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A NEW BOOK TRACES HALF A CENTURY OF BOOKSHOP SANTA CRUZ, AND THE HISTORY OF THE LOCAL LITERARY SCENE P18

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INSIDE Volume 42, No.35 Nov. 30-Dec. 6, 2016

WALL FALLOUT South County leaders extend support to immigrants post-election P11

PAGING SANTA CRUZ Wallace Baine’s new book on lit culture and Bookshop Santa Cruz P18

Gayle Ortiz’s lesser-known identity as a fashion designer P32

FEATURES Opinion 4 News 11 Cover Story 18 A&E 30 Music 38

Events 40 Film 56 Dining 60 Risa’s Stars 65 Classifieds 66

Cover design by Tabi Zarrinnaal. Good Times is free of charge, limited to one copy per issue per person. Entire contents copyrighted © 2016 Nuz, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form is prohibited without publisher’s written permission. Good Times is printed at a LEED-certified facility.

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IN STITCHES

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OPINION

EDITOR’S NOTE

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

If you weren’t living in Santa Cruz in the preAmazon era, it’s probably hard to appreciate how wonderfully mundane it seemed back then to have a thriving literary scene. We didn’t just take independent bookstores for granted, we took taking independent bookstores for granted for granted. Not anymore, of course. Now most cities don’t have an independent bookstore—even the one with a million people right over the hill. And Santa Cruz County has certainly lost our share of great bookstores, like Capitola Book Café and Bookworks, to name the most recent casualties. But lucky for us, there are still indie bookstores in Santa Cruz—and the grande dame of them all, Bookshop Santa Cruz, has not just survived, but risen to be a model for others at a national level. The truth is that Wallace Baine’s new

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book marking the 50th anniversary of Bookshop Santa Cruz would have been a good idea even if this era of indie-lit crisis had never arisen—and that’s a testament to the mark that the store has made on Santa Cruz culture. And while it uses the history of the bookstore as a narrative backbone, A Light in the Midst of Darkness is perhaps even more important for the way it winds into other corners of Santa Cruz’s literary history—for instance, Baine’s wonderful writing about James Houston and Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston, a short section of the book that is excerpted in this week’s issue. Meanwhile, Wendy Mayer-Lochtefeld explores the book’s themes in her interview with the author (page 19). Baine will be talking about A Light in the Midst of Darkness at 2 p.m. this Saturday at Wellstone Center in the Redwoods—the publishing arm of which, Wellstone Books, published it. He’ll be in conversation with Wellstone’s publisher Steve Kettmann, myself, and two key figures in Bookshop Santa Cruz’s history, Neal Coonerty and Casey Coonerty. I hope you’ll join us! STEVE PALOPOLI | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

LETTERS

POPULAR VOTE IS THE ONLY WAY

NO LAUGHING MATTER

Re: Letters, 11/23: Steve Edwards only got it partially correct. Yes, the Electoral College was a nod to small states, but its main purpose was to appease the slave owning states. They had lots of land, but not a lot of free white men. (Twelve of our first 18 presidents were slave owners. George Washington owned more than 300.) So a compromise was reached to count each slave as 3/5 of a person! (I have not been able to ascertain whether this only included adult males.) Moreover, basing a state’s Electoral College votes is absurd, when many people do not, or cannot, vote. Children can’t vote. Prisoners cannot vote. Several religious sects do not believe in voting. Why should they be counted to give a state more voting power? All the votes in the country should be considered equal; the popular vote is the only way to do this. We are supposed to be the United States, after all.

I was eager to read “The Vecchione Project” (GT, 10/26), and I hung onto every word until the last paragraph, which stated, "Vecchione admits that she gets ‘really nervous beforehand, and then I become incredibly happy. It must mean I’m mentally ill,’ she says with a chuckle.” While most of us who suffer from bipolar disorder (which has potentially lethal high and low moods) love humor, as a women’s mental health advocate and mother with bipolar disorder, I found this remark offensive. The talented authors Christina Waters and Patrice Vecchione know that words have enormous power. In a time when one out of four adults live with a mood disorder and suicides are higher than ever, it’s important to remember that at its core, mental illness is no laughing matter. DYANE HARWOOD | FOUNDER, DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE (DBSA), SANTA CRUZ COUNTY CHAPTER

NANCY DEJARLAIS | CAPITOLA

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PHOTO CONTEST PINK SKY ON BLACK FRIDAY A moment of stillness not far from a shopping frenzy.

Photograph by Alison Gamel. Submit to photos@goodtimes.sc. Include information (location, etc.) and your name. Photos may be cropped. Preferably, photos should be 4 inches by 4 inches and minimum 250 dpi.

GOOD IDEA

GOOD WORK

WRITES OF PASSAGE

CAR TALK

Lovers of real paper novels with their refreshing book smell have a reason to celebrate this holiday season because Watsonville is getting a bookstore again. Kelly Pleskunas, longtime owner of the city’s former Crossroads Books, is opening her new Kelly’s Books at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Dec. 3 with raffles and giveaways to celebrate. The new store is located at 1838 Main St., Watsonville, next to Bagel Café & Bakery.

The city of Santa Cruz has released its first-ever Traffic Safety Report, which tracked traffic collision data through Dec. 31, 2015. Among the findings, the study reports that total collisions were down 7.6 percent last year from 2014. Crashes involving pedestrians were down 17 percent, while crashes involving cyclists went up 2 percent. Unsafe speed was the No. 1 cause of collisions, followed by a failure to yield rightof-way and unsafe turning.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“A bookstore is one of the many pieces of evidence we have that people are still thinking.” — JERRY SEINFELD CONTACT

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LOCAL TALK

What do you think about the protests at Standing Rock? BY MATTHEW COLE SCOTT

The Native Americans are standing up for their inherent right. ROB AARON SANTA CRUZ | SELF-EMPLOYED

Cops are supposed to serve and protect, and they’re punishing humans that are trying to protect the water for drinking. DREW HOSMER SANTA CRUZ | SIGN MAKER

They had the land first, and I think the government should leave them alone. FELTON | SALES

It really disturbs me that in our society now we value money over everything. BETH DUNN SCOTTS VALLEY | CLINICAL SOCIAL WORKER

It would be amazing if this turned into a protest for renewable resources. ALI BABBA TRAVELER | MUSICIAN/TEACHER

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

CAROLYN SCHELL

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ROB BREZSNY FREE WILL ASTROLOGY Week of November 30 ARIES Mar21–Apr19 “I frequently tramped eight or ten miles through the deepest snow,” wrote naturalist Henry David Thoreau in Walden, “to keep an appointment with a beech-tree, or a yellow birch, or an old acquaintance among the pines.” I’d love to see you summon that level of commitment to your important rendezvous in the coming weeks, Aries. Please keep in mind, though, that your “most important rendezvous” are more likely to be with wild things, unruly wisdom, or primal breakthroughs than with pillars of stability, committee meetings, and business-as-usual.

TAURUS Apr20–May20 For you Tauruses, December is “I Accept and Love and Celebrate Myself Exactly How I Am Right Now” Month. To galvanize yourself, play around with this declaration by Oscar-winning Taurus actress Audrey Hepburn: “I’m a long way from the human being I’d like to be, but I’ve decided I’m not so bad after all.” Here are other thoughts to draw on during the festivities: 1. “If you aren’t good at loving yourself, you will have a difficult time loving anyone.” - Barbara De Angelis. 2. “The hardest challenge is to be yourself in a world where everyone is trying to make you be somebody else.” - e e cummings. 3. “To accept ourselves as we are means to value our imperfections as much as our perfections.” - Sandra Bierig. 4. “We cannot change anything until we accept it.” - Carl Jung.

GEMINI May21–June20 Are your collaborative projects (including the romantic kind) evolving at a slower pace than you expected? Have they not grown as deep and strong as you’ve wished they would? If so, I hope you’re perturbed about it. Maybe that will motivate you to stop tolerating the stagnation. Here’s my recommendation: Don’t adopt a more serious and intense attitude. Instead, get loose and frisky. Inject a dose of blithe spirits into your togetherness, maybe even some high jinks and rowdy experimentation. The cosmos has authorized you to initiate ingenious surprises.

CANCER Jun21–Jul22

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I don’t recommend that you buy a cat-o’-nine-tails and whip yourself in a misguided effort to exorcise your demons. The truth is, those insidious troublemakers exult when you abuse yourself. They draw perverse sustenance from it. In fact, their strategy is to fool you into treating yourself badly. So, no. If you hope to drive away the saboteurs huddled in the sacred temple of your psyche, your best bet is to shower yourself with tender care, even luxurious blessings. The pests won’t like that, and—if you commit to this crusade for an extended time—they will eventually flee.

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Nobel Prize-winning novelist Gabriel García Márquez loved yellow roses. He often had a fresh bloom on his writing desk as he worked, placed there every morning by his wife Mercedes Barcha. In accordance with the astrological omens, I invite you to consider initiating a comparable ritual. Is there a touch of beauty you would like to inspire you on a regular basis? It there a poetic gesture you could faithfully perform for a person you love?

VIRGO Aug23–Sep22 “For a year I watched as something entered and then left my body,” testified Jane Hirshfield in her poem “The Envoy.” What was that mysterious “something”? Terror or happiness? She didn’t know. Nor could she decipher “how it came in” or “how it went out.” It hovered “where words could not reach it. It slept where light could not go.” Her experience led her to conclude that “There are openings in our lives of which we know nothing.” I bring this meditation to your attention, Virgo, because I suspect you are about to tune in to a mysterious opening. But unlike Hirshfield, I think you’ll figure out what it is. And then you will respond to it with verve and intelligence.

LIBRA Sep23–Oct 22 A reporter at the magazine Vanity Fair asked David Bowie, “What do you consider your greatest achieve-

ment?” Bowie didn’t name any of his albums, videos, or performances. Rather, he answered, “Discovering morning.” I suspect that you Libras will attract and generate marvels if you experiment with accomplishments like that in the coming weeks. So, yes, try to discover or rediscover morning. Delve into the thrills of beginnings. Magnify your appreciation for natural wonders that you usually take for granted. Be seduced by sources that emanate light and heat. Gravitate toward what’s fresh, blossoming, just-in-its-early-stages.

SCORPIO Oct23–Nov21 According to traditional astrology, you Scorpios are not prone to optimism. You’re more often portrayed as connoisseurs of smoldering enigmas and shadowy intrigue and deep questions. But one of the most creative and successful Scorpios of the 20th century did not completely fit this description. French artist Claude Monet was renowned for his delightful paintings of sensuous outdoor landscapes. “Every day I discover even more beautiful things,” he testified. “It is intoxicating me, and I want to paint it all. My head is bursting.” Monet is your patron saint in the coming weeks. You will have more potential to see as he did than you’ve had in a long time.

SAGITTARIUS Nov22–Dec21 A journalist dared composer John Cage to “summarize himself in a nutshell.” Cage said, “Get yourself out of whatever cage you find yourself in.” He might have added, “Avoid the nutshells that anyone tries to put you in.” This is always fun work to attend to, of course, but I especially recommend it to you Sagittarians right now. You’re in the time of year that’s close to the moment when you first barged out of your mom’s womb, where you had been housed for months. The coming weeks will be an excellent phase to attempt a similar if somewhat less extravagant trick.

CAPRICORN Dec22–Jan19 Hundreds of years ago, the Catholic Church’s observance of Lent imposed a heavy burden. During this sixweek period extending from Ash Wednesday to Easter Sunday, believers were expected to cleanse their sins through acts of self-denial. For example, they weren’t supposed to eat meat on Fridays. Their menus could include fish, however. And this loophole was expanded even further in the 17th century when the Church redefined beavers as being fish. (They swim well, after all.) I’m in favor of you contemplating a new loophole in regard to your own self-limiting behaviors, Capricorn. Is there a taboo you observe that no longer makes perfect sense? Out of habit, do you deny yourself a pleasure or indulgence that might actually be good for you? Wriggle free of the constraints.

AQUARIUS Jan20–Feb18 “The Pacific Ocean was overflowing the borders of the map,” wrote Pablo Neruda in his poem “The Sea.” “There was no place to put it,” he continued. “It was so large, wild and blue that it didn’t fit anywhere. That’s why it was left in front of my window.” This passage is a lyrical approximation of what your life could be like in 2017. In other words, lavish, elemental, expansive experiences will be steadily available to you. Adventures that may have seemed impossibly big and unwieldy in the past will be just the right size. And it all begins soon.

PISCES Feb19–Mar20 “I have a deep fear of being too much,” writes poet Michelle K. “That one day I will find my someone, and they will realize that I am a hurricane. That they will step back and be intimidated by my muchness.” Given the recent astrological omens, Pisces, I wouldn’t be shocked if you’ve been having similar feelings. But now here’s the good news: Given the astrological omens of the next nine months, I suspect the odds will be higher than usual that you’ll encounter brave souls who’ll be able to handle your muchness. They may or may not be soulmates or your one-and-only. I suggest you welcome them as they are, with all of their muchness.

Homework: If you had a baby clone of yourself to take care of, what would be your child-rearing strategy? Tell me at freewillastrology.com.

© Copyright 2016


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OPINION

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TRIBUTE TO LOWERY Robert Lowery was his name. Blues was his game. He talked the talk and he walked the walk. A bluesman for life. Authentic and sincere. His gut-level guitar playing wrenched new life from traditional blues classics. He was an accomplished artist of the first degree. A blues artist. The guitar fingerboard was his palette. Six steel strings

and a metal slide would serve as brushes. The notes, mostly blue, were his choice of colors. He’d start to play and sing and instantly proceed to paint a true portrait of what the blues can feel like. His music will live on through a rich repertoire of recordings. Man had the blues in the beginning, and he still has the blues today. Listen to the blues. RICK MESSINA | SANTA CRUZ

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NEWS SAFE SPACES As locals reel from election, South County leaders extend supportive hand to immigrants BY CALVIN MEN

WALL FEARS Trump’s pledge to build a wall along the Mexican border and deport millions of undocumented immigrants has definitely hit home in Santa Cruz County. Though the county is still predominantly white, Latinos are the second-largest group, making up a third of the county’s population. The Migration Policy Institute estimates that there are 20,000 undocumented immigrants in Santa Cruz County and more than 3 million statewide. Immigration experts say it’s too early to know what Trump would do >14

BANKS GIVING A thousand people gathered by the Missouri River on Thanksgiving, honoring native ancestors at a

burial ground as armored guards watched from above. PHOTO: LEONIE SHERMAN

Standing Their Ground Indigenous people speak out on Standing Rock BY LEONIE SHERMAN

‘T

omorrow, only fasting and praying to stop the pipeline!” declares Dorothy Sun Bear, the night before a national holiday that’s been celebrated with feasting since the Civil War. As she rises to leave the warmth of the Oglala Wounded Knee Dining Hall, half a mile north of the Standing Rock Reservation, 50 eyes turn to her and the bustling army tent falls silent. “We don’t have nothing to be thankful for! They’re still stealing our land, they’re still digging up our ancestors!” Sun Bear spits the words in disgust. “And we’re still fighting

like we have been for 500 years.” Sun Bear, a Lakota woman from Wounded Knee on the Pine Ridge Reservation, saw a video of a grandma getting tackled by Morton County sheriff’s deputies four months ago. The woman was resisting construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL), where it was slated to cross the Missouri River. A spill, rupture or leak—there have been 3,300 such incidents nationwide in the past six years— would pollute the drinking water for her relatives on the Standing Rock reservation in North Dakota and for 18 million people living downstream.

“I had to come here to defend her,” explains Sun Bear on Wednesday, Nov. 23. She brought six of her children and grandchildren. “We’re staying until the end, until we win. Then we’ll celebrate Thanksgiving.” On Nov. 24, Oceti Sakowin, the main camp, swells to an estimated 10,000 people. “I think that one of the reasons people are coming here is because Donald Trump got elected,” says Madonna Thunderhawk, a Cheyenne-River Sioux who has been living at camp with her daughter and son-in-law since August. “I mean, where else can you go in this country right now to experience any >12

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At Cabrillo College, anxiety in the November election’s aftermath feels subtle but palpable. A sandwich board in front of the Extended Opportunity Programs and Services (EOPS) office features a flyer calling out to students that are immigrants, LGBTQ, Muslim, women and others feeling unsafe in the weeks after the election of Donald Trump. “Please know that EOPS will continue to offer each and every one of you a SAFE space to express your fears and anxiety in these times of uncertainty,” it reads. Students walking into the office are met with two stacks of flyers: one advertising counseling programs and healing circles, the other listing the phone numbers of immigration lawyers. Brando Marin, a 24-year-old Cabrillo College student and Watsonville resident, remembers peers expressing their fears in class. One friend talked about her son—who is half black, half white—and how he might be affected by stories of aggression against people of color following the election. Others talked about the uncertainty of what Trump, a candidate who boasted about his draconian immigration plans, will and won’t follow through with. “Right now, it’s a time where people are getting informed. They’re acknowledging what’s happened,” says Marin, whose uncle, a fieldworker, has been joking with his co-workers that their deportation is imminent. The election results brought a wave of anti-immigrant sentiment, prompted protests against president-elect Trump and created anxiety across the nation. But they’ve also brought out a network of support.

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NEWS STANDING THEIR GROUND <11 kind of hope for positive change?” They aren’t taking just action to protect Native American interests, Thunderhawk adds, but also the millions of other Americans who live downstream on the Missouri and would be affected by an accident along the oil line. Camp security guard Hunter Short Bear, a Lakota from the Spirit Lake Nation, spent Thanksgiving Day responding to rumors of a camp raid and dealing with the constant stream of cars clogging the entrance station. “Today is supposed to be about giving thanks and coming together with family,” he says, gesturing at the dusty prairie bustling with activity. Supporters from around the world are bundled against the bitter wind, carrying lumber, pounding nails, hauling water and splitting wood. “Well, here we are. We’re all family now.” Many people at the camp ignored the official government holiday completely. “There’s no vacations in camp,” says Everett Bowman, who is part Diné and part Paiute and calls the Owens Valley home. “We’re always working.” The work may be far from over. Over the weekend, the Army Corps of Engineers declared it would arrest all remaining protesters on Monday, Dec. 5 for “trespassing”— an announcement that only

strengthened the resolve of those fighting the DAPL. The corps has backed off those words, but the North Dakota Gov. Jack Dalrymple has since demanded the “mandatory evacuation” of the land, citing safety concerns as winter storms roll in, even though 13 construction crews are working six days a week to winterize their shelters and kitchens. BeaVi McCovey has been fasting on this day for more than 50 years. She travelled here from the Yurok Reservation in Northern California and plans to stay through the winter. “My great-grandmother told me that the first mistake our people made in contact with white people was to feed them. She said if we’d just let them starve, we could have come back a year later and they all would have been dead,” she says. “We would still have our land and our way of life.” When she was growing up, McCovey says her mother thought Thanksgiving was a day to feed folks who didn’t have money or a place to go, and a big crowd every year gathered at her house. But McCovey, inspired by her great-grandmother, fasted each Thanksgiving since she was 9 years old. “In my tradition, we fast as a way of getting closer to spirit and honoring our ancestors,” she explains. “I thought they would look down on what I was doing and regard my efforts and sacrifice in a good light.”

