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HOW SANTA CRUZ’S

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FEATURES

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OPINION

EDITOR’S NOTE When was the first time you heard about virtual reality? For a lot of us, it was some science fiction movie like Tron or TV show like Star Trek: The Next Generation. On the latter, the idea of being fully immersed in a computer-constructed “holodeck” seemed literally centuries away, and both had a wink-wink element of magical realism, as if their creators were saying, “OK, there’s no way this will really happen.” And yet, just a couple of decades later, our writer Christina Waters took a VR spacewalk that she describes in this week’s cover story as a “gorgeous illusion.” And it happened right here at a little production

LETTERS

APRIL 12-18, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

EASTSIDE, NOT MIDTOWN

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I have wondered how our cherished Eastside neighborhood was somehow renamed Midtown—by some merchants, not by the local residents, mind you! I posted a conversation on the NextDoor site, and in six days, there have been more than 100 responses, 99 percent of them in support of the fact that we are in fact Eastside, and not Midtown! Someone suggested writing to you, as you have apparently been referring to us as “Midtown,” even in the heading of your site santacruz.com. You list businesses, and that they are all in Midtown! Are you able to provide me with some facts as to who changed our name, and how to get it back? I think this topic is involved in a very lively discussion, and not going away any time soon. NIKKI SHOEMAKER | RESIDENT OF EASTSIDE SANTA CRUZ FOR MORE THAN 30 YEARS

Nikki, this very topic is hotly debated even in our office. See Jacob Pierce’s “Best Argument We’re Dying to See Settled” in the Best of Santa Cruz County issue (GT, 3/15) for more context. — Editor

studio in Santa Cruz. Maybe locals are familiar with filmmaker Eric Thiermann, who was part of UCSC’s first graduating class and has been making headlines here with his documentary work since the 1980s. But few know what he’s doing now with virtual reality at his company Impact Creative. It has, however, drawn the attention of huge companies like Google, which keep Thiermann and his team busy. Waters’ story is an in-depth look at the state of the VR art, and what’s possible now would be incredible no matter who was doing it. But the fact that one of the major forces driving the creative application of this technology is a small studio right here in Silicon Beach kind of boggles the mind. Meet their team and take a step into the future. What’s next, jetpacks? Please let it be jetpacks. STEVE PALOPOLI | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

RANGE OF OPINIONS I disagree with Paul Cocking’s ( GT, 4/5) disparaging remarks against our Park Rangers, who help protect residents, workers, and tourists on Pacific Avenue. The Rangers help deter crime and other antisocial behavior that adversely affects seniors, children, and everyone else who lives, works, and visits downtown Santa Cruz. ROBERT DEFREITAS | SANTA CRUZ

IT’S A SHAME I have noticed many demonstrations recently here in Santa Cruz protesting everything from Trump’s presidency to condemnations of racism, sexism, xenophobia, homophobia, transphobia and prejudice against poor, homeless and disabled people, and although I agree that these are important issues to address, I sometimes wonder about the motivations behind the protests. Is it about promoting better policies than the current political administration, and ending racism, sexism, xenophobia, homophobia, transphobia and prejudice against the poor, the homeless and disabled, or is it about shaming people who disagree with you, or even shaming >8 people who are your allies if they

PHOTO CONTEST LAST OF THE MONARCHS A butterfly at La Selva Beach. Photograph by

Nanda Currant. Submit to photos@goodtimes.sc. Include information (location, etc.) and your name. Photos may be cropped. Preferably, photos should be 4 inches by 4 inches and minimum 250 dpi.

GOOD IDEA

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Lily Richards, a 13-year-old comic artist, dropped off a comic strip last week and asked to be included in our paper. GT doesn’t run comics, but Lily has written more comics than we have, and is a young powerhouse in the making, so we wanted to give her a shout out. Atlantis Fantasy World on Front Street carries both of her two running series: “The Adventure of Tubby the Clumsy Bear and Crabby” and “The Adventures of Super Gecko.”

Julie Guthman, a social sciences professor at UCSC, has been awarded a 2017 Guggenheim Fellowship. Guthman, a leading scholar on the history and geography of California agriculture, is one of 173 scholars, artists and scientists recognized and selected from among nearly 3,000 applications. Guthman, well-known for her research on sustainable agriculture and alternative food movements, is the author of two books, including Weighing In: Obesity, Food Justice, and the Limits of Capitalism.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“Reality continues to ruin my life.” — BILL WATTERSON

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LOCAL TALK

When is it OK to not tell the truth? BY MATTHEW COLE SCOTT

During a crisis. To keep people tranquil. DAVID JONES SANTA CRUZ | CONSERVATION ENTHUSIAST

When it might cause more harm than good in a small situation. SADIE GRATTAN WAITRESS

I once heard that it’s better to make somebody cry by telling them the truth than it is to make them smile by telling them a lie. MATT UMSTEAD SANTA CRUZ | DRIVER

LAUREN BAKER SANTA CRUZ | SELF EMPLOYED

You have to always tell the truth. There is no exception. MERVE ARSLAN SANTA CRUZ | HOUSEWIFE

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 12-18, 2017

When the truth could hurt yourself or others.

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ROB BREZSNY FREE WILL ASTROLOGY Week of April 12 ARIES Mar21–Apr19 Before visiting Sicily for the first time, American poet Billy Collins learned to speak Italian. In his poem “By a Swimming Pool Outside Siracusa,” he describes how the new language is changing his perspective. If he were thinking in English, he might say that the gin he’s drinking while sitting alone in the evening light “has softened my mood.” But the newly Italianized part of his mind would prefer to say that the gin “has allowed my thoughts to traverse my brain with greater gentleness” and “has extended permission to my mind to feel a friendship with the vast sky.” Your assignment in the coming week, Aries, is to Italianize your view of the world. Infuse your thoughts with expansive lyricism and voluptuous relaxation. If you’re Italian, celebrate and amplify your Italianness.

TAURUS Apr20–May20 It’s closing time. You have finished toiling in the shadow of an old sacred cow. You’ve climaxed your relationship with ill-fitting ideas that you borrowed from mediocre and inappropriate teachers once upon a time. And you can finally give up your quest for a supposed Holy Grail that never actually existed in the first place. It’s time to move on to the next chapter of your life story, Taurus! You have been authorized to graduate from any influence, attachment, and attraction that wouldn’t serve your greater good in the future. Does this mean you’ll soon be ready to embrace more freedom than you have in years? I’m betting on it.

GEMINI May21–June20 The heaviest butterfly on the planet is the female Queen Victoria’s birdwing. It tips the scales at two grams. The female Queen Alexandra’s birdwing is the butterfly with the longest wingspan: more than 12 inches. These two creatures remind me of you these days. Like them, you’re freakishly beautiful. You’re a marvelous and somewhat vertiginous spectacle. The tasks you’re working on are graceful and elegant, yet also big and weighty. Because of your intensity, you may not look flight-worthy, but you’re actually quite aerodynamic. In fact, your sorties are dazzling and influential. Though your acrobatic zigzags seem improbable, they’re effective.

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CANCER Jun21–Jul22

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Picasso had mixed feelings about his fellow painter Marc Chagall, who was born under the sign of Cancer. “I’m not crazy about his roosters and donkeys and flying violinists, and all the folklore,” Picasso said, referring to the subject matter of Chagall’s compositions. But he also felt that Chagall was one of the only painters “who understands what color really is,” adding, “There’s never been anybody since Renoir who has the feeling for light that Chagall has.” I suspect that in the coming weeks, you will be the recipient of mixed messages like these. Praise and disapproval may come your way. Recognition and neglect. Kudos and apathy. Please don’t dwell on the criticism and downplay the applause. In fact, do the reverse!

LE0 Jul23–Aug22 “Go Tell it on the Mountain” is the title of an old gospel song, and now it’s the metaphorical theme of your horoscope. I advise you to climb a tall peak—even if it’s just a magic mountain in your imagination—and deliver the spicy monologue that has been marinating within you. It would be great if you could gather a sympathetic audience for your revelations, but that’s not mandatory to achieve the necessary catharsis. You simply need to be gazing at the big picture as you declare your big, ripe truths.

VIRGO Aug23–Sep22 If you were a snake, it would be a fine time to molt your skin. If you were a river, it would be a perfect moment to overflow your banks in a spring flood. If you were an office worker, it would be an excellent phase to trade in your claustrophobic cubicle for a spacious new niche. In other words, Virgo, you’re primed to outgrow at least one of your containers. The boundaries you knew you would have to transgress some day are finally ready

to be transgressed. Even now, your attention span is expanding and your imagination is stretching.

LIBRA Sep23–Oct 22 For more than a century, the Ringsaker Lutheran Church in Buxton, North Dakota hosted rites of passage, including 362 baptisms, 50 marriages, and 97 funerals. It closed in 2002, a victim of the area’s shrinking population. I invite you to consider the possibility that this can serve as a useful metaphor for you, Libra. Is there a place that has been a sanctuary for you, but has begun to lose its magic? Is there a traditional power spot from which the power has been ebbing? Has a holy refuge evolved into a mundane hang-out? If so, mourn for a while, then go in search of a vibrant replacement.

SCORPIO Oct23–Nov21 Most people throw away lemon rinds, walnut shells, and pomegranate skins. But some resourceful types find uses for these apparent wastes. Lemon rind can serve as a deodorizer, cleaner, and skin tonic, as well as a zesty ingredient in recipes. Ground-up walnut shells work well in facial scrubs and pet bedding. When made into a powder, pomegranate peels have a variety of applications for skin care. I suggest you look for metaphorically similar things, Scorpio. You’re typically inclined to dismiss the surfaces and discard the packaging and ignore the outer layers, but I urge you to consider the possibility that right now they may have value.

SAGITTARIUS Nov22–Dec21 You’re growing too fast, but that’s fine as long as you don’t make people around you feel like they’re moving too slowly. You know too much, but that won’t be a problem as long as you don’t act snooty. And you’re almost too attractive for your own good, but that won’t hurt you as long as you overflow with spontaneous generosity. What I’m trying to convey, Sagittarius, is that your excesses are likely to be more beautiful than chaotic, more fertile than confusing. And that should provide you with plenty of slack when dealing with cautious folks who are a bit rattled by your lust for life.

CAPRICORN Dec22–Jan19 Until recently, scientists believed the number of trees on the planet was about 400 billion. But research published in the journal Nature says that’s wrong. There are actually three trillion trees on Earth—almost eight times more than was previously thought. In a similar way, I suspect you have also underestimated certain resources that are personally available to you, Capricorn. Now is a good time to correct your undervaluation. Summon the audacity to recognize the potential abundance you have at your disposal. Then make plans to tap into it with a greater sense of purpose.

AQUARIUS Jan20–Feb18 The poet John Keats identified a quality he called “negative capability.” He defined it as the power to calmly accept “uncertainties, mysteries, and doubts without any irritable reaching after fact and reason.” I would extend the meaning to include three other things not to be irritably reached for: artificial clarity, premature resolution, and simplistic answers. Now is an excellent time to learn more about this fine art, Aquarius.

PISCES Feb19–Mar20 Are you ready for a riddle that’s more enjoyable than the kind you’re used to? I’m not sure if you are. You may be too jaded to embrace this unusual gift. You could assume it’s another one of the crazy-making cosmic jokes that have sometimes tormented you in the past. But I hope that doesn’t happen. I hope you’ll welcome the riddle in the liberating spirit in which it’s offered. If you do, you’ll be pleasantly surprised as it teases you in ways you didn’t know you wanted to be teased. You’ll feel a delightful itch or a soothing burn in your secret self, like a funny-bone feeling that titillates your immortal soul. P.S.: To take full advantage of the blessed riddle, you may have to expand your understanding of what’s good for you.

Test this hypothesis: The answer to a pressing question will come within 72 hours after you do a ritual in which you ask for clarity.

© Copyright 2017


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OPINION

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happen to be more privileged than you in some way? Most people are privileged in some ways, and lacking privilege in other ways, and I have noticed that politics on both the Left and the Right often involve shaming people for their privilege and their lack of it (often both). Shaming others may help one feel better about oneself, but it is a poor motivator for changing others and changing society for the better. Many people are politically apathetic because they don’t want to be around a lot of angry self-righteous people who may potentially shame them from being who they are. Both the

privileged and those who lack it have internalized the values of a hierarchical society based on comparison and shame, which leads to a hostile, competitive us-versus-them, self-versus-other mentality which is extremely divisive. We have all been poisoned by these destructive values, and we can move beyond it by both respecting differences and acknowledging our common humanity and our common struggles with compassion, and understanding instead of shame. ERICH J. HOLDEN | SANTA CRUZ

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WELLNESS

DRINK TO YOUR HEALTH In the debate over moderate drinking and health, a case-by-case approach is the best way to go.

Well Drinks

Does the right amount of alcohol really improve health—and how much? BY ANDREW STEINGRUBE Health’s website comes eerily close to agreeing with Homer, stating, “It’s safe to say that alcohol is both a tonic and a poison. The difference lies mostly in the dose.” So exactly how much should we be drinking? Where is the line between tonic and poison? One of the first people to look at the question from what he called a “tight, defensible scientific perspective” was Dr. Wells Shoemaker, a local physician and co-author of the book The French Paradox and Beyond, published in 1992, just after the term “French Paradox” entered our lexicon. It refers to the finding that even though French people typically ate

diets rich in saturated fats from things like butter and cheese, their incidence of heart disease was surprisingly low. One proposed explanation was that the French also consumed a lot of wine. Could this resolve the seeming paradox? The answer, according to Shoemaker, is yes. “The alcohol molecule itself has a number of salutary effects,” he says. “It raises [good] HDL cholesterol, lowers [bad] LDL cholesterol, and reduces the tendency of platelets in the blood to clump together.” Wine also offers benefits: “There are a number of antioxidant compounds in wine, mostly in the

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 12-18, 2017

‘H

ere’s to alcohol: the cause of—and solution to—all life’s problems,” proclaimed the animated poet Homer Simpson. His thoughts on the matter may be closer to the truth than perhaps even he realized. Alcohol certainly does have a side as dark as a shot of Fernet: it is an all-too-commonly abused drug, plays a role in many car crashes and violent crimes, and can have disastrous and fatal consequences on health. But there is also scientific evidence that consuming it moderately may enhance well-being. The Harvard School of Public

skins”—which is why red wine is healthier—“that slow damage inside blood vessels,” says Shoemaker, referring to polyphenols like anthocyanins and resveratrol. “So it’s really not a paradox at all. Moderate drinking does lower the risk of heart disease and stroke.” But what exactly constitutes “moderate drinking?” For some, that term is itself the paradox, and unfortunately nine drinks on Saturday night and none the rest of the week does not count. Shoemaker says that the definition has slowly come down over the last two decades, and now sits at about two standard (12-ounce beer/5-ounce wine/ 1.5-ounce liquor) drinks per day for men, and one standard drink per day for women. A 2017 study published in the British Medical Journal showed a reduced risk of heart disease for moderate drinkers relative to both those who didn’t drink at all and those who drank heavily. But a 2016 systematic review published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs looked at 87 previous studies and found that they all showed a reduced mortality risk for low-volume drinkers. After adjusting for insufficiently accounted-for differences between drinkers and abstainers, the effect disappeared. A 2016 review of previous research published in the journal Addiction concluded, “There is strong evidence that alcohol causes cancer at seven sites in the body, and probably others.” It is no wonder that Shoemaker calls this a “very murky field,” and stresses the importance of a case-by-case approach. He doesn’t recommend starting a drinking habit for health reasons, but says, “A physician recommending their patients not drink at all is not scientifically supportable. If you do drink moderately, it’s probably not harmful.” It all comes back to the individual and his or her specific health issues, history, and genetic and environmental risk factors. Perhaps then the question is not, “How much should we be drinking?” but instead, “How much should I be drinking?”

11


NEWS POSITIVE OUTLET Local powers come together as community choice energy moves forward

APRIL 12-18, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

BY ARDY RAGHIAN

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Nearly half of greenhouse gas emissions from Santa Cruz, San Benito, and Monterey counties come from energy production. In our western energy region, which includes pretty much all of California, 63 percent of electricity comes from gas-powered plants like the one in Moss Landing, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. A long-discussed solution—more than four years in the making—aims to create energy that’s cleaner, cheaper, and locally sourced. The reality is closer than ever. Monterey Bay Community Power (MBCP), a new group, aims to launch next spring as a green alternative to Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E). Both the Santa Cruz City Council and the county Board of Supervisors officially signed on to MBCP, the tricounty Community Choice Energy (CCE) partnership, in late February. The agreement brings together local governments with ones from San Benito and Monterey counties. “We understood that we have something in common, and that we can work together to solve our contribution to our greenhouse gas emissions and take control of our own energy,” says Virginia Johnson, the project manager for MBCP and analyst for County Supervisor Bruce McPherson, who also played a leading role in starting MBCP. Johnson says there is a financial benefit of having more partners, as it increases the CCE’s purchasing power. Although not everyone has signed on so far, MBCP has more than enough partners to start the agency and be successful economically and environmentally, Johnson says, creating a local grid that harvests energy from solar and other renewables. “CCE will allow us to do things more consistent with local values,” says Santa Cruz Mayor Cynthia Chase. Two committees, one for policy and another for operations, will run the energy group, a joint powers agency with 18 municipalities. Elected officials like Santa Cruz City Councilmember Sandy Brown will serve on the policy board, holding public meetings for input into deciding which types >16

FREQUENCY BIAS Artist Myra Eastman, part of a group that’s trying to buy rights to a spot on the local airwaves, has fond

memories of listening to community radio on KUSP. PHOTO: KEANA PARKER

Wait for the Signal KUSP fans launch one more effort to bring back community radio BY MAT WEIR

‘I

t was always there, and always something you could count on,” retired art teacher Myra Eastman says, the sound of long-lost love lingering in her voice. “We were friends.” Her late companion is defunct community radio station KUSP (88.9 FM). Although she never worked at the station, Eastman—a local resident for 46 years—says community radio played an integral part in her family’s life. It was the station she turned to for the latest in local politics, or to hear new and strange music hand-curated by passionate disc jockeys. She fondly remembers raising her children with programs

like “Castle Cottage,” and how it was “our only lifeline” for information after the devastating 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake. “It was a local jewel,” she says. “These were [voices] you knew, they were your neighbors.” So when she read about the financial trouble the station was going through two years ago, she became involved with Media Watch and KUSP Forward. Ex-KUSP programmers and community members in those groups did what they could to keep the station afloat, attending board meetings and even attempting several times to raise enough money to acquire

the station’s license. Their latest attempt was in October of last year, when they were outbid by the Educational Media Foundation—an adult contemporary Christian music conglomeration—which won the rights to the bankrupt station’s signal with a $605,000 offer. The new Bible-thumping rock station on 88.9 calls itself Aware FM. With KUSP gone, Eastman and others from Media Watch created a new coalition called Central Coast Community Radio (CCCR), with a new goal of purchasing an entirely different license, frequency and transmitter. Through its online crowdfunding campaign, >14


SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 12-18, 2017

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NEWS WAIT FOR THE SIGNAL <12 CCCR has raised $82,500 toward the purchase of 90.7 FM. The new station, not nearly as powerful as KUSP, would be able to transmit from a small tower on the UCSC campus. Still, their $82,500 is a far cry from the $265,000 needed to purchase the new license and transmitter, and even farther from the estimated $350,000 needed to fully operate a new station for an entire year. To help them reach this goal, CCCR received a challenge grant from a community member of $50,000, should they raise an initial $150,000. Raising the rest could be an uphill climb, and a steep one at that—as the members are well aware—but they hope media coverage will help them get there. If CCCR doesn’t meet its goal, all donors will get their money back. After fundraising and bidding for the signal are wrapped up, the license transfer must still be approved by the Federal

Communications Commission before new call letters get assigned. “Our biggest need is obtaining more contributions to close the deal,” says business attorney and CCCR Steering Committee member Ned Hearn. “By the end of the month, our goal is to have a package of funds.”

