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AMF headliner Melissa etheridge on her surprising connection to santa cruz p18

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INSIDE Volume 43, No.7 May 17-23, 2017

GUANO REPORT How chicken wire could save Cowell Beach P11

VIVID & HIGH IMPACT

THE WAY SHE DOES Melissa Etheridge talks to GT as she gets set for the American Music Festival P18

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INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX Kip Andersen of ‘Cowspiracy’ on his new documentary ‘What the Health’ P28

Opinion 4 News 11 Cover Story 18 A&E 28 Events 33

Film 50 Dining 54 Risa’s Stars 59 Classifieds 60

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OPINION

EDITOR’S NOTE Conservatives long complained that celebrities have no right to speak out on political issues— until, of course, they found conservative celebrities to speak out on their issues. Their attempts to wave off the influence of musicians, movie stars and TV personalities in real-world affairs clearly never worked, anyway, so “if you can’t beat ’em, join ’em” was really their only option. Famous people have an enormous amount of cultural capital and trust, both in this country and around the world, and the election of Donald “I Thought It Would Be Easier” Trump is the ultimate proof of just how misplaced both of those can be. But this phenomenon can have its upside, too. It’s bizarrely thrilling

LETTERS BOOK OF PETE? Thank you Steve Kettmann for honoring Pete (GT, 5/10). I wish I had known him. I want to read more of his poems. Will there be a book published?

MAY 17-23, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

JODI BEHRENS | LA HONDA

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This is the number one question I’ve been asked in the last week. I am told there has been a lot of interest in a book since the story came out, and the possibility has not been ruled out. We’ll keep our readers up on any developments. — EDITOR

MOVING PORTRAIT I was deeply moved by Steve Kettmann’s account of his relationship with the late poet Peter McLaughlin, and gratified to see Good Times generously allot space to Pete’s work. I had many opportunities to hang out informally with Pete and talk about writing, politics, sports and his poetry, and I was floored by the brilliant humor and relentless honesty in his work. Pete was genuinely bedazzled by Steve’s attention to his work and even though, to a poet, there is nothing more coveted than a willing and eager publisher, Steve turned out to be much

when a person whose work we admire turns out to also share our personal values, and especially when we find out that how they conduct themselves in real life seems to reflect the depth we’ve read into their work. You kinda knew that would be the case with Melissa Etheridge, right? Jacob Pierce’s interview with her in this week’s issue shows that, indeed, she is as thoughtful and conscientious as her music and public persona would suggest. What is unexpected, though, is her very personal connection to Santa Cruz. I won’t spoil it, but it makes it seem even more fitting that she is in town Memorial Day weekend to headline the American Music Festival. You’ll find a guide to the entire festival—which comes to Aptos Village Park May 27-28, and also features Mavis Staples, Santa Cruz expats the Devil Makes Three, and many more—in this issue. STEVE PALOPOLI | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

more valuable than that. He was a loyal and stalwart friend to a guy who was never quite sure he was worth befriending. WALLACE BAINE | SANTA CRUZ

OUT AND BACK Pete was a most extraordinary person. I knew him as a runner who refused to run in a circle. If he was going to run, it had to be an “out and back.” So we would run out to Blackberry Falls, or do laps to the gate at Pogonip and back. He used to ride his beautiful road bike a long time ago, which now hangs on the wall at his house. He hadn’t ridden it in years, but he liked looking at it with something like regret, but that’s not quite it. No matter how many times I tried to get him to take it down, he just shook his head, and that was that. He was also a trumpet player. He used to go out to the lighthouse at the harbor or to a special place on West Cliff to serenade the sea. He was a regular at Bocci Cellars the same night every week, but I can’t remember which. And let’s not forget he liked the NYT crosswords. I’ve never met anyone quite like him … but I do understand that thing about the phone. JULIE BRAMLETT | SANTA CRUZ

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PHOTO CONTEST THANKS FOR THE MEMORIES Sand sculpture in Capitola.

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The Santa Cruz Department of Public Works will host lunchtime tours of some of its projects between Tuesday, May 23, and Thursday, May 25. City officials will show interested citizens around the Branciforte Bicycle Pedestrian Bridge Project, the Measure H Overlay Street Paving Project and the Eastside Alley Sewer Project. For more information, visit cityofsantacruz.com/publicworks or cityofsantacruz.com/calendar. Or email questions to jbisgaard@cityofsantacruz.com.

The iconic Santa Cruz surf statue celebrates 25 years at noon on Saturday, May 27. Attendees can learn about its history over drinks and light refreshments. Anyone with a fun photo of the event can email it to recreationevents@cityofsantacruz.com. Photos will be on display at the event, while the 33rd annual Santa Cruz Longboard Union’s annual contest happens in the waters below.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“I sold my soul for freedom/It’s lonely but it’s sweet.” — “TALKING TO MY ANGEL,” MELISSA ETHERIDGE

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LOCAL TALK

What is your earliest memory of Santa Cruz? BY MATTHEW COLE SCOTT

Coming here as a little kid and putting my fingers in the sea anemones on West Cliff. PEGGY BORNFLETH SANTA CRUZ | QUALITY ANALYST

When my friends told me to be careful of high tide and I thought they were joking and as I was playing in the tide pools a big wave crushed me and I thought I was going to die. TINA JOHNSON SANTA CRUZ | BUSINESS OWNER

1959, going to the Boardwalk with my sisters and my mom and dad. DAVID BECK SANTA CRUZ | TOW TRUCK DRIVER

ROSS FULLER SCOTTS VALLEY | BUSINESS OWNER

Traveling through, I stopped to get some pot and I loved it. It was in the late ’90s. WESLEY WILLIAMS SANTA CRUZ | JEWELER/POT GROWER

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 17-23, 2017

Capitola Beach, 20 years ago, where I found my family, my children, my wife. When I met her 20 years ago, it was my first experience in Santa Cruz and I never left.

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ROB BREZSNY FREE WILL ASTROLOGY Week of May 17 ARIES Mar21–Apr19

LIBRA Sep23–Oct 22

“A two-year-old kid is like using a blender, but you don’t have a top for it,” said comedian Jerry Seinfeld. Would you like to avoid a scenario like that, Aries? Would you prefer not to see what happens if your life has resemblances to turning on a topless blender that’s full of ingredients? Yes? Then please find the top and put it on! And if you can’t locate the proper top, use a dinner plate or newspaper or pizza box. OK? It’s not too late. Even if the blender is already spewing almond milk and banana fragments and protein powder all over the ceiling. Better late than never!

Leonardo da Vinci wrote a bestiary, an odd little book in which he drew moral conclusions from the behavior of animals. One of his descriptions will be useful for you to contemplate in the near future. It was centered on what he called the “wild ass,” which we might refer to as an undomesticated donkey. Leonardo said that this beast, “going to the fountain to drink and finding the water muddy, is never too thirsty to wait until it becomes clear before satisfying himself.” That’s a useful fable to contemplate, Libra. Be patient as you go in search of what’s pure and clean and good for you. (The translation from the Italian is by Oliver Evans.)

TAURUS Apr20–May20 My pregnant friend Myrna is determined to avoid giving birth via Caesarean section. She believes that the best way for her son to enter the world is by him doing the hard work of squeezing through the narrow birth canal. That struggle will fortify his willpower and mobilize him to summon equally strenuous efforts in response to future challenges. It’s an interesting theory. I suggest you consider it as you contemplate how you’re going to get yourself reborn.

GEMINI May21–June20 I invite you to try the following meditation: Picture yourself filling garbage bags with stuff that reminds you of what you used to be and don’t want to be any more. Add anything that feels like decrepit emotional baggage or that serves as a worn-out psychological crutch. When you’ve gathered up all the props and accessories that demoralize you, imagine yourself going to a beach where you build a big bonfire and hurl your mess into the flames. As you dance around the conflagration, exorcise the voices in your head that tell you boring stories about yourself. Sing songs that have as much power to relieve and release you as a spectacular orgasm.

CANCER Jun21–Jul22 In normal times, your guardian animal ally might be the turtle, crab, seahorse, or manta ray. But in the next three weeks, it’s the cockroach. This unfairly maligned creature is legendary for its power to thrive in virtually any environment, and I think you will have a similar resourcefulness. Like the cockroach, you will do more than merely cope with awkward adventures and complicated transitions; you will flourish. One caution: It’s possible that your adaptability may bother people who are less flexible and enterprising than you. To keep that from being a problem, be empathetic as you help them adapt. (P.S. Your temporary animal ally is exceptionally well-groomed. Cockroaches clean themselves as much as cats do.)

MAY 17-23, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

LE0 Jul23–Aug22

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SCORPIO Oct23–Nov21 My friend Allie works as a matchmaker. She has an instinctive skill at reading the potential chemistry between people. One of her key strategies is to urge her clients to write mission statements. “What would your ideal marriage look like?” she asks them. Once they have clarified what they want, the process of finding a mate seems to become easier and more fun. In accordance with the astrological omens, Scorpio, I suggest you try this exercise—even if you are already in a committed relationship. It’s an excellent time to get very specific about the inspired togetherness you’re willing to work hard to create.

SAGITTARIUS Nov22–Dec21 In ancient Greek myth, Tiresias was a prophet who could draw useful revelations by interpreting the singing of birds. Spirits of the dead helped him devise his prognostications, too. He was in constant demand for revelations about the future. But his greatest claim to fame was the fact that a goddess magically transformed himself into a woman for seven years. After that, he could speak with authority about how both genders experienced the world. This enhanced his wisdom immeasurably, adding to his oracular power. Are you interested in a less drastic but highly educational lesson, Sagittarius? Would you like to see life from a very different perspective from the one you’re accustomed to? It’s available to you if you want it.

CAPRICORN Dec22–Jan19 “You remind me of the parts of myself that I will never have a chance to meet,” writes poet Mariah GordonDyke, addressing a lover. Have you ever felt like saying that to a beloved ally, Capricorn? If so, I have good news: You now have an opportunity to meet and greet parts of yourself that have previously been hidden from you— aspects of your deep soul that up until now you may only have caught glimpses of. Celebrate this homecoming!

AQUARIUS Jan20–Feb18

Lady Jane Grey was crowned Queen of England in July 1553, but she ruled for just nine days before being deposed. I invite you to think back to a time in your own past when victory was short-lived. Maybe you accomplished a gratifying feat after an arduous struggle, only to have it quickly eclipsed by a twist of fate. Perhaps you finally made it into the limelight but then lost your audience to a distracting brouhaha. But here’s the good news: Whatever it was—a temporary triumph? incomplete success? nullified conquest?—you will soon have a chance to find redemption for it.

I predict that you won’t be bitten by a dog or embarrassed by a stain or pounced on by a lawyer. Nor will you lose your keys or get yelled at by a friend or oversleep for a big appointment. On the contrary! I think you’ll be wise to expect the best. The following events are quite possible: You may be complimented by a person who’s in a position to help you. You could be invited into a place that had previously been off-limits. While eavesdropping, you might pick up a useful clue, and while daydreaming you could recover an important memory you’d lost. Good luck like this is even more likely to sweep into your life if you work on ripening the most immature part of your personality.

VIRGO Aug23–Sep22

PISCES Feb19–Mar20

While shopping at a funky yard sale, I found the torn-off cover of a book titled You’re a Genius and I Can Prove It. Sadly, the rest of the book was not available. Later I searched for it in online bookstores, and found it was out of print. That’s unfortunate, because now would be an excellent time for you to peruse a text like this. Why? Because you need specific, detailed evidence of how unique and compelling you are—concrete data that will provide an antidote to your habitual self doubts and consecrate your growing sense of self-worth. Here’s what I suggest you do: Write an essay entitled “I’m an Interesting Character and Here’s the Proof.”

Time out. It’s intermission. Give yourself permission to be spacious and slow. Then, when you’re sweetly empty—this may take a few days—seek out experiences that appeal primarily to your wild and tender heart as opposed to your wild and jumpy mind. Just forget about the theories you believe in and the ideas you regard as central to your philosophy of life. Instead, work on developing brisk new approaches to your relationship with your feelings. Like what? Become more conscious of them, for example. Express gratitude for what they teach you. Boost your trust for their power to reveal what your mind sometimes hides from you.

Homework: Imagine what your life would be like if you even partially licked your worst fear. Describe this new world. freewillastrology.com.

© Copyright 2017


Huge Warehouse Clearance Sale Escape from Santa Cruz (Part 2) By Datta Khalsa, Broker This article continues a discussion about “escape taxes” from my last column in the Home & Garden magazine on April 12th. I spoke with County Assessor Sean Saldavia regarding escape taxes and he confirmed that the rules allowing retroactive charges for property taxes have been in effect since Prop 13 passed, and that they have a 4-year statute as defined in the Revenue and Taxation code, section 531. This means appraisers can go back 4 years from the date of discovery and retroactively charge property taxes on any significant improvements added to a property without the Assessor’s prior knowledge. He added that, on occasion, it is actually discovered that old buildings were torn down without the Assessor’s knowledge and the former property owner actually gets a credit back. In determining the adjustment to assessed value, they might look at the improvements, interview various parties as to when it was built, or in the absence of direct input simply make the best estimate they can, using standardized tables from the State. They take into account the quality and size of the improvement and then the calculated amount due is sent to the County Tax Collector. An escape tax becomes an unsecured lien after the property is sold, but the tax collector can still collect on the debt through various tools including wage garnishment and filing for summary judgment, in much the same way they collect on court-ordered payments and other personal liens. There are two ways a property can be excluded from an escape tax, but they have to be applied for during the provided 60-day appeal period. The first is under Prop 58 for children who inherit a property when its owner passes away. A parent will typically give their primary residence to kids without it being reappraised, along with up to $1 Million of combined original assessed value of additional properties statewide. Under limited circumstances the estate’s exemption can be given to grandchildren.

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In the end, our protagonists from my last column who thought they had left their property cares behind them begrudgingly paid up—to the tune of about $7,000—but they said they would have felt better about the experience, and could have been more financially prepared, had they been advised of the prospect of escape taxes being charged in the first place. Learning from this example, standards of practice dictate that we include an advisory on the existence of escape taxes as a part of the core disclosure package for all parties to a real estate transaction to help other parties avoid such an unpleasant surprise - a word to the wise, particularly on one for a property to which it appears that unpermitted improvements may have been added. Datta Khalsa is the broker and owner at Main Street Realtors in Soquel. He can be reached at (831)818-0181 or datta@mainstrealtors.com

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The second is if the taxpayer can prove that the undiscovered improvements were there when they bought the property, in which case the Assessor recognizes that the value of the improvements were reflected in their original purchase price and limited thereafter by Prop 13. The burden of proof is on the taxpayer, so if it looks they added the improvement and can’t show that it was there when they bought it, then they have to pay up.

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OPINION

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ONLINE COMMENTS RE: PETER MCLAUGHLIN Thank you for posting this. It is beautiful and it made me cry. I didn’t know Peter, but I feel like I know him a little now and I love his poetry. Is there any way to read more of it? — MARIA ALFARO

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Found this by accident, Steve, and enjoyed it so much. Thanks to you, I feel as if I know Pete and maybe even you a bit. Good people, both of you. And now I’m going to go to bed because it’s 5 o’clock in the

morning, for pete’s sake—and for the real Pete’s sake, I’m gonna pray that now he’s safe in heaven, Pete’s happy ever after. — PAT

I didn’t want the article you wrote to end. I want to hear more about Pete, I wish I could read more of his poetry as well. I hope someday I can. Thank you! — THIA TSURUTA

Steve, You captured my brother beautifully. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. — DANIEL MCLAUGHLIN

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EDITORIAL Editor Steve Palopoli x206 Managing Editor Maria Grusauskas x216 News Editor Jacob Pierce x223 Features Editor Anne-Marie Harrison x221 Web & Calendar Editor Lily Stoicheff x210

MAY 17-23, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

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NEWS PRESSING MATTERS Is it a problem when activists won’t talk to reporters? If so, who’s at fault? BY JACOB PIERCE

TURD OPTION A Santa Cruz parks employee installs chicken wire under the Santa Cruz Municipal Wharf to try to

keep out birds that are elevating bacteria levels.

Dropping Calls

City leaders’ all-out assault on bird poop near Cowell Beach BY BRENDAN BANE

C

owell Beach is famous for easy waves, gorgeous views of Santa Cruz and, unfortunately, being the “dirtiest beach in California.” Heal the Bay, an environmental nonprofit based in Santa Monica, hands out the designation, annually ranking West Coast beaches according to the bacteria-richness of their waters. This year’s “Beach Bummer” rankings are due to arrive just before Memorial Day weekend, and city officials hope Cowell slides down the list. Their secret weapon:

chicken wire. Lots and lots of it. Water under the Santa Cruz Municipal Wharf has grown cleaner, as the city of Santa Cruz and environmental nonprofits report a decline in bacteria levels following the installation of antipigeon fencing just above the shoreline. Though the fencing may have come too late to repair Cowell’s unfortunate rep this year, city officials and environmentalists remain cautiously optimistic about rankings in the upcoming report. “We’ve made incredible progress

toward determining the root cause behind these elevated bacteria levels,” says Vice Mayor David Terrazas, who’s been involved in cleaning up Cowell’s waters since it first appeared on the list. “I’d like to see us clean up whatever’s causing the issue, but also to get off Heal the Bay’s list entirely.” Though Heal the Bay names Cowell and nearby Main Beach specifically, the wharf is the true bacterial epicenter, where levels are highest in shallow waters just below the beams. Walk 100 feet >12

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 17-23, 2017

Ryan Masters, a reporter for the Santa Cruz Sentinel, remembers it as “a nightmare situation.” While he covered this month’s occupation at UCSC’s Kerr Hall, students repeatedly yelled, “Fuck you, Ryan Masters!” “Asshole!” and “Racist reporter!” “The Afrikan/Black Student Alliance [A/ BSA ]—I’ve got a lot of respect for them. I understand systemic racism. I understand white supremacy,” Masters says. “But unfortunately, with some things they say, they sound like a hate group.” Masters had tried to get into the occupation by knocking on the door and asking to get into the building. The A/BSA did not respond for comment for this story, but some students have said on social media that they felt the administrative building had been turned into a home for students. They say that by posting pictures, Masters was invading their privacy—although Masters responded that Kerr Hall is a public building. Students also criticized the way Masters wrote about a previous UCSC protest. Some news outlets got more of a window into the occupation. One day before the university acceded to protesters’ demands, A/BSA co-chair Imari Reynolds spoke on air with Tucker Carlson, who had just taken over Bill O’Reilly’s slot on Fox News. It struck Masters as an odd approach. “As far as them deciding the local news is the enemy and then going on Fox News, that just baffles me,” Masters says. The protesters’ message may have been a little slow in getting out to the campus. One student told KSBW reporter Phil Gomez, “I tried reading news articles about it, and most of them said they wouldn’t talk to news crews, so I’m not entirely sure what that was all about.” Masters says he saw people yelling at Gomez and KSBW cameraman Tom Lopez as well, although he took the brunt of the barrage himself—something the station’s news director Lawton Dodd agrees with, having followed the situation remotely. “The protesters made it obvious that they weren’t going to talk to us. It >14

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past the lifeguard tower, according to city staffers, and those results dissipate, with bacteria dropping to near-undetectable levels. Cowell first landed on Heal the Bay’s report card in 2010, when it claimed second place among West Coast beaches whose waters exceeded state standards for bacterial counts. Cowell danced between first and second place in the intervening years, and has claimed the top spot since 2014. That same year, members of local environmental nonprofits like the Sierra Club, Save the Waves and Surfrider Foundation partnered with the city and county of Santa Cruz to form the Cowell Beach Working Group, an organization dedicated to identifying and neutralizing the cause behind the high bacterial counts. The group began by investigating a list of prospective polluters, from leaky sewers to animal waste left by dogs, birds and marine life. The lineup narrowed as the group tested hundreds of water samples over two and a half years, which revealed basically no traces whatsoever of human or dog DNA. That left one culprit: birds.

In 2016, the group installed fencing beneath the wharf, blocking pigeons from roosting and pooping into the water below. Nik StrongCvetich, executive director of Santa Cruz County’s own Saves the Waves, which works to conserve coastal ecosystems around the world, says the effect was immediate. “When I first saw the results,” Strong-Cvetich says, “I thought, ‘Is there a mistake here?’” When compared with the city’s 2015 water samples, just before the netting was installed, bacteria levels in 2016 initially dropped by more than half in late July, and continued declining through December. Save the Waves also reported a 50 percent drop in water samples that exceeded state standards. “You could almost compare it to a car dropping from 60 to 10 miles per hour,” says Akin Babatola, the city’s environmental compliance manager. “That’s how sharp it was.” Whether those changes will be reflected in Heal the Bay’s report is not guaranteed. Cowell’s spot on the report will be determined by water samples collected before the netting installation, which was completed in August of last year. Even then, Heal the Bay’s report is a comparison

between several beaches, so Cowell could still earn first place if other beaches make greater strides in improving water quality. “On a sanitary basis, the improvement is clear. We’ve made it,” said Akin Babatola. “On a relative basis, it’s not that easy.” Progress aside, Babatola takes issue with the methods used to decide Heal the Bay’s rankings for dirtiest beaches. Coastal counties are legally required to routinely test bacterial levels in beach water samples. Heal the Bay relies on those results to decide their rankings. Many areas, including Santa Cruz County, use a test called Colilert, which detects the presence of coliforms, generally a harmless type of bacteria that indicates the potential presence of viruses, parasites and disease-causing bacteria. Babatola described the use of Colilert in this case as “flawed,” claiming the kit test tends to overestimate, as other microorganisms can falsely trigger the presence of coliforms. Colilert was originally designed to test drinking water, Babatola says, and thus doesn’t account for microorganisms found in ocean waters. >16 “You’re guaranteed to

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Men and women of all ages packed the Louden Nelson Community Center on May 8 for the standing-room-only first meeting of the Santa Cruz Coalition on Homelessness. Organized by members of the Warming Center Program (WCP), local religious organizations and community advocates for homeless rights, the meeting focused on the everyday struggles individuals have on the streets and what is being done to meet their needs. “Emergency shelters have been providing to meet some of these needs,” explained WCP organizer Brent Adams. “But a lot of the funding has

gone away.” For the last three years, the Warming Center Program has been an essential tool in the battle against homelessness, often providing safer and more accessible shelter than the federally funded programs, he said. Coalition organizers informed the audience on what other communities are doing throughout the West Coast to help meet the basic needs that are falling through the systematic gaps. Coalition organizers argued that they can meet many of homeless people’s essential needs through innovative thinking, empathy for others and some creative financing.

“I’m a tightwad and I don’t just want to write out a check,” said Ron Powers, founder of Loads of Love. Based out of a van and fueled by a generator, Loads of Love is a mobile laundromat where individuals without shelter can clean their belongings and feel a little more human for an hour. Powers is an Apple employee, who uses the company’s philanthropy program to fund his endeavor. “There are a lot of companies that have services where whatever you donate, they will match,” he explained. The meeting happened around the same time that the city of Santa Cruz released its 20-point Homelessness

Coordination Committee report, aiming to solve a lot of the same problems coalition members had discussed, including access to showers, charging stations, storage and emergency shelter. The City Council unanimously adopted the report at its May 9 meeting. The council chose to prioritize certain efforts, including year-round shelter and mental health services, while looking for buy-in and collaboration from neighboring jurisdictions, as well as giving direction to explore “what a state of homeless emergency is,” and if it would have any impact on local services. MAT WEIR


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TAKING NOTES The portion of people of color among newsroom reporters comes out to about half the percentage nationwide. And several studies have shown that news agencies have done a poor job over the years representing ethnicity in the stories they cover.

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was clear that Ryan was really the target of their ire,” Dodd says. “We cover the news, and if someone wants to talk, that’s part of the story. And if someone doesn’t want to talk—OK, that’s part of the story.” One outlet, City on a Hill Press, UCSC’s student-run paper, did have reporters on the ground in Kerr Hall. In an editorial last week, the newspaper criticized local reporters for not showing more sensitivity in their coverage and for doing a lousy job building rapport with activists they cover. If some people of color show distrust of how reporters represent them, a look at news trends nationwide might provide insight into why. One study after another—conducted by researchers from institutions such as UC Santa Barbara and Yale—have found that news agencies skew their coverage, for instance, over-representing stories of African-Americans who are poor or involved

in criminal activity. And a 2016 diversity census from the American Society of News Editors found that people of color made up 17 percent of newsroom journalists—an increase over previous years, but still nothing like the country as a whole. Conn Hallinan, who taught journalism at UCSC for 23 years, says that—no matter the circumstances—it behooves activists to be open with reporters. “The media is the way people access what’s going on in the world. As false as some of it may be, as controversial as some of it may be, it’s still the first line of communication,” says Hallinan, who was also provost for Kresge College for three years. “Even if you’re as critical of the media as I am, you have to talk to them and be confident that your protest is valid, that your demands are valid—that they reflect needs of students of color and the student population as a whole. There’s an old rule in politics that you don’t pick a fight with people who buy ink by the barrel.” Hallinan, who once did 30 days in jail

for a protest in 1963, stresses that he’s sympathetic to the struggles that people of color go through in this country. At the same time, he does not agree that protesters have any protection from being photographed. On the other hand, he calls Masters’ decision to argue back-and-forth with people on Twitter “a dumb thing to do.” We shouldn’t forget, of course, that the university did meet A/BSA’s demands, so the protesters didn’t really need any in-depth news coverage to achieve their stated goals. Discussions around the First Amendment at schools isn’t unique to UCSC. In its controversial coverage of safe spaces, The Atlantic suggested in 2015 that some university activists have “weaponized the concept,” using safe spaces to shut down journalists. Masters says, ultimately, his concern is that the press faces an assault—as he sees it—with intimidation coming from President Donald Trump on one side and some leftleaning protesters on the other.

Indeed, Americans’ trust in media has plummeted, beginning long before Trump took office, or even declared his candidacy. The portion of Americans who trust the news sank to 32 percent this past September, down from 55 percent in 1999 and a high of 72 percent in 1976, according to Gallup. The number dropped a whopping eight points between 2015 and 2016 alone. But are protesters getting more standoffish with reporters than ever? Dodd, whose reporters spend a lot of time at breaking news scenes, says he’s hesitant to paint “in broad strokes”—looking for trends when they may or may not be there. And although he doesn’t mind venting, Masters looks forward to putting the kerfuffle behind him. “It upset me. It was interesting,” Masters says. “I don’t want to make a huge freaking deal about it because I don’t want to distract from the issues they’re talking about. That’s the story.”