This year, though, she broke her fast. “I worked so hard with everyone, preparing the meal, I called it the harvest feast,” McCovey says. “It was such a communal effort. And then all these different natives sat down together and we shared what we had. It felt so great to be in a community of people that are gathered in prayer and ceremony.” McCovey, who participated with the American Indian Movement and occupations decades ago, pauses to reflect on the changes that have happened since. “We were more militant then, it seemed like a fight to the death. It feels so much more peaceful here. Maybe it’s because there’s no drugs or alcohol here, maybe I’m just older now.” She stops and squints into the smoky campfire. “The resistance here is so powerful because it’s a spiritual resistance,” she says finally. “We all have different beliefs, but we’re all here in prayer.” Those joined in prayer represent the largest and most diverse gathering of indigenous people on the continent, maybe on the planet. “A month ago, three quarters of the registered tribes were present here, and today there’s even more,” says Farron King, a 28-year-old Cheyenne-River Blackfoot. “I was just kickin’ it with some Pawnee and some Crow; traditionally our people were enemies. So thank you >16

NEWS BRIEFS ALL A BOARD It’s a good time to have a motorized skateboard company in Santa Cruz—the hard work of two innovative startups is paying off as they start getting a little love nationwide. Inboard, the only skate company of its kind with motors built into the wheels, will be appearing on ABC’s “Shark Tank” at 7 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 2. The platform provides an opportunity for CEO Ryan Evans and his team to show off their M1, which has speeds of up to 20 mph and a range of 10 miles between

charges. That is, unless Mark Cuban or one of the show’s other panelists goes into asshole mode, ripping the team a new one for absolutely no reason. But it’s hard to imagine anyone doing that over a sleekly designed longboard that has a remote control, the capability to maneuver the ride from a phone application and the ability to coast when the skater runs low on battery power or simply feels like getting a workout. Also, Inboard posted an image on its website of venture

capitalist and “Shark Tank” regular Kevin O’Leary testing out the board, and he looks to be handling it OK. The basic gist of the show is to convince a filthyrich entrepreneur to fork over a sliver of his or her fortune without giving up too large of a stake in your brilliant idea. The market for such rides among extreme-sports enthusiasts could soon snowball, as shoppers look for an alternative to those trendy hoverboards that have been recalled for being more dangerously flammable than a

Samsung Galaxy Note 7 doused in gasoline. Not to be outdone, the more rugged Onewheel, which was inspired by the feeling of snowboarding on powder, got called the “the futuristic toy we hoped for” by the Wall Street Journal. “What is this unicycleskateboard hybrid that appears to have been engineered by hackers on mushrooms at Burning Man?” the paper asks. It’s called Onewheel, guys. And it’s from Santa Cruz. JACOB PIERCE


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NEWS

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FENCE THE PROBLEM County residents are worrying about many of President-elect Donald Trump’s campaign statements, including promises to ramp up deportations and build a massive wall along the southern borders.

SAFE SPACES <11 in office, but his recent nomination of Sen. Jeff Sessions—a stalwart supporter of anti-immigration policy—for attorney general doesn’t bode well for progressive immigration policy. Nor does the addition of Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach—a figure behind some high-profile immigration laws—to Trump’s transition team. Kobach helped draft the controversial 2008 “show me your papers” Arizona bill, most of which got thrown out by the U.S. Supreme Court, and a photojournalist got a picture of him last week holding a memo titled “Kobach Strategic Plan for First 365 Days.” The document, among other things, called for re-introducing the

“National Security Entry-Exit Registration System,” which was implemented shortly after the Sept. 11 attacks. Anxiety levels have spiked in recent weeks among students in South County schools, says Erica Padilla, CEO of Pajaro Valley Prevention and Student Assistance. Schools and parents have quickly but cautiously reached out to the nonprofit, which provides academic, social and emotional counseling to students. “A lot of fear around their parents being deported. A lot of anxiety of potential separation of children from parents,” Padilla says. “Those are the types of issues that my staff was reporting children were expressing.” A lack of information has driven fears about what can and can’t happen to them

come 2017. Wanting to dispel notions of what could and might happen, community leaders organized a forum at Watsonville High School on Nov. 20. The forum drew more than 450 attendees—a mixture of legal immigrants, citizens and undocumented residents. Hundreds of parents, aunts, uncles and caregivers filed into the high school cafeteria with questions for the twohour session: Will there be mass deportations? When will they happen? How do I talk to my children about this? Organizers tapped legal experts, law enforcement officials and other community organizations to calm fears and share information. Speaking in Spanish, presenters walked the crowd through an array of topics, from their

right to an attorney to current laws to how to plan for the worst. One handout’s instructions detailed how to create an emergency plan during a workplace raid, precautions like carrying a card for an immigration attorney and planning ahead of time how to care for children. “They were very serious. Very attentive,” says Doug Keegan, an immigration attorney and director of the Santa Cruz County Immigration project. “You could tell that this was something very important to them.” Among some of the assurances made by the school district and the Watsonville Police Department were that they were not working to enforce immigration law and take parents away from children. “The message was made clear by many of these groups and it spoke positively about the Watsonville community,” Keegan says. At the end, the crowd’s mood was a mixture of relief and gratefulness at the realization that their community was there for them. Pajaro Valley Unified School District (PVUSD) Superintendent Michelle Rodriguez says some parents were already aware of the community resources available to them, but the forum cemented the support. “People are happy to explicitly hear that and know that they have a community that surrounds them and supports them,” she says. Community support was made clear but what was unclear is what the exact policy change will be under the Trump administration. President Barack Obama deported more than 2.4 million people since taking office, but he also implemented immigration change. The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) passed while he was in office, creating a program designed to protect undocumented immigrant children from deportation. Trump will likely dismantle the DACA program, Keegan says. He also predicts the ramped-up deportation of incarcerated undocumented immigrants. But beyond that, there is only uncertainty about the future of immigration. While Trump promised to target immigrants with a criminal history, it’s unclear whether there would be distinction between major and minor offenders. He also promised to quickly deport millions while in office, a promise that Keegan says is within Trump’s power but is certainly cost-prohibitive. Keegan doesn’t want to be hopelessly optimistic in his expectations of the Trump administration, but he does hope people can find a solution. “The solution isn’t the deportation of millions of people. It’s finding a pathway,” he says. “A middle ground for people who are here without documentation to become legal residents or have some pathway to legal citizenship.”


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oil companies for bringing all these indigenous people together!” He beams as he looks around at the young people with whom he shares the International Indigenous Youth Council Camp on the south shore of the Cannonball River. One of those people is Mia Stevens, a 22-year-old woman from the Paiute Reservation in Nevada, who is of Mexica, Ute, Diné, Paiute and Puerto Rican descent. On the holiday, she and almost 1,000 others marched to an ancient burial ground known as Turtle Island on a hilltop overlooking the Missouri River. Construction crews dug through it a few weeks ago to lay a section of pipeline. Riot cops currently guard the site. “We really wanted to make an honorable prayer for the trauma and genocide our people have been through,” Stevens says. They sang and prayed, she says, for the next seven generations, that their descendents wouldn’t feel the same pain and shame that they have. “We only sang our ceremonial songs. We approached the guards, in peace, and asked them to stand down,” she says, her eyes glowing with the memory. “They didn’t, but some of them lowered their face shields to respect our prayers. That was really big. Because we pray for them, too. We know they’re just doing their jobs. We’re doing this for their children, too.” Stevens, shaking her head, mentions that some celebrities offered a big dinner feast, but that the natives declined. “We don’t want their pity food,” she says. “We want them to stand with us. We want them to pray with us.” Prayer is at the heart of the approach indigenous people and their non-indigenous supporters have taken at Standing Rock. “We don’t call what we’re doing actions or protests. We call them prayers,” explains King. “Everything we do out here is with peace and with prayer. When I came out here, I started learning my language and our songs. When we all sing together, I can feel myself growing like a tree. Now that we’ve found our way, we’ll never stop fighting. This is just the beginning.”


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INDIE FAMILY PORTRAIT Left to right: Ryan Coonerty, Neal Coonerty and Casey Coonerty have all played an important part in the family business, Bookshop Santa Cruz.


STORED KNOWLEDGE Wallace Baine on his new book about Bookshop Santa Cruz and the importance of indie bookstores BY WENDY MAYER-LOCHTEFELD

W

decades, and though Capitola Book Café (of which I was a former owner) has closed, its unique community and kinship with other local indies has meant its legacy lives on. And one of the most celebrated and innovative independent bookstores— not just locally, but even among booksellers nationally—is Bookshop Santa Cruz, which celebrates its 50th anniversary this year. More than ever, indie bookstores offer critical alternatives to the troubling “truthiness” and outright fake news that became such a controversial factor of the recent election—which is why Wallace Baine’s new book about Bookshop Santa Cruz, A Light in the Midst of Darkness: The Story of a Bookshop, a Community and True Love, is such an important reminder of why bookstores matter. The book winds the history of Santa Cruz’s modern literary scene around the story of the store, offering a rare account of how our formidable literary landscape evolved. I recently met with Baine at the Abbey and talked about books, readers, writers, and yes, politics—when it comes to independent bookstores, they’re all related.

What role did bookstores play in your childhood?

WALLACE BAINE: I grew up in suburbia in the ’70s, during the rise of mall bookstores. It wasn’t until I went to college and moved out West that I started connecting to bookstores that had an eccentricity to them. They were places where you could spend three hours and nobody bothered you. You could just sit on the floor and absorb. They used to have a certain complacency—we’re here, come on in, hang out, whatever—but these days, bookstores can’t be complacent. They have to hustle. They have to become, as I talk about in the book, not just bookstores, but destinations for people who like books. There’s a distinction there.

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

hen a book lover steps into her favorite bookstore, her blood pressure drops and her mind opens. She breathes a sigh of relief, as if she’s managed to reach an old friend. As she spots her favorite books, she scans a sea of colorful possibilities, considering titles she might never have thought to read before. Any one of them could change her life. This is the essential beauty of independent bookstores, their distinct capacity to gather and surprise us, even as we pursue our own interests. They cultivate conversations between strangers about everything from Plato to fruit bats to Captain Underpants, with a little truth and beauty thrown in for good measure. Bookstores rattle the imagination—disconnecting us, however briefly, from our own agendas and nudging us gently toward each other. Santa Cruz has played enthusiastic host to many independent bookstores for decades—Logos and the Literary Guillotine continue to draw loyal readers downtown, as they have for

Why do people develop such passionate relationships to bookstores?

Readers are a particular kind of people. They’re the kind of people who develop attachments. Reading is a solitary activity, but bookstores occupy a central place in book lovers’ lives because of the human connection. When you go into a bookstore and talk to the clerks, they speak your language.

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Why are independent bookstores in particular so good for readers and writers? Independent bookstores tend to hire people who are very steeped in literature and reading. This isn’t always a priority in bigger bookstores. As far as writers go, a lot of people who work in bookstores are writers themselves. They want to be around books and they want to be around other writers. It’s a good day job while they do their own work, and readers benefit from their knowledge. How did a small surf town like Santa Cruz capture the literary spotlight with Bookshop Santa Cruz? It’s a story of survival. A lot of towns the size of Santa Cruz at one time had bookstores, but too many have fallen away. Bookshop is still here. Book Café is gone, but it put Santa Cruz on the map with many publishers. They’d look at their

authors’ tour schedules and see New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Capitola of all places. Bookshop Santa Cruz has carried on that tradition. Santa Cruz thinks of itself a lot like Berkeley does, and has labored to build the same kind of literary culture here.

Speaking of literary culture, tell me about your friendship with one of our great departed literary lions, Jim Houston. I started working at the Sentinel in 1991, when Jim’s writing career was in mid-stride. I’d read at least one of his books before moving here and instantly wanted to develop a friendship with him. He had a modest way about him, a cowboy way, and he was fascinated with other parts of the country. Almost more than any writer I’ve come across, he was focused on geography. He believed that California wasn’t just a place, it

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“It’s a story of survival. A lot of towns the size of Santa Cruz at one time had bookstores, but too many have fallen away.” - WALLACE BAINE <20 was a spiritual, emotional place. He felt the same way about Hawaii. He was heir to that kind of wide-openspaces type thinking.

What are your impressions of Neal Coonerty, Bookshop’s steadfast owner and champion through earthquakes and big box rivals. He helped make independent bookstores political animals. Neal was always interested in politics and he liked to come out swinging. He went into city politics because of the earthquake, feeling the need to serve, plus he saw himself as the best intermediary between merchants and progressive university types. That manifested in his business battles with Super Crown and Borders. Some people felt he was insisting they spend their money in a certain way, and they blanched at that. Of course, he was making a larger point about local business and chains and the character of the town. Most people got it, but it did divide people. In taking over the store, how has Neal’s daughter Casey shifted that conversation? Casey’s different than Neal. She’d tell you she’s less of a risk taker and more like her mother Candy. Also, the store itself is in a different situation. Neal didn’t have to deal with Amazon and the current retail environment. It was Casey who had to bring Bookshop into the new era, and she did that by trying to make it a destination for people who love books, providing services, outreach, events, and selling other stuff. She’s a brainstormer.

Independent bookstores have had a brief respite from their political role in the larger culture, but with the recent election they could play one again. What do you think that role might look like? I can only speak about Santa Cruz, but I think a lot of people here who are upset about the election are Bookshop’s clientele— not uniformly, but largely. The outcome doesn’t only represent the election of right-wing politics, even though that’s what everyone is talking about. It also represents the ascendency of an indifference to books. The president we have now is a writer and a good one, but we’re going to have a president who I don’t even think reads as a habit. So the value of books in people’s lives is going to be thrown into more stark relief because Trump is going to be, if not hostile, at least indifferent to whether books live or die. The role that bookstores can play has to do with the truth. Whether it’s through websites claiming to be news sites that aren’t, or big networks, we’re being inundated with lies. You can go into Bookshop and find lies, too, if you know where to look, but bookstores are ultimately about the truth. Somebody needs to speak up for it, and journalism isn’t doing it, so who are the defenders of what is true? It might have to be the publishing world. Maybe they’ll step up in the next four years and try to mitigate the damage. Maybe they can convince people that to find the truth you need to turn to different sources.

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The Icons at Home Celebrating local lit legends James Houston and Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston in an excerpt Kick off the holiday season from ‘A Light in the Midst• of HorsDarkness’ d’oeurves

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Jim Houston, a protégé of Wallace Stegner, was a gentleman writer.

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t’s only a five-minute stroll thing made of cherrywood • Largest ornament collection and heart from one of Santa Cruz’s most withCounty a cupola on top, the in redwood Santa Cruz sun-bright, postcard-pretty ofsparkle! one of Jim’s most vivid •subject Tons of California beaches, but the den essays. He would go on to write in the home of James and Jeanne nine novels and about twice that Wakatsuki Houston is dark and many nonfiction works and win cool, even on the hottest days. The the American Book Award and the room is redolent of another time, Humanitas Prize, and he articulated crowded with antique furniture and as well as anyone the psychic and quiet in a way that I imagine homes historical dimensions of being a used to be before television and air Californian. Much, if not all of that conditioning. I’ve been a guest in writing took place in the attic office that den dozens of of his Santa Cruz times, on official house, including business and his luminous otherwise, and I novel Snow rank some of those Mountain Passage, moments among a heartbreaking the most sublime fictional take on of my years as a the famous Donner cultural journalist. Party tale. If a As the guy from house can serve as the local paper, a muse for a novel, I had license to then this is the one. invite myself over The Houstons and talk for an moved into the hour or two with house as little more the Houstons about than squatters. It books, the past, ideas and long dead was 1962 and the house had been heroes, all that stuff writers love empty for three years. The den’s to talk about. Tall, courtly, cowboy picture window was shattered and handsome, possessed of the kind whatever furniture left behind of deep oaken speaking voice you had been exposed to the elements would expect Uncle Sam to have, for nobody knew how long. The Jim Houston, a protégé of Wallace Houstons didn’t have much money, Stegner, was a gentleman writer, so the cheap rent appealed to them. a mischievous spirit in a brawny They didn’t figure to stay long, but frame who was always aflame they fell in love with the place and with the passions that drove him, bought the house. In a coincidence what you might call an emotional that no novelist could get away with, geography, in Jim’s case, California the Houstons later learned that and Hawaii and the unnamable the house had once belonged to the family of Patty Reed, the youngest essence that those two places share. survivor of the Donner Party, and Jeanne was (still is!) whip-smart and that some of the artifacts of the radiant, wielding an easy charisma Donner Party, including Patty’s doll, that could melt stone. had been stored in the very same The house is a story in its own attic where Jim wrote his books right, a mighty ramshackle of a

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and only man able to conduct the séance. A decade later, Jim and Jeanne Houston tag-teamed on a book that was to become the most lasting literary legacy of each of them. Farewell to Manzanar was a memoir about Jeanne’s childhood experience as a Japanese-American detainee in the Manzanar internment camp during World War II, one of the first literary accounts to emerge from that shameful episode. Farewell to Manzanar was adapted into a television movie and was adopted into school curricula all over California and the U.S. (The Houstons would later go on to establish the Pacific Rim Film Festival, an annual event in Santa Cruz that cross-pollinated the BINDED TO THE COMMUNITY Wallace Baine's new cultures of California, book is published by Soquel's Wellstone Books. Hawaii and other Pacific lands through films.) <25 Manzanar was where the Houstons’ story intersects with about the lure of California and the the Coonertys’. The day in 1973 that mythology of its history. Jim and Jeanne Houston introduced It was inside this house where I Manzanar at a previously scheduled sat many times enthralled by Jim’s book signing was also the day that telling of the Donner Party story and Neal and Candy Coonerty were its offshoots. These times with Jim publicly introduced as the new and Jeanne were peak experiences owners of Bookshop Santa Cruz. for me. Though he was almost thirty years older, I saw a commonality between the two of us. Jim had been born in San Francisco, but his parents were both Southerners. I had been born and raised in the South and had moved west as a young man. We shared a certain temperament that Jeanne recognized as Southern, an introverted nature and a joy in seeing metaphorical connections across geography and history that expressed itself in storytelling. I had come to California for a better life, albeit under circumstances laughably less grim and dramatic than anyone from Patty Reed’s generation. Sitting in the Houstons’ den was to me like sitting among the ghosts of old California with the one

Excerpted from ‘A Light in the Midst of Darkness’ by Wallace Baine. Reprinted with permission. ©2016 Wellstone Books.

Author Wallace Baine will discuss A Light in the Midst of Darkness, Santa Cruz literary history and the role of independent bookstores in the 21st century this Saturday at 2 p.m. at Wellstone Center in the Redwoods, 858 Amigo Road in Soquel. He will be joined by Wellstone Books publisher Steve Kettmann, Bookshop Santa Cruz’s Neal Coonerty and Casey Coonerty, and GT editor Steve Palopoli. The event is free.


