between two plates of glass. It was not a very high-tech operation. It’s helped people to take my work >16

HEALTH ASSURANCE Activist Denise Elerick chats with Assemblymember Mark Stone at a kickoff for the new harm reduction group she co-founded. PHOTO: KEANA PARKER

Tough Pill to Swallow As the U.S. reels from drug addiction, locals work to reduce health impacts BY MAT WEIR

I

n a county that was once almost as well-known for drugs as it was for anything else, statistics show that many drug-related deaths have decreased in recent years. That means Santa Cruz County is bucking a larger trend—in much of the nation, things are moving in a more troubling direction. There were 63,600 drug-related deaths in the U.S. in 2016, the most recent year with data available. Around 66 percent of those Americans—some 42,000 people— died from opioid use, making it the worst year on record, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Those deaths were a major part of

the fact that 2016 was the second consecutive year that Americans’ life expectancy fell, and the first time since the early 1960s that the United States had seen life expectancy drop for two years in a row. As health officials continue to see the opioid crisis take its toll, the Trump Administration held a summit last month to discuss how to combat it. Meanwhile, a new local coalition has joined a larger effort to create a safety net and hopefully save lives. Opioids include a variety of substances, like heroin, prescription painkillers, and synthetic opioids such as fentanyl, a new drug on the market which can be 50 times

stronger than heroin. Fentanyl is often used by dealers to cut street opioids, in order to make as much profit from their product as possible. However, dealers are now also using it to cut other drugs, including stimulants like cocaine, law enforcement officials say. Connecticut has seen a 420 percent increase in fentanyl-laced cocaine over the last three years. At this point, however, fentanyl seems to be more of a problem on the East Coast. Dr. Stephany Fiore, the sheriff forensic pathologist, says that while Santa Cruz County does see fentanyl overdoses, “it’s very minor compared to everything else.” >14


EARTH DAY SANTA CRUZ SATURDAY, APRIL 21

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In defiance of national trends, Fiore says, the county has actually seen a decrease in both overall drug deaths and opioid-related ones. In 2017, there were 32 accidental drugrelated deaths, down from 56 in 2014. But the county’s overdose rate is still more than three times the state average. Nineteen of last year’s drug deaths were stimulant-related, which is the highest number in the last five years—as far back as the county’s data goes. The Midwest and East Coast have been hit harder by fentanyl imported from China, the number one producer of the drug, Fiore explains. “We’ve always had a difference in drug use on the different coasts,” she says. Black tar heroin has always been found primarily on the West Coast, Fiore adds, whereas “China white” has been more popular in the Eastern U.S. Still, she says there were nine cases of fentanyl deaths in the county in 2015, spread between various forms of fake prescription pills—like streetmade versions of Xanax—along with cocaine and heroin. Fentanyl testing is one of the services a new partnership called the Harm Reduction Coalition of Santa Cruz County will be supporting, along with syringe access, drug treatment methods, mental health counseling, and housing assistance. Harm reduction also includes ensuring access to naloxone, a substance that prevents fatal overdoses. Grey skies and the threat of rain didn’t stop a group of roughly 30 people from gathering outside the Santa Cruz County Courthouse steps on Thursday, April 5 to announce the newly formed coalition. “Harm Reduction understands a particular behavior will occur, regardless, and we take steps to minimize impact on individuals and the community,” said Denise Elerick, one of the coalition’s founders. Teaming up with similar harmreduction chapters throughout the state and around the world, the local partnership wants to “promote evidence-based approaches” to supporting those suffering from substance disorders. Elerick hopes

it will be an inclusive group, offering a space for anyone concerned about opioid issues—both legal and illicit— and their impact on the community. The larger Harm Reduction Coalition, founded in 1993, is now an international organization. Last month, Elerick and other locals met with representatives from Oakland who showed them the steps to launching the Santa Cruz chapter. Elerick, a dental hygienist, says that harm reduction is not a new concept, and that the group is “not trying to reinvent the wheel.” City and county health officials attended the announcement, which was held during National Public Health Week, as did state Assemblymember Mark Stone and County Supervisor John Leopold. “Too often we try to solve a complex problem with a simple solution,” Stone told audiences. “A Harm Reduction Coalition and a multi-jurisdictional approach is the right way to educate the community.” Some elements of harm reduction best practices have seen their share of opposition. A few years ago, needle exchange practices came under fire from public safety activists, largely out of a concern that they create an environment where syringes end up strewn about. Many called for either abolishing the practice or the creation of a strict one-for-one exchange, where intravenous drug users get only as many needles as they give back, instead of the “needs-based” model that’s in place in counties like San Francisco and Los Angeles. But studies have shown that neither model results in more hazardous waste or drug use than the other. “In fact, the California Department of Public Health is no longer issuing permits for programs that are not needs-based,” Elerick says. “They do not advocate or support one-for-one exchange.” Elerick remembers Austin, Indiana making headlines in 2015, while under the leadership of thenGov. Mike Pence, who opposed needle exchanges. With a population of 5,000—just slightly larger than Felton—an HIV outbreak among intravenous drug users left more

than 200 people infected with the disease, and 95 percent of the infected also tested positive for Hepatitis C. After a long struggle with Pence, public health experts and state legislatures were able to convince him to lift the state’s ban on the program. The data supports the trend too. A recent study by the Centers For Disease Control (CDC) found that the number of people who shared syringes has dropped 52 percent since the exchange was implemented. The study also found proper disposal of used syringes went from 18 percent to 82 percent. But the debate over drug-use services isn’t over. Last year, many residents were shocked to learn that Santa Cruz County had been placed on a list of eight counties marked for possible “safe injection sites.” These are supervised facilities where users can have access to a clean facility to inject with clean materials, minimizing the spread of disease and personal damage. It’s a practice found throughout Europe and one that was instrumental in drastically reducing heroin use and harm in Portugal, once a capital in Europe’s drug consumption. Authored by Assemblywoman Susan Talamantes Eggman of Fresno and Senator Scott Weiner from San Francisco, AB 186 stated that the program was completely voluntary, not mandatory, but it, too, ignited local concern over public safety, prompting the county’s removal from the bill. Assemblymember Stone—who voted for the bill, which failed to pass the senate—is hopeful it will be revised and reintroduced. “The messaging from the backlash was very one-way,” he tells GT. He believes Santa Cruz should take another look at safe injection sites, possibly once more data has been collected. “I think having a broader conversation about the complexities of the issue is what the Harm Reduction Coalition is all about. Looking at real solutions.” The Harm Reduction Coalition of Santa Cruz County’s next meeting will be at 7 p.m. on Thursday, April 19 in the Capitola City Hall community room and is open to the public.


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SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 11-17, 2018

Awareness Month.

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NEWS on the genetic level? Should we even want to know? We have to remember that human beings created the concept of race, and human beings will always be deciding what it means and how it will be used. Genomics isn’t going to solve any of those things. It could aggravate or make them worse, because the problem is that people will too easily put genomics on a pedestal and say, “Oh, the science tells us this,” and forget that human beings made genomics. Human beings made the categories that human beings use.

STRAND BY ME Jenny Reardon, a UCSC sociologist and former genomics researcher,

says genetic lab work was more hands-on in her day.

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What are you doing in Germany? I’m here with a group that’s formed in Freiburg to address questions of human genetic variation research, and there’ve been some new developments in Germany. Ever since World War II, it’s been a taboo against using DNA to try to identify the population an unknown person comes from. If there’s a criminal investigation into a cold case in the U.S., police would want to look at the DNA and say what race or population the person who committed the crime came from. In Germany, this has been illegal since 1997, but now they’re talking about reversing it. There’s this group here made up of population geneticists, sociologists, and historians who’re addressing this issue. There was a death of a medical student here in Freiburg, and it launched the whole push to try to overturn the law because it was a cold case. They didn’t have any clues, and they

PHOTO: MELISSA DE WITTE

wanted to be able to say, “Oh, this person was from Turkey,” or “This person was from Syria.” There are a lot of concerns about it, because it seems like it’s part of the backlash against immigrants.

Is testing for a suspect’s race a bad thing? One of the first issues we took on at the Science and Justice Research Center, which I direct, came from a couple of grad students in a forensic anthropology laboratory. They came to me and said, “Hey, we’ve got a problem. Our job is to take these missing bodies the state of California brings us—say for instance, people who cross the border, and they didn’t make it. But they don’t know who these people are. They’re missing people.” And they said to me that the state of California requires we assign a race to these bodies, but the database that was developed to do this work was developed in the American South, and the bodies they used were of people who have a different background. It’s

different parts of the world. They were saying, “When we do this, and we assign a race, we’re actually throwing ourselves off the trail because the database doesn’t represent the people that we see here.” So that gives you some sense of the problems of it. You can only say something about the ancestral background of someone if you’ve sampled those people. The use of racial categories in genetics poses lots of serious issues. Historically, it’s not gone well when we’ve used race to define people genetically.

After researchers sequenced the human genome, President Clinton touted the project for showing how much all people have in common. Will genomics do more to heal racial divisions or make them worse? We’ve yet to see the answer. If it’s not going to make things worse, it’s going to require very careful thought about how genetics is interpreted. Is it possible there are racial differences

What can a company do with someone’s DNA data? One of my chapters is about 23andme. 23andme—if you read the fine print, which I did just do recently—they ask you to spit in a tube, and ostensibly they’re selling you information about you. But really what they want to do—and what their business plan has always been—is use your data to create the largest DNA database in the world that will be of interest to pharmaceutical companies. That has always been its business plan—but it’s not, of course, what they lead with. There are various levels of 23andme. You can just spit in a tube and they’ll send you your information. They then ask you if you will participate in 23andwe. And most people say ‘yes’ to this. They frame it as “Hey, you can help other people.” And most people want to help and do research. At that point 23andme can use your DNA for research purposes, although keeping people anonymous these days is technically difficult in genetics. They tell you that they won’t release your data to the FBI or CIA, unless requested. It is legally possible that, once you’ve spit in the tube, that the FBI or CIA can end up with that data should they decide that this was an issue of national security or something like that. 23andme is quickly becoming the largest DNA repository in the world, and the federal government would like to be able to identify every resident in the United States genetically. The other thing people don’t understand is that once you spit in that tube and they send you back the information, they do things like tell you whether or not you’re at risk for breast cancer. You are then responsible for telling your insurance company, “Yes, I’m at risk for breast cancer,” or you’re committing fraud. The importance of that in the United States is we have a law that says you can’t discriminate against people based on the genetic >18


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UCSC researchers led the push to sequence the human genome as quickly as possible. If they had moved too slowly, the private firm Celera would have tried to patent the entire thing. How would this conversation be different if that had happened? We know a little bit about this because of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 [genes], which are the breast cancer genes. In that case, a company did patent it and did beat out the public effort. It was these two researchers from Utah who ended up creating a company, and that lead to Myriad Genetics. And Myriad Genetics cornered the market on BRCA1 and 2 testing until 2013, when the Supreme Court said gene patents are unconstitutional. To get your BRCA1 and 2 data you had to pay Myriad $3,000. BRCA1 and 2 is one of the few examples right now where the genetic information is, you could argue, very medically relevant. It has medical value, and for many, many years, women had to pay a high price to get access to that. Now the whole market’s been opened by the overturning of the gene patents. All of these new companies have come into this space. 23andme is in this space. And you see all this competition. I don’t think it ever would have happened, that anyone would have let Celera patent the Human Genome. We probably would have seen the Supreme Court case come a lot earlier. It’s in nobody’s interest to have genomic data under patent. Who was against Celera being under patent? The pharmaceutical companies. They did not want genomic data to be locked up under a patent because they weren’t going to make any money off genomic data. They were gonna make money off the things developed from genomic data. Anything else I should be scared of in the future? I hate that framing! We shouldn’t be afraid of genetics. We should be informed about genetics—not put it up on a pedestal. The whole reason I wrote this book was to make the field of genomics more accessible to people so they could join in the conversation and not treat it like it’s some high priesthood, that you have to have some fancy degree or that you need to be some kind of really smart scientist in order to understand it and to participate.


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APRIL 11-17, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

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FAST FLAMES The wind-driven fire in Santa Rosa found fuel not just in

trees but in buildings and vehicles, with embers from torched houses flying as far as a half mile in front of the advancing fire. PHOTO: STETT HOLBROOK


WINDS OF CHANGE The new patterns of recent wildfires in Santa Rosa and elsewhere show why Santa Cruz is at risk all the way from the mountains to its urban center BY MALCOLM TERENCE

E

the spread of a major wildfire was proven wrong once again, he says, when the most recent fires in Santa Barbara and Santa Rosa crossed roads and even a six-lane freeway. A six-lane freeway, by the way, is all that separates Pennell’s home from the endangered Prospect Heights—a gap he knows could be easily closed by a fire pushed by strong winds. “Convection and radiation usually makes fire go uphill,” says Pennell, “but the other factor would be adiabatic, where the winds come downhill. They are warm and dry, and they cause more extreme fire behavior.” Prospect Heights isn’t the only neighborhood considered to be at great risk. The bottom line is that Santa Cruz firemen have long worried about the windy-day fire that would start in the forested hills and sweep down toward the urban flats—exactly what happened in Santa Rosa and Santa Barbara—and they say it’s more critical than ever that residents prepare for that possibility.

WIND FACTOR The Bear Fire started in the steep San Lorenzo uplands on Oct. 18, 10 days after the start of the Santa Rosa fires. By then, the north winds had died down, so crews were able to contain it in 10 days. Rich Sampson, a Cal Fire division chief

based in Felton, says that if the Bear Fire had started at the same time as Santa Rosa’s wildfires, the winds would have blown flames down to Boulder Creek and Ben Lomond, a particularly dangerous situation because so much of Cal Fire’s crew had already been sent up to Santa Rosa. Sampson says similar risks exist for canyons with a north-south alignment above Aptos, Corralitos and Watsonville, where a fire could begin in the drier elevations above the inversion layer and pick up speed when it gets fanned by an offshore wind. Normally, at higher altitude, the temperature decreases due to the changes in air pressure. But in an inversion, instead of getting cooler, it is actually warmer at higher elevation. The flames would rush downhill, an example of the adiabatic fire behavior Pennell described. The flushes of heavy rain in March and April have barely moved this season’s precipitation needle to 65 percent of normal, and the more generous rain last winter may have made things even more flammable, Sampson says. This was because the heavy rain last year was not enough to wet the bigger fuels after many years of drought and, besides, it stimulated the growth of lots of fine fuels— weeds and grass—which also dry out quickly.

22>

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 11-17, 2018

ven 25 years ago, Santa Cruz fire officials were worried about the the Prospect Heights neighborhood that adjoins the overgrown eucalyptus stands in DeLaveaga Park. In a newspaper article at the time, then-Fire Chief Ron Prince expressed concern that brush, downed trees and fallen limbs were four feet deep in some areas. In the parlance of veteran firefighters, these accumulations of downed vegetation are called “fuel,” and they help a small ground fire crown into the treetops when the worst conditions align. A walk through the forest there today reveals it is still just as fuel-rich. One of those veteran firefighters is Cap Pennell, who worked for 34 seasons with Cal Fire, mostly around Santa Cruz, and who retired from the state firefighting agency 15 years ago. He recalls the gallows humor in the fire stations about the fire that might start in Boulder Creek and get pushed by strong offshore winds down the San Lorenzo canyon, all the way to the Boardwalk. The counter-argument to that particularly bleak outlook on the state of fire safety, Pennell recalls, was that there was a crossroad every quarter-mile which would stop such a blaze. The idea that this imaginary hedge would stop

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<21 As evidence, he cites 20-30 acres of intentional prescribed burning that Cal Fire had just completed to reduce hazardous fuel buildups near UCSC. The timing for the burn—in the middle of the winter—would never have been possible before the drought. Jake Hess, a Cal Fire deputy chief based in Felton, says firefighters routinely sample fuels for moisture in their work, and are finding that, although heavy rainfall in 2017 had refilled reservoirs, a lot of the live fuels were clearly weakened, but not killed, and had not bounced back to their typical moisture level after one good year. Hess says he’s seen every fire season outpace the previous year’s fires, and Cal Fire has moved more funding to each unit for increased protective fuels reduction. In the Santa Cruz area, this will mean two full engine crews doing this pre-fire work, six days a week. Hess agrees that winds can be a dominant factor in fire behavior and said the 2008 Summit Fire between Santa Cruz and Los Gatos had winds so strong—80 miles per hour—that firefighting aircraft had to be grounded. Hess was headed to the Santa Rosa Fire when he got orders to turn around and head home to the Bear Fire. He says strong wind is such a big factor in fire behavior that his agency increases crew strength whenever it is forecast. As fuel moistures have continued to drop from lack of rain and lack of snowpack every year, the fire season for Cal Fire Southern Region is all year now. Big fires late in the year in 2005 seemed an anomaly at first, but Hess says that lately they’ve added “a new mental component that our employees are having to deal with: burnout. I don’t see it changing; all the science says this is the new normal, and will increase.”

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Tim Chavez, a Cal Fire field battalion chief from the Riverside area, was on the Thomas Fire near Santa Barbara for 16 days, and he remembers the offshore winds.

“They came for 13 days straight. Usually they get them for three days, then the fog comes in and the fire stops spreading,” he says. It would be hard to overstate the catastrophe of the wind-driven fires in the Santa Barbara and Santa Rosa areas. The Tubbs Fire in Napa, Sonoma and Lake counties had burned 36,807 acres by its containment on Oct. 31, 2017, and caused 22 deaths by fire. It burned 5,643 structures including 2,800 homes in the city of Santa Rosa, 5 percent of the city’s housing stock, with an estimated $1.2 billion of damage. It was the most destructive wildfire in California history. The Thomas Fire in Ventura and Santa Barbara Counties started Dec. 4, 2017, and burned 281,893 acres, becoming the largest wildfire in modern California history. It destroyed 1,063 structures and was linked to the deaths of one firefighter and one civilian before it was contained on Jan. 12 of this year. Another 20 people subsequently died when rainstorms triggered mud and debris flows in the burn area. One Northern California insurance broker says insurance companies are looking closely at brush and slope in issuing new fire policies and reassessing existing ones. He says the companies were “getting off a lot of their risks, even policies that they’ve held for 20 or 30 years. Fire with a wind, you aren’t going to stop it. We’re seeing policies that cost $1,000 a year coming back for $1,800, two grand.” Many instructional materials for fire protection are designed for homes built in forested areas—what firefighters call the Wildland/Urban Interface, or WUI. These materials suggest clearing or seriously reducing vegetation and other fuels accumulations around a residence within a 100-foot perimeter. In most of the less-wildland neighborhoods of Santa Cruz County, this would amount to removing the next two houses on every side of your house. Chief Hess observes that the wind-driven fire in Santa Rosa found fuel not just in trees but in buildings and vehicles, with embers from

24>


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APRIL 11-17, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

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<22 torched houses flying as far as a half mile in front of the advancing fire. In conditions like those, ordinary Opportunity firefighting becomes impossible, and the main strategy becomes evacuation. Jim Frawley, the chief of the Santa Cruz Fire Department, told a recent community meeting at DeLaveaga School that residents need to make themselves, their homes and their community better prepared for the catastrophic possibilities. As part of his department’s firereadiness campaign, representatives are going out into neighborhoods to form a Firewise Community, starting with the people who live near DeLaveaga Park. Materials aiding people and neighborhoods to prepare are available at https://goo. gl/oQ5k55. Frawley says that at any given moment, his department has 17 firefighters on duty—enough for one house on fire. So, in the case of a wind-driven fire, it’s the preparation that comes beforehand—investment in non-combustible roofs, clearing rain gutters of debris so they are less flammable, and other actions aimed at fireproofing. Much of that information is available at the Ready, Set, Go program. (See https://goo.gl/Tphe6w.) The “Go” step is evacuation. More than 100,000 residents were evacuated during the Thomas Fire. Frawley says that in a worst-case fire starting in the Eucalyptus groves, Branciforte Avenue and Morrissey Boulevard would be converted to one-way evacuation routes headed toward the ocean. The fire districts in the county have cooperative agreements with Cal Fire to respond jointly to fires too big for any one department. Frawley says that the city government has also budgeted $100,000 per year to help reduce fuel buildups in overgrown areas like Delaveaga Park. His department is working with the city parks department to prioritize the work and to enlist other groups for resources that can help prepare for the next fire. The county Fire-Safe Council has funds to bring in a chipper to

chew up unwanted brush after it’s removed, and Cal Fire can supply convict crews to help handle the accumulations of fallen trees, branches and brush. Frawley was a firefighter in Southern California before he came to Santa Cruz three years ago, and he says that dryness and wind conditions are not as bad in Santa Cruz as in Santa Rosa or Santa Barbara, but adds, “To say ‘never’ is wrong. So we need to be aware of it, to plan for it and to bring in the community.” As a step in that direction he moderated the well-attended meeting in November at Delaveaga School. The neighborhood had already had an early warning when a fire broke out near DeLaveaga Golf Course in early July. Ed Silveira from Friends of DeLaveaga Park, welcomed the fuels treatment in the park to reduce fire danger, but also questioned the amount of money being appropriated for the job. “It’s interesting that the City Council came up with close to $300,000 to remodel the city golf course restaurant, but the fire chief only gets $100,000 for public safety in this area.” Bill Maxfield, another homeowner near the park, said, “Besides the terrible fires in Sonoma, Napa, Ventura and Santa Barbara, we’ve had a couple of scares in DeLaveaga Park, including one in 2017 that required helicopter drops [of water and fire retardant] and a small fire within the last couple of weeks that happening during a rainstorm—both are thought to be human-caused. I’m really thankful that city leaders are paying attention to this issue. The question is, what can the city do to help, and how can neighbors participate in a solution that cuts the fuel load and helps us prepare our homes and families in the case of a major fire in the park? I’m optimistic that it can be done. Clearly the interest is there.” Cal Fire and local firefighting groups called another public meeting since then to study lessons learned from the Bear Fire above Boulder Creek, which burned nearly 400 acres before containment. It


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EXTRAORDINARY MEASURES An air drop during the Santa Rosa fire. Normal

Malcolm Terence has been a firefighter with the U.S. Forest Service and a reporter for the ‘Los Angeles Times’ and other papers in California. His new book, ‘Beginner’s Luck, Dispatches from the Klamath Mountains,’ is being published by Oregon State University Press next month.