TALKING POINT Charlie Lange, another committee member, agrees that KUSP’s departure stripped the community of a vital service. “The need for a locally based, locally supported media outlet is crucial in these times we live in,” says Lange, who serves on CCCR’s Advisory Committee. “For disasters, for public commentary, for entertainment and artistic expression.” For nearly 40 years, he helped build the station’s listenership and maintained its local focus by hosting shows like “Soul Shack.” In the early days, he would even drive around in his Volkswagen van,

broadcasting live from concerts and events. Although Lange’s faith in community radio’s importance remains unwavering, he often wonders if the public realizes what it’s missing. “In my opinion, [the verdict] is still out on whether or not people in this community want to support it,” he admits. “We’ve had strong fundraising efforts for the last few months, but we’re not even halfway to the cost of just the license.” Worries like these led Central Coast Community Radio to create an ongoing survey on its website, asking community members what they want to hear. Since the poll launched in January, 110 people have answered, and the results show a strong desire for the old KUSP-style formatting, with 85 percent saying they want to hear local news, 78 percent in favor of local politics and 69 percent in favor of live broadcasts from events around the county. When asked what community >19

NEWS BRIEFS

APRIL 12-18, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

COURT SIGH

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“What are you talking about?” “I don’t know. Coach was yelling something about—” “It’s too loud in here, mostly because I’m yelling!” On the streaming video, the Oklahoma City Blue’s two broadcasters were breaking down a play in the team’s D-League game against the Santa Cruz Warriors. Or at least trying to. This Facebook Live feed was the only way to watch Monday night’s game, which was played in Oklahoma. Typically, a game has two announcers—a color commentator and a play-by-play one. But this game’s analysts clearly came from a different school of communications, as they repeatedly asked each other what was happening, leaned over to check in with

the coaches and nervously criticized each other’s choice of words. The Cox Convention Center, where the Blue play, is a hockey arena built in the ’70s that seats close to 14,000, but looks like it has about 400 guests for the playoff game. The Warriors got off to a hot start, as they often have lately, going up 29-16 in the first quarter, thanks to beautiful passing, limited mistakes, smart defense, and some wild shots finding their way into the hoop. But that lead slipped away (another recurring theme), giving way to a competitive back-and-forth battle, until a fourth-quarter collapse left Santa Cruz with a 124-104 loss and the revelation that it had been eliminated from the playoffs. Now change is on the way. In the D-League, every year

is a rebuilding year, as rules restrict how many players a team can keep from the previous season. And athletes frustrated by the pay often try their hands playing overseas. Both player consistency and pay may see an upswing next year, though, as the NBA’s collective bargaining agreement will create two-way players, who will make $50,000-$70,000 a year—about twice what traditional D-League players make—and bounce back and forth between the two leagues. It’s all part of the D-league’s growing reputation. The second-tier organization is slowly adding a few teams each year, and the league announced it would rebrand as the Gatorade League next season—a rather brazen corporate sellout, but maybe it’ll lead to better compensation.

(The switch also makes us feel bad about how, two years ago, we mocked the Warriors for adding sponsorship from the local company Pay Stand to its jerseys, an experiment that, comparatively, doesn’t look so bad these days.) For an organization where executives pride themselves on fostering an environment that’s the “closest thing” to the NBA, part of the charm is that this lower-budget league is still different. The Blue’s bumbling commentators harken back to a time when professional sports were just a little less, er—professional ... before $140 million contracts or even firstclass flights, or announcers who are practically movie stars. When the only thing that mattered more than the game itself was just how much everyone loved it. JACOB PIERCE


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No one enjoys facing legal problems. And yet, all of us at some time or another find ourselves in situations where professional legal assistance becomes a necessity. With so many law firms all eager to provide legal services, it becomes rather frustrating to know where you can get answers to your questions. In Santa Cruz, many individuals and businesses have learned to appreciate the personal approach that Stone Siegel Law Firm takes in giving you the peace of mind that you deserve regarding legal representation. Stone Siegel Law Firm is engaged in the practice of real estate law with creative, customized solutions for businesses and individuals alike. The editors of this 2017 Consumer Business Review urge our readers to contact Stone Siegel Law Firm to handle your real estate legal matters. You'll be glad you did and you'll have the assurance of knowing that you have found a law firm you can depend on!

When you want the finest paint and exceptional customer service, see King's Paint & Paper first, the community's favorite paint and wallpaper store. This community-minded paint and paper store has been serving Santa Cruz County proudly for 40 years! Their reputation rides on every can of paint that goes out the door! Featuring the full line of Benjamin Moore paints, this outstanding retailer offers free custom color mixing…free professional advice…free contractor referrals. They hold to their philosophy that their customers deserve more than just a product. So, if you need anything in the way of painting equipment and, of course, famous Benjamin Moore paints…see King's Paint & Paper and do business with this community's paint professionals! The editors of this 2017 Consumer Business Review highly recommend King's Paint & Paper to all of our readers for the finest in Benjamin Moore paints…stop in TODAY!

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Experienced construction people have come to rely on Olive Springs Quarry for all their needs when it comes to the finest sand and gravel. This is one firm, which isn't content just to offer the best selection…they specialize in service. Located at 1299 Olive Springs Road in Soquel, an outstanding community member that knows that your job cannot be held up because of delays. They endeavor, therefore, to keep an exact schedule to suit the convenience of their customers. Since they carry so many products, graded and sized gravel, sand, crushed rock, fill material and much more, Olive Springs Quarry usually has just the right products for the job. If you're a homeowner, you can count on the same professional service as larger contractors. The editors of this 2017 Consumer Business Review know you'll get the kind of service and quality products you've been looking for. We recommend for the 14th time Olive Springs Quarry to our readers!

Many years ago, the farm and feed store was the center of the farming community. Besides selling the many items that were needed on the farm or home, it served as the unofficial meeting place for farmers and growers and a good source of information on pet or livestock nutrition. The owner of General Feed & Seed Co., at 1900 B Commercial Way in Santa Cruz, continue the age old tradition of offering farm and pet feed, hay, straw, tack and a large selection of saddles and boots, belts, jewelry, hats and clothing. A friendly, knowledgeable staff is there to assist you with your entire farm, garden, organic garden, fertilizers and livestock needs. A tie with the past and a clear vision of the future needs of the community in Santa Cruz has made General Feed & Seed Co. the most popular farm and feed store and largest in Santa Cruz county. The editors of this 2017 Consumer Business Review urge all farmers, ranchers, growers and pet owners to shop General Feed & Seed Co., the community's big little farm store!

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What do you look for in an auto repair shop? Efficiency? Friendliness? Realistic prices? Well, in Santa Cruz AAMCO Transmissions Total Car Care offers all of this and more! Located at 1915 Soquel Avenue, moving in April to 1218 Ocean Street, with over 50 years as the trusted experts, this first-rate repair shop can take care of your vehicle with maintenance you can trust. Check engine lights, engine tune-up and auto repair, tire rotations, transmission service, oil change and exhaust services available. Over 50 years of experience plus the highest standards of repair using state-of-the-art technology and techniques are just a couple of the reasons that make doing business with this trusted total car care center such a pleasure. The editors of this 2017 Consumer Business Review highly recommend AAMCO Transmissions Total Car Care to our readers. Kim Johnson, owner for 12 years, invites you to stop into the new location and let Cody, the manager, help you with your repair needs!

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NEWS

PANEL DISCUSSION Homeowners can already sell energy from solar panels back into PG&E’s grid, but Allterra Solar Marketing Director David Stearns says Community Choice Energy would make it profitable for them to install more. PHOTO: CONNER QUINTO - ALLTERRA SOLAR

APRIL 12-18, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

POSITIVE OUTLET <12

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of electricity to purchase, setting the rate for customers, and deciding on how exactly to spend surplus revenue. MBCP will use that surplus revenue, expected to be about $9 million per year, to lower its rates, invest in local renewable electricity projects, and provide interest-free programs for solar home installations, says Johnson. The operations board—made up of administrators like Santa Cruz City Manager Martín Bernal—will manage the agency’s day-to-day work. Both boards will meet monthly, with their first meetings coming up at the end of this month. Municipalities with more than 50,000 citizens will get permanent seats on the 11-member boards, with the six remaining seats to be shared. Capitola and Scotts Valley, for example, will be swapping control

of the seat every two years. Starting this summer, MBCP will automatically enroll residents, who will have an option to opt-out and stay with PG&E, which will also operate the CCE grid, its meter readings, and maintenance services, PG&E spokeswoman Brandi Merlo says. Santa Cruz County will set up a credit guarantee with a local bank for the projected $3 million cost of starting MBCP, and once it’s paid off by the end of 2018, the agency will be financially independent, says Johnson. Initially, MBCP will purchase green electricity from nearby renewable projects, like the local Panoche Valley Solar Farm, which currently sells its renewable electricity to Southern California Edison. But its leaders expect to buy renewable electric plants within the next several years, using surplus revenue. “At some point, MBCP can choose to be

an owner of plants or continue to purchase from renewable projects,” says Johnson. “In Southern California, we are overloaded with solar systems throughout the state. There are plenty of places to buy renewably generated power for our program.” Of course, Santa Cruz residents can already install solar at their homes and sell it back into PG&E’s grid. MBCP could just make it even more lucrative for people to do so. A CCE in the Silicon Valley, for instance, will let residents sell energy at four times the rate that PG&E does, allowing such people to get up to $5,000 back, says Allterra Solar Marketing Director David Stearns, an avid supporter of the local CCE plan. “You’re taking the power back, literally and figuratively,” he says. Today, in California, there are two fully functioning CCE programs, Marin Clean Energy and Sonoma Clean Power, and three

other new ones—Clean Power San Francisco, Peninsula Clean Energy, and Silicon Valley Clean Energy—that are in the process of enrolling customers. Additionally, East Bay Community Energy, like MBCP, was recently approved, and more than 16 counties and cities, including San Jose, are exploring CCE programs. This is the simplest and most effective way for Californians to make a big difference in reducing carbon emissions, says Tatanka Bricca, a long-time environmental activist who lives in Ben Lomond. He’s attended city council meetings on CCE in Santa Cruz and Watsonville. “It’s a duplicatable model that is spreading across California,” says Bricca. “We can make a difference nationwide through CCE, even when the temporary residents of the White House make decisions hostile to the Earth and its people.”


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Looking forward to what Santa Cruz delivers next. You have a lot of choices when it comes to the delivery of your newborn. Our obstetricians, nurses, and certified nurse midwives work with you to develop your birth plan. And for newborns who need a little special care, the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford NICU is right here. It’s the type of care we can offer because we’re more than just a hospital, we’re part of this community. To schedule a birth center tour, call 831-457-7099 or visit dignityhealth.org/dominican/babies to learn more.

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NEWS WAIT FOR THE SIGNAL <14 radio means to them, comments included “community-owned and operated,” “Radio of, by and for the people,” and even “The old KUSP.” There were suggestions about bringing back some of the old programming, like “Talk of the Bay.” “There seems to be a growing interest [in community radio],” says ex-“Talk” host and current CCCR Steering Committee member Rachel Goodman. “Once people hear about it, they get excited. It’s just a matter of getting the word out.” A Peabody-Award-winning journalist and current co-host of “Planet Watch” on KSCO (1080 AM), Goodman believes the survey is a positive step in the right direction from the lessons learned after KUSP’s demise, something she felt could have been avoided. “Being nimble and responsive to your community is very important,” she says, “along with looking at other successful models from around the country.”

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One model that radio-loving locavores admire is KPCW out of Park City, Utah. “We’re growing audience and revenue while airing more shows we produce,” says KPCW General Manager Larry Warren. “We believe this is a great time to be in noncommercial radio.” The community station is affiliated with National Public Radio, although it broadcasts only the bare minimum of the media organization’s shows. “I stripped away most of the syndicated programs,” he states. “Why should I pay for a show that a bigger station with a stronger signal is also running?” When it comes to what communities crave, Lange believes one need not look farther than KPIG, which broadcasts out of Watsonville. “I would rather listen to a show by someone who is passionate,” he says. “People might like the music, but it’s the personality that they respond to.”

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THE FOUNDER Eric Thiermann, the

APRIL 12-18, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Santa Cruz filmmaker who started Impact Creative. PHOTO: KEANA PARKER

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On the Edge of

Silicon Beach

With its groundbreaking camera work, small Santa Cruz production studio Impact Creative is having a huge impact on the future of virtual reality technology BY CHRISTINA WATERS

O

cites Rising International, the nonprofit, founded by Carmel Jud, that has recently starting using VR technology to acquaint women in high-risk areas around the world with the women selling their handmade goods locally. Thiermann has applied for a U.N. Impact Grant to deepen the social justice area of his work. “You gotta do something to feed your soul. All the companies are coming out with games,” Thiermann notes. “What I like to do is tell stories that connect people.”

THE STUDIO Two lively little dogs greet invited guests at the code-protected front door of Impact Creative. Once they have a sniff, the house mascots romp away to other regions of the spacious design studio. Huge enough to house studio and brainstorming areas, the first floor boasts at least two man-cave-sized lounge areas (wraparound couches, toys, what have you), a conference table that can seat the entire IC team, a central staging area for off-site shoots that also works up into a mini studio for product photography, and

long counters filled with various snacks and drinks, plus water bowls for the canines. Desks and computers for programmers, producers, editors, and writers hold down a far corner— the business end of the studio, if you will. At the opposite corner is a vault protected by codes and locks, in which the house treasures are stored—cameras, drones, robotics, lithium batteries the size of toaster ovens, stabilizers, and assorted sound capture devices. Major motion pictures have been made with the exact same equipment. On one side of the studio, post-production is finessed. On the other, image and data captured. Highenergy humans with laptops pace in between, mostly very young. The first day I visit IC, a trade show booth is being finalized for its gig at a Las Vegas convention, and I’m invited to step into a fabulous virtual world. “With VR, you don’t use space and time in the usual way,” Thiermann says. “Creating experiential content requires a lot of craft.” VR goggles cover my eyes, and I step out into space, looking at the Earth far below me. After floating for

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 12-18, 2017

scar-winning documentary filmmaker Eric Thiermann lives for storytelling. His experience and imagination ignite the narratives at Impact Creative, a small production studio here in Santa Cruz that epitomizes “state of the art.” A member of the first graduating class at UCSC, company founder Thiermann feels that proximity to the university is key to Impact Creative’s future. “I’d like to set up a funicular going straight down the hill from Science Hill to our studio,” he says. With their pioneering work in virtual reality, companies like Seagate, Google, Hyundai, CISCO and Princess Cruises are coming to Impact Creative to help them launch ad campaigns, forgoing traditional TV spots and billboards for the opportunity to plunge their prospective consumers into an unforgettable experience. But the company’s productions can have social applications, too, Thiermann says. “Two people in two different parts of the world can have headsets and interact in a single virtual space,” he says. He

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a few seconds, I turn my head and see the NASA space shuttle docking just beside me. I float inside it, and watch as it maneuvers through various intricate exercises that I can step into, or not. I can already feel the addictive pull of this sort of gorgeous illusion. However sexy—and however rapidly evolving—the 360 VR technology needs much more content before it becomes the promotional industry standard. “We’re not getting rid of our 2D bread and butter,” Thiermann admits, and that includes computer-animated videos, as well as shoots involving complex 360 live-action imagery. Over 40 years, Thiermann’s group has grown and evolved. While he can’t reveal the name, he will say that “a major Hollywood film company” just contacted them about a collaboration. IC demos often get one million hits in a day. Thiermann thinks the reason is simple: “People want engaging content.” Raised in L.A., Thiermann learned to take photos and shoot movies as a UCSC student before getting his MFA at UCLA. “I worked around Hollywood, worked with Jonathan Demme. But I didn’t want to be an art director. I wanted to do movies,” he says. “I made short films, then applied for an AFI grant that was my ticket out of LA.” After doing a PBS-style documentary of artists in prisons, Thiermann made The Last Epidemic, an anti-nuke film, exposing the medical consequences of nuclear war, nominated for an Oscar. “The next one, In the Nuclear Shadow—I was the shooter—did win the Oscar,” he says. “I made tons of documentaries, and we started getting lots of jobs. Once the internet came along, you could be anywhere, so you didn't have to be in New York or L.A. The quality of life here, raising a family in a real community, has kept me here.” “I think we have a good reputation. It’s all referrals, it’s not me,” he insists. “There are so may talented people here.” He points around the studio. “Young people

who grew up with digital technology. I can still shoot really well, but they grew up with this stuff,” he says. Thiermann and his team seem to inhale work. “Every year, we get bigger and better. All the demo videos you see at Best Buy stores all over the world—those are ours. Anything Google. We make all the videos on all those products.” Thiermann likes doing it all. “I like shooting guerilla-style. I like building things,” he says. Travel comes with the territory. “Every week or so we’re on location. I just got back from Standing Rock. Couldn’t get a plane, so we drove for two days in the snow to make a little documentary. We went up to the Northwest to do a really fun shoot for Hyundai. Going to Haiti next month, and then the Cameroons to document innovations that help


LOOK HERE Judy Mo, motion graphics designer for Impact Creative,

keep young women in school.” Why slow down? “I’d rather be working,” he says with a shrug. “It’s too much fun. And it’s all new, all the time.”

Philip Lima gets to play with the dazzling toys. Expensive (close to six figures) cameras—like the “Weapon,” which is made by Red and delivers megapixel images that are detailed enough to eat. The Martian, The Hobbit, and Transformers were all shot on similar Red cameras. These are stored in the code-protected vault, along with an arsenal of other digital cameras, VR hardware in its own James Bond-style case, robots, drones, etc. The man who handles all of this hardware was born and raised in Santa Cruz and has been with Eric

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Thiermann for 10 years—one third of his life. “I started editing video,” explains Lima, “and quickly shifted to computers and capturing images.” He claims he still enjoys editing, but I can tell he likes image capturing the best. “Small projects begin with the directing team. They figure out the approach, and then come to me. I shoot, then they edit. I do color correction afterwards, usually with DaVinci Resolve.” One of Lima’s most arduous VR camera shoots involved a parachute assault training exercise piece at Fort Bragg. “Since it was a VR shot, I had to be close to the camera, to monitor sound, and I had to fit in. The client in that case was VICE News, an investigative reporting group that does a very organic kind of news gathering.”

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ON THE EDGE OF SILICON BEACH

BRACED FOR IMPACT Member of the Impact Creative team on a shoot with the first autonomous robot to arrive at Walmart Supercenters. Left to right: Philip Lima, Kelsey Doyle, David Sieburg, Deva Blaisdell-Anderson and Donald Eldridge.

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The result was a four-minute VR special that takes viewers inside a Boeing C-17 while paratroopers perform assault maneuvers. The camera and reporter had to capture everything with multiple camera arrays while staying out of the way of the military. Lima suited up in camouflage gear in order to blend in. “Shooting a commercial with cameras, like the Reds, you have complete control,” Lima says. “All that goes away with 360 panoramas. Plus, there’s a real challenge with storytelling using 360, because it’s hard to move the viewer’s attention in the way that you can by using different lenses, different kinds of focus and light.” So how does he guide the viewer’s eye in these wraparound panoramas? “Audio cues are helpful, and lighting. That can lead them in the desired directions.” But there are other challenges with 360. “All of the lighting equipment has to be invisible, because of the omnidirection of the views. Have to hide the lights—that’s a big challenge.” But challenges also involve a lot of on-location fun. “We began

using 360 a year and a half ago,” he says. “One of our recent clients was Princess Cruises. We all went to New York, and went on the boat as it docked. Then we did all the touristy things in New York, shooting it in 360 degrees so the viewer could get a feel for the cruise package experience. It was great.” How long does this kind of shoot take? Their Hyundai Canada commercial, he says, required three 12-hour days of shooting to produce two 30-second spots. What’s fun, says Lima, is that “everything’s new in this field.” And the most fun involves aerial drones. “I started with drones five years ago,” he says, eyes widening. “The big thing is that you can achieve a stable image. You can put a camera wherever you want—it opens a world of possibilities beyond the obvious visual clichés.” Those ads that take you right out over the water with surfers, or soaring high above a car speeding through the desert—those are shot with a smart camera suspended from a drone. Known for his aerial shots, Lima admits to strapping the costly Red


ON THE EDGE OF SILICON BEACH cameras onto the bigger drones for some shots. “For those, we use both a flier and a spotter. Definitely lots of adrenaline,” he says.