Give the Gift Of Play

Gifts For Sports Lovers

Baseball Gloves & Bats $24.99 & Up

The largest selection of new & used sporting goods in Northern California

Youth Archery Sets $24.99 & Up

Skateboarding helmets $19.99 & Up

Disc Golf Bags $14.99 & Up

Gifts For All Those That Play

Complete Skateboards $34.99 & Up

Mon-Fri 10am-6:30pm Sat & Sun 10am-6pm 4770 Soquel Dr. (Downtown Soquel) 831.475.1988 I playitagain-soquel.com

Together we can keep kids safer on bikes!

Dumbbells and Weight Plates Starting at $1.09/lb

Lizard Skins Bat Grips From $10.99

2016 Winter Sports Sale Going On NOW

Save $20 off of your purchase of $100 or more.

Purchase Limit of $250. Coupon good from 11/30/2016 -12/25/2016 Not Valid on Clearance Merchandise

Shared Adventures is excited to be chosen to participate in the “Santa Cruz Gives” campaign.

our goal is to raise $15,000 for our 25th Annual “Day on the Beach” event in july 2017 We also want to thank these community partners:

In 2016, Ecology Action’s Youth Bike Education Program provided hands-on safety instruction to 2,000+ kids. Help us reach more kids! Consider this: • A $20 donation will provide a helmet to a student in need • If just 20 people gave $50, we could provide hands-on safety instruction to one classroom!

http://ecoactbike.org/donate

100s of Amazing Volunteers Chardonnay II Sailing Charters Frank & Mary Kline Henry Bertram and the Santa Cruz Archers John Harold Pacific Yachting & Sailing UC Santa Cruz College 10 Praxis Volunteer Group UC Santa Cruz LifeLab Jeanine Olsen Santa Cruz SCORE

In 2016, Shared Adventures was able to provide over 60 events to more than 2,000 kids and adults with special needs!

thank you for your support! Shared Adventures

(831) 459-7210 www.sharedadventures.org – info@sharedadventures.org

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

Help Shared Adventures enrich the lives of individuals living with disabilities by donating through the Santa Cruz Gives website: www.SantaCruzGives.org or with a check to “Santa Cruz Gives” with “Shared Adventures” written in the memo to: Volunteer Center: 1740 17th Ave. Santa Cruz, CA 95062

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You chase down the car you want, we’ll fetch you a low, low rate. You’ll also enjoy flexible terms and an easy application process. New, used or refinance, we have some of the the best dog-gone rates around. Plus our local lending professionals really care about our community – they know it’s their job to put you (and Fido) back on the road at the best rate possible. • Rates as low as 1.99% APR* • Terms up to 84 months • New, Used and Refi’s • Up to 100% financing • .25% rate discount for Clean Cars • Motorcycle, RV and boat loans available too!

APPLYING IS EASY! YOU CAN APPLY ONLINE AT SCCCU.ORG, VISIT A BRANCH OR CALL US AT 831-425-7708. *APR = Annual Percentage Rate. Rates and terms subject to change without notice. Subject to credit approval.

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

ACUPUNCTURE | HERBS | ENERGETICS | DIET | MASSAGE

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Five Branches University Health Center Come to the voted best Acupuncture Clinic in Santa Cruz three years running!

Specialties include: F Pain Management and Orthopedics F Pediatrics, and Women’s Health F Dermatology F And much more Our clinic is open late and on Saturdays to accommodate your schedule.

HOURS: Mon-Thurs 9:00am-7:30pm Friday 9:00am-5:00pm Saturday 9:00am-4:30pm To make an appointment call: 831-476-8211

200 7th Avenue, Santa Cruz CA | fivebranches.edu/clinic | 831.476.9424


SANTA CRUZ COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION LOCAL SPOTLIGHT

Business Profile:

Prima Salon In Italian prima means “ahead of the rest,” and that’s the standard Brandi Moran sets for herself and her staff at Prima Salon. Since Prima opened its doors in 1985 the hip salon has created an environment that is flirty and modern with an emphasis on excellent customer service, health and wellness.

Moran explains that many of Prima’s employees have worked as a collective for many years, often generously referring clients to each other. “There’s a bit of mastery that comes with that,” she says. Moran’s stylists also offer color services. These include highlights with shine, earthy palettes for brunettes, and treatments that help hair stay nourished and looking its best, such as curl-enhancing treatments and deep conditioning. “Grey glamour is spoken here, as well,” notes Moran.

Prima also helps clients achieve radiant, youthful complexions with European-style facials, masterful massage techniques, Microdermabrasion with wild crafted oils, beauty peels, and brow shaping. Moran’s vision, which she started with her former business partner Yvonne Feistman, was almost never realized because of difficulty securing an affordable business loan. “I shopped for a loan for a few months with a baby on my hip and another in tow, and most banks weren’t interested in loaning to young, dreamy, female entrepreneurs,” says Moran. Then, the partners went to Santa Cruz Community Credit Union. “SCCCU welcomed us and the loan approval process was expedient, fair and reasonably easy. Credit Unions

value their members and circulate profits back into our community. They keep it local.” Since 1989, when Moran and Feistman purchased real estate on River Street near downtown Santa Cruz, SCCCU has helped them weather all sorts of financial storms. “We weathered the Loma Prieta earthquake, and the economic downturn, and I became a sole proprietor,” says Moran. “I enthusiastically look forward to new visions for my little ‘jewel by the sea’ partnered with SCCCU.” Additionally, over the years, six of her employees have gone on to open their own salons after honing their skills at Prima—an opportunity they never would have had had they not received support from Santa Cruz Community Credit Union. As Moran looks to the future for her salon (new ventures include a natural lipstick line, a jewelry line by Shelley May, and luxurious curl-enhancing, in-salon treatments) she still looks to the past for style inspiration. “My beauty inspiration is my Nonie, who loved a beautiful tan, orange lipstick, a white two piece, and true beauty!”

Local Dollars Local Jobs

www.scccu.org

Prima Salon 312 River Street Santa Cruz, CA 95060 (831) 423-3360 www.primasantacruz.com paid advertisment

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

Wearable hairstyles designed with a California vibe, for both men and women, are Prima’s specialty. The skilled stylists can tackle a Sassoon precision cut as easily as craft loose, unstructured curls. “Our soft focus is making clients look naturally beautiful, but beauty should be fun, simple and timeless,” says Moran.

She explains that when men and women of a certain age choose to forgo coloring and embrace their new, natural grey, Prima stylists are knowledgeable on how to support that transition with style. “The longevity of the business is really about partnership—partnership with building a strong loyal following that is generational, and working with gifted staff that trust the vision.”

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LITERATURE

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

MIRROR BREAKTHROUGH Santa Cruz therapist Andrea Wachter wrote ‘Getting Over Overeating for Teens,’ which comes out Dec. 1, to help adolescents talk about body image and eating disorders. PHOTO: COURTESY OF ANDREA WACHTER

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Teen Image

Local therapist Andrea Wachter’s new book focuses on how to talk to teens about eating disorders BY ANNE-MARIE HARRISON

A

few years ago, licensed marriage and family therapist Andrea Wachter encountered a patient who, even after 25 years in her field, she never expected to treat: a weight-obsessed 6 year old. In fact, Wachter started getting

HOT TICKET

calls from several doctors in Santa Cruz County asking for help with 6- and 7-year-olds obsessed with toning their abs, or telling their parents they felt fat. She published Mirror, Mirror on the Wall: Breaking the ‘I Feel Fat’ Spell and The Don’t Diet, Live-It Workbook with Marsea

Marcus in June 2016 so that there’d be something for kids that age to relate to. Her latest book, Getting Over Overeating for Teens, comes out Dec. 1 and is geared for the next stage of development—adolescents the same age Wachter was when she first developed an eating disorder.

Wachter says she began dabbling in diets at age 12, and by 17 had a full-blown eating disorder. “I kept trying different diets: protein shakes, cutting out fats, lowering carbs, counting calories, fasting— every fad known to man and woman. Eventually I discovered bulimia and

ARTFILES

MUSIC

FILM

You don’t know what Gayle Ortiz has been up to P32

Do the Steel Wheels play bluegrass? Discuss! P38

P56

Mo’ on-a ‘Moana’


LITERATURE

Info: ‘Getting Over Overeating for Teens’ comes out Dec. 1. andreawachter.com.

Winter ART MARKET at the TANNERY ARTS CENTER

December 1-4

THURSDAY 4-7, 6PM – Lighting Ceremony of Griswoldia* FRIDAY 6-9 SATURDAY & SUNDAY 12-5 SEE THE LIGHTS, PLUS... ornament making, gifts, stocking making, card creating, vendors, live music, food SHOP LOCAL THIS HOLIDAY SEASON! 50+ artists // ceramics, glass, textiles, printmaking, illustration, painting, jewelry, sculpture *Griswoldia is an outdoor laser light installation by artist Geoffrey Nelson. On exhibition in December, 5-9pm every evening.

13th Annual Native American Market Sat, Dec 3 10am-5pm Sun, Dec 4 10am-4pm Come & shop for unique Native American gifts: Sterling silver jewelry, beadwork, paintings, handmade drums, & interesting gift items for family & friends. Buy American By Native Americans Enjoy a Rez Dog, Fry Bread or Indian Taco

FREE Admission | info: 831.601.3051

Spreckels Veterans Memorial Building Exit #21 off Hwy 68 between Monterey & Salinas

5th & Llano Ave, Spreckels CA

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

supposed to be happy instead of being taught that we’re supposed to be everything,” she says. “We’re supposed to be mad sometimes, sad sometimes, scared sometimes, sobbing sometimes, just like different weather patterns.” Many people who struggle with eating disorders have an “unkind mind,” says Wachter, and go through the day “shoulding” themselves— shouldn’t eat that, shouldn’t say that, should’ve done this, etc. Fighting that unkind mind takes finding things that are “lifeaffirming,” which, for someone in their 40s, is going to look different than for someone who’s 12 or 13, says Wachter. But since that early age is filled with even more terrifyingly pervasive pressures, young people need to have something outside of just Facebook, Snapchat and the like. “Unfortunately these screens are sucking the life out of everybody, but especially adolescents because it’s fun, it’s great to surf the web,” she says. “But if that’s where they’re spending a majority of their time. That’s not life-giving.” Most Americans fall somewhere on the spectrum of disordered eating with different levels of severity— maybe it isn’t life-threatening, but they’re constantly monitoring how much they eat—maybe binging in private, or struggling to some extent, says Wachter. On one hand “healthy-eating,” portion control and fitness are glorified in the U.S., while on the other, colossal portions are everywhere and the idea of savoring your food isn’t as mainstream as in other countries. “Our culture has an eating disorder,” says Wachter. There is hope, however; nowadays, Wachter isn’t tempted to binge or restrict and she enjoys the food she eats. “It’s in part having a strong sense of self, having your GPS system in yourself be strong and clear: This is exactly what I want to eat, this is when I want to go to bed, this is how I want to be touched,” she says. “Sometimes we have to quiet our minds to even hear it and convince ourselves that we’re worthy, but everyone has that intuition.”

rg r.o nte UZ sce A CR art ANT ery ET, S ann STRE w.t VER ww1050 RI

I thought that was brilliant ... but it turned out to be the road to hell,” says Wachter. “That’s what I did for years. Throw in drugs, alcohol, cigarettes and lunacy. That was my life.” Wachter wants to reach young people as early as possible, especially in adolescence, when life’s problems can feel titanic and eating disorders can seem like a tempting Band-Aid. For Wachter, she says, three main things led to her eating disorder: cultural messages of diet and perfection, her family, and her “breed.” “I was a sensitive breed, as many of my clients are,” says Wachter. “Someone might get teased about their body and say ‘Oh screw them, they’re just mean.’ I got teased about the size of my body and wanted to die.” It took getting new ideas from a variety of sources, like therapists and friends who wouldn’t “fat chat,” as she calls it—talk about weight, losing it, gaining it, calories, etc. The people she surrounded herself with talked about recovery, healing, their emotions, and how to confront them. “It’s an ongoing practice to every day work on loving myself and loving my imperfections,” says Wachter. “Now it’s the aging process. In one of my blogs [on her website and Huffington Post] I wrote ‘I spent the first half of my life trying to lose weight and I refuse to spend the second half trying to lose wrinkles.’” After Wachter got the help she needed, she wanted to share the tools she learned with those struggling with eating disorders—30 million of all genders and ages in the U.S., according to most recent numbers—that she could reach. “The work that I do is all about loving yourself and feeling your deeper needs so you don’t have to turn to counterfeit, insufficient means of getting those needs met,” says Wachter, animated and unreserved over the phone—she likes catchphrases: “I call it ‘heal and deal with what you feel.’” For her, that meant coming to terms with the fact that she wasn’t a weak person without willpower, but that society’s standards of perfection had been so ingrained in her and her family that they dictated her inner monologue. “A lot of us are taught that we’re

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ARTFILES

GAYLE FORCE Once best known for Gayle’s Bakery, Gayle Ortiz has found international success as a fashion designer. PHOTO: KEANA PARKER

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Maker’s Mark

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Gayle Ortiz may be known for the bakery that bears her name, but she’s quietly crafted a fashion career BY CHRISTINA WATERS

F

or as long as I’ve known her, Gayle Ortiz has had the gleam of mischief in her dark eyes. Practically levitating with creative energy, she nonetheless exudes an aura of calm and control—spend two minutes with her and you know she’s got her act together. The thing is, after knowing her all through the bakery days, the rosticceria debut, the cookbooks, the expansions, I didn’t realize that Ortiz has only just gotten started. Who knew that about a decade ago, the woman whose name is emblazoned on regional culinary legend began crafting around with one-of-a-kind sweaters, and after a successful entrepreneurial run selling her designer creations to

boutiques the world over, she’s now vigorously immersed in designing, sewing, and workshopping custom clothing? And that’s in between weekly rounds of professional-grade mah jong and Pilates. Fresh from a sewing retreat in Ashland with her clothing design mentor Diane Ericson, Ortiz is happy to show me around her sewing studios. “It started when I began going to workshops and meeting other sewers. We have our own group now,” she says happily. “We share our projects and problems. And of course we just sew together, too.” Ortiz was at a point a few years back, she claims, where she found it hard to “get a pattern to fit.” So she sought inspiration for the graceful,

easy-to-wear clothes she now favors. “I made my own clothes when I was young,” she says, and her eyes now glow like neon obsidian. “I remember making all my prom dresses. I stopped it to do the bakery. I started again when I knew what didn’t look good on me, but couldn’t find clothes I liked. I was in my mid-50s. I didn’t need fancy dress-up clothes. I wanted everyday items. I found out about Marcy Tilton and her Vogue pattern designs, and I began to follow her. Then I met Diane, and her Design Outside the Lines workshops and retreats.” Ortiz’s interest has, characteristically, expanded into her own sewing and making blog, in which she proves to be a clear and encouraging teacher.

“A good reason to have community around you is that they bring in other hands,” she says with a chuckle. “They can help fit the piece on you. Once you’ve got something that fits well, you make a tester. Then I tweak it.” She doesn’t even have to point out that she is wearing her own designs, a striking combination of flared skirt and draped vest top that flairs out flatteringly around a long-sleeved knit top. “The recycled sweaters—I made hundreds of them. Now I’m into eco-printing and eco-dying,” she says. We step into her freestanding studio for a look. She shows me examples of scarves with delicate leaf and flower patterns imprinted on them by indigo dyes and steam. “I’ve been playing around with those,” she says. “I’m into the creative stuff now, and I think Jody Alexander’s classes on boro are great.” She holds up a few vests and samples that show the influence of boro piecing and stitching. “The classes I take eventually absorb into my work. I’m very changeable,” she confesses. “In everything. The two constants in my life are the bakery and Joe.” Ortiz calls herself a “maker,” insisting that she’s not an artist. “Everything I make has to be practical—I’m a utilitarian.” In her colorful but well-organized studio, Ortiz has a sunny front room for sewing. A new Bernina and a Serger are the workhorse machines. Under a cabinet she keeps “an old, old Bernina,” a portable Brother for travel and a new tiny Singer she refurbished. The sunny cutting room is lined floor-to-ceiling with fabric. A chic black trapeze jacket with hand-inset buttonholes sits on a form, waiting to have its sleeves lengthened. “I don’t like unfinished projects,” she says. Ortiz’s taste embraces asymmetrical, casually structured lines, with distinctive details such as triangular bound buttonholes and pieced yokes. A lifelong sewer myself, it’s all music to my eyes. Ortiz brings out three necklaces she’s designing out of found elements. “Rubber jewelry,” she says with a grin, pointing to dramatic cut-outs of re-purposed bicycle tires. “Everything I do gives me pleasure, but I admit I need the new!” See Gayle Ortiz’s designs at gayleygirl.blogspot.com.


ready... ENGAGE

DECEMBER 2ND

DECEMBER FEATURES Green Space-

Jody Alexander, Polly Goldman, Will Marino, Bob Brandes 719 Swift St #56A, 5pm-7pm

R. Blitzer Gallery S.C.R.A.P.

2801 Mission Street, 5-9pm “The Dump” is what many of us call that magical place where everything goes when we no longer have use for it. It turns out the Resource Recovery Facility has different ways to deal with almost any kind of material than you can imagine. This month seven local artists will show work created from materials salvaged from the Dimeo Lane facility, and fabricated in partnership with Fab Labs Santa Cruz. SCRAP is a project of the City of Santa Cruz Arts Commission, Sponsored by the Santa Cruz Warriors and New Leaf Community Markets.

FIRST FRIDAY FOCUS

Nicola Percy Fine Art Photography All kinds of portraits for all kinds of people. Nicola Percy is a UK photographic portrait artist and visual storyteller. In the studio or on location - she crafts photographs of grace and distinction.

Home/Work– Miranda Powell

1100 Soquel Ave., 5-8pm As usual, Midtown has got it going on for First Friday. Lots of great art and fun parties including the watercolor and fiber works of Miranda Powell at Home/Work’s new midtown location.