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for Cal Fire before recently retiring as a station captain in Corralitos. He says the reality of fire danger in Santa Cruz County is part of California’s natural landscape, and will require continually evolving vigilance. “The Lockheed and Summit fires were wind-driven fires initially, also the Oakland Hills Fire in 1991,” says Carlson. “These areas have histories of burns, these are areas where plants are adapted to fire—knobcone pines, called fire pines, manzanita—fire is a part of their ecology. And part of it is that we live in these areas.”

EL CRE QU E O

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was a mountainous, heavily forested area with less housing but more vegetation. Joe Christie from the Santa Cruz Fire Safe Council says 80 people attended. Christie says that prevention efforts in the area are complicated by the network of access roads, overgrown by vegetation, and by rural residents who value privacy and are concerned with the prospect of increased code enforcement. The lack of egress is a problem, not just on a neighborhood level. It is a similar challenge on a larger scale for fire managers in Santa Cruz and across the West. There’s no easy way out of this expanding fire risk; fuel buildup, drought and climate change have all been piling up for decades. It’s especially a problem when strong winds shift the main fire response strategy to flight, rather than fight. Stuart Carlson worked 35 seasons

S

firefighting methods can become impossible in wind-driven fires. PHOTO: JON LOHNE

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&

ART

‘LABOR TEA’ AND JUSTICE FOR ALL Each of the tea bags in Victor Cartagena’s ‘Labor Tea’—part of his ‘We Feed You’ exhibit—contains

the photo of a farm worker, as part of a darkly satirical metaphor.

APRIL 11-17, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Facing Our Food System

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Artist Victor Cartagena’s provocative MAH exhibit ‘We Feed You’ humanizes and satirizes the ag industry BY WALLACE BAINE

L

ike many of us, artist Victor Cartagena has a favorite internet meme. It’s a two-picture panel; in the top photo, a white family sits at the dinner table, their eyes

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closed in prayer. The caption reads, “Thanks, Jesus, for this food.” In the bottom photo, a Latino man in a hoodie is standing in a strawberry field, holding a flat of berries. His caption? “De nada.”

MUSIC Why Alvvays’ most popular song is misunderstood P30

Cartagena’s new exhibit at the Museum of Art and History in Santa Cruz, titled “We Feed You,” takes on the same theme in a more expansive—if less Reddit-friendly— way. The new show attempts to

FILM Stalin is dead, long live satire P48

address some of the uncomfortable truths about our agricultural industry in often provocative, even satirical ways. For example, in the center of the MAH’s third-floor gallery is a >29

DINING Dine in—and on—a garden at May Flower Festival and Feast P52


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The Santa Cruz Jewish Film Festival Presents extraordinary films, free to the public! Saturday, April 14 Jewish Community Center 3055 Porter Gulch Road, Aptos

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RETURN OF THE HELLCATS Doors open 5:45PM, Game STARTS AT 6:30PM

SANTA CRUZ DERBY GIRLS

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ROOT FORCE Santa CRuz Civic Auditorium, 307 CHURCH STREET

Sunday, April 15

Cabrillo College Watsonville Center 1:00 pm Tijuana Jews 318 Union St. Room A150 2:00 pm Facing Fear

Monday, April 16

Del Mar Theater, 1124 Pacific Ave Santa Cruz 6:15 pm The Wandering Muse 8:05 pm Keep The Change

Tuesday, April 17

Aegis Living, 125 Heather Terrace, Aptos 2:00 pm Spring Chicken & GI Jews

Wednesday, April 18

Del Mar Theater, Santa Cruz

6:00 pm Dear God & An Average Story 6:30 pm The Oslo Diaries

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tickets : $17-$33 kids, group, & student prices available

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SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 11-17, 2018

2018 SEASON

7:00 pm Spring Chicken & Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Violin 7:45 pm Ben Gurion, Epilogue

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Moving forward … at every age Thank you for helping us improve the health and well-being of aging adults, our environment and our community.

APRIL 11-17, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

< Grey Bears volunteer and surfer, Nola Moosman, 66, pulls a nice bottom turn at Capitola.

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ART

&

“I never quite understood what the campesinos were going through until this project. It’s one of those things that I never experienced for myself. Even if you hear stories about how life is for the campesinos in the field, you don’t really pay attention to it.” — VICTOR CARTAGENA <26 the campesinos were going through until this project,” says Cartagena. “It’s one of those things that I never experienced for myself. Even if you hear stories about how life is for the campesinos in the field, you don’t really pay attention to it.” His muse in the “We Feed You” project was a 102-year-old Salinas man who stood alongside Cesar Chavez in the United Food Workers movement, Maurilio Maravilla. Maravilla not only embodies many of the workers’ rights issues that Cartagena illustrates in the show, he’s also the direct subject for the show’s most visceral component. Inspired by Maravilla’s stories of sucking on sugar cane to maintain energy for a long day’s work, “Sugar Face” features a dozen casts of Maravilla’s face, each made of sugar. The masks are designed to decay and melt over the course of the four-month show. “They start to disintegrate pretty quickly,” says the artist. “Each one is made a little differently, so one will decay faster than another. And eventually, they’ll all disappear.” One of the show’s biggest challenges, says Cartagena, was casting a life mask on a 102-yearold man, who had to sit still with his face in plaster for 20 minutes. “I was afraid he was going to fall asleep or something. We recorded the whole thing, and at the end, we asked him what was the most difficult thing about it, and he said, ‘You kept asking me if I was OK. I’ve been through so much in my life. This is nothing.’” ‘We Feed You: Works by Victor Cartagena’ runs through July 22 at the Museum of Art & History, 705 Front St., Santa Cruz. santacruzmah.org.

SANTACRUZ.COM || GOODTIMES.SC GOODTIMES.SC || APRIL APRIL 11-17, 11-17, 2018 2018 SANTACRUZ.COM

handsomely appointed dinner table that the San Francisco-based artist has titled “La Santa Cena (The Last Supper).” On the table, glowing yellow in condiment bottles, are samples of sulphur, which is so ubiquitous as a pesticide in the fields that it often ends up in the food (as well as on the clothes and the bodies) of the migrant workers at the end of a long day. “The people picking your food can’t even enjoy their own food,” says Cartagena. “We Feed You” is largely the same show that Cartagena brought to the San Jose Museum of Art in 2017. That show was tailored to the exhibition space in San Jose, and the new show is similarly designed to fit into the MAH. An 80-footlong mural of charcoal sketches, for example, has been cut and pasted into an entirely different context in Santa Cruz. The sketches feature an unsettling collection of figure studies mixing human and donkey characteristics to form a satire of bureaucracy called, in a Spanishflavored pun, the “Burrocracia.” More haunting (but no less punny) is an enormous cascade of tea bags, each containing a photo of a migrant worker, titled “Labor Tea.” “The connection is they use you, they suck all the good out of you, and when there’s no more to get from you, they throw you away,” says Cartagena. A native of El Salvador, Cartagena came to California as a young man during the Salvadoran civil war in the mid-1980s. His work has never shied away from the political, but he had never addressed the policies of the U.S. food production system until this show. “I never quite understood what

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MUSIC

KNOW WHAT THEY MEAN? Canadian dream-pop band Alvvays plays the Catalyst on Wednesday, April 11.

APRIL 11-17, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Dream Analysis

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Alvvays’ Molly Rankin doesn’t mind if you misinterpret her catchy, literary songs BY AARON CARNES

M

olly Rankin, the guitarist and lead singer for Canada’s breakout dream-pop band Alvvays doesn’t mind that the group’s most beloved single, “Archie, Marry Me” has been so thoroughly misunderstood. Most fans and critics, including me, hear a song that embraces domestic life in the face of youth and rebellion—or at least hear the singer pleading with a lover who expressed “contempt for matrimony” to give marriage a shot. The music’s wispy, distorted ’90s indie-pop sound fits this interpretation.

But in fact, its intended meaning was the exact opposite. The earworm chorus: “Hey, hey, marry me, Archie” was written ironically. “I was at an age of seeing some of our friends leaping into cubicles and marriage, and I was afraid of that. I value being in the moment, staying up late and enjoying my youth. It was never about a plea to be wed,” Rankin says. “I kind of like the other life it’s taken on. I’m happy that people gleaned different things from it.” The video for “Archie, Marry Me,” which was released in 2014, is approaching 4 million views on YouTube. It’s the kind of poppy

song that gets stuck in your head, but doesn’t wear out its welcome when it gets there. I’ve probably listened to it 50 times myself. Despite its success, however, the band didn’t catch fire overnight. When Alvvays recorded the song, they weren’t even a band yet—it was a solo project for Rankin, with the other members “helping out.” It was the producer that saw that there was something special about what they were doing. “When he had signed on for the project, he thought I was a singer-songwriter, and then when we showed up it was a lot more than that,” says Rankin. “He was like,

‘you guys should have told me you were a band.’ We took that advice.” It took a while to find a label interested in releasing their debut album. One night, opening for Yuck in New York, they met some people from Polyvinyl Records who were interested. It was another three years before they released a follow-up album, Antisocialites, which came out last September. “The first record grew and kept growing. So we had to keep on playing shows due to that growth, which was a very gradual thing,” Rankin says. It seems to me that the sound of the new record is a little less hazy and distortion-filled, and a little softer and morose than Alvvays’ debut—but Rankin disagrees. “I feel like the second record is more distorted, and has a little bit more energy,” she says, although she doesn’t mind my interpretation. “That’s cool, because it’s a subjective thing.” However you hear the album, the content is darker. She refers to it as a “fantasy breakup album,” a loose concept album documenting the various aspects related to a break up. The fantasy part is that it’s not based on her life. “The record goes through a lot of the different stages: separation, self-preservation, and hitting one’s stride after the fact. It was fun to follow a little bit of that arc, because there were so many aspects to separation and being with somebody,” Rankin says. “I’m not very good at writing about my own life. I like lonely solitary characters. I typically read books that have that sort of premise.” There are still catchy hooks that permeate every corner of these songs, and soften the melancholy vibe. Rankin writes not as personal catharsis, but rather as an opportunity to spin stories the way a novelist would. “I’m very intrigued by space and tuning out and creating my own little planet,” she says. “With everything going on in the world right now, I think it’s also channeled a little bit of that escapism.” Alvvays plays at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, April 11, at the Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $20/adv, $25/door. 429-4135.


The Shining Souls Featuring Tammi Brown

David Jones

Don Caruth Tammi Brown

Mike Turner

Ron E. Beck

Noel Catura

Show MC by Radio Show Host Afrikahn Jahmal Dayvs from JaZzLine KKUP 91.5 FM & KPFA 94.1 FM

KUUMBWA JAZZ CENTER

April 15th 2018 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Show Start 7PM, Doors Open 6PM Tickets www.brownpapertickets.com or at the door Advance $20 / Door $25 / Any Questions Call 831.612.6505

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 11-17, 2018

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CALENDAR

GREEN FIX

See hundreds more events at santacruz. com.

‘EVOLUTION OF ORGANIC’ FILM PREMIERE Organic farming and food wasn’t always mainstream, and the documentary The Evolution of Organic is a time warp back to the late ’60s, when it was an act of rebellion to reject chemical farming and explore organic alternatives. The film tells the story of the earliest Alan Chadwick Garden farmers at UCSC, and their goal of making organic and sustainable agriculture and food accessible to everyone. INFO: 6:30-9 p.m. Friday, April 13. Veterans Memorial Building, 846 Front St., Santa Cruz. brownpapertickets. com. $17/$20.

ART SEEN

APRIL 11-17, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

‘THE WHOLE BALL OF WAX’ TWISTED ARTIST RECEPTION

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Joan Lowden a.k.a. “Bass Lady” is a woman of many facets. She is an encaustic artist, meaning that she works with wax and pigment to create visual art, and she is also a jazz bass musician—hence the nickname. She says jazz and encaustics go together because they are both improvisational; not surprisingly, her shows aren’t limited to just one of her artistic mediums. This show series will feature weekly themed music events, with local musicians alongside her encaustic visual art. Lowden will be playing with her jazz trio ‘Jazz With a Twist’ during the reception, to the beat of some twisted cocktails. INFO: Reception 2-5 p.m. Sunday, April 15. Show continues through Sunday, April 22, with “Ragtime Wrap Up” from 2-5 p.m. Felix Kulpa Gallery. 107 Elm St., Santa Cruz. basslady.com. Free.

Free calendar listings in print and online are available for community events. Listings show up online within 24 hours. Submissions of free events and those $15 or less received by Thursday at noon, six days prior to the Good Times publication date, will be prioritized for print (space available). All listings must specify a day, start time, location and price (or ‘free’ if applicable). Listings can be set to repeat every week or month, and can be edited by the poster as needed. Ongoing events must be updated quarterly. It is the responsibility of the person submitting an event to cancel or modify the listing. Register at our website at santacruz.com in order to SUBMIT EVENTS ONLINE. E-mail calendar@goodtimes.sc or call 458.1100 with any questions.

WEDNESDAY 4/11 CLASSES PLANT-BASED CHEESE-MAKING WORKSHOP Join Chef Beth Love for a hands-on workshop and make three plantbased, cultured, artisan, vegan cheeses: semi-firm cashew cheese in a variety of flavors, Parmesan-style cheese, and semifirm almond cheese. Children ages 8 and up welcome to attend with adult. Chef Love is the author of cookbook series, Tastes Like Love and she has appeared on the Oprah show. 6-8:30 p.m. New Leaf Market, 1101 Fair Ave., Santa Cruz. newleaf.com. $45-$40.

CHAIR YOGA Suzi Mahler has been teaching chair yoga to all ages and abilities for more than six years. She has developed a unique style that allows each person to access the benefits of yoga without getting on the floor. Her classes are a gentle yet dynamic blend of strength-building movement and breath awareness. 9 a.m. Yoga Center, 429 Front St., Santa Cruz. 4236719 or suzimahler.com. Donation/$5.

FOOD & WINE DOWNTOWN SANTA CRUZ FARMERS MARKET In addition to a large variety of farm products, this market offers a great selection of local artisan foodstuffs, delicious baked goods, and lots of options for lunch and dinner. 1:30 p.m. Cedar and Lincoln streets, Santa Cruz. 454-0566.

ALEHOUSE NARRATIVES Come join in the alehouse tradition of sharing your personal anecdotes, poems, short stories, creative nonfiction, essays and humor, accompanied by a jazz band and a pint of fine organic ale. Write Sober. Edit Drunk. Read Buzzed. 7 p.m. Santa Cruz Mountain Brewing, 402 Ingalls St. Suite 27, Santa Cruz. 425-4900 or scmbrew.com. Free.

GROUPS SPRING GREEN BUSINESS MIXER Join us at the 2018 Spring Green Business Mixer at the beautiful CruzioWorks space. This event is open to currently certified/certifying

FRIDAY 4/13 APTOS HIGH PRESENTS ‘CINDERELLA’ Everyone knows the story of Cinderella, so Aptos High School has a bit of a twist to keep things interesting. The musical production will be ’80s themed, with some seriously big hair and totally tubular costumes—think Cinderella meets an ’80s workout video. Few things sound more entertaining than Cinderella right out of a John Hughes movie. The musical is directed by drama teacher Stacy Aronovici and Aptos High student Quinn Youngs, and features more than 50 students in the cast and crew. Puppetry and a full orchestra will add a bit more enchantment to the evening. INFO: Opens 7 p.m. Friday, April 13 and runs through Saturday, April 21. aptoshs.net. $10/$11 general admission. $8/$9 students and seniors.

Green Businesses, as well as businesses and organizations that are interested in learning more. Complimentary refreshments followed by guest speakers, trivia, networking, and regional program and marketing update. Cruzio Internet, 877 Cedar St., Suite #150, Santa Cruz. 459-6301 or cruzio.com. Free.

TOGETHER IN THE PARK Together In The Park offers free parenting resources, craft projects, music, stories, healthy snacks. Parents, family members or caregivers and their young children meet for play and

group activities every Wednesday. 10-12 a.m. Felton Covered Bridge County Park, Graham Hill and Mt Hermon roads, Felton. communitybridges.org/mcr.

PRESCHOOL ADVENTURES AT THE MONTEREY BAY MARINE SANCTUARY EXPLORATION CENTER Come enjoy weekly preschool adventures at the Sanctuary Exploration Center with oceanthemed book readings, show-and-tell, and crafts. Perfect for kids ages 2-5. 10-11 a.m. Monterey Bay Sanctuary Exploration >34


events.ucsc.edu

APR IL 2 018

JOIN US AS W E SHA RE THE EXCIT EMENT OF LE ARNING ONGOING EVENTS

Film Screening: Cruel and Unusual— The Story of the Angola 3

FOREST (for a thousand years...) Exhibition

APR 22, 2PM UC SANTA CRUZ, MEDIA THEATER FREE ADMISSION

RUNS THROUGH JUNE 30 UC SANTA CRUZ, ARBORETUM & BOTANIC GARDEN FREE WITH PAID ADMISSION TO THE ARBORETUM

The story of three black men imprisoned in LA, their decades-long struggle for justice, and the movement to end solitary confinement. A talk with psychology professor Craig Haney and Marie Levin follows.

Mary Porter Sesnon Exhibition Opening Reception APR 12, 5PM, EXHIBITION ON VIEW THROUGH MAY 12 UC SANTA CRUZ, SESNON GALLERY FREE ADMISSION

An exhibition celebrating the life of Mary Porter Sesnon and her local influence on the arts. Featuring paintings by California artists, as well as sketches and watercolors from the historic scrapbook made during salons hosted at her Pino Alto residence.

Original Thinkers: Earth Night APR 18, 3–5PM; 6:30–9PM THE INN AT PASATIEMPO $0– $10/PERSON

Learn how light pollution impacts people, animals, and observing the night sky through short scientific talks and stunning visuals. Afternoon session features the SKYGLOW Project. Presented by UCSC, International Dark-Sky Association Santa Cruz Chapter, and Lick Observatory.

Hip-Hop Hesteria Concert APR 20, 7:30PM UC SANTA CRUZ, MUSIC CENTER RECITAL HALL FREE ADMISSION

Hip-hop joins live experimental jazz, featuring professor Karlton Hester, video from Peru, and West African dance.

Crossings Film Series: [s]comparse/ [dis]appeared

UPCOMING EVENTS

APR 18, 5:30PM UC SANTA CRUZ, HUMANITIES 2, ROOM 259 FREE ADMISSION

APR 14, NOON–4PM, 10AM–NOON MEMBERS PRESALE UC SANTA CRUZ ARBORETUM & BOTANIC GARDEN

The Arboretum’s Spring Plant Sale returns! Gardeners will find hundreds of varieties of plants well-suited to the central California Coast, including featured plants from Australia and South Africa.

LE ARN MORE AT

events.ucsc.edu

APRIL 28–29

UCSC Farm & Garden Spring Plant Sale APRIL 28

The Del Sol Quartet Alumni Weekend APR 27–29 VARIOUS LOCATIONS ADMISSION VARIES BY EVENT

All alumni and the community are welcome! Visit alumniweekend.ucsc.edu to learn more about dozens of talks, performances, open houses, and celebrations. Fun for the entire family!

MAY 31–JUNE 3

The Magic Flute

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 11-17, 2018

Arboretum Spring Plant Sale

A documentary about what happened behind the scenes while filming Terraferma on an isolated island, where Africans were brought to play the part of refugees—something most actually experienced.

An audio installation by renowned artists Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller, FOREST (for a thousand years...) is an immersive sensory experience located in a mysterious pocket of the Arboretum. Presented by the Institute of the Arts and Sciences, the Arboretum and Botanic Garden, and the San José Museum of Art.

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CALENDAR from the diet or in capsule form. Everyone can benefit from a B12 shot. After B12 injections many patients feel a natural boost in energy. 3-6 p.m. Santa Cruz Naturopathic Medical Center, 736 Chestnut St., Santa Cruz. 477-1377 or scnmc.com. $29/$17.

B12 HAPPY HOUR B12 deficiencies are common, as the vitamin is used up by stress, causing fatigue, depression, anxiety, insomnia and more. Not well absorbed in the gut, B12 injections can be effective in helping to support energy, mood, sleep, immunity, metabolism and stress resilience. Come get a discounted shot from 1:30-4:30 p.m. Thrive Natural Medicine, 2840 Park Ave., Soquel. thrivenatmed.com/b12-injections or 515-8699. $15.

MUSIC

SATURDAY 4/14 THIRD ANNUAL ‘STEP INTO FASHION’ Spring is here, and for some that means a wardrobe refresher. But before you go to a department store or online, consider shopping for a cause. “Step Into Fashion” will feature more than 40 Bay Area designers selling affordable clothing, handbags, accessories, jewelry and more. Plus, a portion of all proceeds will go to Palo Alto Medical Foundation’s cancer prevention and care programs. To date, the event has raised more than $227,000 for cancer-related programs in Santa Cruz County. For fashion-forward questions, local television personality and fashion producer Joyce Anderson will talk about accessorizing, and Image Consultant Alyce Parsons will discuss incorporating the latest trends into your wardrobe. INFO: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Boardwalk’s Cocoanut Grove. 400 Beach St., Santa Cruz. stepintofashion.org. $15. Free parking.

<32 Center, 35 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz.

APRIL 11-17, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

montereybay.noaa.gov. Free.