THE TECH GUY

THE CEO David Sieburg’s background in broadcast marketing for ABC, NBC and the Department of Defense positioned him to lead the product development direction of IC. He and his former wife had come out from Colorado, shopping for a future home. Santa Cruz sold itself, and a friend of Jacques Cousteau’s helped make a connection to documentary films—and that led to Eric Thiermann. “The world is quickly transitioning into an ‘era of experience’ where the digital and physical merge,” says Sieburg. “We have a long track record in film and video production, but we are evolving into a new breed of production company.” Noting the overwhelming newness of the technology IC uses, Sieburg admits that “all of these terms—virtual and augmented reality, artificial intelligence, machine learning, big data, drones, autonomous cars— they’re all different pieces of this experiential future.” Like Thiermann, he is attracted to social relief efforts, and has documented post-disaster efforts in places like New Orleans and the

Philippines. There’s no stopping the move toward virtual and artificial intelligence, but Sieburg wants to keep his eyes on the big picture, and help influence the positive implications of technology. What does a CEO of a video production company do? “I develop client projects,” he says. “I’ll ask about their goals—mostly by phone and email—and then build a proposal. Next come the threephase pre-production, production and post-production. This is a group process. Half of what we do is animation, although it’s more fun to do the video projects.” Sieburg estimates the eightperson team has “between 10 and 30 projects going at any given time, and each takes anywhere from six to 10 weeks for completion.” People are surprised that a small studio like IC can produce such slick, high-powered work. “We blow

them away with our ability. All of us, Eric, Deva, Donald, Philip—the whole team—we all edit and direct and write. We’ve mind-melded after almost eight years. We're not the usual agency model,” says Sieburg. The team includes directors, producers like Deva BlaisdellAnderson, Kelsey Doyle, and Toby Thiermann, plus motion designers Judy Mo and David Whitmer. “All of us, we are very hands on.” The marketing angle is “all about eyeballs—getting people to notice and watch the content. The bigger topic,” Sieburg says, “is what are we— mankind—going to do with it? I’m not sure if it’s driving us, or if we’re driving us. We know that technology is evolving—you can’t stop it. We want to be part of the good uses. But what’s next on the horizon? There’s no portfolio yet for that. It’s the edge—that’s where it is exciting.”

A VR GLOSSARY VR (virtual reality) offers an immersive experience, one that simulates a three-dimensional world and places the viewer in a non-real somewhere, using a headset and motion tracking device. In VR, using a headset, you can look around a virtual space and it feels as if you’re actually there.

360 DEGREE cinematography uses many cameras with multiple lenses to capture all angles, side to side, top to bottom. The captured imagery is then “stitched” together by computer programs to simulate a seamless encounter with a wraparound environment, seen from the viewer’s point of view. Anyone with an ounce of geek DNA can attach a 360 camera to a drone and make a fairly decent “oh wow” visual experience. AR (AUGMENTED REALITY) lies somewhere in between a physical environment and a virtual one. It adds sensory data to the natural world, like maps and directions suddenly popping up along your sightlines when you need them. Think of the hologram of Obi Wan in Star Wars—the hologram of Princess Leia was a digital creation placed into a real space. Another great example of AR occurs in the film Minority Report when Tom Cruise’s character walks through the shopping mall and all of the window ads and billboards know his name and offer him his favorite product choices. This, as anyone surfing the internet knows, is already with us in the form of robots tracking our reading and purchasing choices. CHRISTINA WATERS

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 12-18, 2017

Joe Goldin left the computer science program at UCSC to develop the emerging technology area at IC. Kinetic as a Tesla coil, the house technologist manages IT systems. “Making sure the internet’s running, researching server upgrades, new technology, how we can utilize it,” he says with a grin. “For a Seagate project, we had to research product mapping. Ninety percent of my research happens online.” Barely 20 years old, Goldin grew up with gaming and computers. “My biggest curiosity is how humans use technology,” he says. “VR is where psychology, storytelling, and technology come together.” Which is why the pieces made by IC have such emotional power, as well as state-of-the-art graphics. Goldin’s work also involves stitching together digital images. “For the Princess Cruises piece, a 360-degree video, I started by looking at the shot list, at pre-production, how many shots would be indoors, or outdoors,” he says. “With 360, we use six cameras and a single brain that compiles all the images. After the shoot, I stitch it together on a computer.” He often invents the required programs as he goes. After the compiled images are edited, Goldin smooths the edges so the final product is visually seamless. Goldin surfs emerging technologies for exciting ways of displaying products, like logos mapped onto three-dimensional volumes. “With video projection mapping,” Goldin says, “we can project images onto anything— faceted objects, trees, hands. What is new is the ability to map onto the shape of an object with a single projector—saving lots of money.” Goldin explains a simple but important distinction: everything VR is 360-degree, but not all 360-degree video is VR.

“VR is defined by the technology,” he explains. “If you are watching a 360 video on a computer, that’s not virtual reality. If you watched that same video in a VR headset, that is virtual reality. Current headset hardware has been perfected so that it won’t make you motion sick. It in essence moves with the user’s motor expectations.” For example, my spacewalk was an animated 360 video that IC created for the hard drive company LaCie. It can be watched on a computer or tablet, but it was created with viewing on a VR headset in mind. “A few years from now we won’t have the clunky headset, there will be a contact lens, or a chip that acts as a receiver,” says Goldin. He doesn't believe this will all lead to a dystopic Matrix-type world. “I still love to go outside and play,” he says.

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LITERATURE

FLIGHT CLUB Jennifer Ackerman talks about her new book ‘The Genius of Birds’ on Wednesday, April 12 at 7 p.m.

APRIL 12-18, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Bird is the Word

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In her new book, Jennifer Ackerman explains why science is only just beginning to understand bird smarts BY WENDY MAYER-LOCHTEFELD

E

ver been called a birdbrain? According to Jennifer Ackerman, you should be so lucky. In her wondrous new book, The Genius of Birds, she reminds us

HOT TICKET

that there is more than one way to wire a clever mind. From the exacting beauty of their nests to the evidence of their empathy, navigational prowess, and ability to recognize faces, she lays out the

MUSIC Las Cafeteras reboots P29

surprisingly adaptable intelligence of birds, elevating it to its rightful place in the natural world. We talked recently about the delights and mysteries to be found in the avian brain.

DINING Ode to the El Palomar Taco Bar P46

How has your personal history influenced your interest in birds? JENNIFER ACKERMAN: I started birdwatching with my dad when I was eight or nine years old. We had five girls in our family, so

HOT TICKET You’re literally reading it right now. We’re just messing with you! P26


Hussain_Sharma_GoodTimes.pdf

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3/21/17

2:13 PM

PRESENTS

Sunday, April 30th, 7:30 pm at the Rio Theatre Tickets: kuumbwajazz.org and Logos Books & Records, downtown Santa Cruz Info: kuumbwajazz.org or (831) 427-2227

COMING SOON: Jean Luc-Ponty, June 5th at the Rio Theatre

cabrillo theatrearts presents

BY ANNA DEAVERE SMITH DIRECTED BY DONALD WILLIAMS

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Los Angeles, 1992

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LITERATURE

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INTRODUCTORY EVENINGS

Birds are smarter than we give them credit for. What have we learned about the nature of their mental abilities?

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getting a little alone time with him was a big deal. He’d learned about birds in Boy Scout camp, so he was pretty good at identifying them by call and sight. I’ve held onto that love of birds all my life. When studies started to come out about their surprising cognitive abilities, I thought it sounded like a fascinating topic to delve into.

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The misrepresentation of the bird brain goes back to Ludwig Edinger in the 19th century. He suggested it was a primitive, reptilian structure, which turned out to be wrong, but it stymied research in the field for a very long time. Scientists finally began to sort out that birds may not have a neocortex like ours, but they have a structure that’s similar. Many species have brains that are large for their body size. Neurons in the brains of songbirds and corvids have a density akin to primates, but intelligence is not so much about brain size—it’s about the connections between neurons. When birds learn to vocalize, they use neural pathways similar to those we use to learn speech.

APRIL 12-18, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

So birdsong is like language?

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There are remarkable similarities between song learning in birds and speech learning in humans. Young songbirds have a period of vocalizing called subsong, which is like human baby babble. Some birds sing their songs in regional dialects and pass them down through generations. Some songbirds have speech defects. They stutter. Like humans, songbirds have a narrow window of time in which their brains are more easily wired to learn songs the way ours are more easily wired to learn language.

You write that birds having mapping minds. How does a hummingbird

find his way to the same feeding ground each year? The navigational abilities of birds so far exceed our own that they’re in a different domain. It’s believed that they use a sort of map and compass system, but it’s all cognitive. They tap into many different types of information, from sun and stars to magnetic fields, landscape features, wind, sound, smell, and more. All of it funnels into their brains and somehow guides them to their destination. Birds displaced from their natural migratory paths by hundreds or thousands of miles are able to beeline back to the right route within an hour or two.

Birds’ adaptability is often used as an explanation for their success, but many species are highly vulnerable right now. How can we help? Birds that are adaptable are probably going to do all right, like blackbirds and sparrows. The ones that are highly specialized, particularly in mountain or tropical niches, are being squeezed out of their habitats. In terms of helping, being an ethical consumer is important, calling and writing your representatives about environmental issues can make a difference, but we can also do things in our own backyards. One of the great stories where I come from is the rise of the bluebird population. It happened because people put up bluebird boxes everywhere to protect them from predatory birds that were displacing their nesting sites. Growing native plants that birds love is another way to help, and you get the added joy of seeing them in your garden. I’ve even had an eastern screech owl roost in a tree right outside my kitchen window. That was pretty great. Jennifer Ackerman will talk about and sign her new book at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, April 12 at Bookshop Santa Cruz, 1520 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, 423-0900. Free.


MUSIC

CAFETERIA STYLE Las Cafeteras comes to the Rio Theatre in Santa Cruz on Saturday, April 15.

Stump It Up What would the members of Las Cafeteras do if they were president? BY STEVE PALOPOLI to carrying on the centuries-old folk tradition from the Veracruz region of Mexico. For instance, Las Cafeteras member Leah Gallegos wouldn’t mind at all if songs like “Señor Presidente” weren’t so relevant today. “Four hundred years later, we’re still singing about the same needs,” says Gallegos by phone, as the seven-member band prepares for an album release tour that comes to the Rio Theatre in Santa Cruz on Saturday, April 15. On Tastes Like L.A., “Señor Presidente” leads into an even more direct comment on our times, the hip-hop-driven “If I Was President,” featuring lyrics like “If I was

president/I’d free all my poor black and brown kids that got caught up in three strikes/And when they get out/They gettin’ free bikes.” Few bands can find the humor and joy in a political protest song the way Las Cafeteras does (another great line from “If I Was President”: “My first lady would be my mom/Cause she’d slap me at the first thought/Of drone strikes and dropping bombs”). Gallegos doesn’t even see it as political, really, singing about the human experience. “I think we sing about very basic human needs,” she says. “A lot of times that gets named ‘political’ or ‘radical,’ and I think that’s a little off.” Perhaps the difference is that, as

INFO: 7:30 p.m., Saturday, April 15, Rio Theatre, 1205 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. $25. 423-8209.

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 12-18, 2017

I

n the traditional son jarocho song “Señor Presidente,” a peasant laments the sad state of his neighborhood. In each verse, the narrator asks the president if the common people will ever have things as good as they are in the president’s neighborhood. Will their streets ever be as safe? Will they ever be as rich? The questions go unanswered, but after all, they are rhetorical. The answer, it is clearly implied, is no. Las Cafeteras perform their own version of the song on their new album, Tastes Like L.A., which comes out this week. The East L.A. band is known for their love of son jarocho, but that doesn’t mean there’s no downside

most of the band members come from immigrant families, the issues people have been most alarmed about since Trump took office are ones they’ve had to be worried about their whole lives. “It’s become a little more loud, it’s a little more in everyone’s face,” says Gallegos. “But it’s not that new to us.” Neither is the internal turmoil they had to deal with in 2015, when Annette Torres left the band; Torres released a statement claiming the members of Las Cafeteras weren’t living up to their stated feminist and democratic values, saying the women in the band were being pushed around by the men. The other band members denied most of her claims, and Gallegos took issue with anyone speaking for her. Any band that finds success—as Las Cafeteras has since the release of its popular last album, 2012’s It’s Time— is going to have tension, she says, but the story she saw represented by Torres and much of the media coverage was not her experience at all. Because Torres is the aunt of two of the band members, brothers David and Hector Flores, the breakup was that much harder. “We’re still broken-hearted about it,” says Gallegos. “But I think internally it sort of allowed us to grow stronger. It really tested our caring for one another, because we lost a family member. We lost a friend.” Weirdly, the conflict also pushed them to complete their long-overdue follow-up to It’s Time, which kept getting pushed back year after year as they continued to tour. “It kind of put us in a place where we wanted to create, and be in the studio making music,” she says. “It was sort of our medicine.” The finished product represents a lot of musical growth by the band, which has created a sonic stew on Tastes Like L.A. that goes well beyond their origins in traditional sounds and songs. “We have a lot more originals. We’ve kind of strayed away from son jarocho,” says Gallegos. “We’re starting to experiment with more instruments and more sounds.”

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CALENDAR

GREEN FIX

See hundreds more events at santacruz. com.

‘LOSE YOUR LAWN’ WORKSHOP The long California drought is over, but the next drought may be just around the corner. As governor Jerry Brown said last week, “Conservation must remain a way of life.” Learn how to make that a reality with Santa Cruz County’s “Lose Your Lawn” workshop to convert an existing lawn into a beautiful and colorful drought-tolerant Monterey Bay-friendly garden. The workshop will cover converting overhead spray irrigation to efficient drip irrigation, proper selection of water-wise California native and Mediterranean plants, and how to save money and time by using sheet mulching method for lawn removal.

Free calendar listings in print and online are available for community events. Listings show up online within 24 hours. Submissions of free events and those $15 or less received by Thursday at noon, six days prior to the Good Times publication date, will be prioritized for print (space available). All listings must specify a day, start time, location and price (or ‘free’ if applicable). Listings can be set to repeat every week or month, and can be edited by the poster as needed. Ongoing events must be updated quarterly. It is the responsibility of the person submitting an event to cancel or modify the listing. Register at our website at santacruz.com in order to SUBMIT EVENTS ONLINE. E-mail calendar@goodtimes.sc or call 458.1100 with any questions.

WEDNESDAY 4/12 ARTS STEAM IN NATURE Create STEAM-based nature art while learning about the science of our natural environment in this weekly class with educator Sue Creswell. Sue Creswell has been a primary teacher, with an emphasis on environmental education, for 26 years. 3 p.m. Santa Cruz Children’s Museum of Discovery, 1855 41st Ave., Capitola. 888-424-8035.

Info: 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, April 15. County of Santa Cruz, 1080 Emeline Ave., Building D, Santa Cruz. Free.

BOOK TALK: JENNIFER ACKERMAN Bookshop Santa Cruz along with Friends of Santa Cruz State Parks presents awardwinning science writer Jennifer Ackerman and her new book, The Genius of Birds. 7-8 p.m. Bookshop Santa Cruz, 1520 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. 423-0900.

ART SEEN

FOOD & WINE TRIVIA NIGHT Trivia night at 99 bottles. 21 and up. 8 p.m. 110 Walnut Ave., Santa Cruz. 459-9999.

APRIL 12-18, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

PURE PLEASURE COMEDY

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A “Joisey” native and veteran of the Bay Area comedy scene since 2001, Ronn Vigh once worked as a flight attendant and didn’t smother any of his passengers with a pillow. Vigh has been performing stand up for 13 years and his acerbic wit landed him a writing gig on Joan Rivers’ “Fashion Police” on E! Entertainment Television. With Vigh headlining, Pure Pleasure is bringing six of the funniest folks from the Bay Area to Santa Cruz: Emily Catalano, Liz Stone, Emma Haney, Ta’Vi, and Aviva Siegel will bring the house down this Friday, April 14. Info: 8 p.m. Friday, April 14. Pure Pleasure, 111 Cooper St., Santa Cruz. purepleasureshop.com $25.

DOWNTOWN SANTA CRUZ FARMERS MARKET In addition to a large variety of farm products, this market offers a great selection of local artisan foodstuffs, delicious baked goods, and lots of options for lunch and dinner. 1:30 p.m. Cedar and Lincoln streets, Santa Cruz. 454-0566.

VOLUNTEER VOLUNTEER OPEN HOUSE Whether you’re a long-time volunteer or brand new to Santa Cruz, we invite you to the Volunteer Open House to celebrate our community of river stewards and learn about how to get involved in your watershed in 2017. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Coastal Watershed Council, 345 Lake Ave., Santa Cruz. 464-9200.

THURSDAY 4/13 ARTS STORYTIME Join us for storytime. Free with museum admission and for MOD Members.

FRIDAY 4/14 - SATURDAY 4/29 ‘THE NETHER’ AT CENTER STAGE It’s a virtual wonderland that provides total sensory immersion. The Nether only requires a login, choosing an identity, and indulging in every desire. But a young detective uncovers a disturbing brand of entertainment, and when she does, she triggers an interrogation into the darkest corners of the imagination. “This is a disturbing play, but also one which rewards by generating conversation on the topic and providing much food for thought,” says director Brian Spencer. The crime drama won the 2012 Susan Smith Blackburn Prize, Los Angeles Ovation Award in 2012, and the 2014 ATCA Francesca Primus Prize. For mature audiences only. Info: 8 p.m. Center Street Theater, 1001 Center St., Santa Cruz. $20.

10:30-11 a.m. Santa Cruz Children’s Museum of Discovery. 888-424-8035. Free.

6-9 p.m. Del Mar Theater, 1124 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. 334-0226. $15.

EVENING OF CINEMA AND ART, BENEFIT FOR PREGNANT MARE RESCUE Guests are invited to sip a glass of Hecker Pass wine and enjoy hors d’oeuvres with other members of the wider Pregnant Mare Rescue and horse communities. There will be a one-time showing of Harry & Snowman.

LESLIE KARST, A MEASURE OF MURDER Bookshop Santa Cruz welcomes local author Leslie Karst for a reading and signing of her new cozy mystery, A Measure of Murder, book two in Karst’s Sally Solari mystery series. 7 p.m. Bookshop Santa Cruz, 1520 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. 423-0900. Free.


CALENDAR CLASSES

MIDTOWN

STARGAZING WITH “COSMIC JOE” JORDAN Hike the enchanted upper campus of UCSC to view constellations and planets, with “true tall tales of the universe!” Meet first at the east field multi-purpose room, and then go out into wonders of the night sky. 8 p.m. East Field House UCSC, 420 Hagar Drive, Santa Cruz. 459-2807. $15.