Scribbles Institute - Draw Fest 2016

Find her at: www.nicolapercy.com

Right in between the vibrancy of Downtown Santa Cruz and the creative epicenter of the Tannery Arts Center, you are likely to find some very sketchy activity. In fact, the sketchy center of the Sashmill is celebrating its fifth anniversary with the Scribbles Institute Draw Fest 2016. Drawing lessons and advice for all ages and levels, plus refreshments, and guaranteed fun are all on the menu.

https://www.facebook.com/ NicolaPercyPhotography/

303 Potrero #59, 6-9:30pm

sponsored by

https://instagram.com/nicpercy/

GALLERIES

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC |NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6 , 2016

Eco home improvement center, Greenspace, is celebrating its 10-year anniversary on First Friday! Featuring the work of Jody Alexander, Will Marino, and Bob Brandes, as well as Joey Dawn O’Regan, maker of Ribbon Street. Greenspace is devoted to educating the community on the array of options available to lighten our impact on the earth and to create healthy environments without sacrificing comfort and beauty.”

santacruz.com

FRIDAY ART TOUR

FIRSTFRIDAY

FIRST

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FIRST Galleries/ DECEMBER 2ND FRIDAY

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Agency Caryn Owen 1519 Pacific Ave. shopagencyhome.com 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Luma Yoga and Family Center Genna BloomBecker and Barry Brooks 1010 Center St. lumayoga.com 4:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Artisans Gallery Home For The Holidays 1368 Pacific Ave. artisanssantacruz.com 6:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Mutari Chocolate Pop-up Johanna Atkinson & Sarah Borgeson 504 A Front St. mutarichocolate.com 5:00 pm - 10:00 pm

Botanic and Luxe Emily Underwood 701A Front Street botanicandluxe.com 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm

NextSpace Santa Cruz Bennett Roesch 101 Cooper St. nextspace.us 4:00 pm - 7:30 pm

Buttercup Cakes & Farm House Frosting Joan Hellenthal 1411 Pacific Ave. farmhousefrosting.com 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Nut Kreations Nick Craig 104 Lincoln St. nutkreations.com 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Cornucopia Real Estate Daniel Hernandez 1001 Center St. Suite 5 cornucopia.com 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm Faust Salon & Spa Rebecca A. Sutton and Scott Thornburg 110 Cooper Suite F faustsalon.com 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm Felix Kulpa Gallery & Sculpture Garden My Favorite Piece 107 Elm St. felixkulpa.com 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Fish Princess Farm Rochelle Carr 109 Locust St. fishprincessfarm.com 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm Food Lounge Christine Charter Moorhead 1001 Center Street Suite 1 scfoodlounge.com 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm Kate Nolan Studio Kate Nolan 1001 Center St. #7 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm

L’Atelier Salon Jenni Fox 114 Pearl Alley lateliersalon.com 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Santa Cruz County Government Center Michele Hausman, Timothy Lydgate, Vivienne Orgel, Huve Rivas & Vanessa Stafford 701 Ocean St. 1st and 5th floors artscouncilsc.org 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm Santa Cruz Museum of Art & History State of the MAH 705 Front St. santacruzmah.org 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm Stripe MEN Chloe Wilson 117 Walnut Ave. stripedesigngroup.com 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm Stripe Anna Sofia Amezcua and Sarah Lesher 107 Walnut Ave. stripedesigngroup.com 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Ocean Conservancy Joao de Brito and Ethan Estess 725 Front St. Suite 201 oceanconservancy.org 5:30 pm - 8:30 pm PF Atelier Randall Vevea, Fanny Renoir, Alex Prikazsky, Deana Fukatsu, Krista Gambrel and Paola Favatà 2027 N. Pacific Ave. Suite C pfatelier.com 4:00 pm - 9:00 pm Pacific Wave Surf Shop Mario Guizar 1502 Pacific Ave. pacwave.com 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm Pure Pleasure Shannon Morgan 111 Cooper St. purepleasureshop.com 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm Rare Bird Salon Cindy Mori 227 Cathcart St. rarebirdsalon.com 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm Rivendell Jahandar Hamidieh and Sam Clarkson 1001 Center St. 5:00 pm - 8:30 pm Sanctuary Exploration Center Local Artists Pop-Up 35 Pacific Ave. montereybay.noaa.gov/vc/sec/ welcome.html 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm Santa Cruz County Bank Color & Light - John Babcock, Kathleen Crocetti, Stacy Frank and Heidi Hybl 720 Front St. santacruzcountybank.com 12:00 pm - 6:00 pm

MIDTOWN

DOWNTOWN

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

ART TOUR

The Homeless Garden Project Downtown Store Open House Holiday Gala 1001 Center St. homelessgardenproject.org 5:30 pm - 9:00 pm The True Olive Connection Amy Glover Martin 106 Lincoln St. trueoliveconnection.com 6:00 pm - 8:30 pm Thrifty Cuts Barber Shop Deborah Good 805 Front St. tcbarbershopsantacruz.com 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm Village Yoga Jill Faragher 1106 Pacific Ave. villageyogasantacruz.com 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm Santa Cruz Picture Framing Capitola Plein Air Event 1430 Soquel Ave. santacruzpictureframing.com 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm Chaminade Resort & Spa The Spa at Chaminade Haven Art Live - Haven Sisters Emily Theis - SeaSaltByEm Bryan Garrison Wetfeet Photography 1 Chaminade ln. chaminade.com 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm Home/Work Miranda Powell 1100 Soquel Ave. shophomework.com 5:00 pm - 8:00 am Midtown Guitar Company Mark Holsapple 926 Soquel Ave. midtownguitar.com 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm Miss Mae’s House of Beauty Fakie to Fakie Presents GOOFY 527 Seabright Ave. missmaes.com 5:30 pm - 9:30 pm Santa Cruz Art League Luck of the Draw Annual Fundraiser 526 Broadway scal.org 12:00 pm - 9:00 pm


Galleries/DECEMBER 2ND Michaelangelo Studios The Artists of Michaelangelo 1111-A River St. michaelangelogallery.net 5:30 pm - 8:30 pm

SC MOUNTAINS Central Avenue Art Walk Boulder Creek Highway 9 bcba.net 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm

The Scribbles Institute DrawFest 2016 (5th Anniversary!) 303 Potrero #59 scribblesinstitute.com 6:00 pm - 9:30 pm

Radius Gallery Small Works 1050 River Street #127 radius.gallery 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm Tannery Arts Center Artists of the Tannery 1050 / 1060 River St. tanneryartscenter.org 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm

CAPITOLA

Health Markets Janas Smith Durkee 505-A River St. manfredluedge.com 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm

First Friday Felton Art Walk Too many Artists to list but there’ll be Cookies and a Chai Bar! Shops Along Hwy. 9 facebook.com/FirstFridayFelton 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm La Raux Salon Whitney Mitchell Wirtz 2165 41st Ave. larauxsalon.com 4:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Neil Simmons Gallery Neil Simmons Photography & Yeshe Jackson Art 747-F 41st Ave. neilsimmonsphotography.com/ fineart 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm

WEST SIDE

RIVER ST.

FIRST FRIDAY ART TOUR

GREENSPACE Jody Alexander, Polly Goldman, Will Marino and Bob Brandes 719 Swift Street 56-A greenspacecompany.com 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm

R. Blitzer Gallery SCRAP-Santa Cruz Recyled Art Program 2801 Mission St. rblitzergallery.com 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Stockwell Cellars Janet Ferraro 1100 Fair Ave. stockwellcellars.com 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Special Holiday Gift Offer Only a few naming opportunities remain. Over 150 seats have already been sold for the Tannery Arts Center’s Colligan Theater! Price - $2,500

contributions are tax deductible

Make check payable to: Tannery Arts Center Mail to: PO Box 1080, Santa Cruz, CA 95061 Include note with designated seat name For more information contact

Jess Brown (831) 818-1193 or jessbrown@sbcglobal.net

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

Name a seat at the Colligan Theater for a special person, business or organization!

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EXTAORDINARY PORTRAITS

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

on FIRST FRIDAY December 2, 5-9 pm

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Judy Ziegler of Cornucopia Real Estate, invites you to join Daniel Hernandez and his display of works with oils and portraits. Danielâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s works show the influence of the Old Masters including Vermeer, Rembrandt and Titian. With Christmas arriving, his portraits make perfect gifts for family members, friends, and why not you?

SANTA CRUZ ART CENTER 1001 CENTER STREET, STE 5 DOWNTOWN


A NEW WAY OF GIVING. 33 LOCAL NONPROFITS. CONTRIBUTE WITH CONFIDENCE. IT’S EASY TO DO.

November 23 – December 31

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

SantaCruzGives.org

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MUSIC

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

IT’S STEEL ROOTS MUSIC TO ME The Steel Wheels perform on Tuesday, Dec. 6 at Don Quixote’s.

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Am I Blue? The Steel Wheels come from a place where you don’t mess around with the word ‘bluegrass’ BY CAT JOHNSON

G

enerally, bluegrass is thought to encompass everything from Bill Monroe and Alison Krauss to David Grisman, Old Time Medicine Show and the Punch Brothers. For bluegrass purists, however, bluegrass is a very distinct thing, with strict rules, roles and instrumentation. Here in California, where progressive bluegrass has been a fixture for many decades, we may be a bit looser about putting the bluegrass label on bands. But in Virginia—which is in the heart of bluegrass country and home to fast-rising roots outfit the Steel Wheels—if you call yourself a

bluegrass band, you damn well better be playing bluegrass. “We spent the first five or six years of our band really resisting the word bluegrass,” says Steel Wheels frontman and songwriter Trent Wagler. “We knew that in Virginia, we couldn’t bill ourselves as bluegrass because you’ve got some serious traditionalists that are saying, ‘Wait a minute, these guys aren’t playing anything that Bill Monroe played, or Earl Scruggs played, and that’s bluegrass.’” Wagler explains that melding different roots styles “doesn’t speak to certain traditional ways of thinking” and that this tension

between the “hippies and some of the old-school, straight-up bluegrass people” is nothing new. Sam Bush and the early newgrass artists faced it, as do young acts coming up now. For the Steel Wheels, this intersection of old and new is where the band is right at home. The members of the four-piece draw heavily from bluegrass and oldtime styles, while staying rooted in who they are as artists influenced by a number of sounds and styles, including rock ’n’ roll, blues, soul, and old gospel music. “When we’re making our music, we’re not trying to stay in a box,” says Wagler, “and we’re not trying

to limit ourselves. That’s what I love about music—it’s such a strange bag of influence.” He adds that for the Steel Wheels, that bag of influence goes into traditional old time and bluegrass music, but it “certainly doesn’t stay there.” The music of the Steel Wheels is tight and driving, with lovely, layered harmonies and catchy hooks. It’s also gritty and soulful, which gives the band a depth and texture that is sometime lost when things are too polished. That’s not to say these guys slack—in fact, anything but. They’re top-notch players, they just lean toward the real rather than the perfect, and over the years that approach has served them well as the band has gone from casual shows to touring almost full-time since 2010. The band members all grew up in Mennonite communities and Wagler says that their shared background comes through in the band’s approach to making music. “The big things that Mennonites hold dear ... is an ethic of some aspect of simple living and community,” says Wagler. “Another piece is a certain amount of nonviolence and non-participation in war. These have informed a number of things in me. Therefore, it’s going to come out in lyrical content and how I see the world.” Wagler points to the competitive nature of bluegrass, with its flashy licks and songs being more about a great picker than the feel of the tune. For the members of the Steel Wheels, this is the opposite of what they do. For them, says Wagler, a song is “not a vehicle for a bunch of licks,” but about collectively creating something. He wonders if that ethos and the no-drama sensibility of the members isn’t at the heart of the band’s successes, both on-stage and off. “The on-stage stuff is not even half the battle,” he says. “There’s much more to keeping a band together than that. We are really good friends offstage and that really helps us create a strong harmony in all senses of the word.” The Steel Wheels will perform at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 6 at Don Quixote’s, 6275 Hwy. 9, Felton. $15. 335-2800.


presents:

SWEET HONEY IN THE ROCK

celebrating the holydays tues december 20 @ 7:30 pm rio theatre, santa cruz

Tickets: kuumbwajazz.org and Logos Books & Records, Downtown Santa Cruz Info: kuumbwajazz.org or 831.427.2227 COMING SOON TO THE RIO THEATRE: LADYSMITH BLACK MAMBAZO â&#x20AC;&#x201C; JANUARY 22

LIVE AT THE SANTA CRUZ CIVIC AUDITORIUM 5 PERFORMANCES

Fri, Dec. 16, 8pm Sat, Dec 17, 1pm and 4:30pm Sun, Dec 18, 1pm and 4:30pm

Co-Executive Artistic Directors Robert Kelley and Diane Cypher

TICKETS by phone

831-420-5260 (press 5) o n l i n e scbt.com or santacruztickets.com in person

Civic Auditorium Box Office Tues - Fri 11a - 6p 307 Church St, Santa Cruz

Make some new Christmas memories this year. Buy your tickets today.

Thank you sponsors: Arts Council Santa Cruz County, Community Printers, Dream Inn /Aquarius, Google, Good Times, Opes Advisors, Organic Brand Management, Santa Cruz Sentinel, The Art Institute of California - Silicon Valley, The Community Foundation of Santa Cruz County, The Studio

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

Maestro Pamela Martin conducts the Santa Cruz Ballet Theatre Orchestra Music by P.I. Tchaikovsky

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CALENDAR

GREEN FIX

See hundreds more events at santacruz. com.

Free calendar listings in print and online are available for community events. Listings show up online within 24 hours. Submissions of free events and those $15 or less received by Thursday at noon, six days prior to the Good Times publication date, will be prioritized for print (space available). All listings must specify a day, start time, location and price (or ‘free’ if applicable). Listings can be set to repeat every week or month, and can be edited by the poster as needed. Ongoing events must be updated quarterly. It is the responsibility of the person submitting an event to cancel or modify the listing. Register at our website at santacruz.com in order to SUBMIT EVENTS ONLINE. E-mail calendar@goodtimes.sc or call 458.1100 with any questions.

WEDNESDAY 11/30 ARTS IN SEARCH OF HERPS Herpetologist Paul Haskins will lead a group in search of herps—reptiles and amphibians, that is—at Quail Hollow Ranch County Park. Peruse the pond and muse over the meadow as hikers learn about the reptile and amphibian backyard, their favorite hangouts and resting places. Sign up to reserve a spot, group size is limited. Info: 1-3 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 4. Quail Hollow Ranch, 800 Quail Hollow Road, Felton. 335-9348. Free.

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

ART SEEN

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HOUR LOCAL RADIO SHOW Host Neil Pearlberg sits down with many of the fascinating and diverse members of the Santa Cruz community. 7-8 p.m. KSCO 1080 AM. 479-1080. SMALL WORKS A gallery featuring the work of 12 artisans and craftspeople all creating handmade wearables, gifts, and housewares in the spirit of “giving art” this holiday season. Noon-5 p.m. Radius Gallery, 1050 River St., Santa Cruz. 706-1620. $5.

CLASSES SALSA RUEDA CLASSES Cuban-style dance at the Tannery. Introductory and beginning classes 7-8 p.m. Intermediate and advanced classes 8-9 p.m. Tannery, 1060 River St., Suite #111, Santa Cruz. Cesario, Danny, Gilberto. $7/$5. ARGENTINE TANGO Argentine tango classes and practice every Wednesday with John and Nancy Lingemann. Beginners 7 p.m., Intermediate/Advanced 8:15 p.m., and all levels at 9:15 p.m. Calvary Episcopal Church, 532 Center St., Santa Cruz. 469-3288. $3.

MONARCH CRAFT FAIR FUNDRAISER Make crafts, shop crafts—enjoy an afternoon of live music performances, food, and more to lessen the stress of holiday shopping with a benefit for Monarch Community School. Impress your kids with a stellar gingerbread house, your parents with some beeswax candles or friends with lavender sachets. Enjoy all that and more after celebrating with the holiday parade. Info: Noon-4 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 3. 840 North Branciforte Ave., Santa Cruz. Free.

SEMI-PRIVATE TRAINING This group exercise program has between two-to-five clients, so early scheduling is recommended. All sessions incorporate strength, cardio, stability, toning, cardio conditioning, and flexibility into an undulating periodization model. Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. 317 Potrero St., Santa Cruz. 425-9500. HAS SMOKING POT STOPPED BEING FUN? Come join a fellowship of men and women inspired to live a life free from the possession of marijuana addiction. This group uses the 12 steps to achieve personal freedom and spiritual awakening. 7 p.m. 301 Center St., Santa Cruz. 420-6177. Free. BEGINNING BALLET WITH DIANA ROSE Ballet for the beginning adult student with little or no ballet training. Learn ballet terminology and fine tune placement, posture and technique. Noon-1:15 p.m. 320 Encinal St., Santa Cruz. 466-0458. $10.

WEDNESDAY 11/30 ELISSA ALTMAN ‘TREYF’ A person can eat treyf, and a person can be treyf. It’s unkosher, prohibited, and according to Leviticus and Elissa Altman’s grandmother, it’s illicit rule-breaking. Altman’s memoir tells the story of tradition, expectations, religion and rule-breaking that defined her childhood from the synagogue to her bedroom. According to Publishers Weekly, “Her decades-long struggle to regain the happiness and comfort she felt in her beloved maternal grandmother’s home is depicted lovingly, with many moments of heartbreak and disappointment but also joy and contentment. Altman’s path to living authentically is hard won, but she demonstrates there’s reward to be found in the fight.” Info: 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 30. Bookshop Santa Cruz, 1520 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. bookshopsantacruz.com. Free. HOOP SKILLS Join hoop coach Good Golly Miss Molly Wednesdays at the Aerial Arts Studio. Each week we’ll learn new tricks, breaking them down to suit hoopers at all levels. 5-6 p.m. Aerial Arts Studio, 2801 Mission St. Extension, Santa Cruz. 246-1513. $10.

FOOD & WINE TRIVIA NIGHT Trivia night at 99 bottles. 21 and up. 8 p.m. 110 Walnut Ave., Santa Cruz. 459-9999.

DOWNTOWN SANTA CRUZ FARMERS MARKET In addition to a large variety of farm products, this market offers a great selection of local artisan foodstuffs, delicious baked goods, and lots of options for lunch and dinner. 1:30 p.m. Cedar and Lincoln streets, Santa Cruz. 454-0566.

GROUPS NAR-ANON FAMILY GROUPS OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA—APTOS/

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Seven local artists spent 5 months gleaning trash at the Santa Cruz dump and together with Idea Fab Lab have created an amazing and diverse show. Co-sponsored by the Santa Cruz City Arts, City of Santa Cruz, Idea Fab Labs, New Leaf Community Markets and Santa Cruz Warriors.

R. Blitzer Gallery

2801 Mission Street, Santa Cruz CA 95060 831-458-1217 | rblitzergallery.com Gallery Hours: Tuesday - Saturday noon - 5 pm

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Practitioner. Lecturer. Teacher on going self help workshops 831-423-6495 | reflexologychart.info

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

Super Suds

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Parties • Special Events Weddings • Themes

831-840-1355 Scott & Sandy Dexel www.kisscatering.com

Come visit our NEW kitchen and café for breakfast or lunch! Enjoy great food and excellent service!

Kiss Catering and Café 915 Disc Drive, Scotts Valley CA Located in the Fox Building

Café opened Mon. – Fri., 7:30 AM – 2 PM Overwhelmingly recommended by organizations and happy customers for over 20 years

Honored as 2016 Business of the Year by the Aptos Chamber of Commerce

Water for Christmas Sale! NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

November 28th - December 10th

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Wet & Dry Suits • SCUBA • Kayaks • Fins/Masks Warm Fuzzies • Aquatic Fun Stuff • Adventures • Classes

Everything 10-50%

Off

<40 SANTA CRUZ A 12-step group for those who have been affected by the addiction or drug problem of another. NarAnon’s program is adapted from Narcotics Anonymous and uses Nar-Anon’s 12 Steps. 6:30-8 p.m. Santa Cruz and Aptos. saveyoursanity@aol.com or helpline or 2915099. Free/donations.

HEALTH B12 HAPPY HOUR B12 can treat fatigue, anemia, anxiety, depression, PMS, heart disease, and more. 3-6 p.m. 736 Chestnut St., Santa Cruz. 477-1377. $29/$17.