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get a number higher than the true number of coliforms,” says Babatola, who presented his criticisms at a May 11 meeting for the Northern California Beach Water Quality Workgroup in Oakland. Even using Colilert alone, bacterial counts still appear to be declining. But only testing throughout a full summer season—when bacteria levels reliably spike—will reveal the full extent of progress. “If we can count them more accurately,” says Strong-Cvetich, “then I think we should go in that direction. But there’s progress being made on the overall bacteria count no matter how you count them.” It may seem like it took an especially long time to get to the bottom of the issue, especially considering that Steve Peters, from the county’s Department of Environmental Health, told Santa Cruz Weekly five years ago that the causes of high bacteria levels were natural and may have included birds. Scott Collins, assistant to the city manager, says the process was a matter of investigating all possible contributors and ruling out the possibility of human contamination. Strong-Cvetich calls water quality “slow, arduous work.” An independent technical advisory committee is reviewing the group’s testing methods and findings, and will recommend next steps early next year, Terrazas says. Until then, the group plans to continue modifying the netting to exclude birds that have figured out how to roost on and around it. Collins says they’ve joked about hiring a city falcon to deter persistent pigeons, just as the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club hired Rufus, a Harris Hawk, to scare off birds lingering around the 2012 Summer Olympics. Strong-Cvetich suspects cases like Cowell’s will become more common as environmental agencies lose government funding. Just last month, the Trump administration proposed to cut the Environmental Protection Agency’s budget by 31 percent. “We might not be able to lean on the EPA to fund these types of things,” warns Strong-Cvetich. “If we want to solve environmental problems, it’s got to start locally, and it’s got to be collaborations between nonprofits and local government.”


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Thrill Melissa Etheridge on her little-known connection to Santa Cruz By Jacob Pierce


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The two-time Grammy winner loves sipping on Know Label’s cannabis-infused wine, which is made with bud from the Santa Cruz Mountains to give tasters a full-body buzz. “It’s pretty awesome,” says Etheridge, who’s bringing her Memphis blues sound to the Santa Cruz American Music Festival next weekend. Etheridge loved the beverage—technically called a tincture because it’s only sold medically—so much that she partnered with Santa Cruz resident Lisa Molyneux in the operation. Molyneux, who runs the Greenway Compassionate Relief delivery nonprofit, ferments the wine herself with grape juice she buys from a vintner friend in Santa Maria. “People misunderstand. It’s not like an edible at all. You’re not going to get all messed up on it. It’s more like an awesome glass of wine that makes you feel really, really good,” Etheridge tells me, chuckling. The Know Label wine is high in CBDs, but doesn’t contain any THC, so it isn’t psychoactive at all. The drink, which Greenway delivers, varies in price from $25 to $250, depending on the variety and bottle size. Etheridge first became a vocal supporter of medical marijuana 12 years ago, after a bout with cancer. To this day, the card-carrying medical user says pot helps her cope with some of the gastrointestinal issues created by chemotherapy. About a decade ago, Molyneux was on the lookout for celebrities who were brave enough to speak out on the benefits of medicinal cannabis. Etheridge caught her attention, and Molyneux started going to meet-and-greets with the singer, giving her information about the industry—then more of a grassroots effort—and showing her how to get involved. For her part, Etheridge says she had already been hoping to join the movement. The two became friends after Molyneux purchased one of Etheridge’s guitars to benefit a breast cancer charity. They’ve cemented the bond over time, with Etheridge and her wife Linda Wallem often visiting Molyneux and her wife Syndy Reinecke, who co-own Greenway. Etheridge’s performance in Aptos Village Park on Saturday, May 27 will be her first gig in Santa Cruz County. Now launching her own cannabis line, Etheridge hopes to help Molyneux re-open Greenway’s storefront dispensary, which closed in the fall of 2015 due to a combination of financial struggles, landlord disputes and zoning issues. 20>

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Molyneux, a fellow cancer survivor, marvels at how her friend is unaffected by the spotlight. “She gets off the stage and can be making her kids pancakes,” Molyneux says. “It’s like, ‘Aren’t you the person who was just up there performing?” For Etheridge fans, the music is not simply a collection of songs. Etheridge has built a relationship with listeners that goes both ways, and more than with most singers, Etheridge’s shows—and her whole catalog, really—sound like a conversation. That’s a career trademark the singer shares with Bruce Springsteen, who Etheridge calls a “top five” influence on her. “He’s going so strong still,” Etheridge says of the Boss. “That’s

what I wanted. I didn’t need to have the huge hits. As Bruce told me, ‘Hits are fine, but what you really want is longevity. You want to remain relevant and be a voice for a people.’” Etheridge found fame for impassioned tunes like “Come to My Window,” “I’m the Only One,” “I Want to Come Over,” and “Angels Would Fall.” She’s earned 15 Grammy nominations, and won twice. She also won the 2007 Oscar for best song for “I Need to Wake Up” from “An Inconvenient Truth,” Al Gore’s global warming film. It’s easy to see what makes Etheridge such an effective activist. She does indeed seem unchanged by the spotlight, whether passionately belting out rock ballads to thousands of screaming fans or

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explaining to Dan Rather what it was like growing up a lesbian in the 1970s. That unassuming confidence makes her a powerful voice for the issues closest to her. “When you don’t have another persona to try to maintain, you can just keep your truth and operate from there, so it definitely keeps you from going crazy, and is much easier to be yourself,” explains Etheridge, who grew up in Kansas. “All these places where you find me being an activist, they’re because they truly do affect my personal life. I’m an LGBT person. I’m a cannabis believer and consumer, and you’re going to find me pushing for that. And health and all those things are very personal to me. I’m able to put that out there. I’m from the Midwest, and I never thought about trying to be someone other than who I am. It’s much more enjoyable that way.” Etheridge says “the next revolution” will be a rethinking of nutrition and what people do to their bodies by making bad food choices. As my conversation with Etheridge winds down, I tell her about my favorite live television moment ever. I recall the 2005 Grammy Awards like they happened last night, with Etheridge, who’d just beaten breast cancer, walking onstage—her bald head glistening in the stage lights, her smile proudly beaming into the Staples Center crowd and her soulful alto voice screaming into the microphone. I don’t think I’d ever seen anyone look so alive. Etheridge thanks me graciously and even starts getting choked up, which is rather incredible considering that she mentions a minute later that people still tell her

pretty much the same thing I did about once a week. Leading up until that night in 2005, Etheridge had hardly seen anyone other than close family for three months, and she had undergone a radiation treatment that morning, before going to the awards ceremony. Etheridge, a longtime Joplin fan, confesses that she would have been crushed if someone else had sung “Piece of My Heart” in her place. While planning her performance, Etheridge had considered, for about 30 seconds, wearing a wig, before reminding herself, “Good God, no. That’s so not me.” Clearly, she had no clue that her decision to perform—shiny head and all—would make her a source of inspiration among those suffering from cancer. For all the confidence Etheridge showed striding across the stage, she says there was a moment immediately before when she was just hoping no one would make fun of her. “I did not realize the social impact it was going to have,” she reflects. “Sometimes when you do things in a really personal way, just for yourself, they can end up impacting the whole world. Those are special moments you can’t plan.”

Santa Cruz American Music Festival is 11 a.m.-7 p.m. on Saturday, May 27, and Sunday, May 28, in Aptos Village Park. Tickets are $25-$1,000. Melissa Etheridge headlines Saturday afternoon. Visit santacruzamericanmusicfestival. com for more information.

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he all-woman bluegrass barbershop trio Baskery opens up the Santa Cruz American Music Festival at 11 a.m. on Saturday, May 27, with an inventive sound anchored by an upright bassist and two multiinstrumentalists. The group busts out clever musical twists like banjo with heavy guitar distortion to give alt-country a fresh feel. Next up is roots-rockers Record Company, best known for their 2016 hit “Off the Ground,” which leans heavily on guitarist Chris Vos’ bluesy slide. The blues get into full swing after that with JJ Grey and Mofro, a Southern band pulling from influences as diverse as Otis Redding and Lynyrd Skynyrd. Grey’s charismatic, slightly guttural

crooning may remind audiences of the late Joe Cocker, who actually co-headlined the festival (then called the Santa Cruz Blues Festival) in 2009 with B.B King. Next, rock legend Stephen Stills will take the stage with the Rides, a blues outfit that features keyboardist Barry Goldberg and guitarist Kenny Wayne Shepherd. The group’s second studio album, “Pierced Arrow,” came out last year, although in concert Stills pulls out throwbacks like Buffalo Springfield’s “For What It’s Worth,” the anti-war song he wrote 40 years ago. Melissa Etheridge (see main story) comes out last to finish a Saturday afternoon of rocking music. On Sunday, Barns Courtney’s voice rings with a timeless sound that is part pop star and part Robert

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POWER OF THREE The Devil Makes Three returns to Santa Cruz to headline

the AMF on Sunday, May 28.

<24 Johnson. The English native guitar player, who grew up in Seattle, is up first Sunday to play viral online hits like “Glitter and Gold” and “Fire.” The Brothers Comatose, who hail from San Francisco and are not brothers, will take the stage with their upbeat, well-written bluegrass songs that drive forward with the energy of a steam engine. After that comes a pair of actual brothers, the Wood Brothers— guitarist Oliver and upright bassist Chris—who get deep into the roots of bluesy folk music. A couple years ago, multi-instrumentalist Jano Rix joined the group, sometimes playing his “shitar,” a beat-up acoustic with a bunch of percussive gizmos attached to it. The three harmonize beautifully.

A true highlight of the festival is 77-year-old Mavis Staples, who sang with the Staples Sisters on Stax Records, putting out hits like “I’ll Take You There” and “Respect Yourself.” In her six-decade career, Staples has collaborated with Van Morrison, Billy Preston, Willie Nelson, Ry Cooder, Neko Case, Justin Vernon, Nick Cave, Ben Harper, Tune-Yards and Jeff Tweedy. The history of gospel, soul, pop, R&B and blues would not be the same without her. Wrapping up the festival is the Devil Makes Three, the once local band that plays punk-infused bluegrass songs about religious themes, getting drunk and being messed up on drugs. That’s Santa Cruz music to raise your beer to.


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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

VEGAN GOING Kip Andersen, director of ‘Cowspiracy,’ will be at the screening of his new ‘What the Health’ documentary on May 17 at the Nickelodeon.

MAY 17-23, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Uncowed

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Fiercely passionate ‘Cowspiracy’ director Kip Andersen comes to Santa Cruz for screening of his latest film BY ANNE-MARIE HARRISON

T

here’s a scene in the documentary Cowspiracy where director Kip Andersen charges into the lobby of the San Francisco Greenpeace office and asks the woman at the counter to see the

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program director. Andersen has been trying to get an appointment for two months, and wants to know why Greenpeace doesn’t focus on animal agriculture as the leading cause of greenhouse gas emissions. Greenpeace’s PR person comes

MUSIC I know why the Stray Birds sing P31

out to shoo him away, saying representatives will be in touch. Cowspiracy, which got some star power from executive producer Leonardo DiCaprio, has become the most popular and arguably most controversial pro-vegan documentary

FILM Richard Gere is a bit of a fixer-upper in ‘Norman’ P50

of all time. That’s at least partially because Andersen doesn’t just take on the obvious targets: healthcare, pharmaceutical companies and factory farming. This is Greenpeace, after all—the same Greenpeace whose members routinely >30

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scale famous monuments to display climate change banners and put themselves in the path of whalers. But the former Boulder Creek resident is uncompromising, leaving no cow unturned—a man who, early in our interview, asks “Can you be an environmentalist and still eat meat?” Andersen has taken the same confrontational approach with his follow-up, What the Health, in which he investigates the healthcare and pharmaceutical industries’ connection to our nation’s reliance on meat, dairy and processed food consumption. What the Health will be screened in Santa Cruz on May 17 followed by a Q&A with the filmmaker. When you’re uncovering “one of the biggest health cover-ups in the history of mankind, how it got to be so, and what the solution is,” you’ve got to take risks, says Andersen of his scorch-earthed tactics. He spent hundreds of hours researching, sending emails, making calls and showing up at American health nonprofits, only to have his questions ignored, he says. He claims the information he did find was tainted by questionable studies, media hype and political interference. “It’s tough because with medical studies you have to dig really deep and go back to see how they were funded,” says Andersen. “A lot of times it’s like ‘Oh, that’s funded by the meat and dairy industry.” Like the Siri-Tarino study, says Andersen, which was headed by Robert Krauss and sparked the “butter is back” craze in 2010 when it concluded that there was no significant evidence to connect saturated fat with an increased risk of coronary heart disease or cardiovascular disease, despite studies since 1965 saying the opposite. When the study was repackaged and released in 2014, the chair of Harvard’s nutrition department called it “seriously misleading,” saying it contained “multiple errors and omissions,” and called for the paper to be retracted. Turns out, says Andersen, Krauss had been funded by the National Dairy Council since 1989, and received support from the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and the Robert & Veronica Atkins Foundation (if you remember the

Atkins Diet from the ’90s, it was pretty big on meat intake). “That’s what they want: ‘doubt is our product,’” says Andersen, quoting the 1969 PR proposal from Brown & Williamson, a then-subsidiary of British American Tobacco, reviewing the state of the tobacco industry’s public relations and proposing next steps. “It’s formulated, it’s perfected. All you have to do is introduce doubt, and then people say ‘Oh well, I don’t know what to believe,’ and then move on with doing what they want to do.” With the deep pockets and long-standing influence that these industries have, says Andersen, it’s no wonder that when we think protein, we think meat, and when we think calcium, we think milk. A plant-based diet can offer those nutrients and more, he says, but it’s the combination of mass marketing, popular myths, and enough doubt to not know the difference that keeps people reaching for burgers instead of tofu, tempeh and seitan. Cowspiracy has been called “vegan propaganda” by critics, who claim that it’s unrealistic to transition the global population to veganism, and that some of the facts used in the film were over-hyped. Andersen sighs. “When Leonardo DiCaprio came on board, we had two of his lawyers down our throats for 10 months making sure we had every single fact sourced, at least one or two sources,” says Andersen. “It’s all his image—he’s worth, what, a billion dollars? It is the most lock solid.” But the hullabaloo doesn’t matter to him, says Andersen, because at screenings across the globe, he’s met receptive audiences. “We’re in a paradigm shift, I feel, as a human species,” says Andersen. “Everybody really wants to know what’s going on—they’re hungry for it—to realize that we can know the truth and move on, not rely on these powers that be and cross our fingers that they’re telling the truth.” Info: 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 17. Nickelodeon Theatre, 210 Lincoln St., Santa Cruz. Tickets available at the door 6-6:30 p.m. and online. 722-3253. tugg.com. $10. What the Health is also available for download at whatthehealthfilm.com.


MUSIC

WHY SING A MELODY AS A SOLILOQUY The Stray Birds harmonize at Moe’s Alley on Wednesday, May 24.

Birds’ Song

R

ichly layered vocals are a hallmark of bluegrass, from inimitable sibling harmony groups like the Stanley Brothers and Santa Cruz’s own Coffis Brothers on through to roots supergroups like I’m With Her. Rafter-raising harmonies are also heard throughout gospel music, and folk music is designed to be harmonized to, providing space for everyone to jump in and sing along. The Stray Birds fit nicely in the long, rich tradition of American roots harmony. A three-piece originally from Lancaster, Pennsylvania, the band members lay their voices on

top of one another to create a sound that’s tight, pure and timeless. All three take song crafting duties very seriously, making sure they get even the smallest details right. “We’re a band that has a threeheaded monster approach,” says bassist and banjo player Charlie Muench, explaining that the vocal arrangements play a big role in setting the trio apart from the sea of singer-songwriter groups. “We take a lot of time to craft the music and have it be something that can resonate with people—the actual music and also the message in the music and the craft of it.”

The band, comprising Muench and singer-songwriters Maya de Vitry and Oliver Craven, was formed in 2012, but Muench and de Vitry’s friendship goes back to middle school, where the two were in the school band together. Though all three have moved out of Lancaster and now live in Brooklyn and Nashville, their hometown roots come through in their music, as they explore small-town life in postindustrial America. In 2016, the Stray Birds won Song of the Year at the Folk Music Alliance’s International Folk Music Awards for “Best Medicine,” a song about a record store in Saskatchewan,

The Stray Birds will perform at 8:30 p.m. on Wednesday, May 24 at Moe’s Alley, 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz. $10/adv, $15/ door. 479-1854.

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 17-23, 2017

The Stray Birds carry on a roots tradition of crafting dazzling harmony BY CAT JOHNSON

New York, that, with the area’s fading industry and economic struggles, was holding on for dear life. The song, which was written by de Vitry and appears on the Stray Birds’ album of the same name, is a snapshot of the town that speaks to the importance of art and music, even when times are hard. It’s a tribute to a man named Kurt Hellijas, who had unfulfilled ambitions to be a music teacher, and now owns the record store. “Kurt was carrying on his passion in this place where there’s no economics for this sort of thing, and he’s doing it anyway,” says Muench. “The whole Best Medicine record is sort of dedicated to him. He gave it a vision.” For years, the Stray Birds has been a folk and roots trio. On the band’s new release, titled Magic Fire, however, the members stretched their musical bounds. They brought in electric instruments and drums, layered tracks in the studio and pushed the Stray Birds sound into a new arena. They also brought in producer Larry Campbell, who has worked with Bob Dylan and Levon Helm, to help them go beyond simply reflecting what the band does on stage. The experience, says Muench, was “way beyond what we were expecting or thought was possible.” “The studio is an instrument, just like the bass or guitar or voice is an instrument,” he says. “The possibilities are so great. We were trying to open up to that and try something that was a little bit more experimental in nature. Larry just kept saying, ‘Don’t limit the scope of what anything can be in the studio.’” Of working with Campbell, Muench says he “bent things in a way that we wouldn’t necessarily have done,” and that “he’s the dude you want in there trying to create with you.” What shines through is a commitment to crafting the melodies, instrumentation and harmonies down to the smallest detail. “I don’t want to use the word ‘precious,’” says Muench, “but it’s so important to us to get the music right. That ambition and care and urgency is very easy to feel and see.”

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SATURDAY, MAY 27

SUNDAY, MAY 28

11:00-12:00

Baskery

11:00-12:00

Barns Courtney

12:25-1:40

The Record Company

12:30-1:40

Brothers Comatose

2:10-3:25

JJ Grey & Mofro

2:10-3:25

The Wood Brothers

3:55-5:10

The Rides

3:55-5:10

Mavis Staples

5:45-7:15

Melissa Etheridge 5:45-7:15

Devil Makes Three


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• Gates open by 10am on Saturday and Sunday. There are no ins and outs after 3pm. We recommend arriving early as both the Gold Circle and General Admission sections are on a first come, first served basis. • Aptos Village Park is located at 100 Aptos Creek Road in Aptos, California. Please note there is no parking at the event site. Free parking and a free luxury shuttle service, to and from the festival site, is located at Cabrillo College. Signs will be posted directing cars to the parking site. • The Cabrillo College parking lot opens at 8am and shuttle buses begin transporting ticket holders at 9am. No parking at Aptos Village Park. Specified areas for Disabilities Accessible parking and DA shuttles available at Cabrillo. • What to bring: one sealed personal bottle of water, money or credit card to purchase Festival Bucks, sunscreen, hat, and a small personal-use camera (no video). • What not to bring: dogs, food, alcohol, cans, bottles, containers, coolers, umbrellas, cameras with removable lens, recording devices, video cameras. • All seating is on a first come first served basis. Seats are provided for each person in the Gold Circle section. Ticket holders in the General Admission section may bring chairs that are a maximum of 30 inches in height, with a maximum seat height of 10 inches. • Park Rules: Smoking is not allowed anywhere inside Santa Cruz County Parks. The Santa Cruz County Parks and Sheriff’s Department do not allow colors of any organization to be worn at any public event. • Santa Cruz American Music Festival is a scrip-based event. Cash is not accepted at any booths except the Merchandise booths (Festival, Vintage & Artists only). Ticket holders can visit the Festival Bucks booth to purchase scrip tickets for $1 each, either with cash or credit card (Visa or Mastercard only). Use Festival Bucks like cash for all food and beverage purchases. An ATM is located beside the Pavilion at the back of the park.

• The 2017 Santa Cruz American Music Festival is produced by Judy Appleby, Michael, Nick & Steve Blas, Connie Burroughs, Bruce Howard, Phil Lewis, Mike Spano, Jim Tracey & Margie Way.

Santa Cruz County’s

Top online events calendar

June 22-25, 2017 June 22-25, 2017

John Prine Bruce Cockburn

Brandi Carlile Playing For Change Blind Pilot Carrie Rodriguez

Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real Paul Thorn Band Las Cafeteras Charlie Thomas and The Drifters Paper Bird Baka Beyond Rising Appalachia Laura Love Duo Ferron & Her All-Star Band Jimmy Lafave Sarah Lee Guthrie Joel Rafael w/John Trudell’s Bad Dog Barbara Higbie Dar Williams Poor Man’s Whiskey Mouths of Babes Keith Greeninger & Dayan Kai Achilles Wheel Joe Craven Front Country

The Sam Chase & the Untraditional Rainbow Girls John Craigie David Luning Sherry Austin & Henhouse The Real Sarahs Danny Click & The Hell Yeahs! Blue Summit Halden Wofford & the Hi Beams Dirty Cello Monica Pasqual & The Handsome Brunettes The Heifer Belles Carolyn Sills Combo Crow & The Canyon The Cave Singers + More BLACK OAK RANCH • LAYTONVILLE, CALIFORNIA KATEWOLFMUSICFESTIVAL.COM

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 17-23, 2017

• The food court offers a wide variety of choices, including BBQ, Asian, Mexican, Gyros, New Orleans cuisine, Gourmet Hot Dogs, Kettle Korn, Frozen Fruit Bars, Smoothies and other tasty delights. Water, other nonalcoholic beverages, beer, wine, and hot and cold coffee drinks are available at selected booths.

MUSIC FESTIVAL

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11:00 - 12:00

I

n the tradition of bringing opening act unknowns who strike it big— think Trombone Shorty and Carolyn Wonderland—the three sisters who make up the Swedish band Baskery have been receiving raves from other musicians and critics who see them in small gigs and opening slots.

MAY 17-23, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Some of the greatest purveyors of Americana music are from elsewhere (think Australia’s Kasey Chambers) and sisters Greta (banjo, drums), Stella (double bass), and Sunniva (guitar) Bondesson so loved U.S. culture, they moved from Stockholm to Nashville in 2014 and then to Los Angeles, where they recorded a new disc with Grammy-winning producer Andrew Dawson (Kanye West, Beyoncé, the Rolling Stones—talk about eclectic!).

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All three sing in perfect harmonies—like they were born to sing together. They were! Heavy on drums and bass and rock, they opened for the Brian Setzer Orchestra when they were known as the Slaptones and had their father, Janåke, on drums. In 2007 they changed their name and toured as a trio, opening for Gary Clark, Jr., Brandi Carlile and Robbie Williams. They have been compared to the Dixie Chicks, the Roches and—yowza—Led Zeppelin. The trio has recorded four albums, including One Horse Down (2007); Fall Among Thieves (2009); New Friends (2011) and Little Wild Life (2013). You can expect to hear the latest songs from their upcoming record in this opening slot. The great music magazine Mojo summed them up this way: “This is absurdly wonderful… Stockholm sisters turn Americana on its head.”

12:25 - 1:40

L

ast year, two months after the release of The Record Company's debut album, Rolling Stone magazine called this power trio “one of the 10 new artists you need to know.” If you watch TV you’ve already heard them as background music for 30 shows and commercials, including Coors Light and Miller Lite, and TV shows, CSI and Shameless. But where this band really shines is in live performances and on its debut album, Give it Back to You, which was nominated for a 2017 Grammy for Best Contemporary Blues Album. The album’s first single, “Off the Ground,” was No. 1 on Billboard’s Adult Alternative chart.

2:10 - 3:25

L

ike the Grateful Dead, JJ Grey says his band is better live than on records, although his albums have gotten rave reviews since 2001. The demand for him is so great that this is the fourth time he’s appeared at the festival. Grey got his jam band credentials on the festival circuit with Widespread Panic, Galactic and Ben Harper. Anyone can play a song, but to stretch it out to a swampy drawl, like a jazz musician, and keep it fascinating for more than just three minutes, is the mark of a master musician and band. That’s Mofro’s mojo.

This Los Angeles trio’s name sounds too commercial for the authenticity they deliver. But if you don’t think about corporate record companies, but rather, the glorious days of rough and ready vinyl recording, you get the idea.

Grey is from Jacksonville, FL, home of Lynyrd Skynyrd and Jerry Reed, both big influences. A coworker at an air conditioning company nicknamed him Mofro and it stuck. He recorded first under the name Mofro, but added his own name after his grandmother asked him if he was ashamed to use his own name.

The Record Company started when guitarist Chris Vos moved to L.A. from Wisconsin and met bassist Alex Stiff. The two shared their passion for vinyl records and old-time, drum-and-bass heavy rock ‘n’ roll, especially the John Lee Hooker and Canned Heat disc, Hooker 'n Heat.

His latest album, from 2015, Ol’ Glory, was called a “new gem,” by the Americana music magazine No Depression. The album was hailed as one of the best of the year, and Grey was said to perform with an “evangelical and fearless manner and a boundless compassion and honesty."

They started jamming with drummer Marc Cazoria in a Los Feliz neighborhood, where they recorded a demo—and where they still record.

Grey said it best to Santa Cruz’s Good Times: “I don’t want to think and add something to make an album more bluesy or have more soul or funk. I want it all to be there, but I want to stay out of the way of that happening.”

Aspiring artists can take inspiration from their origin story. They sent out a preview of their recording to hundreds of websites, asking listeners to give it 15 seconds. It got them a booking at the Montreal Jazz Festival and a tour. We predict you’ll love them the first 15 seconds you hear.


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The Santa Cruz American Music Festival would like to thank all of our valued sponsors, particularly Kendall Larsen at VirnetX; Louie Pieracci & Matt Kannely at Couch Distributing; & Andrew Weiss at Youngʼs Market. We would also like to recognize the extraordinary efforts of the Rotary Club of Capitola/Aptos & all of our elite group of volunteers. This event could not possibly take place without all of their heartfelt, sincere participation.