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FOOD & WINE TRIVIA NIGHT This festive event brings together trivia aficionados, boneheads and the chic geek for a night of boisterous fun. 8:30 p.m. Woodstock’s Pizza, 710 Front St., Santa Cruz. 427-4444. LIVE MUSIC AT ZIZZO’S COFFEEHOUSE AND WINE BAR Enjoy live music at the area’s only built in piano bar with the biggest mirror ball on the Central Coast! Our bar serves a variety of wines and local craft beer along with tasty small-plate appetizers and desserts. 7-9:30 p.m. Zizzo’s Coffeehouse & Wine Bar, 3555 Clares St., Capitola. 4770680 or zizzoscoffee.com. $5.

HAPPY EASTER! UNIQUE ORIGINAL MERMAID DESIGNS In-House Screen Printed and Embroidered Clothing, Hats, Home Decor “Shell” Phone: (831) 345-3162 • 718 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz

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PUBSMASH: CALLAHAN’S WEEKLY GAME DAY Every week Santa Cruz Gamers expands the back room game bar at Callahan’s for everyone to enjoy by adding extra consoles, games, screens, and board games. Noon-Midnight. Callahan’s, 507 Water St., Santa Cruz. 427-3119. Free.

GROUP

THE SANTA CRUZ TREMOLOS SINGING GROUP FOR PEOPLE WITH PARKINSON’S Many people with Parkinson's Disease suffer from weak (quiet) speech. Singing is known to be a good voice strengthening exercise for people with Parkinson’s Disease. Santa Cruz County has an ongoing singing group for people with Parkinson’s and their caregivers. 1-2:30 p.m. The Episcopal Church, 125 Canterbury Drive, Aptos. easepd.org/singing. Free. WOMEN IN CANNABIS SC HAPPY HOUSE Monterey Bay Women in Cannabis Happy hour. Everyone is welcome. Be prepared to ask what you need to be successful, and how you can help others. 5 p.m. MacKenzie >32

McCARTY’S WINDOW FASHIONS 1224 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz

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*Manufacturer’s mail-in rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made 4/15/17–6/26/17 from participating dealers in the U.S. only. For certain rebate-eligible products, the McCarty's Window Fashions purchase of multiple units of such product is required to receive rebate. Rebate 1224a Soquel Ave will be issued in the form of a prepaid reward card and mailed within 6 weeks of rebate claim receipt. Funds do not expire. Subject to applicable law, a $2.00 monthly be assessed against card balance 6 months after card issuance and each month thereafter. M-F: 10:00fee amwill - 4:00 pm Additional limitations may apply. Ask participating dealer forSat: details rebate form. ©2017 Hunter Douglas. All rights reserved. All trademarks used herein are the property of By and Appointment Hunter Douglas or their respective owners.17Q2NPS&LC1 831-466-9167 www.mccartyswindowfashions.com

*Manufacturer’s mail-in rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made 4/15/17—6/26/17 from participating dealers in the U.S. only. For certain rebate-eligible products, the purchase of multiple units of such product is required to receive a rebate. Rebate

see our schedule at

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SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 12-18, 2017

WOMENCARE: LAUGHTER YOGA Laughter yoga for women with cancer meets the first and third Thursdays. Call WomenCARE to register. 12:30-1:30 p.m. WomenCARE, 2901 Park Ave., Suite A1, Soquel. 457-2273. Free.

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Thrive

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CALENDAR

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2017

B12 Happy Hours: nted Discou 12 Wednesday 1:30-4:30pm B Vitamin Thursdays 9am-12pm Shots! Fridays 3-6pm

831-464-8691

www.santacruzmentor.org

12TH ANNUAL SECRET FILM FESTIVAL “The titles are a secret. The awesomeness is not.” That’s the promise of this year’s Secret Film Festival, this area’s coolest movie event for more than a decade running. Founding SFF mastermind Scott Griffin brings a mix of genres to his 12-hour movie marathon every year, and always gives audiences a sneak peek of highly anticipated films that don’t premiere until later in the year. The catch: you don’t get to know what they are! The titles are only revealed as each film begins. Last year's festival included the premieres of Hunt for the Wilderpeople, The Invitation and the best overlooked gem of last year, Operation Avalanche. Concessions are open all night; pillows and PJs are encouraged. Info: 11:59 p.m., Del Mar Theater, 1124 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $25.

<31 APRIL 12-18, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Bar and Grill at Pasatiempo, 20 Clubhouse Road, Santa Cruz. 459-9162. Free.

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HEALTH

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B12 HAPPY HOUR Receiving B12 in the form of an injection bypasses the gut absorption problem, and people receive 100 percent of the B12 in an injection. This helps people feel their best energy with better stress resilience. 9 a.m.-Noon. Thrive Natural Medicine, 2860 Park Ave., Soquel. 515-8699. $15.

MUSIC DJ A.D. Come out every Thursday evening to dance, drink, and play some pool. 21 and up. 9 p.m. The Castaways, 3623 Portola Drive, Santa Cruz. thecastawaysbar.com. Free.

FRIDAY 4/14 ARTS THE NETHER Jennifer Haley’s “The Nether” takes place in a virtual wonderland that provides total sensory immersion. One only needs to log in, choose an identity, and indulge in every desire. 8 p.m. Center Street Theater, 1001 Center St., Santa Cruz. 4257506. $20. A SPECIAL EVENING OF COMEDY A Special Evening of Comedy starring six of the wittiest entertainers in the Bay Area: Liz Stone, Emma Haney, Ta’ Vi, Emily Catalano, headliner Ronn Vigh, and host Aviva Siegel. 18 and up. 8-10 p.m. Pure Pleasure, 111 Cooper St., Santa Cruz. 466-9870. $25.


CALENDAR CLASSES

HEALTH

CHAIR YOGA WITH SUZI Instructor Suzi Mahler, CMT NE will guide you through a series of gentle seated yoga postures that are performed slowly and with breath awareness. This wonderfully therapeutic practice will help you increase strength and range of motion. 9:30 a.m. California Grey Bears, 2710 Chanticleer Ave., Santa Cruz. 234-6791. $5.

VITAMIN B12 FRIDAY Receiving B12 via injection means that people can increase their energy. B12 Fridays are a fun time for people to meet and mingle. 3-6 p.m. Thrive Natural Medicine, 2840 Park Ave., Soquel. 515-8699.

CIRCLE TIME Join us in the MOD Toddler Area at 10:45 a.m. for rhythm and song, in both English and Spanish. Let your littles explore musical instruments and finger puppets while everyone sings. Developmentally designed for ages 0-3. 11-11:30 a.m. Santa Cruz Children’s Museum of Discovery, 1855 41st Ave., Capitola. 888424-8035. BABY SIGN LANGUAGE (ADULT WITH CHILD) Weekly American Sign Language class for adults with children, taught by expert native language instructor with more than 40 years experience using ASL. 10 a.m. 3025 Porter St., Soquel. 435-0512. $15. BEGINNING ADULT FLAMENCO This class will focus on the dance form called clásico Español, a form of Spanish dance based on the principles of classical ballet. Students will begin to learn the classical version of the Sevillanas, a dance which is traditionally performed each year at the spring fairs in Andalucía. 6:30-7:30 p.m. International Academy of Dance, 320 Encinal St., Santa Cruz. 466-0458. $10.

FOOD & WINE

ST. JOSEPH’S CAPITOLA FISH FRY The “world famous” Lenten Fish Fry Dinners are back for another year. 5 p.m. St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, 435 Monterey Ave., Capitola. 475-8211. $5. NIGHT MARKET AT FOOD LOUNGE Only once monthly, on the second Friday of the month, come out for this deliciously exciting evening of local food, craft cocktails and live music. 4-9 p.m. Santa Cruz Food Lounge, 1001 Center St., Santa Cruz. 212-5399. Free.

Inspire

SATURDAY 4/15 FOOD & WINE

Relax

APTOS FARMERS MARKET AT CABRILLO COLLEGE Voted Good Times best farmers market in Santa Cruz County. With more than 90 vendors, the Aptos Farmers Market offers an unmatched selection of locally grown produce and specialty foods. 8 a.m.-Noon, Saturdays, Cabrillo College. montereybayfarmers.org or akeller@ montereybayfarmers.org. Free. WESTSIDE FARMERS MARKET The Westside Farmers Market takes place every week at the corner of Highway 1 and Western Drive, situated on the northern edge of Santa Cruz’s greenbelt. This market serves the communities of the west-end of Santa Cruz including Boony Doon, North Coast, UCSC Campus and is a short trip from downtown. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Mission Street and Western Drive, Santa Cruz. 454-0566. SCOTTS VALLEY FARMERS MARKET Started in 2009 with the City of Scotts Valley, the market represents farmers and specialty food purveyors along with cookedto-order food. This local market is the place for the Scotts Valley community to get their fill of fresh, healthy, locally grown fruits and vegetables. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. 360, Kings Valley Road, Scotts Valley. 454-0566. SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAINS APRIL 2017 PASSPORT DAY Passport Celebration Days to the Santa Cruz Mountains was introduced in 1993, by the Winegrowers of the Santa Cruz. Four times a year the winegrowing community comes together to celebrate the generations of farmers, vintners and families. Noon-5 p.m. Santa Cruz Mountains WInegrowers Association. 685-8463 or scmwa.com. $65.

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SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 12-18, 2017

WATSONVILLE FARMERS MARKET This market is in the heart of the famously bountiful Pajaro Valley. Peaceful and familyoriented, the Hispanic heritage of this community gives this market a “mercado” feel. 2-7 p.m. 200 Main St., Watsonville.

Live

33


APRIL 12-18, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Portola Dr.

41st Ave.

34 HWY 1 to S.C. N


CALENDAR <33 of Watsonville Nature Center, 30 Harkins Slough Road, Watsonville. 768-1622. Free.

students that hosts weekly poetry events. 4 p.m. Tannery Arts Center, 1010 River St. Suite Suite 112, Santa Cruz. 621-6226. Free.

VOLUNTEER

CLASSES

VOLUNTEER TO FEED THE HUNGRY WITH FOOD NOT BOMBS We need help sharing vegan meals with the hungry every Saturday and Sunday in downtown Santa Cruz: Cooking from Noon-3 p.m, 418 Front St., Santa Cruz. 515-8234. Serving from 4-6 p.m. at the Post Office, 840 Front St., Santa Cruz.

HELPING YOUR CHILD BECOME A READER Reading aloud is one of the most important things parents can do with their children. Reading books aloud to children stimulates their imagination, expands their understanding of the world, helps them develop language and listening skills and prepares them to understand the written word. 6:30-8:15 p.m. Santa Cruz Children’s Museum of Discovery, 1855 41st Ave., Capitola. sccmod.org. Free.

SUNDAY 4/16 FOOD & WINE LIVE COMEDY AT THE CROW’S NEST Crow’s Nest features live comedy, with talent from the national circuit, every Sunday night year-round. 21 and up. 2218 E. Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz. 476-4560. $7. EASTER AT PARADISE Come join us for Easter brunch, lunch or dinner. Dolce Musica will be entertaining. Paradise Beach Grille maximizes the beautiful beach location on Monterey Bay with an outdoor patio. 10 a.m. Paradise Beach Grille, 215 Esplanade, Capitola. 476-4900. $8. EASTER SUNDAY BRUNCH AT CHAMINADE RESORT Spring is just around the corner and it’s time to start making your Easter Sunday plans for the whole family. Join us at Chaminade Resort & Spa for a superb dining experience and fun-filled afternoon of activities for the whole family. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Chaminade - Linwood’s Bar and Grill, one Chaminade Lane, Santa Cruz. 4755600. $62.95/$18.95.

ARTS MUSIC TOGETHER—MUSICAL ME MusicalMe brings the essential Music Together Early Childhood Music & Movement class (for ages birth to 5 years, and the adults who love them) to the MOD Workshop. Pre Registration required. 10 a.m. 438-3514 or musicalme.com. Santa Cruz Children’s Museum of Discovery, 1855 41st Ave., Capitola. POETRY OPEN-MIC CELEBRATES NEW VENUE What started as a small group of poets performing at the Tannery Arts Center four years ago has quickly evolved into an entire collective of Santa Cruzans and UCSC

Same Great Location • Same Great Reputation

501 River St, Santa Cruz • 831-466-9551

$59 Renewals $79 New patients

TUESDAY 4/18

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CLASSES TUESDAY TEA TIME: FERMENTED FOODS Learn about the power of fermented foods, and how probiotics can improve your digestive and immune systems. Get tips on incorporating these beneficial foods and sample some of our store’s selections while enjoying tea. With Nutrition Consultant Madia Jamgochian. Noon-1 p.m. New Leaf Market, 1101 Fair Ave., Santa Cruz. 426-1306. Free.

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FOOD & WINE TRIVIA NIGHT Trivia Night at New Bohemia Brewing Company every Tuesday. 21 and up. 6 p.m. 1030 41st Ave., Santa Cruz. nubobrew. com/events. Free.

ONE STEP EVALUATION PROCESS Prop 64 takes effect in 2018!

GROUPS TIMEBANK ELDERHANDS INFORMATION MEET The TimeBank is enrolling folks willing to help their elderly neighbors with minor home repairs, light chores and errands, pet care, tech support and rides to appointments. 10:30 a.m. United Way Conference Room, 4450 Capitola Road, Capitola. timebanksantacruz.org/events. Free.

MUSIC SHERRY AUSTIN WITH HENHOUSE A local Americana icon, and story teller with an exquisite voice, Sherry Austin reminds us in silky, smooth tones about life’s simple pleasures. Austin on guitar, and a stellar lineup of local talent perform classic folk, country-folk, folk-rock, and standard ballads.

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SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 12-18, 2017

MONDAY 4/17

ltations u s n o c Our 8th Year

35


MUSIC CALENDAR

LOVE YOUR

LOCAL BAND

GINGER & JUICE “Don’t let the juice loose.” That’s the slogan of local band Ginger and Juice’s line of condoms. That’s right: this band sells its own condoms. And they work, too—that’s the band’s guarantee. No juice will be let loose. “Other bands have vinyl records. We have Ginger and Juice condoms and flasks,” says lead singer Ty Armstrong.

APRIL 12-18, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

As ridiculous as this sounds, it’s only the tip of the ridiculous iceberg for Ginger and Juice, whose members play a blend of smooth ’70s yacht rock and groove-rich, toe-tappin’ R&B.

36

Most bands shy away from the very notion of being thought of as gimmicky. Ginger and Juice embraces it, and takes it to the limit. The live shows are filled with costumes, audience participation, sing-alongs, give-away contests, burlesque dancers, and other unexpected moments. For this particular show, they plan to orchestrate an Easter egg hunt—in the Crepe Place. Initially, when the group started a couple years ago, it was a much more straightforward—and serious—rock project. As the members pushed into campy, dance-y territory, people started to take notice. “There’s a zillion good bands around here. I want to stand apart in this town,” Armstrong says of Ginger and Juice’s unhinged approach. “We want people to feel like a part of it. We’re trying to be ahead of the curve.” AARON CARNES

INFO: 9 p.m. Friday, April 14. Crepe Place, 1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. $8. 429-6994.

MITSKI

WEDNESDAY 4/12 INDIE

MITSKI The name of Mitski’s fourth album, Puberty 2, suggests a personal transformation so intense, she likens it to the body literally growing hair where there was none, the voice dropping, and all of those other awkward changes we go through. But for her, this life transition—the sequel to puberty—is a subtle one. The album chronicles the anxiety and depression of her day-to-day life as an adult in her mid-20s: Trying to find peace in routine, questioning love and identity, and trying to comprehend the great abyss that is human existence. She pulls it off in a somber, fuzzy-guitar-driven alt-rock album that will move you to pieces if you take the time to soak in the nuances. AARON CARNES INFO: 8 p.m. Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $15/adv, $18/door. 429-4135.

ROCK

SCOTT PEMBERTON What comes to mind when you hear the words “timber rock?” A

Northwestern flair? A grunge feel? A deep-woods vibe? If yes, then it’s a good way to describe guitarist extraordinaire Scott Pemberton. A technical and passionate lead guitarist with a joy and lightheartedness that seeps into everything he does, Pemberton is a hard-to-define, easyto-love rocker whose wheelhouse includes rock, blues, funk, jazz, jam and psych-rock. Often compared to fellow Northwestern rocker Jimi Hendrix, Pemberton is one of the most innovative guitarists, performers and artists of his time. CJ

music that should inspire a lot of freeloving. We’re talking bands that mix Americana, rock, jazz and country all into a big, heaping psychedelic stew. The lineup includes Action Street Ramblers, Levi Jack, and Grampa’s Chili. Be prepared for copious hugs. AC

INFO: 8:30 p.m. Moe’s Alley, 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz. $9/adv, $12/ door. 479-1854.

A fleet and fluid guitarist with a light and ingratiating tone, Lee Ritenour has spent some four decades bringing sleek melodicism, fusion, intelligence and style to smooth jazz, both as a solo artist and a founding member of the all-star quartet Four Play. He’s touring with longtime friend, jazz pianist Dave Grusin, an Academy Award-winning Hollywood composer. Often overlooked in jazz circles due to his focus on his film career, Grusin is an excellent player who recorded with heavyweights like Carmen McRae, Gerry Mulligan, Howard Roberts and Art Farmer. ANDREW GILBERT

FRIDAY 4/14 ROCK

LOVEFEST 2017 When is not a good time for a Lovefest? Answer: It’s always time. It’s not clear why this show is being billed as Lovefest 2017—maybe the bookers just think we all need more love in our lives. They’re not wrong! We do know that on April 14, Don Quixote’s will host three excellent regional bands who make the kind of

INFO: 8 p.m. Don Quixote’s, 6275 Hwy. 9, Felton. $10/adv, $12/door. 335-2800.

JAZZ

LEE RITENOUR & DAVE GRUSIN

INFO: 7 and 9 p.m. Kuumbwa Jazz, 320-2 Cedar St., Santa Cruz. $38/adv, $48/door. 427-2227.


MUSIC

BE OUR GUEST LOU HARRISON CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION

DJ SHADOW

If the phrase “new music” doesn’t mean anything to you, you might not know about Santa Cruz music legend Lou Harrison. If you’re looped into the new music scene, however, you know that the late Harrison is a giant of 20th century classical music. A composer known for incorporating found-sound percussion and nonWestern elements into his work, Harrison pushed contemporary music forward in unexpected ways . Harrison collaborators and fans will pay tribute to him with a matinee of Organ Concerto, and an evening performance of Solstice. CAT JOHNSON

SATURDAY 4/15 BLUEGRASS/TRIBUTE

GRATEFUL BLUEGRASS BOYS

INFO: 8:30 p.m. Don Quixote’s, 6275 Hwy. 9, Felton. $12/adv, $15/door. 335-2800.

SUNDAY 4/16 BLUES

INDIGENOUS The smoothed out licks of Indigenous have brought smiles to

Leon, string quartets by Anahati Abbasi and Scott Wollschleger, and a quartet by Danish composer Martin Stauning. CJ

INFO: 4 p.m. Moe’s Alley, 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz. $15/adv, $20/door. 479-1854.

Ever since he dropped his debut album, Entroducing, in 1996, DJ Shadow has been a household name in the electronic and hip-hop worlds. With a record collection of more than 60,000 albums to sample beats and instruments from, he sticks to the old-school tradition of crate-digging and hands-on DJing. While he’s constantly dropping new tracks and EPs, Shadow has only five albums on the market since his debut. Last year saw the release of his latest work, The Mountain Will Fall, which finds the producer extraordinaire diving deeper into the modern world of electronic beats and sounds. MW

NEW MUSIC

MIVOS QUARTET The Mivos Quartet is a new music ensemble that the Chicago Reader called “one of America’s most daring and ferocious.” Hailing from New York City, the quartet has a comfort zone that spans from metal clubs to museums and traditional venues. On Sunday, the ensemble hits Santa Cruz for a selection of works from the U.S., Denmark and Iran. The program includes pieces by avant-rock and metal guitarists Patrick Higgins and Mario Diaz de

INFO: 8 p.m. Resource Center for Nonviolence, 12 Ocean St., Santa Cruz. $10/ student, $20/gen. 423-1626.