MUSIC ‘COME SING WITH US’ EVERY WEDNESDAY Gold Standard Barbershop Chorus is a mixed (men and women) voice chorus that sings in four-part a cappella barbershop style. Come sing with us. 7 p.m. Kirby Prep School Music Room, 425 Encinal St., Santa Cruz. 218-1771. WORLD HARMONY CHORUS Everyone is welcome, there are no auditions and no singing experience is necessary but is welcomed. All parts are taught by ear, and musical transcriptions are provided. 7 p.m. Louden Nelson Community Center, 301 Center St., Santa Cruz. 420-6177.

SPIRITUAL WEEKLY MEDITATION GROUP Vipassanastyle meditation group for all experience levels. Beginners welcome. 7-8 p.m. Branciforte Plaza, 555 Soquel Ave., Room 245, Santa Cruz. Russ, 246-0443 or russ@ holeyboy.com. Free/Donations. PEMA CHODRON AUDIO TEACHING Learn to meditate from one of the world’s foremost meditation instructors at weekly Shambala gatherings. Guided meditation and instruction, followed by discussion. 7-9 p.m. 920 41st Ave., Santa Cruz. 316-8282.

Open House Christmas Party Dec. 10th • FREE Seafood & Libations • $2000 Gift Raffle to Every Customer ($50 min) • ½ Off SCUBA Instructions • Local Travel Discounts

ADVENTURE SPORTS UNLIMITED

CALENDAR

THURSDAY 12/1 ARTS 303 Potrero St #15 Santa Cruz, CA 831.458.3648 www.asudoit.com

All Watches 40% Off

STORYTIME Join us for storytime. Free with museum admission and for MOD Members. 10:30-11 a.m. Santa Cruz Children’s Museum of Discovery. 888-424-8035. Free. THURSDAY ART MARKET Check out the new Thursday Art Market with live music, demonstrations from artists across mediums, featured loft artists, and food

from Jonathan Parvis’ Dead Cow BBQ. New features and performers every week. 4-7 p.m. The Tannery Arts Center, 1050 River St., Santa Cruz. 621-6226.

CLASSES SALSA DANCING CUBAN-STYLE This class is for intermediate dancers and features Cuban casino partnering, salsa suelta and great Cuban music. 7-8 p.m. Louden Nelson Center, Santa Cruz. salsagente.com or 426-4724. $9/$5. SALSA RUEDA SERIES BEGINNER 2 A fun, four-week Rueda de Casino series for Beginner 2 and up. No partner required. Must know the basics in Rueda such as guapea, dame, enchufla doble, el uno, sombrero, and setenta. 8-9 p.m. Louden Nelson Community, 301 Center St., Santa Cruz. 420-6177. $34. BEGINNING BALLET WITH DIANA ROSE An introduction to ballet technique with a focus on posture, balance and strength building. Noon-1:15 p.m. International Academy of Dance Santa Cruz. info@iadance.com. $10. TAI CHI FOR ARTHRITIS Tai Chi for Arthritis is designed to be safe and effective for those living with arthritis and other chronic diseases. Designed to improve balance, flexibility and posture, and to increase strength, range of motion and energy. Advanced 2-3 p.m. Beginner 3-4 p.m. 1900 17th Ave., Santa Cruz. 475-478. $60. FALL LINE DANCE SESSION Classes incorporate fun while learning the basics of line dance into intermediate dance level. Dance lessons for all levels ultra beginner, beginner, advanced beginner, beginning intermediate, and intermediate. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Boulder Creek Recreation, 13333 Middleton Ave., Boulder Creek. 408-712-2287. $10. RESTORE BALANCE YOGA Designed for the working person in mind, this class will help you make a smooth transition from being outwardly focused, to a balanced state of inner calm. 5:30 a.m. Ananda Scotts Valley Yoga, 221-A Mount Hermon Road, Scotts Valley. 818-2715. $15. NIGHT CLUB TWO-STEP INTER. SERIES A lilting partner dance done to current, popular slow music. It is popular with swing, country and ballroom dancers alike. If you know the basics and want to learn more, this class is for you. Come as a single or with a partner. 6-7 p.m. Capitola Recreation, 4308-4498 Jade St., Capitola. 475-4134. $48. CITIZEN SCIENCE: BIG SUR FOG Drs Steven and Mary Albert are academic filmmakers who focus on the local and natural history of


CALENDAR

THURSDAY 12/1 VANILLA FESTIVAL Have you ever wondered why people refer to things that are boring as “so vanilla” when, in reality, the flavor itself can have so many nuances, profiles, and complexities? Weird. Treat your beloveds to a holiday gift unlike any other in town with an evening beginning at the Museum of Art & History where Vanilla Queen Patricia Rain and Chocolate Restaurant owner-chef David Jackman (yes, they get the irony) will take you on a visual journey through vanilla’s origin from Mesoamerican rain forests to its worldwide reach as a favorite flavor and fragrance. Later in the evening, savor a three-course meal at Chocolate crafted to highlight the exceptional and versatile flavors that can only come together between vanilla and chocolate. Info: 6 p.m. Chocolate, 1522 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. 427-9900.

FOOD & WINE TRIVIA NIGHT THIS Festive event brings together trivia aficionados, boneheads and the chic geek for a night of boisterous fun. 8:30 p.m. Woodstock’s Pizza, 710 Front St., Santa Cruz. 427-4444. VANILLA FESTIVAL Join Chef David Jackman and Patricia Rain, Vanilla Queen, for a magical evening celebrating vanilla and chocolate, a sublime duo, well worth their weight in gold. 6 p.m. Chocolate, 1522 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. 427-9900. $40.

HEALTH ARM-IN-ARM CANCER SUPPORT GROUP2 For women with advanced, recurrent and

O N 41S T AV E Music and movement classes for babies, toddlers, preschoolers... and the grownups who love them.

metastatic cancers. Registration required. 12:30-2 p.m. WomenCARE 457-2273. Free.

MUSIC KEN CONSTABLE IN THE ROCKROOM LOUNGE Ken Constable has been part of the Santa Cruz music scene since the late ’80s. He has performed in numerous legendary clubs on the West Coast such as Whiskey A Go Go, Slim’s, Bimbo’s 365 Club, and the Catalyst. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Shadowbrook Restaurant, 1750 Wharf Road, Capitola. 475-1222.

SPIRITUAL BUDDHISM FOR BEGINNERS You may have heard something about Buddhism but are still wondering how such a “foreign” spiritual tradition could be relevant to life in the world today. Join us in learning about Buddhist viewpoints and time-tested methods for leading a meaningful life. 7-9 p.m. Land of Medicine Buddha, 5800 Prescott Road, Soquel. landofmedicinebuddha.org. Free. >44

SANTA CRUZ'S PREMIER FLOAT SPA Experience the benefits of float theraapy: • experience less pain • increase athletic performance • reach deep states of relaxation

Gift Certificates Available

Register Now for our Winter Session! BEN LOMOND - CAPITOLA PLEASURE POINT - SANTA CRUZ SCOTTS VALLEY - WATSONVILLE

BOOK ONLINE AT WWW.SAGEFLOATSPA.COM 1395 41 ST AVE. CAPITOLA, CA 831.854.2700

MusicalMe.com (831) 438-3514

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

California’s Central Coast. Big Sur Fog: The Science and the History, examines the science behind coastal fog and tells a forgotten story from Big Sur’s pioneer days. 6:30-8 p.m. Santa Cruz Public Library, 224 Church St., Santa Cruz. santacruzpl.org. Free.

NOW OPEN

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CALENDAR <43

FRIDAY 12/2

ARTS

Interns wanted for SantaCruz.com Good Times publishes SantaCruz.com, an events and lifestyle website, and we are relaunching the site with the aim of creating a more expansive resource and dynamic user experience for locals and visitors alike. We can use part-time or full-time help with content and organizing information on the site. If you are detail-oriented and/or have good writing skills, and would like to help us with this project at the downtown Santa Cruz office, please send your resume and cover letter stating the start date and hours you are available to Andrea Patton at andrea@goodtimes.sc.

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

1101 Pacific Ave. Suite 320, Santa Cruz

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Flexible appointment times available. 831-332-4642 SantaCruzComplexions.com 709 Frederick Street Santa Cruz, CA 95062

JEWEL THEATRE PRESENTS: NEXT TO NORMAL This groundbreaking and awardwinning musical explores how one suburban family copes with crisis. With a thrilling contemporary score, Next to Normal is an intense, emotional powerhouse of a musical that aims right for the heart. 8 p.m. The Colligan Theater, 1010 RIver St., Santa Cruz. jeweltheatre.net. $26.

20% off full line!

free gift with purchase for the the month of Dec.

1220 A 41st Avenue Capitola, CA 95010 (831) 464-4113 • Open Daily www.wayoflife.net

WATSONVILLE FARMERS MARKET This market is in the heart of the famously bountiful Pajaro Valley. Peaceful and familyoriented, the Hispanic heritage of this community gives this market a “mercado” feel. 2-7 p.m. 200 Main St., Watsonville.

GROUPS DROP-IN GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP Grief support group meets weekly to offer support to persons grieving the death of someone. Noon. 5403 Scotts Valley Drive, Scotts Valley. 430-3000. Free. WATSONVILLE QUEER YOUTH MEET-UP Every Friday after school, youth ages 12-18 are invited to join our dynamic team of youth activists and leaders from the Santa Cruz County. This group will run in conjunction with the Saturday LGBTQ youth meet-ups. 3:30-6 p.m. First Christian Church, 15 Madison St., Watsonville. diversitycenter.org. Free.

HEALTH

FIRST FRIDAY SANTA CRUZ Founded by the Santa Cruz Institute of Contemporary Arts, First Friday is an independent event designed to support a strong cultural environment through the promotion of Artists. 5 p.m. Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. firstfridaysantacruz.com. Free.

VITAMIN B12 FRIDAY Receiving B12 via injection means that people can increase their energy. B12 Fridays are a fun time for people to meet and mingle. 3-6 p.m. Thrive Natural Medicine, 2840 Park Ave., Soquel. 515-8699.

SHANE MAUS AT THE CENTER STAGE DNA Presents in association with M.A.P.S, 2 Shows with comedian Shane Maus. 80 Cities in 80 days: An Evening of Comedy, Science and Psychedelics. 7-11 p.m. Center Street Theater, 1001 Center St., Santa Cruz. 425-7506. $20.

MUSIC

ARGENTINE TANGO DANCING Tango open dancing. 8-11 p.m. Tannery World Dance and Cultural Center, 1060 River St., Santa Cruz. For info on beginners classes please contact tangoalternativo@gmail.com. $10/$8/$5.

1/2 OFF FACIAL

expires 12/31/16

SENSORY PLAY Join us in the MOD Workshop for this new weekly class exploring sensory play activities. Messy sensory play gives young children endless ways to develop and learn, while using all their senses for creative thinking. 3-3:30 p.m. Santa Cruz Children’s Museum of Discovery. 888-424-8035. Free with admission.

CLASSES

Facials . Makeup. Waxing. Lash Extensions

Buy a Gift Card for a Facial and Get One For Yourself 1/2 Off

STORYTIME Free with museum admission and for MOD Members. 10:30-11 a.m. Santa Cruz Children’s Museum of Discovery. 888-4248035. Free.

FOOD & WINE

FREE TEEN YOGA (13-17) Teens welcome at the Santa Cruz Teen Center in the Louden Nelson Community Center for free yoga. Stretch, strengthen, and relax. 4:30-5:30 p.m. 301 Center St., Santa Cruz. stephaniembain@ gmail.com. Free. VEGAN HOLIDAY FEAST Indulge in a delicious five-course holiday meal and still have energy for dancing afterwards. These recipes will delight health-conscious holiday guests. 6-8:30 p.m. New Leaf Market, 1101 Fair Ave., Santa Cruz. 426-1306. $45.

JOE FERRARA San Jose native Joe Ferrara has been entertaining audiences from Santa Cruz to San Francisco since his first gig at the Grog and Sirloin in Los Gatos in 1968. Joe’s rich baritone voice and comfort with his audience have attracted fans of all ages. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Shadowbrook Restaurant, 1750 Wharf Road, Capitola. 475-1511.

OUTDOOR A STELLAR EXPERIENCE—STAR GAZING AT QUAIL HOLLOW Come to Quail Hollow Ranch County Park where, gazing up at the night skies, you’ll travel through space to see images like the Earth’s moon and all its craters and mountains, Jupiter and its moons, and the rings of Saturn. 6-9 p.m. 800 Quail Hollow Road, Felton. scparks.com. Free.

SATURDAY 12/3 ARTS JEWEL THEATRE PRESENTS: NEXT TO NORMAL This groundbreaking and >46


The OGG’s They’re young. They’re hot. They’re LOCAL!

They go by the OGG’s, a Hip-Hop group who started off with only ideas and dreams soon escalated to a new movement in the Bay Area. From internet view’s to small stages to opening acts for big names to an independently managed tour across the country. In a recent interview with the creator of the group who goes by the alias LOKY…, “How did you do it?” Loky quickly responded, “Hard work, stick to your plan, and believe you’re capable of anything, because you are.” Loky also said it would have never happened if it wasn’t for the help of his group, who put 100% trust in his decisions. “When we went on tour we all quit or lost our jobs, but it was worth it in the end.” Some may say, “Ok, but what’s the big hype?” With only the release of two songs as a high school senior, Loky managed to go to Las Vegas to shoot his first music video to a hit song named “One Day.” Soon after, he released a mixtape which led him to become a performer on stages across the country. “Some people think I’m living the dream, but I still work 9-5.” So, what’s his next move? “Internet, my music will be on Thizzler very soon.” It’s amazing how someone from your class just ups and goes to Las Vegas or a tour to Miami when we grew up believing it’s impossible to become a star. “Do you ever let doubt hit you or the fact that becoming a star is a one in a million?” “Nope. If it’s a one in a million chance then I’m taking a million chances…and some.” Not only does Loky have a rap group on the verge of making it big in the Bay Area, but he also has a clothing brand, “SFC.” You’ve probably seen his posters in malls around the counties of Monterey, Santa Cruz and Santa Clara “I sold out my shirts and sweaters the first time I made them at a show I did with Ezale.” It’s safe to say we can support our local rap group coming up in our neighborhood. “How do you deal with hate? Im sure you have a few people mad at your success.” “I just ignore it, I mean they should be happy because what this means is opportunity opens up not just for me, but every artist who has a dream whether it’s painting, singing, or acting. I’m opening up opportunities and they’ll thank me later.”

W W W. TA N N E R YA R T S C E N T E R . O R G

Sat, Dec 10

Kuumbwa

Sun, Jan 22

Kuumbwa

7:30 pm $25 Gen. Adv. $32 Gold Circle

7:30 pm $25 Gen. Adv. $32 Gold Circle

Co-sponsored by Fiddling Cricket Kuumbwa

Fri, Feb 3

7:30 pm $25 Gen. Adv. $40 Gold Circle

Tues, Feb 14

Rio Theatre

Sat, Sat, Mar Mar 25 4

Kuumbwa

Sat, Mar 25

Rio Theatre

Sat, April 1

Kuumbwa

Sun, April 2

Kuumbwa

Sat, April 7

Kuumbwa

7:00 pm $26 Gen. Adv. $40 Gold Circle

7:30 7:30 pm pm $30 Gen. Gen. Adv. Adv. $25 $45 $40 Gold Gold Circle Circle

7:30 pm $30 Gen. Adv. $45 Gold Circle

7:30 pm $25 Gen. Adv. $32 Gold Circle

7:30 pm $25 Gen. Adv. $40 Gold Circle

7:30 pm $25 Gen. Adv. $40 Gold Circle

Snazzy at Don Quixote’s Mon, Dec 5 Sun, Dec 11 Sun, Feb 5 Sun, Feb 26

7:30pm 2:00pm 1:00pm 7:00pm

Tony Furtado Uncle Bonsai Laura Love Roy Zimmerman

$15 Adv/ $15 Door $15 Adv/ $15 Door $20 Adv/ $20 Door $18 Adv/ $20 Door

section (45 seats). Additional $4 for each ticket purchased at the door. Tax is included.

visit Tannery

Santa Cruz Tides

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Arts Center

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It’s the craziest, sensory-overloading-in-the-best-possible-way show of the season. Don’t miss 30 world-class singers, dancers and circus artists remixing Nutcracker to new heights with Mexican folklorico dancers, hip-hoppers, Mongolian contortionists, gymnasts, ballroom dancers, and award-winning a capella group SoVoSó performing modern world beats to Tchaikovsky’s holiday music. Wang Hong, gold medal-winner in the world’s top circus competition in Paris and former soloist for Cirque du Soleil, is just one of the many top-tier performers in Tandy Beal’s annual classic. Info: 2 and 7 p.m. Hammer Theatre Center, 101 Paseo De San Antonio Walk, San Jose. nutzremixed.com. $25-$65.

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how one suburban family copes with crisis. With a thrilling contemporary score, Next to Normal is an intense, emotional powerhouse of a musical that aims right for the heart. 8 p.m. The Colligan Theater, 1010 RIver St., Santa Cruz. jeweltheatre.net. $26. HOLIDAY ART & CRAFT FAIRE A wide variety of high-quality, handmade art and crafts will be showcased at the annual Holiday Art and Craft Faire. Shoppers will find one-of-a-kind items created by local Santa Cruz County artists. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Simpkins Family Swim Center, 979 17th Ave., Santa Cruz. 454-7901. Free.

CLASSES SATURDAY MORNING YOGA AT YOGA WITHIN Class will focus on the fundamentals of basic poses, offering a well-rounded practice emphasizing safe alignment, breathing techniques, and the gradual development of greater flexibility, strength and balance. 10:15 a.m. 8035 Soquel Drive, Aptos. 251-3553. $15. AHIMSA (UH-HIM-SAH): FREE YOGA IN THE PARK “Ahimsa” is Sanskrit for non-violence. We will join together every week to cultivate

inner peace through meditation and physical well-being through a gentle yoga practice in an inclusive atmosphere of kindness and mutual respect. 9:30-11 a.m. San Lorenzo Park, 137 Dakota St., Santa Cruz. 423-1626. Free. MONARCH BUTTERFLY TOURS Meet at the visitor center for a guided tour of the overwintering monarchs. Migration is variable, to find out the current population, or to arrange a tour for groups of 10 or more please call for reservation. 11 a.m. Natural Bridges, Swanton Boulevard and West Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz. parks.ca.gov. Free. PILLS ANONYMOUS OF SANTA CRUZ PILL ADDICTION—12 STEPS OF RECOVERY Our primary purpose is to carry the message to the addict who still suffers. 8 a.m. Sutter Maternity & Surgery Center, 2900 Chanticleer Ave., Santa Cruz. pillsanonymous.org. Free. RISE AND SHINE YOGA Set the tone for your weekend with a relaxed body, calm mind, and smile on your face. We’ll start with some standing asanas (postures/poses) to awaken energy and get it moving in an inward and upward direction. 8:30 a.m. Ananda Scotts Valley, 221-A Mount Hermon Road, Scotts Valley. Anandascottsvalley.org. $15.