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ARTS ROBIN: THE ULTIMATE ROBIN WILLIAMS TRIBUTE EXPERIENCE Get

Magic Flute” which will be performed by students from UCSC’s renowned opera program. Students will perform at the MAH’s atrium, and the full production will take place, with stunning costumes and full orchestra, May 31-June 3, at UCSC’s Music Center Recital Hall. 6:30 p.m. MAH, 705 Front St., Santa Cruz. 459-4731 or arts.uces. edu/events. Free.

OPEN MIC NIGHT Open Mic Night every Wednesday in Capitola Village. Join us at the new Cork and Fork Capitola. All are welcome. Always free, always fun. Awesome wines by the glass or bottle, Discretion beer on tap, handmade pizzas and great small-plate dishes. 7 p.m. Cork and Fork, 312 Capitola Ave., Capitola. corkandforkcapitola.com. Free. WORLD HARMONY CHORUS The World Harmony Chorus is a community chorus that welcomes participants of all ages and ability levels. There are no auditions nor entrance requirements. 7:15-9:15 p.m. Louden Nelson Community Center, 301 Center St., Santa Cruz. instantharmony.com.

TOBY GRAY AT REEF/PONO Toby’s music is cool, mellow and smooth, with a repertoire of classic favorites and heartfelt originals. 6:30-9:30 p.m. The Reef Bar and Restaurant, 120 Union St., Santa Cruz. reefbarsantacruz.com. Free.

THURSDAY 4/12

ready to reminisce and laugh at The Ultimate Robin Williams Tribute Experience! Featuring award-winning comedian Roger Kabler and Marc “Skippy” Price from the hit ’80s show Family Ties. This show goes to great lengths to respect Robin’s memory and celebrate his legacy. For everyone around the globe confused about Robin’s unexpected departure, this tribute offers a form of closure and a chance to laugh with Robin one last time. 7:30 p.m. Michaels on Main, 2591 S Main St., Soquel. 479-9777. $17.

HEALTH

WFF PRESENTS: PINK SARIS & LAAL PARI Watsonville Film Festival presents

SOUND IMMERSION Spend your time in healing energy as you bathe in the pure, harmonic resonance of the Crystal Bowl Orchestra. Meets every second Wednesday. For women with cancer. Call to register. 1:303 p.m. WomenCARE, 2901 Park Ave., Suite A1, Soquel. 457-2273. Free.

THE MAGIC FLUTE HIGHLIGHTS Enjoy

B12 HAPPY HOUR Come and get your

delightful highlights from the upcoming production of Mozart’s very popular “The

Happy Hour B12 shot. Your body needs B12 to create energy and is not well absorbed

a powerful double-feature focusing on women’s rights in rural India. Pink Saris follows the Gulabi Gang, a group of Indian vigilantes in pink, defending the survivors of domestic abuse. Laal Pari is a self-taught elected leader in a small town fighting for women’s rights and equality. Post-screening Q&A with Laal Pari Director, Salida Halima. Tickets sold only at the door starting at 6:30 p.m. Youth under 18 free. 7 p.m. Appleton Grill & Event Lounge. 410 Rodriguez St.,

ARTS

Watsonville. watsonvillefilmfest.org or 7275555. $8.

POETS’ CIRCLE POETRY READING SERIES Join featured reader Patrice Vecchione, whose nonfiction works include Step Into Nature and Writing & the Spiritual Life; two poetry collections: The Knot Untied, and Territory of Wind; and several anthologies—for adults and young people. Patrice will read both her own work and work by her students. Open mic to follow. Refreshments provided. 7-9 p.m. Watsonville Public Library, 275 Main St., Suite 100, Watsonville. 768-3400. Free.

CLASSES MISO COOKING CLASS Join Masumi Diaz and Eriko Yokoyama of the Hakouya Cooking School and learn how to make organic miso, a delicious, high-protein seasoning and probiotic that supports digestion and immunity. Ingredients will be prepared in advance and assembled in class. Take home two pounds. 6-7:30 p.m. New Leaf Market, 1101 Fair Ave., Santa Cruz. newleaf.com. $35.

HEALTH B12 HAPPY HOUR B12 helps support energy, mood, sleep, immunity, metabolism and stress resilience. Since B12 is not absorbed well during digestion, and all B vitamins are depleted by stress, most Americans are deficient. Having B12 in the form of an injection bypasses the malabsorption problem, and people often feel an immediate difference. Every Thursday morning, we offer discounted vitamin B12 by walk-in or appointment. 9 a.m.-Noon. Thrive Natural Medicine, 2840 Park Ave., Soquel. thrivenatmed.com or 515-8699. $15.

MUSIC JON FOREMAN Jonathan Mark Foreman is the lead singer, guitarist, main songwriter and co-founder of the alternative rock band Switchfoot. In April 2009, he was GMA Dove Award-nominated for Male Vocalist of the Year. 7 p.m. Rio Theatre, 1205 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. 423-8209. $437/$31. THE SANTA CRUZ TREMOLOS SINGING GROUP FOR PEOPLE WITH PARKINSON’S Singing is known to be a good voice-strengthening exercise for people with Parkinson’s disease. Santa Cruz County has an ongoing singing group for people with Parkinson’s and their caregivers. >36


TS TICKE AT START$25 JUST

FRIDAY, APRIL 20 AT 8PM GRAMMY-winning singer songwriter Shelby Lynne’s timeless, unique style ranges from country, blues, Southern soul, roots rock, Western swing, jazz, and adult contemporary pop.

Tickets can be purchased online at www.sunsetcenter.org, in person at or by calling the Sunset Center Box Office at 831.620.2048.

Brought to you by Sunset Cultural Center, Inc., a nonprofit 501(c)(3)

www.sunsetcenter.org • 831.620.2048 San Carlos at Ninth Ave • Carmel-by-the-Sea

California Designers’ Sale Palo Alto Medical Foundation Sutter Maternity & Surgery Center

Proceeds benefit Cancer Care Programs in Santa Cruz County

Saturday April 14, 2018 10:00am – 4:00pm Cocoanut Grove | 400 Beach Street | Santa Cruz, California

41 fabulous designers selling their newest clothing designs, handbags, accessories, jewelry, wearable art and more at affordable prices.

shopping for a cause

To pre-order event tickets call (831) 458-6391

• Top brands and labels

great prices.

• Women’s fashion great cause.

• Gently used/high quality 10:00 am – 4:00 pm 12:00 – 2:00 pm 12:30 – 1:30 pm 12:30 & 2:30 pm 1:00, 2:00 & 3:00 pm 2:30 – 3:30 pm 3:00 pm

Shop Designer booths and play Designer Bingo: match your receipt to win a gift Pre-ordered lunch boxes available for pick up Complimentary coffee hour Complimentary style workshops with image consultant Alyce Parsons and stylist Joyce Anderson Free door prize drawings (must be present to win) Complimentary tea time (tea, coffee and scones) Drawings for $8,000 sapphire and diamond bracelet raffle and Foodie Delight raffle

STEPINTOFASHION.ORG

• Tax-deductible donations welcome Located in the King’s Plaza Shopping Center

1601 41st Ave. Capitola

831-462-3686 www.the-daisy.org

Proceeds benefit programs provided by Family Service Agency of the Central Coast | www.fsa-cc.org

Furniture. Building Materials. Household Goods. Appliances

719 Swift St, Santa Cruz . 831.824.4704 Open to the public Wed - Sat 9am to 5pm habitatmontereybay.org/restore

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 11-17, 2018

Event Ticket & Parking $15.00 pre-order or at door Pre-Ordered Boxed Lunch $15.00

35


Help Support Children in our Community

CALENDAR

What:

The annual bowl-a-thon 100% of proceeds match local youth to caring adult mentors.

When & Where:

Who:

Saturday & Sunday Individuals and Businesses April 28 & 29, 2018 Boardwalk Bowl Santa Cruz countywide bowling to support youth mentoring in 115 Cliff St | Santa Cruz our community. Register individually or start a team! Register online at:

How:

www.santacruzmentor.org Questions? Call: 831-464-8691 or email: bowl@santacruzmentor.org

SUNDAY 4/15 Register

PAJARONIAN

www.santacruzmentor.org

Years

APRIL 11-17, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT Scoping Meeting Kresge College Project

36

In compliance with California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), UCSC is preparing a Draft Environmental Impact Report (DEIR) for the proposed Kresge College Project, which consists of new construction, renovation, and selective removal of buildings, and improvements to site infrastructure in the existing Kresge College complex. Public agencies and members of the public are invited to learn more about the proposed project and to provide oral comments on the range of issues to be addressed in the DEIR. Where:

Kresge Town Hall, Porter Kresge Road Kresge College, UC Santa Cruz Main Campus

When:

Tuesday, April 17, 2018, 5–7pm.

For more information, call 459-3732

KIDS DAY DOWNTOWN It’s adults day everyday, so isn’t it about time we stop being so selfish and focus on the next generation of Santa Cruzans? In celebration of kids everywhere, the Downtown Association has brought back ‘Kids Day,’ a fun-filled bubble bash in downtown Santa Cruz. There will be yoga, dance, facepainting and of course tons of yummy food for even the pickiest of eaters. INFO: 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Downtown Santa Cruz, Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. downtownsantacruz.com/kids. Free.

<34 1-2:30 p.m. The Episcopal Church, 125 Canterbury Drive, Aptos. easepd.org/ singing. Free.

FRIDAY 4/13 ARTS OUR TOWN BY THORNTON WILDER Our Town, set in the early 20th century, has been described as “the record of a tiny New Hampshire village as created by the lives of its most humble inhabitants.” It invites reflection on how our country has changed over the past century. Yet the play is less about a particular time than about time itself, and the passing ephemeral quality of all life. 8 p.m. Center Stage Theater, 1001 Center St, Santa Cruz. 662-2238. $25/$10.

‘EVOLUTION OF ORGANIC’—SANTA CRUZ PREMIERE Santa Cruz Premiere of the long-awaited film Evolution of Organic by Mark Kitchell. Learn how organic agriculture developed from some hippie dreams in

Marin County and at UCSC, among other California locales, to a major consumer preference, with outlooks for future tweaking into regenerative agriculture. Speakers and Q&A follow the film. A benefit for the Homeless Garden Project, Community Agroecology Network (CAN), and Mesa Verde Gardens. 6-9 p.m. Veterans Memorial Building, 846 Front St., Santa Cruz. 4265755. $17.

CABRILLO THEATRE ARTS PRESENTS MANY ROADS—AN EVENING OF SHORT PLAYS An exciting journey through the voices of 10 short plays directed by 10 new directors under the Artistic Direction of Sarah Albertson. 7:30 p.m. Cabrillo Black Box Theater, 6500 Soquel Drive, Aptos. 4796154. $17/$15.

SECOND FRIDAY Come join our Artists Reception on the second Friday of every month with live music and light appetizers. 6:30 p.m. Hotel Paradox, 611 Ocean St., Santa Cruz. 855-425-7200. >38


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CALENDAR <37

FOOD & WINE

WATSONVILLE FARMERS MARKET

ŶƚĞƌͲdŽͲtŝŶ ϮŵŽŶƚŚƐŽĨ ĐŽŵŵĞƌĐŝĂůͲĨƌĞĞ <W/'ƐƚƌĞĂŵĂƚ <W/'͘ĐŽŵ

This market is in the heart of the famously bountiful Pajaro Valley. Peaceful and family-oriented, the Latino heritage of this community gives this market a “mercado” feel. 2-7 p.m. 200 Main St., Watsonville.

LOCAL BY LOCALS Every Friday we’re filling our halls and hearts with live music as well as creating craft cocktails and pouring local wines and beers. All made locally. Come celebrate the goodness created in Santa Cruz. 3-6 p.m. Hotel Paradox, 611 Ocean St., Santa Cruz. 425-7100 or hotelparadox.com.

HEALTH VITAMIN B12 FRIDAY Every Friday is B12

The Fresh

ƌŽƚŚĞƌƐŽŵĂƚŽƐĞΎŚƌŝƐ^ƚĂƉůĞƚŽŶΎ:ĂƐŽŶ/ƐďĞůůΎ:DĐWŚĞƌƐŽŶ >ƵŬĂƐEĞůƐŽŶΎDŝĐŚĂĞů&ƌĂŶƚŝΎEĂƚŚĂŶŝĞůZĂƚĞůŝĨĨΎEŝŬŬŝ>ĂŶĞ

The Faves

ůĂĐŬďĞƌƌLJ^ŵŽŬĞΎĞǀŝůDĂŬĞƐϯΎ:ĂĐŬŝĞ'ƌĞĞŶĞΎ:ŽĞŽŶĂŵĂƐƐĂ <ĞŶŶLJtĂLJŶĞ^ŚĞƉĂƌĚΎEŽƌĂŚ:ŽŶĞƐΎdĞĚĞƐĐŚŝͲdƌƵĐŬƐĂŶĚ

Happy Hour at Thrive Natural Medicine. B12 improves energy, memory, mood, immunity, sleep, metabolism and stress resilience. Come on down for a discounted shot and start your weekend off right! Walk-ins only. 3-6 p.m. Thrive Natural Medicine, 2840 Park Ave., Soquel. thrivenatmed.com/b12injections or 515-8699. $15.

SATURDAY 4/14 ARTS SANTA CRUZ JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL

The Santa Cruz Jewish Film Festival presents Ben-Gurion, Epilogue, a documentary featuring archival footage and a long lost ŽŶŶŝĞZĂŝƚƚΎ'ƌĂƚĞĨƵůĞĂĚΎ:ŽŚŶŶLJĂƐŚΎ>ŽƐ>ŽďŽƐ interview with the founding father of Israel >LJůĞ>ŽǀĞƚƚΎZŽďĞƌƚĂƌů<ĞĞŶΎdŽŵWĞƚƚLJΎtŝůůŝĞEĞůƐŽŶ speaking on war and peace, religion, Zionism, and moral character. The movie won Best Documentary at the 2017 Israeli Film and TV Academy Awards. It will be preceded by a reception and fundraising raffle starting at 5:45 pm. 7 p.m. Temple Beth El, 3055 Porter Gulch Road, Aptos. 239-5208. Free.

APRIL 11-17, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

The Legends

38

Alliance Française  11 week French classes @ the MAH, starting April 2018

12 students per class max. Call 305Ͳ877Ͳ2938 or email delphine.houssin@afscv.org to reserve your spot.

SECOND SATURDAYS IN HISTORIC DOWNTOWN FELTON WITH MUSIC BY WHISKEY WEST Join us in downtown

It’s not  too late  to register

A bientôt!

Felton for our inaugural Second Saturday Festivities. Bring the whole family down to enjoy pop-up vendors, local artisans, and more. Be sure to catch the toe-tapping outlaw country, honky tonk, bluegrass sound of Whiskey West on the Felton Community Deck. The band will perform two 45-minute sets between noon and 3 p.m. 10 a.m-6 p.m. Felton Community Deck, Hwy. 9. 508-0620. Free.

‘OUR TOWN’ BY THORNTON WILDER Our Town, set in the early 20th century, has

been described as “the record of a tiny New Hampshire village as created by the lives of its most humble inhabitants.” It invites reflection on how our country has changed over the past century. Yet the play is less about a particular time than about time itself, and the passing ephemeral quality of all life. 8 p.m. Center Stage Theater, 1001 Center St, Santa Cruz. 662-2238. $25/$10.

COMEDY NIGHT FOR RELAY FOR LIFE Featuring the Best of Local and Bay Area comedians. Proceeds will benefit the Scotts Valley Relay for Life. If you're planning on eating, come early for a bite to eat and mention the Relay Fundraiser to your server from 5 to 9 p.m. and Bruno’s will donate 20 percent to the Scotts Valley Relay for Life event. 6-9 p.m. Bruno’s Bar and Grill, 230G Mount Hermon Road, Scotts Valley. 4382227. Free.

STEP INTO FASHION Shop 40 fabulous Bay Area Designers and support cancer patient education and care in Santa Cruz County. Unique designs, wearable art, jewelry, handbags, accessories all at affordable prices. Complimentary Tea at 2 p.m. Entrance fee includes parking. Box lunches are also available for $15 on pre order. All proceeds benefit PAMF cancer patient care and education. 10 a.m. Cocoanut Grove, 400 Beach St., Santa Cruz. 423-2053 or stepintofashion.org. $15. SANTA CRUZ BONSAI KAI 30TH ANNUAL EXHIBIT The Santa Cruz Bonsai Kai is a local club devoted to promoting and teaching bonsai as an art form. The beautifully exhibited trees are the product of many years of horticultural development and artistic creativity.The highlight of the show will be at 2 p.m. when Bonsai Master, Jonas Dupuich will demonstrate the techniques of creating an artistic tree from common nursery stock. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. MAH, 705 Front St., Santa Cruz. 469-0688 or santacruzbonsaikai.com. $5.

CABRILLO THEATRE ARTS PRESENTS MANY ROADS—AN EVENING OF SHORT PLAYS An exciting journey through the voices of 10 short plays directed by ten new directors under the Artistic Direction of Sarah Albertson. 7:30 p.m. Cabrillo Black Box Theater, 6500 Soquel Drive, Aptos. 4796154. $17/$15.

FOOD & WINE TAPAS AND WINE PAIRING EVENT WITH CHEF DIEGO FELIX Come and join us for a very special afternoon at


CALENDAR Burrell School Vineyards with guest Chef Diego Felix. Straight from the beautiful land of Buenos Aires to our own blooming rose garden, Chef Felix will be pairing five different dishes to go with our estate grown varietals. With live music, five different wines to taste, passed around tapas in the rose garden, and special case discounts for the guests, this event is not to be missed! 3 p.m. Burrell School Vineyards, 24060 Summit Road, Los Gatos. 408-353-6290. $55/$45.

MIDTOWN RELIGIOUS MEDALS BAPTISM FIRST COMMUNION QUINCEAÑERA PARTY FAVORS

APTOS FARMERS MARKET AT CABRILLO COLLEGE Voted Good Times best farmers market in Santa Cruz County. With more than 90 vendors, the Aptos Farmers Market offers an unmatched selection of locally grown produce and specialty foods. 8 a.m.-Noon, Saturdays, Cabrillo College. montereybayfarmers.org or akeller@montereybayfarmers.org. Free.

UNIQUE ORIGINAL MERMAID DESIGNS In-House Screen Printed and Embroidered Clothing, Hats, Home Decor “Shell” Phone: (831) 345-3162 • 718 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz

HOURS: MON-FRI 9-5PM, SAT 12-4PM Instagram.com/The_Mermaid_Shop_ Etsy.com/shop/SantaCruzMermaidShop Facebook.com/SantaCruzMermaidShop

WESTSIDE FARMERS MARKET The Westside Farmers Market takes place every week at the corner of Highway 1 and Western Drive, situated on the northern edge of Santa Cruz’s greenbelt. This market serves the communities of the west-end of Santa Cruz including Bonny Doon, North Coast, UCSC Campus and is a short trip from downtown. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Mission Street and Western Drive, Santa Cruz. 454-0566.

PARTNER YOGA AND WINE TASTING Share sacred energy the second and fourth Saturdays of each month at Poetic Cellars Winery. Wine tasting will follow the class. 10 a.m.-Noon. Poetic Cellars, 5000 N. Rodeo Gulch Road, Soquel. 462-3478.

PUBLIC BREWERY TOUR OF SANTA CRUZ—WESTSIDE ROUTE Hop aboard

GROUPS FREE TAX PREPARATION—MOUNTAIN COMMUNITY RESOURCES Community Ventures is hosting a free tax preparation site at Mountain Community Resources. If you have not yet done your taxes >40

1224 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz

SILHOUETTE® WINDOW SHADINGS AND LUMINETTE® PRIVACY SHEERS

From glare to glow. For less.

M-F: 10am-4pm Sat: By Appointment

831.466.9167

Save now on Hunter Douglas window fashions.

Enjoy generous rebates on qualifying purchases of light-diffusing styles April 14–June 25, 2018.

100* ON QUALIFYING PURCHASES

REBATES STARTING AT $

mccartyswindowfashions.com

McCarty's Window Fashions *Manufacturere’s mail-in rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made 4/14/18-6/25/18 from participating dealers in the U.S. only. Rebate will be issued in the form of 1224 Soquel Ave a prepaid reward card and mailed within 4 weeks of rebate claim receipt. Funds do not expire. Subject to applicable law, a $2.00 monthly fee will be assessed against card CA Additional limitations may apply. Ask participating dealer for details and rebate form. ©2018 Hunter Douglas. balance 6 months after card issuance and eachSanta month Cruz, thereafter. M-F: 10:00 am - 4:00 pm Douglas or their respective owners. 18Q2NPS&LC1 All rights reserved. All trademarks used herein are the property of Hunter Sat: By Appointment Sun: Closed 831-466-9167 www.mccartyswindowfashions.com

*Manufacturer’s mail-in rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made 4/14/18–6/25/18 from participating dealers in the U.S. only. Offer excludes HDOrigins™ and Nantucket™ Window Shadings, a collection of Silhouette® Window Shadings. Rebate will be issued in the form of a prepaid reward card and mailed within 4 weeks of rebate claim receipt. Funds do not expire. Subject to applicable law, a $2.00 monthly fee will be assessed against card balance 6 months after card issuance and each month thereafter. Additional limitations may apply. Ask participating dealer for details and rebate form. ©2018 Hunter Douglas. All rights reserved. All trademarks used herein are the property of Hunter Douglas or their respective owners. 18Q2NPS&LC1

Beauty • Treasures • Joy 1119 Soquel Ave

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720-722 Soquel Ave. Santa Cruz 831.457.9245 1481 Freedom Blvd. Watsonville 831.728.4950 idealjewelryca.com SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 11-17, 2018

a unique ride on the newest member to the Brew Cruz family, Slowboy. A 1964 split-window VW Bus offers vintage transport over the course of four hours. Passengers receive discounted beers at each location, the opportunity to meet the brew masters, and a knowledgeable driver who will guide you through the day with discussions of beer and local history. Noon. Dream Inn Santa Cruz, 175 West Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz. scbrewcruz.com. $75/$45.