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ICE MACHINES

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8

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9 10 11 12

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KIDS AREA

MAY 17-23, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

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ATM Legendary Rhythm & Blues Cruise American Hat Makers McCollum Family Chiropractic SCAMF Merchandise Grandpa's Kettle Korn

Face Painting

7 8 9 10 11 12

Oriental Express Gourmet Faire Albor's Mexican Cuisine JB's Power Station

Poor House Bistro Gyro Boys

13 14 15 16 17

Holy Smokes BBQ Michaelʼs on Main Norma Jean's Coffee Soda & Water Cold Beer & Wine


3:55 - 5:10

S

tephen Stills could be touring the country, making a fortune playing the greatest hits that have him inducted in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame twice. But he’s an artist, like former partner Neil Young, always pushing the envelope, and this time you can expect fireworks. Since 2013 Stills has joined blues veteran Kenny Wayne Shepherd and early rock and bluesman Barry Goldberg in what Stills calls his “dream blues band,” the Rides.

In a career of momentous hits, including “For What It’s Worth” and “Love the One You’re With,” Stills is a guitarist’s guitarist who recorded with Jimi Hendrix and Mike Bloomfield. He’s also amazingly multitalented, playing percussion on the Bee Gee’s hit “You Should Be Dancing” and guitar on Bill Withers’ “Ain’t No Sunshine.”

He’s already played Aptos with his solo band, and as part of the Jimi Hendrix tribute, and the idea of Shepherd dueling it out with Stills onstage is enough to carry any festival. This isn’t about changing partners or loving the one you are with—it’s a marriage made in heaven. Add to the mix keyboardist Barry Goldberg, who toured with the Electric Flag and played on Mitch Ryder’s “Devil with the Blue Dress On,” and you’ve got a real thrill ride, with tons of history and lots of mystery.

W

hen Melissa Etheridge burst on the scene in 1988 with her selftitled debut album, she was called a female Bruce Springsteen and compared warmly to Janis Joplin. She did what few female rockers have managed—winning Grammys and charting high on Billboard charts—while maintaining her rock and soul credibility. On her latest disc, this Leavenworth, KS native goes back to her musical roots saluting the Stax Records catalog of rock, soul and blues that were her early influences. “At this late stage in Melissa Etheridge’s nearly 30-year-and-counting recorded career, the only strange aspect of a dive into the fertile Stax catalog is wondering why it took so long,” writes American Songwriter magazine. “Her naturally boisterous grits and gravy approach is perfectly suited to tackle songs from the similarly styled vocals of Otis Redding, Sam & Dave, Albert King, etc. and she sure has the attitude to blow some new life into the (mostly) established classics she interprets here.” Her latest work is the definition of the Santa Cruz American Music Festival, a tribute to the finest songs this country has produced, including “Born Under a Bad Sign,” “I’ve Been Loving You Too Long (To Stop Now)” and a tune by Sunday performer Mavis Staples’ band, “Respect Yourself.” Etheridge hasn’t turned her back on hits like “Bring Me Some Water,” "I'm the Only One," and "Like the Way I Do." On this tour, backed by three other musicians, she’s been stretching them out into jam territory.

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 17-23, 2017

The Rides gives him a band that rivals his best. Kenny Wayne Shepherd has been an established star in the blues firmament since his 1995 debut, Ledbetter Heights, which was No.1 on the Billboard U.S .Blues Chart.

5:45 - 7:15

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11:00 - 12:00

B

arns Courtney’s musical career brings to mind the name of his first band, Sleeper Cell: The 26-year-old singersongwriter is bubbling under the surface, about to explode. He compares to Ed Sheeran, for whom he’s opened, and Courtney has been touring and couch-surfing, like Sheeran did before he sold 33 million albums and won a slew of awards.

MAY 17-23, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Catching Courtney in his early incarnation is like getting a tip on Apple stock in 1980. The signs are already audible, though, and he's scheduled to play the much larger Bottle Rocket Festival in Napa and the Governors Ball Music Festival in New York. He’s played on Conan and opened for Blur, Sheeran, the Libertines and one of rock’s defining bands, The Who.

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His song “Fire” appeared in the Bradley Cooper movie Burnt and has been streamed 8 million times, landing at No. 3 in the Adult Alternative Billboard chart. A second single, “Glitter & Gold,” has been streamed 5 million times. Clearly, the word is out, even if he’s not quite swimming in the mainstream yet. His latest EP, released in February, is playfully named The Dull Drums and has been getting strong reviews. When Miramax movie producer Harvey Weinstein met Courtney, after buying his song for the Bradley Cooper film, he told Courtney he was surprised by his appearance, after only hearing Courtney's smoky, gospelinfused vocals. “When I first heard your music, I thought you would be a 70-year-old black man!” he told him. A reviewer for EssentiallyPop.com who saw him perform both acoustic and electric put it this way: “Grab a performance while you can, this guy is the real thing!”

12:30 - 1:40

W

e all know that a bluegrass band that hails from San Francisco—the birthplace of psychedelia, jam bands and earthy rock—is going to sound a whole lot different than one from Arkansas. With a sound that captures the intensity of fine-spun rock paired with traditional instruments like banjos and standup bass, Brothers Comatose are more new-grass than bluegrass. They are redefining the genre. This is music that appeals to a broad audience, not just those brought up to twang. When you consider their roots, you'll get the picture. The band started with brothers Ben and Alex Morrison, who play guitar and banjo respectively, rearranging and jamming on tunes by Led Zeppelin, the Rolling Stones and Creedence Clearwater Revival. They played living rooms and campfires before word spread and the gigs got bigger. They added Ryan Avellone on mandolin, Giovanni Benedetti on bass and vocals and classically-trained redneck, Philip Brezina on violin for a sound that redefines what you know about bluegrass. “This isn’t your daddy’s bluegrass anymore,” wrote Glide Magazine, which gave the band’s latest album, City Painted Gold, 8 stars out of 10, adding, “the album offers a case study in tightly tailored musicianship and the kind of close-knit harmonies that only siblings can deliver.” The album title is a reference to the changes in San Francisco, a city that once was an artist’s sanctuary and now is so overpriced only rich tech people can afford to live there—a topic more contemporary than what you’d expect in the old-timey genre.

2:10 - 3:25

T

alk about a change in direction. The bassist in this rootsy folk trio, Chris Wood, is one of the top names in modern exploratory jazz. His instrumental band Medeski, Martin & Wood has been touring for more than 25 years. His brother, Oliver Wood, was guitarist and singer for Tinsley Ellis’s blues band and then a member of the blues, funk, R&B band King Johnson. But the two Boulder-born musicians always had a love for roots music, inspired by their parents’ campfire playing. This band takes them back to their own roots. After playing separately for 15 years, King Johnson opened for MM&W at a gig in North Carolina. "I realized we should be playing music together," Chris recalled. They added drummer Jano Rix and recorded nine albums since 2006, some live, some in the studio, with many esteemed guests including Buddy Miller, John Medeski, Derek Trucks, Susan Tedeschi and Zac Brown. Rolling Stone said the most typical thing about the band is how atypical they are. “Oliver’s vocals describe what the brothers see as a study in contrast that is the American experiment — in short, that American heartache and the American dream are one and the same. “ No Depression magazine said: “They shift from gritty blues to soft folk to gospel and deliver each genre with sincerity.” With backgrounds in experimental jazz, blues, bluegrass, folk, R&B and country, they are a perfect addition to a festival that draws from all kinds of American music and refuses to be locked in a genre cage.


fountain

blues festival

Elvin Bishop Bettye LaVette

Fillmore Slim

Aki Kumar Blues Band Maxx Cabello, Jr.

Saturday, June 24th TIME: NOON-8:00 p.m. Location: Plaza de Cesar Chavez San Jose , CA Tickets on sale: fountainblues.com or at Poor House Bistro,

We bring the Brews to the Blues—sample over 20 craft beer selections Abita, Allagash, Ballast Point, Drakes, Elysian, Faultline, Firehouse, Firestone, Golden Road, Lagunitas, Lost Coast, North Coast, Oskar Blues, Sierra Nevada, Stone, Tilt, Wildcide Hard Cider + more TBA

* Enjoy local blues talent on the SJZ mobile boom box stage before - and between - main stage acts, courtesy of Silicon Valley Blues Society

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GENERAL ADMISSION $20 ADVANCE/$25 DAY OF EVENT Kids 12 and under free with paid adult.

VIP $75 (Advance Only)

Each VIP ticket includes a seat in shaded area adjacent to the stage, access to flushable toilet and private bar, plus 2 drink vouchers

For parking information: sjpark.org For VTA light rail stations near the

venue: vta.org Free bike valet 10:00 A.M. - 8:30 P.M., near main entrance

BONNIE

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Wayde Audio; Mike and Cathy Miller; Golden Gate Blues Society; Good Times; Helen Ross, KSCU 103.3; KSJS 90.5; KKUP 91.5; KSZU 90.1

On the corner of Mission St. & Bay St. Open 7 days a week from 11-6 www.sylvanmusic.com 831-427-1917

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 17-23, 2017

GATES OPEN AT 11 A.M. - MAIN STAGE BANDS BEGIN AT NOON*

Specializing in

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3:55 - 5:10

I

t’s hard to decide what’s more shocking about Mavis Staples—that despite having eight Top 40 singles, she didn’t win her first Grammy until 2011, or that Bob Dylan once proposed to her and she turned him down. In her 67 years of performing, she’s seen it all and sung it all. She started performing with her family band, The Staple Singers, in 1950 at age 12. They had their first hit in 1956 with “Uncloudy Day.” Her father “Pops” Staples was close with Martin Luther King at a time when gospel singers became voices of the Civil Rights movement. The Staple Singers covered Dylan’s “A Hard Rain’s a-Gonna Fall" and Stephen Stills’ “For What It’s Worth.”

MAY 17-23, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

In 1968 they signed with Stax Records and had a string of hits, including “I’ll Take You There,” “Lets Do It Again” and “Who Took the Merry out of Christmas?”

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Mavis Staples went solo in the 1960s and over the years worked with a collection of inspiring musicians including Prince, Lucky Peterson, John Scofield, Patty Griffin and Jeff Tweedy. You can see her on the big screen in “Graffiti Bridge,” “The Last Waltz” and a biopic called “Mavis!” Her album “You Are Not Alone” won a Grammy in 2011 for Best Americana Album. “This has been a long time coming,” she said in a tearful acceptance speech. She recorded her newest work, 2016’s “Livin’ on a High Note” to show her joyful side and “lift people up.” Expect to be uplifted!

5:45 - 7:15

S

unday’s headliner is about to set a record—this is the first time a local band has topped the bill in 24 years at Aptos Village Park. The festival usually tries to import exotic and significant bands from around the world, figuring that locals can see locals when they want. But fans can’t get enough of this raw and raucous devilish trio — they are so busy touring that we rarely get a chance to see them here in Santa Cruz anymore. This is a special treat! TDM3 formed in Santa Cruz, a trio of two guitars, a bass and no drummer. This amazed fans because they managed with acoustic instruments and no bass drum to get audiences dancing. Their music has roots in bluegrass, folk, ragtime and blues—with a strong dose of the punk rock they were brought up on. “We bend genres pretty hard,” guitarist Pete Bernhard says. With upright bassist Lucia Turino, and guitarist and banjo player Cooper McBean, TDM3 released their first recording in 2002 and broke out in 2006 with a live album recorded in Felton called “A Little Bit Faster and a Little Bit Worse.” They’ve played some of the biggest festivals in the world, including Outside Lands, Austin City Limits, and Hardly Strictly Bluegrass. The band’s newest disc, Redemption and Ruin, is a concept album divided between sacred and profane cover tunes. PopMatters.com said they bring “a hellacious drive to the side A songs of Bacchanalian abandon, and they are equally moving in their performances of the sacred material.”


SW

EL LIE S 201

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come hang out on our patios, have a beer & enjoy the show! 7941 Soquel Dr., Aptos 95003

burgeraptos.com â&#x20AC;˘ 831.662.2811

open 11am daily & 9am for breakfast on weekends! open late 7 days a week

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 17-23, 2017

(((folkYEAH!))) Presents is a Northern California based boutique music and events curator and presenter. (((folkYEAH!))) shows are highly regarded and carefully planned affairs with an emphasis on presenting each event as a one-of-a-kind experience for both the artist and the attendees.

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12 MAY 17-23, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM


CALENDAR

GREEN FIX

See hundreds more events at santacruz. com.

Free calendar listings in print and online are available for community events. Listings show up online within 24 hours. Submissions of free events and those $15 or less received by Thursday at noon, six days prior to the Good Times publication date, will be prioritized for print (space available). All listings must specify a day, start time, location and price (or ‘free’ if applicable). Listings can be set to repeat every week or month, and can be edited by the poster as needed. Ongoing events must be updated quarterly. It is the responsibility of the person submitting an event to cancel or modify the listing. Register at our website at santacruz.com in order to SUBMIT EVENTS ONLINE. E-mail calendar@goodtimes.sc or call 458.1100 with any questions.

OPEN STREETS WATSONVILLE

WEDNESDAY 5/17

Reclaim the streets this Sunday, May 21, as Watsonville opens up Brennan and Union streets to a free community event so locals can bike, skate, walk, dance and play without cars present. Enjoy the “pop-up park” with friends and family, live music, educational outreach booths, art and activities. The first Open Streets in Santa Cruz County took place in 2012 on West Cliff Drive, and drew more than 9,000 participants.

ARTS

Info: 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday, May 21. Brennan and Union streets, Watsonville. scopenstreets.org. Free.

MOVIE NIGHT: ‘WHAT THE HEALTH’ What the Health is a groundbreaking featurelength documentary that follows the exciting journey of intrepid filmmaker Kip Andersen, as he uncovers the impacts of highly processed industrial animal foods on our personal health and greater community. 6-8 p.m. The Nickelodeon, 219 Lincoln St., Santa Cruz. 722-3253. $10.

ART SEEN

12TH ANNUAL VIVE OAXACA GUELAGUETZA

Info: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday, May 21. Harbor High School, 300 La Fonda Ave., Santa Cruz.

PRESCHOOL STORYTIME Bookshop Santa Cruz invites any toddler or preschool age children (with parental supervision) to listen to stories read by Mamoura Slike. Mamoura is a wonderful reader and she will be sharing fantastic books. 10 a.m. Bookshop Santa Cruz, 1520 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. 423-0900. Free.

CLASSES SALSA RUEDA CLASSES Cuban-style dance at the Tannery. Introductory and beginning classes 7-8 p.m. Intermediate and advanced classes 8-9 p.m. Tannery, 1060 River St., Suite #111, Santa Cruz. Cesario, Danny, Gilberto. $7/$5.

THURSDAY 5/18 ‘QUEENS OF SYRIA’ FILM SCREENING The Watsonville Film Festival will screen Queens of Syria, an award-winning documentary that follows 50 Syrian women who were forced into exile in Jordan, and brings their tragedies to life through their rendition of Euripides’s classic The Trojan Woman. Info: 7-9 p.m. Appleton Grill & Event Lounge, 410 Rodriguez St., Watsonville. 724-5555. queensofsyriatour.com. $8.

Center St., Santa Cruz. 420-6177. Free.

ARGENTINE TANGO Argentine tango classes and practice every Wednesday with John and Nancy Lingemann. Beginners 7 p.m., Intermediate/Advanced 8:15 p.m., and all levels at 9:15 p.m. Calvary Episcopal Church, 532 Center St., Santa Cruz. 4693288. $3.

BEGINNING BALLET WITH DIANA ROSE Ballet for the beginning adult student with little or no ballet training. Learn ballet terminology and fine tune placement, posture and technique. Noon-1:15 p.m. 320 Encinal St., Santa Cruz. 466-0458. $10.

HAS SMOKING POT STOPPED BEING FUN? Come join a fellowship of men and women inspired to live a life free from the possession of marijuana addiction. This group uses the 12 steps to achieve personal freedom and spiritual awakening. 7 p.m. 301

CRYSTAL SOUND INFUSION Sacred sound raises your vibrational level, increases spiritual awareness, releases energy blocks and increases flow. 8:15 p.m. Divine Tree Yoga, 1043-B Water St., Santa Cruz. 3336736. $10.

TANGO LESSONS AND PRACTICE Tango in the original Argentine style, with music provided to match. Come with or without a partner. All are welcome. 7-9 p.m. Calvary Episcopal Church, 532 Center St., Santa Cruz. 423-8787. $3. TRIPLE P LIFESTYLE GROUP: IMPROVING CHILDREN’S NUTRITION & PHYSICAL ACTIVITY Attend this free workshop to learn guidelines for healthy eating, making healthier food choices, and being active. Class will be taught in Spanish. 6-7:30 p.m. La Manzana Community >34

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 17-23, 2017

Coming from the Zapotec language, guelaguetza signifies giving, cooperation and community. Celebrate its meaning through Oaxacan culture and tradition with Santa Cruz nonprofit Senderos’ 12th annual Vive Oaxaca Guelaguetza. Festivities will kick off with a traditional Calenda, a procession and fiesta with dancers, musicians, and large puppets parading on Cooper Street. The festival marketplace will be selling traditional Oaxacan food and beverages like mole, tlayudas and tejate, as well as crafts and souvenirs. Traditional Oaxacan band Banda de Viento will provide the tunes, along with students from Zoogocho, Oaxaca, and Senderos’ youth banda Ensamble Musical.

STEAM IN NATURE Create STEAM-based nature art while learning about the science of our natural environment in this weekly class with educator Sue Creswell. Sue Creswell has been a primary teacher, with an emphasis on environmental education, for 26 years. 3 p.m. Santa Cruz Children’s Museum of Discovery, 1855 41st Ave., Capitola. 888-424-8035.

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REGISTER TODAY! Take Summer Classes & Get Ahead! Only $46 per unit!

Classes start June 19

Many affordable, transferable classes available

MAY 17-23, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

www.cabrillo.edu

<33 Resources, 18 W. Lake Ave., Watsonville. 465-2217. BEYOND AUTOIMMUNE If you are struggling with a chronic autoimmune illness, join us for a transformational evening and learn what may be keeping you from healing and discover approaches and tools to help you restore your health, and get back to doing what you love. With Integrative Holistic Practitioner Bonnie Bea. 6:30-8 p.m. New Leaf Market, 1101 Fair Ave., Santa Cruz. 426-1306. $5. CONFLICT RESOLUTION SKILLS FOR WORK AND LIFE Explore how you handle conflict now, understand how conflict works, and learn practical, powerful skills to: keep conflict from escalating, listen without defensiveness, speak without offending, find common ground and satisfying solution and create positive, lasting change. 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Conflict Resolution Center of Santa Cruz County, 1414 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. 419-1718. $125. TRIPLE P WORKSHOP: PREVENTING & MANAGING TANTRUMS Attend this parenting workshop to learn common reasons why children have tantrums; strategies to prevent tantrums from happening; and how to stay calm and handle tantrums if they do occur. Register through Toys “R” Us. 7-8:30 p.m. Toys “R” Us, 1660 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz. 479-4296 or registry@toysrus.com. Free. TOWN HALL NIGHT Local speakers on topics ranging from the alternatives to treated sewage water, emf pollution, Child Protective Services and more. All speakers are well informed and active within their cause. 7-9:30 p.m. Live Oak Grange, 1900 17th Ave., Santa Cruz. meetup.com/ santacruz-freedom-forum. Free.

FOOD & WINE TRIVIA NIGHT Trivia night at 99 bottles. 21 and up. 8 p.m. 110 Walnut Ave., Santa Cruz. 459-9999.

Caren L. Spencer Realtor

Data Distributing the Image Distribution People

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CALENDAR

DOWNTOWN SANTA CRUZ FARMERS MARKET In addition to a large variety of farm products, this market offers a great selection of local artisan foodstuffs, delicious baked goods, and lots of options for lunch and dinner. 1:30 p.m. Cedar and Lincoln streets, Santa Cruz. 454-0566.

GROUPS NAR-ANON FAMILY GROUPS OF

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA—APTOS/SANTA CRUZ A 12-step group for those who have been affected by the addiction or drug problem of another. Nar-Anon’s program is adapted from Narcotics Anonymous and uses Nar-Anon’s 12 Steps. 7-8:30 p.m. Freedom Roads Church, 7200 Freedom Boulevard, Aptos. saveyoursanity@aol.com. Free/donations. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS Come join us for a friendly 12-Step support group with the solution. Teens and adults welcome. Includes compulsive overeating, anorexia, and bulimia. Meets in the church Youth Room, two doors down from the corner of Poplar and Melrose. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Trinity Presbyterian Church, 420 Melrose Ave., Santa Cruz. santacruzoa.org. Free. BNI NETWORKING MEETING The mission of BNI is to help members increase their business through a structured, positive and professional “word-of-mouth” program that enables them to develop long-term, meaningful relationships with quality business professionals. We meet weekly. 8-9:30 a.m. The Abbey Coffee Shop, 350 Mission St., Santa Cruz. bni.com. Free. TABLETOP NIGHT Unplug for a few hours to play new and exciting tabletop games. These aren’t your grandparents’ board games. This is a program for adults only, ages 21 and up. 6:308:30 p.m. Scotts Valley Branch Library, 251 Kings Village Road, Scotts Valley. 427-7700. Free. NATURAL HEALERS NETWORK MONTHLY MEETING The Natural Healers Network is a group of dedicated holistic practitioners who meet monthly to inform and bounce ideas off of one another. Our goal is to build powerful relationships with the purpose of growing each of our businesses. 9:30-11 a.m. The Center for Source Healing, 2959 Park Ave., Soquel. 510-326-8844. $5.

THURSDAY 5/18 ARTS STORYTIME Join us for storytime. Free with museum admission and for MOD Members. 10:30-11 a.m. Santa Cruz Children’s Museum of Discovery. 888-424-8035. Free. ‘QUEENS OF SYRIA’ FILM SCREENING (THE SEVENTH ART STAND) The Watsonville Film Festival is proud to premiere Queens of Syria, directed by Yasmin Fedda. This award-winning documentary follows 50 women forced into exile, who come together


CALENDAR

FRIDAY 5/19 THIRD FRIDAY ART WALK CAPITOLA MALL LAUNCH This Friday, May 19, the nonprofit arts organization Arts of Santa Cruz will take over the empty stores in Capitola Mall and showcase more than 20 local artists’ work— photography, jewelry, ceramics, clothing, woodwork and more. Art of Santa Cruz works to support artists in Santa Cruz County with customer assistance, facilitating participation, and merchandizing art. Each month, the Art of Santa Cruz nonprofit will feature a local charity to support. May will showcase the Walnut Avenue Family & Women’s Center. Info: 5:30-8:30 p.m. Capitola Mall, 1855 41st Ave., Capitola. facebook.com/ ArtofSantaCruz. Free.

CLASSES SALSA DANCING CUBAN-STYLE This class is for intermediate dancers and features Cuban casino partnering, salsa suelta and great Cuban music. 7-8 p.m. Louden Nelson Center, Santa Cruz. salsagente.com or 4264724. $9/$5. SALSA RUEDA SERIES BEGINNER 2 A fun, four-week Rueda de Casino series for Beginner 2 and up. No partner required. Must know the basics in Rueda such as guapea, dame, enchufla doble, el uno, sombrero, and setenta. 8-9 p.m. Louden Nelson Community, 301 Center St., Santa Cruz. 420-6177. $34.

BEGINNING BALLET WITH DIANA ROSE An introduction to ballet technique with a focus on posture, balance and strength building. Noon-1:15 p.m. International Academy of Dance Santa Cruz. info@ iadance.com. $10. AWARENESS THROUGH MOVEMENT Come explore Feldenkrais Awareness Through Movement Classes. These engaging and potent classes will heighten your vitality as they increase your self-awareness, flexibility and overall well-being. 5:30 p.m. Pacific Cultural Center 1307 Seabright Ave., Santa Cruz. 332-7347.

TRIYOGA BASICS/THERAPEUTIC YOGA WITH KIM TriYoga taught by Kim Beecher, DC (chiropractor) includes sustained postures with prop support. Everyone is welcome. Suitable for those with chronic conditions. 7:30-9 p.m. Triyoga Center, 708 >36

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SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 17-23, 2017

to perform their own version of The Trojan Women, a timeless Greek tragedy about the plight of women in war. 7-9 p.m. Appleton Grill & Event Lounge, 410 Rodriguez St., Watsonville. 724-5555. $8.

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Lies, Insanity and Low Inflation Trump Higher Rates

CALENDAR

Q: I notice that in spite of the Fed having raised their rates, mortgage rates seem to be going down every time they go up. We are waiting to refinance our primary loan and combine it with our equity line which has adjusted to a higher payment. Should we move now to lock a rate or wait for rates to move lower?

MAY 17-23, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

A: ACT NOW OR SOON! The “normal” economic cycles of expansion and contraction went out the window with the Great Recession. Lower paying jobs recovered first and the higher paying jobs had made enough of a recovery by this time last year that the Fed was predicting a series of necessary rate hikes to prevent an overheated economy. Then we had the most insane election in history which has resulted in a deeply divided country. To make matters even more strange and totally unpredictable, we now have a president who believes “the end justifies the means” and feels totally comfortable using tactics heretofore viewed as “over the line” by both political parties. The president is behaving erratically and using outright lies, exaggerations and threats on a daily basis to try to manipulate public opinion to achieve more power for him to wield and to further his ever changing agenda. Like him or hate him, RATES ARE LOWER DUE TO TRUMP’S VERSION OF GOVERNANCE! THANKS DONALD!

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THE GOOD NEWS FOR BORROWERS IS THAT TRUMP-CREATED INSTABILITY AND UNCERTAINTY RESULTS IN INVESTORS WORLDWIDE MOVING MORE MONEY INTO BONDS AND MORTGAGE SECURITIES AND THIS KEEPS BOTH INFLATION AND INTEREST RATES LOWER THAN THEY WOULD BE UNDER NORMAL CIRCUMSTANCES. INTEREST RATES ARE LOWER AND OPPORTUNITIES TO BUY AND REFINANCE ARE BETTER THAN EXPECTED ON 1-1-2017!!! With rates UNDER 4% on some programs and below 4.375% on many, NOW IS THE TIME TO REFINANCE TO CONSOLIDATE DEBTS AND CREDIT LINES AT HISTORICALLY LOW RATES. WHO KNOWS HOW LONG THE “TRUMP EFFECT” WILL LAST? CALL ME AT 831-475-2600 OR SEND EMAIL TO jchubb1@gmail.com for a personal consultation and information on how you can take advantage of the “Trump Effect” on interest rates!