CALENDAR PARTNER YOGA AND WINE TASTING Share sacred energy the second and fourth Saturdays of each month at Poetic Cellars Winery. Yoga class will be taught first, with wine tasting following. 10 a.m.-Noon. Poetic Cellars, 5000 N. Rodeo Gulch. 462-3478. HOLIDAY COOKIE BAKING EXTRAVAGANZA It’s our annual class for kids and teens with their parents or relatives. Bake an assortment of lovely cookies that are gluten and dairy-free, low sugar, high-protein with fiber! Vegan options available. Take some home to share. With Chef Lauren Hoover-West. 2-5 p.m. New Leaf Market, 1101 Fair Ave., Santa Cruz. 426-1306. $30.

FOOD & WINE APTOS FARMERS MARKET AT CABRILLO COLLEGE Voted Good Times best farmers market in Santa Cruz County. With more than 90 vendors, the Aptos Farmers Market offers an unmatched selection of locally grown produce and specialty foods. 8 a.m.-Noon, Saturdays, Cabrillo College. montereybayfarmers.org or akeller@ montereybayfarmers.org. Free. WESTSIDE FARMERS MARKET The Westside Farmers Market takes place every week at the corner of Highway 1 and Western Drive, situated on the northern edge of Santa Cruz’s greenbelt. This market serves the communities of the westend of Santa Cruz including Boony Doon, North Coast, UCSC Campus and is a short trip from downtown. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Mission Street and Western Drive, Santa Cruz. 454-0566.

GROUPS SANTA CRUZ LGBTQ YOUTH MEET-UP Are you an LGBTQ youth between the ages of 12-18 who wants to join a welcoming community? Join our dynamic team of youth from the Santa Cruz County. Bring yourself or bring a friend. 1-3:30 p.m. 1117 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. diversitycenter.org. Free.

MUSIC MUSIC TOGETHER WITH MUSICAL ME Lizz Hodgins teaches the essential Music Together

SPIRITUAL MEDICINE BUDDHA PRACTICE GUIDED MEDITATION Sessions include recitation of traditional Tibetan Buddhist prayers and the Medicine Buddha mantra, as well as some quiet meditation. 9:30-10:45 a.m. Land of Medicine Buddha, 5800 Prescott Road, Soquel. 462-8383. Donation. ZEN MEDITATION & LIFE How do you practice equanimity, kindness and compassion? Four classes on The Awakened Mind & Heart. Meditation 8:30 a.m. Class and tea: 9-10:30 a.m. Ocean Gate Zen Center, 920 41st Ave., Capitola. 8:30-10:30 a.m. 920 41st Ave., Suite B, Capitola. info@oceangatezen.org. Donation.

VOLUNTEER ANIMAL SHELTER RELIEF RESCUE ADOPTION FAIR Come meet some adorable animals who are looking for their forever homes! Animal Shelter Relief rescues cats and dogs from high-risk situations in Santa Cruz and the surrounding areas. Our ultimate goal is to reduce euthanasia numbers at local shelters. Noon. PetSmart, 490 River St., Santa Cruz. animalshelterrelief.org. VOLUNTEER TO FEED THE HUNGRY WITH FOOD NOT BOMBS We need help sharing vegan meals with the hungry every Saturday and Sunday in downtown Santa Cruz: Cooking from Noon-3 p.m, 418 Front St., Santa Cruz. 515-8234. Serving from 4-6 p.m. at the Post Office, 840 Front St., Santa Cruz.

SUNDAY 12/4 CLASSES GOOD MORNING WORKOUT Get your juices flowing. Enjoy the music and get fit at the same time. You’ll learn movement, patterns, style, and technique in a welcoming environment. No partners needed. Drop-ins are welcome. 9-10 a.m. The Tannery, 1060 River St., Suite #111, Santa Cruz. Cesario. $7/$5. SWING DANCING EVERY SUNDAY Come join Swing Set Lounge every Sunday for all things swing. Lessons and social dancing. Snacks provided. All ages welcome. No partner needed. No experience necessary. 6-10 p.m. 1122 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. 471-8142. $10. >48

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SCOTTS VALLEY FARMERS MARKET Started in 2009 with the City of Scotts Valley, the market represents farmers and specialty food purveyors along with cooked-to-order food. This local market is the place for the Scotts Valley community to get their fill of fresh, healthy, locally grown fruits and vegetables. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. 360, Kings Valley Road, Scotts Valley. 454-0566.

class for all ages. Music Together is hosted by Musical Me in the MOD Workshop. 10-11 a.m. and 11 a.m.-Noon. Santa Cruz Children’s Museum of Discovery. Register at musicalme. com or 438-3514.

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CALENDAR <47 IN SEARCH OF HERPS Join herpetologist, Paul Haskins for a saunter along Quail Hollow park trails in search of herps—that is, reptiles and amphibians. Come peruse the pond and muse over the meadow as we learn about the favorite hangouts and resting places of these fascinating animals. 1-3 p.m. 800 QUail Hollow Road, Santa Cruz. scparks.com. Free.

FOOD & WINE LIVE COMEDY AT THE CROW’S NEST Crow’s Nest features live comedy, with talent from the national circuit, every Sunday night year-round. 21 and up. 2218 E. Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz. 476-4560. $7. TOBY GRAY AT THE PONO Acoustic sweet classic favorites and jammin’ originals at the downtown Santa Cruz Oasis. 1:30-4:30 p.m. 120 Union St., Santa Cruz. 426-7666. Free.

SPIRITUAL

of varied artistic mediums. Children will paint, sketch, sculpt, design, and assemble as they make new discoveries and are delighted by art and science. 3-3:30 p.m. Santa Cruz Children’s Museum of Discovery. 888-424-8035. Free with admission or membership.

TUESDAY 12/6 ARTS STORYTIME Join us for Storytime. Free with museum admission and for MOD Members. 10:30-11 a.m. Santa Cruz Children’s Museum of Discovery. 888-424-8035. Free with admission. HOLIDAY GARLAND WORKSHOP Free craft workshop! Create one of a kind holiday garlands with recycled paper and book pages. Several designs will be explored. 1 p.m. Somersault Vintage Goods, 1226 Mission St., Santa Cruz. 316-0920. Free.

GUIDED MEDITATION Led by Venerable Drimay, an excellent way to learn how to set up a daily meditation practice. Stabilizing meditation followed by guided contemplation on various Dharma topics. 9:30-10:30 a.m., Land of Medicine Buddha, 5800 Prescott Road, Soquel. 462-8383. Donation.

CLASSES

MEDICINE BUDDHA PUJA Medicine Buddha Puja is a prayer ceremony that is performed daily at Land of Medicine Buddha. One Sunday a month it is done in English. The other three Sundays it is done in Tibetan. 2-3 p.m. Land of Medicine Buddha, 5800 Prescott Road, Soquel. 462-8383 or landofmedicinebuddha.org. Free/donation.

DIY HOLIDAY GIFTS Learn to make fragrant and health-promoting Ayurvedic aromatherapy body care products from scratch, using essential oils that strengthen your energy, support good mood, improve circulation and beautify the skin. To enjoy or give as gifts. 6:309 p.m. New Leaf Market, 1101 Fair Ave., Santa Cruz. 426-1306. $30.

INSPIRATIONAL MEDITATION SERVICE Join the Santa Cruz SRF Meditation Group for Sunday morning Inspirational Service. This service includes inspirational readings from the teachings of Paramahansa Yogananda. 11 a.m.noon. Call for location, 334-2088.

HOLIDAYS, STRESS AND YOUR HEALTH This event is an educational workshop on the three types of stress associated with the holidays. Physical, mental, and chemical stressors which affect our ability to enjoy the holidays. 1 p.m. Santa Cruz Yoga, 402 Ingalls St. Suite 11, Santa Cruz. 459-9990. Free.

SUBUD INTRODUCTION Subud is a worldwide association of people who follow the spiritual practice known as the Latihan Kejiwaan, an exercise of surrender to the divine force within each one of us. Reservation required. 11 a.m.-noon. Subud Center, 3800 Old San Jose Road, Soquel. 588-3013 or santacruz.subudcalifornia.org. Free.

GUIDED MEDITATION FOR STRESS REDUCTION Guided meditation to reduce your stress with Renee Rowe. Every Tuesday evening. 7-7:45 p.m. The Barn Studio, 104 S. Park Way, Santa Cruz. awakentoyourpath.com. Donation.

TRIPLE P LIFESTYLE GROUP: IMPROVING CHILDREN'S NUTRITION & PHYSICAL ACTIVITY Attend this free parenting group to learn tips on healthy eating and physical activity. This group meets once a week for ten weeks. 6:30-8 p.m. Fitz Wetlands Education Center, 500 Harkins Slough Road, Watsonville. 465-2217.

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MUSIC CALENDAR

LOVE YOUR

LOCAL BAND MOLLY’S REVENGE

For the past 16 years, local ensemble Molly’s Revenge has brought upbeat traditional Irish music to local and national audiences. David Brewer, the only original member of the lineup, says of the group that it “blasts high-energy Celtic dance music in a really lively and entertaining way. It’s a very actionpacked show.” Can’t argue with that.

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

On Dec. 1, however, Molly’s Revenge will show a different side of their music with their holiday Winterdance show. It will feature traditional Irish dancers, and L.A. vocalist Christa Burch will be providing guest vocals.

50

“The Winterdance show is much more sculpted with highs and lows— everything from really delicate stuff to fast and lively, like people are used to seeing,” Brewer says. The idea is to bring to Santa Cruz a little slice of how folks celebrate Christmas in Ireland, where a winderdance like this is an informal gathering. A lot of the songs that Molly’s Revenge will be playing will be familiar to Irish audiences, but less so to American ones. “It’s all very different from what we usually do as Molly’s Revenge. It’s much more of a show than a concert, I guess you could say,” Brewer says. “The biggest thing that people respond to is they see how much fun we’re having. People get absorbed into that joyous effect that it brings. And that’s really our goal. So the traditional stuff is our vessel to do that.” AARON CARNES INFO: 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 1. Don Quixote’s, 6275 Hwy. 9, Felton. $17/ adv, $20/door. 335-2800.

CAMILA MEZA

WEDNESDAY 11/30 JAZZ

ECHO FABRIC Echo Fabric is a new Santa Cruz outfit blending traditional jazz with electronic sounds, including arpeggiated synthesizers, sequenced basslines and synth piano. Founded by multi-instrumentalist Jon Lukas, whose resume includes creating music for website intros of Silicon Valley tech companies in the ’90s, Echo Fabric is designed to “bring the audience in with familiar jazz elements, then introduce exciting, original, contemporary territory.” On Wednesday, Lukas is joined by jazz vocalist Magdalena, Olaf Schiappacasse on drums and Brad Hecht on saxophone. CAT JOHNSON INFO: 7:30 p.m. The Crow’s Nest, 2218 E Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz. $3. 476-4560.

THURSDAY 12/1 JAZZ

CAMILA MEZA QUARTET It seems entirely fitting that Chilean-born guitarist/vocalist Camila

Meza concludes 2016 by making her California debut with her own band. On her earlier visits this year, the New York-based musician contributed vocals to trombonist Ryan Keberle’s South American-inflected band Catharsis, and joined Cuban pianist/composer Fabian Almazan at SFJAZZ on vocals and guitar. She co-headlined an all-star concert at the Stanford Jazz Festival with Israeli guitar star Gilad Hekselman, but she caps a banner Bay Area year with her blazing young quartet featuring pianist James Francies and drummer Jeremy Dutton, rising players from Houston, and Israeli bassist Or Bareket. She’ll be focusing on music from her gorgeous, sumptuously melodic 2016 album Traces (Sunnyside). ANDREW GILBERT

INFO: 7 p.m. Kuumbwa Jazz, 320-2 Cedar St., Santa Cruz. $20/adv, $25/door. 427-2227.

FRIDAY 12/2 ALTERNATIVE

PETER MURPHY “Bela Lugosi’s Dead” is arguably the eeriest song to come out of the early-’80s British postpunk revolution. When Bauhaus broke up in 1983,

singer Peter Murphy carried on as a solo artist. His 1989 record Deep was a turning point that merged goth with college pop. Much of his later work explores Middle Eastern music, but the unifying factor is a haunting, and heart-wrenching baritone that carries emotion like no other. He’s doing his “stripped” tour, bringing strippeddown versions of his music from across his discography. AARON CARNES INFO: 7:30 p.m. Rio Theatre, 1205 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. $33. 423-8209.

SATURDAY 12/3 BLUEGRASS

FLYPAPER BLUES Newly established local band Flypaper Blues is made up of Trevor Bridge, Lauren Wahl, Devon Pearse and Darlene Norman, featuring two-part female harmonies, driving upright bass rhythms, fiddle, mandolin and acoustic guitars. Adding to Santa Cruz’s growing roster of bluegrass bands, the Flypaper Blues draw inspiration from traditional bluegrass, folk, and alt-country genres. Pigmanlion opens the set. KATIE SMALL INFO: 9 p.m. Crepe Place, 1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. $8. 429-6994.


MUSIC

BE OUR GUEST ADAM SHULMAN

PETER MURPHY

What would the holidays be without a few spins of Vince Guaraldi’s soundtrack to Charles Schulz’s 1965 holiday classic, A Charlie Brown Christmas? Full of sweet, catchy tunes steeped in nostalgia and a simpler time, the album is a seasonal classic. On Dec. 15, jazz pianist and onetime Santa Cruzan Adam Shulman, who is best known as part of Marcus Shelby’s Jazz Orchestra and has been described as a “creative force on the San Francisco jazz scene for the past decade,” brings Guaraldi’s wonderful album to the stage. Joining Shulman are bassist John Wiitala and drummer James Gallagher. CAT JOHNSON

HIP-HOP

FLOBOTS

INFO: 9 p.m. Moe’s Alley, 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz. $12/adv, $15/door. 479-1854.

SUNDAY 12/4 EXPERIMENTAL

HENRY KAISER & EVIL GENIUS A prolific composer and guitarist whose stylistic comfort zone is seemingly

INFO: 7 p.m. Don Quixote’s, 6275 Hwy. 9, Felton. $10. 335-2800.

HIP-HOP

HOW THE GROUCH STOLE CHRISTMAS Two of the biggest names to come out of the Living Legend collective, Murs and the Grouch left the group back in 2012. But the Grouch, who puts on the annual “How the Grouch Stole Christmas” tour, has something special planned for this, its 10th year: he’s gotten the entire original lineup

of the Living Legends together to rock venues all over the country. AC INFO: 8 p.m. Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $30/adv, $35/door. 429-4135.

TUESDAY 12/6

INFO: 7 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 15, Kuumbwa Jazz, 320-2 Cedar St., Santa Cruz. $20/adv, $25/door. 427-2227. WANT TO GO? Go to santacruz.com/ giveaways before 11 a.m. on Thursday, Dec. 8 to find out how you could win a pair of tickets to the show.

POP-FOLK

BENJAMIN FRANCIS LEFTWICH Singer-songwriter Benjamin Francis Leftwich cites the late, great Nick Drake as a key influence, and the influence is clear. Leftwich, who hails from York, England, draws from indie-pop and folk, but his breathy vocals, heart-on-sleeve songwriting and lush, lovely instrumentation reveal his Drake discipleship. Where Leftwich veers off, however, is with his skillful use of electronics to add texture and weight to his sound. Where Drake stuck to acoustic sounds, Leftwich takes a more experimental, rock approach to his instrumentation—which is fine, because you’d be a fool to try to simply recreate the inimitable, lasting beauty of Drake’s compositions. CJ INFO: 9 p.m. Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $15. 423-1338.

IN THE QUE TOMMY CASTRO

Rocking blues from a contemporary favorite. Friday at Moe’s Alley BEATS ANTIQUE

Electro-meets-world fusion standout group. Friday at Catalyst IRISH CHRISTMAS IN AMERICA

Celtic sounds and stylings for Christmas. Friday at Kuumbwa PEDRITO MARTINEZ GROUP

New York-based Afro-Cuban outfit. Monday at Kuumbwa TONY FURTADO

Renowned bluegrass multiinstrumentalist. Monday at Don Quixote’s

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

The Flobots’ unique mix of hip-hop, rap and alternative rock results in an unparalleled sound landing somewhere between Eminem and Green Day. The Denver natives stand out for their passionate activism and socially charged lyrics that focus on racial justice, immigration reform and the fight for a living minimum wage. Their newest album, NOENEMIES, is a crowdfunded collection of protest music. For over a year, the group has been hosting monthly workshops that blend community organizing with choir practice in a celebratory atmosphere; intended to “equip movement participants to create and lead songs designed to embody the change we want to see in the world.” KS

boundless, Henry Kaiser is a longtime fixture of the Bay Area music scene. An accomplished sideman, as well, he has appeared on more than 250 albums and scored dozens of TV shows and films. On Sunday, Kaiser is joined by Santa Cruz experimental standout act the Walkers, comprising brothers Bill and Rick Walker, whose genre-defying musical adventures have made them long-running local favorites. Also on the bill is the Portland/Los Angeles band Evil Genius, an experimental jazz trio that draws from punk, rock, jazz and more. The evening promises to be an exciting night of musical barrier-pushing, looping and experimental adventuring. CJ

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LIVE MUSIC

Wednesday November 30th 8:30pm $25/30

New Orleans Supergroup: Eric Lindell, Ivan Neville, Stanton Moore & Robert Mercurio

DRAGON SMOKE + JELLY BREAD

Thursday December 1st 8:30pm $7/10 Double Bill Dance Party

POST ST. RHYTHM PEDDLERS + PUFFBALL DANCE COLLECTIVE Friday December 2nd 8pm $20/25

Blues Favorite Returns For A Friday Night

TOMMY CASTRO

& THE PAINKILLERS Saturday December 3rd 9pm $12/15

Chart Topping Live Alternative Hip Hop Band

FLOBOTS + BANG DATA

APTOS ST. BBQ 8059 Aptos St, Aptos

Al Frisby 6-8p

AQUARIUS RESTAURANT Santa Cruz Dream Inn 175 W Cliff Dr, Santa Cruz

Three Dimensional Comedy Night/80s Crew, TroyLLF, Dopeless, Night Free 8:30p Hazel $5 9p

Castle, Mos Generator, Bad Light, Doors to Nowhere 8:30p

BOARDWALK BOWL 115 Cliff St, Santa Cruz

Karaoke 8p-Close

Thanksgiving Karaoke 9-11:45p

BOCCI’S CELLAR 140 Encinal St, Santa Cruz

Funk Night w/ Light the Band Free 9p

1535 Commercial Way Santa Cruz 831.479.1854

SUN

12/4

MON

12/5

TUE

12/6

Steve’s Kitchen Jazz 6:30-9:30p

Warm Brew, Michael Christmas $12 8:30p

Alex Lucero 6:30-9:30p

Hawk n’ Blues Mechanics 1p Lloyd Whitley 6-8p

James Murray 6-8p

Aki Kumar & Little Johnny 6-8p

Kim Wilson w/ Big Jon Atkinson 6-8p

Tango Ecstasy 6-9:30p

Swing Dance $5 5:30p The Knutzens Free 9p Karaoke 9p

CAVA WINE BAR 115 San Jose Ave, Capitola

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SC Guitar Club Social Free 7p