McCARTY’S WINDOW FASHIONS

Watches, Necklaces, Rings, Bracelets, Earrings Gold, Silver and Diamonds Custom Engraving

39


CALENDAR <39 please join us on April 13 to get your

w/this coupon *rates apply to cash only

taxes done. Bring photo ID, Social Security or ITIN cards, all 2017 tax documents needed to file return, child care cost for 2017, and a voided check for direct deposit (optional). Noon. Nueva Vista Community Resources, 711 E. Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz. 423-5747 or sccvonline.org. Free.

Ancient Chinese Full Body Deep Tissue Table Massage

GRAND OPENING OF JOE & LINDA ALIBERTI CLUBHOUSE The community

$5 Off Pack (1) $28/hr. ~ Pack (2) $48/hr. Locally owned business serving local people living healthy lives.

China Foot Massage & Reflexology Call for appointment 831-464-0168

APRIL 11-17, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

4140 Ste. “T” Capitola Rd (By Big 5, Near D.M.V.) Open 7 days a week 10am–10pm

40

is invited to a grand opening event for the Boys & Girls Clubs, Joe & Linda Aliberti Clubhouse. Serving kids and teens in Scotts Valley and San Lorenzo Valley communities, the Joe & Linda Aliberti Clubhouse features a 3,000-square-foot building and large outside play area. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Joe & Linda Aliberti Clubhouse, 5060 Scotts Valley Drive, Scotts Valley. 423-3138 or boysandgirlsclub.info. Free.

HEALTH B12 HAPPY HOUR Come and get your Happy Hour B12 shot. Your body needs B12 to create energy and is not well absorbed from the diet or in capsule form. Everyone can benefit from a B12 shot! After B12 injections many patients feel a natural boost in energy. 10 a.m.-Noon. Santa Cruz Naturopathic Medical Center, 736 Chestnut St., Santa Cruz. 477-1377 or scnmc.com. $29/$17.

SUNDAY 4/15 ARTS ‘OUR TOWN’ BY THORNTON WILDER Our Town, set in the early 20th century, has been described as “the record of a tiny New Hampshire village as created by the lives of its most humble inhabitants.” It invites reflection on how our country has changed over the past century. Yet the play is less about a particular time than about time itself, and the passing ephemeral quality of all life. 2 p.m. Center Stage Theater, 1001 Center St., Santa Cruz. 662-2238. $25/$10.

SANTA CRUZ JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL Two extraordinary films offered free to the public: Tijuana Jews tells the story of European and Middle Eastern Jews who immigrated to the border city in the early 20th century and thrived there through the Prohibition era and to the present day. At 2 p.m. Facing Fear will screen. This powerful 24-minute film was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Short in 2014. It tells the true story of a gay man’s unlikely meeting and reconciliation with the former neo-Nazi skinhead who nearly beat him to death 25 years before. The film will be followed by a live Q&A with the principal subject of the movie in attendance. 1-3:30 p.m. Cabrillo College Forum 318 Union St., Watsonville. 469-9467 or santacruzjewishfilmfestival.com. Free.

MUSIC

SANTA CRUZ BONSAI KAI 30TH ANNUAL EXHIBIT The Santa Cruz Bonsai

BLUE WITH GEOFF ALLEN Guitarist

Kai is a local club devoted to promoting and teaching bonsai as an art form. The beautifully exhibited trees are the product of many years of horticultural development and artistic creativity.The highlight of the show will be at 2 p.m. when Bonsai Master, Sensei Katsumi Kinoshita will demonstrate the techniques of creating an artistic tree from common nursery stock. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. MAH, 705 Front St., Santa Cruz. 469-0688 or santacruzbonsaikai.com. $5.

Geoff Allen and friends lead a musical trip through the last 40 years. Family-friendly venue. 6-9 p.m. Davenport Roadhouse Restaurant, 1 Davenport Ave., Davenport. davenportroadhouse.com. Free.

OPEN JAM WITH TIMOTHY THE BASS PLAYER Come join the jam at The Blue Lounge, or just dance and listen. Happy hour drink specials. 5-8 p.m. The Blue Lounge, 529 Seabright Ave., Santa Cruz. 423-7771. Free.

VOLUNTEER VOLUNTEER TO FEED THE HUNGRY WITH FOOD NOT BOMBS We need help sharing vegan meals with the hungry every Saturday and Sunday in downtown Santa Cruz: Cooking from Noon-3 p.m, 418 Front St., Santa Cruz. 515-8234. Serving from 4-6 p.m. at the Post Office, 840 Front St., Santa Cruz.

ARTIST RECEPTION—THE WHOLE BALL OF WAX Featuring encaustic paintings by 22 artists working at the Rocket Encaustic Studio. Encaustics is an ancient and cutting-edge method of painting using molten beeswax and pigment. Music: Jazz with a Twist trio. 2-5 p.m. Felix Culpa Gallery, 107 Elm St., Santa Cruz. felixkulpa.com. Free.

new directors under the Artistic Direction of Sarah Albertson. 2 p.m. Cabrillo Black Box Theater, 6500 Soquel Drive, Aptos. 4796154. $17/$15.

KIDS DAY 2018 The Downtown Association of Santa Cruz presents Kids Day 2018. Kids Day is a revival of a beloved Downtown annual celebration. Exhibitors will line the sidewalks of Pacific Ave. from Water St. to Cathcart St. with fun activities and resources for the youth in our community and many downtown businesses will be offering discounts and specials for kids. Join us for a fun day of performances, activities, face painting, treasure hunts, and more. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Downtown Santa Cruz. downtownsantacruz.com/kids. Free. SPRINGTIME GREENWOOD ARTS Come uplift yourselves and our world in springtime, through music, free-form movement with colored materials, pastel drawing, creative writing and sharing circle. Includes all art and writing materials. No previous experience necessary. 2-4 p.m. Polo Grounds Park, 2255 Huntington Drive, Aptos. 454-7938. $10/free for children.

CLASSES IMMERSE IN TRIYOGA LEVEL 2 & 3 TEACHER TRAINING One weekend per month through to June. This program can be taken to deepen the practice, to study all Level 2 series, to be introduced to Level 3 sequences each weekend that demonstrate the progression to Level 3, and to certify in Level 2 and partially in Level 3. 12:30 p.m. TriYoga Center, 708 Washington St., Santa Cruz. info@triyoga.com or triyoga-santacruz. com.

FOOD & WINE PUBLIC BREWERY TOUR OF SANTA CRUZ—WESTSIDE ROUTE Hop aboard a unique ride on the newest member to the Brew Cruz family, Slowboy. A 1964 splitwindow VW Bus offers vintage transport over the course of four hours. Passengers receive discounted beers at each location, the opportunity to meet the brew masters, and a knowledgeable driver who will guide you through the day with discussions of beer and local history. Noon. Dream Inn Santa Cruz, 175 West Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz. scbrewcruz. com. $75/$45.

CABRILLO THEATRE ARTS PRESENTS MANY ROADS—AN EVENING OF SHORT PLAYS An exciting journey through

MUSIC

the voices of 10 short plays directed by ten

STEADY SUNDAZE REGGAE All-ages


CALENDAR

OUTDOORS WATSONVILLE NATURE WALKS Come experience the incredible bird life that the Wetlands of Watsonville have to offer. Located along the globally important Pacific Flyway, the Wetlands of Watsonville provide a resting stop for birds on their migratory journey. The wetland system of sloughs and their uplands offer breeding and year-round habitat for more than 220 species of shorebirds, waterfowl, raptors and song birds. Bilingual walk every Sunday at 1:30 p.m. City of Watsonville-Nature Center, 30 Harkins Slough Road, Watsonville. cityofwatsonville.org. Free.

MONDAY 4/16 FOOD & WINE SOUTH AMERICAN WINE TASTING AND TAPAS AT HOME RESTAURANT IN SOQUEL Enjoy a deliciously elegant

ARTS SANTA CRUZ JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL Extraordinary movies presented free to the public! At 6:15 p.m. The Wandering Muse travels the world to deliver a kaleidoscope of Jewish-influenced music, from tangoinfused Klezmer to Hebrew prayers sung in East African harmonies. At 8 p.m. the quirky romantic comedy Keep The Change presents a seldom seen story of autistic adults in relationship. The film won Best Narrative Feature and Best New Narrative Director at the 2017 Tribeca Film Festival. 6:15-9:30 p.m. Del Mar Theatre, 1124 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. 426-7500. Free.

Legendary Collective, the weekly Santa Cruz Word Church poetry open mic is a community of local writers who recognize the power of spoken word. They gather every Monday for a community writing workshop, then host a 15-slot open mic followed by a different featured poet each week. 4 p.m. Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History, 705 Front St., Santa Cruz. santacruzmah.org. Free.

DRINKING CREATIVELY AT BRUNO’S Join us for a painting party. The artist will provide all of the supplies needed as well as guidance to paint a beautiful scene. Bring your friends, order some drinks and get ready to laugh and have fun with others as you all create your masterpieces. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Bruno’s Bar and Grill, 230G Mount Hermon Road, Scotts Valley. 438-2227 or brunosbarandgrill.com/events. $45.

TUESDAY 4/17 MUSIC DIXIE DREGS—DAWN OF THE DREGS The Dixie Dregs evolved from an Augusta, Georgia band called Dixie Grit, formed by Steve Morse and Andy West in 1970. The complete original lineup of Steve Morse, Rod Morgenstein, Allen Sloan, Andy West and Steve Davidowski is reunited after 40 years. 7:30 p.m. Rio Theatre, 1205 Soquel Avenue, Santa Cruz. 423-8209 or riotheatre.com. $50.

SHANTY SINGING WITH CHARMAS Sing along with Charmas traditional music of the Celtic countries: Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Brittany, and Galicia. This local ensemble plays fiddle, flute, penny whistle, guitar, mandolin, banjo, bohdran, bagpipe, bass and vocal music. Family friendly venue. 6-9 p.m. Davenport Roadhouse Restaurant & Inn, 1 Davenport Ave., Davenport. davenportroadhouse.com. Free.

ARTS SANTA CRUZ JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL Free movie and refreshments! GI Jews tells the profound story of the 550,000 American Jews who served in World War II. These brave men and women fought for their nation and for Jews worldwide against Hitler, bigotry, fascism, and genocide. Preceded by the delightful documentary short Spring Chicken. 2-4 p.m. Aegis, 125 Heather Terrace, Aptos. 684-2700 or santacruzjewishfilmfestival.com. Free.

APRIL

21

Saturday

SAN LORENZO RIVER LEVEE EARTH DAY CLEANUP JOIN US!

10AM-NOON

Saturday, April 21

Meet at Mimi de Marta Park parking lot located at 119 Broadway, Santa Cruz, CA

For more details please visit saveourshores.org/eventscalendar This program is funded by the City of Santa Cruz Clean River, Beaches, and Ocean Fund

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 11-17, 2018

evening sampling wine and tapas at Home Restaurant in Soquel with Colectivo Felix. This event will showcase the immense variety of microclimates and geography of South America and how that translates into wines. Four different varietals from Argentina and Chile will be paired with four small plates. Laura Majano will lead the guided wine tasting while Chef Diego Felix serves Latin American inspired small plates created specifically for each wine. 6-9 p.m. Home Restaurant, 3101 N Main St., Soquel. 805826-7361. $45.

POETRY OPEN MIC A project of the

Photo by Shay Hlavaty

reggae in Santa Cruz outside on the patio at the Jerk House with DJ Daddy Spleece and DJ Ay Que Linda plus guest DJs in the mix. 1-5 p.m. The Jerk House, 2525 Soquel Drive, Santa Cruz. 316-7575. Free.

41


MUSIC CALENDAR

LOVE YOUR

LOCAL BAND

PACIFIC ROOTS Drummer A.J. Aguayo can’t remember exactly when his reggae band Pacific Roots played its first show—he thinks it was 2015, but it might have been 2016. He does remember that the show—a local showcase—went really well. They sold $300 worth of tickets, more than any other band that night. “We were the band that had the biggest crowd. We had a mosh pit. It was insane. It was probably one of the best shows I’ve played, and it was the first show of this band,” Aguayo says. “Right now, the gas pedal is to the floor—that’s how fast we’re moving.”

APRIL 11-17, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Of course, when Aguayo started the band with guitarist/vocalist Carlos Rubalcaba, he didn’t have high expectations.

42

“When we were first starting out, we did not think we’d be at this point where we’re at right here. When you’re starting out in a music group, you’re jamming out, it’s fun. And then we met Jake [White] and Jose [Picazo] and the structure came with it,” says Rubalcaba. The band released its full-length debut about a year ago, which was produced by the Expendables’ Max Peterson. “We’re really excited about coming up with new music where all four of us are contributing,” says White. “We got some songs in the works right now that we want to record later this year, and we’re really excited about those. We’re getting really good feedback from the audience when we play them.” AARON CARNES INFO: 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 17. Moe’s Alley, 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz. $7/adv, $10/door. 479-1854.

MC CHRIS

THURSDAY 4/12 BLUEGRASS

COFFEE ZOMBIE COLLECTIVE Have you ever wondered what Taylor Swift’s “Shake It Off” would sound like as a bluegrass song? How about Wham’s “Careless Whisper,” or Guns ’n’ Roses’ “Sweet Child o’ Mine?” Well, just go check out local favorites Coffee Zombie Collective. They play high energy, sing-along bluegrass versions of all your favorite guilty pleasure karaoke songs, as well as obscure indie tunes. (“In the Aeroplane Over the Sea” by Neutral Milk Hotel, anyone?). The thing is, the group isn’t really technically bluegrass. With the standard string instruments and a ukulele, a trumpet, a kick bass drum, and a lot of unhinged fun, it’s just a blast in a very Santa Cruz, rule-breaking kind of way. AC

starting point, you can’t do much better than MC Chris, whose weird highpitched voice, geek culture references, and DIY beats will have you basking in nerdiness in pure ecstasy. I mean, the multiple Star Wars-themed songs alone earn him a seat at the throne. AC INFO: 9 p.m. Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $15/adv, $17/door. 429-4135.

THURSDAY & FRIDAY 4/12 & 4/13 HIP-HOP

SOB X RBE

MC CHRIS

SOB x RBE (which stands for “Strictly Only Brothers Real Boi Entertainment”) hail from Vallejo, and have blown up into international stars in just a few short years, starting with the release of last year’s self-titled mixtape. This year looks even more promising as the hip hop quartet released their debut full-length, Gangin, in February to critical acclaim and were featured on the Black Panther soundtrack, produced by the current king of hip-hop, Kendrick Lamar. MAT WEIR

For anyone rifling through the names of nerd rappers and looking for a good

INFO: 9 p.m. Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $30/adv, $35/door. 429-4135.

INFO: 7:30 p.m. Michael’s on Main, 2591 S. Main, Soquel. $12/adv, $15/door. 479-9777.

NERDCORE

FRIDAY 4/13 JAZZ

DIANNE REEVES Friday the 13th is your lucky day. Lucky, that is, if you procure tickets to see newly minted NEA Jazz Master Dianne Reeves, a vocalist with a sound so sumptuously beautiful she banishes all thoughts of ill fortune. Usually heard in concert halls and theaters, Reeves rarely plays intimate spaces like Kuumbwa, a venue with which she shares decades of history. She’s joined by her incomparable band, including longtime pianist and music director Peter Martin and Brazilian guitarist Romero Lubambo, a jazz giant in his own right. ANDREW GILBERT INFO: 7 and 9 p.m. Kuumbwa Jazz, 320-2 Cedar St., Santa Cruz. $45-$60. 427-2227.

TRIBUTE

SUN KINGS The Sun Kings pay tribute to the Beatles as authentically as possible by recreating the legendary band’s music, note for note, exactly as it was recorded. Rather than relying on costumes and caricatures, the Sun Kings rely on the members’ technical and melodic expertise


MUSIC

BE OUR GUEST TONY LINDSAY PRESENTS: BLACK MAGIC

DIANNE REEVES

and commitment to getting the songs just right. Considered one of the premier Beatles tribute bands in the country, the Sun Kings boast a repertoire of over 150 songs. The Kings are currently celebrating the 50th anniversary of The White Album with performances up and down the West Coast. CJ INFO: 8 p.m. Flynn’s Cabaret, 6275 Hwy. 9, Felton. $22/adv, $25/door. 335-2800.

FUNK

GHOST-NOTE Drummer Robert “Sput” Searight and percussionist Nate Werth are the driving heart of the Grammy winning jazz and funk collective Snarky Puppy. They’re also the masterminds behind Ghost-Note, a “conscious funk” outfit that spotlights their tremendous skills and chemistry, and also gives the rotating cast of all-star band members plenty of space to do what they do best. With a combined resumé that includes work with Norah Jones, Snoop Dogg, Justin Timberlake, David Crosby, Q-Tip and more, these two are quiet powerhouses of the music world. CJ INFO: 9 p.m. Moe’s Alley, 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz. $12/adv, $15/door. 479-1854.

JAZZ

REBIRTH BRASS BAND The Rebirth Brass Band is steeped in the tradition of New Orleans jazz, and over the last 35 years has infused funk and hip-hop, among other genres, into its sound. The band’s unique swing has earned them special acclaim in pop culture, leading to an appearance on HBO’s Treme, and a 2012 Grammy Award. The members’ infectious playing commands even the grumpiest of people to shake their hips and swing their feet. MW INFO: 8:30 p.m. Moe’s Alley, 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz. $25/adv, $30/ door. 479-1854.

MONDAY 4/16 COUNTRY

BIRDCLOUD This Nashville duo plays twangy satirical songs, which isn’t necessarily anything new, but the brazen crudeness with which they do it is either

unsettling or hilarious, depending on your personality. With songs like “Warshin’ My Big Ol’ Pussy,” “Saving Myself For Jesus,” “Indianer” and “Black Guys,” the twosome crosses the line of good taste a thousand times over, and lets the listener deal with their songs’ implicit irony without any wink-winks to ease the comic tension. AC INFO: 9 p.m. Crepe Place, 1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. $12/adv, $15/door. 429-6994.

TUESDAY 4/17 ROCK

DIXIE DREGS Formed in Augusta, Georgia in the 1970s, the Dixie Dregs helped shape a generation of boundary-pushing rock with a mostly-instrumental blend of hard rock, Southern rock, progressive metal, and classical music. Led by guitarist/composer Steve Morse of Deep Purple, and bass guitarist and composer Andy West, the Dregs remain a “loose collection” of former members who join forces for performances, studio projects and tours. CJ INFO: 7:30 p.m. Rio Theatre, 1205 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. $50. 423-8209.

INFO: 7 p.m. Thursday, May 3. Kuumbwa Jazz, 320-2 Cedar St., Santa Cruz. $25/adv, $30/door. 4272227. WANT TO GO? Go to santacruz. com/giveaways before 11 a.m. on Tuesday, April 24 to find out how you could win a pair of tickets to the show.