Jim Chubb, Home Loan Consultant Pacific Inland Financial Inc. 475-2600 • jchubb1@gmail.com BRE #00911706, NMLS #360542; BRE #00956877, NMLS #361091

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visits to two African wildlife parks—Kafue in Namibia and Hwange in Zimbabwe. He will also touch on the history, wildlife management, poaching problems and conservation efforts in these parks. 7 p.m. Live Oak grange, 1900 17th Ave., Santa Cruz. ventana2.sierraclub.org/santacruz/ node/902. Free. BLOOM OF THE PRESENT WEEKLY DROP-IN INSIGHT MEDITATION GROUP Join us each week for silent meditation and a Dharma talk with group discussion. Sitting with others can help support your daily meditation and inspire you to live with wisdom and compassion. New and experienced welcomed. 18 and up. 6:30-8 p.m. Ocean Gate Zen Center, 920B 41st Ave., Santa Cruz. bloomofthepresent.org. Free/ Donation.

SATURDAY 5/21 PIE FOR THE PEOPLE The past few months have been a scary time for immigrant communities in the U.S., which is why Pie for the People has teamed up with the Santa Cruz County Immigration Project and the Community Action Board. In an effort to raise community awareness and money to support local immigrant families, they’re hosting their eighth community fundraiser with this month’s featured nonprofit, the Santa Cruz County Immigration Project (SCCIP). SCCIP provides free, competent and professional legal services, advocacy and education for local immigrant families. Attendees are encouraged to bring a sweet or savory vegetarian pie, plates and cutlery. Info: 1-3 p.m. Homeless Garden Project, Delaware Ave., Santa Cruz. Donation.

<35 Washington St., Santa Cruz. 310589-0600. $15. SALSA RUEDA FOUR-WEEK SERIES Fun four-week series in Salsa Rueda for experienced beginners. No partner required. Age 16+. Minimum six people needed. Drop ins welcome, but need to know the basics. 8 p.m. Louden Nelson Community Center, 301 Center St., Santa Cruz. 426-4724. $8. DETOX YOUR HYGIENE ROUTINE Body care products can play a role in causing allergies, infertility problems, immune disorders, digestive issues, weight gain, and obesity. Come learn what ingredients to avoid and what to safely use. With Certified Holistic Health Coach Stephanie Hanson. 6-7 p.m. New Leaf Market, 1101 Fair Ave., Santa Cruz. 426-1306. $5. ENVIRONMENTALISM OUTSIDE THE BOX: AN ECOSEX SYMPOSIUM Join us

for a multi-disciplinary gathering to explore our relationships with the environment and social justice, engage in human/non-human collaboration, critique ideologies and debate new sexualities. Let’s examine where our “bodies” end and “nature” begins. 10 a.m. UCSC, Digital Arts Research Center 108, 407 McHenry Road, Santa Cruz. earthlab.ucsc. edu/ecosex-symposium. $4/Free. VEGAN CHEESE, PLEASE! A GOURMET CULINARY WORKSHOP Your guide Chef Beth Love, author of the cookbook series Tastes Like Love, will share recipes and techniques for making cashew cream cheese, several flavors of semi-firm cheeses, and Parmesan-style cheese. Address provided upon registration. 5-10 p.m. The Love House. 607-1374. $100. TWO WILDLIFE PARKS IN SOUTHERN AFRICA Professor Barry Bowman will share travel stories and beautiful slides from

TRIPLE P EIGHT-WEEK GROUP FOR FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN 2-12 YEARS OLD This support group provides in-depth parenting information and assistance for families with children 2-12 years old. Attendees will learn what Positive Parenting is and how to incorporate it into their families. 5-7 p.m. La Manzana Community Resources, 521 Main St., Watsonville. 4652217. Free.

FOOD & WINE TRIVIA NIGHT This festive event brings together trivia aficionados, boneheads and the chic geek for a night of boisterous fun. 8:30 p.m. Woodstock’s Pizza, 710 Front St., Santa Cruz. 427-4444. LIVE MUSIC AT ZIZZO’S COFFEEHOUSE AND WINE BAR Enjoy live music at the area’s only built in piano bar with the biggest mirror ball on the Central Coast! Our bar serves a variety of wines and local craft beer along with tasty small-plate appetizers and desserts. 7-9:30 p.m. Zizzo’s Coffeehouse & Wine Bar, 3555 Clares St., Capitola. 4770680 or zizzoscoffee.com. $5.

GROUP WOMENCARE: LAUGHTER YOGA Laughter yoga for women with cancer meets the first and third Thursdays. Call WomenCARE to register. 12:30-1:30 p.m. WomenCARE, 2901 Park Ave., Suite A1, Soquel. 457-2273. Free. SUPPORT GROUP FOR SURVIVORS OF CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE: WOMEN’S GROUP We provide a safe and supportive environment for healing from child sexual


CALENDAR abuse. Together we break through isolation, develop healthy coping skills, reduce shame, and build healthy boundaries. 6 p.m. Family Service Agency of the Central Coast, 2901 Park Ave., Suite A3, Soquel. 423-7601. SURVIVORS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE Walnut Avenue Family & Women’s Center offers free drop-in socio-educational support groups open to those who have or are currently experiencing domestic violence and that identify as female. 6:30-7:45 p.m. Walnut Avenue Women’s Center, 303 Walnut Ave., Santa Cruz. 426-3062. SLV CAREGIVERS SUPPORT GROUP Connect with others, find out about services to help you, plus get valuable information and support. There have been presentations on Alzheimer’s, dementia and veterans issues. 2 p.m. Highlands Park, 8500 Hwy. 9, Ben Lomond. facebook.com/ valleywomensclub. Free. THE SANTA CRUZ TREMOLOS SINGING GROUP FOR PEOPLE WITH PARKINSON’S Singing is known to be a good voicestrengthening exercise for people with Parkinson’s Disease. Santa Cruz County has an ongoing singing group for people with Parkinson’s and their caregivers. 1-2:30 p.m. The Episcopal Church, 125 Canterbury Drive, Aptos. easepd.org/singing. Free.

HEALTH

MUSIC DJ A.D. Come out every Thursday evening to dance, drink, and play some pool. 21 and up. 9 p.m. The Castaways, 3623 Portola Drive, Santa Cruz. thecastawaysbar.com. Free. SCOTT KAILS TUPPERWARE PARTY BAND Bring your requests and be prepared for an entertaining night of great classic rock from the ’60s and ’70s. Scott Kails Tupperware Party Band continues on their tribute to the “Summer of Love” with a majority of songs from the year 1967. 8-11 p.m. Britannia Arms Capitola, 110 Monterey Ave., Capitola. 464-2583. $8/Free.

on Brennan/Union Street

FRIDAY 5/19 ARTS THIRD FRIDAY: HISTORY JAM Get handson with history. Discover untold stories and local lore. Learn about the work being done to protect and preserve the legacy of Santa Cruz County and beyond. See live tattooing, enjoy a beer and learn about the history of California beer labels. 6 p.m. Santa Cruz Museum of Art & History, 705 Front St., Santa Cruz. 429-1964. $5. THIRD FRIDAY ART WALK—ART OF SANTA CRUZ Art of Santa Cruz displays the work of over 60 different local artists in our non-profit venue. We encourage you to come in for this special event to meet our artists and discuss their work. Bring your friends and come for a leisure stroll through our Gallery to see new works and participate in our monthly raffle. 5:30 p.m. 1855 41st Ave., Capitola. regionalartisansassociation. org. Free. VANYA AND SONIA AND MASHA AND SPIKE For its 17th season, the Miriam Ellis International Playhouse will present fully-staged performances in French, Japanese, Russian, and Spanish, with English supertitles projected above the stage. 8-11 p.m. Park Hall, 9401 Mill St., Ben Lomond. 336-4777. $17.

CLASSES CHAIR YOGA WITH SUZI Instructor Suzi Mahler, CMT NE will guide you through a series of gentle seated yoga postures that are performed slowly and with breath awareness. This wonderfully therapeutic practice will help you increase strength and range of motion. 9:30 a.m. California Grey Bears, 2710 Chanticleer Ave., Santa Cruz. 234-6791. $5. CIRCLE TIME Join us in the MOD Toddler Area at 10:45 a.m. for rhythm and song, in both English and Spanish. Let your littles explore musical instruments and finger puppets while everyone sings. Developmentally designed for ages 0-3. 11-11:30 a.m. Santa Cruz Children’s Museum of Discovery, 1855 41st Ave., Capitola. 888-424-8035. BABY SIGN LANGUAGE (ADULT WITH CHILD) Weekly American Sign Language class for adults with children, taught by expert native language instructor with more than 40 years experience using ASL. 10 a.m. 3025 Porter St., Soquel. 435-0512. $15.

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MUSIC / GAMES / COMMUNITY / FAMILY FUN • Bike rodeo • Art activities • Wellness resources • Yoga

• Reading circles for kids in Spanish and English • Space to play • Free raffle

SCOpenStreets.org Open Streets Santa Cruz County Walk, skate, bike, or roll your way there! Open Streets’ mission is to promote community health by encouraging creative use of public spaces. Join this international movement!

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 17-23, 2017

NINTH ANNUAL HEALTH & LIFESTYLE EXPO FOR WOMEN Ladies, grab your friends and family. Moms, take the night off. This event is all about you. Attractions include wellness presentations, local exhibitors, fun giveaways and a grand raffle prize of a gift certificate to Yoso Wellness Spa worth $500. 5-8 p.m. Cocoanut Grove, 400 Beach St., Santa Cruz. 465-7818. Free.

POP-UP STREET PARK

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HEALTHY LIVING

CALENDAR <37 BEGINNING ADULT FLAMENCO This class will focus on the dance form called clásico Español, a form of Spanish dance based on the principles of classical ballet. Students will begin to learn the classical version of the Sevillanas, a dance which is traditionally performed each year at the spring fairs in Andalucía. 6:307:30 p.m. International Academy of Dance, 320 Encinal St., Santa Cruz. 466-0458. $10.

Medical Massage at North Bay Physical Therapy • orthopedic massage • scar tissue release

• trigger point • cranial sacrial • lymphatic

WINE & WATERCOLOR Come spend the evening sipping wine and painting with watercolor. Paper, paint, brushes and still life subject provided. With book illustrator Madia Jamgochian. 6-8 p.m. New Leaf Market, 1101 Fair Ave., Santa Cruz. 426-1306. $15.

• myofacial • structural integration

COMMUNITY DRUMMING WITH JIM GREINER IN SOQUEL Percussionist/ educator Jim Greiner conducts A monthly community drumming session with the theme of Playful Empowerment on the third Friday of every month at the Inner Light Center in Soquel. 7-8:30 p.m. Inner Light Center, 5630 Soquel Drive, Santa Cruz. 4624623. $10.

Clinical massage

TRIPLE P WORKSHOP: PREPARING YOUR CHILD FOR A NEW BABY This Triple P Workshop is offered through the Dominican Hospital Personal Enrichment Program (PEP). 10 a.m.-Noon. Dominican Hospital, 610 Frederick St., Santa Cruz. 457-7099.

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WATSONVILLE FARMERS MARKET This market is in the heart of the famously bountiful Pajaro Valley. Peaceful and familyoriented, the Hispanic heritage of this community gives this market a “mercado” feel. 2-7 p.m. 200 Main St., Watsonville.

GROUPS SCOTTS VALLEY NAR-ANON FAMILY GROUP Nar-Anon is a 12-step program/ support group for friends and families who have been affected by the addiction or drug problem of another. 6:30-7:45 p.m. Bison Center, The Camp Recovery Center, 3192 Glen Canyon Road, Santa Cruz. Free. NAR-ANON FAMILY GROUPS—GREATER BAY AREA SANTA CRUZ Nar-Anon GBA Santa Cruz offers three meetings in support of friends and families of addicts. naranoncalifornia.org/norcal or helpline 291-5099. 9-10 a.m. Santa Cruz, Aptos and Scotts Valley. saveyoursanity@aol.com. Free/ donations.

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CALENDAR

LIFE TOOLS FOR MEN Would you like to be a: • better partner • better father • better friend • better man

90-Day OA, Study of the AA 12 and 12 book. OA is a 12-step support group to stop eating compulsively. Noon-1 p.m. Live Oak Family Resource Center, Community Conference Room, 1740 17th Ave., Santa Cruz. Nate, 4297906. Free. CLUTTERERS ANONYMOUS SUPPORT GROUP Is clutter getting you down? Feeling discouraged about all your stuff? There is hope. Come to this weekly 12-step group for understanding and support. 5:30 p.m. Sutter Maternity and Surgery Center, 2900 Chanticleer Ave., Santa Cruz. 477-2200. Free.

Breakthrough can help!

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<38 OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS

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At The Monterey Coast Preparatory School 125 Bethany Dr. Scotts Valley

831-375-5441

CIRCLE DANCE GROUP Traditional and newly choreographed dances from around the world. Each dance taught in a circle, no partners or dance experience necessary. Beginners always welcome. 7:30-8:45 p.m. Galleria Wellness Center, 740 Front St. Suite 250, Santa Cruz. 510-566-5412. $5. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP A drop-in Grief Support Group for anyone in the community grieving the death of a loved one. Meets every Friday. Noon-1 p.m. Hospice of Santa Cruz County, 940 Disc Drive, Scotts Valley. hospicesantacruz.org. Free.

HEALTH VITAMIN B12 FRIDAY Receiving B12 via injection means that people can increase their energy. B12 Fridays are a fun time for people to meet and mingle. 3-6 p.m. Thrive Natural Medicine, 2840 Park Ave., Soquel. 515-8699.

MAY 17-23, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

MUSIC

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Part-time Bookkeeper Accounts Receivable/Collections Good Times is hiring a bookkeeper to assist with accounts receivable and collections. A minimum of two years experience is required, along with knowledge of Excel and accounting programs. You must be extremely detail oriented, enjoy working with the ad reps in our busy office, and learn quickly in order to use our software system that manages advertising schedules and AR. You’ll also need excellent customer service skills in dealing with our clients (local business advertisers). Compensation will be based on experience. Please send your resume to Jeanne Howard: jeanne@santacruz.com and note that you saw the ad in Good Times.

FORWARD FRIDAYS REGGAE IN THE MIX Reggae Party with DJ Daddy Spleece, Ay Que Linda and special guests in the mix at the Jerk House. All ages event. 6 p.m. The Jerk House, 2525 Soquel Drive, Santa Cruz. santacruzreggae.com. Free. FAMILY BARN DANCE Family-friendly barn dance for all. Come out and do-si-do and sashay to your hearts’ content with dance caller, Andy Wilson, and a room full of friendly people. 6-8 p.m. Live Oak Grange, 1900 17th Ave., Santa Cruz. 650-879-0864. $10.

SATURDAY 5/20 ARTS HISTORIC PHOTO PROCESSES FORUM The Historic Photo Processes Forum is

a resource for photographers, collectors and conservators to study the history and practice of alternative photographic image making. 11 a.m. Santa Cruz Museum of Art & History, 705 Front St., Santa Cruz. santacruzmah.org/event/historic-photoprocesses-forum-31/2017-05-20. Free.

CLASSES MUSIC TOGETHER—MUSICAL ME MusicalMe brings the essential Music Together Early Childhood Music & Movement class (for ages birth to 5 years, and the adults who love them) to the MOD Workshop on Mondays and Saturdays. 10 a.m. Santa Cruz Children’s Museum of Discovery, 1855 41st Ave., Capitola. 438-3514.

RISE AND SHINE YOGA Set the tone for your weekend with a relaxed body, calm mind, and smile on your face. We’ll start with some standing asanas (postures/poses) to awaken energy and get it moving in an inward and upward direction. 8:30 a.m. Ananda Scotts Valley Yoga, 221-A Mount Hermon Road, Scotts Valley. 338-9642. $15.

PARTNER YOGA AND WINE TASTING Share sacred energy the second and fourth Saturdays of each month at Poetic Cellars Winery. Wine tasting will follow the class. 10 a.m.-Noon. Poetic Cellars, 5000 N. Rodeo Gulch Road, Soquel. 462-3478.

ZEN MEDITATION & DISCUSSION Meditation and Talk on Zen Buddhism. All are welcome. 8:30 a.m. Ocean Gate Zen Center, 920 41st Ave., Capitola. info@oceangatezen. org. Free.

SAFETY HOME CAR SEAT FITTING EVENT Did you know that 75 percent of car seats are installed incorrectly? Dominican Hospital and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford are offering a free car seat fitting station event for the community. 9 a.m. Dominican Hospital, 3050 Paul Sweet Road, Santa Cruz. 462-7266. Free.

K-SIXTH TEACHER WORKSHOPS Teacher’s workshop for K-Sixth teachers. Come learn about pet safety and humane education at the animal shelter. Get a tour of the shelter and 10 ready to use lessons. All lessons are aligned with the Common Core Standards and the Next Generation Science Standards. 10 a.m. Santa Cruz County Animal Shelter, 2200 7th Ave., Santa Cruz. scanimalshelter.org. Free. THIRD SATURDAY DANCE W/ NIGHT CLUB 2-STEP LESSONS This is a “beginner


SUNSET PRESENTS 2017/2018 SEASON

CALENDAR friendly” event for singles and couples of all ages. Discounts for newcomers, students and seniors. 7:30-11 p.m. Market Street Theater, 222 Market St., Santa Cruz. 4754134. $8.

FOOD & WINE APTOS FARMERS MARKET AT CABRILLO COLLEGE Voted Good Times best farmers market in Santa Cruz County. With more than 90 vendors, the Aptos Farmers Market offers an unmatched selection of locally grown produce and specialty foods. 8 a.m.-Noon, Saturdays, Cabrillo College. montereybayfarmers.org or akeller@ montereybayfarmers.org. Free. WESTSIDE FARMERS MARKET The Westside Farmers Market takes place every week at the corner of Highway 1 and Western Drive, situated on the northern edge of Santa Cruz’s greenbelt. This market serves the communities of the west-end of Santa Cruz including Boony Doon, North Coast, UCSC Campus and is a short trip from downtown. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Mission Street and Western Drive, Santa Cruz. 454-0566. SCOTTS VALLEY FARMERS MARKET Started in 2009 with the City of Scotts Valley, the market represents farmers and specialty food purveyors along with cookedto-order food. This local market is the place for the Scotts Valley community to get their fill of fresh, healthy, locally grown fruits and vegetables. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. 360, Kings Valley Road, Scotts Valley. 454-0566.

GROUPS OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS Do you have a problem with food? Please check out our free, friendly 12-step support groups with the solution. Teens and adults welcome. 11 a.m.Noon. Watsonville Community Hospital, 75 Nielson St., Watsonville. santacruzoa.org. Free. QIGONG FOR WOMEN LIVING WITH CANCER WomenCARE offers a group to learn specific tools for managing side effects of cancer treatments. Meets every third

PILLS ANONYMOUS OF SANTA CRUZ Twelve Steps of Recovery. Our primary purpose is to carry the message to the addict who still suffers. Located in the Sutter room in the East end on the first floor. 8 a.m. Sutter Maternity and Surgery Center, 2900 Chanticleer Ave., Santa Cruz. pillsanonymous.org. Free.

MUSIC LIVE MUSIC AT ZIZZO’S COFFEEHOUSE AND WINE BAR Enjoy Live Music at the area’s only built-in Piano Bar with the Biggest Mirror Ball on the Central Coast. Our bar serves a variety of wines and local craft beer along with tasty small-plate appetizers and desserts. 7-9:30 p.m. 3555 Clares St., Capitola. 477-0680. $5. REFLECTIONS JAZZ TRIO This Santa Cruz trio plays a range of jazz styles, from classic standards to modern compositions for the casual jazz fan to the musician. With James Thomason on piano, Chel Sheffer on bass and Evan Benway on drums. 6-9 p.m. Davenport Roadhouse, 1 Davenport Ave., Davenport. 426-8801. Free. HOUSE OF FLOYD PRESENTS 50 YEARS OF PINK FLOYD House of Floyd is San Francisco’s immersive Pink Floyd tribute band. Rather than simply replicating the iconic band’s recorded songs, House of Floyd focuses on the adventurous live arrangements and sonic explorations of their namesake. 8 p.m. Rio Theater, 1205 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. 423-8209. $25.

Neil Sedaka

Saturday, September 30 • 8:30PM

American Rhapsody: The Gershwin Songbook Friday, October 6 • 8PM

Join our 8th Anniversary Party and Health Fair!

Saturday, May 20th 10am - 3pm -

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Kathy Griffin: Celebrity Run-Ins Friday, October 13 • 8PM

ArcAttack

Friday, October 27 • 7PM

Letters Home

Saturday, November 4 • 8PM

Dwight Yoakam

Thursday, November 9 • 8PM

Shemekia Copeland Saturday, November 11 • 8PM

Tango Buenos Aires: Spirit of Argentina Friday, November 17 • 8PM

Anne Lamott

Friday, January 19 • 8PM

The Second City: Look Both Ways Before Talking

Thursday, February 15 • 8PM

Black Violin

Friday, February 16 • 8PM

317 Potrero St. Suite C Santa Cruz, CA 95060

One Night of Queen

www.santacruzcore.com

The TEN Tenors: Wish You Were Here

Wednesday, February 21 • 8PM

Sunday, March 4 • 7PM

Celtic Nights: Oceans of Hope

HIGHTONES IN THE PARK Come join us for our last show of the year! We are changing things up a bit, and hoping to take advantage of the beautiful Santa Cruz spring weather. Please bring any lawn chairs or blankets to sit on the grass. We encourage a picnic and/or snacks for the show as well. 5 p.m. San Lorenzo Park, 137 Dakota Ave., Santa Cruz. 204-2451. $5.

Candid Camera: 8 Decades of Smiles with Peter Funt

SAMBA CRUZ PLAYS BRAZILIAN JAZZ Featuring Vivian Simon on flute, sax and percussion and Pablo Riviere on guitar and vocals playing bossa nova, samba, baião, choro and other jazz-inflected Brazilian musical forms. 6-9 p.m. Davenport Roadhouse and Inn, 1 Davenport Ave., Davenport. davenportroadhouse.com. Free.

www.sunsetcenter.org

CABARET: BARBERSHOP STYLE 2017 Come out and enjoy the annual >42

Friday, March 9 • 8PM

Mystic India Friday, April 6 • 8PM

Friday, April 27 • 8PM

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BRAVO! MEMBER PRESALE Friday, June 16 at 9:30AM PUBLIC ON-SALE Friday, June 23 at 9:30AM

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 17-23, 2017

FARM FRESH FEST: SECOND ANNUAL HOMELESS GARDEN PROJECT FOOD & WELLNESS FAIR Cooking demos, nutrition workshop, yoga, qi gong, container gardening workshop, kids activities galore, free light lunch and much more. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Homeless Garden Project, Shaffer Road at Delaware Avenue, Santa Cruz. homelessgardenproject.org. Free.

SUNSET CENTER’S FIFTH ANNUAL GALA

Saturday. 2-3 p.m. Pacific Cultural Center, 1307 Seabright Ave., Santa Cruz. fsa-cc.org/ womencare. Free.

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Thrive

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B12 Happy Hours: Wednesday 1:30-4:30pm Thursdays 9am-12pm Fridays 3-6pm

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CALENDAR <41

Cabaret barbershop show with the Gold Standard Chorus and friends. 7 p.m. Felton Community Hall, 6191 Highway 9, Felton. 335-5621. $18.

San Lorenzo Park, 180 S. River St., Santa Cruz. march-against-monsanto.com. Free.

SUNDAY 5/21

OUTDOOR

ARTS

GETTING TO KNOW ARANA GULCH: GUIDED HIKE Join the Museum of Natural History for Nature Connections that bring us closer to our surroundings. Learn new skills, visit new places, or discover familiar places in a whole new way. 9:30 a.m. Arana Gulch, Agnes St., Santa Cruz. santacruzmuseum. org/public-programs. $10.

THE SANTA CRUZ OLDIES BUT GOODIES RADIO SHOW A new old radio show is debuting on KSCO. For those who remember Santa Cruz in the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s, the show will feature a variety of guests. 6 p.m. KSCO 1080 AM. 475-1080.

SWIM LESSONS WITH SEAHORSE SWIM SCHOOL As part of an effort to prevent and reduce accidental drownings, Seahorse Swim School has partnered with USA Swimming Foundation and the Make a Splash initiative to offer swim lessons to all ages, levels and abilities. 1-3 p.m. Seascape Sports Club, 1505 Seascape Blvd., Aptos. seahorseswimschool.com. Free. MOVIE AT THE MISSION: DISNEY’S ‘THE BRAVE LITTLE TOASTER’ Friends of Santa Cruz State Parks kicks off summer special events with Movie at the Mission featuring Disney’s The Brave Little Toaster. 7-9 p.m. Santa Cruz Mission Historic State Park, 144 School St., Santa Cruz. thatsmypark.org/ event/movie-mission-disneys-brave-littletoaster. Free. GOAT HILL FAIR—A VINTAGE MARKET Our vendors wrap up their collected, patinaladen, magnificent to quirky, antiquities and display them in the most lusciously creative ways. To capture your eye and sing to your vintage-loving heart. 10 a.m. Santa Cruz County Fairgrounds, 2601 E. Lake, Watsonville. 408-221-5054. $10.

VOLUNTEER VOLUNTEER TO FEED THE HUNGRY WITH FOOD NOT BOMBS We need help sharing vegan meals with the hungry every Saturday and Sunday in downtown Santa Cruz: Cooking from Noon-3 p.m, 418 Front St., Santa Cruz. 515-8234. Serving from 4-6 p.m. at the Post Office, 840 Front St., Santa Cruz. MARCH AGAINST MONSANTO— SANTA CRUZ Let’s show our support for safe, organic food production and land management in Santa Cruz. Too many people are using “weed” killer Roundup and other toxic pesticides in our neighborhoods, which inevitably end up poisoning our pollinators, wildlife and children. Noon-4 p.m.

could be performed at the Synergy Cabaret. 4-6 p.m. Synergy Dance, 9055 Soquel Drive, Aptos. 661-0235. $40.