BRITANNIA ARMS 110 Monterey Ave, Capitola

December 8th QUITAPENAS December 9th PURE ROOTS + EARL ZERO December 10th B-SIDE PLAYERS December 11th ELVIN BISHOP (afternoon) December 11th MCCOY TYLER + THE GRAHAMS (eve) December 13th GARY HOEY – HO HO HOEY HOLIDAY TOUR December 14th DISIAC + DOS OSOS December 15th ANUHEA December 16th MELVIN SEALS & JGB December 17th REDLIGHT DISTRICT, GINGER & JUICE, ERIC MORRISON, WILD IRIS December 18th MIKE SCHERMER- Moe’s 25th Anniversary Celebration December 28th TESS DUNN December 29th ORGÓNE December 30th & 31st DON CARLOS January 4th TALKING DREADS January 6th KATDELIC

January 19th CELSO PIÑA

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Minor Thirds Trio 7-10p

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January 17th THE Nth POWER

SAT

Virgil Thrasher, Rick Stevens 6-8p

Preacher Boy 6-8p

DJ

CATALYST ATRIUM 1011 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

January 14th SAMBADÁ

12/2

Live Jazz & Wine Tasting Salsa Bahia 6-9p 6-9p

Wesley Stromberg $17.50/$225 8p

January 12th THE HEAVY PETS + BROTHERS GOW

FRI

BAYVIEW HOTEL 8041 Soquel Dr, Aptos

CATALYST 1011 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

January 11th BRYAN SUTTON BAND

12/1

Minor Thirds Trio 6:30-9:30p

Blues/Rock Great Debuts Moe’s w/ New CD

January 7th SOUL MAJESTIC

THU

Open Mic Free 7:30p

DJ Luna 9p

DOYLE BRAMHALL II

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

11/30

CASA SORRENTO 393 Salinas St, Salinas

Tuesday December 6th 8:30pm $15/20

52

WED THE APPLETON GRILL 410 Rodriguez St, Watsonville

Head Soar, Gregg The Box (Goth Night) James, Jungle Bandit & 9p more $5 9p

Fyah Reggae Party Free 9p

Still Searching, Warcorpse, Railgun, Subcreature 9p Karaoke 8p-Close

Karaoke 8p-Close

Jazz Society 3:30p Modern Sons, Sika & more Free 9p

Julian Phillips Free 8p

Open Mic Free 8p

Ages and Ages $10/$12 8p

Benjamin Francis Leftwich $15 8:30p

Karaoke 9p

Virtual Riot $15/$20 8p

Sin Sisters Burlesque $15/$20 9p

AC Slater $12/$15 9p

Beats Antique $30/$35 8p

Seshollowaterboyz $25 8p

10th Annual How the Brothers Osborne Grouch Stole Christmas $20/$25 7p $30/$35 7p

Frank Sorci 6:30-9:30p

Dave Muldawer 6:30-9:30p

Alex Lucero 6:30-9:30p

OPEN LATE EVERY NIGHT! TUESday 11/29

7 COME 11 Show 9pm $5 Door

wednesday 11/30

SCIENCE ON TAP

International Music Hall and Restaurant

FINE MEXICAN AND AMERICAN FOOD ALL YOU CAN EAT LUNCH BUFFET M-F $7.95 Thurs Dec 1

WINTERDANCE CELTIC CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION Molly’s Revenge,

Christa Burch, The Rosemary Turco Irish Dancers

$17 adv./$20 door <21 w/parent 7:30pm Fri Random Rab, KR3TURE, Dec 2 Timonkey, Kat Factor & Yoga with Magnolia

$15 adv./$18 door <21+ 8pm

Spirit of ’76 plus Edge Of The West

Featuring:

Sat Dec 3

$12 adv./$15 door 21+ 8:30pm

discussing PREY CAPTURE STRATEGIES in seals

Sun Dec 4

The Beatles White Album Youth Orchestra 2pm

SARAH KIENLE free event 7pm

friday 12/2

DRIVIN SOUTH

$7 adv./$7 door SEATED <21 w/parent Sun Dec 4

final show!!!

w / THE FIGHTING MURRAYS and special guest

Doors 8:30pm/Show 9pm $8 Door

saturday 12/3

FLYPAPER BLUES Doors 8:30pm/Show 9pm $8 Door

TUESday 12/6

7 COME 11 Show 9pm $5 Door

thursday 12/8

TOM FREUND w / THE CRAFTERS

Doors 8:30pm/Show 9pm $8 Door MIDTOWN SANTA CRUZ 1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz

429-6994

Henry Kaiser with Walkers plus Evil Genius 7pm

$10 adv./$10 door <21 w/parent 7pm

Mon Dec 5 Tue Dec 6

Wed Dec 7

Tony Furtado

$15 adv./$15 door <21 w/parent 7:30pm

The Steel Wheels plus David Jacobs-Strain

$15 adv./$15 door <21 w/parent 7:30pm

Laurence Juber Trio

$17 adv./$20 door <21 w/parent 7:30pm COMING RIGHT UP

Thu. Dec. 8 Handsome Family Fri. Dec. 9 Patterson Hood of The Drive-By Truckers Sat. Dec. 10 Hollywood Holidays A Youth Vocal Journey 2pm Sat. Dec. 10 Painted Mandolin 8:30pm ACOUSTIC GARCIA with Joe Craven Matt Hartle, Larry Graff, Roger Sideman Sun. Dec. 11 Uncle Bonsai 2pm Sun. Dec. 11 David Holodiloff Band “Enchanted Winter” Holiday Hoedown! 7pm

Reservations Now Online at www.donquixotesmusic.com Rockin'Church Service Every Sunday ELEVATION at 10am-11:15am


LIVE MUSIC WED

11/30

THU

12/1

FRI

12/2

SAT

12/3

CILANTROS 1934 Main St, Watsonville

Hippo Happy Hour 5:30-7:30p

CRAZY HORSE BAR 529 Seabright Ave, Santa Cruz

Punk Night

Karaoke

CREPE PLACE 1134 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz

Science on Tap: Prey Capture Free 7p

Drivin South $8 9p

Flypaper Blues $8 9p

CROW’S NEST 2218 E. Cliff Dr, Santa Cruz

Echo Fabric $3 7:30p

Groovity $5 8:30p

Locomotive Breath $6 9p

Lighted Boat Parade Free 5:30p

Winterdance Celtic Christmas Celebration $17/$20 7:30p

Random Rab, Kr3ture, Timonkey & more $15/$18 8p

12/4

MON

12/5

TUE

12/6

KPIG Happy Hour 5:30-7:30p

DAV. ROADHOUSE 1 Davenport Ave, Davenport DON QUIXOTE’S 6275 Hwy 9, Felton

SUN

THE FISH HOUSE 972 Main St, Watsonville

Comedy/Trivia

Flingo 7:30p

Ricky Torres Group 9p

HINDQUARTER BAR & GRILLE 303 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz

The Nightdriver 9p

Live Comedy $7 9p

Reggae Party Free 8p

BR Jazz Band

Reflections Trio

Spirit of ‘76, Edge of the West $12/$15 8:30p

Henry Kaiser $10 7p $15/$18 7p

The Steel Wheels, David Jacobs-Strain $15 7:30p

Broken Fences 9p

$15

Camila Meza Quartet $20/$25 7p

JuannaJam 8p

MALONE’S 4402 Scotts Valley Dr, Scotts Valley

Live Music 5:30-9p

MICHAEL’S ON MAIN 2591 Main St, Soquel

Silver Lining w/ Paul Logan 7-10p

Roadhouse Karaoke 7:30p Carlos Martinez 6-9p

Irish Christmas in America $24/$30 7p

Pedrito Martinez Group $30/$35 7p

Sasha’s Money 7-10p

BEER

Tsunami 7-10p

MIKE STERN BAND WITH BOB FRANCESCHINI, TOM KENNEDY AND DAVE WECKL JIM KWESKIN & GEOFF MULDAUR

Tickets: SnazzyProductions.com Monday, December 12 • 7 & 9 pm |No Comps

ROBERT GLASPER EXPERIMENT A fusion of jazz, hip-hop and R&B!

ETIENNE CHARLES & CREOLE SOUL: A CREOLE CHRISTMAS Saturday, December 17 • 7 pm

KEN EMERSON & JIM “KIMO” WEST SLACKERS IN PARADISE TOUR

Tickets: TicketFly.com Monday, December 19 • 7 & 9 pm |No Comps

Fri. December 2 Virgil Thrasher & Rick Stevens 6-8 pm

Dec 9 Lewis Black 8pm

Sat. December 3 Lloyd Whitley 1-5 pm Hawk N Blues Mechanics 6-8 pm

Dec 14 John Prine w/ Ramblin Jack Elliot 8pm

Sun. December 4 James Murray 6-8 pm

Dec 15 Jonny Lang 8pm Jan 29 KPIG & (((folkYEAH!))) present Robert Earl Keen 7pm

CHARLIE HUNTER QUARTET WITH SCOTT AMENDOLA, KURT KNUFKKEE AND KASEY KNUDSEN Tuesday, December 20• 7:30 pm At the Rio Theatre | No Comps

SWEET HONEY IN THE ROCK: CELEBRATING THE HOLYDAYS TICKETS MAKE GREAT GIFTS! 1/22 Ladysmith Black Mambazo at Rio Theatre 1/26 Poncho Sanchez Latin Jazz Band 1/28 Larry Carlton 2/6

Branford Marsalis Quartet feat. special guest Kurt Elling

Feb 16 Live Nation Presents: Brian Regan 7:30pm

Unless noted advance tickets at kuumbwajazz.org and Logos Books & Records. Dinner served one hour before Kuumbwa presented concerts. Premium wines & beer. All ages welcome.

For Tickets www.GoldenStateTheatre.com 831-649-1070

kuumbwajazz.org

320-2 Cedar St x Santa Cruz 831.427.2227

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

Thurs. December 1 Preacher Boy 6-8 pm

Dec 3 Jake Shimabukuro 8pm

8059 APTOS ST, APTOS APTOSSTBBQ.COM | 662.1721

Friday, December 9 • 7 & 9 pm |No Comps

Friday, December 16 • 7:30 pm

Wed. November 30 Al Frisby 6-8 pm

Tues. December 6 Kim Wilson w/Big Jon Atkinson

Afro-Cuban conguero with infectious grooves!

FAMILY FRIENDLY CONCERT! $8/CHILDREN 12 AND UNDER

BLUES

Mon. December 5 Aki Kumar & Little Jonny

PEDRITO MARTINEZ GROUP

ADAM SHULMAN TRIO: A CHARLIE BROWN CHRISTMAS

BBQ BEER BLUES

BBQ

Tickets: CelticSociety.org & More Music

Monday, December 5 • 7 pm |No Comps

Thursday, December 15 • 7 pm

Karaoke w/Ken 9p Wild Blue 7-10p

Jazz/pop singer-guitarist- composer from Chile with a fresh Pan-American sound! 1/2 PRICE NIGHT FOR STUDENTS

Saturday, December 10 • 7:30 pm

Karaoke 10p

KUUMBWA 320-2 Cedar St, Santa Cruz

CAMILA MEZA QUARTET

IRISH CHRISTMAS IN AMERICA 7 Come 11 $5 9p

NiteCreepers

HENFLING’S 9450 Hwy 9, Ben Lomond

Thursday, December 1 • 7 pm

Friday, December 2 • 7:30 pm

Karaoke

Tony Furtado 7:30p

Celebrating Creativity Since 1975

53


1011 PACIFIC AVE. SANTA CRUZ 831-429-4135

LIVE MUSIC

Wednesday, Nov. 30 • In the Atrium • All Ages WESLEY STROMBERG of Emblem 3 Thursday, December 1 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

WARM BREW • MICHAEL CHRISTMAS Friday, December 2 • Ages 16+

BEATS ANTIQUE Friday, December 2 • In the Atrium • Ages 18+

VIRTUAL RIOT

plus Sub Artillery b2b Griefer

Saturday, December 3 • Ages 16+

SesHolloWaterBoyz Saturday, December 3 • In the Atrium • Ages 21+

SIN SISTERS BURLESQUE Sunday, December 4 • Ages 16+

WED

12/1

Dragon Smoke $25/$30 8p

Post Street Rhythm Peddlers & more $7/$10 8p

Tommy Castro & the Painkillers $20/$25 7p

Flobots, Bang Data $12/$15 8p

MOTIV 1209 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Libation Lab w/ Syntax 9:30p-2a

Tone Sol 9:30p-2a

Tech Minds 9:30p-2a

NEW BOHEMIA BREWERY 1030 41st Ave, Santa Cruz

Football & Gordo’s Gustavo’s BBQ 7-9p

The Crafters 7-9p

Nomalakadoja 7-9p

Brothers Osborne

THE POCKET 3102 Portola Dr, Santa Cruz

Jam Session w/ Vinny Johnson 7p

BENJAMIN FRANCIS LEFTWICH

POET & PATRIOT 320 E. Cedar St, Santa Cruz

Dec 8 Kabaka Pyramid/ Raging Fyah (Ages 16+) Dec 9 Hari Kondabolu (Ages 21+) Dec 11 Bone Thugs-N-Harmony (Ages 16+) Dec 16 IAMSU (Ages 16+) Dec 17 The Expendables (Ages 16+) Dec 29 Del The Funky Homosapien, Andre Nickatina, Chali 2na Yukmouth, A-Plus & more (Ages 16+) Dec 30 & 31 The Devil Makes Three (Ages 21+) Jan 13 & 14 Iration (Ages 16+)

Unless otherwise noted, all shows are dance shows with limited seating. Tickets subject to city tax & service charge by phone 877-987-6487 & online

12/3

MOE’S ALLEY 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz

Claudio Melega 6p

Tuesday, December 6 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

SAT

Coyote Slim 6p

PARADISE BEACH 215 Esplanade, Capitola

Monday, December 5 • Ages 16+

12/2

Lloyd Whitley 6p

Sunday, December 4 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+ plus 219 Boys

FRI

Al Frisby 6p

99 BOTTLES 110 Walnut Ave, Santa Cruz

AC SLATER

SUN

12/4

Al Frisby 6p

MON

TUE

12/6

James Murray 6p Doyle Bramhall II $15/$20 8p

Rasta Cruz Reggae Party Eclectic Bass Event 9:30p-Close 9:30p-Close

Hip-Hop w/DJ Marc 9:30p-Close Tacos & Trivia 6-8p

Dennis Dove 2-5p Eric Winders & Whiskey West $5 9p

Isaiah Pocket 2-5p

The Joint Chiefs $5 9p

Comedy 9p Comedy Open Mic 8p

THE RED 200 Locust St, Santa Cruz THE REEF 120 Union St, Santa Cruz

12/5

Rob Vye 6p

Trivia 8p

Open Mic 8-11:30p ‘Geeks Who Drink’ Trivia Night 8p

SC Jazz Collective 6p

RIO THEATRE 1205 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz ROSIE MCCANN’S 1220 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

www.catalystclub.com

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

THU

Broken Shades 6p

10th Annual How the Grouch Stole Christmas

LIVING LEGENDS

54

11/30

MISSION ST. BBQ 1618 Mission St, Santa Cruz

Good Times Ad, Wed. 11/30

Acoustic Reggae Jams 6p

Traditional Hawaiian Music 6:30p

Brunch Grooves12:30p Featured Acoustic 6:30p

Brunch Grooves 1:30p Open mic and Bluegrass Musicians Showcase Evening Krowd Karaoke 9p 6p 6p

Peter Murphy $33 7:30-11:30p

Holiday Circus $25 7p Trivia 8p

Open Mic 7:30p


LIVE MUSIC WED

11/30

THU

12/1

FRI

12/2

SAT

12/3

THE SAND BAR 211 Esplanade, Capitola

Claudio Melega Band 8-Midnight

The John Michael Band 8-Midnight

SANDERLINGS 1 Seascape Resort, Aptos

Sambassa 8-11p

We Three 8-11p

SEABRIGHT BREWERY 519 Seabright, Santa Cruz SEVERINO’S BAR & GRILL 7500 Old Dominion Court, Aptos

U Turn 7:30-11:30p

The Emphatics 8-11:30p

SHADOWBROOK 1750 Wharf Rd, Capitola

Ken Constable 6:30-9:30p

Joe Ferrara 6:30-10p

Claudio Melega 7-10p

UGLY MUG 4640 Soquel Ave, Soquel

Thirsty Thursday 5p Open Mic 7-10p

MON

12/5

TUE

12/6

Alex Lucero Acoustic 7-11p

Tuesday, December 6

JP the Band 7-10p

DEC 08 Dave Mason DEC 10 Film: Right to Exist

Robert Elmond Stone 5-7p Daniel Martins 9-11p

DEC 02 Peter Murphy DEC 06 Holiday Circus

Silver Lining 4-7p

Daniel Martins 9-11p

Daniel Martins 9-11p

Daniel Martins 9-11p

JonKennedy 7-9:30p

Ruby Rudman & Friends Sing-Along 7-9:30p

Scotty Wright 7-9:30p

DEC 20 Sweet Honey in the Rock DEC 29-30 White Album Ensemble

ZELDA’S 203 Esplanade, Capitola ZIZZO’S COFFEEHOUSE & WINE BAR 3555 Clares St, Capitola

Upcoming Shows

Aqua Cats 6-9p

Open Mic w/Mosephus 5:30p

Gary Blackburn 7-10p

WHALE CITY 490 Highway 1, Davenport YOUR PLACE 1719 Mission St, Santa Cruz

12/4

Jesse Sabala Pro Jam 7-11p

Even Thomas Band Don McCaslin & the Amazing Jazz Geezers 6-10p

IT’S WINE TYME 321 Capitola Ave., Capitola

SUN

JAN 19 JAN 22

Lecture: Gary Griggs Ladysmith Black Mambazo

FEB 04 The Comic Strippers FEB 11

Frans Lanting

FEB 23-26 Banff Mountain Film MAR 05 The Wood Brothers

READ US ONLINE AT

Gift Card. Easy to order online or by phone.

LOCATED ON THE BEACH

Amazing waterfront deck views.

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

See live music grid for this week’s bands.

STAND-UP COMEDY

Three live comedians every Sunday night.

HAPPY HOUR

HIRING

Full or part-time Experienced Lube Tech or Service Writer. Will train motivated person.

Mon–Fri from 3:30pm. Wednesday all night!

VISIT OUR BEACH MARKET

Wood-fired pizza, ice cream, unique fine gifts.

DEAL WITH A VIEW

$9.95 dinners Mon.-Fri. from 6:00pm.