IN THE QUEUE STELLA BY BARLIGHT

Standout local jazz vocalist and her band. Wednesday at Crow’s Nest ROCK COLLECTION

All-star jam band led by Melvin Seals. Friday at Moe’s Alley SCOTT BRADLEE’S POSTMODERN JUKEBOX

Contemporary pop hits reimagined as doo-wop, ragtime and Motown sounds. Saturday at Rio Theatre ANDRE THIERRY & ZYDECO MAGIC

Acclaimed Zydeco act. Saturday at Michael’s on Main ALBOROSIE

Italian reggae artist. Saturday at Catalyst

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 11-17, 2018

SATURDAY 4/14

SUNDAY 4/15

Tony Lindsay barely needs an introduction for Bay Area music lovers. As lead vocalist for Santana for 25 years, and a multi-faceted bandleader in his own right, Lindsay is a familiar presence on the local scene. Lindsay’s latest project, Black Magic, sees him collaborating with an ace band, including standout blues guitarist Chris Cain. The band traverses blues, soul and jazz and shines a light on Lindsay’s awardwinning vocal chops. CAT JOHNSON

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Thursday April 12th 8:30pm $10/15 A Tribute To PHISH With

CHUM

LIVE MUSIC

Friday April 13th 9pm $20/25

All Star Jam/Rock Favorites Return

ROCK COLLECTION

Melvin Seals, Greg Anton, Stu Allen, Dan “Lebo” Lebowitz, John-Paul McLean & Stephanie Salva Saturday April 14th 9pm $12/15 SNARKY PUPPY Side Project

GHOST NOTE

Robert Sput Searight & Nate Werth Of SNARKY PUPPY w All Star Band

Sunday April 15th 8:30pm $25/30

Grammy Winners From New Orleans

REBIRTH BRASS BAND Tuesday April 17th 8:30pm $7/10 Live Reggae Showcase

SENSAMOTION PACIFIC ROOTS

& ANIMO CRUZ ACOUSTIC

WED

4/11

THE APPLETON GRILL 410 Rodriguez St, Watsonville APTOS ST. BBQ 8059 Aptos St, Aptos

Al Frisby 6-8p

AQUARIUS RESTAURANT Santa Cruz Dream Inn 175 W Cliff Dr, Santa Cruz

APRIL 11-17, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

44

May 4th May 5th May 6th May 9th May 10th May 11th May 12th May 17th May 18th

SOULWISE + Aloha Radio RAY CHARLES PROJECT (afternoon) MIKE & THE MOONPIES (eve) EDGE OF THE WEST + CORAL CREEK THE ENGLISH BEAT LYRICS BORN SUGARAY RAYFORD (afternoon) GRANT FARM (eve) KABAKA PYRAMID KYLE HOLLINGSWORTH + HOT BUTTERED RUM SUNNY SWEENEY + WARD DAVIS SAMBADÁ + FLOR DE CAÑA LYDIA PENSE & COLD BLOOD ROGUE WAVE MAOLI THE MERMEN LOUISIANA LOVE ACT FLAMIN’ GROOVIES COFFIS BROTHERS + The Sextones

WWW.MOESALLEY.COM 1535 Commercial Way Santa Cruz 831.479.1854

SUN

4/15

Watsonville Film Festival: Pink Saris 7p

Sonora Dinamita 9p

Scott Miller 6-8p

James Murray 6-8p

Lloyd Whitely 1p Kid Andersen & John Blues Mechanics 6-8p “Blues” Boyd 6-8p

Jazz Free 7p

Jazz Free 7p

Jazz Free 7p

MON

4/16

TUE

4/17

Dogtooth & Nail 8p Broken Shades 6-8p

Mojo Mix 6-8p

Top 40 Music Videos Free 10p

The Box (Goth Night) 9p

Metal Monday Free 9p

Saucy Square Dance $5 9p

THE BLUE LOUNGE 529 Seabright Ave, Santa Cruz

Wednesdays Unplugged The Eldorados w/ Monica 9p Free 7:30p

Karaoke Free 9p

Karaoke Free 9p

Comedy Night 9p

Karaoke Free 9p

Free Pool

BOARDWALK BOWL 115 Cliff St, Santa Cruz

Karaoke 8p-Close

Karaoke 8p-Close

Nickle Experience 9-11:45p

Karaoke 6p-Close

Karaoke 6p-Close

Karaoke 6p-Close

Karaoke 8p-Close

BOCCI’S CELLAR 140 Encinal St, Santa Cruz

Magick Blues Band Free 8p

Karaoke Free 8p

Swing Dance $5 5:30p Retrograde Soul, Paper Towel 8p

Kenny Thomas & the Southern Baptists & more Free 8p

SC Jazz Society Free 3:30p Watercolor Weekend & more 8p

Shane Klein Free 8p

Comedy w/ Shwa Free 8p

Karaoke 9-12:30a

Karaoke 9-12:30a

BRITANNIA ARMS 110 Monterey Ave, Capitola CATALYST 1011 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Alvvays, The Drums $20/$25 7p

SOB x RBE SOLD OUT 8p

SOB x RBE SOLD OUT 8p

Alborosie $25/$28 8p

CATALYST ATRIUM 1011 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

U.S. Bombs $16/$20 8:30p

MC Chris $15/$17 8:30p

Turnover $20/$24 8:30p

PVRIS $25 7p

Cumbia/Psychedelic/Latin

April 21st April 22nd April 23rd April 26th April 27th April 28th April 29th April 29th May 2nd May 3rd

4/14

SAT Rose & the Honeysuckers Free 6:30-9:30p

The Undead, Rusted Anchor& more $10 9p

Thursday April 19th 8:30pm $7/10

ALO

4/13

Joe Cutter vs. Lyrical I & Comedy Night/80s more $5 9p Night Free 8:30p

DIRTY REVIVAL + POST STREET RHYTHM PEDDLERS

420 Bash With Animal Liberation Orchestra

FRI

BLUE LAGOON 923 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Soul, Funk & New Orleans Hot Jazz

Friday April 20th 9pm $20/25

4/12

Ménage Free 6:30-9p

Wednesday April 18th 8:30pm $7/10

TROPA MAGICA + QIENSAVE

THU

ABBOTT SQUARE 118 Cooper St, Santa Cruz

OPEN LATE EVERY NIGHT! wednesday 4/11

roselit bone w/ midicine moon and noctooa

9PM - $10 door

thursday 4/12 bart & the bedazzled w/ hod and the helpers and ollie’s

9PM - $8 door

friday 4/13

the ajimas w/ the fading sound and zealousy

Show 9pm $8 Door

saturday 4/14

thunderegg w/ bulletproof hearts and pieces

Show 9pm $8 Door

monday 4/16

birdcloud w/ chris crofton

Show 9pm $12 ADV - $15 Door

tuesday 4/17

7 come 11 Show 9pm $6 Door

wednesday 4/18

joe kaplow w/ wild iris and ladies of sound

Show 9pm $10 Door

MIDTOWN SANTA CRUZ 1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz

429-6994

Singer/Songwriter Showcase 9p-12:30a Strangelove $30/$35 7p

Jungle $20 8p Ron Gallo $12/$15 7p


LIVE MUSIC WED

4/11

CAVA CAPITOLA WINE BAR 115 San Jose Ave, Capitola

THU

4/12

Mike P.Z. 6:30-9:30p

CILANTROS 1934 Main St, Watsonville

Hippo Happy Hour 5:30-7:30p

CORK AND FORK 312 Capitola Ave, Capitola

Open Mic Free 7-10p

CREPE PLACE 1134 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz

Roselit Bone w/ Medicine Man & Noctooa $10 9p

CROW’S NEST 2218 E. Cliff Dr, Santa Cruz

Stella by Barlight $3 8p

FRI

4/13

Dave D’Oh 7-10p

SUN

4/15

MON

4/16

Bart & the Bedazzled w/ Hod & the Helpers $8 9p Rose & the Honeysuckers $5 8:30p

The Ajimas w/ The Fading Sound & Zealousy $8 9p

Thunderegg w/ Bulletproof Hearts & Pieces $8/$10 8p

The Messiahs $6 9p

Room 9 $7 9:30p

Birdcloud w/ Chris Crofton $12/$15 9p

4/17

Funk Night ft. 7 Come 11 $6 9p

Live Comedy $7 9p Shanty Singing w/ Charmas Free 6-9p

Gary Blackburn Free 6:30-8:30p

MASTER CLASS: SCOTT SORKIN IMPROVISATION WORKSHOP Approaching material through memorization and improvisation. Thursday, April 12 • 7 pm

BOB & JOEY JACKSON MUSIC THERAPY PROGRAM BENEFIT Supporting Hospice of Santa Cruz County’s music therapy program. Friday, April 13 • 7 & 9 pm

DIANNE REEVES One of the pre-eminent jazz vocalists in the world. Saturday, April 14 • 8:30 pm

SIN SISTERS BURLESQUE Tickets: eventbrite.com Sunday, April 15 • 7 pm

Southern Drawl Band $15/$20 7:30p

The Sun Kings $22/$25 8p

The Beggar Kings $15/$20 8p

AN EVENING OF GOSPEL & JAZZ WITH THE SHINING SOULS FEATURING TAMMI BROWN Tickets: brownpapertickets.com

Al Pancho $18/$20 8p

KickBack Free 8p Scott Sorkin Improvisation Workshop Free 7p Robin Williams Tribute Experience $17/$20 7:30p

TUE

Paul Logan 3-6p

The Beach Cowboys Free 7-10p

THE FISH HOUSE 972 Main St, Watsonville

MICHAEL’S ON MAIN 2591 Main St, Soquel

4/14

TBA 7-10p

Blue w/ Geoff Allen Free 6-9p

DON QUIXOTE’S 6275 Hwy 9, Felton

KUUMBWA JAZZ 320-2 Cedar St, Santa Cruz

SAT

KPIG Happy Hour 5:30-7:30p

DAV. ROADHOUSE 1 Davenport Ave, Davenport DISCRETION BREWING 2703 41st Ave, Soquel

Wednesday, April 11 • 7 pm • FREE!

Bob & Joey Jackson Music Therapy Program Benefit $45/$50 7p Coffee Zombie Collective $12/$15 7:30p

Diane Reeves $45/$50 7 & 9p

Sin Sisters Burlesque $20-$40 8:30p

7th Wave Free 5p The Louisiana Picnic Ten O’Clock Lunch Band & Dance $12/$15 2p $10 8p The Joint Chiefs $6 8p

An Evening of Gospel & Jazz w/ The Shining Souls $20/$25 7p Grateful Sundays Free 5:30p

Monday, April 16 • 7 pm Lionel Loueke Trio $25/$30 7p

LIONEL LOUEKE TRIO An inventive & expressive guitarist, combining a wealth of global influences. 1/2 PRICE NIGHT FOR STUDENTS! Thursday, April 19 • 7 pm

THEO CROKER Exlporing infinite musical possibilities with an unfiltered approach on trumpet. 1/2 PRICE NIGHT FOR STUDENTS! Saturday, April 21 • 7:30 pm

DUO DUOS Tickets: snazzyproductions.com Monday, April 23 • 7 pm

WILLIE JONES III QUINTET WITH JEREMY PELT, RALPH MOORE, ERIC REED & GERALD CANNON A bold & innovative drummer with an all-star band. 1/2 PRICE NIGHT FOR STUDENTS! Thursday, April 26 • 7 pm

DAVE STRYKER ORGAN QUARTET A truly distinctive guitarist’s soulful organ ensemble. TERENCE BLANCHARD FEAT. THE E-COLLECTIVE A collective ensemble of musical pioneers, led by a legendary trumpeter. INTERNATIONAL JAZZ DAY! Thursday, May 3 • 7 pm

TONY LINDSAY PRESENTS: BLACK MAGIC WITH SPECIAL GUEST CHRIS CAIN One of the Bay Area’s favorite jazz, blues and soul-infused vocalists, joined by Cain on searing lead guitar. 1/2 PRICE NIGHT FOR STUDENTS!

Unless noted advance tickets at kuumbwajazz.org Dinner served one hour before Kuumbwa prsented concerts. Premium wines & beer available. All ages welcome.

320-2 Cedar St | Santa Cruz 831.427.2227 kuumbwajazz.org

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 11-17, 2018

1/2 PRICE NIGHT FOR STUDENTS! Monday, April 30 • 7 & 9 pm

45


International Music Hall and Restaurant FINE MEXICAN AND AMERICAN FOOD

FLYNN’S CABARET AND STEAKHOUSE will be presenting its Grand Opening soon! Farm-to-table, non-GMO with 40% Vegan, Vegetarian menu. Thu Apr 12

Fri Apr 13

Southern Drawl Band

$15 adv./$20 door Dance – ages 21+ 7:30pm

MOE’S ALLEY 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz

Southern Rockin’ Country music

The Sun Kings

A Beatles Tribute the Way Nature Intended

The Beggar Kings Live Recreations of Classic Rolling Stones Albums

$15 adv./$20 door Dance – ages 21+ 8PM Sun Apr 15

Al Pancho

Roots Reggae artist from Kingston, Jamaica $18 adv./$20 door Dance - ages 21+ 8pm

Wed Apr 18

The Do Rights Burlesque Neo-Burlesque dance troupe

$15 adv./$15 door Dance – ages 21+ 8:30pm Thu Apr 19

Mr. Crowley

Moonalice

Psychedelic Roots Rock Band

Girls’ Night Out

Trivia 8p

4/12

FRI

Virgil Thrasher & Rick Stevens Free 6p

4/13

SAT

Lloyd Whitley Free 6p

4/14

SUN

4/15

MON

Al Frisby 1p Gil De Leon Trio 6p

Magpies Blues Band Free 6p

Chum-A Tribute to Phish The Rock Collection $10/$15 8p $20/$25 9p

Ghost-Note $12/$15 8p

Rebirth Brass Band $25/$30 7:30p

Libation Lab w/ Syntax, King Wizard & more 930p-1:30a

D-ROC 9:30p

Adam Cova 9:30p-1:30a

Rasta Cruz Reggae Party 9:30p

Shotgun Suitor Free 7p

Matt Masih & The Messengers Free 7p

4/16

TUE

Rob Vye Free 6p

4/17

Kid Andersen & John “Blues” Boyd Free 6p

Hip-Hop w/ DJ Marc 9:30p Pint & Pottery 6p

Asher Stern Free 10p-12a

PARADISE BEACH 215 Esplanade, Capitola

Taylor Rae 6p

Vinny Johnson 2p

POET & PATRIOT 320 E. Cedar St, Santa Cruz

THE REEF 120 Union St, Santa Cruz

$15 adv./$20 door Dance – ages 21+ 8pm Sun Apr 22

99 BOTTLES 110 Walnut Ave, Santa Cruz

Laurie Morvan Band

$15 adv./$20 door Dance – ages 21+ 8pm Sat Apr 21

Crunkcertified! 9p

THU

NEW BOHEMIA BREWERY 1030 41st Ave, Santa Cruz

THE RED 200 Locust St, Santa Cruz

Stunning California Blues Axe Slinger

4/11

Preacher Boy Duo Free 6p

MOTIV 1209 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Ozzy Osbourne Tribute

$15 adv./$18 door Dance – ages 21+ 8pm Fri Apr 20

WED MISSION ST. BBQ 1618 Mission St, Santa Cruz

$22 adv./$25 door Dance – ages 21+ 8PM Sat Apr 14

LIVE MUSIC

Roving Sun

Dolce Music 2p

Open Mic 4p Catalina Scramblers

Comedy Open Mic 9-11p

Open Mic 8-11p ‘Geeks Who Drink’ Trivia Night 8p

Acoustic Grooves 6:30p

RIO THEATRE 1205 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz ROSIE MCCANN’S 1220 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Acoustic Grooves 6:30p

Traditional Hawaiian Music 6:30p

Featured Acoustic Hits 12:30 & 6:30p

Jon Foreman of Switchfoot $21.50/$31.50 7p

Hayley Kiyoko $22 8p

Scott Bradlee’s Postmodern Jukebox $42/$63 7 & 9p

Featured Acoustic Hits 12:30 & 6p

Audition Night 6:30p

African World Acoustic 6:30p Dixie Dregs $50 7:30p

Comedy Night 9p

Open Mic 7:30p

The most exciting Ladies’ Night event of the year!

$20 adv./$28 door seated – ages 21+ 8pm Mon Apr 23

Chad Elliot

Timeless and genuine musical poet

$15 adv./$15 door seated <21 w/parent 7:30pm Tues Apr 24

Black Uhuru

Wed Apr 25

The Nordic Fiddlers Bloc Fiddle Trio from Norway, Sweden and the Shetland Islands

$20 adv./$20 door seated <21 w/parent 7pm Thu Apr 26

Zepparella

All Female Led Zeppelin tribute band

$20 adv./$20 door Dance – ages 21+ 8pm Fri Apr 27

Mustache Harbor

Yacht Rock the way you want it, complete with a mustache! $20 adv./$20 door Dance – ages 21+ 8pm

APRIL 11-17, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Sat Apr 28

46

The China Cats

A Tribute to the Grateful Dead

$15 adv./$18 door Dance – ages 21+ 9pm Sun Apr 29

Ken Campbell & Linsey Aitken

From Loch Lomond, Scotland

$17 adv./$17 door seated <21 w/parent 7pm Sat May 5

Achilles’ Wheel w/Sol Nova High Energy Rock & Roll

$15 adv./$20 door Dance – ages 21+ 9pm Thu May 10

The Native Howl w/Dead Country Gentlemen Thrash Grass to kick your ass!

$15 adv./$15 door Dance – ages 21+ 7:30pm Sat May 12

1011 PACIFIC AVE. SANTA CRUZ 831-429-4135

Legendary Reggae band for over 50 years $25 adv./$30 door Dance – ages 21+ 9pm

Corduroy

Pearl Jam Tribute

$15 adv./$20 door Dance – ages 21+ 8pm

COMIN G RIGH T U P

Mon. May 14 Tues. May 15 Thu. May 17 Fri. May 18

Horse Feathers + Dead Horses Mother Island Midnight North Edge of the West

Tickets Now Online at www.donquixotesmusic.com Rockin'Church Service Every Sunday ELEVATION at 10am-11:15am

Wednesday, April 11 • Ages 16+ • THE

ALVVAYS

DRUMS

Wednesday, April 11 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

U.S. BOMBS

Thursday, April 12 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

MC CHRIS

plus Bitforce

Saturday, April 14 • Ages 16+

alborosie Sunday, April 15 • Ages 21+

Strangelove J UNGLE Omar Apollo Tuesday, April 17 • Ages 16+ plus

Tuesday, April 17 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

RON GALLO

plus The Nude Party

Apr 20 Ghastly/ Riot Ten (Ages 16+) Apr 21 Uriah Heep (Ages 21+) Apr 26 Emmure/ Counterparts (Ages 16+) Apr 28 Metalachi/ Fulminate (Ages 21+) May 3 Skizzy Mars/ Oliver Tree (Ages 16+) May 4 Carnifex/ Oceano (Ages 16+) May 7 Rainbow Kitten Surprise (Ages 16+) May 8 Tech N9ne feat. Krizz Kaliko (Ages 16+) May 9 Joey Bada$$/ Boogie (Ages 16+) May 16 Poptone (Ages 16+) May 18 Against Me!/ Chris Farren (Ages 16+) May 19 Desert Daze Caravan (Ages 16+) May 20 YBN Nahmir (Ages 16+) May 24 Alpha Blondy (Ages 16+) Jun 1 Goldfish (Ages 16+) Jun 17 Stars (Ages 16+) Jun 21 Dance Gavin Dance (Ages 16+)

Unless otherwise noted, all shows are dance shows with limited seating.

Tickets subject to city tax & service charge by phone 877-987-6487 & online

www.catalystclub.com

Wed Apr 11 7:30

The Ultimate Robin Williams Experience starring Roger Kabler plus Marc Price $17 adv./$20 door Seated show

Thu. Apr 12 7:30pm

Coffee Zombie Collective

Fri, Apr 20

8:00 pm $27 Gen. Adv. $40 Gold Circle

Rio Theatre

Wild versions of hits & originals $12 adv./$15 door Dance– ages 21 +

7th Wave

Fri. Apr 13 5pm HAPPY HOUR

NO COVER

Fri. Apr 13 8pm

Ten O’Clock Lunch Band w/ Tammi Brown

Sat Apr 14 2pm

THE LOUISIANA PICNIC & DANCE

Sat, Apr 21

7:30 pm $25 Gen. Adv. $40 Gold Circle

Kuumbwa

Motown Gems--Dance Party! $10 adv./$10 door Dance– ages 21 +

Andre Thierry & Zydeco Magic $12 adv./$15 door (Children Under 13 Free) Dance– <21 w/parent

Joint Chiefs

Sat. Apr 14 8pm Funk, acid jazz & classic R&B

$6 adv./$6 door dance- ages 21+

Grateful Sunday

Sun. Apr 8 5:30pm Grateful Dead Tunes

NO COVER

COMING UP

Wed April 18 James Lee Stanley Thu. April 19 Bastard Sons of Johnny Cash Fri. April 20 Joe Robinson Sat. April 21 Wooden Shjips + Kelly Stoltz Mon. April 23 Kinky Friedman Wed. April 25 Kevin Brennan & Wavelength Van MorrisonTribute

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Full Concert Calendar : MichaelsonMainMusic.com

2591 Main St, Soquel, CA 95073

The Duo Quartet: Nina Gerber & Chris Webster;� Pam Delgado & Jeri Jones

Fri, July 20

7:30 pm $26 Gen. Adv. $40 Gold Circle

Rio Theatre

Snazzy at Michael’s on Main Fri, April 20 8pm Joe Robinson $20 Adv/$20 Door Thu, May 17 7:30pm Crooked Jades $15 Adv/$15 Door Sun, June 24 2pm Amy Rigby Alex Lucero opens $15 Adv/$15 Door Gold Circle: Rio Theatre: first 8 rows (100 seats), Kuumbwa: First 3 rows including 2 seats each side (40 seats). Additional $4 for each ticket purchased at the door. Tax is included. Tickets for all Snazzy shows are available online at: www.snazzyproductions.com or on the Snazzy tickets hotline 831.479.9421


LIVE MUSIC WED

4/11

THE SAND BAR 211 Esplanade, Capitola

THU

4/12

FRI

4/13

SAT

4/14

Open Jam w/ Don Caruth Jake Nielson Triple 7-11p Threat 8-11p

The John Michael Band 8-11p

SANDERLINGS 1 Seascape Resort, Aptos

Ultrasonic w/ Josh Mann & Frank Buchanan 8-11p

Sambassa w/ Jeff Buenz & Timo Gutierrez 8-11p

SEABRIGHT BREWERY 519 Seabright, Santa Cruz

Otilia Donaire & Band 6:30p

SEVERINO’S BAR & GRILL 7500 Old Dominion Court, Aptos

Don McCaslin & the Amazing Jazz Geezers 6-9:30p

John Michael Band 8-11:30p

Toby Grey 1-4p Hot Fuse 8-11:30p

SHADOWBROOK 1750 Wharf Rd, Capitola

Ken Constable 6:30-9:30p

Joe Ferrara 6:30-10p

Claudio Melega 7-10p

STEEL BONNET 20 Victor Square, Scotts Valley

Jeff Blackburn & Friends Rayburn Brothers Free 5p Free 5p

SUSHI GARDEN S.V. 5600 Scotts Valley Dr. Scotts Valley

Toby Gray Free 5:30p

UGLY MUG 4640 Soquel Ave, Soquel

Brooks Williams Country Blues 7:30p $15/$18

WHALE CITY BAKERY 490 Highway 1, Davenport

4/15

MON

4/16

TUE

4/17

Pro Jam w/ Dennis Dove 7-11p

Dave Muldawer Free 5:30p Open Mic w/ Steven David 5:30p

Ziggy Tarr 6-8p

Willy Bacon 7:30-8:30p

ZELDA’S 203 Esplanade, Capitola

Sound Reasoning 9:30p

John Michaels Band

Ten O’Clock Lunch

Ziggy Tarr 7-9p

Ziggy Tarr 11a-1p

Upcoming Shows

APR 12 Jon Foreman APR 13 Hayley Kiyoko APR 14 Postmodern Jukebox APR 17 Dixie Dregs APR 18 Los Lonely Boys APR 20 House of Floyd APR 21 Robert Cray Band

Steve Abrams Free 6-9p

WHARFHOUSE 1400 Wharf Road, Capitola YOUR PLACE 1719 Mission St, Santa Cruz

SUN

Block Party 9:30p

Dessa Lunafest Film: Dr Sean Carroll Taimaine Asleep At The Wheel Madeleine Peyroux Todd Snider Solo Acoustic MAY 26 Chirgilchin MAY 28 Godspeed You! MAY 05 MAY 10 MAY 11 MAY 18 MAY 19 MAY 24 MAY 25

JUN 08 JUN 09 JUN 15 JUN 22

The Wiggles Cash & King The Kingston Trio Shawn Colvin

JUL 15 The Del McCoury Band JUL 20 Paul Thorn Follow the Rio Theatre on Facebook & Twitter! 831.423.8209 www.riotheatre.com

JONNY LANG

& ZANE CARVEY

GOLDEN STATE THEATRE - MONTEREY, CA

SATURDAY, APRIL 21ST

RIO THEATRE - SANTA CRUZ, CA

LOCATED ON THE BEACH

Amazing waterfront deck views.