MONDAY 4/17 HIP-HOP

DJ SHADOW

INFO: 9 p.m. Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $25/adv, $28/door. 429-4135.

INFO: 3 & 7 p.m. Sunday, May 14. Peace United Church of Christ. 900 High St., Santa Cruz. $17-$20. 4262010. WANT TO GO? Go to santacruz. com/giveaways before 11 a.m. on Wednesday, May 3 to find out how you could win a pair of tickets to the evening performance.

IN THE QUEUE OF MONTREAL

Experimental rock band out of Athens, Georgia. Wednesday at Catalyst AVI ZEV BAND

Santa Cruz-based surf-rock band. Wednesday at Crepe Place TECH N9NE

Long-running hip-hop favorite. Friday at Catalyst MELVIN SEALS & JGB

Longtime Jerry Garcia Band member and his mighty band. Saturday at Moe’s Alley AFRO-CUBAN ALL STARS

Celebrated Cuban outfit led by Juan de Marcos González. Monday at Kuumbwa

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 12-18, 2017

If you know anything about the Grateful Dead, you know that the band has its roots in bluegrass music. The Grateful Bluegrass Boys skip the Dead’s psych-jam bits and take the band full-circle with traditional bluegrass covers of their classic tunes, including “Ripple,” “Ramble On Rose,” “Eyes of the World,” and “Scarlet Begonias.” But the hotpicking band members don’t stop there—they also put a bluegrass twist on Bob Dylan, the Stones, Van Morrison and more. Also on the bill: Santa Cruz’s own honky-tonkin’ jam band Edge of the West. CJ

audience members since the late ’90s. Led by frontman Mato Nanji, Indigenous captures the roots of American blues, and beefs them up with a powerful, electric punch. Not surprising, since Indigenous has played with everyone from Bonnie Raitt to the late B.B. King, and Nanji once toured with original Jimi Hendrix band members Billy Cox and Mitch Mitchell for the Experience Hendrix tour in 2012. This Sunday, get to Moe’s early, as it’s a 4 p.m. matinee show. MAT WEIR

37


LIVE MUSIC

Wednesday April 12th 8:30pm $12

Portland Oregon Roots Rocker Returns

SCOTT PEMBERTON Thursday April 13th 8:30pm $7/10

Americana, Roots, Rock & Alt Country

MCCOY TYLER, DAN TOO, PAT HULL Friday April 14th 9pm $16/20 Live Reggae Party With

SPAWNBREEZIE

+ GONZO (OF TRIBAL SEEDS) Saturday April 15th 9pm $20/25

The Keepers Of The Flame Return

MELVIN SEALS & JGB Sunday April 16th 4pm $15/20

Afternoon Blues Series w/ Mato Nanji &

INDIGENOUS Thursday April 20th 8:30pm $7/10 Live Rock, Funk & Soul With THE

REDLIGHT DISTRICT + THE BLIND SPOTS Friday April 21st 9pm $12/15

Former Guitarist Of THE BLACK CROWES Debuts His New Band At Moe’s Alley Along With DIRTY KNOBS Side Project

MARC FORD

WED

4/12

THE APPLETON GRILL 410 Rodriguez St, Watsonville APTOS ST. BBQ 8059 Aptos St, Aptos

Kyle Jester 6-8p

AQUARIUS RESTAURANT Santa Cruz Dream Inn 175 W Cliff Dr, Santa Cruz BELLA VISTA ITALIAN KITCHEN AND BAR 8041 Soquel Dr, Aptos

4/13

THU Darls & Darls Fabrications, Paint Sessions 6-8p Chickenbone Slim Trio w/Marty Dodson, Troy Sandow 6-8p

FRI

4/14

Unsalted Pop 7p James Murray 6-8p

Minor Thirds Trio 6:30-9:30p John Michael 6:30-9:30p

4/15

SAT Apothesary, Blessed Curse 8p

Coyote Slim 1p Lloyd Whitley 5p

SUN

4/16

MON

Reverend Stephan Sams 6-8p

4/17

Broken Shades 6-8p

Silver Lining 7-10p

Phoenix & Tomas 6-9p

BLUE LAGOON 923 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Black Rainbows, Doors Comedy Night/80s To No Where, Supernaut Night Free 8:30p $5 9p

Gozu, Ape Machine, Kook, Winter Wind $8 9p

Fulminante, Boss’ Daughter, Randy Savages $5 9p

The Box (Goth Night) 9p

Metal Monday Free 9p

THE BLUE LOUNGE 529 Seabright Ave, Santa Cruz

Punk Night

Karaoke

Karaoke

Comedy

Karaoke

BOARDWALK BOWL 115 Cliff St, Santa Cruz

Karaoke 8p-Close

Karaoke 8p-Close

Hot Fuse 9-12:15p

Karaoke 6p-Close

Karaoke 6p-Close

Karaoke Free 8p

Swing Dance $5 5:30p The Ricky Torres Group Free 9p

Highway Murderers & more Free 8p

Jazz Society Donation 3:30p Life Free 8p

Karaoke 9p

BRITANNIA ARMS 110 Monterey Ave, Capitola CASA SORRENTO 393 Salinas St, Salinas

4/18

Rob Vye 6-8p

Minor Thirds Trio 7-10p Claudio Melega 7-10p

BOCCI’S CELLAR 140 Encinal St, Santa Cruz

TUE

Karaoke 8p-Close Joey Hudoklin Free 8p

Comedy w/Shwa Free 8:30p

Karaoke 9p

DJ Joey Martinez & DJ Kaos 9p

CATALYST 1011 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Of Montreal $18/$20 7p

Grouplove Cancelled 7p

Tech N9ne $36/$38 7p

Joseph $18/$20 8p

CATALYST ATRIUM 1011 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Mitski $15/$18 7p

Captured by Robots $12/$16 8p

Crowell, Codd, Sudden Death $20/$23 8:30p

Selena’s Birthday Party $5/$8 8:30p

DJ Shadow $25/$28 8p Katchafire $25/$30 8:30p

Stolas $12/$14 8p

Floating Points, Tortoise $18/$20 8:30p

& THE NEPTUNE BLUES BAND + THE JASON SINAY BAND ( W/ JASON OF THE DIRTY KNOBS) Saturday April 22nd 9pm $20/25

Co-Bill With 2 Of Jamaica’s Top Reggae Artists

PABLO MOSES + PREZIDENT BROWN Sunday April 23rd 9pm $35/40

International Music Hall and Restaurant

FINE MEXICAN AND AMERICAN FOOD ALL YOU CAN EAT LUNCH BUFFET M-F $7.95 Thu Apr 13

An Intimate Evening With 2 Texas Legends

APRIL 12-18, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

REVEREND HORTON HEAT + DALE WATSON

38

April 27th GHOST NOTE (Members Of Snarky Puppy & Prince) April 28th DILATED PEOPLES April 29th HARRISON STAFFORD May 3rd SUNNY SWEENEY May 4th LIBERATION MOVEMENT + DOGON LIGHTS May 5th DON CARLOS + Nomalakadoja May 6th KOOL AD, JUDO NO & OLRIGHT May 7th JAMES MCCARTNEY (Paul McCartney’s Son) May 11th JOE MARCINEK w/ Members Of Motet & Dumpstaphunk May 12th MICHAEL ROSE May 13th POORMAN’S WHISKEY + DAVID LUNING May 14th WEST COAST PLAYBOYS w/ Andy Santana

WWW.MOESALLEY.COM 1535 Commercial Way Santa Cruz 831.479.1854

Soohan, KR3TURE, Noetik

World Music remixing, Global Bass, Deep Electronica

$12 adv./$15 door Dance – ages 21 + 8:30pm Fri Apr 14

LOVEFEST 2017

Sat Apr 15

Grateful Bluegrass Boys plus Edge of the West

Acton Street Ramblers, Levi Jack, Grampa’s Chili $10 adv./$12 door 21 + 8pm

$12 adv./$15 door Dance– ages 21 + 8:30pm Wed Apr 19

Patrick Maguire Folk-Americana

Thu Apr 20

El Rhan Cōmbo Celebrates 420!

$7 adv./$10 door <21 w/parent 7:30pm Rhythmically enhanced Rhan Wilson & friends!

$15 adv. / $18 door. <21 w/parent 7:30pm Fri Apr 21

In the Spirit of Lennon

plus Come Together Sun Kings’ Drew Harrison celebrates John Lennon

$15 adv./$15 door <21 w/parent 8pm

Sat Apr 22

T Sisters plus The Naked Bootleggers Sassy Sister & Bootlegger Roots

$12 adv./$15 door 21 + 8:30pm COMING RIGHT UP

Sun. Apr 23 Mark Twain Still Talking starring actor Jeffrey Stonehill A One Man Play 2pm Matinee

Sun. Apr 23 The Quitters (ex-Waybacks Glenn Houston & Stevie Coyle) 7pm Concert Wed. Apr 26 John Cruz Hawaiian Treasure Reservations Now Online at www.donquixotesmusic.com Rockin'Church Service Every Sunday ELEVATION at 10am-11:15am

OPEN LATE EVERY NIGHT! wednesday 4/12

THE AVI ZEV BAND w / JIVE MACHINE

Doors 8:30pm/Show 9pm $8 Door

thursday 4/13 IN THE CREPE PLACE GARDEN

BOURBON AND BURLESQUE Advance Tickets at www.ticketweb.com

Event starts 6pm/Show 7pm $10 Door

FRIday 4/14

GINGER AND JUICE w / SUN HOP FAT

Doors 8:30pm/Show 9pm $8 Door

saturday 4/15

UNPOPABLE w / BIG LAZY

Doors 8:30pm/Show 9pm $5 student $10 adults Door

monday 4/17

APRIL RANDOL w / TELOMIRROR

Doors 8:30pm/Show 9pm $5 Door

TUESday 4/18

7 COME 11 Show 9pm $5 Door

4/19 WESTERN WEDNESDAY #20: SARAH PETITE 9PM 4/20 ONCE AND FUTURE BAND 9PM MIDTOWN SANTA CRUZ 1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz

429-6994


LIVE MUSIC WED

4/12

CAVA WINE BAR 115 San Jose Ave, Capitola

Steve’s Kitchen Jazz 6:30-9:30p

CILANTROS 1934 Main St, Watsonville

Hippo Happy Hour 5:30-7:30p

THU

4/13

Alex Lucero 6:30-9:30p

FRI

4/14

Dave Muldawer 6:30-9:30p

SAT

4/15

SUN

4/16

MON

4/17

4/18

Friday, April 14 • 7 & 9 pm | No Comps

AN EVENING WITH LEE RITENOUR & DAVE GRUSIN

KPIG Happy Hour 5:30-7:30p

Avi Zev Band, Jive Machine $8 9p

Ginger and Juice, Bourbon and Burlesque Sun Hop Fat $10 6p $8 9p

Unpopable, Big Lazy $5/$10 9p

CROW’S NEST 2218 E. Cliff Dr, Santa Cruz

West Coast Soul $3 7:30p

Ten O’Clock Lunch Band $5 8:30p

Matt Masih & the Messengers $7 9:30p

Tsunami $6 9p

DAV. ROADHOUSE 1 Davenport Ave, Davenport

Lovefest $10/$12 8p

THE FISH HOUSE 972 Main St, Watsonville

Saturday, April 15 • 8 pm

7 Come 11 $5 9p Live Comedy $7 9p

FUNK & SOUL DANCE PARTY! CHRIS YOUMANS & THE SOUND AGENCY, THE INCITERS, PAWN SHOP SOUL

Reggae Party 8p

Esoteric Collective 6-9p Soohan, Kr3ture, Noetik $12/$15 8:30p

Tickets: BrownPaperTickets.com

Joy Mills Band 6-9p

Monday, April 17 • 7 & 9 pm | No Comps

JUAN DE MARCOS & THE AFRO-CUBAN ALL STARS

Grateful Bluegrass Boys $12/$15 8:30p Alex Lucero Band

HENFLING’S 9450 Hwy 9, Ben Lomond

Stream 8p

HINDQUARTER BAR & GRILLE 303 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz

August Sun 9p

Take One 9p

TV Show 4p

Roadhouse Karaoke 7:30p

Karaoke 10p

KUUMBWA 320-2 Cedar St, Santa Cruz

Stanley Jordan $30/$35 6p

MALONE’S 4402 Scotts Valley Dr, Scotts Valley

Live Music 5:30-9p

MICHAEL’S ON MAIN 2591 Main St, Soquel

Scott Slaughter 7:30-10:30p

Lee Ritenour & Dave Grusin $38/$48 8:30p

Joint Chiefs 8-11p

DANCE SPACE!

Founder of the Buena Vista Social Club promotes the complete story of Cuban music– son, salsa, timba and more! Wednesday, April 19 • 7 pm

FREE! FAMILY EVENT

MASTER CLASS: DISCOVER JAZZ!

Juan De Marcos & the Afro-Cuban All-Stars $35/$45 6, 8:30p

Funk & Soul Dance Party $10 7:30p

History of jazz with live band! Thursday, April 20 • 7 pm | No Comp

Karaoke w/Ken 9p Phoenix Rising 7:30-10:30p

Wednesday, April 12 • 7 pm | No Comps Guitar Virtuoso!

STANLEY JORDAN

Frank Sorci 6:30-9:30p

CREPE PLACE 1134 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz

DON QUIXOTE’S 6275 Hwy 9, Felton

TUE

Celebrating Creativity Since 1975

NELLIE MCKAY A GIRL NAMED BILL: The Life and Times of Billy Tipton

Beat Street 8-11p

Friday, April 21 • 7 & 9 pm | No Comps

AN EVENING WITH JULIAN LAGE & CHRIS ELDRIDGE PLUS AOIFE O’DONOVAN

LIVEYou UPReady TO LIFE’S Are to Get CHALLENGES the Help You Need? Individual life coaching:

Saturday, April 22 • 9 pm

$5 @

CLUB KUUMBWA: Door SPEAKEASY 3 + POST STREET RHYTHM PEDDLERS

Addiction Interventions Career Relationships Trauma Codependency

Monday, April 24 • 7 & 9 pm | No Comps OMAR SOSA GFS TRIO W/ TRILOK GURTU & PAOLO FRESU Thursday, April 27 • 7 pm Legendary Jazz/Blues/Folk Singer/Activist BARBARA DANE WITH

Enlightenment Recovery of Santa Cruz enlightenmentrecoveryofsantacruz.org

Saturday, April 29 • 7:30 pm

THE BILLS

Tickets: SnazzyProductions.com Sunday, April 30 • 7:30 pm NEW r Owne

ZAKIR HUSSAIN & RAHUL SHARMA

Super Suds

Laundromat

at the Rio Theatre | No Comps

• Super Clean • Restroom • Parking • Wi-Fi Available • Best rates in town USE YOUR DEBIT/CREDIT CARD AT OUR MACHINES.

Easy and Convenient. Daily Hours: 6am -11pm 2429 B Mission St. Santa Cruz

419.9212

2017

May 1 May 5 May 8 May 11 May 15 May 22 - 23

tabla and santoor virtuosos!

Bill Charlap Trio Wolff-Clark Expedition Gerald Clayton Trio Anat Cohen & Trio Brasileiro Steps Ahead Reunion Tour Chucho Valdés

Unless noted advance tickets at kuumbwajazz.org and Logos Books & Records. Dinner served one hour before Kuumbwa presented concerts. Premium wines & beer. All ages welcome.

320-2 Cedar St | Santa Cruz 831.427.2227 kuumbwajazz.org

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 12-18, 2017

(831)334-1258 By Appt. Only

PIANIST TAMMY HALL AND SPECIAL GUEST FROM CUBA PABLO “MEZCLA” MENENDEZ

39


1011 PACIFIC AVE. SANTA CRUZ 831-429-4135

LIVE MUSIC

Wednesday, April 12 • Ages 16+

OF

MONT R EAL

Thursday, April 13 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

CAPTURED! BY ROBOTS

Friday, April 14 • In the Atrium • Ages 18+

CROWELL • CODD • SUDDEN DEATH Saturday, April 15 • Ages 16+

JOSEPH

plus

Paul Arend

Saturday, April 15 • In the Atrium • Ages 18+

SELENA’S BIRTHDAY PARTY

Sunday, April 16 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

KATCHAFIRE

plus Inna Vision

Monday, April 17 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

STOLAS

WED

4/12

THU

4/13

FRI

4/14

SAT

4/15

SUN

4/16

MON

MISSION ST. BBQ 1618 Mission St, Santa Cruz

Kid Andersen & John “Blues” Boyd 6p

Blues Mechanics 6p

Lloyd Whitley 6p

Jeffrey Halford 1p Al Frisby 5p

Dennis Herrera & Sid Morris 6p

MOE’S ALLEY 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz

Scott Pemberton Band $9/$12 8p

McCoy Tyler, Dan Too, Pat Hull $7/$10 8p

Spawnbreezie, Gonzo $16/$20 8p

Melvin Seals & the Jerry Garcia Band $20/$25 8p

Indigenous, Mato Nanji $15/$20 3p

MOTIV 1209 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Crunkcertified 9:30p-2a

Libation Lab w/ Syntax 9:30p-2a

D-ROC 9:30p-2a

NEW BOHEMIA BREWERY Pint & Pottery 6-8p 1030 41st Ave, Santa Cruz

4/17

Rob Vye 6p

Rasta Cruz Reggae Party 9:30p-Close

Papiba and Friends 7-9p

TUE

Hip-Hop w/DJ Marc 9:30p-Close

Keho and Moshe 7-9p

Tacos & Trivia 6-8p

plus Mylets also Icarus The Owl

Monday, April 17 • Ages 16+

99 BOTTLES 110 Walnut Ave, Santa Cruz

Tuesday, April 18 • Ages 18+

PARADISE BEACH 215 Esplanade, Capitola

DJ SHADOW JAI WOLF Chet Porter plus

Tuesday, April 18 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

FLOATING POINTS • TORTOISE Apr 21 Mike Love (Ages 16+) Apr 27 Gregory Alan Isakov (Ages 21+) Apr 28 E-40/ Kool John (Ages 16+) Apr 29 Minnesota/ Bleep Bloop (Ages 18+) May 2 Dweezil Zappa (Ages 16+) May 6 Dennis Banks/ Daniel Stolpe (Ages 21+) May 12 Tuxedo (Ages 16+) May 13 The Expendables (Ages 16+) May 16 Enanitos Verdes (Ages 21+) May 24 Robin Trower (Ages 21+) May 27 Jurassic 5 (Ages 16+)

Trivia 8p

Matt Masih Duo 10p Alex Lucero 6p

Dave Muldawer 2-5p Spike McGuire, Loud as Folk 9p

POET & PATRIOT 320 E. Cedar St, Santa Cruz

Dolce Musica 2-5p

Treetop Tommy 9p

Comedy Open Mic 8p

THE RED 200 Locust St, Santa Cruz

Open Mic 8-11:30p ‘Geeks Who Drink’ Trivia Night 8p

Toby Gray Acoustic Classics 6:30p

THE REEF 120 Union St, Santa Cruz

Moshe Vilozny Acoustic/World 6:30p

Traditional Hawaiian Music 6:30p

RIO THEATRE 1205 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz

Brunch Grooves 12:30p Featured Acoustic 6:30p

Brunch Grooves 1:30p Chas Cmusic Krowd Karaoke 6p

Acoustic Classics 6:30p

James Murray Soulful Acoustic 6:30p

Las Cafeteras $25 7:30p

ROSIE MCCANN’S 1220 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Wednesday Comedy Night 7:30p