FOOD & WINE LIVE COMEDY AT THE CROW’S NEST Crow’s Nest features live comedy, with talent from the national circuit, every Sunday night year-round. 21 and up. 2218 E. Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz. 476-4560. $7.

VIVE OAXACA GUELAGUETZA Spend the day in Oaxaca! Senderos invites you to the Vive Oaxaca Guelaguetza, an authentic music, dance, food, crafts and cultural festival like those held annually in Oaxaca, Mexico. 9 a.m.5 p.m. Harbor High School, 300 La Fonda Ave., Santa Cruz. 854-7740. $10.

PIE FOR THE PEOPLE—SANTA CRUZ Let’s eat pie and gather in community to support the Santa Cruz County Immigration Project (SCCIP). SCCIP provides free legal services and counsel for immigrant families in Santa Cruz and Pajaro Valley. 1-3 p.m. Homeless Garden Project Farm, Shaffer Road, at Delaware, Santa Cruz. pieforthepeoplesantacruz.org. $5 donation per person.

CLASSES

GROUPS

SUBUD INTRODUCTION Subud is an international spiritual community whose members experience an active moving exercise that can lead to deep inner healing and an experience of the divine.11 a.m.Noon. Subud Santa Cruz, 3800 Old San Jose Road, Soquel. 476-3020. Free.

OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS Speaker/ Discussion meeting. Have a problem with food? OA is a 12-Step support group to stop compulsive eating behaviors. 9:05-10:15 a.m. Sutter Maternity & Surgery Center, Sutter Room, 2900 Chanticleer Ave., Santa Cruz. santacruzoa.org or 429-7906. Free.

SWING DANCE CLASSES Swing Set Lounge is Santa Cruz’s venue for all things swing. Our mission is to grow a friendly, fun, diverse and inclusive swing community. All levels of experience are welcome. 7-10 p.m. Pacific Arts, Complex, 1122 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. swingsetlounge.com. $40/$5.

NAR-ANON FAMILY GROUPS—SANTA CRUZ AREA OF NORTHERN CA, SUTTER HOSPITAL Nar-Anon Family Groups meet to support the friends and families of addicts. We share experience, strength and hope to reduce the stress related to living with active addiction and after that to live life on life’s terms. We are a 12-Step program. 6:30-8 p.m. Sutter Maternity Center, 2900 Chanticleer Ave., Santa Cruz. 477-2200. Free.

YOGA BURN: VINYASA FLOW CLASS Yoga Burn is a four-week yoga series workshop. Join us for a Vinyasa flow class that will get your heart pumping. This class will focus on yoga postures that build strength, flexibility and focus to enhance the overall health of the body and mind. 10:30-11:45 a.m. TULA Center for Bodywork, 3065 Porter St. #105, Soquel. 454-8198. $80. LURE COURSING This off-leash sport is for dogs who love to run and to chase. We provide the lure, you provide the dog. This monthly fun event is a great way for the dogs to blow off steam and have a great time. 9:30 a.m. 8022 Soquel Drive, Aptos. 601-2458. $5. NEO-BURLESQUE BASICS WORKSHOP Join Lola L’Amor, the director of the Do-Rights Burlesque, for an afternoon of fun. Workshops includes warm up, teaching of basic burlesque and jazz moves, and learning a short neo-burlesque number that

OUTDOOR SURFER’S PATH MARATHON, CAPITOLA HALF MARATHON & RELAY The courses feature ocean and beachfront views along the Santa Cruz County coast. The event starts at the legendary Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk and travels east along the bluffs to the City of Capitola. 7 a.m. 400 Beach St., Santa Cruz. 423-5590 or runsurferspath.com.

MONDAY 5/22 ARTS MUSIC TOGETHER—MUSICAL ME MusicalMe brings the essential Music Together Early Childhood Music &


CALENDAR Movement class (for ages birth to 5 years, and the adults who love them) to the MOD Workshop. Pre Registration required. 10 a.m. 438-3514 or musicalme.com. Santa Cruz Children’s Museum of Discovery, 1855 41st Ave., Capitola. POETRY OPEN MIC CELEBRATES NEW VENUE What started as a small group of poets performing at the Tannery Arts Center four years ago has quickly evolved into an entire collective of Santa Cruzans and UCSC students that hosts weekly poetry events. 4 p.m. Tannery Arts Center, 1010 River St. Suite 112, Santa Cruz. 621-6226. Free.

CLASSES BEGINNING BALLET WITH DIANA ROSE Ballet for the beginning adult student with little or no ballet training. Learn ballet terminology and fine tune placement, posture and technique. 1:30-2:30 p.m. International Academy of Dance Santa Cruz. info@iadance.com. $10. SANTA CRUZ BODYWORK COLLECTIVE (SCBC) Santa Cruz Bodywork Collective is a dojo - a place of the way - for those seeking guided instruction to achieving greater ease, flow and connection in one's body, mind, heart and life. 21 and up. 7 p.m. Cypress Health Institute, 1119 Pacific Suite 300, Santa Cruz. 476-2115. Free.

OUTDOOR PUBLIC TOUR: EAST CLIFF DRIVE SIDEWALK/ SEWER RELOCATION PROJECT The slope above Seabright Beach continues to erode following recent storms. This project is relocating the sidewalk, railing and sewer towards the street. Senior Civil Engineer and his team will explain the details of this construction work. Noon-1 p.m. Santa Cruz Museum of Natural History, 1305 E. Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz. 420-5166. Free.

SPIRITUAL MONDAY DROP-IN MEDITATION Led by Venerable Yangchen and Venerable Gyalten. Basic meditation instruction and practice. One session of mindfulness meditation, followed by guided reflection meditation. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Land of Medicine Buddha, 5800 Prescott Road, Soquel. 462-8383. Donation.

501 River St, Santa Cruz • 831-466-9551

$59 Renewals $79 New patients with copy of ad Growrs e Lettb a le dto avail ifie qualie pat nts

We’ll matc h any local clinic ad specia l! w/copy of th is ad

NEW HOURS 11AM-6PM

CLASSES

ONE STEP EVALUATION PROCESS

TUESDAY TEA TIME: ANTIINFLAMMATORY FOODS If you have a condition that causes inflammation, come and enjoy a relaxing cup of tea and a bite, and learn which foods naturally reduce inflammation. With Nutrition Consultant Madia Jamgochian. Noon-1 p.m. New Leaf Market, 1101 Fair Ave., Santa Cruz. 426-1306. Free.

FOOD & WINE

OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS Overeaters Anonymous is a 12-Step support program for those who wish to stop compulsive eating, including anorexia and bulimia. 12:151:15 p.m. Trinity Presbyterian Church, 420 Melrose Ave., Santa Cruz. 476-8291. Free.

FRIED CHICKEN, BUBBLES & BOURBON Nothing pairs better with fried chicken than sparkling wine, so each Tuesday we’re opening a different bottle of bubbly to pour by the glass all evening. For those who prefer a stiff cocktail to the fizz, “The Bitter Liberal,” a house cocktail featuring Benchmark bourbon, will be discounted to $8 all evening. 5 p.m. Soif Wine Bar & Restaurant, 105 Walnut Ave., Santa Cruz. 423-2020. $10.

SUPPORT GROUP FOR SURVIVORS OF CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE: WOMEN’S GROUP We provide a safe and supportive

Same Great Location • Same Great Reputation

TUESDAY 5/23

GROUPS

ARM-IN-ARM CANCER SUPPORT GROUP For women with advanced, recurrent and metastatic cancers. Registration required. 12:30-2 p.m. WomenCARE, 2901 Park Ave., Suite A1, Soquel. 457-2273. Free.

ltations u s n o c

TRIVIA NIGHT Trivia Night at New Bohemia Brewing Company every Tuesday. 21 and up. 6 p.m. 1030 41st Ave., Santa Cruz. nubobrew. com/events. Free.

WALK-INS WELCOME GET APPROVED OR NO CHARGE!

Pizza the Way it Oughta Be GLUTEN FREE crusts available on all pizzas

BOGO

Buy any Large Specialty Pizza at regular price and get a Large 1-Topping fpr $6.99 Must present coupon when ordering. Valid at Portola Dr. location only. Delivery charges may apply. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Expires 6/28/17

3715 Portola Dr., Santa Cruz 831.477.7760 MountainMikes.com

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 17-23, 2017

SANTA CRUZ CORE FITNESS + REHAB SPT CORE This small group exercise program has between two-five clients. All sessions incorporate strength, cardio, stability, toning, cardio conditioning, and flexibility into an undulating periodization model. Days and times vary, please see our website for more information. 317 Potrero St., Santa Cruz. 425-9500.

environment for healing from child sexual abuse. Together we break through isolation, develop healthy coping skills, reduce shame, and build healthy boundaries. 1 p.m. Family Service Agency of the Central Coast, 104 Walnut Ave., Santa Cruz. 423-7601.

43


MUSIC CALENDAR

LOVE YOUR

LOCAL BAND SPUN

The members of Spun have been playing together since the late ’90s. But in the past couple of years, the band has played some incredible shows that they consider to be highlights. They played the Pleasure Point Bike Race three years in a row before it closed. Then last year, they got to play at Facebook, where they performed to some 700 people. And audiences have been loving them at bike and skate demos. “The music really seems to fit the genre of skater, surfer, BMX mentality,” says guitarist/vocalist P-Bone.

MAY 17-23, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Before starting Spun, the members played in several alternative rock bands, and Spun was conceived as a genre mashup group—the name refers to them “spinning all different styles of music.” Primarily playing covers, Spun audiences can hear songs from Bob Marley, Montrose, Van Halen, Sublime, James Brown, Poison, and many more.

44

“A lot of bands now are specialized. Like you’re the Led Zeppelin tribute band. You’re an AC/DC tribute band. Which we could do if we wanted to, but it’s nice to mix it up and throw those different vibes out,” says P-Bone. They hope to work on more originals, while still maintaining the fun vibe of the shows. “Life’s short,” says guitarist/vocalist T. Rollin. “We try to be as danceable as possible without getting cheesy with it. The classic rock songs that we do pull out are really good feel-good choices.” AARON CARNES INFO: 8 p.m. Saturday, May 20. Don Quixote’s, 6275 Hwy. 9, Felton. $10. 335-2800.

BLACKALICIOUS

WEDNESDAY 5/17 COUNTRY

BREA BURNS & THE BOLEROS A country and honky tonk outfit out of Phoenix, Arizona, Brea Burns and the Boleros features ace musicians from the city’s classic country and rockabilly scenes. Born in Southern California, Burns is a talented artist and frontwoman who draws comparisons to Loretta Lynn and Wanda Jackson—pretty good company for a rising star. She had a solid foundation to spring from, as her mother was a songwriter and musician, and her father a longtime music industry veteran. Also on the bill: the Western Wednesday All-Star Band, with special guest McCoy Tyler. CJ INFO: 9 p.m. Crepe Place, 1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. $10. 429-6994.

INDIE ROCK

KING TUFF Established by Kyle Thomas—who has since taken on the band’s name—King Tuff initially failed to draw much of a following. So Thomas moved to other projects, like playing with indie leg-

ends Dinosaur Jr., metalheads Witch, and prolific rocker Ty Segall. But when his second, self-titled album was released in 2010, it firmly established King Tuff as his own entity on the indie scene. MAT WEIR INFO: 8 p.m. Don Quixote’s, 6275 Hwy. 9, Felton. $15. 335-2800.

FRIDAY 5/19 HIP-HOP

BLACKALICIOUS In 2015, there was a certain potency to Blackalicious’ album Imani Vol. 1— the first album the bay area hip-hop duo had released in a decade. It was timely, politically unapologetic, and even a celebration of sorts. (“Darker than the random check of passengers/traveling first-class/blacker than the President/well half of him”). In 2017, considering everything going on with the nation, the record seems darker, and at the same time more necessary. The duo has almost single-handedly redefined how a rap group can be both experimental and accessible, and they still have a lot to say. AARON CARNES INFO: 9 p.m. Moe’s Alley, 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz. $17/adv, $20/door. 479-1854.

ROOTS

MARTY O’REILLY A four-piece that formed in Santa Cruz in 2012, Marty O’Reilly and the Old Soul Orchestra trips through Howlin’ Wolf and John Lee Hooker-inspired blues, rock and roll, and American roots music to emerge with a gritty, soulful sound of its own. Led by O’Reilly, who boasts a gorgeous voice and solid instrumental chops, the band raises the bar on the local roots singer-songwriter scene. Exploring topics of love, heartache, loss and joy with passion and precision, O’Reilly and company have established themselves as ones to watch on the larger American roots landscape. CJ INFO: 8:30 p.m. Don Quixote’s, 6275 Hwy. 9, Felton. $15. 335-2800.

SATURDAY 5/20 SKA

DAN P & THE BRICKS One of Santa Cruz’s most popular local bands was ’90s ska-rock-pop ensemble Slow Gherkin. The town is also home to Dan Potthast, lead


MUSIC

BE OUR GUEST REDWOOD MOUNTAIN FAIRE

CHUCHO VALDES

singer of St. Louis’ biggest ska band of all time, MU330. For some reason, it took until 2009 before these monsters of ska joined forces to create the ultimate local ska Voltron. There’s even non-Gherkin/ MU330 members in the group, 10 people total. This is the perfect band to see if you’ve grown embarrassed by your ska past, but you secretly miss skanking at shows. You will be among friends here. AC

SURF-PUNK

FRIGHTS The song “Kids” off of the Frights’ latest record talks about how, when you still live with mom and dad, you hate everything they say and do. But once you move out, you realize that they were right about a lot of things. Musically, the Frights embody this mix of childish rebellion and grown-up self-restraint with a healthy mix of punk, pop, garage, and surfy earworms. They wail and scream and gently hum along tender melodies. The new record might actually be a bit scatterbrained for some fans, but if they can appreci-

INFO: 8:30 p.m. Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $13/adv, $15/door. 429-4135.

SUNDAY 5/21 AMERICANA

DANGERMUFFIN Remember when Americana was a sub-genre? Now that sub-genre has sub-genres of its own, including “alt-Americana,” “indie Americana” and now “coastal Americana.” I recently heard the phrase used to describe the Charleston, South Carolina-based band Dangermuffin. While I have no idea what the band name is about, I must admit, I really dig the coastal Americana tag. It makes me think that we need one to describe the Santa Cruz roots sound. Anyway, Dangermuffin is a rootsy four-piece that digs into folk, roots, traditional fingerpicking, jam tradition and even reggae to create something upbeat, catchy and, yes, coastal. CJ INFO: 7 p.m. Don Quixote’s, 6275 Hwy. 9, Felton. $10. 335-2800.

MON-TUE 5/22-23 AFRO-CUBAN

CHUCHO VALDES: SOLO PIANO Even in Cuba, where prodigious pianists are one of the new things not in short supply, Chucho Valdés stands head and shoulders above his virtuosic peers. At 75, he embodies the nation’s creatively fecund musical traditions with a sound springing from his Afro-Cuban heritage, European classical training, and love of American jazz. Playing solo, he’s a dominating force of nature whose huge hands coax a jaw-dropping array of sounds from the instrument, with thunderous low-end rumbles, lightning runs up the keyboard, and luxuriant, ringing harmonies. With six Grammy Awards and three Latin Grammys, he’s continued to evolve since leaving Irakere, the legendary band he co-founded in the early 1970s. ANDREW GILBERT

INFO: 7 p.m. Kuumbwa Jazz, 320-2 Cedar St., Santa Cruz. $50/adv, $60/door. 427-2227.

INFO: 11 a.m. Saturday & Sunday, June 3 & 4 at Roaring Camp, 5401 Graham Hill Road, Felton. More information: redwoodmountainfaire.com. WANT TO GO? Go to santacruz.com/giveaways before 11 a.m. on Wednesday, May 24 to find out how you could win a pair of passes to the faire.

IN THE QUEUE ANUHEA

Hawaiian pop music favorite. Wednesday at Moe’s Alley LARRY JUNE

Bay Area hip-hop. Wednesday at Catalyst VETIVER

Indie-folk and rock. Thursday at Moe’s Alley AMY LAVERE & WILL SEXTON

Roots songwriter and bass player and her guitarist/husband. Gary Blackburn opens. Thursday at Don Quixote’s WACO BROTHERS

Alt-country standouts. Sunday at Crepe Place

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 17-23, 2017

INFO: 9 p.m. Crepe Place, 1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. $10. 429-6994.

ate the diversity of sound, they are in for a crazy ride. AC

The Redwood Mountain Faire is one of the musical highpoints of summer in Santa Cruz County. Each year, the faire brings a stellar lineup of artists that cover the gamut, from folk, bluegrass and rock to soul, blues, pop and jam, including standouts of our rich local scene. This year is no exception. On June 3 and 4, Cracker, Dave Alvin & Phil Alvin (above) with the Guilty Ones, Katdelic, Poor Man’s Whiskey, Jesse Daniel and the Slow Learners, Taylor Rae, the Coffis Brothers and many more gather for a weekend of music, crafts, food, kids activities and community. Proceeds benefit local nonprofits and service organizations. CAT JOHNSON

45


LIVE MUSIC

Wednesday May 17th 8:30pm $20/25 Hawaii’s #1 Female Artist

ANUHEA + Tenelle Thursday May 18th 8:30pm $15/17 Presented By (((folkYEAH!)))

WED

VETIVER + JESSE SYKES

THE APPLETON GRILL 410 Rodriguez St, Watsonville

Saturday May 19th 9pm $17/20

APTOS ST. BBQ 8059 Aptos St, Aptos

Bay Area Hip Hop Legends Return

BLACKALICIOUS Saturday May 20th 9pm $15/20 Afro Brazilian Dance Party With

SAMBADÁ

Sunday May 21st 8:30pm $8/12 Afro-Cuban, Latin, Funk

SOLTRON + CHANGUI MAJADERO Wednesday May 24th 8:30pm $10/15 Americana & Roots Music With

THE STRAY BIRDS + MICHAELA ANNE Thursday May 25th 8:30pm $7/10

Funk, Soul & Rock & Roll Dance Party

THE SEXTONES + DISIAC

5/17

THU

Kyle Jester 6-8p

BLUE LAGOON 923 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Pieces, Chicken Mama, New Spell, l0l $5 9p

THE BLUE LOUNGE 529 Seabright Ave, Santa Cruz

Punk Night

BOARDWALK BOWL 115 Cliff St, Santa Cruz

Karaoke 8p-Close

BRITANNIA ARMS 110 Monterey Ave, Capitola

FRI

5/19

SAT

5/20

Virgil Thrasher & Rick Stevens 6-8p

Harlis Sweetwater 6-8p

Minor Thirds Trio 6:30-9:30p Claudio Melega 7-10p

MAY 17-23, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

46

PETER HARPER + Pat Hull

May 31st COSMIC PINBALL + THE LEFTOVERS June 1st ELEKTRIC VOODOO + PAWN SHOP SOUL June 2nd ROYAL JELLY JIVE + NAKED BOOTLEGGERS June 3rd THE ITALS + Ancestree June 9th PIMPS OF JOYTIME June 10th DREAMING GHOSTS + REDLIGHT DISTRICT June 11th TOMMY CASTRO (afternoon)

WWW.MOESALLEY.COM 1535 Commercial Way Santa Cruz 831.479.1854

TUE

5/23

Kid Andersen & John ‘Blues’ Boyd 6-8p

Broken Shades 6-8p

Mojo Mix 6-8p

60 Somethin’ Strings 6-9p

US Air Guitar Championships $5 9p

The Box (Goth Night) 9p

Manorlady, Me Pretty, Revolution Bummer & more $5 9p

Karaoke

Karaoke

Comedy

Sonic Addiction 9-12:15p

Karaoke 6p-Close

Karaoke 6p-Close

Karaoke 8p-Close

Jazz Society Donation Maya Songbird 3:30p Erisy Watt Free 8p Free 8p

Comedy w/Shwa Free 8:30p

Radiate Santa Cruz $12/$15 6p

Stellar Corpses $7/$10 8p

The Inciters, Comedy Night/80s Sweet Hayah, Madaline Safety Dance Free 8:30p & more $5 9p

Karaoke 8p-Close

Ukulele Club Free The Get Down Funk Jam 5:30p Karaoke Free 8p Free 8p Scott Kail’s Tupperware Party Band 8-11p

Swing Dance $5 5:30p Reckless Noise Punk Light the Band $5 9:30p Show 6p Karaoke 9p

Karaoke

Karaoke 9p

DJ Joey Martinez & DJ Kaos 9p

CATALYST 1011 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz CATALYST ATRIUM 1011 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Larry June $15/$20 8:30p

Jack Ingram $20/$25 8p

Night Riots $14/$16 8:30p

The Frights, Hunny $13/$15 8p

Saturday May 27th 9pm $15/20

Ben Harper’s Brother Returns To Santa Cruz Celebrating The Release Of His Brand New Album “Break The Cycle”

5/22

Jeff Blackburn & Friends 6-9p

BROKEN ENGLISH + FLOR DE CAÑA

Sunday May 28th 8:30pm $9/12

MON

Bill Walker 7-10p

Latin Dance Party Double Bill

DOOBIE DECIBEL SYSTEM FEATURING MELVIN SEALS, DAN LEBOWITZ (of ALO) STEVE ADAMS (of ALO) ROGER MCNAMEE & PETE LAVEZZOLI

5/21

Minor Thirds Trio 7-10p

Frank Sinatra’s Music w/ John Michael 6:30-9:30p

CASA SORRENTO 393 Salinas St, Salinas

Preacher Boy Trio 1p Lloyd Whitley 5p

Friday May 26th 9pm $9/12

All Star Band Debuts Moe’s On A Saturday Night

SUN

Las Cruxes, Los Honey Sekta Core, Pop Bottle Rockets 9p Bombers 8p

AQUARIUS RESTAURANT Santa Cruz Dream Inn 175 W Cliff Dr, Santa Cruz BELLA VISTA ITALIAN Tomas Obomsawin KITCHEN AND BAR 6:30-9:30p 8041 Soquel Dr, Aptos

BOCCI’S CELLAR 140 Encinal St, Santa Cruz

5/18

International Music Hall and Restaurant

FINE MEXICAN AND AMERICAN FOOD ALL YOU CAN EAT LUNCH BUFFET M-F $7.95 Wed May 17

King Tuff “The mischievous gnome child of rock & roll” plus Ruth Garbus & Chris Weisman

$15 adv./$15 door 21 + 8pm Thu May 18

Amy LaVere & Will Sexton

plus Gary Blackburn Americana, Trad-Country,

Gypsy Jazz, Roots

$10 adv./$10 door seated <21 w/parent 7:30pm

Fri May 19

Marty O’Reilly & The Old Soul

Orchestra Irresistible Vintage Blues plus MAJK

$15 adv./$15 door 21 + 8:30pm Sat May 20

Spun plus The Spazztics

Spun Classic Rock & Spazztics Reunion

$10 adv./$10 door 21 + 8pm Sun May 21 Sun May 21

Scotts Valley High School Music Production 2pm Matinee

OPEN LATE EVERY NIGHT! wednesday 5/17

western wednesday

sponsored by Tomboy and tourMore Booking:

BREA BURNS AND THE BOLEROS Doors 8:30pm/Show 9pm $10 Door ($8 with boots on!)

thursday 5/18

IAN BELL w / TRAPPIST ONE

Doors 8:30pm/Show 9pm $8 Door

FRIday 5/19

TODD DAY WAITE'S PIGPEN

$7 adv./$7 door <21 w/parent 2pm

w / JESSE DANIEL AND THE SLOW LEARNERS

From Carolina mountains and beaches

saturday 5/20

Dangermuffin 7pm Concert $10 adv./$10 door 21 + 7pm

Doors 8:30pm/Show 9pm $10 Door

DAN P AND THE BRICKS

Mon May 22

James Lee Stanley Birthday Bash

Thu May 25

Phoebe Hunt & The Gatherers

doors 8:30pm/Show 9pm $10 door

$15 adv. /$15 door <21 w/parent 7:30pm

OPEN BLUEGRASS JAM

$12 adv./$15 door <21 w/parent 7:30pm

Phoebe, of the Belleville Outfit plus Jordan Tice

COMING RIGHT UP

Fri. May 26 Santa Cruz’s Dead Homage to Grateful Dead’s 80’s acoustic/electric shows

Sat. May 27 McCoy Tyler plus Scary Little Friends McCoy’s CD Release Concert-- McCoy accompa nied by The Coffis Brothers & The Mountain Men

Sun. May 28 The Golden RAGE of Television featuring Pat McCormack Guitar rock and visual tribute to classic TV themes from ‘50s and ‘60s

Reservations Now Online at www.donquixotesmusic.com Rockin'Church Service Every Sunday ELEVATION at 10am-11:15am

w / WASABI

Advance Tickets at www.ticketweb.com

sunday 5/21

Hey you pickers, pluckers, fiddlers, and grinners come on down and play from 5-8pm on our on our garden stage. Got banjo?