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

See live music grid for this week’s bands.

STAND-UP COMEDY

Three live comedians every Sunday night.

HAPPY HOUR

TUESDAY, APRIL 17TH

THE RIO THEATRE - SANTA CRUZ, CA

GOLDEN STATE THEATRE - MONTEREY, CA GET TICKETS AT

SBLENTERTAINMENT.COM

Main Street Realtors FRANCHISED SANDWICH DELI $295,000 Capitola STAND ALONE RESTAURANT W/BAR $499,500 Santa Cruz

Mon–Fri from 3:30pm. Wednesday all night!

POND & LANDSCAPE COMPANY $99,500 Santa Cruz

Wood-fired pizza, ice cream, unique fine gifts.

RESTAURANT, ASSET SALE $99,500 Downtown, Santa Cruz

VISIT OUR BEACH MARKET

TUESDAY, APRIL 24TH

BUSINESSES FOR SALE

DEAL WITH A VIEW

$9.95 dinners Mon.-Fri. from 6:00pm.

NOW SERVING BREAKFAST

Open for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Daily

(831) 476-4560

crowsnest-santacruz.com

SUCCESSFUL CAFE $99,000 Capitola

DATTA KHALSA

DATTA KHALSA,CABB BROKER/OWNER Cell 831.818.0181 Cell: 831.818.0181 BRE# 01161050

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 11-17, 2018

SATURDAY, APRIL 7TH

Upstairs $9.95 dinners M - F. Impress someone with our good deals.

47


FILM

MAKING A POINT Despite its 1950s setting, ‘The Death of Stalin’ has plenty of satirical relevance in 2018.

Communist Plot Driven APRIL 11-17, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Hilarious ‘Death of Stalin’ has fun with Cold War game of thrones BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

48

T

he year 2018 has made us all connoisseurs of misrule. Thus Armando Iannucci’s speedy farce, The Death of Stalin, has relevance. Still, at a recent San Francisco appearance, Iannucci stressed that he shot the film in the summer of 2016, lest viewers suspect it was some sort of allusion to the court of Trump. (Putin didn’t like it— it was banned in Russia.) The movie finds comedy in the plight of shivering people, fearing the knock on the door in the middle of the night. And it lampoons that infuriating boredom that comes from serving a man who always, always must be right. One evening in 1953, the highest

executives of the USSR are socializing with Stalin. As played by Adrian McLoughlin, this enemy of mankind is smaller than you’d expect. He gathers his cohorts to watch an old cowboy movie in a language they don’t understand. Later that night, Stalin is struck by a brain hemorrhage; he’s flat on the floor in a large puddle of piss, which will soon be diluted by the crocodile tears of Stalin’s staff. No one wants to be the first to call a doctor, in case he wakes up. The dictator dies, and there is no clear designated successor. However, the portly Beria (Simon Russell Beale), head of the NKVD secret police, and a sadist and rapist who has kompromat on everyone, aims to be Stalin II.

The contenders are nervous weaklings. The darkest horse among them is the diplomat Molotov (Michael Palin, perfect in this part as a man corroded by tyranny). Molotov tries to stay on Beria’s good side even though the secret police chief arrested Molotov’s wife. Meanwhile, the weird, troutfaced Malenkov (Jeffrey Tambour) oversees the transition team, while fussing over his official portrait. No one realizes that Nikita Khrushchev, not a prepossessing man, will be the most skilled of the plotters. Steve Buscemi is the last actor you’d think of to play a stocky, warty mid-century Soviet politician. Yet the cross-casting wins. He gives

this comedy of terror some warmth and sanity. Like Stalin, Khrushchev was a killer—he admitted later that he had blood on his hands (“up to the elbow,” he lamented). Yet Iannucci was intelligent to pick Khrushchev as the one we root for. There’s something about him that invites nostalgia—for a dictator, he was quite human. Khrushchev just wanted to go to Disneyland, after all. Were Iannucci as soft as Capra or Spielberg, he could have staged Khrushchev’s real-life heroic moment, when he took the serious risk of telling the 20th Party Congress that they no longer needed to quake in terror in front of Stalin’s dirty underwear. Buscemi burlesques this hardheaded boss as an antsy, anxious nebbish—able to fawn, while trusting no one. As on The Sopranos, he’s a jester to terrifying people. (He tries to entertain Stalin with a ridiculous story about how they used to play hot potato with live grenades back in winter in Stalingrad, just to keep their hands warm.) He has Woody Allen-worthy delivery when he introduces the fearsome Field Marshal Zhukov (Jason Isaacs); the officer makes his grand entrance, whipping off his cloak to show off a chest gleaming with medals. Khrushchev mutters, “He planted the flag on Hitler’s tomb or knocked out a bear with one punch, I forget which.” Russian accents are the king of comedic dialects. Yet the cast keeps their own voices, for the same reason that actors perform Shakespeare in modern dress—so we can tell the posh people from the proles. The natural accents add a level of comedic distance to this tale of woe and murder. Like the ’60s British political comedies it resembles, The Death of Stalin may be too clever, too mordant. But it does have tang, Tom Stoppardlike wordplay and some big and surprising laughs. What’s best about this razory comedy is that just from the tone, you can tell the difference between what’s true and what’s too good to be true, and there’s more of the former than the latter. THE DEATH OF STALIN Directed by Armando Iannucci. Starring Steve Buscemi, Adrian McLoughlin and Michael Palin. R; 107 minutes.


FILM NEW THIS WEEK BEIRUT Studio executive No. 1: “Hey, have we ever done a movie about a white guy who goes in to fix the Middle East?” Studio executive No. 2: “Hold on, let me check … hmm, it looks like that’s the storyline of literally every movie we do about the Middle East.” Studio executive No. 1: “Really? Wow! So we shouldn’t do this movie about John Hamm as an ex-diplomat brought to Beirut by the CIA to negotiate for the life of a friend he left behind?” Studio executive No. 2: “Did you not hear me? Statistically speaking, we have to do that movie. Cultural stereotypes aren’t going to perpetuate themselves!” Studio executive No. 1: “How are we so good at our jobs?” Directed by Brad Andersen. Co-starring Rosamund Pike and Dean Norris. (R) 109 minutes. (SP) FINDING YOUR FEET This movie is likely to come in very handy if, like me, you often misplace your feet. What, it’s not a documentary about the most common places people leave their feet? Well, that’s disappointing. No, I don’t care that this is a critically acclaimed romantic comedy with a lovely cast that’s being called the feelgood movie of the year! I want to know where my feet are! Directed by Richard Loncraine. Starring Imelda Staunton, Timothy Spall and Joanna Lumley. (PG-13) 111 minutes. (SP)

TRUTH OR DARE Guess the plot of this horror movie! A game of Truth or Dare turns deadly when a) teenagers start mysteriously dying if they fail to tell the truth or do the dare; b) one of the dares is to eat

CONTINUING EVENT: LET’S TALK ABOUT THE MOVIES Film buffs are invited Wednesday nights at 7 p.m. to downtown Santa Cruz, where each week the group discusses a different current release. For location and discussion topic, go to https:// groups.google.com/group/LTATM.

NOW PLAYING BLACK PANTHER After months of jaw-droppingly cool trailers and ever-more revealing clips, anticipation for this latest Marvel comic adaptation is at a fever pitch. The character at the center of this story, T’Challa (played here by Chadwick Boseman), goes all the way back to 1966, and was the first character of African descent in a major American comic. Incredibly, it took more than 25 years of development hell for this adaptation to finally reach the big screen—but it’s finally here, primed to be one of the biggest movies of the year. Directed by Ryan Coogler. Co-starring Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong’o, and Angela Bassett. (PG-13) 134 minutes. (SP) BLOCKERS Apparently it’s still taboo to use the phrase “cockblockers” as a movie title, so the makers of this comedy instead put a silhouette of a rooster in front of the word “blockers.” So much classier! And hey, what else but total class would you expect from a movie about parents trying to keep their sex-obsessed teenagers from boinking after prom? Directed by Kay Cannon. Starring John Cena, Leslie Mann and Kathryn Newton. (R) 102 minutes. (SP) CHAPPAQUIDDICK Last week, my dad asked me if this movie about Ted Kennedy’s national scandal

was going to tarnish the late politician’s reputation. Not having been born yet when the 1969 incident went down, I asked “Wait, didn’t the actual Chappaquiddick already tarnish his reputation?” But he said I would be surprised at how much of—and how quickly— the whole tragedy was swept under the rug at the time. Despite its infamy, there is indeed a bizarre level of mystery still surrounding what happened the night of July 18, 1969, on the Dike Bridge on Chappaquiddick Island. So even those who were around back then are likely to learn a thing or two from this fictionalized retelling of the story, based on true accounts. Directed by John Curran. Starring Jason Clarke, Kate Mara, Ed Helms and Bruce Dern. (PG-13) 101 minutes. (SP) THE DEATH OF STALIN Reviewed this issue. Directed by Armando Iannucci. Starring Steve Buscemi, Simon Russell Beale, Michael Palin, Paddy Considine and Jeffrey Tambor. (R) 107 minutes. (SP) A FANTASTIC WOMAN (LA MUJER FANTASTICO) Transgender actress Daniela Vega makes a triumphant debut playing a transgender woman fighting for respect in modern-day Chile. Winner of this year’s Foreign Language Oscar, Sebastián Lelio’s engrossing film is a resonant and stylishly-told story about the basic human right to live with dignity and carve out one’s identity in the world. When her partner of several years dies suddenly, and his family closes ranks against her, she experiences the universal plight of an outsider forbidden the rights of the legal kinship group. That not all of these issues are gender identitybased broadens the film’s scope, and in Vega’s fearless performance, we get a heroine worth cheering for. (R) 105 minutes. In Spanish with English subtitles. (LJ) LEANING INTO THE WIND In 2001, German filmmaker Thomas Riedelsheimer made Rivers and Tides, a stirring documentary about the life and extraordinary work of "environmental artist"

Andy Goldsworthy, a vibrant joyride through themes of art, time and nature. To the delight of artists and movie lovers everywhere, filmmaker and subject reunite in this new doc. It's an invigorating portrait of the artist 16 years later: older, mellower (perhaps) but no less questing, as he travels the globe revisiting old work (or what's left of it), setting himself new challenges, and always seeking new ways to look at art, his work, and life. Like its predecessor, this move is a feast. Peel your orbs and dig in! (PG) 93 minutes. (LJ) THE LEISURE SEEKER Donald Sutherland and Helen Mirren drive an RV from Boston to Florida in a journey full of surprises and lifeaffirming joy. This is only a movie … for now. Don, Helen, call me! We’re gonna road trip! Guys! Guys? (R) 112 minutes. (SP) LOVE, SIMON The clever trailer for this film does a good job of building up the big secret that high schooler Simon is keeping: he’s gay. What happens when everyone finds out? Well, it’s a romantic comedy, not, say, a horror film, so the outlook is good. Starring Nick Robinson, Josh Duhamel and Jennifer Garner. Directed by Greg Berlanti. (PG-13) 109 minutes. (SP) PACIFIC RIM UPRISING Isn’t it kind of weird to think that, as of Guillermo Del Toro’s Oscar victory for The Shape of Water, the original Pacific Rim—a movie about giant robots that battle giant monsters—is officially the product of an Academy-Award-winning director? It’d be like if Michael Bay won an Oscar for directing, and we all started thinking about the Transformers movies differently … okay, that’s not going to happen. For this sequel, the series lost Del Toro as director (he’s producing here) and Idris Elba as its marquee actor, but adds John Boyega as his robot-driving, monsterfighting son. Directed by Steven S. DeKnight. Co-starring Scott Eastwood and Jing Tian. (PG-13) 111 minutes. (SP) A QUIET PLACE You may only remember him as the goofy

straight man from The Office, but John Krasinski has been quietly writing and directing offbeat indie films for years. This one—which he directed, co-wrote, and stars in (with his wife, Emily Blunt)—could be his first big hit. Following the recent trend of smart, trippy horror thrillers, it’s about a family hiding from creatures that hunt using sound. (PG-13) 90 minutes. (SP) READY PLAYER ONE This film adaptation of the book that crammed every reference to ’80s nerd culture into one story is brought to you Steven Spielberg, the man who gave you most of that ’80s nerd culture in the first place. Pop will indeed eat itself. Most people are going for the Easter eggs (and released on Easter week, too—clever!), but in case you care about the story, it’s about a kid in 2045 who joins a treasure hunt through a virtual-reality world called the Oasis that gives people respite from their dreary real lives. Starring Tye Sheridan, Olivia Cooke, Ben Mendelsohn and Simon Pegg. (PG-13) 140 minutes. SHERLOCK GNOMES I don’t know how else to say this: he’s a garden gnome and he solves mysteries. That explains the name, but maybe not how this B-level animated children’s comedy got such a distinguished cast to sign on. Starring the voices of Johnny Depp, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Emily Blunt, James McAvoy, Maggie Smith and Michael Caine. Directed by John Stevenson. (PG) (SP) TOMB RAIDER When critics described her turn as a robot object of desire in Ex Machina as a “breakout role,” I doubt they had any idea how right they were. Now, here she is poised to be the next Angelina Jolie, taking over as Lara Croft in the Tomb Raider franchise. I know, I know, The Bourne Legacy didn’t exactly make Jeremy Renner the next Matt Damon, and the Carrie remake certainly didn’t make Chloe Grace Moretz the next Sissy Spacek. Geez, you people are cynical! (PG-13) 118 minutes. (SP)

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 11-17, 2018

SECRET FILM FESTIVAL Over the years, the Del Mar’s Secret Film Festival has become the gold standard of local film events. Stretching from midnight on Saturday night to noon on Sunday, it features films so exclusive they can’t even tell you what they are beforehand. See the best new movies before everyone else, and you can even wear your pajamas! (SP)

a Tide Pod; c) Madonna shows up thinking this might be the sequel to her 1991 documentary, and goes berserk when none of the teens in this movie even know who she is. I think even though we know the answer is a, we all wish it was c. Directed by Jeff Wadlow. Starring Lucy Hale, Tyler Posey and Violett Beane. (PG-13) 100 minutes. (SP)

49


YOUTH ACTIVITIES

MOVIE TIMES

April 11-17

All times are PM unless otherwise noted.

DEL MAR THEATRE

831.359.4447

A QUIET PLACE Wed 4/11 1:30, 2:30, 3:45, 4:50, 6:00, 7:15, 8:15, 9:45; Thu 4/12 1:30, 2:30, 3:45, 4:50, 7:15, 9:45;

SUMMER YOUTH PROGRAM CAMPS for AGES 4–18

Fri 4/13 1:30, 2:30, 3:45, 4:50, 6:00, 7:15, 8:15, 9:45, 10:30; Sat 4/14 11:15, 12:15, 1:30, 2:30, 3:45, 4:50, 6:00, 7:15, 8:15, 9:45; Sun 4/15 12:15, 1:30, 2:30, 3:45, 4:50, 6:00, 7:15, 8:15, 9:45, 10:30; Mon 4/16, Tue 4/17 1:30, 2:30, 3:45, 4:50, 7:15, 9:45 ISLE OF DOGS Wed 4/11-Fri 4/13 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30; Sat 4/14 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30; Sun 4/15-Tue

YB

IRD DISCO

REGISTER

UN

BY MAY 31st

T

EAR L

4/17 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30

for discounted fees!

DISTANT SKY: NICK CAVE & THE BAD SEEDS LIVE IN COPENHAGEN Thu 4/12 7:00 NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: JULIUS CAESAR Sun 4/15 11:00AM; Tue 4/17 7:00 THE SECRET FILM FESTIVAL 2018 Sat 4/14 11:55PM

NICKELODEON

Cooking & Baking Camps • Science & Engineering Computer & Technology • Sports Camps Creative Arts & Design Leadership & Academic Enrichment Watsonville Camps & Classes Camp Cabrillo! • Extended Day

www.cabrillo-extension.org

(831) 479-6331

831.359.4523

BEIRUT Wed 4/11, Thu 4/12 1:50, 4:20, 7:00, 9:30; Fri 4/13 2:10, 4:40, 7:10, 9:40; Sat 4/14, Sun 4/15 11:40, 2:10,

4:40, 7:10, 9:40; Mon 4/16, Tue 4/17 2:10, 4:40, 7:10, 9:40 CHAPPAQUIDDICK Wed 4/11-Fri 4/13 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 9:50; Sat 4/14, Sun 4/15 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 9:50;

Mon 4/16, Tue 4/17 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 9:50 THE DEATH OF STALIN Wed 4/11, Thu 4/12 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:45; Fri 4/13-Tue 4/17 7:00, 9:35 FINDING YOUR FEET Fri 4/13 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:45; Sat 4/14, Sun 4/15 11:50, 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:45; Mon 4/16,

Chartwell School: Empowering students who think and learn differently. ams progr r e m g. Sum nrollin now e

Tue 4/17 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:45 THE LEISURE SEEKER Wed 4/11, Thu 4/12 2:00, 4:30, 7:10, 9:40; Fri 4/13 2:00, 4:30; Sat 4/14, Sun 4/15 11:30,

2:00, 4:30; Mon 4/15, Tue 4/16 2:00, 4:30

GREEN VALLEY CINEMA 9

831.761.8200

APRIL 11-17, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Call theater for showtimes.

50

CINELUX SCOTTS VALLEY CINEMA

831.438.3260

Call theater for showtimes.

CINELUX 41ST AVENUE CINEMA 831.479.3504

For students with dyslexia and other learning differences.

Prospective parents:

join us for a Tuesday Tour Tuesday, April 17 at 10:30 am. Register today at www.chartwell.org or call 831.394.3468 Chartwell School | 2511 Numa Watson Rd. | Seaside, CA 93955

Call theater for showtimes.

REGAL SANTA CRUZ 9

844.462.7342

Call theater for showtimes.

REGAL RIVERFRONT STADIUM 2 Call theater for showtimes.

844.462.7342


YOUTH ACTIVITIES HOST AN INTERNATIONAL STUDENT

HOST FAMILIES URGENTLY NEEDED NOW! HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS FROM FRANCE, ITALY, AND GERMANY

International Student Services Santa Cruz is a locally-based program. Linking our area with overseas friends. Students have a busy daytime schedule of English classes, local activities and Bay Area bus excursions. Make a friend you can visit!

Santa Cruz Soccer Camp

GREAT FUTURES GREAT FUTURES GREAT STARTFUTURES HERE GREAT STARTFUTURES HERE START HERE START HERE

SUMME R G ROUP S:

I TAL I ANS ~ TWO WEEK PROGRAMS IN JULY AND AUGUST Contact Jessica & Steve Wilson 462-0650 jlowewilson22@gmail.com or Sandi F RE NCH ~ JULY 21 - AUGUST 13 • Contact Sandi 2018-’19 SCHOOL YEAR & SEMESTER STUDENTS URGENTLY NEED HOMES Eager to become part of an American family & experience high school life. Make a life-long friendship between families! The time flies! Interests: Classical Dance, Video Production, Theatre, Volleyball, Cooking!! Languages, Music, Horseback-riding, Photography, Soccer, Basketball, Politics

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON ALL THE STUDENTS & PROGRAMS CALL SANDI NOW! SANDI • 335-3088 • 419-9633 • sandispan@aol.com

Early bird discount ends May 1st 246-1517 www.santacruzsoccercamp.com

SUMMER REGISTRATION

OPEN April 14

2018

a Call for FREE Preview Class!

Register NOW for our Spring Sessions of Music Together™ and Canta y Baila Conmigo™ classes. Santa Clara County • Santa Cruz County • Monterey County

www.musicalme.com . (831)438-3514

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 11-17, 2018

Sing, Dance, Play, Learn!

51


&

FOOD & DRINK oil blending bar, as well as a silent auction. Guest speaker Karl Maret, M.D. is an expert on developments in the field of subtle energy medicine. This is a lot of sensory wisdom, experimentation, and enjoyment for $100 per person ticket. To purchase, go to cobha.org or call 462-1807.

WINE OF THE WEEK

Versatile to the max is the Altocedro Malbec 2016 currently sitting pretty on the Gabriella wine list ($30). We split a bottle at Easter dinner, and the deep crimson wine from the splendid province of Mendoza proved a sensitive partner to duck, lamb and fish. Yes, that’s what I said. Graced with enough tobacco, leather, and mystery spice to handle the red meats, this Malbec was restrained enough to allow the soft perfume of rock cod to expand. Give it a try at your next visit to Gabriella. I’m betting that whatever you order, this wine will do the trick.

DESSERT OF THE WEEK

GROWING APPETITE Chef Rebecca Mastoris of the Teen Kitchen Project will provide the garden dining for the

fourth annual May Flower Festival and Feast.