Open Mic 7:30p

Unless otherwise noted, all shows are dance shows with limited seating. Tickets subject to city tax & service charge by phone 877-987-6487 & online

www.catalystclub.com

$5 Off APRIL 12-18, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

w/this coupon *rates apply to cash only

40

4/18

Preacher Boy 6p

Soltron opens

Good Times Ad, Wed. 04/12

Ancient Chinese Full Body Deep Tissue Table Massage

Pack (1) $28/hr. ~ Pack (2) $48/hr. Locally owned business serving local people living healthy lives.

co-sponsored by Fiddling Cricket

The BOBs

Fri, May 19

7:30 pm $25 Gen. Adv. $32 Gold Circle

Rio Theatre

Sat, May 27

China Foot Massage & Reflexology Call for appointment 831-464-0168 4140 Ste. “T” Capitola Rd (By Big 5, Near D.M.V.) Open 7 days a week 10am–10pm

7:30 pm $30 Gen. Adv. $45 Gold Circle

Kuumbwa

A recent addition to the Living Legend Club. Special Guest Joe Robinson

Thurs, June 22

Rio Theatre

7:30 pm $27 Gen. Adv. $40 Gold Circle

Great Australian band with folk rock from down under

cycleworks.bike

Snazzy at Don Quixote’s Thur, May 25 7:30pm Thur, June 29 7:30pm

Phoebe Hunt and the Gatherers The Austin Lounge Lizards

$15 Adv/ $15 Door $20 Adv/ $20 Door

Sun, May 28

Dirty Cello Duo

$20 Adv/ $23 Door

7:00pm

Snazzy at the Ugly Mug

1420 Mission Street (831) 316-7671


LIVE MUSIC WED THE SAND BAR 211 Esplanade, Capitola

4/12

THU

4/13

FRI

4/14

SAT

4/15

The Leftovers 8p-midnight

Burnin’ Vernon Davis 8p-Midnight

SANDERLINGS 1 Seascape Resort, Aptos

Golden Shred 8-11p

In Time 8-11p

SEABRIGHT BREWERY 519 Seabright, Santa Cruz

Jimmy Dewrance Band 6:30-10p

Dan Frechette

7-11p

Don Karuth 7-11p

SEVERINO’S BAR & GRILL 7500 Old Dominion Court, Aptos

Don McCaslin & the Amazing Jazz Geezers 6-10p

Beach Cowboy Band 7:30-11:30p

Toby Gray 1-4p Tsunami 8-11:30p

SHADOWBROOK 1750 Wharf Rd, Capitola

Ken Constable 6:30-9:30p

Joe Ferrara 6:30-10p

Claudio Melega 7-10p

UGLY MUG 4640 Soquel Ave, Soquel

Victor Veysey $18/$20 7:30p

WHALE CITY 490 Highway 1, Davenport

Puffball Collective 6-9p

SUN

Daniel Martins 9-11p

ZELDA’S 203 Esplanade, Capitola ZIZZO’S COFFEEHOUSE & WINE BAR 3555 Clares St, Capitola

Bonnie Bell 7-9:30p

4/17

TUE

4/18

Alex Lucero 7-11p

Yuji Tojo & Mike Santella 6:30-9:30p

Speak Up Teen Open Mic 6p

Steve Abrams 5:30-7:30 Harpin Johnny & the Groovehounds 1-5:30p

Daniel Martins 9-11p

MON

Open Mic w/Steven David 5:30p

WHARF HOUSE 1400 Wharf Rd, Capitola YOUR PLACE 1719 Mission St, Santa Cruz

4/16

Dennis Dove Pro Jam 7-11p

Daniel Martins 9-11p

Daniel Martins 9-11p

John Michael Band & Red Roosters 9:30p

The Joint Chiefs 9:30p

Kats 7-9:30p

Rocky Pase 7-9:30p

Vito and Friends 1-5:30p

Upcoming Shows APR 15 APR 22 APR 28 APR 29 APR 30

Las Cafeteras Zep Live White Buffalo Elvin Bishop Zakir Hussain & Rahul Sharma

MAY 06 MAY 16 MAY 20 MAY 30 MAY 31

The Great Majinga Straight Outta Oz House of Floyd Poptone Deva Premal and Miten

JUN 02 JUN 05 JUN 07 JUN 08 JUN 10 JUN 22 JUN 23 JUN 26

Jesse Colin Young Jean-Luc Ponty Joan Osborne Life on Mars Hurray for the Riff Raff The Waifs Paul Thorn Cat Power

SEP 27 Apocalyptica OCT 15 Snatam Kaur BRITANNIA ARMS IN CAPITOLA 110 Monterey Avenue, Capitola Village

7-10pm Free and open to everyone registration starts at 6pm

LOCATED ON THE BEACH

Amazing waterfront deck views.

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

To guarantee a time slot, please pre-register at

See live music grid for this week’s bands.

STAND-UP COMEDY

831.688.8435 mars-studios.com

Three live comedians every Sunday night.

HAPPY HOUR

Raffling off Boulder Creek Guitar Raffle proceeds go to Guitars Not Guns

Mon–Fri from 3:30pm. Wednesday all night!

VISIT OUR BEACH MARKET

Wood-fired pizza, ice cream, unique fine gifts.

DEAL WITH A VIEW

$9.95 dinners Mon.-Fri. from 6:00pm.

NOW SERVING BREAKFAST

Open for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Daily

(831) 476-4560

crowsnest-santacruz.com

MUSIC ARTS

RECORDING STUDIO

Guitar Works

April 26 David Crosby 8pm May 12 Film: Monterey Pop The D.A. Pennebaker Film from 1967 7:15pm Jun 2 Los Lonely Boys 8pm Jun 3 The Wailin’ Jennys 8pm Jul 22 Ozomatli 8pm Aug 4 Toad the Wet Sprocket 8pm Aug 19 Comedian Rodney Carrington 8pm

TUESDAY DINNER SPECIAL 2-TOPPING LARGE PIZZAS 1/2 PRICE DINE IN ONLY 6-9 Friday April 14th DJ Night with DJ WILLMATTIC

Oct 20 Comedian Howie Mandel 8pm

Saturday April 15th IRIE FUSE & YESHUA AND THE HIGHTONES Reggae / Rock / DUB / Hip Hop

For Tickets www.GoldenStateTheatre.com 831-649-1070

393 Salinas St, SALINAS (oldtown) 831.757.2720 // casasorrento.com

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 12-18, 2017

Shore is pretty!

For contest rules, raffle tickets, information & registration, contact Mars Studio.

April 21 Film: Deathgrip 7:30pm

Follow the Rio Theatre on Facebook & Twitter! 831.423.8209 www.riotheatre.com

41


FILM

FRENCH CONNECTION Pierre Niney and Paula Beer in ‘Frantz.’

APRIL 12-18, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Aftermath Problems

42

‘Frantz’ a haunting postwar tone poem on love, loss and absolution BY LISA JENSEN

S

adly, the first World War did not live up to its advertising as “the war to end all wars.” Its consequences were devastating; particularly within the European community, where a generation of young men were lost, either dead or damaged, fighting their neighbors in the trenches. French filmmaker Francois Ozon revisits that era in all its complexity in Frantz, a moody, mysterious, and utterly engrossing tone poem on love, loss, and absolution. The origins of Ozon’s story lie in a 1932 stage play by Maurice

Rostand, which Ernst Lubitsch made into the film Broken Lullaby the same year. At that time, no one knew the world was on the brink of yet another Great War, which only proves how stubbornly the human species refuses to learn from its mistakes—a situation Ozon finds as disturbingly timely as ever today. Protagonist Anna (poised, wistful Paula Beers) is a young German woman in a small town, whose fiancé, Frantz, was killed in the war. It’s 1919, and Anna has moved in with Frantz’s parents, doctor Hans Hoffmeister (Ernst Stotzner), and homemaker

Magda (Marie Gruber), to share their grief. On one of Anna’s daily visits to the cemetery, she finds a stranger, soft-spoken young Frenchman Adrien Rivoire (Pierre Niney), leaving flowers on Frantz’s grave. Adrien tells them all that he knew Frantz in Paris, where their Francophile son lived for a time before the war. Most of the townsfolk, Hans included, are suspicious of a Frenchman in their midst, but Magda warms up to Adrien; she calls him “shy and stormy”—like Frantz. The rest of the plot is best left

to the viewer to discover. Let’s just say the movie keeps changing direction, but never quite ends up where you might think it’s going. Ozon (who made the elegant 2002 thriller Swimming Pool) shoots in expressionistic black-and-white, evoking both the between-the-wars period (special kudos to costume designer Pascaline Chavanne), and the element of mystery at the heart of his story. Both visually and in storytelling terms, Frantz is an immersive experience. We are drawn to the characters and into their world even as we begin to unravel the intricacy of lies—some tormenting, others merciful—woven into the underpinning of their story. Ozon also subtly switches to color for some scenes, for reasons that become apparent only gradually. His images are as haunting and steeped in emotion as the story deserves. Maybe it’s the black-and-white film, but the compelling Niney has the expressive look and demeanor of a silent movie actor, with his darkrimmed eyes and pencil moustache. He doesn’t exaggerate, but you can read everything he’s feeling on his face. His Adrien desperately wants to do the right thing (by Frantz and his family, and by Anna) if only he could figure out how. He embodies the dilemma faced by everyone, at the front and at home, forced into unimaginable horror from which there will never be any escape. Ozon quietly makes this point again and again, especially in his devastating riff on the uber-patriotic scene from Casablanca in which a roomful of French civilians stands up to sing “La Marseillaise” when German soldiers enter Rick’s bar. Except this time, Ozon provides subtitles to the anthem’s bloodthirsty lyrics, which puts a whole new spin on the scene, and the notion of passionate, unbridled nationalism. With Frantz, Ozon has gifted us with the kind of thoughtful, lyrical moviemaking we don’t see enough of anymore. FRANTZ **** (out of four) With Pierre Niney and Paula Beer. Written by Francois Ozon and Philippe Piazzo. Directed by Francois Ozon. A Music Box Films release. (PG-13) 113 minutes. In German and French with English subtitles.


MOVIE TIMES April 12-18

LANDMARK THEATRES

There is a Better Way

landmarktheatres.com/santa-cruz

All times are PM unless otherwise noted.

The DEL MAR

DEL MAR THEATRE

1124 Pacific Ave . Santa Cruz Showtimes and Information (831) 469-3220

831.469.3220

GIFTED Daily 2:10, 4:30, 7:00, 9:20 + Sat-Sun 11:50am GOING IN STYLE Daily 2:30, 4:50, 7:20, 9:30 +

FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES PRESENTS A FILMNATION ENTERTAINMENT / GRADE A ENTERTAINMENT PRODUCTION A MARC WEBB FILM “GIFTED” CHRIS EVANS MCKENNA GRACE MUSIC RANDALL POSTER LINDSAY DUNCAN AND OCTAVIA SPENCER SUPERVISORS MUSIC FILM & MEGHAN CURRIER BY ROB SIMONSEN EDITOR BILL PANKOW, ACE PRODUCTION DIRECTOR OF DESIGNER LAURA FOX PHOTOGRAPHY STUART DRYBURGH, ASC EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS GLEN BASNER BEN BROWNING MOLLY ALLEN PRODUCED WRITTEN BY KAREN LUNDER, p.g.a. ANDY COHEN, p.g.a. BY TOM FLYNN DIRECTED BY MARC WEBB

Sat-Sun 12:00 THE ZOOKEEPER’S WIFE Daily 1:40, 4:20, 7:10*,

9:45 + Sat-Sun 11:10am *No Thu show

www.foxsearchlight.com

SECRET FILM FESTIVAL Sat 11:59pm

NICKELODEON

831.426.7500

FRANTZ Daily 1:40, 4:20, 7:10, 9:45 +

Sat-Sun 11:15am KEDI Wed 2:10, 7:15 Thu 2:05, 7:20 Fri-Tue 2:10,

4:40, 7:20 + Sat-Sun 12:10 RAW Wed 9:10 Thu 9:40 Fri-Tue 9:10 T2 TRAINSPOTTING Fri-Tue 1:50, 4:20, 7:10,

9:40 + Sat-Sun 11:00am YOUR NAME Daily 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 +

Sat-Sun 11:40am

GREEN VALLEY CINEMA 8 831.761.8200

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST Daily 12:30, 3:30,

6:30, 9:30 THE BOSS BABY Daily 1:30, 4:00, 7:00, 9:30 + Fri-Sun 11:00am

© 2017 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

PROPERTY OF FOX. PROMOTIONAL USE ONLY. SALE, DUPLICATION, OR OTHER TRANSFER OF THIS MATERIAL IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED.

Mediate & Move On • Avoid Court • Divorce Mediation • Family Conflicts • Dispute Resolution • Fast, Fair, Affordable Free 1/2-hr. Phone Consultation

THE FATE OF THE FURIOUS Thu 7:00, 8:00, 9:00,

10:00 Fri-Tue 1:05, 1:50, 3:30, 4:20, 5:05, 6:45, 7:30, 8:15, 9:05, 9:55 + Fri-Sun 10:35, 12:15

Lu Haussler, J.D.

GHOST IN THE SHELL Wed-Thu 2:30, 5:00,

7:30, 10:00 GOING IN STYLE Daily 6:30, 9:00 + Wed-Thu 1:15,

3:45 + Fri-Tue 11:00*, 1:30, 4:00 *No Mon, Tue show 6:30, 9:30 Fri-Tue 11:25*, 5:55 *No Mon, Tue show POWER RANGERS Wed-Thu 1:30, 4:20 + Wed 7:10,

10:00 Fri-Tue 2:40

831.334.9539 mediationgroupofsc.com

From the Director of 500 DAYS OF SUMMER Chris Evans and Octavia Spencer in

GIFTED (PG13) CC DVS

(2:10, 4:30), 7:00, 9:20 + Sat, Sun (11:50am) Morgan Freeman, Michael Caine, Alan Arkin and Christopher Lloyd in

GOING IN STYLE (PG13) CC DVS

STARTS FRIDAY!

Daily: (2:10, 4:30) 7:00, 9:20 Plus Sat-Sun: (11:50am) ( ) at discount

(2:30, 4:50), 7:20, 9:30 + Sat (12:00) From the Director of WHALE RIDER Jessica Chastain in

THE ZOOKEEPER’S WIFE

Lotus

TRADITIONAL THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE

$50

1 hour Body Massage

$25

1 hour Foot Massage

KONG: SKULL ISLAND Wed-Thu 12:30, 3:30 + Wed

1440 41st Avenue, Suite G. 831.515.7254

SMURFS: THE LOST VILLAGE Fri-Tue 12:55, 3:10, 5:25, 7:40, 9:55 + Wed 6:30, 8:45 + Fri-Sun 10:40am

(PG13) CC DVS

(1:40, 4:20), 7:10*, 9:45 + Sat, Sun (11:10am) *no show 4/13

Midnights @ The Del Mar THE

SECRET FILM FESTIVAL (R) Saturday Midnight to Sunday Noon Next Week: DR. STRANGELOVE

The NICK

210 Lincoln St . Santa Cruz Showtimes and Information (831) 426-7500

“ A vividly realized and emotionally satisfying feature.” - Variety

YOUR NAME

(PG)

(2:00*, 4:30), 7:00, 9:30 + Sat, Sun (11:40am)

*English Dubbed - All Other Shows with English Subtitles

T2 TRAINSPOTTING (R) CC DVS

(1:50, 4:20), 7:10, 9:40 + Sat, Sun (11:15am) (1:40, 4:15), 7:05, 9:45* + Sat, Sun (11:00am) *no show 4/20

CINELUX SCOTTS VALLEY CINEMA 831.438.3260

(2:10, 4:40), 7:20* + Sat, Sun (12:10)

Call theater for showtimes.

REGAL SANTA CRUZ 9 844.462.7342

Call theater for showtimes.

REGAL RIVERFRONT STADIUM 2 844.462.7342 Call theater for showtimes.

KEDI (NR) partialy subtitled *no show 4/20

shopping for a cause • Women’s fashion

RAW

• Gently used/high quality

NEW B-12 Happy Hour Every Sat. 10-12pm on the Westside

• Tax-deductible donations welcome

Every Wed. 3-6p Main Center

• Top brands and labels

Located in the King’s Plaza Shopping Center

1601 41st Ave. Capitola

831-462-3686 www.the-daisy.org

Proceeds benefit programs provided by Family Service Agency of the Central Coast | www.fsa-cc.org

St. John’s Organics 2345 Mission St.

Walk-ins Welcome!

Boost your mood, energy & overall well-being with B12 shots and many add-on options.

Can’t make it? Call us to schedule another day. Santa Cruz Naturopathic Medical Center 736 Chestnut St. downtown Santa Cruz 831.477.1377 | www.scnmc.com

(R) CC, DVS

Once Nightly at 9:10pm “ Ravishingly beautiful adventure cinema at its finest.” - Film Journal International Charlie Hunnam, Sienna Miller, Tom Holland & Robert Pattinson

THE LOST CITY OF Z (PG13) CC Advance Screening Thurs 4/20 at 7:00pm Regular Engagement starts 4/21 Subscribe FilmClub.LandmarkTheatres.com LandmarkTheatres.com/GiftCards

( ) at Discount NP = No Passes CC = Closed Captioning DVS = Descriptive Video Services

VALID 4/12/17 - 4/20/17

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | APRIL 12-18, 2017

10:00 + Wed-Thu 2:55 + Fri-Sun 10:40am

CINELUX 41ST AVENUE CINEMA 831.479.3504

.

FRANTZ (PG13) subtitled

THE ZOOKEEPER’S WIFE Daily 1:30, 4:20, 7:10,

Call theater for showtimes.

.

43


FILM NEW THIS WEEK THE FATE OF THE FURIOUS Every muscular bald action star ever, and Charlize Theron with some twist dreads y’all. F. Gary Gray directs. Dwayne Johnson, Scott Eastwood co-star. (PG-13) 136 minutes. GIFTED Mary’s a precocious, sassy, seven-year-old with a college-level brain. She’s already doing advanced calculus, but her uncle promised her late mother that he’d give Mary a normal life. When he’s drawn into a custody battle with Mary’s grandmother, the question of nurturing Mary’s genius instead of her happiness becomes the dividing line. Marc Webb directs. Chris Evans, Mckenna Grace, Lindsay Duncan co-star. (PG-13) 101 minutes. SPECIAL SCREENINGS: The Secret Film Festival, 11:55 p.m Saturday, April 15-Noon, April 16, Del Mar Theatre, 1124 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. CONTINUING EVENT: LET’S TALK ABOUT THE MOVIES Film buffs are invited Wednesday nights at 7 p.m. to downtown Santa Cruz, where each week the group discusses a different current release. For location and discussion topic, go to https:// groups.google.com/group/LTATM.