TUESday 5/23

7 COME 11 Show 9pm $5 Door

MIDTOWN SANTA CRUZ 1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz

429-6994


LIVE MUSIC WED

5/17

CAVA WINE BAR 115 San Jose Ave, Capitola

Steve’s Kitchen Jazz 6:30-9:30p

CILANTROS 1934 Main St, Watsonville

Hippo Happy Hour 5:30-7:30p

CREPE PLACE 1134 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz

Western Wednesday: Brea Burns & the Boleros $8/$10 9p

CROW’S NEST 2218 E. Cliff Dr, Santa Cruz

Yuji Tojo 8p

THU

5/18

FRI

Myhaylo K 6:30-9:30p

Dave Muldawer 6:30-9:30p

Todd Day Waite’s Pigpen, Jesse Daniel and the Slow $10 9p

Ian Bell, Trappist One $8 9p $3 Nagging Doubts 8:30p

5/19

$5 Blue Summit $6 9p

DAV. ROADHOUSE 1 Davenport Ave, Davenport DON QUIXOTE’S 6275 Hwy 9, Felton

5/20

Isaiah Pickett 6:30-9:30p

SUN

5/21

MON

5/22

King Tuff, Ruth Garbus, Chris Weisman $15 8p

Amy LaVere & Will Sexton, Gary Blackburn $10 7:30p

Marty O’Reilly & the Old Soul Orchestra, Majk $15 8:30p

TUE

5/23

1/2 PRICE NIGHT FOR STUDENTS Friday, May 19 • 7:30 pm

7 Come 11 $5 9p

Billy Martini Show $7 9:30p

Live Comedy $7 9p

Reggae Party 8p Sherry Austin w/ Henhouse 6-9p James Lee Stanley $12/$15 7:30p

Silverback 8p

HINDQUARTER BAR & GRILLE 303 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz

Broken Fences 9p

August Sun 9p

Anais Mitchell $18 8p

MALONE’S 4402 Scotts Valley Dr, Scotts Valley

Live Music 5:30-9p

MICHAEL’S ON MAIN 2591 Main St, Soquel

John Michael 7:30-10:30p

UCSC Jazz Ensemble $10/$15 6p

Silverback 4p

Roadhouse Karaoke 7:30p

The Bobs Farewell Show $25/$32 6p

Bombshell Bullys 8-11p

TWO NIGHTS! CUBAN LEGEND! Monday, May 22 • 7 pm and Tuesday, May 23 • 7 pm | No Comps

JOEY DEFRANCESCO + THE PEOPLE

Hammond B-3 acclaimed ambassador! Thursday, June 1 • 7 pm

Chucho Valdés $50/$60 6p

Chucho Valdés $50/$60 6p

Karaoke w/Ken 9p Acoustic Soul 7:30-10:30p

Tickets: SnazzyProductions.com

Thursday, May 25 • 7 pm | No Comps

Karaoke 10p

KUUMBWA 320-2 Cedar St, Santa Cruz

THE BOBS FAREWELL SHOW

CHUCHO VALDES: SOLO

Benton St Blues Band Flingo 8p

Tickets: eventbrite.com

UCSC JAZZ ENSEMBLES DIRECTED BY KARLTON HESTER & CHARLES HAMILTON

Open Bluegrass Jam 6p Waco Brothers $15 9p

Spun, Spazztics $10 8p

ANAIS MITCHELL

KPIG Happy Hour 5:30-7:30p Dan P & the Bricks, Wasabi $10 9p

Scotts Valley High School $7 2p Dangerman $10 7p

Wednesday, May 17 • 8:30 pm

Thursday, May 18 • 7 pm

Bulletproof Heart 6:30-9:30p

Samba Cruz 6-9p

THE FISH HOUSE 972 Main St, Watsonville HENFLING’S 9450 Hwy 9, Ben Lomond

SAT

Celebrating Creativity Since 1975

Beat Street 8-11p

Grateful Sundays Concert Series 2-3p

Kid Anderson and John Blues Boyd 6:30-8:30p

JAYME STONE’S FOLKLIFE: THE LOMAX PROJECT

Appalachian ballads and more from folklorist and field recording legend Alan Lomax 1/2 PRICE NIGHT FOR STUDENTS Monday, June 5 • 7:30 pm At the Rio Theatre | No Comps or Gift Cert.

JEAN-LUC PONTY ELECTRIC FUSION “THE ATLANTIC YEARS” Thursday, June 8 • 7 pm

AMINA FIGAROVA

DownBeat Rising Star Composer Three Years in a Row! 1/2 PRICE NIGHT FOR STUDENTS Monday, June 12 • 7 and 9 pm | No Comps

DJANGO FESTIVAL ALL-STARS Keeping the flame of gypsy jazz burning strong!

Wednesday, June 14 • 7 pm | Free

MASTER CLASS: DAVE EGAN UKULELE ERGONOMICS Bring you ukes!

Thursday, June 15 • 7 and 9 pm | No Comps Four-time Grammy winning bass virtuoso! Monday, June 19 • 7 pm

AMBROSE AKINMUSIRE QUARTET

Acclaimed trumpeter celebrates new double album: A Rift in Decorum: Live at the Village Vanguard

SUMMER JAZZ CAMP

June 19 – 29 @ Cabrillo College Grades 8 – 12 Register online at: kuumbwajazz.org Unless noted advance tickets at kuumbwajazz.org and Logos Books & Records. Dinner served one hour before Kuumbwa presented concerts. Premium wines & beer. All ages welcome.

320-2 Cedar St | Santa Cruz 831.427.2227 kuumbwajazz.org

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 17-23, 2017

STANLEY CLARKE BAND

47


1011 PACIFIC AVE. SANTA CRUZ 831-429-4135

LIVE MUSIC

Wednesday, May 17 • Ages 16+

LARRY JUNE

plus J Worthy

Thursday, May 18 • In the Atrium • Ages16+

JACK INGRAM

plus Jamie Lin Wilson

Friday, May 19 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

NIGHT RIOTS

Saturday, May 20 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

THE FRIGHTS • HUNNY

Sunday, May 21 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

RADIATE SANTA CRUZ

Tuesday, May 23 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

STELLAR CORPSES

plus Gutter Demons

May 24 Robin Trower (Ages 21+) May 24 Ab-Soul Atrium (Ages 16+) May 25 Sleepy Sun Atrium (Ages 16+) May 26 Miguel Mateos (Ages 16+) May 27 Jurassic 5 (Ages 16+) May 28 Alborosie/ Yellowman (Ages 16+) Jun 1 T.I. (Ages 16+) Jun 4 Santa Cruz Pride Show w/ Dev (Ages 16+) Jun 9 XXXTentacion (Ages 16+) Jun 16 Corey Feldman (Ages 16+) Jun 19 Raekwon (Ages 16+) Jun 20 Suicide Girls Blackheart Burlesque (Ages 21+) Jun 22 The Crystal Method (Ages 16+) Jun 24 P-Lo/ Rexx Life Raj (Ages 16+) Jun 27 Galactic (All Ages) Jul 7 Justin Martin (Ages 18+) Jul 8 Foreverland (Ages 16+) Jul 15 Tour de Fat (Ages 21+) Jul 16 Khalid (Ages 16+) Jul 18 Reel Big Fish (Ages 21+) Jul 20 Nicolas Jaar (Ages 18+) Jul 31 Taking Back Sunday (Ages 16+) Aug 5 Amadou & Mariam (Ages 16+) Aug 28 Fidlar (Ages 16+)

WED

MAY 17-23, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

48

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

STAND-UP COMEDY

Three live comedians every Sunday night.

HAPPY HOUR

Mon–Fri from 3:30pm. Wednesday all night!

VISIT OUR BEACH MARKET

Wood-fired pizza, ice cream, unique fine gifts.

DEAL WITH A VIEW

$9.95 dinners Mon.-Fri. from 6:00pm.

NOW SERVING BREAKFAST

Open for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Daily

(831) 476-4560

crowsnest-santacruz.com

5/19

SAT

5/20

SUN

5/21

Shane Dwight 1p Virgil Thrasher 5p

Dennis Herrera & Sid Morris 6p

MOE’S ALLEY 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz

Anuhea, Tenelle $20/$25 8p

Vetiver, Jesse Sykes $15/$17 8p

Blackalicious $17/$20 8p

SambaDá $15/$20 8p

Soltron, Changui Majadero $8/$12 8p

MOTIV 1209 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Space Bass w/Andrew the Pirate 9:30p-2a

Libation Lab w/ Syntax 9:30p-2a

Trevor Williams 9:30p-2a

Brandon Fox 9:30p-2a

Rasta Cruz Reggae Party 9:30p-Close

MON

5/22

Rob Vye 6p

99 BOTTLES 110 Walnut Ave, Santa Cruz

Trivia 8p

Jake Nielsen 10p Alex Lucero 2-5p

POET & PATRIOT 320 E. Cedar St, Santa Cruz

Dave Muldawer 2-5p Speakeasy 3 9p

Dolce Musica 2-5p

Snap Dragon 9p

Comedy Open Mic 8p

THE RED 200 Locust St, Santa Cruz

Open Mic 8-11:30p ‘Geeks Who Drink’ Trivia Night 8p

Toby Gray Acoustic Classics 6:30p

RIO THEATRE 1205 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz ROSIE MCCANN’S 1220 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

5/23

Tacos & Trivia 6-8p

PARADISE BEACH 215 Esplanade, Capitola

THE REEF 120 Union St, Santa Cruz

TUE

Ben Rice Trio 6p

Hip-Hop w/DJ Marc 9:30p-Close

NEW BOHEMIA BREWERY 1030 41st Ave, Santa Cruz

Wednesday Comedy Night 9p

Good Times Ad, Wed. 05/17

See live music grid for this week’s bands.

FRI

Lloyd Whitley 6p

www.catalystclub.com

Amazing waterfront deck views.

5/18

Harlis Sweetwater 6p

Unless otherwise noted, all shows are dance shows with limited seating.

LOCATED ON THE BEACH

THU

Broken Shades 6p

Tickets subject to city tax & service charge by phone 877-987-6487 & online

A thing of beauty since 1969.

5/17

MISSION ST. BBQ 1618 Mission St, Santa Cruz

Moshe Vilozny Acoustic/World 6:30p

Traditional Hawaiian Music 6:30p

Brunch Grooves 12:30p Featured Acoustic 6:30p

‘Proximity’ Screening $12 8p

House of Floyd $25/$40 8p

Brunch Grooves 1:30p Chas Cmusic Krowd Karaoke 6p

Acoustic Classics 6:30p

James Murray Soulful Acoustic 6:30p

Open Mic 7:30p


LIVE MUSIC WED

5/17

THE SAND BAR 211 Esplanade, Capitola

THU

5/18

FRI

5/19

Billy Martini 7-11p

SAT

5/20

Joint Chiefs 8p-Midnight

SANDERLINGS 1 Seascape Resort, Aptos

Sambassa 8-11p

SEABRIGHT BREWERY 519 Seabright, Santa Cruz

Vinny Johnson Band 6:30-10:30p Don McCaslin & the Amazing Jazz Geezers 6-10p

Chain of Fools 7:30-11:30p

Soulwise 8-11:30p

SHADOWBROOK 1750 Wharf Rd, Capitola

Ken Constable 6:30-9:30p

Joe Ferrara 6:30-10p

Claudio Melega 7-10p

MON

Jesse Sabala Pro Jam 7-11p

5/22

Alex Lucre 7-11p

TUE

5/23

El Dub 7-11p

TBD 6-9p

Dan Walsh 5p

Open Mic w/Steven David 5:30p

WHALE CITY 490 Highway 1, Davenport

Robert Elmond Stone 5:30-7:30p Reverend Love Johnes & the Sinners 1-5:30p

WHARF HOUSE 1400 Wharf Rd, Capitola YOUR PLACE 1719 Mission St, Santa Cruz

5/21

Yuji and Steve 8-11p

SEVERINO’S BAR & GRILL 7500 Old Dominion Court, Aptos

UGLY MUG 4640 Soquel Ave, Soquel

SUN

Daniel Martins 9-11p

Daniel Martins 9-11p

ZELDA’S 203 Esplanade, Capitola

Daniel Martins 9-11p

Daniel Martins 9-11p

John Michael Band 9:30p

B4Dawn 9:30p

Aki Kumar

1-5:30p

We’ll get you biking.

The BOBs

Fri, May 19

7:30 pm $25 Gen. Adv. $32 Gold Circle

Kuumbwa

Rio Theatre

Sat, May 27

7:30 pm $30 Gen. Adv. $45 Gold Circle

Kuumbwa

Sister Tiny?

Jerry and Eliott Kay open

Fri, June 23

7:30 pm $26 Gen. Adv. $40 Gold Circle

Follow the Rio Theatre on Facebook & Twitter! 831.423.8209 www.riotheatre.com

Rio Theatre

The Southern gentleman from Mississippi and long time KPIG favorite! Kuumbwa

Fri, July 21

7:30 pm $26 Gen. Adv. $40 Gold Circle

Snazzy at Don Quixote’s Thur, May 25 7:30pm Thur, June 29 7:30pm

Phoebe Hunt and the Gatherers The Austin Lounge Lizards

$15 Adv/ $15 Door $20 Adv/ $20 Door

Sun, May 28

Dirty Cello Duo

$20 Adv/ $23 Door

7:00pm

Snazzy at the Ugly Mug

Events. Resources. Services. ecoactbike.org

She's still gettin' it done:

Sats noon-6pm & Suns 8a-2p (pdt)

jiveradio.org

on Free Form Schizoclectic Radio

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 17-23, 2017

Fri, June 16

MAY 19 Film: Taylor Steele’s Proximity MAY 20 House of Floyd MAY 25 Film: I Am Jane Doe MAY 27 Rodney Crowell MAY 30 Poptone MAY 31 Deva Premal and Miten JUN 01 Mandel Lecture JUN 02 Jesse Colin Young JUN 03 Film: Hope Dances JUN 05 Jean-Luc Ponty JUN 07 Joan Osborne JUN 08 Life on Mars JUN 10 Hurray for the Riff Raff JUN 21 Jerry Jeff Walker & Tim Flannery JUN 23 Paul Thorn JUN 26 Cat Power JUL 01 Cuddlefish AUG 01 10,000 Maniacs AUG 26 Beggar Kings SEP 22 Banff Mountain Film SEP 27 Apocalyptica OCT 14 Josh Garrels OCT 15 Snatam Kaur FEB 09 Bruce Cockburn

Remember KFAT Radio's

A recent addition to the Living Legend Club. Special Guest Joe Robinson

7:30 pm $25 Gen. Adv. $40 Gold Circle

Upcoming Shows

49


FILM

MR. FIX-IT Richard Gere as a small-time fixer who gets a taste of real power in ‘Norman.’

Web Master MAY 17-23, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Small-time hustler goes big in droll, uneven ‘Norman’ BY LISA JENSEN

50

I

t’s a trope as old as the movies— and Jewish culture in New York. Everybody has an uncle or an in-law who specializes in connecting people to other people who might be able to do each other a favor some time. It’s the thrill of adding people as the web of connections becomes more intricately tangled that makes these usually small-time operators feel like big shots. But what would happen if somebody involved in this roundelay of minor obligations suddenly came into a position of real power? How would that reverberate throughout the web—especially for the webmaster who constructed the whole thing? That’s the question posed by Norman, a droll, offbeat dramatic comedy of truth and

consequences written and directed by New York-born Israeli filmmaker Joseph Cedar. It stars Richard Gere as a dealmaking, old-school New York “fixer” who gets in way over his head. We first meet Norman Oppenheimer (Gere) trying to jumpstart some shady-sounding financial scheme. It’s a confusing way to start the movie, but the details of this particular scheme aren’t important; all that matters is seeing Norman in action. Against his better judgment, his nephew, Philip (Michael Sheen) supplies his wheedling uncle with one bit of information, which sends Norman to Central Park at the crack of dawn to stalk a financial investor (Dan Stevens) on his morning run. Roaming the city streets in a snapbrim cap, long coat, and muffler,

earbuds constantly plugged into his phone, Norman doesn’t seem to actually live anywhere; he’s always on the move, looking for his next opportunity. (His business card reads “Oppenheimer: Strategies.”) One afternoon, he buddies up to a minor Israeli diplomat, Micah Eshel (Lior Ashkenazi) that somebody in his web wants to meet. That meeting fails to happen, but in the course of the hour or so they spend together, Norman insists on buying Eschel an expensive pair of shoes. (Shoes that will “last longer than the government I serve,” sighs Eshel, referring to his beleaguered party back home.) Yet three years later, Eshel has become the Prime Minister of Israel. To Norman’s amazement, Eshel remembers him fondly when he

goes to the reception at the New York consulate, introducing Norman to so many influential people that Norman has to whip out his everpresent yellow legal pad and scribble down all their names and who they know on his way home. But fortunes rise and fall as truth becomes ever more complicated and elusive. Players in the unfolding drama include Alex (Charlotte Gainsbourg), who’s investigating possible corruption in Eshel’s ties to New York, and Rabbi Blumenthal (Steve Buscemi), leader of Norman’s synagogue, who needs Norman’s help when their temple is facing eviction. Suddenly Norman finds himself where he thought he’s always wanted to be—right in the middle—but not necessarily in a good way. Gere is effective as Norman. Well-meaning, but annoying in his relentless drive to link people up (“It’s the third time in five minutes you’ve tried to introduce me to someone,” Alex tells him), he’s desperate to embroider any chance remark or random encounter into a fantasy of significance and personal relationships that does not actually exist. When Eshel’s people stop taking his calls, they decide to brand him as a “delusional name-dropper.” (Hmm, sound like anyone else we know in the public eye?) Ashkenazi is terrific as Eshel— debonair and determined to embrace compromise to keep himself and his agenda afloat. (He starred in the fine 2001 Israeli drama Late Marriage, about a thirtysomething bachelor involved with a Moroccan divorcee whose parents are pressuring him to marry a virgin.) Norman has some sharp, sly moments, but the pacing often unravels over two hours, especially when focus shifts to complicated Israeli politics. Filmmaker Cedar tries to jazz it up with split-screen and other busy techniques, but the story feels a bit hollow. As sympathetic as Gere often is, his character is written as an empty archetype, who can’t quite sustain the whole movie. NORMAN **1/2 With Richard Gere, Lior Ashkenazi, Michael Sheen, and Steve Buscemi. Written and directed by Joseph Cedar. A Sony Classics release. Rated PG-13. 118 minutes.


MOVIE TIMES

May 17-23

All times are PM unless otherwise noted.

DEL MAR THEATRE

831.469.3220

Fifty years ago, one woman fought for the people of New York City.

FASCINATING…

Pulses with contemporary resonance.” -Variety

BORN IN CHINA Wed-Thu 2:50 Fri-Tue 2:30 Daily 4:50 + Sat-Sun 12:20 COLOSSAL Daily 7:20 + Wed 9:45

“A genuine David and Goliath story. Citizen Jane is the film that Jane Jacobs deserves.”

LANDMARK THEATRES landmarktheatres.com/santa-cruz

The DEL MAR 1124 Pacific Ave . Santa Cruz Showtimes and Information (831) 359-4447

.

-Musée Magazine

EVERYTHING, EVERYTHING Thu 7:10, 9:30 Fri-Tue 2:20, 4:40, 7;10, 9:30 + Sat-Sun 12:00pm FIXER Daily 1:40, 4:20, 7:00, 9:40 + Sat-Sun 11:10am NORMAN: MODERATE RISE AND TRAGIC FALL OF A NEW YORK

(PG13) CC, DVS

(2:20, 4:40), 7:10, 9:30 + Sat, Sun (12:00)

THE WALL Wed-Tue 1:45, 4:25, 7:10, 9:50 Fri-Tue 9:45 MY NEIGHBOR TOTORO Fri-Sat 11:59pm

Richard Gere in

NORMAN:

NICKELODEON

STARTS FRIDAY!

831.426.7500

Daily: (2:10, 4:50) 7:10, 9:20 Plus Sat-Sun: (11:50am) ( ) at discount

CITIZEN JANE: BATTLE FOR THE CITY Fri-Tue 2:10, 4:50, 7:10, 9:20 + Sat-Sun 11:50am THE DINNER Wed-Thu 1:50, 4:30, 7:10*, 9:35 *No Wed show

(1:45, 4:20), 7:00, 9:40 + Sat, Sun (11:10am) Disneynature

BORN IN CHINA (G) CC DVS (2:30, 4:50) + Sat, Sun (12:20)

THE LOST CITY OF Z Daily 1:00, 4:00, 7:00*, 9:50 *No Tue show

COLOSSAL (R) CC Nightly* 7:20

THEIR FINEST Daily 2:00, 4:40, 7:15, 9:40* + Sat-Sun 11:30am *No Tue show

*no show 5/24 & 5/25

THE WALL (R) CC DVS

A QUIET PASSION Daily 1:40, 4:20, 7:05, 9:45 + Sat-Sun 11:00am

Nightly* 9:45 *no show 5/25

ROYAL OPERA HOUSE PRESENTS: JEWELS Tue 7:00

GREEN VALLEY CINEMA 8

THE MODERATE RISE AND TRAGIC FALL OF A NEW YORK FIXER (R) CC, DVS

831.761.8200

ALIEN: COVENANT Thu 7:00, 10:00 Fri-Tue 1:30, 4:20, 7:10, 10:00 + Sat-Sun 10:40am THE BOSS BABY Wed-Thu 1:15 + Wed 3:45, 6:15 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: THE LONG HAUL Thu 5:00, 7:15, 9:30 Fri-Tue 1:15, 3:45, 6:45, 9:15 + Sat-Sun 10:45am EVERYTHING, EVERYTHING Thu 5:00, 7:15, 9:30 Fri-Tue 1:45, 4:15, 7:00, 10:00 + Sat-Sun 11:15am THE FATE OF THE FURIOUS Wed 12:30, 3:35, 6:40, 9:45 + Thu 12:30 GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY: VOL. 2 Daily 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 9:45 + Wed-Thu 2:15 + Wed 5:15, 8:15 HOW TO BE A LATIN LOVER (ENGLISH) Wed-Thu 2:55, 8:35 Fri-Tue 1:30, 9:45 HOW TO BE A LATIN LOVER (SPANISH) Daily 4:15, 7:00 + Wed-Thu 1:30, 9:45 + Sat-Sun 10:45am

$3

2017

OFF

Pancake Breakfast, Basic Burger

$2

OFF

Basic Breakfast Exp. 5/26/17 Tues-Fri with coupon

Open Tues–Sun, 7-2:30p

819 pacific ave., santa cruz 427.0646

KING ARTHUR: LEGEND OF THE SWORD Daily 1:30, 4:20, 7:10, 10:00 + Sat-Sun 10:40am

Thursday 5/25 at 7:00pm

(NR)

Midnights @ The Del Mar Friday & Saturday @ Midnight (G)

in Japanese w/ English subtitles Next Week: Kiki’s Delivery Service in Japanese w/ English subtitles

The NICK

210 Lincoln St . Santa Cruz Showtimes and Information (831) 359-4523

KING ARTHUR: LEGEND OF THE SWORD 3D Wed-Thu 5:45

.

LOWRIDERS Fri-Tue 2:15, 4:45, 7:30, 10:00 + Sat-Sun 11:45am

CINELUX SCOTTS VALLEY CINEMA

(NR) CC

(2:10, 4:50), 7:10, 9:20 + Sat, Sun (11:50am) 831.438.3260

A QUIET PASSION (PG13) (1:40, 4:20), 7:05, 9:45 + Sat, Sun (11:00am)

Call theater for showtimes.

THE LOST CITY OF Z

CINELUX 41ST AVENUE CINEMA 831.479.3504 Call theater for showtimes.

REGAL SANTA CRUZ 9

THEIR FINEST (R) CC DVS

Delicious and Authentic

844.462.7342

Call theater for showtimes.

(2:00, 4:40), 7:15, 9:40* + Sat, Sun (11:30am) *no show 5/23

Royal Opera House

JEWELS (NR) Tuesday 5/23 at 7:00pm Subscribe FilmClub.LandmarkTheatres.com LandmarkTheatres.com/GiftCards

Call theater for showtimes.

REGAL RIVERFRONT STADIUM 2

(PG13) CC

(1:10, 4:00), 7:00*, 9:50 *no show 5/23

844.462.7342

Brunch Sat & Sun 10am–Noon 831.477.9384 655 Capitola Rd, Santa Cruz

( ) at Discount NP = No Passes CC = Closed Captioning DVS = Descriptive Video Services

VALID 5/19/17 - 5/25/17

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 17-23, 2017

SNATCHED Daily 1:00, 3:15, 5:30, 7:45, 10:00 + Sat-Sun 10:45am

51


FILM NEW THIS WEEK ALIEN: COVENANT This might be the sixth movie in the Alien franchise, but heck, with so many good looking people on one spaceship sent to colonize the new planet, there might be some new plot twists possible here. Wait, who even cares, we’re just here for the aliens. Ridley Scott directs. Michael Fassbender, Katherine Waterston, Billy Crudup co-star. (R) 162 minutes. CITIZEN JANE: BATTLE FOR THE CITY Robert Moses was the urban planner, wielding absolute power. Jane Jacobs questioned orthodoxy and was treated as a petulant housewife. She fought for the city of New York, for the historic city in an age of redevelopment and she became the voice of a movement. Matt Tyrnauer directs. Thomas Campanella, Mindy Fullilove, Alexander Garvin co-star. (NR) 92 minutes.

MAY 17-23, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: THE LONG HAUL This is what happens when the kids take over. Parents, beware. David Bowers directs. Alicia Silverstone, Tom Everett Scott, Charlie Wright co-star. (PG) 90 minutes.

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EVERYTHING, EVERYTHING Her nurse, her mom, her sickness were her whole life. If she left the house, she would die. So, of course, she leaves because the boy next door is cute. Stella Meghie directs. Amandla Stenberg, Nick Robinson, Anika Noni Rose co-star. (PG-13) 96 minutes. SPECIAL SCREENINGS: Long Strange Trip 7 p.m., Thursday, May 25. Del Mar Theatre, 1124 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. My Neighbor Totoro, Midnight, Friday, May 20 & Saturday, May 21. Del Mar Theatre. Royal Opera House “Jewels,” 7 p.m., Tuesday, May 23. The Nickelodeon, 210 Lincoln St., Santa Cruz. CONTINUING EVENT: LET’S TALK ABOUT THE MOVIES Film buffs are invited Wednesday nights at 7 p.m. to downtown Santa Cruz, where each week the group discusses a different current release. For location and

discussion topic, go to https:// groups.google.com/group/LTATM.