APRIL 11-17, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Herbal Awareness

52

Garden dining at the May Flower Festival and Feast; plus a perfect dessert BY CHRISTINA WATERS

T

he fourth annual May Flower Festival and Feast on May 27 benefits the aromatic work of the College of Botanical Healing Arts, which is dedicated to research in plant-based medicine. This year’s festival happens up at the hummingbird-intensive UCSC Arboretum. The culinary skills of the Teen Kitchen Project, working with chef Rebecca Mastoris, will create a vegetarian essential oil infused cuisine to stimulate the senses. In keeping with the intriguing gardens and flowering vistas of the neverbetter Arboretum, the event’s menu

will offer a menu filled with edible flowers such as nasturtiums, borage, lavender, and pansies. It sounds like the sort of menu that would have pleased Shakespeare and other Elizabethan pleasure-seekers from long-ago gardens and far-away feasts. Eating a garden on a plate, while actually surrounded by a garden, makes a sort of surrealist magic, and also takes full advantage of the vivacious new developments up at UCSC’s surprising collection of rare plants. Mastoris, a wizard of vibrant menus featuring seasonal ingredients, regularly caters

events at Live Earth Farms and is thinking along these lines. A main dish lasagna of stuffed Portobello mushrooms with preserved lemon will be joined by a side of garlicky kale with pine nuts, currants, lemon, and pickled onions. Dessert of lavender honey tea cakes will round out this late spring menu. The fourth annual Flower Festival unfolds on Sunday, May 27 from noon to 5 p.m., and the meal will be joined by live jazz and bossa nova classics by Trio Passarim. There will be demonstrations and a garden walk, plus the chance to savor an essential

Strawberry Cheesecake, also at Gabriella. When you’re hot, you’re hot. The impact of absolutely perfect fresh strawberries topping a barely sweet, very light cheesecake sided with whipped cream, mint and candied hazelnuts, well, you can imagine. Tasting even better than it sounds, this Easter week dessert created by pastry chef Krista Pollack was itself miraculous. You know those times when you say to yourself, dammit, I’m an adult and I can skip the main course and just eat dessert? Well, for those times, there’s the pastry menu at Gabriella Cafe. Trust me.

HOMELESS ACTIVISM SOUPLINE

Here’s a fundraiser we can all endorse. On Thursday, April 19, join the community enjoying a meal of specialty soups, salads, artisan breads and desserts created by more than 50 of our best restaurants. Local community leaders will be on hand to serve up these always unusual and delicious specialty soups. The supper runs from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Boardwalk’s Cocoanut Grove. Last year’s event helped to raise more than $80,000 to help those in need find safe and permanent homes. $20-$50. souplinesupper.org.


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Two Locations to Serve You— By the Mountains or By the Sea

Sawasdee Soquel 5050 Soquel Drive 831.462.5051 or 831.431.6988 Sawasdee by the Sea 101 Main St., Santa Cruz 831.466.9009 SAWASDEESOQUEL.COM Catering and to-go orders available

Lively and Local SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 11-17, 2018

CAFÉ CRUZ APPAREL- GET YOURS NOW! HOODIES, T-SHIRTS AND TANKS

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&

FOODIE FILE

Treat yourself to an award-winning experience... and the largest breakfast menu in Watsonville

PREP MOTHER Jennifer Ulmer Jenkins of In the Breadbox at her commercial kitchen, with Justin Hall preparing chocolate. PHOTO: KEANA PARKER

In the Breadbox . 6 choices of Eggs Benedict . Daily Soups & Specials . Fresh 1/2 lb. Burgers . Great Service

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V Best oted in W Break fas ats onv

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Downtown Watsonville

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2017

589 AUTO CENTER DRIVE WATSONVILLE 831.761.9551 OPEN MONDAY-SUNDAY 7AM - 3PM

t

Local gluten-free business takes on edibles BY AARON CARNES

I

n 2012, Jenn Ulmer Jenkins started eating gluten-free, and found she needed to teach herself how to create delicious gluten-free baked goods. A year later, she started In The Breadbox, and now you can find her products in restaurants all over Santa Cruz County, like Michael’s on Main, Crow’s Nest, and Earthbelly. Her gluten-free hamburger bun quickly became her most popular item, and for a while she had expanded to the point of running a retail store for her products. But she’s made some changes—now the commercial kitchen she manages is a strictly cannabis kitchen, so she’s moved In The Breadbox to a different one. She spoke to us about the new direction of her business.

You manage a cannabis kitchen now? JENN ULMER JENKINS: Because of the law of Jan. 1, regular food businesses and edibles cannot be in the same kitchen, so I had to make a decision about what to do. I made the decision to go the edibles route with the kitchen. As of March 1, we are strictly an all-edibles kitchen,

and renting to eight to nine edibles companies. We are Santa Cruz’s only edibles kitchen. I moved In the Breadbox back to the kitchen I used to rent. I’m back to just wholesale. I have my hamburger buns with many restaurants here in Santa Cruz, I do pizza crust for many restaurants, I do some pancake-waffle blend for some of the restaurants for breakfast, I do vegan cookies for Veg on the Edge. I’m getting some of our products that we used to sell retail, like our frozen biscuits, in the stores.

And you’re starting your own edibles line, Sweet Blossom? Yes. That’ll be In the Breadbox’s edibles brand, run out of my edibles kitchen. It’s going to be gluten-free edibles—we’re going to do sweet bread—and some CBD dog treats for the pet stores. I’m still trying to figure out the products that we’re going to make in the edible line. I’m also looking at the local edible companies that are in there. Some of my renters just do CBDs and some do just THC. We’ll be doing both. 477-9484, inthebreadbox.com.


Lunch

11:30am to 2:00pm Wednesday, Thursday, Friday

Cocktail Hour

4:30pm to 6:00pm Tuesday through Saturday $7-9 Bar Bites | $6 Wine $8 Cocktails | $8 Whiskey w/ Draft Beer

OswaldRestaurant.com 121 Soquel Avenue at Front Street, Santa Cruz 831.423.7427 CLOSED MONDAY

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GoodTimes.SC

LUNCH & DINNER

B ot h Loca t io ns Ope n E ve r y Day Sept 1 East End will start serving brunch starting at 10:30 sat and sun

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HANDCRAFTED FOOD, BEER & WINE

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Free Birthday Meal

One item up to $25 value with two or more entree orders Must present ad with order. Cannot be combined with other offers. 1 offer per table, per visit. Dine in only. See store for more details. Good through May 15, 2018.

CAPITOLA

SCOTTS VALLEY

820 Bay Ave

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(Victor Square)

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(Target Shopping Center)

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APRIL 11-17, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Open 7 days Lunch 11:30 - 2:30 Dinner 5:00 - 9:30 Scotts Valley & Watsonville Lunch 12 - 3 (Sat & Sun Only)

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VINE & DINE

&

VINE TIME

Join Us for Passport April 21st! Enjoy Live Music w/Mark Creech and Chocolate with Ashby Confections

24250 Loma Prieta Ave., Los Gatos (just 1/4 mile off Summit Road) Open Fri-Sun 11-5 408-560-9343 • wrightsstation.com

WINE TASTING SATURDAYS ALL YEAR SUNDAYS ALL SUMMER

PINKY PROMISE Windy Oaks’ 2016 Rosé is a great example of how far

pink wine has come.

Windy Oaks Rosé 2016 is a perfect match for spring picnics BY JOSIE COWDEN

O

content (13.2 percent). Only 120 cases were produced, so you had better head to one of Windy Oaks’ tasting rooms and load up on this easy-to-drink salmon-pink wine. Windy Oaks Estate Vineyards & Winery, 550 Hazel Dell Road, Corralitos, 786-9463. Windy Oaks operated a tasting room in Carmelby-the-Sea, and has moved to a new tasting room in Carmel Valley. windyoaksestate.com.

SPRING FORWARD AGAINST CANCER The Santa Cruz Cancer Benefit Group’s annual event will be held at Chaminade from 5:30-11 p.m. on Saturday, April 14—an extravaganza of fine dining, dancing and auctions. Take this opportunity to bid on outstanding wines—local and international— and remember that by attending this event you are supporting local cancer-related beneficiaries. Tickets are $185. Visit sccbg.org for more info.

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SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 11-17, 2018

ne of my favorite go-to wines is Rosé. Today’s Rosés are such a far cry from those of yesteryear. Remember when Mateus Rosé was all the rage? I was living in Greece many moons ago when it first became available—and we used to drink gallons of it. It’s still around and remains inexpensive. But, thank heavens, Rosés have taken a turn for the better, and wineries such as Windy Oaks are making good-quality Rosé from grapes harvested in the Arroyo Seco appellation of Monterey County. Their 2016 Bastide La Combe Rosé is a terrific wine for around $20, and, with warmer spring weather now, it’s a handy wine to take on a picnic, especially with its easy-to-open screw-cap top. Made in the French Provençal style from 100-percent Grenache grapes, it’s harvested at low brix. (Brix measures sugar in wine grapes and determines how much alcohol a wine will have.) So, in this case, the Rosé has a low alcohol

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL WINEMAKERS!

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H RISA’S STARS BY RISA D’ANGELES

Spring Savings!

MERCURY DIRECT AND ARIES NEW MOON

Always Open Late

ARIES Mar21–Apr20

LIBRA Sep23–Oct22

What are your financial realities and perspectives, how are they faring, are they safe, are they budgeted, and do you tithe? These are some of the monetary questions coming into focus. Also, of importance is the review, revision and recognition of your true values. What and whom do you value? Do you consider yourself as valuable? How? These days and nights shed light upon your true Aries self.

Be careful with resources, values, money and finances. Be acutely aware of where your money is being used, how much and when it’s coming in, and carefully jot down what you do with it (your money). Consider investments at this time in gold and silver, especially gold. Carefully assess your money as it finances your future.

Esoteric Astrology as news for week of April 11, 2018

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On Wednesday Venus trines Mars—our relationships become most important to tend to. Simultaneously, Sun conjuncts Jupiter—we have more love and compassion for others. Friday Venus sextiles Neptune as the Moon is in Pisces. We seek authentic and intelligent friendships, able to spot illusion and glamours quite easily. Friday is v/c (Moon void of course) all day—so we remain solitary and keenly observant. Aries Moon begins late Friday evening. Saturday morning, just after midnight, Jupiter sextiles Pluto. We have deep and expansive dreams. In the morning Mars sextiles Neptune—the dreams come true. Sunday, Mercury is still in the sky, preparing to move forward at 4.47 degrees Aries. Mercury doesn’t reach its retrograde shadow until May 4. So, we proceed slowly forward. The new moon occurs Sunday at 6:57 p.m. (West Coast time), at 26 degrees Aries. The Sun and Moon are together

in Aries, calling forth all fiery forms from the heavens. Calling forth the Divine Mind of God to impress humanity’s minds. “I come forth and from the plane of Mind, I rule,” says Mercury. The Lords of Fire (Agni Lords) are present during the month of Aries, especially at the New and Full Moon times. These great beings hold the archetype (pattern) for the future race of humanity with the task of producing a harmonious and peaceful world to come. The Lords of Fire participated in our initial creation, but for most of humanity, their work lies still in the future. The fires (Fohat) of their nature produce a purifying consciousness. These fires produce the discriminating personality, the illumined consciousness, and a fiery force field of radiation needed in our ascent, or resurrection, of consciousness back toward the Source.

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TAURUS Apr21–May21 There could be confusion in communication with close friends, partners, friends, associates and intimates. There could also be questions concerning your possessions and their maintenance. Something important for day to day living may have stopped working. It’s possible that someone close may not understand you. There won’t be any compromise. Our life changes through the decisions we make, and often through what we can’t quite see yet.

GEMINI May 22–June 20

TM

Revelations may appear as your mind has an inner focus, quite compassionate at times, yet it could turn quickly to a Virgo criticalness. Be aware of this. Study the religious and/or spiritual. Alice Bailey’s book Service (a compilation) is good at this time. Have the intention for fairness, for non-judgment, clarity and “Let reality guide my every thought and Truth be Master of my Life.”

APRIL 11-17, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

CANCER Jun21–Jul20

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During this time, we've all been returning to the past, to friends and/or family close to us, to those we need, love and cherish. Our family is our first and foremost experience of community and group work, where we grow, encounter and learn life’s lessons. Should sad or lamenting thoughts appear, think on them with forgiveness and begin writing them down in longhand. Eventually, healing takes place.

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LE0 Jul21–Aug22

SCORPIO Oct23–Nov21 One-on-one communication needs deep awareness, care and kindness. Previous partnership issues, concerning constancy, safety, money and security, arise once again, for re-evaluation. Messages may continue to be mixed. Be aware of this. Disputes call for negotiation. Perhaps this is too difficult for you. Make no decision till after Mercury’s shadow. Simply observe. Then follow the beauty, the bliss, the heart and your intuition.

SAGITTARIUS Nov22–Dec20 You’re more sensitive than usual. Is that possible? Yes. Healthwise, for the next several weeks, it’s best to create daily routines that strengthen your well-being. Maintain a non-judgmental response to everyone, lest falling into old criticisms and sarcasms occurs. Criticism separates us. Then an existential loneliness emerges. Find silence, beauty, a sanctuary, an ashram, a sangha. Rest in one from new moon to full to new again.

CAPRICORN Dec21–Jan20 Observe children, family and loved ones during these Mercury shadow days. Children and elders are especially sensitive to transits. In your observations, what do you see in terms of their ability to communicate, maneuver in their world of friends, school and studies? Help them (with you, too), create a Mercury Retrograde and Shadow Journal for later use. Observe yourself during these times, too. What are you remembering these days?

AQUARIUS Jan21–Feb18

Communication confusions could have occurred at work, with colleagues, superiors, and others working around you. Awareness of this allows you to make concessions when speaking in the future. The focus for three weeks was on critical judgments concerning your work and other people’s work, everything professional and most importantly your life path. Shift the critical judgements to praise.

Things, thoughts, events are occurring about home. They have roots from many months ago. There’s a shift about what home means, and what you consider your personal foundation. This has been a time for assessment, review, re-evaluation and revelations concerning home—what you need, where and what home is for you. Assess how family can assist with your plans for a home. Ask them. They want to help.

VIRGO Aug23–Sep22

PISCES Feb19–Mar20

What are you thinking about in terms of education, travel, legal affairs and all communications with co-workers? Have there been delays in many areas of your life recently? Things will ease soon. Be very clear when discussing joint finances and decisions with professionals. Know that you may be hidden for a while, your actions therefore must be explained to others so they are understood. Use few precise words.

You will find that only patience assists at this time. It seems that emptiness has come to roost in all parts of your life and it is very hard to understand. Stand with that emptiness, become empty yourself, allow life to flow through you. Many will not understand this part of your life. It’s an initiation, very valuable, extremely difficult. You stand alone. No matter your actions, the emptiness remains. Expect nothing. Be still like nothing at all. Good.


Classifieds classifieds PHONE: 831.458.1100 | EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@GOODTIMES.SC | DISPLAY DEADLINE: THURSDAY 2PM | LINE AD DEADLINE: FRIDAY 2PM

The following Individual is doing business as EL BUEN TACO. 101 CIVIC CENTER DR.#314, SCOTTS VALLEY, CA 95066. County of Santa Cruz. GERADO VELASCO MORALES. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: GERADO VELASCO MORALES. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Feb. 21, 2018. Mar 21, 28, Apr 4, & 11.

This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: SNOWMERCHANT, INC. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 1/12/2018. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar 7, 2018. Mar 21, 28, Apr 4, 11.

6/1/2017. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 14, 2018. Mar. 21, 28, Apr. 4, 11.

County, on Feb. 27, 2018. Mar. 21, 28, Apr. 4, 11. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 18-0505 The following Individual is doing business as FRG HANDYMAN. 522 MADISON ST., WATSONVILLE, CA 95076. County of Santa Cruz. RITA S LUIS. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: RITA S LUIS. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 3/5/2018. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 15, 2018. Mar. 21, 28, Apr. 4, 11.

CREEK BLVD., SCOTTS VALLEY, CA 95066. County of Santa Cruz. JAMES JOHNSON. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: JAMES JOHNSON. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 19, 2018. Mar. 28, Apr 4, 11, 18.

registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 1/27/1989. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 19, 2018. Mar. 28, Apr. 4, 11, 18.

NO. 18-0563 The following Individual is doing business as CLOWT CONTENT. 120 ERRETT CIRCLE, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. MARCI CLOW. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: MARCI CLOW. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 22, 2018. Mar. 28, Apr. 4, 11, 18.

SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. Al# 4075822. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: R AND V CONSULTING. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 10/18/2017. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 22, 2018. Mar. 28, Apr. 4, 11, 18.

real estate

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 18-0439 The following Individual is doing business as CELIA FIOROVICH. 40 ZILS RD., WATSONVILLE, CA 95076. County of Santa Cruz. CELIA FIOROVICH. 40 ZILS RD., WATSONVILLE, CA 95076. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: CELIA FIOROVICH. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 2/1/2018. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 2, 2018. Mar. 21, 28, & Apr. 4, 11.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 18-0501 The following Individual is doing business as MIMI'S TREES AND GARDENS. 111 BEAN CREEK RD. UNIT 146, SCOTTS VALLEY, CA 95066. County of Santa Cruz. MAUREEN SCOPPETTONE. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: MAUREEN SCOPPETTONE. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on

HAVE A LIFE… Your Way!

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 18-0417 The following Limited Liability Company is doing business as FRUITION BREWING. 918 EAST LAKE AVE., WATSONVILLE, CA 95076. County of Santa Cruz. ICARUS FERMENTATION, LLC. 743 B VOLZ LANE, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062 AI# 24310092. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company signed: TALLULA PRESTON. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 18-0516 The following Individual is doing business as COMMUNITY PAINTERS. 1704 LOTMAN DRIVE, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. ADRIAN CRESCITELLI. 1704 LOTMAN DRIVE, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: ADRIAN CRESCITELLI The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 11/20/2012. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 16, 2018. Mar. 16, 2018. Mar. 28, Apr. 4, 11, 18. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 18-0517 The following Individual is doing business as DESIGNED BY JJ, PAINTED BY JJ. 317 OAK

Kathleen M. Pouls LAc,CMP ~ Acupuncture ~ ~ Refined Bodywork ~ ~ Combination Treatments ~

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 18-0403 The following Individual is doing business as EXTRAORDINARY CONSTRUCTION. 1200 CAPITOLA RD #21, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. PASCUAL ROSAS CRUZ. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: PASCUAL ROSAS CRUZ. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 1/12/2017. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Feb. 26, 2018. Mar. 28, Apr. 4, 11, 18.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 18-0500 The following Individual is doing business as VITTEN INTERIOR DESIGN. 431 PEBBLE BEACH DR., APTOS, CA 95003. County of Santa Cruz. VAIVA VITTEN. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: VAIVA VITTEN. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 3/14/2018. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Jan. 4, 2016Mar. 14, 2018. Mar.28, Apr. 4, 11, 18.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 18-0521 The following Corporation is doing business as IMS LANDSCAPE AND MAINTENANCE. 23800 MORELL CUT OFF ROAD, LOS GATOS, CA 95033. County of Santa Cruz. I.M.S. MARINE CORPORATION. 190 ATHERLY LANE, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. Al# 1506970. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: DJANGO DAWSON. The

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE

CAREER CONSULTATION David Thiermann

Career Services

• Find a new career! • Get a better salary! • Find passion in your work! • Successful career change! • Start up a business!

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 18-0551 The following Individual is doing business as SANTA CRUZ NOTARIES. 2030 N. PACIFIC AVENUE #336, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. ELIZABETH M YEW. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: ELIZABETH M YEW. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 20, 2018. Mar. 28, Apr. 4, 11, 18.

Self-assessment Explore career options n Determine your focus n Market yourself n Career management n n

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 18-0568 The following Corporation is doing business as READY FOR LIFE OF SANTA CRUZ. 309 CEDAR ST. #3C, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. READY FOR LIFE OF SANTA CRUZ. 309 CEDAR ST. #3C, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060.. Al# 4075752. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: READY FOR LIFE OF SANTA CRUZ. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 10/18/2017. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 22, 2018. Mar. 28, Apr. 4, 11, 18. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 18-0569 The following Corporation is doing business as R AND V CONSULTING. 309 CEDAR ST. #3C, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. R AND V CONSULTING. 309 CEDAR ST. #3C,

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 18-0583 The following Individual is doing business as DUENDE PROJECT. 1730 WHARF RD., CAPITOLA, CA 95010. County of Santa Cruz. STEPHANIE GOLINO. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: STEPHANIE GOLINO. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 26, 2018. Apr. 4, 11, 18, 25. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 18-0561 The following Limited Liability Company is doing business as GROWING UP, GROWING UP IN SANTA CRUZ. 507 LOMA PRIETA DR., APTOS, CA 95003. County of Santa Cruz. BRADIN, LLC. 507 LOMA PRIETA DR., APTOS, CA 95003 AI# 7810146. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company signed: BRAD KAVA. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 11-17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 18-0466 The following Corporation is doing business as TRANQUILITY BASE CAFE. 345 ENCINAL ST., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. SNOWMERCHANT, INC. 930 ROSEDALE AVE. #22, CAPITOLA, CA 95010. Al# 3899301.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 18-0496 The following Individual is doing business as SURF CITY PLANTSCAPES, SURF CITY LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE COMPANY. 2270 17TH AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. MATTHEW NOEL BJERK. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: MATTHEW NOEL BJERK. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar 13, 2018. Mar 21, 28, Apr 4, 11.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 18-0504 The following Corporation is doing business as OUTSIDE THE BOX BUILDERS. 1601 JARVIS RD., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95065. County of Santa Cruz. OUTSIDE ENTERPRISES, INC. 1601 JARVIS RD., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95065.. Al# 3973980. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: RANDALL NEWKIRK. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 14, 2018. Mar. 21, 28, Apr. 4, 11.