APRIL 12-18, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

NOW PLAYING

44

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST This live-action adaptation of the fairytale classic might sound pointless to you, but to Disney it sounds like “ka-ching !”. Bill Condon directs. Emma Watson, Dan Stevens, Luke Evans co-star. (PG) 129 minutes. THE BOSS BABY I want to hate this animated kid’s movie about a talking baby, because all movies about talking babies should be hated. But I’ve seen the trailer a zillion times now (give or take), and I have to admit Alec Baldwin doing his Jack Donaghy character from 30 Rock (basically) in baby form is pretty funny. (PG) 97 minutes. CHIPS Since demand for a film adaptation of a crappy 40-year-old

TV show (look, I had the lunchbox too, but let’s not kid ourselves) was no doubt sky-high, who can blame Hollywood execs for trying to repeat the tongue-in-cheek comedy-action success of the 21 Jump Street movies? Dax Shepard directs. Michael Pena and Dax Shepard star. (R) 100 minutes. FRANTZ Reviewed this issue. Francois Ozon directs. Pierre Niney, Paula Beer, Ernst Stötzner. (PG-13) 193 minutes. GET OUT White suburbs: the real hell. Jordan Peele directs. Allison Williams, Daniel Kaluuya, Lakeith Stanfield co-star. (R) 103 minutes. GHOST IN THE SHELL All the talk about this Japanese manga adaptation has been about the casting of Scarlett Johansson and the growing backlash over Hollywood’s “whitewashing” of Asian roles with non-Asian actors. But let’s also acknowledge what the casting director for this sci-fi/ crime flick about cyborgs chasing cyberterrorists did right: a rare blockbuster role for one of Japan’s most incredible actors (and filmmakers), Takeshi Kitano as Chief Daisuke Aramaki. (PG-13) 106 minutes. GOING IN STYLE Their bank accounts are dwindling, their pensions are frozen, the banks screwed them over and Jojo chose Chase. What else is there for a trio of octogenarians to do but become vigilante bank robbers? Zach Braff directs. Joey King, Morgan Freeman, Ann-Margret co-star. (PG-13) 96 minutes. KEDI If you’ve been to Istanbul, you’ve seen the cats that own the streets. This is their city, through their eyes. Ceyda Torun directs. Bülent Üstün co-stars. (Unrated) 80 minutes. KONG: SKULL ISLAND King Kong, a dangerous island, and an overly ambitious crew of explorers played by a cast of gorgeously recognizable faces. Is it a prequel or sequel? Are we still keeping track? Jordan Vogt-Roberts directs. Tom Hiddleston, Samuel L.

WHEN YOU REALIZE ‘WHOA, OUR MOVIE SUCKS’ Charlize Theron and Vin Diesel in

‘The Fate of the Furious.’ Jackson, Brie Larson co-star. (PG13) 120 minutes. LIFE An international space station crew discovers life on Mars, but because they’ve never seen any movie ever they don’t realize they are totally screwed. Daniel Espinosa directs. Ryan Reynolds, Jake Gyllenhaal and Rebecca Ferguson start. (R) 103 minutes. LOGAN The X-Men franchise gets gritty for this supposedly last time out for Hugh Jackman as Wolverine and Patrick Stewart as Xavier. The long-awaited story about Logan’s badass prodigy already has a 9.5 out of 10 rating on IMDB. James Mangold directs. Hugh Jackman, Patrick Stewart co-star. (R) 137 minutes. POWER RANGERS I never watched the Power Rangers shows, but for some reason this week I did read a detailed ranking of all the Power Rangers outfits through the history of the franchise. Man, there have been a lot, and most all of them look pretty cool, in their cheesy jumpsuit way. This film adaptation attempts to keep the

cheese to a minimum, putting a Chronicle-style teen-superheroesare-just-like-us spin on it. If I didn’t know better, I’d think it was kind of embarrassed to be a Power Rangers movie. Bill Israelite directs. Naomi Scott, Dacre Montgomery co-star. (PG-13) 124 minutes. RAW A young vegetarian suffers through a carnivorous hazing ritual, but what happens afterward is far more disturbing. Probably like Santa Clarita Diet, only artsier. Julia Ducournau directs. Garance Marillier, Ella Rumpf, Rabah Nait Oufella co-star. (R) 99 minutes. SMURFS: THE LOST VILLAGE This is what happens when you have a colony full of dudes in tight white pants and only one female. Kelly Asbury directs. Ariel Winter, Michelle Rodriguez, Joe Manganiello co-star. (PG) 89 minutes. T2 TRAINSPOTTING For those of who will never get over the scene with the baby in the first Trainspotting, the dawn of an older, hopefully more mature

Trainspotting will be more than enough reason to go see something cheerful like Beauty and the Beast. However, for the rest of the film’s massive cult, following the reunion of Mark Renton, Sick, Boy, Spud and Begbie will undoubtedly be cause for a 1996style celebration. Danny Boyle directs. Ewan McGregor, Ewen Bremner, Jonny Lee Miller co-star. (R) 117 minutes. YOUR NAME When two strangers witness a star falling worlds apart from each other, they begin to swap bodies. The Japanese animated version of Freaky Friday? Makoto Shinkai directs. Ryûnosuke Kamiki, Mone Kamishiraishi, Ryô Narita co-star. (PG) 106 minutes. THE ZOOKEEPER’S WIFE It seems like Jessica Chastain has been in pretty much every movie for years now, but this time she tackles something very different in this true story of a zookeeper in 1939 Poland who puts herself and her family at risk to save lives in the Nazi-ruled Warsaw ghetto. (PG-13) 124 minutes.


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International Student Services Santa Cruz is a locally-based program. Linking our area with overseas friends. Students have a busy daytime schedule of English classes, local activities and Bay Area bus excursions. Make a friend you can visit!

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FOOD & DRINK

SETTING THE BAR Tacos at the El Palomar Taco Bar are a Santa Cruz favorite. PHOTO: KEANA PARKER

APRIL 12-18, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Taco the Town

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The ever-popular El Palomar Taco Bar, plus a blood-red Italian sweet vermouth BY CHRISTINA WATERS

W

e have never had a bad time at the little arcade party that is the El Palomar Taco Bar. Four TVs all tuned to sports, spacious tiled floors, a team of can-do women running the food show (wearing lots of bright pink), a full bar of tequilas, and delicious freshly-made Mexican classics. Of course we love this place—and so, it appears, does everybody else. Families, children, babies, grandpas, surfers, students, tourists, rock

stars, local politicos, everybody ends up hanging out. We checked out the lunch specials as we stood in line to place our order. Great offerings at great prices. But we had our favorite orders already in mind. For me, a ginormous prawn quesadilla ($8), plus a succulent guacamole taco ($3.50). For Jack, his all-time favorite snapper taco ($4) plus rice and beans ($3). And a large diet Coke ($2.25). Diet Coke goes brilliantly with the bright flavors of pico de gallo, cilantro,

and creamy guacamole. Besides, Jack doesn’t get anything close to a Coke at home, so he indulges when at El Palomar. So we pay and pick up our bowls of chips and salsa, grab a table and wait for our number. It’s important to grab a table fast anytime close to noon. This place fills up in nanoseconds. Chips: warm, light, crisp and salty. Perfecto. Salsa: well-balanced, spicy, complex, but not lip-incineratingly hot. Like everything at El Palomar, these foods are cooked to order, so

while it’s quick, it’s by no means fast food. The scene is so vivacious that waiting is also part of the fun. A plump baby spreads one of those supernatural smiles all over the place. A well-behaved pug poses beneath his owner’s chair. Buffed men kick a soccer ball across an emerald field on one of the screens. First comes my guacamole taco, a layer of citrusy mashed avocado, cilantro, and lettuce on a pillow of world-class refritos and a soft corn tortilla. I never knew that guacamole could hold its own as the key taco element. It can. Next came my beautiful quesadilla, melting with cheese, a thin frosting of refritos, and lots of hot prawns. Pre-scored into accessible strips, the quesadilla was deluxe, and so were its partners— sour cream, guacamole, and a fat scoop of, you guessed it, pico de gallo (I love pico de gallo). Finally came the snapper taco, sauteed chunks of fish filet tossed with beans, cilantro and lettuce, and tucked into a tender taco. Next to the taco was a broad band of seasoned rice, and next to that a dinner-sized portion of pinto beans. Oh. God. So. Good. For $22 we had enough for a substantial side dish. In and out in 40 minutes. El Palomar Taco Bar—siempre! Downtown Santa Cruz, in the arcade connecting Pacific Avenue and Front Street.

A VERMOUTH WORTH DRINKING That’s Carpano “Antica Formula” Sweet Vermouth. Elegant, full-bodied, and delicious, this blood-red Italian sweet vermouth is made from several varieties of grapes plus botanicals such as vanilla, saffron, wormwood (the central ingredient in absinthe), and bitter orange. Such complexity (a secret formula since the late 18th century) yields an equally complex libation. I consider this beautiful beverage the sweet sister of my favorite bitters, Fernet Branca. We were given this spectacular vermouth as a New Year’s gift—thanks to the impeccable palates of Lin and Dee. It is definitely the finest sweet vermouth I’ve ever encountered. Obviously, it would make a sensational Manhattan, but we enjoyed it neat, room temp. Does anyone know if it’s available here in Santa Cruz? If so, let me know where!


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FOODIE FILE

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POP-UP CHOP UP Anna Deraco gets ready for a La Sofrita event. PHOTO: KEANA PARKER

La Sofrita Santa Cruz gets traditional Puerto Rican with new pop-up BY AARON CARNES

A

nna Deraco really wanted to start a food truck. She had the perfect idea, too: Puerto Rican food. With no professional culinary experience—she always cooked at home—her friend encouraged her to start out doing pop-ups. Last September, La Sofrita was born. Her Puerto Rican food pop-ups have been a huge success. Now she hopes to one day open a café. Deraco gives us the complete breakdown of La Sofrita.

Why did you start La Sofrita? ANNA DERACO: I grew up with great Puerto Rican food. You don’t get a lot of that out here. On the East Coast, it’s all over the place. There’s a sizable Puerto Rican population in the area in Pennsylvania I grew up in. Whenever I would cook it, people would love it. Once I started doing this, what became really fun for me was seeing how many Puerto Ricans were in the Santa Cruz area. That’s been fun, having them show up and go, “Oh my gosh, I’m so excited to have this food here.” What defines Puerto Rican food? On the surface, it doesn’t sound

terribly different. It’s rice, beans and chicken. Puerto Rican rice and beans have a distinct flavor. The rice is flavored and covered with something called achiote, which is a pebbly seed from a flower off a tree that grows in the tropics. Once you put them in some warm olive oil, it gives off this gorgeous orange color and subtle nutty flavor. It’s added more for the color. The stuff that I’ve been doing a lot is empanada. Those have been pretty popular. It’s just a flour-based dough stuffed with whatever you want to stuff it with.

Why did you choose the name La Sofrita? Sofrito is the base of about 90 percent—I’m exaggerating—of Puerto Rican dishes. It’s absolutely indispensable to Puerto Rican cooking. The base is traditional peppers that I don’t have access to here, but I substitute with sweet red and green bell peppers, onion, cilantro, tomatoes, that gets blended together into a relish. That gets fried up in olive oil and that’s what starts a lot of Puerto Rican food. Look for La Sofrita events at facebook. com/lasofrita.


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VINE TIME

VINE & DINE

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Alfaro Vineyards

An aromatic Albarino that pairs well with seafood and spicy cuisines BY JOSIE COWDEN

I

t’s hard to keep up with all of the different varietals that winemaker Richard Alfaro is producing these days. And his wines sell out so quickly. As of writing this, Richard and his wife Mary Kay Alfaro still have plenty of their estate Albarino 2015, made with grapes from the Ryan Spencer Vineyard, named after the Alfaros’ son. Richard produced 71 cases of the dry and zesty Albarino after aging it for three months in neutral oak. Pale straw in color with a medium body, “it boasts the stone-fruit flavors of peach and apricot, but finishes with bright acidity,” the Alfaros say. Originating in Spain and Portugal, the Albarino grape produces a highly aromatic wine that pairs well with seafood and spicy cuisines like Asian, Thai and Cajun. Although most people don’t walk in the door after work and pour themselves a glass of Albarino, it is gaining in popularity and is becoming quite trendy, in fact. With its sturdy acidity and rather high alcohol content, it’s a versatile white to enjoy on its own as well as with food. My husband and I were in Spain recently, staying with friends in

their 100-year-old farmhouse. They cooked many a splendid dinner for us, and we all drank copious amounts of Albarino (Spanish wines are so inexpensive) – before, during and after dinner. I appreciate this varietal more than ever. The Albarino sells for about $25 at Alfaro’s tasting room—an upbeat place to visit with an energetic vibe. You’ll have a great time, for sure. Alfaro Family Vineyards & Winery, 420 Hames Road, Corralitos, 728-5172. alfarowine.com.

GRAND OPENING OF SWEETSURF PARTY ROOM SweetSurf Party Room is all set up to help you host a party in their new quarters—with Marianne’s and Polar Bear ice cream companies combined. “We are ready for your next birthday party, business meeting or team celebration! Let’s party!” says co-owner Mary Cody. They also do outside functions, of course. SweetSurf Catering, 1020 Ocean St., Santa Cruz, 687-9220. Visit sweetsurfcatering.com to check out their flavorful offerings.


H RISA’S STARS BY RISA D’ANGELES THE STORY OF PASSION WEEK AND EASTER It is Easter Week, also called Passion Week. The story of Jesus the Christ, an Avatar from the blue-white star Sirius, who was judged, crucified, died and then resurrected from the tomb. The narrative focuses upon death. With one day set aside for resurrection. The new narrative for humanity concerning the Christ (Piscean and Aquarian World Teacher) in this biblical story, concerns the Resurrection. What happened this Passion Week a long time ago? And what is occurring now? From Monday through Wednesday, Christ taught his disciples hidden esoteric teachings, preparing them for His death. On Holy Thursday, at the Last Supper (Passover), Christ anchored the new Piscean religion and the priesthood. On Good Friday, the Christ at his crucifixion, “rent’ (tore/broke) the veils” that separated humanity from returning to the Father.

On Holy Saturday, the Christ entered deep into the Earth and welcomed the Souls waiting for release and lifted them into heaven. On Sunday, Resurrection Day, the Christ, rolling the rock back, demonstrated to humanity the fact that there is no death. There is only liberation from captivity in matter. And a Great Adventure in death, ahead. Christ’s three-year mission on Earth, culminating in the Easter/Resurrection festival, was a labor done for all of humanity. He closed one great cycle (Aries) and initiated the new cycle of Pisces (sign of the Savior). In the Aquarian Age, the esoteric (hidden) teachings focus upon the fact of the resurrected and liberated humanity, released from the Cosmic Crucifix. Now we are preparing for Christ’s Reappearance as the Aquarian teacher.

ARIES Mar21–Apr20

LIBRA Sep23–Oct22

You’re here, there and everywhere. In and out, up and down. The energies are dynamic yet contemplative, fiery yet watery, leading to excessive activities and times of melancholy. Attempt to focus within the heart. This allows all new ideas, not yet to be acted upon, to filter through the question “Is this for the Goodwill of everyone?” The answer allows you to know the best course of action through tumultuous times.

You continue to assess what you’re able to provide to others, especially those close to you. You also review exactly what you need. Sometimes realizations can be difficult especially for Librans who want to have harmony above conflict, ease above constant change. You want more depth, meaning, closeness and yet also freedom. Sometimes a dilemma. Maintain silence this week, listening only to the heart of nature. You will forgive and then love more.

TAURUS Apr21–May21

SCORPIO Oct23–Nov21

You’re often in serious contemplation or study, attempting to sort out details, feelings, instincts, and intuitions. The main key is truth. You may not know immediately what you feel. However, you must still express to others when the timing isn’t right, when the path isn’t clear, when the past hasn’t caught up to the present/future. You know that moving forward without right timing is foolish. So many retrogrades these days!

Find ways to express yourself, not necessarily through words but through exercise, yoga, tai chi, walking, running, cooking, music, boating, etc. However you express yourself, movement is what is important for it will sustain and stabilize highly emotional trigger points. Daily life stresses make you feel like escape is necessary. Yes, do escape. You know how to do this. Ohm.

Esoteric Astrology as news for week April 12-18, 2017

GEMINI May 22–June 20

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CANCER Jun21–Jul20

CAPRICORN Dec21–Jan20

Anything unresolved with intimates and relationships (even those who have died) will reappear through feelings, thoughts, emotions and memories. Attempt to reconnect with grace and equanimity, remembering “Love underlies all events and happenings.” Life creates tests, losses, sadnesses and meaningful encounters, so that we are strengthened. Contemplate on all ideas and dreams being impressed upon your mind. They are messages.

As you tend to needed domestic duties and disciplines, a small voice, becoming louder and stronger, calls for a change and a bit more freedom. Be caring when communicating with family. You could feel impatient, saying things you later regret. You may work harder and longer to the point that exhaustion follows. Don’t allow that to occur. In all ways, you are recognized, needed, creative and very valuable.

LE0 Jul21–Aug22

AQUARIUS Jan21–Feb18

It’s as if you need a ship to navigate the tides going in and out of your life. See yourself at the seashore, building a fire close to the water’s edge. Then contemplate both elements—fire and water. When they join, a new reality, new direction and a new awareness of life occur. You need these. The challenge will be maintaining an inner steady course when emotions become overwhelming. You can do this. Talk with those who love you. The animal and plant kingdoms listen well.

Maintain strict limits and agendas so time and money are not wasted. Discipline allows the intuition to emerge. When we have no discipline, intuition has nothing to focus upon. Should you need anything, realize your communication abilities are excellent. Ask and it will be given. Give and more will be asked of you. Both must occur. Think on all the love and goodness your life has provided. This goodness rules your life.

PISCES Feb19–Mar20 What you communicate will affect many people. Tell the truth about your experiences. Let people know both your inner and outer realities. No matter what is occurring in your life, move toward it with grace and love and willingness. Great good will come of it. Remember this when the road becomes rocky. (Only for a small amount of time). Read Psalm 91. Write daily in your gratitude journal.

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Use your mind and spiritual will to focus on health and well-being. Think prevention. Then attempt to enjoy yourself. Both are important. You have a real sense of confidence in your intelligent and good planning. When you’re truly mindful, your communication infects others with laughter, inspiration and enthusiasm. You bring a “resurrection” to people. An upliftment. Ponder these things during the Easter festival. Attend church and pray.

You’ll be practical as well as creative with money and finances, day-to-day events, plans, connections and agendas. Even if you feel like an inner explosion might occur, focus on how to bring balance and harmony, caution and care into all situations. The week is paradoxical with polarized realities everywhere. Stand in the middle where the light is. That will be your adventure.

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SAGITTARIUS Nov22–Dec20

Do not be discouraged. Love’s hiding so you can assess your wants, needs, and aspirations first. Pleasure might also be hidden, delayed until just the right time to come out and play. Be very aware of the Easter festival. Since love pours down on all of humanity during the festival, and since you’re Ray 2 (Love/Wisdom), you’re in the direct pathway to receive. Allow nothing to interrupt your meditations.

VIRGO Aug23–Sep22

HAPPY HOUR

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Classifieds classifieds PHONE: 831.458.1100 | EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@GOODTIMES.SC | DISPLAY DEADLINE: THURSDAY 2PM | LINE AD DEADLINE: FRIDAY 2PM

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-0391 The following Individual is doing business as ICS, INNOVATED CONTROL SYSTEMS. 1220-A WEST BEACH STREET, WATSONVILLE, CA 95076. County of Santa Cruz. RONALD FRYN. 1220-A WEST BEACH STREET, WATSONVILLE, CA 95076. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: RONALD FRYN. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 2/1/1997. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Feb. 28, 2017. Mar. 22, 29 & April. 5. 12.

NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-0395 The following Individual is doing business as JULIE'S DELECTABLES. 331 MOUNTAIN VIEW AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. JULIE CONWAY. 331 MOUNTAIN VIEW AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: JULIE CONWAY. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 2/28/2017. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Feb. 28, 2017. Mar. 22, 29 & Apr. 5, 11.

FICTITIUS BUSINESS NAME The following person(s) has/have withdrawn as a general partner(s) from the partnership operating under the fictitious business name of HARMONY WITHIN COUNSELING. 4401 HILLTOP RD., SOQUEL, CA 95073. The fictitious business name statement for the partnership was filed on 8/11/2015 in the County of Santa Cruz. The full name and residence of the person(s) withdrawing as a partner(s): AMY ERIN MC NISH. 651 SUNSET RD, SOQUEL, CA 95073. This statement was filed with the County ClerkRecorder of SANTA CRUZ COUNTY on the date indicated by the file stamp: Filed: Mar. 9, 2017. File No.20150001428. Mar. 22, 29 & Apr. 5, 12.

APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 17, 2017. Mar. 29 & Apr. 5, 12, 19.

APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 28, 2017. Apr. 5, 19, 12, & 26.

the fictitious business name listed above on 4/29/1988. Original FBN number: 2012-0000761. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 16, 2017. Mar. 29 & Apr. 5, 12, 19.

statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 23, 2017. Apr. 5, 12, 19, 26.

NO. 17-0620 The following Corporation is doing business as LIVING WELL LANDSCAPE. 190 ATHERLY LANE, BONNY DOON, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. I.M.S. MARINE CORPORATION. 23800 MORRELL CUT OFF RD, LOS GATOS, CA 95033. Al# 1506970. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: DJANGO DAWSON. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 1/30/1989. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 30, 2017. Apr. 12, 19, 26 & May 3.

APRIL 12-18, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

real estate

52

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-0472 The following Individual is doing business as EMERALD OCEAN PAINTING. 211 BERKELEY WAY, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. SEAN SCHULTZ. 211 BERKELEY WAY, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: SEAN SCHULTZ. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 9, 2017. Mar. 22, 29 & Apr. 5, 12. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-0495 The following Individual is doing business as NAILS-2-ENVY. 1622 SEABRIGHT AVE, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. SHAKIRA MEDEN. 1622 SEABRIGHT AVE, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: SHAKIRA MEDEN. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 13, 2017. Mar. 22, 29 & Apr. 5, 12. STATEMENT OF WITHDRAWAL FROM PARTNERSHIP OPERATNG UNDER

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17- 0535. The following General Partnership is doing business as THE SANCTUARY FOR LIVING CULTURES. 24764 SOQUEL SAN JOSE RD., LOS GATOS, CA 95033. County of Santa Cruz. JOAN FEDENCIA COLEMAN & JOSHUA ROY MCKEE. 2464 SOQUEL SAN JOSE RD., LOS GATOS, CA 95033. This business is conducted by a General Partnership signed: JOAN FEDENCIA COLEMAN. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-0543 The following Individual is doing business as SPACE BUNS. 610 ORD STREET, APTOS, CA 95003. County of Santa Cruz. KATHRYN ELIZABETH MULENBURG. 610 ORD STREET, APTOS, CA 95003. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: KATHRYN ELIZABETH MULENBURG. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 3/20/17. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 20, 2017. Mar. 29 & Apr. 5, 12, 19.

REFILING OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT WITH CHANGE FILE NO. 17-0521 The following Married Couple is doing business as DIGGER'S PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT COMPANY. 2282 MATTISON LANE, UNIT C. County of Santa Cruz. LAURI MORGAN, WAYNE MORGAN. 2282 MATTISON LANE, UNIT C, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95065. This business is conducted by a Married Couple signed: LAURI MORGAN. The registrant commenced to transact business under

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-0498 The following Individual is doing business as WINDFALL FARM. 10 OLD WOMAN CREEK RD., DAVENPORT, CA 95017. County of Santa Cruz. JANA FRESTON MENDENHALL. 10 OLD WOMAN CREEK RD., DAVENPORT, CA 95017. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: JANA FRESTON MENDENHALL. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 13, 2017. Apr. 5, 12, 19, 26.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-0377 The following Individual is doing business as XTENSION. 320 RIVER ST. SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. TIFFANIE ROMERO. 320 RIVER ST. SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: TIFFANIE ROMERO. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 2/24/2013. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Feb. 24, 2017. Mar. 29 & Apr. 5, 12, 19.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-0557 The following Individual is doing business as VINEGIRL PRODUCTS. 498 WHITE ROAD, WATSONVILLE, CA 95076. County of Santa Cruz. MARY BANNISTER. 498 WHITE ROAD, WATSONVILLE, CA 95076. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: MARY BANNISTER. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-0577 The following Individual is doing business as NORTH STAR ALLIED. 21 STEVENS PLACE, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. County of Marin. DAVID ANDREW WOOD. 21 STEVENS PLACE, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: DAVID ANDREW WOOD. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-0510 The following Corporation is doing business as FREELINE SURF SHOP. 821 41ST AVENUE, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. MEL ENTERPRISES. 821 41ST AVENUE, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. Al# 3485226. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: MEL ENTERPRISES. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 15, 2017. Apr. 5, 12, 19, 26. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-0487 The following Corporation is doing business as THE HEARING AID STORE. 550 WATER STREET

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BLDG. BI, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. NORTHLAND HEARING CENTERS, INC.. 6600 WASHINGTON AVENUE SOUTH, EDEN PRAIRIE, MN, 55344. AI# 2890457. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: NORTHLAND HEARING CENTERS, INC.. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 10, 2017. Apr. 12, 19, 26 & May 3. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-0465 The following Individual is doing business as HEART & SOUL FITNESS. 3034 MCGLENN DR, APTOS, CA 95003. County of Santa Cruz. AMANDA CHADWICK. 3034 MCGLENN DR., APTOS, CA, 95003. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: AMANDA CHADWICK. The registrant

commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 5/1/2008. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Mar. 8, 2017. Apr. 12, 19, 26, & May. 3. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-0641 The following Individual is doing business as FAUST SALON AND SPA (DOWNTOWN SANTA CRUZ). 110 COOPER ST. #100 F, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. VERNON D. TIBBITTS, III. 18 SEACLIFF DRIVE, APTOS, CA 95003. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: VERNON TIBBITTS. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Apr. 4, 2017. Apr. 12, 19, 26, & May 3.

TOP EMPLOYERS TRUST US FOR THEIR CLEANING & LANDSCAPING NEEDS.

SANTA CRUZ FIRE DEPARTMENT NOTICE TO ABATE WEEDS

We encourage you to abate your own weeds and rubbish; however, if the work has not been completed by the May 15th deadline, the City contractor will perform the abatement work. You will be charged for the contractors’ work, plus a $100.00 administrative fee on your property tax bill.

New Restaurant Opening Soon. Management and staff positions available. Apply at vegontheedge.com. 725 Front Street, Santa Cruz.

If you have already abated the weeds and/ or rubbish, please disregard this notice. Be advised, however, that your property is required to be maintained free of weeds and rubbish throughout the year and the City contractor is authorized to perform additional work should a hazard reoccur. Please refer any questions to Fire Inspector Tim Shields at (831) 420-5286.

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New Living Expo

We are so excited to be hosting the Expo for the 16th year. A large part of the success of our show is due to our wonderful volunteers, many of whom return every year. Volunteers receive the following: Free three day pass, Free Special Event ticket for working 2 or more shifts, Free New Living Expo t-shirt or bag to keep after your shift, The opportunity to meet new people, Fun, fun, fun http://

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The Fire Code requires property in the City of Santa Cruz to be free of weeds and rubbish. Therefore, please be advised that as part of the City Weed Abatement Program, vegetation and debris on your property must be cleared in an approved manner by May 15, 2017.

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Where the locals shop since 1938. VOTED BEST BUTCHER SHOP BEST WINE SELECTION BEST CHEESE SELECTION BEST LOCALLY OWNED GROCERY STORE BEST MURAL /PUBLIC ART

Family owned & operated 78 years. 622 Soquel Avenue, Santa Cruz

OUR 78 TH YEAR

WEEKLY SPECIALS

BUTCHER SHOP

A LEG OF & LAMB WITH PAIRING WINE FOOD GARLIC AND ROSEMARY Ingredients

-1 (7-pound) semi-boneless leg of lamb, aitchbone removed, fat trimmed to 1/4 inch thick, and lamb tied NOW TAKING ORDERS FOR - 4 garlic cloves HOLIDAY FEASTS! 423-1696 LAMB LEGS, LAMB RACKS, LAMB SIRLOIN - 1 tablespoon fine sea salt ROAST, PRIME RIB ROASTS, BOAR’S HEAD - 2 tablespoons chopped BONELESS 1/2 HAMS, DIESTEL TURKEY’S fresh rosemary - 1/2 teaspoon black pepper - 1/4 cup dry red wine or beef broth

Preparation

MEAT

BEEF ■ NEW YORK STEAKS, U.S.D.A Choice/ 12.98 LB ■ COULOTTE STEAKS, U.S.D.A Choice/ 7.98 LB ■ VEAL RIB CHOPS, Pasture Fed/ 12.98 LB LAMB ■ LEG OF LAMB/ 6.98 LB ■ BONELESS LAMB LEG/ 7.98 LB ■ LAMB CUBES, Boneless/ 8.98 LB SAUSAGE ■ MILD ITALIAN SAUSAGE/ 5.98 LB ■ HOT ITALIAN SAUSAGE/ 5.98 LB ■ PORK BREAKFAST LINKS/ 4.98 LB ■ LINGUICA LINKS/ 6.98 LB FISH ■ FRESH CREATIVE SALMON FILLETS, Organically Fed/ 16.98 LB ■ FRESH TILAPIA FILLETS/ 9.98 LB ■ FRESH PETRALE SOLE FILLETS/ 14.98 LB

Beers

■ QUE PASA, Organic Tortilla Chips, 16oz/ 3.69 ■ CRYSTAL GEYSER, Sparkling Water, 1.25L,

■ ANCHOR BREWING, “STEAM”, 6 PACK, ■ BLUE MOON, “BELGIAN WHITE”, 6 PACK,

■ BECKMANN’S, California Sour Round, 16oz/ 3.49 ■ WHOLE GRAIN, Nine Grain, 30oz/ 4.19 ■ KELLY’S, Four Seed, 16oz/ 3.89 ■ GAYLE’S, Jewish Rye, 16oz/ 2.79 ■ SUMANO’S, Sourdough Round, 24oz/ 3.99

■ ANDERSON VALLEY, “ALL KINDS”, 6 PACK,

12OZ BOTTLES/ 8.99 + CRV

■ NORTH COAST, “LE MERLE + OLD RASPUTIN”, 4 PACK, 12OZ BOTTLES, 7.99 +CRV 12OZ BOTTLES/ 8.49 +CRV

■ DEEP EDDY, 3 Kinds/ 12.99 ■ CHOPIN/ 19.99 ■ KETEL ONE/ 19.99 ■ HANGAR ONE/ 22.99 ■ BELVEDERE/ 24.99

“Fresh & rBST Free”, 8oz/ 3.29 ■ WILDWOOD VEGGIE BURGER, “Made with Sprouted Soybeans”, 6oz/ 3.89 ■ FIORUCCI DICED PANCETTA, “All Natural”, 4oz/ 4.69 ■ HEMPLER SMOKED BACON, “All Varieties”, 10oz/ 5.19

and Pink Lady / 1.89 LB

12OZ BOTTLES/ 8.49 + CRV

■ FIRESTONE, “LUPONIC DISTORTION”, 6 PACK,

Vodka

“Premium”, 8oz/ 5.49

■ BANANAS, Always Ripe/ .89 LB ■ NAVEL ORANGES, Sweet and Seedless/ 1.29 LB ■ BABY LOOSE SPINACH, Organically Grown/ 4.99 LB ■ ZUCCHINI SQUASH, Extra Fancy Squash/ 1.19 LB ■ AVOCADOS, Ripe and Ready to Eat/ 1.89 EA ■ YELLOW ONIONS, A Kitchen Must Have/ .49 LB ■ CLUSTER TOMATOES, Ripe on the Vine/ 2.69 LB ■ MANDARINS, Seedless and Juicy/ 1.99 LB ■ ORGANIC BANANAS, The Perfect Snack/ .99 LB ■ TANGELOS, Sweet and Juicy/ 1.29 LB ■ BABY CELLO CARROTS, 1 Lb Bags/ 1.19 EA. ■ GREEN BEANS, Fresh and Tender/ 1.79 LB ■ LOOSE CARROTS, Great Source of Vitamin “A”/ .59 LB ■ RUSSET POTATOES, Peak Quality/ .59 LB ■ ROMA TOMATOES, Ripe and Firm/ 1.19 LB ■ POTATOES, Red and Yukon/ .89 LB ■ SEEDLESS GRAPES, Red and Green/ 2.99 LB ■ LEMONS, Blemish Free Lemons/ .59 EA ■ PINEAPPLE, Ripe and Sweet/ 1.09 LB ■ GRAPEFRUIT, Pink Flesh Grapefruit/ .79 EA.

12OZ BOTTLES/ 8.99 +CRV

All Flavors/ .99+ CRV ■ SAN PELLEGRINO, Italian Sparkling Juice, 6 Pack, 11.15oz Cans/ 4.99+CRV ■ SPINDRIFT, Sparkling Water, 4 pack, 12oz Cans/ 3.99 ■ BEN & JERRY’S ICE CREAM, Pint, (Reg 5.29)/ 4.29

■ BELGIOIOSO MOZZARELLA BALL,

■ APPLES, Fuji, Granny Smith, Gala, Braeburn

S HOPP ER SPOTLIG HT

Compare & Save

■ DI STEFANO MASCARPONE CHEESE,

Organic: Arrow Citrus Co., Lakeside Organic

MSRP 26.99 Shoppers Special 13.99

Best Buys, Local, Regional, International

Local, Organic, Natural, Specialty, Gourmet

Delicatessen

CALIFORNIA-FRESH, Blemish–free, Local/

Wine Pairing

BEER/WINE/SPIRITS

GROCERY

Bakery

PRODUCE

– Pat lamb dry and score fat by making shallow cuts all over with tip of a sharp small knife. – Pound garlic to a paste with sea salt using a mortar and pestle (or mince and mash with a heavy knife) and stir together with rosemary and pepper. Put lamb in a lightly oiled roasting pan, then rub paste all over lamb. Let stand at room temperature 30 minutes. – Preheat oven to 350°F. – Roast lamb in middle of oven until an instant-read thermometer inserted 2 inches into thickest part of meat (do not touch bone) registers 130°F, 1 1/2 to 1 3/4 hours. Transfer to a cutting board and let stand 15 to 25 minutes (internal temperature will rise to about 140°F for medium-rare). – Add wine to pan and deglaze by boiling over moderately high heat, stirring and scraping up brown bits, 1 minute. Season pan juices with salt and pepper and serve with lamb.

2012 Montes Alpha Syrah #37 Wine Spectator Top 100 of 2015 92 Points Wine Spectator

LL NATURAL USDA Choice beef & lamb only corn-fed Midwest pork, Rocky free-range chickens, Mary’s air-chilled chickens, wild-caught seafood, Boar’s Head products.

Celebration Sparklers

■ MICHELLE BRUT/ 9.99 ■ VALDO PROSECCO/ 13.99 ■ ROEDERER ESTATE BRUT, (92WE)/ 19.99 ■ SHARFFENBERGER BRUT, (91WE)/ 19.99 ■ IRON HORSE WEDDING CUVEE, (96WE)/ 36.99

Cheese - “Best Selection in Santa Cruz” Easter Specials

■ EOS ROSÉ, Central Coast, (Reg 16.99)/ 8.99 ■ 2014 SOQUEL TRINITY, (Reg 16.99)/ 9.99 ■ 2015 STORRS CHARDONNAY, SCM, (Reg 23.99)/ 19.99 ■ 2014 CINNABAR PINOT NOIR, (94WE, Reg 34.99)/ 24.99 ■ 2015 ROMBAUER CHARDONNAY, (Reg 35.99)/ 29.99

■ MONTEREY JACK, “rBST Free”

Loaf Cuts/ 3.09 Lb, Average Cuts/ 3.49 Lb ■ PEPPER JACK, “A Customer Favorite”/ 6.99 Lb ■ SAINT AGUR BLUE, “Creamy Blue Cheese”/ 12.99 Lb ■ DRY JACK RUMIANO, “Pepper Coated”/ 8.29 Lb

Shop Local First- Locally Made

Rosé

■ SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAIN MARINADE, 12oz/ 4.99 ■ MANUEL’S SALSA, 14oz/ 5.59 ■ KGWANS, Triple F Hot Sauce, 5oz/ 6.99 ■ CAROLYN’S COOKIE CO., Frozen Dough, 21oz/ 9.99 ■ THE GREEN WAFFLE, Blueberry, 18oz/ 11.39

Clover Stornetta

■ ORGANIC MILK, 1/2 Gallon/ 3.99 ■ ORGANIC WHIPPING CREAM, Pint/ 3.99 ■ ORGANIC BUTTER, 16oz/ 6.99 ■ ORGANIC SOUR CREAM, 16oz/ 3.79 ■ COTTAGE CHEESE, 16oz/ 2.99

■ 2015 VERDAD, Central Coast, (Reg 17.99)/ 11.99 ■ 2013 WEST CLIFF ROSÉ, Santa Clara Valley/ 13.99 ■ 2016 MARTIN RAY, Russian River/ 16.99 ■ 2015 ST SUPERY, Napa Valley, (90WW)/ 16.99 ■ 2015 BEAUREGARD, Coast Grade/ 25.99

Connoisseur’s Corner- Cabernet Sauvignon ■ 2012 SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAIN VINEYARD, (93WE)/ 38.99

■ 2011 SILVER OAK, (MSRP 74.99)/ 59.99 ■ 2012 MOUNT EDEN, SCM Estate, (95WE)/ 69.99 ■ 2013 SIGNORELLO, Napa Valley, (94WA)/ 69.99 ■ 2008 LANCASTER, Alexander Valley, (94WA)/ 69.99

ASHLEY SPENCER, 47-Year Customer, Santa Cruz

Occupation: Stay-at-home mom Hobbies: Cooking, traveling, hiking, reading Astrological Sign: Virgo Who or what first got you shoppIng here? My mother first brought me to Shopper’s. It’s the only grocery store I shop, and I’ve been coming here my whole life. Shopper’s is mine. I have a personal relationship with it. The owner, Andre (Beauregard) sets the tone — as his father, Jim, and grandfather, Bud, did as well — for the employees to always help you out. Shopper’s takes it role as part of the community pretty seriously. They effectively establish relationships with their customers which most other stores have no interest in doing. Shopper’s is consistent with their service, along with their highquality products they offer in all departments.

What do you like to cook? Comfort food, my triedand-true recipes, but I also change it up sometimes with something complicated and new to me. Could tagine orora a be from the paper or Epicurean, like a tangine paella which I’ll tend to make when having people over. Together, the butchers and I will try and figure out how best to do it. Speaking of the the butchers, the quality of the meat department is something I haven’t found when traveling — I always miss my store and the guys from the meat department. Hey kids, is your mom a good cook? “Yes!” You like shopping here with your mom? “Everyone is really nice to us, and Shopper’s is really comfortable.”

That’s cool that your kids like it here. Yes, they know the staff, and in return, they know my kids, Kate, Jack and Margarette, by name. My kids know where to find things when I ask, ‘What would you like for lunch or dinner?’ Kate and Margarette bake a lot, and it’s great that we can get Valrhona Chocolate and King Arthur flour, which is hard to find. We consume an enormous amout of specialty products, from wines, “weird” mustards, capers, exotic sauces, and, much more. I’ll often tell new residents that we live in a remarkable area for food and wine. Because Shopper’s showcases that bounty, you’ll feel like you’ve hit the jackpot and a connection to the community.

“I’ll tell new residents that we live in a remarkable area for food and wine. Because Shopper’s showcases that bounty, you’ll feel like you’ve hit the jackpot!”

|

Corner: Soquel & Branciforte Avenues 7 Days: 6am-9pm

| Meat: (831) 423-1696 | Produce: (831) 429-1499 | Grocery: (831) 423-1398 | Wine: (831) 429-1804

Superb Products of Value: Local, Natural, Specialty, Gourmet ■ Neighborly Service for 78 Years

Gtw1715  

April 12-18, 2017

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