NOW PLAYING BEAUTY AND THE BEAST This live-action adaptation of the fairytale classic might sound pointless to you, but to Disney it sounds like “ka-ching!” Bill Condon directs. Emma Watson, Dan Stevens, Luke Evans co-star. (PG) 129 minutes. BORN IN CHINA Disneynature tracks China’s incredible wildlife from the Qinghai Plateau to the Sichuan Mountains and offers a rare glimpse into the lives of pandas, monkeys, and snow leopards—oh my! Chuan Lu directs. John Krasinski, Xun Zhou co-star. (G) 76 minutes. THE BOSS BABY I want to hate this animated kid’s movie about a talking baby, because all movies about talking babies should be hated. But I’ve seen the trailer a zillion times now (give or take), and I have to admit Alec Baldwin doing his Jack Donaghy character from 30 Rock (basically) in baby form is pretty funny. (PG) 97 minutes. THE CIRCLE The Circle tech company is saving humanity, curing every disease and solving every problem. But the Circle is also watching you at every moment. Everything you do is recorded, seen, broadcast, stored and analyzed. Hearts be still, Dave Eggers fans. James Ponsoldt directs. Emma Watson, Tom Hanks, John Boyega co-star. (PG-13) 110 minutes. COLOSSAL Oh no, there’s a giant monster and its hugely destructive behavior is related to Anne Hathaway’s mental breakdown. Help us. Nacho Vigalondo directs. Anne Hathaway, Jason Sudeikis, Austin Stowell co-star. (R) 110 minutes. THE DINNER What begins as an unassuming dinner between two couples quickly devolves into a downward spiral of family secrets hinging on questions of right and wrong. What did their sons do, and who should pay the price? Oren Moverman directs. Richard Gere,

Laura Linney, Steve Coogan costar. (R) 120 minutes. THE FATE OF THE FURIOUS Every muscular bald action star ever, and Charlize Theron with some twist dreads y’all. F. Gary Gray directs. Dwayne Johnson, Scott Eastwood co-star. (PG-13) 136 minutes. GET OUT White suburbs: the real hell. Jordan Peele directs. Allison Williams, Daniel Kaluuya, Lakeith Stanfield co-star. (R) 103 minutes. GIFTED Mary’s a precocious, sassy, seven-year-old with a college-level brain. She’s already doing advanced calculus, but her uncle promised her late mother that he’d give Mary a normal life. When he’s drawn into a custody battle with Mary’s grandmother, the question of nurturing Mary’s genius instead of her happiness becomes the dividing line. Marc Webb directs. Chris Evans, Mckenna Grace, Lindsay Duncan co-star. (PG-13) 101 minutes. GOING IN STYLE Their bank accounts are dwindling, their pensions are frozen, the banks screwed them over and Jojo chose Chase. What else is there for a trio of octogenarians to do but become vigilante bank robbers? Zach Braff directs. Joey King, Morgan Freeman, Ann-Margret co-star. (PG-13) 96 minutes. GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY VOL. 2 The fate of the universe lies on Baby Groot’s shoulders. The universe is screwed. James Gunn directs. Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana, Dave Bautista co-star. (PG-13) 136 minutes. HOW TO BE A LATIN LOVER Maximo used to be quite the stud, seducing women left and right. But when his wife of 25 years dumps him and leaves him penniless, he has to figure out a new game plan. Here’s to hoping this Casanova tale isn’t a super problematic reinforcement of women as mindless conquests. Ken Marino directs. Eugenio Derbez, Salma Hayek, Rob Lowe co-star. (PG13) 115 minutes. KING ARTHUR: LEGEND OF THE SWORD The story of Arthur before he pulled the sword

from the stone and became the legendary king—with a perfectly scruffed yet dashingly trimmed undercut, duh (cue eye roll). The new Arthur’s got an arsenal of nerd-out-worthy special effects, and with Jude Law as the expertly cast power-hungry king, it might be the most badass rendition of the classic tale ever told. At least, that’s what director Guy Ritchie thinks. Charlie Hunnam and Astrid Bergès-Frisbey co-star. (PG-13) 126 minutes. LOGAN The X-Men franchise gets gritty for this supposedly last time out for Hugh Jackman as Wolverine and Patrick Stewart as Xavier. The long-awaited story about Logan’s badass prodigy already has a 9.5 out of 10 rating on IMDB. James Mangold directs. Hugh Jackman, Patrick Stewart co-star. (R) 137 minutes. THE LOST CITY OF Z A hidden civilization thought not to exist, and one British explorer crazy enough to go looking for it. James Gray directs. Charlie Hunnam, Robert Pattinson, Sienna Miller costar. (PG-13) 141 minutes. LOWRIDERS Getting to the heart of L.A.’s lowrider car culture, Lowriders follows a street artist trying to break away from his father’s obsession and find a way to be true to his talent. Ricardo de Montreuil directs. Gabriel Chavarria, Demián Bichir, Elgin James co-star. (PG-13) 99 minutes. MY ENTIRE HIGH SCHOOL SINKING INTO THE SEA High school as a colorful, yet flat, animated hellscape in the style of what you might’ve scrawled on the back of your notebook in fourth period chemistry class. Jason Schwartzman, Lena Dunham, Reggie Watts, Maya Rudolph and Susan Sarandon voice the weird characters who fight for survival after their high school indeed begins sinking into the sea. Dash Shaw directs. (PG-13) 75 minutes. NORMAN Reviewed this issue. Joseph Cedar directs. Gere, Lior Ashkenazi, Michael Sheen co-star. (R) 118 minutes.

A QUIET PASSION “You are alone in your rebellion, Ms. Dickinson.” And indeed, from her time as a defiant schoolgirl to a brazen woman who would not kneel to God or man, Emily Dickinson was. But, as Cynthia Nixon depicts, her aloneness had more to do with being out of step with the world and more in tune with the universe. Terence Davies directs. Jennifer Ehle and Duncan Duff co-star. (PG13) 125 minutes. SMURFS: THE LOST VILLAGE This is what happens when you have a colony full of dudes in tight white pants and only one female. Kelly Asbury directs. Ariel Winter, Michelle Rodriguez, Joe Manganiello co-star. (PG) 89 minutes. SNATCHED Vacationing with your mother when your boyfriend has just dumped you can be somewhat stifling, even if she is Goldie Hawn. But thankfully, things get all kinds of exciting when Amy Schumer and Hawn get out of their hotel room and into a … kidnap situation. Jonathan Levine directs. Kim Caramele co-stars. (R) 91 minutes. THEIR FINEST When bombs are dropping from above, how do you escape reality? It’s 1940 England at the height of the Blitz, and Catrin needs a story to capture the nation—so, doggone it, she and the rest of the Ministry of Information will find one. Lone Scherfig directs. Gemma Arterton, Sam Claflin, Bill Nighy co-star. (R) 117 minutes. THE WALL Two American soldiers are trapped in a lethal stalemate with a sniper, and their only protection is a shoddy brick wall. Doug Liman directs. Aaron TaylorJohnson, John Cena, Laith Nakli co-star. (R) 81 minutes. THE ZOOKEEPER’S WIFE It seems like Jessica Chastain has been in pretty much every movie for years now, but this time she tackles something very different in this true story of a zookeeper in 1939 Poland who puts herself and her family at risk to save lives in the Nazi-ruled Warsaw ghetto. (PG-13) 124 minutes.


YOUTH ACTIVITIES Experience the beauty of clay

2017 SUMMER CAMPS BASEBALL CAMPS

Santa Cruz Baseball School offers a variety of week-long camps for ages 614 at Polo Grounds County Park, including pitching, hitting, and fielding. All skill levels are welcome.

A RT & S CIENCE C AMPS Held @ Aptos Village Park for ages 6-12. Renaissance Camp - Hands-on art & science instruction every day, plus out-of-county field trip, games, sports, cooking, music, and an open-house! Art Studio 95003 & Science Explorations Art is held from 9AM-12PM, Science from 1-5 PM; supervised lunchtime provided for kids enrolled in both programs.

SUMMER CLAY CAMPS Teen and preteen 8-12 years old sessions offered June 12th - August 17th. goodlifeceramics.com 831 515 7560 3717 Portola Dr, SC

CAPITOLA RECREATION

CAMP CAPITOLA

ct us Conta Free for a ss! Cla

A fun day camp at Jade Street Park for kids ages 6-11. Sports, arts & crafts, beach days, drama, clubs, carnivals, theme weeks & more! We offer half-day care (mornings or afternoons) or all-day care, with extended care hours.

Sing, Dance, Play, Learn!

Z OMBIE C AMP ! Have fun while learning how to find or build shelter, shoot an arrow, forage for edibles and identify plants, locate safe drinking water, pack a bug-out bag, develop emergency plans, and administer first aid! At Aptos Village Park for ages 11-14.

RECREATION CLASSES

Spring Classes: April thru June with UNLIMITED make-ups!

Enrolling now for kids and adults classes! Martial Arts, Tennis, Guitar, Sailing, Dancing, Zumba, Language, Watercolor, Mosaics & More!

Sign up for Music Together this semester and sing, wiggle and jam along with your baby, toddler, or preschooler for 45 minutes every week. Save a spot for your family at a class near you! Register today!

Register NOW at www.scparks.com. For info. please call (831) 454-7941.

For more information: 475.5935 www.cityofcapitola.org/recreation LIKE US ON FACEBOOK! www.facebook.com/capitola.recreation

Ben Lomond • Capitola • Pleasure Point Santa Cruz • Scotts Valley • Watsonville

Santa Cruz Soccer Camp

musicalme.com • (831) 438-3514

Learn the

Art of Fashion CAMP CATWALK SUMMER FASHION CAMPS Register Soon!

A magical experience taught by Fashion Professional Carmella Weintraub.

Over 100 Summer Camps for ages 5 to 17!

Science, Technology, & Digital Fabrication

Over 30 Summers of Soccer Fun!!! 246-1517 www.santacruzsoccercamp.com

Baking & Cooking Leadership & Academic Enrichment Sports Camps

Register online www.cabrillo-extension.org For more information call 831.479.6331

Ages 8-14, Santa Cruz 10-2pm Mon-Fri CAMP FASHION DESIGNER Beg-Intermediate (July 24-28) Beg-Intermediate (July 31-Aug 4)

Dance & Music

REDUCED FEES FOR REGISTRATION BEFORE JUNE 5TH Check our web page for class details, dates, and pricing!

25 years Experience. Sewing, branding, Fashion, Drawing, and Fun!

CAMP TEXTILE DESIGNER Beg-Intermediate (August 7-11)

GREAT FUTURES GREAT FUTURES GREAT STARTFUTURES HERE GREAT STARTFUTURES HERE START HERE START HERE

For more info, email carmella@got.net 831-423-8879 - Carmella Weintraub campcatwalkdesignandsewingacademy.com

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 17-23, 2017

Visual Arts & Digital Media

53


&

FOOD & DRINK

FIXING DESSERT Buttercup Cakes and Farmhouse Frosting is now offering savory items to complement its

famous desserts. PHOTO: KEANA PARKER

Farmhouse Lunch MAY 17-23, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Lunch at Buttercup, a flan to write home about, and a few must-stops in South County BY MARIA GRUSAUSKAS

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ith its checkered tile floor and dreamlike display of otherworldly confections, Buttercup Cakes and Farmhouse Frosting is one of those special places to take your friends and family when they come to town, as well as a saving grace for anyone in charge of bringing the dessert. Which is why I was pleasantly surprised to find myself there last week, eating a salad, of all things, on my lunch break. The Salad Medley ($8) on Buttercup’s recently installed lunch menu is a heap of fresh greens and thinly sliced fennel and cabbage, and a seasonal menagerie of toppings

that included, on this particular day: slices of ripe, sweet strawberries, candied almonds, Gorgonzola, and pickled beets. Buttercup’s salads are boxed—with the toppings and a light apple cider vinaigrette packed separately to avoid mushiness—and ready to go to the park, beach, or (hopefully not) back to the office. Its “Toast of the Town” offerings are made with Kelly’s French Bakery sourdough bread, and include a vegan beet hummus ($8) or cured salmon and herbed cream cheese ($9) option. But back to Buttercup’s main attraction. A thrilling discovery:

the 50-percent-off “Misfits” bakery case. Seriously, there was nothing aesthetically wrong with the large ginger cupcake crowned with Buttercup’s signature voluptuous dollop of handcrafted chocolate frosting and candied ginger ($2.25), but if there had been, it would be forgotten at first bite. Brunch available from 10 a.m.2:30 p.m. Friday-Sunday and lunch 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday. farmhousefrosting.com.

SOUTH COUNTY HIGHLIGHTS

After hiking in the serene Byrne Milliron forest on the outskirts of

Corralitos, a friend and I stopped at Windy Oaks Winery on the idyllic Hazel Dell Road. We tasted several acclaimed Pinots, and found the 2014 Estate Wood Tank ($58), fermented in French Oak, to be our favorite. The dry and refreshing 2015 Bastide La Combe Rosé ($19)—made from 100-percent Grenache grapes grown in the Cedar Lane vineyard in Arroyo Seco was also a highlight on that hot day. I recommend the hike, the wine stop, and continuing into Watsonville on Casserly Road, which turns into East Lake Avenue. Stay in the right lane and keep an eye out for the towering Santa Fe Market sign, then throw on your blinker, grab your shopping bag, and save on a vast selection of inexpensively priced produce (five avocados for $5) and traditional Mexican ingredients, like a 4-pound bag of dried beans for 99 cents, dried chiles, spices, and Jamaica for iced tea. Prepared hot foods satisfy more immediately: a hot, double-corn tortilla taco of carnitas will set you back $1.69, and is a filling flavor bomb of cilantro, spicy salsa, and lime wedges. Or, take home a pint of creamy refried beans, and definitely do not miss the selection of more than a dozen salsas—the pico de gallo and salsa de guacamole took my lunches to the next level all week. If you’re hungry now and have time to spare, stop at Taqueria Tecoman, on the left just past Santa Fe Market. Here, an order of sopes ($8) will fill you up for hours with two hand-shaped rounds of thick masa layered with refried beans, tomato, crema, Cotija cheese and your choice of meat (shredded chicken goes well.)

DESSERT OF THE WEEK On the spectrum of flan—which seems to travel from light and eggcentric to floury cake-like slabs— the one made in-house at Jaguar on Soquel Avenue falls in the heavenly balance. A medium-bodied custard served in a sublime pool of orange glaze and accented with citrus twists. It’s not the only reason to visit the cozy hole in the wall formerly occupied by Lillian’s, but it’s an unforgettable highlight.


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n Friday afternoons, a mouth-watering array of dishes, regional cuisines and snacks from Latin American countries line two sides of the Watsonville City Plaza, which is crowded with cross-generational community members and lately, one North County food writer. With so many enticing smells wafting down the corridor, it can be difficult to decide where to go first. When in doubt, I always look for the longest line as an indicator of impending deliciousness, which, on a recent, exceptionally warm spring day led me to a stall offering ice cold drinks. The most popular option was the mangonada—almost every person in front of me was walking away with a cold, sunny drink of chopped mango and lime spiced generously with chili and finished with a straw rolled in tamarind powder and a healthy squirt of Tapatio. But the weather is hot enough without adding to the furnace, so I order a tejuino, a sugary

cooler made from fermented corn. My straw slid through the shaved ice and I tasted sweet corn, lemon and brown sugar. Thirst quenched, I peeked into the Oaxacan stall and saw a woman grilling masa, and ordered a mamela. The base of this snack is similar to a tortilla, but thicker, chewier and toasted from the grill. It’s topped with frijoles, the wonderful, mozzarellalike queso Oaxaca, and a few spoonfuls of pickled vegetables. For a dollar more, I add a 6-inch quesadilla filled with diced, slippery nopales. Although I’m running out of hands, Noe’s Churros causes me to pause. I watch as a hand-operated machine pulls and cuts the dough into long, thin, ridged doughnuts and drops them into a huge bowl of hot oil, until they’re fried to a golden brown. $1.25 later, I walk away with dessert and mix with the rest of South County in the tree-studded plaza. 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Fridays at Watsonville City Plaza.


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his could be one of my last articles on Zayante Vineyard. Although an abundance of Zayante’s varietals are in wine stores and supermarkets right now, the winery is up for sale—so who knows what changes are afoot when the new owners come in? Winery owners Kathleen StarkeyNolton and Greg Nolton, along with winery co-owner Marion Nolten, have always made affordable wines, and the 2012 Santa Cruz Mountains Zinfandel is no exception. At just under $20, it’s worth the search to get some. Or head to Deluxe Foods in Aptos where the shelves are bursting at the seams with local wines, including those of Zayante Vineyard. Zayante’s Santa Cruz Mountains Estate Zinfandel has earthy aromas of plum and strawberry jam—with a balance of fruit that leaves a lingering finish. The Noltens’ mission has always been to produce “the finest wines in California,” and they’re doing a stellar job. The fascinating Zinfandel grape has many fans, and it’s always a sure-fire hit with anything barbecued—its typical peppery-

jammy aromas and flavors adding lip-smacking spiciness. After the devastating loss of their son three years ago in a motorcycle accident, Kathleen and Greg continued with the winery, producing their quality wine. But now they are moving on, and I wish them well for their future. Zayante Vineyard, 420 Old Mount Road, Felton, 335-7992. zayantevineyards.com.

SUMMER DINNERS Route 1 Farms’ spectacular al fresco dinner events are coming up. June 25 is at Rancho del Oso with Chef Stephen Beaumier of Mutari Chocolate in Santa Cruz, and Richard Alfaro of Alfaro Family Vineyards as the featured winemaker. Aug. 13 is at Rancho del Oso with Chef Jessica Yarr of Assembly in Santa Cruz, and Eric Stockwell of Stockwell Cellars. Sept. 24 is at Ocean Street Extension with Chef Katherine Stern of La Posta in Santa Cruz and Denis Hoey of Odonata Wines. Visit route1farms.com for more info.


H RISA’S STARS BY RISA D’ANGELES AS ABOVE, SO BELOW The Sun and the planets shift about more than usual in the following days, which means more shifting about and activity on Earth. As the outer planets are contacted, we see signs of continued transformations in our world. Mercury and the Sun change signs this week. Mercury left risktaking Aries and entered slow-moving, Taurus (Monday night), sign of the Art of Living. On Saturday, Sun leaves Taurus (comfort) and enters Gemini, sign of the messenger instructing humanity in communication. Friday (possible difficult day) things get all shook up due to interactions between Saturn/ Uranus, Mars/Pluto and Venus/Jupiter. As above in the heavens, so below on Earth. With Saturn trine Uranus (in fiery Sag and Aries), everything that is staid, unmovable, crystallized and locked into place is shocked into instability. Uranus doesn’t allow the old ways to hinder the new ways from forming. Uranus disrupts everything, allowing

new rhythms to take shape. With Mars/Pluto (Gemini/Capricorn), the old world comes tumbling down with a fury! Nothing seems to work. Messages (Gemini) are lost in the rubble. With Venus opposite Jupiter (Aries/ Libra), something new “over there somewhere (opposite us)” appears. We can’t comprehend it, so we ignore or destroy it. But Venus/Jupiter is benevolent, kind and expansive. They bring awareness, love and wisdom to our relationships. Eventually, we allow ourselves to see what new is being introduced. Gradually, we accept and integrate it. We always learn through conflict and chaos. With Sun in Gemini we are more communicative, friendly, sociable, interested and curious to learn about everyone and everything. We gather information and share it.

ARIES Mar21–Apr20

LIBRA Sep23–Oct22

You may be dreaming more often, feeling more instinctive, sometimes confused, sensitive, inspired and insightful. Prayer, meditation, study, contemplation are good for you. They create compassion and a deeply caring way of being. When you find yourself in a group calling you to leadership to help create the future, the needed skills, tools and virtues appear. The new world is what you are to initiate.

Think, visualize and pray daily for all that you want and need your life to be. Include art, creativity and loving relationship partnerships. If you’re not sure of your needs, ask yourself each day, “What are my hopes, dreams and wishes? What are my abilities and gifts?” In the coming months, you become stronger, more resilient. Take cautionary care with money and resources. You need fishes in a fishbowl and an apricot canary.

TAURUS Apr21–May21

SCORPIO Oct23–Nov21

You have one task now—a focus upon health. Tend to joints and bones and your heart, taking more calcium/magnesium, not allowing anxiety or stress, eating calming foods. Swimming in warm salt pools is recommended. Use practicality to care for yourself. You must choose daily—to be out and about socially, leading everyone into the future, or remaining at home, in the garden, building toward perfect health. Begin each day facing the early morning Sun. Eyes wide open.

Use your resources and investments in terms of preparing for the future. Find a forward-thinking money manager. Think seriously about a new economy needing to unfold. It will look much different than our present one. Don’t speculate on the old economy. Consider precious metals. Study books on greenhouses and bio-shelters and the resources needed to create these environments. You then become forward thinking.

Esoteric Astrology as news for week of May 17, 2017

GEMINI May 22–June 20 Something revelatory happens between you and the world, you and work, and you and certain groups. You’re inspired, encouraged and guided. With careful study, years of preparation, and viewing the past in terms of cultivating your gifts, a spiritual pathway opens. Choices and commitments are more easily made, and gratitude settles in your heart. The next festival is the Gemini festival of Goodwill. Plan to participate.

CANCER Jun21–Jul20

LE0 Jul21–Aug22 You’re becoming more perceptive, intuitive and enlightened, and this affects those you work with. Someone, something (words, ideas, memories of someone in particular) will create a shift into greater and deeper awareness of how you have related in previous relationships. Your mind sorts through ideas of intimacy, money, sadness sometimes, and old dreams. Love is good, all the time, even when it hurts, which means you’re learning.

VIRGO Aug23–Sep22 You will relate better with others, especially those close to you, if you offer love as unqualified and unconditional. This is something many of us need yet to learn. We don’t quite know how to love. But when we do so, we flourish and thrive and discover greater support and the needed guidance. Challenging others doesn’t work. Curiosity, listening, care and compassion do. They nourish all hearts.

The planets are affecting your sense of self, your identity, your money, your family, home situation, creativity and possibilities in terms of relationships, partnerships, and for some, marriage. So many different realities pulsing about. Something kind and benevolent, something sacrificial and sad is remembered in your family. Are relatives and loved ones on your mind? Your remembering creates the needed relinquishment.

CAPRICORN Dec21–Jan20 You’re thinking optimistically about doing something new about who you are in the world, your talents and gifts. You want to bring more grace, goodness, ease and beauty to your life and the life of humanity. You recognize everyone’s doing their very best, especially you, and you’re asking for more opportunities in the world. Begin writing (journaling) in earnest and even drawing how you want to serve the world. This is your next creative endeavor.

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AQUARIUS Jan21–Feb18 Money and resources are going through a definite change. You want adequate money in order to stabilize yourself in the future. This means more attention to the well-being of your finances. Don’t forget to always help others. When we serve others, our needs are always taken care of. The charts show a focus on home, past, present and future. Follow what calls to you. It loves you.

PISCES Feb19–Mar20 Neptune in Pisces brings forth revelations and visions and, at times, confusion. Neptune blends many realities into one reality and specifics dissolve away. Be aware and observe this occurring. Neptune is not the planet of detail. It’s the planet of refinement, of parting the veils, of creative imagination and realms where dreams come true. Neptune transits can make us experience exhaustion. Magnesium, vitamins A, B and D3 help stabilize the body. Tend carefully to health in these times.

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What have you been sensing, feeling and thinking of during these spring festivals? Do you feel you’re being introduced to new qualities within yourself, a new identity emerging? Do these days make you feel generous and at home? Is there a new reality or interest presenting itself? You want to participate fully. But you know it’s not quite the right timing. Are you gardening, redecorating, expanding your foundation? Love is close by.

SAGITTARIUS Nov22–Dec20

Fill’er up!

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Classifieds classifieds PHONE: 831.458.1100 | EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@GOODTIMES.SC | DISPLAY DEADLINE: THURSDAY 2PM | LINE AD DEADLINE: FRIDAY 2PM

CHANGE OF NAME IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA CRUZ. PETITION OF GLADYS HERNANDEZ VASQUEZ CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO.17CV01055. THE COURT FINDS that the petitioner GLADYS HERNANDEZ VASQUEZ has filed a Petition for Change of Name with the clerk of this court for an order changing the applicants name from: GISSELLE CRUZ VASQUEZ to: GISSELLE CRUZ-VASQUEZ. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING JUNE 1, 2017 at 8:30 am, in Department 4 located at Superior Court of California, 701 Ocean Street. Santa Cruz, CA 95060. A copy of this order to show cause must be published in the Good Times, a newspaper of general circulation printed in Santa Cruz County, California, once a

week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: Apr. 17, 2017. Denine J. Guy, Judge of the Superior Court. Apr. 26 & May 3, 10, 17.

transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Apr. 20, 2017. May 3, 10, 17, 24.

fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Apr. 17, 2017. May 3, 10, 17, 24.

fictitious business name listed above on 4/13/2017. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Apr. 13, 2017. May 10, 17, 24, 31.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17- 0830 The following General Partnership is doing business as THE ZODIAC MAN. 2697 LAFAYETTE ST. SOQUEL, CA 95073. County of Santa Cruz. WILLIAM JOHAUN JACOBSEN, LAURA JANE ONETO. 2697 LAFAYETTE ST. SOQUEL, CA 95073. This business is conducted by a General Partnership signed: LAURA JANE ONETO. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on May 3, 2017. May 10, 17, 24, 31.

CHANGE OF NAME IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA CRUZ. PETITION OF YURIDIA SALAZAR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO.17CV01182. THE COURT FINDS that the petitioner YURIDIA SALAZAR has filed a Petition for Change of Name with the clerk of this court for an order changing the applicants name from: YURIDIA SALAZAR to: YURIDIA AQUINO. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING June 19, 2017 at 8:30 am, in Department 5 located at Superior Court of California, 701 Ocean Street. Santa Cruz,

CA 95060. A copy of this order to show cause must be published in the Good Times, a newspaper of general circulation printed in Santa Cruz County, California, once a week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: May 2, 2017. Denine J. Guy, Judge of the Superior Court. May 10, 17, 24, 31.