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Classifieds classifieds PHONE: 831.458.1100 | EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@GOODTIMES.SC | DISPLAY DEADLINE: THURSDAY 2PM | LINE AD DEADLINE: FRIDAY 2PM

3/21/2018. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 22, 2018. Apr. 4, 11, 18, & 25.

Mar. 19, 2018. Apr. 4, 11, 18, & 25. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 18-0545 The following Married Couple is doing business as LAZERTEK. 533 SEACLIFF DR., APTOS, CA 95003. County of Santa Cruz. JON HENRICK & JUSTINE HENRICK. This business is conducted by a Married Couple signed: JON HENRICK. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 20, 2018. Apr. 4, 11, 18, & 25.

COURT FINDS that the petitioner EMELY GUERRERO PEREZ has filed a Petition for Change of Name with the clerk of this court for an order changing the applicants name from: ELYSE GONZALEZ to: JADE ELYSE GONZALEZ. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING May 11, 2018 at 8:30 am, in Department 5 located at Superior Court of California, 701 Ocean Street. Santa Cruz, CA 95060. A copy of this order to show cause must be published in the Good Times, a newspaper of general circulation printed in Santa Cruz County, California, once a week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: Mar. 27, 2018. Paul P. Burdick, Judge of the Superior Court. Apr. 4, 11, 18 & 25.

CAPITOLA, CA 95010. County of Santa Cruz. MICHAEL CARLONE. 2077 EDMUND LANE, CAPITOLA, CA 95010. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: MICHAEL CARLONE. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Feb. 22, 2018. Apr. 4, 11, 18, & 25.

objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING May 14, 2018 at 8:30 am, in Department 5 located at Superior Court of California, 701 Ocean Street. Santa Cruz, CA 95060. A copy of this order to show cause must be published in the Good Times, a newspaper of general circulation printed in Santa Cruz County, California, once a week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: Mar. 28, 2018. Paul P. Burdick, Judge of the Superior Court. Apr. 4, 11, 18, & 25.

CRUZ, CA 95061. County of Santa Cruz. RACHEL SLADE. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: RACHEL SLADE. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar 27, 2018. Apr. 4, 11, 18, & 25.

California, 701 Ocean Street. Santa Cruz, CA 95060. A copy of this order to show cause must be published in the Good Times, a newspaper of general circulation printed in Santa Cruz County, California, once a week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: Mar. 19, 2018. Paul P. Burdick, Judge of the Superior Court. Apr. 4, 11, 18, & 25.

CHANGE OF NAME IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA CRUZ. PETITION OF ALANNA KULL CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO.17CV03231. THE COURT FINDS that the petitioner ALANNA KULL has filed a Petition for Change of Name with the clerk of this court for an order changing the applicants name from: ALANNA JEAN KULL to: ALANNAH JEAN KULL. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING May 3, 2018 at 8:30 am, in Department 5 located at Superior Court of

CHANGE OF NAME IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA CRUZ. PETITION OF DEBRA MAY SCHAFFER CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO.18CV00936. THE COURT FINDS that the petitioner DEBRA MAY SCHAFFER has filed a Petition for Change of Name with the clerk of this court for an order changing the applicants name from: DEBRA MAY SCHAFFER to: MAY HAWTHORN. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter

appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING May 14, 2018 at 8:30 am, in Department 5 located at Superior Court of California, 701 Ocean Street. Santa Cruz, CA 95060. A copy of this order to show cause must be published in the Good Times, a newspaper of general circulation printed in Santa Cruz County, California, once a week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: Mar. 29, 2018.

real estate

APRIL 11-17, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME. The following person (persons) have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: GOLDEN STATE FARMZ. 320 SOQUEL AVE., UNIT D1, SANTA CRUZ CA 95062. The fictitious business name referred to above was filed in SANTA CRUZ COUNTY on: 4/14/2016 GSF NONPROFIT, INC. 320 SOQUEL AVE., UNIT D1, SANTA CRUZ CA 95062. This business was conducted by: CORPORATION: GSF NONPROFIT, INC. This statement was filed with the County ClerkRecorder of SANTA CRUZ COUNTY on the date indicated by the file stamp: Filed: Mar. 19, 2018. File No.2016-0000777. Apr. 4, 11, 18, & 25.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 18-0533 The following Corporation is doing business as LUCKY LADY BUDZ. 320 SOQUEL AVE., UNIT D1, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. GSF NONPROFIT, INC.320 SOQUEL AVE., UNIT D1, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. AI# 3883023. This business is conducted by a Corporation signed: JENNIFER NORMAN. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 4/7/2016. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 18-0532 The following Individual is doing business as CONNECTING NEW DOTS. 120 KENNETH STREET, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. MARIJE MILLER. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: MARIJE MILLER. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar 19, 2018. Apr. 4, 11, 18, & 25. CHANGE OF NAME IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA CRUZ. PETITION OF EMELY GUERRERO PEREZ CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO.18CV00895. THE

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 18-0373 The following Individual is doing business as EDMUND MANOR. 2077 EDMUND LANE,

CHANGE OF NAME IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA CRUZ. PETITION OF IRMA MAGDALENO CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO.18CV00914. THE COURT FINDS that the petitioner IRMA MAGDALENO & DANIEL HERNANDEZ has filed a Petition for Change of Name with the clerk of this court for an order changing the applicants name from: AXEL HERNANDEZMAGDALENO to: DANIEL HERNANDEZMAGDALENO. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 18-0578 The following Corporation is doing business as AMBROSIA INDIA, AMBROSIA INDIA BISTRO, AMBROSIA RESTAURANT. 207 SEARIDGE ROAD, APTOS, CA 95003. County of Santa Cruz. AMBROSIA COMMERCIAL, INC. 565 ABREGO ST. MONTEREY, CA 93940. Al# 3092005. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: AMBROSIA COMMERCIAL, INC. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 23, 2018. Apr. 4, 11, 18, & 25. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 18-0594 The following Individual is doing business as LONG MEADOW MIDWIFERY. P.O. BOX 257, SANTA

JUNIOR This handsome boy is Junior! He will make his new family smile every day. He is house-trained, great with dogs, and is a sweetheart. Junior loves food, his daily walk, snuggling on the couch, and every human he’s ever met. Junior is an 80 pound, 11-year-old, Pit Bull. Junior came to POMDR from the Santa Cruz County Animal Shelter If you’d like to meet Junior, please fill out an online adoption application.

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real estate PHONE: 831.458.1100 | EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@GOODTIMES.SC | DISPLAY DEADLINE: THURSDAY 2PM | LINE AD DEADLINE: FRIDAY 2PM

Paul P. Burdick, Judge of the Superior Court. Apr. 4, 11, 18, & 25.

Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 20, 2018. Apr. 4, 11, 18, & 25.

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME. The following person (persons) have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: IARA. 5301 OLD SAN JOSE RD. #A, SOQUEL, CA 95073. The fictitious business name referred to above was filed in SANTA CRUZ COUNTY on: 7/1/2014 IARA. 5301 OLD SAN JOSE RD. #A, SOQUEL, CA 95073. This business was conducted by: INDIVIDUAL: ALYSA ASHLEIGH GARCIA. This statement was filed with the County ClerkRecorder of SANTA CRUZ COUNTY on the date indicated by the file stamp: Filed: Mar. 13, 2018. File No.2014-0001296. Apr. 4, 11, 18, & 25.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 18-0000582 The following Individual is doing business as WILD MOON FLOWERS 737 37TH AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. CAROLINE MARTIN. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: CAROLINE MARTIN. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 26, 2018. Apr. 11, 18, 25, & May 2.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 18-0000553 The following Corporation is doing business as COASTLINE PILATES and JAID, INC. 406-B MISSION STREET, SANTA CRUZ, CA, 95060. County of Santa Cruz. JAID, INC. 406-B MISSION STREET, SANTA CRUZ, CA, 95060. Al# 4121957. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: JAID, INC. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 3/20/2018. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0000586 The following Limited Liability Company is doing business as CELIABRATE, CELIABRATE.COM, GFTREATS.COM, KRISTANN'S, & KRISTANNS.COM. County of Santa Cruz. CELIABRATE, LLC. 325 SOQUEL AVE. #307, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062 AI# 1710057. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company signed: KRISTIN HARRIS. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 3/10/2013. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 26, 2018. Apr. 11, 18, 25, & May 2.

HELP WANTED Immediate opening for Experienced Mac & PC Technician at Computer Zone. Networking iPhone service is a plus. (831)466-9099 or (831)466-9065

DRIVER WANTED Deliver Good Times early each Wednesday morning.

MASSAGE A*wonderful*Touch. Relaxing, Therapeutic, Light to Deep Swedish Massage for Men. Peaceful environment. 14 yrs. Exp. Days/Early PM. Jeff (831) 332-8594. Call Curt feel good now! Muscles relaxed and moods adjusted. De-stress in my warm safe hands. Days and Evenings, CMP. Please call (831) 419-1646 or email scruzcurt@gmail. com.

Reliability and some flexibility with delivery time is needed. FOR DETAILS, CONTACT: SHANNEN CRAIG SHANNEN@GOODTIMES.SC

QUIT CIGARETTES Struggling to quit cigarettes? 30-year respiratory therapist (and former smoker) offers free techniques and perspectives. Be part of research as Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m developing a program to help smokers quit. Don (831) 325-6084.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0000643. The following General Partnership is doing business as ELEMENT ROOFING AND WATERPROOFING. 141 LUNAR DR., SCOTTS VALLEY, CA 95066. County of Santa Cruz. JOSE LUIS CARRILLLO & DARIN SCOTT DARNEAL. This business is conducted by a General Partnership signed: DARIN DARNEAL. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Apr. 5, 2018. Apr. 11, 18, 25, & May 2. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0000506 The following Individual is doing business as PERLACHER CONSULTING. 827 BAY AVE. #1442, CAPITOLA, CA 95010-1442. County of Santa Cruz. SCOTT GILLETT. 121 ATHERTON LOOP, APTOS, CA 95003. This business is conducted by an Individual signed:

SCOTT GILLETT. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar 15, 2018. Apr. 11, 18, 25, & May 2. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0000494 The following Individual is doing business as REDWOOD PIPE AND DRAIN. 985 30TH AVE. APT. 1, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. MICHAEL J. MIRANDA This business is conducted by an Individual signed: MICHAEL J. MIRANDA. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 13, 2018. Apr.11, 18, 25, & May 2.

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For Sale 1974 TRIUMPH TR6 4-speed with overdrive New paint, new interior 94,700 original miles $19,500 Email for details: sangox8@yahoo.com

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 11-17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 18-0000609 The following Corporation is doing business as LCS STAFFING. 615 BRIDGE ST., WATSONVILLE, CA 95076. County of Santa Cruz. PLAN C MARIE. 615 BRIDGE ST., WATSONVILLE, CA 95076. Al# 4125409. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: CHRISTINE KRATCOSKI, CEO. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 29, 2018. Apr. 4, 11, 18, & 25.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 18- 0000580. The following General Partnership is doing business as ONE ON ONE HOMES. 2113 FELT ST., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. STEPHAN CASSADY & SUZANNE M CASSADY. This business is conducted by a General Partnership signed: SUZANNE M CASSADY. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 26, 2018. Apr. 11, 18, 25 & May 2.

GARDENING Happy Gardens Rototilling (831) 234-4341

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APRIL 11-17, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

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3600 Soquel Ave • Santa Cruz 8am – 10pm

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Where the locals shop since 1938. VOTED BEST BUTCHER SHOP BEST WINE SELECTION BEST CHEESE SELECTION BEST LOCALLY OWNED GROCERY STORE BEST MURAL /PUBLIC ART

Family owned & operated 80 years. 622 Soquel Avenue, Santa Cruz

OUR 80 TH YEAR

WEEKLY SPECIALS Good th r u 4/17/18

BUTCHER SHOP

GROCERY

WINE & SPIRITS

only corn-fed Midwest pork, Rocky free-range

Compare & Save

Beer

ALL NATURAL USDA Choice beef & lamb chickens, Mary’s air-chilled chickens,

WINE & FOOD PAIRING

OVEN BAKED COUNTRY STYLE PORK SPARE RIBS INGREDIENTS

wild-caught seafood, Boar’s Head products. PORK

■ SPINDRIFT, Sparkling Water, (Reg 4.69)/ 2.99

■ PORK CHOPS, Center Cut/ 3.98 LB

■ SAN PELLEGRINO, Italian Sparkling Beverage,

Preheat the oven to 250°F. Season the ribs well with salt and pepper and add them to a baking sheet lined with aluminum foil. Bake for 90 minutes, uncovered. Pour off any abundance of grease that has collected in the pan. At the end of the first 90 minutes, increase the oven temperature up to 350 degrees F. Then turn the ribs over and baste them with BBQ sauce. Continue basting in 30-minute intervals, turning the ribs each time you baste with sauce. After 90 minutes, the meat will begin to fall apart it’s so tender – you’ll notice this when you turn the ribs during basting. Once the ribs are tender, baste them one more time and then move them under the broiler. Broil the ribs for a minute or two just to caramelize the sauce. The sugars in the sauce can char fast so be sure to stay close to the oven during the broiling process. Serve with your favorite BBQ sides like mac n cheese, cole slaw, or potato salad.

Local Bakeries - Fresh Daily ■ BECKMANN’S, California Sour Loaf, 24oz/ 3.89

■ PORK BABY BACK RIBS/ 4.89 LB

■ WHOLE GRAIN, Whole Wheat, 30oz/ 4.19

LUNCH MEAT

■ GAYLE’S, Francese Baguette, 16oz/ 2.69

■ PORK BABY BACK RIBS/ 4.89 LB

■ KELLY’S, Sour Baguette, 16oz/ 2.69

■ HONEY HAM, Sweet Slice/ 8.49 LB

■ SUMANO’S, Rosemary Garlic Sourdough/ 3.99

■ BLACK FOREST HAM, Smoked Flavor/ 8.49 LB ■ DANISH STYLE HAM/ 8.49 LB

MARINATED TUMBLED MEATS ■ BLACK PEPPER LONDON BROIL/ 5.98 LB ■ SANTA MARIA LONDON BROIL/ 5.98 LB

■ BOMBAY, Dry London Dry/ 14.99 ■ JUNIPERO, By Anchor Distilling/ 22.99 ■ VENUS NO.1, “Made in Santa Cruz”/ 27.99 Delicatessen ■ AVIATION, American Gin, (98WE)/ 29.99 ■ BELGIOIOSO MOZZARELLA BALL, “Fresh”, 8oz/ 2.59 ■ ST. GEORGE, 3 Kinds/ 31.99 ■ BUBBIES, Bread and Butter Chip Pickles,

BBQ REDS- Incredible Reds

33 fl. Oz/ 6.59 ■ NANCY’S CREAM CHEESE, 8OZ/ 2.09 ■ BEELER’S BACON, 12oz/ 6.99

■ PETRALE SOLE FILLET/ 14.98 LB

■ COLUMBUS SALAME, 12oz/ 7.19

■ FRESH TILAPIA FILLET/ 10.98 LB

Cheese - Best Selection in Santa Cruz

■ BAY SHRIMP MEAT/ 12.98 LB

■ WISCONSIN SHARP CHEDDAR, “rBST Free”

PRODUCE

■ DOMESTIC SWISS, “A Customer Favorite”/ 4.09 Lb

■ GRAPEFRUIT, Pink Flesh Grapefruit/ .79 EA

■ DANISH BLUE CHEESE, “Imported”/ 7.49 Lb

■ YELLOW ONIONS, Premium Quality/ .49 LB

■ ITALIAN PECORINO ROMANO WHEEL/ 11.99 Lb

■ BANANAS, Always Ripe/ .89 LB

Specialty Foods

Butter and Iceberg/ 1.49 EA

■ FARMER FREED, Culinary Salts, 3.5oz/ 10.49 ■ HOMELESS GARDEN PROJECT, Seasonings,

■ 2013 TRUVEE, Red Blend, (Reg 20.99)/ 8.99 ■ 2013 WILD HORSE GSM, (Reg 23.99)/ 8.99 ■ 2012 MONTES ALPHA, Syrah (92WS, Reg 24.99)/ 9.99 ■ 2012 CANTO DE APALTA, Red Blend, (91WE)/ 9.99 ■ 2014 PEPPERJACK, Barossa Red, (Reg 26.99)/ 9.99

Wines under $5

Average Cuts/ 5.49 Lb Loaf Cuts/ 5.09 Lb

■ AVOCADOS, Ripe and Ready to Eat/ 1.59 EA

■ TOMATOES, Roma and Large/ 1.39 LB

■ BALLEST POINT BREWING CO. IPA, 12 Pack Cans, 12oz/ 15.99 + CRV ■ GROUND BREAKER, Gluten Free, IPA, 4 Pack Cans, 12oz/ 7.99 + CRV ■ GREEN FLASH BREWING CO., “Soul Style”, IPA, 12 Pack Cans, 12oz/ 14.99 + CRV ■ NEW BELGIUM BREWERY, “VooDoo Ranger 8 Hop” Pale Ale, 6 Pack Bottles, 12oz/ 7.99 + CRV ■ ALE SMITH BREWING, “Speeday” Imerial Stout, 150ml/ 9.99 + CRV

Quality Gin

FISH

■ LEAF LETTUCE, Red, Green, Romaine,

2015 GNARLY HEAD OLD VINE ZINFANDEL 89 Points Wine Enthusiast “Best Buy” Reg 12.99 | Shoppers Special 8.99!

■ CRYSTAL GEYSER, Sparkling Water, 1.25L/ .99+CRV 6 Pack/ 4.99+CRV

■ PORK SIRLOIN CHOPS/ 2.98 LB ■ PORK COUNTRY SPARERIBS/ 2.98 LB

INSTRUCTIONS

■ 2012 OLD VINE WINE CO, Riesling, (Reg 21.99)/ 3.99 ■ 2011 FROG HAVEN, Pinot Noir, (Reg 16.99)/ 4.99 ■ 2014 BV ZINFANDEL, Coastal, (Reg 11.99)/ 4.99 ■ 2015 PARDUCCI, Chardonnay, “Best Buy” (Reg 12.99)/ 4.99

Connoisseurs Corner-Italy

■ 2011 BOLLA AMARONE, (Reg 59.99)/ 29.99 ■ 2012 ASCHERI BAROLO, (94WE, Reg 44.99)/ 34.99 ■ 2014 PRODUTTORI BARBARESCO, (94WA)/ 39.99 ■ STONEWALL KITCHEN, Jellies and Jams, 12.5oz/ 6.49 ■ GAJA CA’MARCANDA PROMIS,Toscana, ■ MENDOCINO MUSTARD, “Small Batch, (93WA)/ 49.99 ■ 2000 DAMILANO BAROLO RISERVA (95JS)/ 71.99 Family Owned, 9oz/ 5.49 4oz/ 12.00

■ BROCCOLI CROWNS, Fresh from the Field/ 1.49 LB ■ REESE, Mint Jelly, 10.5oz/ 3.99 ■ ORGANIC BANANAS, The Perfect Snack/ .99 LB ■ CLUSTER TOMATOES, Ripe on the Vine/ 2.69 LB ■ CELERY, Top Quality/ 1.19 Ea

S HOPP ER SPOTLIG HT

■ ODWALLA ORANGE JUICE, 1.8Qt/ 4.99

■ PORK CHOPS, Thick Cut/ 3.98 LB

– 3 lbs country-style ribs (bone-in) [See Notes 1 and 2] – Salt and pepper, to taste – Jar of favorite BBQ Sauce.

Best Buys, Local, Regional, International

Local, Organic, Natural, Specialty, Gourmet

BOB LAMAR, 33-Year Customer, Santa Cruz Occupation: First Transit driver Hobbies: Master Gardner, landscaping, plant propagation, biking, hiking, cooking, baking Astrological Sign: Leo What first got you shopping here? I was a route driver for Frito-Lay, and Shopper’s was one of my stops. This was when the founding owners were here. This is my favorite market. They carry products that you can’t find elsewhere, like their many imported items. It’s a friendly store with a comfortable, old-school feel. I like the wooden floors. Shopper’s has good pricing, and I prefer supporting local businesses. It’s great that you can find so many good local products here such as their many fresh salsas, Glaum eggs, the breads, especially Kelly’s, Marianne’s ice cream and the organic produce.

What do you like to cook? I really enjoy making Austrian food. I was born in Austria, and we moved to the States when I was 5. Then we moved back for a few years when I was 10. I make schnitzel, pork roasts, goulash, spaetzleh (small noodles for soups), sauerkraut, potato salad and dumplings. I also like to bake cakes, breads and strudel. Shopper’s has a good selection of flours, including King Arthur. This store somehow has everything that I need for my recipes, along with chestnut puree, marizpan, and quality baking chocolates for my pastries. They have amazing specialty products.

What else is on your “speciality” list? Definitely the cheeses and wine selections. Great variety in both departments. Shopper’s carries 6-7 Austrian wines, where other stores might have one choice. I appreciate being able to bring my mother an Austrian wine when visiting her. I also like their French and California wines. Shopper’s butcher shop reminds me of when I was a boy growing up in Austria: It’s always clean, and they’ll trim or special-cut whatever you need. Excellent quality! Shopper’s is an anchor of the community. It’s always fun coming here. Karla and all the checkers are really nice.

“Shopper’s is my favorite market. They carry products that you can’t find elsewhere, like their many imported items.”

|

Corner: Soquel & Branciforte Avenues 7 Days: 6am-9pm

| Meat: (831) 423-1696 | Produce: (831) 429-1499 | Grocery: (831) 423-1398 | Wine: (831) 429-1804

Superb Products of Value: Local, Natural, Specialty, Gourmet ■ Neighborly Service for 80 Years

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April 11-17, 2018