TAVANGAR. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on April 10, 2017. May 10, 17, 24, 31.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-0665 The following Individual is doing business as ANURA. 435 TIE GULCH RD., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95065. County of Santa Cruz. SHANNON MCDONALD. 435 TIE GULCH RD., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95065. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: SHANNON MCDONALD. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Apr. 6, 2017. Apr. 26 & May. 3, 10, 17.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-0786 The following Individual is doing business as STEVE'S E.T.S., STEVE'S ELECTRICAL TROUBLESHOOTING SPECIALIST. 24090 MORRILL CUTOFF RD, LOS GATOS, CA 95033. County of Santa Cruz. STEVEN JACOB SEABOCK. 24090 MORRILL CUTOFF RD, LOS GATOS, CA 95033. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: STEVEN JACOB SEABOCK. The registrant commenced to

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-0720 The following Individual is doing business as ALPHA THREAD. 2150 MATTISON LANE, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. MICHAEL CARNOHAN. 2150 MATTISON LANE, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: MICHAEL CARNOHAN. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Apr. 14, 2017. May 3, 10, 17, 24.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-0733 The following Individual is doing business as NEAP, NEAP DESIGNS. 127 ANDERSON STREET, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. TAYLOR HOWARD LANE. 127 ANDERSON STREET, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: TAYLOR HOWARD LANE. The registrant commenced to transact business under the

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-0716 The following Individual is doing business as WILDFLOWER MARKETING. 424 CAYUGA ST., A, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. LINDSEY NICOLE PERRY. 424 CAYUGA ST., A, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: LINDSEY NICOLE PERRY. The registrant commenced to transact business under the

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-0803 The following Individual is doing business as THE COLOR ROOM. 94 B MARIPOSA AVENUE, WATSONVILLE, CA 95076. County of Santa Cruz. NORMA COLIN. 94 B MARIPOSA AVENUE, WATSONVILLE, CA 95076. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: NORMA COLIN. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on May 1, 2017. May 11, 17, 24, 31. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-0683 The following Individual is doing business as HOLISTIC PSYCHOTHERAPY WITH RASA. 555 SOQUEL AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. RASA TAVANGAR. 555 SOQUEL AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: RASA

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NOTICE OF PUBLICATION OF ORDINANCE BY POSTING (ORDINANCE NO. 2017-11) The City Council of the City of Santa Cruz having authorized the city clerk administrator, that the ordinance hereafter entitled and described, be published by posting copies thereof in three (3) prominent places in the City, to wit: The City of Santa Cruz Website www.cityofsantacruz.com City Hall–809 Center Street Central Branch Library–224 Church Street

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that copies of said ordinance were posted according to said order. (Original on file with city clerk.) Said ordinance was introduced on May 9, 2017 and is entitled and described as follows: ORDINANCE NO. 2017-11 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF SANTA CRUZ AMENDING PORTIONS OF TITLE 24 (ZONING ORDINANCE) OF THE SANTA CRUZ MUNICIPAL CODE REGARDING REQUIREMENTS FOR ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE SALES IN CHAPTER 24.12 PART 12 (ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE SALES), CHAPTER 24.10 PART 8 (C-C COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL DISTRICT), PART 10 (C-T THOROUGHFARE COMMERCIAL), AND SECTION 24.22.338.1 OF CHAPTER 24.22 (DEFINITIONS)

This ordinance amends portions of the Zoning Ordinance of the municipal code regarding alcoholic beverage sales. PASSED FOR PUBLICATION on this 9th day of May, 2017, by the following vote: AYES: Councilmembers Krohn, Mathews, Watkins, Brown, Noroyan; Vice Mayor Terrazas; Mayor Chase. NOES: None. ABSENT: None. DISQUALIFIED: None. APPROVED: ss/Cynthia Chase, Mayor. ATTEST: ss/Bren Lehr, City Clerk Administrator. This ordinance is scheduled for further consideration and final adoption at the Council meeting of May 23rd, 2017.

City Council City of Santa Cruz NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING A public hearing will be held on Thursday, May 25, 2017 after the hour of 9:00 a.m. in the Council Chambers, City Hall, 809 Center Street, Santa Cruz, California to consider the following: City of Santa Cruz Measure D 5-Year Expenditure Plan for Fiscal Years 2018-22 The City of Santa Cruz does not discriminate against persons with disabilities. Out of consideration for people with chemical sensitivities, we ask that you attend fragrance free. Upon request, the agenda can be provided in a format to accommodate special needs. Additionally, if you wish to attend this public meeting and will require assistance such as an interpreter for American Sign Language, Spanish, or other special equipment, please call the City Clerk’s Department at 420-5030 at least five days in advance so that we can arrange for such special assistance, or email CityClerk@cityofsantacruz.com. The Cal-Relay system number: 1-800-735-2922. All interested persons are invited to present their oral or written statements at said hearing. For further information, please contact Chris Schneiter, Assistant Director/City Engineer, 809 Center Street, Rm 201, 831-420-5422, cschneiter@cityofsantacruz.com.


real estate PHONE: 831.458.1100 | EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@GOODTIMES.SC | DISPLAY DEADLINE: THURSDAY 2PM | LINE AD DEADLINE: FRIDAY 2PM

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-0802 The following Individual is doing business as MST CENTRAL COAST WELDING. 135 SUDDEN STREET, WATSONVILLE, CA 95076. County of Santa Cruz. EDUARDO H. DUARTE. 135 SUDDEN STREET, WATSONVILLE, CA 95076. This business is conducted

by an Individual signed: EDUARDO H. DUARTE. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on May 1, 2017. May 17, 24, 31, & Jun. 7.

ORDINANCE NO. 2017-12 AN UNCODIFIED URGENCY INTERIM ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF SANTA CRUZ EXTENDING FOR AN ADDITIONAL ONE YEAR A TEMPORARY MORATORIUM ON THE ESTABLISHMENT OF SHORT TERM VACATION RENTAL USE IN THE CITY OF SANTA CRUZ WHEREAS, the City of Santa Cruz is experiencing a severe shortage of rental housing in both single family homes and apartments, including loss of rental units and displacement of tenants as existing housing is being converted to vacation rentals, and WHEREAS, newer online technology allows the marketing of short term/ vacation rentals to a larger audience than in the past; and

Identify • Strategize • Achieve Gina Odom, Realtor

#01708073 SantaCruzDwellings.com 831-331-9455

ARE YOUR LOVED ONES AT RISK FOR LEAD POISONING? MICHAEL T. GROHOL

Lead Inspector/ Risk Assessor ID# 23367

centralcoastleadinspectionservices.com

LOCAL EXPERTS

855.765.MAIN • www.MainStRealtors.com • Home Sales • Vacation Rentals • Income Properties • Business Sales • Commercial • Leasing • Investment Fund

DATTA KHALSA

Broker/Owner • Cal DRE 01161050 831.818.0181 • datta@mainstrealtors.com

WHEREAS, the City established a Short Term Vacation Rental Subcommittee to evaluate vacation rentals, which has led to a consideration of an amendment to the City’s zoning code; and WHEREAS, additional time is required to prepare a draft amendment to the City’s zoning code; and WHEREAS, any such regulations adopted by the City may require review and certification by the California Coastal Commission before they could, if adopted, take effect within the Coastal Zone area of the City; and WHEREAS, allowing the proliferation of short term/vacation rentals to occur during the period that regulations are considered by the City Council and the California Coastal Commission would conflict with public health, safety and welfare needs of the community; and WHEREAS, based on the foregoing it is in the best interest of public health, safety and welfare to allow the staff and the City time to adequately study the land use issues related to short term/vacation rentals; and WHEREAS, the City Council finds that there is a current and immediate threat to the public health, safety, and welfare associated with the proliferation of short term/vacation rentals and that the approval of additional use permits, variances, building permits or any other

WHEREAS, for the protection of the public’s health, safety and welfare, the City Council on October 25, 2016 adopted Ordinance No. 2016-17 making findings and establishing a 45-day moratorium on the establishment of short term/ vacation rentals in a housing unit or duplex not occupied by the owner of that housing unit or duplex anywhere within the City of Santa Cruz unless extended in accordance with Government Code Section 65858; and WHEREAS, for the protection of the public’s health, safety and welfare, the City Council on November 22, 2016 adopted Ordinance No. 2016-18 making findings and extending until May 31, 2017 the moratorium on the establishment of short term/vacation rentals in a housing unit or duplex not occupied by the owner of that housing unit or duplex anywhere within the City of Santa Cruz unless extended in accordance with Government Code Section 65858; and WHEREAS, the City Council desires to extend Ordinance 2016-18 for a period of one year effective from May 31, 2017, expiring on May 31, 2018, as permitted by Government Code Section 65858, to maintain the current status quo and to provide time to provide time to allow review of any code amendment to the municipal code with properly noticed public hearings before the Planning Commission and City Council; and provide time to allow review and certification of any amendment by the California Coastal Commission. NOW, THEREFORE BE IT ORDAINED by the City Council of the City of Santa Cruz as follows: Section 1. In accordance with Government Code Section 65858, from and after the date of this Ordinance, a moratorium against the establishment of short term/vacation rentals in a housing unit or duplex not occupied by the owner of that housing unit or

duplex anywhere within the City of Santa Cruz is hereby enacted for a period one year pending further study by City staff and development of appropriate regulations. This moratorium shall apply to any use which has not yet been lawfully established in accordance with all applicable requirements of the City of Santa Cruz Municipal Code, and which has not yet obtained substantial vested rights as defined by the California Supreme Court in Avco Community Developers, Inc. v. South Coast Regional Com. (1976) 17 Cal.3d 785. Section 2. This interim ordinance is necessary in that there is a current and immediate threat to the public health, safety, or welfare, and that the approval of any applicable entitlement for short term/ vacation rentals which are required in order to comply with a zoning ordinance would result in that threat to public health, safety, or welfare as discussed above. Section 3. This interim ordinance is not subject to the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) pursuant to Section 15060(c) (2) – the activity will not result in a direct or reasonably foreseeable indirect physical change in the environment and Section 15060(c) (3) – the activity is not a project as defined in Section 15378 of the CEQA Guidelines, because it has no potential for resulting in physical change to the environment, directly or indirectly. Section 4. This interim ordinance shall be of no further force and effect upon the expiration one year from May 31, 2017 (expiration date: May 31, 2018) unless rescinded in accordance with Government Code Section 65858. Section 5. This ordinance shall take effect and be in force immediately upon its final adoption. PASSED FOR FINAL ADOPTION as an Urgency Interim Ordinance this 9th day of May, 2017, by the following vote: AYES: Councilmembers Krohn, Mathews, Watkins, Brown, Noroyan; Vice Mayor Terrazas; Mayor Chase. NOES: None. ABSENT: None. DISQUALIFIED: None. APPROVED: ss/Cynthia Chase, Mayor. ATTEST: ss/Bren Lehr, City Clerk Administrator.

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 17-23, 2017

Call for a free consultation: (831) 335-0407

WHEREAS, increasing numbers of short term/vacation rentals have raised concerns about the preservation of residential neighborhood character and integrity such as decreasing long-term rental opportunities and increased rents for local residents; and

applicable entitlement or change of use from a residence for their new use as a short term/vacation rental while staff and the City conduct the aforementioned study would result in that threat to public health, safety, or welfare; and

61


Classifieds classifieds PHONE: 831.458.1100 | EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@GOODTIMES.SC | DISPLAY DEADLINE: THURSDAY 2PM | LINE AD DEADLINE: FRIDAY 2PM

HELP WANTED Direct Care Full and part time positions working with intellectually challenged adults. $500 hiring bonus! Training provided. Call (831) 475-0888, M - F 9 am - 3 pm.

and referrals. If interested, please email cover letter and resume to: dr.julimazi@gmail.com No Cost Travel Group Forming – Any Age Group Travel group forming for singles who don’t like paying the single supplement fare for traveling alone. We can meet to form safety rules. This includes plane, train, cruise ship, RV, etc. Please contact John at (831) 335-2484. Speak slow & clear & repeat.

Place your legal notice in Good Times Fictitious Business Name $52 Abandon Fictitious Business Name $52 Order to Show Cause (Name Change) $80

real estate

Summit Store Inc. Seeking deli clerks. Full or part time. 24197 Summit Rd. Los Gatos, 95033. Contact Stacey (831) 588-2908. Summitstacey@gmail.com Thrive Natural Medicine is looking for holistic practitioners of all sorts to join our team. There are 3 upstairs treatment rooms available for rent in our Natural Medical Center. Furnished rooms can be rented either full time, half time, or in shifts of 5 hours, with a minimum of 20 hours per week to start. Room rent includes utilities, wifi, reception service, regular professional cleaning and landscaping, free parking, website presence, advertising,

MASSAGE Call Curt feel good now! Muscles relaxed and moods adjusted. De-stress in my warm safe hands. 2 or 4 hand massage. Days and Evenings, CMP. Please call (831) 419-1646 or email scruzcurt@gmail.com. A*wonderful*Touch. Muscles relaxed and moods adjusted. De-stress in my warm safe hands. 2 or 4 hand massage. Days and Evenings, CMP. Please call (831) 419-1646 or email scruzcurt@gmail.com.

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NOTICE OF PUBLICATION OF ORDINANCE BY POSTING (ORDINANCE NO. 2017-13) The City Council of the City of Santa Cruz having authorized the city clerk administrator, that the ordinance hereafter entitled and described, be published by posting copies thereof in three (3) prominent places in the City, to wit: The City of Santa Cruz Website www.cityofsantacruz.com City Hall–809 Center Street Central Branch Library–224 Church Street NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that copies of said ordinance were posted according to said order. (Original on file with city clerk.) Said ordinance was introduced on May 9, 2017 and is entitled and described as follows: ORDINANCE NO. 2017-13 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SANTA CRUZ AMENDING SECTION 19.05.220 AND ADDING SECTION 19.05.290 OF THE SANTA CRUZ MUNICIPAL CODE PERTAINING TO RESIDENTIAL FIRE SPRINKLER REQUIREMENTS IN ACCESSORY DWELLING UNITS This ordinance amends portions of the municipal code pertaining to residential fire sprinkler requirements in accessory dwelling units. PASSED FOR PUBLICATION on this 9th day of May, 2017, by the following vote: AYES: Councilmembers Krohn, Mathews, Watkins, Brown, Noroyan; Vice Mayor Terrazas; Mayor Chase. NOES: None. ABSENT: None. DISQUALIFIED: None. APPROVED: ss/Cynthia Chase, Mayor. ATTEST: ss/Bren Lehr, City Clerk Administrator. This ordinance is scheduled for further consideration and final adoption at the Council meeting of May 23rd, 2017.

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SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 17-23, 2017

140 Dubois, Suite C Santa Cruz, CA

63


Where the locals shop since 1938. VOTED BEST BUTCHER SHOP BEST WINE SELECTION BEST CHEESE SELECTION BEST LOCALLY OWNED GROCERY STORE BEST MURAL /PUBLIC ART

Family owned & operated 78 years. 622 Soquel Avenue, Santa Cruz

OUR 78 TH YEAR

WEEKLY SPECIALS

BUTCHER SHOP

LL NATURAL USDA Choice beef & lamb only A corn-fed Midwest pork, Rocky free-range chickens, Mary’s air-chilled chickens, wild-caught seafood, Boar’s Head products.

WINE & FOOD PAIRING GRILLED MARINATED LONDON BROIL INGREDIENTS

– 4 large garlic cloves, minced – 4 tablespoons balsamic vinegar – 4 tablespoons fresh lemon juice – 3 tablespoons Dijon mustard – 1 1/2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce – 1 tablespoon soy sauce – 1 teaspoon dried oregano, crumbled – 1 teaspoon dried basil, crumbled – 1 teaspoon dried thyme, crumbled – 1/2 teaspoon dried hot red pepper flakes – 2/3 cup olive oil – 1 (2 to 2 1/2 pound) London broil

MEAT

BEEF ■ LONDON BROIL, U.S.D.A CHOICE/ 5.98 LB ■ BEEF STIR FRY, U.S.D.A CHOICE/ 6.49 LB ■ VEAL RIB CHOPS, Pasture Fed/ 12.98 LB LUNCH MEATS ■ HONEY HAM, Sweet Slice/ 8.49 LB ■ BLACK FOREST HAM, Smoked Flavor/ 8.49 LB ■ DANISH STYLE HAM/ 8.49 LB MARINATED TUMBLED MEATS ■ LEMON PEPPER CHICKEN BREAST, Boneless, Skinless/ 5.98 LB ■ CAJUN STYLE CHICKEN BREAST, Boneless, Skinless/ 5.98 LB ■ LEMON DIJON CHICKEN BREAST, Boneless, Skinless/ 5.98 LB ■ WINE & GARLIC CHICKEN BREAST, Boneless, Skinless/ 5.98 LB FISH ■ PACIFIC RED SNAPPER FILLET, /6.98 LB ■ COOKED PRAWNS, Large Peeled & Deveined/ 12.98 LB ■ SALMON LOX TRIMMINGS/ 9.98 LB

PRODUCE

CALIFORNIA-FRESH, Blemish–free, Local/

Organic: Arrow Citrus Co., Lakeside Organic

DIRECTIONS To make marinade: Mix all marinade ingredients in a bowl. Put London broil in a large resealable plastic bag and pour marinade over it. Marinate meat, chilled, turning bag once or twice, for 8 hours. Remove meat from the marinade, discard the marinade, and pat the meat dry. Preheat a grill and on an oiled rack set about 4 inches over glowing coals, grill the meat, turning each once, 9 to 10 minutes on each side, or until it registers 125 to 130 degrees on a meat thermometer for medium-rare meat. (Alternatively, meat may be broiled.) Transfer meat to a cutting board and let stand 10 minutes. Cut meat diagonally across the grain into thin slices.

S HOPPER SPOTLIG HT

■ ORGANIC BANANAS, The Perfect Snack/ .99 LB ■ LIMES, Extra Juicy/ .19 EA. ■ STRAWBERRIES, 1lb Clamshell/ 2.99 EA. ■ POTATOES, Red and Yukon/ .89 LB. ■ YELLOW ONIONS, A Kitchen Must Have/ .49 LB. ■ AVOCADOS, Always Ripe/ 1.99 EA. ■ LEAF LETTUCE, Red, Green, Romaine, Butter & Iceberg/ 1.49 EA.

BEER/WINE/SPIRITS

Compare & Save

Beers

Local, Organic, Natural, Specialty, Gourmet

Best Buys, Local, Regional, International

■ STONE, “Enjoy By” 22 oz Bottle/ 7.99 + CRV ■ NORTH COAST, “Scrimshaw + Red Seal” 6 Pack,

■ SANTA CRUZ ORGANIC LEMONADE, All Kinds, 32oz/ 1.99 ■ CRYSTAL GEYSER, Sparkling Water, 1.25L, All Flavors/ .99+ CRV ■ SAN PELLEGRINO, Italian Sparkling Juice, 6 Pack, 11.15oz Cans/ 4.99 + CRV ■ ODWALLA OJ, 1.8 Qt/ 4.99 ■ HIGH BALL ENERGY DRINK, 16oz/ 2.99 + CRV

12 oz Bottles/ 7.69 + CRV

■ NORTH COAST, “Le Merle + Old Rasputin,” 4 Pack, 12 oz Bottles/ 7.49 + CRV ■ SIERRA NEVADA, “Summerfest,” 6 Pack, 12 oz cans/ 9.49 + CRV ■ BEAR REPUBLIC, “Racer 5,” 6 Pack, 12 oz. Bottles/ 9.99 + CRV

Local Bakeries

Quality Gin

■ BECKMANN’S, Nine Grain Sour Round 16oz/ 3.49 ■ WHOLE GRAIN, California Black, 30oz/ 4.19 ■ GAYLE’S, French Loaf, 16oz/ 3.49 ■ KELLY’S, Sour Cheddar, 16 oz/ 3.89 ■ SUMANO’S, 100% Whole Wheat Loaf, 24oz/4.79

■ NO. 209, “Made in San Francisco”/ 21.99 ■ DEATH’S DOOR, “Outstanding”/ 24.99 ■ VENUS NO.1, “Made in Santa Cruz”/ 27.99 ■ BARR HILL, “Made with Raw Honey”/ 37.99 ■ ST. GEORGE, “3 Kinds, All Great”/ 31.99

Delicatessen

Wines Under $5

■ NIMAN RANCH CANADIAN BACON, Uncured

■ 2013 RED DIAMOND, Mysterious Red, (Reg 12.99)/ 4.99 ■ NV RAVENSWOOD MUCKRAKER, (Reg 13.99)/ 4.99 ■ 2013 MOTTO, Cabernet Sauvignon, (Reg 14.99)/ 4.99 ■ 2011 RAVENSWOOD, Shiraz, (Reg 10.99)/ 4.99 ■ 2012 CRAFTWORK, Chardonnay, (Reg 19.99)/ 4.99

7oz / 6.99 ■ BELLA CHI-CHA BASIL PESTO, “Made Locally” 6oz/ 6.99 ■ FIORUCCI DICED PANCETTA, Uncured, 4 oz/ 4.29 ■ TILLAMOOK SHREDDED SHARP CHEDDAR, Farm Style Cut, 8oz/ 3.09 ■ OLLI SALUMERIA SLICED SALAME, All Flavors, 4 oz/ 4.09

Best Buy Whites

■ 2013 LINCOURT, Sauvignon Blanc, (Reg 15.99)/ 8.99 ■ 2012 VO.CA, Cortese, (91WW, Reg 16.99)/ 5.99 ■ 2013 BENZINGER, Chardonnay, (90WE, Reg 14.99)/ 8.99 ■ 2015 VILLA ANTINORI, Bianco, (Reg 13.99)/ 8.99 ■ 2015 VILLA MARIA, Sauvignon Blanc,

Cheese - “Best Selection in Santa Cruz” ■ WISCONSIN SHARP CHEDDAR,

Loaf Cuts/ 5.09LB, Average Cuts/ 4.49LB

(90WS, Reg 15.99)/ 9.99

Wines from Argentina

■ DOMESTIC SWISS, A Customer Favorite, /4.99LB ■ BLACK RIVER GORGONZOLA, Pair with Apples,

■ RADISHES AND GREEN ONIONS, Peak Quality/ .49 EA. ■ BABY LOOSE SPINACH, Organically Grown/ 4.99 LB. ■ APPLES, Fuji, Granny Smith, Gala, Pink Lady & Braeburn/ 1.89 LB. ■ BANANAS, Ripe and Ready to Eat/ .89 LB. ■ NAVEL ORANGES, Sweet and Juicy/ 1.49 LB. ■ CLUSTER TOMATOES, Ripe on the Vine/ 2.29 LB. ■ RUSSET POTATOES, Premium Quality/ .59 LB. ■ ROMA TOMATOES, Ripe and Firm/ 1.19 LB. ■ ZUCCHINI SQUASH, Extra Fancy Squash/ .99 LB. ■ BROCCOLI CROWNS, Delivered Fresh Daily/ 2.29 LB. ■ GREEN BEANS, Fresh and Tender/ 2.29 LB. ■ GRAPEFRUIT, Pink Flesh/ .89 EA. ■ PINEAPPLE, Ripe and Sweet/ 1.09 LB. ■ LEMONS, Blemish Free/ .69 EA. ■ LARGE TOMATOES, Great for Slicing/ 1.49 LB. ■ RED ONIONS, Top Quality/ .79 LB.

GROCERY

■ 2015 COLOMÉ, Torrontes, (92JS)/ 13.99 ■ 2012 TAPIZ, Cabernet Sauvignon, (90WE)/ 15.99 ■ 2012 CLOS DE LOS SIETE, Red Blend, (91JS)/ 14.99 ■ 2012 AMANCAYA, Malbec, (91JS)/ 14.99 ■ 2013 ZOLO, Reserva Cabernet Sauvignon, (93JS)/ 19.99

/6.09LB

■ STELLA PARMESAN, Domestic Whole Wheel Cuts/ 7.99LB

Clover Stornetta- Best Price in Town ■ ORGANIC SOUR CREAM, Pint/ 2.59 ■ ORGANIC WHIPPING CREAM, Pint/ 3.79 ■ BUTTER QUARTERS, Lb/ 3.99 ■ ORGANIC BUTTER QUARTERS, Lb/ 6.49 ■ ORGANIC MILK, Gallon/ 6.99

Connoisseur’s Corner- Bordeaux

■ 2010 CHATEAU VILLARS, Fronsac, (90WA)/ 26.99 ■ 2010 CHATEAU TOUR HAUT-CAUSSAN, Medoc, (90WA)/ 32.99

Shop Local First

■ SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAIN MARINADE, 12oz/ 4.99 ■ MANUEL’S SALSA, 14oz/ 5.59 ■ KGWANS, Triple F Hot Sauce, 5oz/ 6.99 ■ CAROLYN’S COOKIE CO., Frozen Dough, 21oz/ 9.99 ■ FLIP’S AWESOME SAUCE, 5oz/ 5.99

■ 2011 CHATEAU TOUR PIBRAN, Pauillac, (90WS)/ 34.99 ■ 2009 CHATEAU DE PEZ, Saint-Estephe, (93ST)/ 44.99 ■ 2007 CHATEAU BARDE HAUT, Saint-Emilion, (92WA, 92ST)/ 46.99

TINA SHORT, 38-Year Customer, Santa Cruz

Occupation: Artist/painter (tinashort.com) Hobbies: Mountain biking, hiking, hanging out with my kids/family and friends, painting (yes!) cooking Astrological sign: Libra What first got you to Shopper’s? I would come shopping with my mom when I was about 10. She would send me to the meat department with a list. I was really shy as a kid, and that was one way of coaxing me out of it. As a teenager I had crushes on a few of the butchers. I went from shy to becoming excited about riding my bike here to shop! When I first lived on my own, I could only afford simple basic meals like barbecues, tacos, burritos, and pasta. When I became pregnant with twins, I nourished my body with more of Shopper’s meats and its beautiful organic veggies. It’s been an evolution.

You prefer shopping local? Absolutely. Shopper’s is a true home-town store. It’s old-school, comfortable and easy. I like the layout and that they don’t move things around like some stores do. And the size: Sometimes you need to squeeze by people in the aisles — I like having to make eye contact and I enjoy that momentary connection. I always run into someone I know and wind up having a conversation, even if it’s brief. The boys love it too! You guys like coming here? ZANDER: We like Shopper’s because everything is fresh, and it feels good to go to a place I know by heart. ROWAN: Ditto.

What’s your opinion of Shopper’s over-all overall pricing? I’ve priced it out. Shopper’s isn’t expensive, not for the quality you get. As a single mom and artist, if I can afford to shop here, then pretty much anybody can. I spend less money by shopping here more often, rather than shopping at big box stores and getting $300 worth of nothing! Thanks to Shopper’s, I can make an amazing meal with whatever’s in the fridge. We really like the marinated skirt steaks and the bloody mary pork chops, as well as the whole chickens, and ham hocks for split pea soup. Did I mention that everyone who works here is great?!

“I spend less money by shopping here more often, rather than shopping at big box stores and getting $300 worth of nothing!”

|

Corner: Soquel & Branciforte Avenues 7 Days: 6am-9pm

| Meat: (831) 423-1696 | Produce: (831) 429-1499 | Grocery: (831) 423-1398 | Wine: (831) 429-1804

Superb Products of Value: Local, Natural, Specialty, Gourmet ■ Neighborly Service for 78 Years

Gtw1720  

May 17-23, 2017

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