NOW SERVING BREAKFAST

Open for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Daily

(831) 476-4560

crowsnest-santacruz.com

Follow the Rio Theatre on Facebook & Twitter! 831.423.8209 www.riotheatre.com

Send resume or call Paul: cruzcontrol123@comcast.net

TUESDAY DINNER SPECIAL 2-TOPPING LARGE PIZZAS 1/2 PRICE DINE IN ONLY 6-9 ALSO KARAOKE 6-10 FRIDAY DECEMBER 2ND FULMINANTE & PAN DULCE LATIN / ROCK / INDIE

462-3323

SATURDAY DECEMBER 3RD HOLIDAY KICK OFF PARTY WITH DJs SIR ELEGANCE, RICHARD TORRES & JOEY MARTINEZ

2842 Soquel Avenue (X Hwy 1), Santa Cruz

393 Salinas St, SALINAS (oldtown) 831.757.2720 // casasorrento.com

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

GoodTimes.SC

APR 22 Zep Live

55


FILM

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

MAIDEN VOYAGE Auli’i Cravalho voices Moana in the mythology-rich Disney animation ‘Moana.’

56

Water Whirled Disney’s gorgeously animated and girl-powered ‘Moana’ is a princess movie that doesn’t need a prince BY LISA JENSEN

D

isney’s Frozen, with its snowy Nordic landscape, was a perfect animated feature for the holiday season back in 2013. The studio’s new holiday release, Moana, is just as perfect, but for the opposite reason: enveloped in the landscape and folklore of Polynesia, it is a sunny, beachy, gorgeously animated antidote to winter. Moana is directed by Disney veterans Ron Clements and John Musker, the brain trust behind The Little Mermaid and Aladdin, among others. The movie’s story

and look are steeped in Polynesian mythology, and it features a voice cast of mostly Pacific Islander descent, along with a songwriting team that includes Broadway wunderkind Lin-Manuel Miranda, of Hamilton fame. The result is a wonderful tale of a young woman on a quest to find herself and fulfill her destiny. Scripted by Jared Bush, from a story concocted by the directors and their minions, Moana begins with a creation myth about a slumbering earth goddess in the shape of an island. Because a trickster demigod called

Maui stole the sparkling green heart of the goddess, the seas are restless, and life in the islands is imperiled. This tale is told by Gramma Tala (Rachel House) to an audience of rapt island children, including her own granddaughter, Moana. All her life, Moana has been drawn to the sea. Her father, the village chieftain (Maori actor Temuera Morrison), tells her the sea is dangerous, but life is beautiful in the village, where she is destined to lead the people one day. But the sea disagrees. One day when little Moana protects a sea turtle hatchling from predator birds

as it crawls into the sea, a beautiful green wave rises up and deposits a trail of conch shells at her feet. Her grandmother tells her the sea has chosen Moana to find Maui and return the heart to the sleeping island, far away across the ocean— even though villagers are forbidden from sailing their outriggers past the reef that surrounds their island. But when Moana is a young woman (now voiced by Auli’i Cravalho), a coconut blight and a dwindling fish supply put island life in jeopardy. Navigating by a constellation shaped like the Maui’s fabled fishhook, Moana finds the desolate salt island where the demigod has been stranded for his crime. With a body full of tattoos, and plenty of attitude, Maui (Dwayne Johnson, who’s part Samoan), isn’t interested in Moana’s quest; he covets her boat. But when the sea prevents him from throwing Moana overboard, Maui reluctantly adopts a big brother attitude, and they set out to fix the mess he’s made. After a bizarrely funny encounter with a few boatloads of ferocious pirates made out of coconuts, they visit a scavenger crab (Jemaine Clement provides its sleepy hipster voice) to retrieve the magic fishhook that allows Maui to shape-shift. Moana’s determination to become a Wayfinder echoes another great girl-power movie, Whale Rider. And Maui’s cool tattoos not only move around and tell their own animated stories, but act as Maui’s conscience. Like Brave before it, Moana is an original adventure not based on a classic fairy tale, and a Disney princess movie that doesn’t need a prince. And it’s always great to see the folks at Disney continuing their pursuit of diversity. (Remember when it was a big deal that Belle in Beauty and the Beast had brown eyes, not blue?) Bursting with color, music, beautiful seagoing vistas, and the mythology and folkways of the Pacific Islands, Moana is guaranteed to cure your winter blahs. MOANA (***1/2) With the voices of Auli’i Cravalho, Dwayne Johnson, Rachel House, and Jemaine Clement. Written by Jared Bush. Directed by Ron Clements and John Musker; co-directed by Don Hall and Chris Williams. A Walt Disney release. Rated PG. 113 minutes.


MOVIE TIMES

November 30-December 6

All times are PM unless otherwise noted.

DEL MAR THEATRE

831.469.3220

MOANA Daily 2:00, 4:30, 7:00 + Wed-Thu 9:45 + Fri-Tue 9:30 + Sat-Sun 11:30am MOONLIGHT Daily 2:10*, 4:40, 7:10**, 9:35** + Sat 11:40am *No show Sun **No show Mon

“A BLISS-OUT.”

-Manohla Dargis,

“AN ENCHANTING TALE OF GIRL POWER.” -Kenneth Turan,

THE

E AG L E HUNTRESS

NOCTURNAL ANIMALS Daily 1:40, 4:20, 7:15 + Wed-Thu 9:40 + Fri-Tue 9:45 + Sat-Sun 11:00am RSC PRESENTS: KING LEAR Sun 11:00am Mon 7:00

The spellbinding true story about a 13-year-old girl on an epic journey to gain victory in a faraway land.

YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN Fri + Sat 11:59pm

NICKELODEON

831.426.7500

THE ACCOUNTANT Wed-Thu 2:00, 7:15 Fri-Tue 1:30, 4:10, 7:05, 9:45 A MAN CALLED OVE Daily 1:50, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 + Sat-Sun 11:20am BLEED FOR THIS Wed-Thu 4:40, 9:50 THE EAGLE HUNTRESS Fri-Tue 2:50, 5:00, 7:15, 9:20 + Sat-Sun 12:40

A film by

OTTO BELL

LOVING Daily 1:40, 4:20, 7:10, 9:50 + Wed-Thu 2:30, 5:20, 8:10 + Sat-Sun 11:00am WWW.THEEAGLEHUNTRESSMOVIE.COM

GREEN VALLEY CINEMA 8

WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM

STARTS FRIDAY!

831.761.8200

Daily: (2:50 5:00) 7:15, 9:20 Sat–Sun: (12:40pm) • ( ) at discount

ALLIED Daily 1:30, 4:20, 7:10, 10:00 + Sat-Sun 10:40

SANTA CRUZ SHOW TIMES FOR FRI. 12/2/16 – THURS. 12/8/16

the

D E L M A R

ARRIVAL Daily 2:00, 4:40, 7:20, 10:00 + Sat-Sun 11:20am

“Classic Disney adventure... with something new, a smart and fiery deviation from your standard love-struck princesses.” –Entertainment Weekly From the Directors of The Little Mermaid and Aladdin PG

(2:00, 4:30), 7:00, 9:30 + Sat, Sun (11:30am) From the Director of A Single Man

NOCTURNAL ANIMALS

R

(1:40, 4:20), 7:15, 9:45 + Sat, Sun (11:00am)

BAD SANTA 2 Daily 1:10, 3:25, 5:40, 8:00, 10:15 + Sat-Sun 10:55am BLEED FOR THIS Wed-Thu 10:15pm DOCTOR STRANGE Daily 2:00, 4:40, 7:20, 10:00 + Sat-Sun 11:20am

R

FANTASTIC BEASTS AND WHERE TO FIND THEM Daily 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 (2:10*, 4:40), 7:10**, 9:35** + Sat (11:40am)

HACKSAW RIDGE Wed-Thu 4:45, 7:30 Fri-Tue 12:30, 8:30 INCARNATE Thu 7:00, 9:30 Fri-Tue 1:15, 3:30, 5:45, 8:00, 10:15 + 11:00am MOANA Daily 1:30, 4:15, 7:00, 9:45 + Sat-Sun 10:45 MOANA 3D Wed-Thu 2:15 Fri-Tue 3:30, 6:00 RULES DON’T APPLY Wed-Thu 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 Fri-Tue 1:15 TROLLS Wed-Thu 12:55, 3:10, 5:15, 7:40, 9:55 Fri-Tue 4:05, 6:30, 8:50 + 11:00am

CINELUX SCOTTS VALLEY CINEMA

831.438.3260

ALLIED Daily 1:00, 4:15, 7:20 + Wed-Thu 10:15pm + Fri-Tue 10:00pm ARRIVAL Daily 11:00, 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 10:10 + Fri-Tue 8:30 DOCTOR STRANGE Daily 11:15, 2:00, 4:45, 7:30, 10:15 THE EDGE OF SEVENTEEN Daily 5:15, 7:45, 10:15 + Wed-Thu 2:30 FANTASTIC BEASTS AND WHERE TO FIND THEM Daily 11:30, 12:30, 3:45, 5:15, 7:00 + Wed-Thu 8:30, 10:15 +

Fri-Tue 9:30 FANTASTIC BEASTS AND WHERE TO FIND THEM DBOX Daily 12:30, 3:45, 7:00 + Wed-Thu 10:15pm

shopping for a cause

RSC presents

• Women’s fashion

KING LEAR

• Top brands and labels

Sunday 12/4 at 11:00am Monday 12/5 at 7:00pm

NR

MIDNIGHTS @ THE DEL MAR

• Gently used/high quality • Tax-deductible donations welcome

PG

Located in the King’s Plaza Shopping Center

1601 41st Ave. Capitola

Friday & Saturday at Midnight

831-462-3686

1124 PACIFIC AVENUE | 426-7500

www.the-daisy.org

( ) at a discount

Proceeds benefit programs provided by Family Service Agency of the Central Coast | www.fsa-cc.org

“Intimate, moving and superbly underplayed.” – The Washington Post

HACKSAW RIDGE Daily 3:00, 6:30, 9:45 PG13

MOANA Daily 10:45, 1:20, 4:00, 6:45, 9:30 + Wed-Thu 11:45am + Fri-Tue 2:30, 8:30 RULES DON’T APPLY Wed-Thu 12:15, 3:30, 7:00, 10:00 Fri-Tue 5:30 TROLLS Daily 11:00, 2:45, 4:30 + Wed-Thu 6:45, 9:15 + Fri-Tue 7:00

CINELUX 41ST AVENUE CINEMA 831.479.3504 ALLIED Daily 1:00, 4:15, 7:15, 10:15 ARRIVAL Daily 12:15, 3:30, 7:15, 9:15 BAD SANTA Daily 4:55, 7:30, 10:00 + Wed-Thu 11:55, 2:30 DOCTOR STRANGE Daily 11:00, 2:00, 5:15, 8:15 FANTASTIC BEASTS AND WHERE TO FIND THEM Daily 12:30*, 3:45, 7:00, 10:15 + Wed-Thu 11:15am + Fri-Tue

11:30, 5:30 *No Sat show FANTASTIC BEASTS AND WHERE TO FIND THEM 3D Wed-Thu 2:20 MOANA Daily 10:45, 1:20, 4:00, 6:45, 9:30 + Fri-Tue 11:45, 2:30, 8:30 TROLLS Daily 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 6:45 + Fri-Tue 10:00pm

the

N I C K

(1:40, 4:20), 7:10, 9:50 + Sat, Sun (11:00am) “Fresh and charming ... a modern feminist epic!” – Seattle Times G

(2:50, 5:00), 7:15, 9:20 + Sat, Sun (12:40)

A MAN CALLED OVE

PG13

(1:50, 4:30), 7:00, 9:30 + Sat, Sun (11:20am)

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SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

FANTASTIC BEASTS AND WHERE TO FIND THEM 3D Daily 1:30

*no show Sun 12/4 **no shows Mon 12/5

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FILM NEW THIS WEEK

NOW PLAYING

THE EAGLE HUNTRESS Aisholpan is a 13-year-old eagle hunter. She’s the first female in 12 generations in her family to fill the coveted and time-honored Kazakh role—and she’s about to school them all. Otto Bell directs. Aisholpan Nurgaiv, Daisy Ridley costar. (G) 87 minutes.

THE ACCOUNTANT Ever since he was a kid, Christian Wolff exhibited highly advanced cognitive skills. As an adult, he’s an accountant—with a somewhat illicit sidegig that gets the Treasury Department interested in his daily goingson. Gavin O’Connor directs. Ben Affleck, Anna Kendrick, J.K. Simmons co-star. (R) 128 minutes.

INCARNATE A how-to guide on what to do when your kid has one of those demonic screaming fits. Brad Peyton directs. Carice van Houten, Aaron Eckhart, David Mazouz co-star. (PG-13) 91 minutes. KIDNAP Her son’s been kidnapped and Mom of the Year/infinite badass Halle Berry is not about to sit around waiting for the police to find him. Luis Prieto directs. Berry, Christopher Berry, Lew Temple costar. 94 minutes.

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

LA LA LAND Ah, old Hollywood whimsy, musical magic à la Rogers and Astaire that’s getting Emma Stone early Oscar buzz—just the kind of la la land we needed after a post-Nov. 8 Thanksgiving. Damien Chazelle directs. Ryan Gosling, Stone, Amiée Conn co-star. (PG-13) 128 minutes.

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OFFICE CHRISTMAS This is exactly what last year’s GT office party looked like. Just kidding … sort of. Josh Gordon, Will Speck direct. Kate McKinnon, Olivia Munn, Jennifer Aniston co-star. (R) 105 minutes. SPECIAL SCREENINGS: King Lear 11 a.m., Sunday, Dec. 4 and 7 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 5. Del Mar Theatre, 1124 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. Young Frankenstein, Midnight, Friday and Saturday, Dec. 2 and 3. The Del Mar. CONTINUING EVENT: LET’S TALK ABOUT THE MOVIES Film buffs are invited Wednesday nights at 7 p.m. to downtown Santa Cruz, where each week the group discusses a different current release. For location and discussion topic, go to https:// groups.google.com/group/LTATM.

ALMOST CHRISTMAS Aah, movies about dysfunctional families during the holidays … do they make us thankful for our own dysfunctional families, or just more fearful? David E. Talbert directs. Kimberly Elise, Omar Epps, Danny Glover co-star. (PG-13) 112 minutes. ALLIED OMG, Brangelina broke up because Angelina is a German spy. Of course! (This is their marriage memoir, right?). Robert Zemeckis directs. Brad Pitt, Vincent Ebrahim, Xavier De Guillebon co-star. (R) 124 minutes. ARRIVAL Aliens are here, but no one can decipher what they’re saying. Thankfully, the military sends in a woman to help communicate. Denis Villeneuve directs. Amy Adams, Jeremy Renner, Forest Whitaker costar. (PG-13) 116 minutes. BAD SANTA 2 The bad Claus crew is back and this time momma’s coming, too. Kathy Bates as a tattooed con artist from the North Pole, fueled by cheap whiskey and a mean streak, who ropes her son (Santa) into robbing a charity? Now that’s holiday spirit, y’all. Mark Waters directs. Billy Bob Thornton, Kathy Bates, Tony Cox co-star. (R) 92 minutes. BLEED FOR THIS World Champion Boxer Vinny Pazienza was at the top of his game and the top of the world until a car crash broke his neck. He was told that any small movement could sever his spinal cord. He didn’t listen; instead, he took the screws out of his head and went back to the gym to make one of the greatest comebacks in sports history. Don’t try this at home? Ben Younger directs. Miles Teller, Aaron Eckhart, Katey Sagal co-star. (R) 116 minutes.

WAIT, IS THIS ‘PULP FICTION 2?’ Nope, it’s Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling in ‘La La Land.’

DOCTOR STRANGE What if the material world was only one of many? In that case it’d probably be beneficial to have someone with a name like Dr. Strange to protect it. Scott Derrickson directs. Benedict Cumberbatch, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Rachel McAdams co-star. (PG-13) 115 minutes. THE EDGE OF SEVENTEEN While most of us surely would rather avoid revisiting the unbearable pain of being in high school, sometimes the awkward moments of youth just never get old—especially when Woody Harrelson plays the lovable, confidant high school teacher who’s writing his suicide note on his lunch break. Kelly Fremon Craig directs. Hailee Steinfeld, Haley Lu Richardson, Blake Jenner co-star. (R) 104 minutes. FANTASTIC BEASTS AND WHERE TO FIND THEM Eddie Redmayne accidentally let a bunch of evil ghouls into our realm. It all makes sense now: how else could a cheeto-faced Voldemort have gotten in? David Yates directs. Eddie Redmayne, Katherine Waterston, Alison Sudol co-star. (PG-13) 133 minutes. LOVING Virginia, 1958: Richard and Mildred are in love. But there’s one problem: they’re an interracial couple in a state where their marriage violates antimiscegenation laws. It’s a true story of love overcoming hate. Jeff

Nichols directs. Ruth Negga, Joel Edgerton, Will Dalton co-star. (PG13) 123 minutes. A MAN CALLED OVE Ove spends his days visiting his wife’s grave. He’s given up on friendship and he’s had enough. So he decides to leave the world for good, but “killing oneself isn’t so easy, you know.” Hannes Holm directs. Rolf Lassgård, Bahar Pars, and Zozan Akgün costar. (PG-13) 116 minutes. MOANA A great danger is coming but Moana will find the demigod Maui and they’ll save the world— he’s a little difficult, so she’ll need all the help she can get. Thankfully, she’s got the ocean on her side. Ron Clements, Don Hall, John Musker, Chris Williams direct. Auli’i Cravalho, Dwayne Johnson, Rachel House co-star. (PG) 113 minutes. MOONLIGHT Imagine growing up in Miami’s black neighborhoods as a small boy—a boy who likes to dance instead of fight, routinely gets the crap kicked out of him, and has to take care of his single mother and avoid being swept up in the seduction of the streets. And who might be gay. Barry Jenkins directs. Mahershala Ali, Sheriff Earp, Duan Sanderson co-star. (R) 110 minutes. NOCTURNAL ANIMALS “I did something horrible to him. I loved him in a brutal way,” says Amy Adams as Susan Morrow, looking

bleakly into her past, haunted by her ex-husband’s novel and the threat she sees in it. Tom Ford directs. Adams, Jake Gyllenhaal, Michael Shannon co-star. (R) 117 minutes. RULES DON’T APPLY Howard Hughes wants 350 gallons of banana nut ice cream. Lucky for him, he’s Howard Hughes so when he’s hiding out in dark corners, sending body doubles to meet foreign dignitaries and bankrolling a fleet of young actresses, the rules simply don’t apply. Warren Beatty directs. Lily Collins, Haley Bennett, Taissa Farmiga co-star. (PG-13) 126 minutes. STORKS In this animated film, storks used to deliver babies, now they deliver packages for cornerstore.com—is this an allegory about the U.S. Postal Service? Adventure ensues when an order for a baby appears and the top delivery stork scrambles to fix the mistake. Nicholas Stoller, Doug Sweetland direct. Andy Samberg, Jennifer Aniston, Ty Burrell co-star. (PG) 89 minutes. TROLLS Branch is a troll living in a fortified survival bunker ... To protect against the indelibly chipper Poppy. Poppy is the leader of the Trolls, the happiest Troll ever born, and she’s out to rescue her friends from the Bergen. Walt Dohrn, Mike Mitchell direct. Anna Kendrick, Justin Timberlake, Zooey Deschanel co-star. (PG) 92 minutes.


GOOD TASTES CHRISTMAS 2016

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SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

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FOOD & DRINK Gluten-free, yet offering a convincing chewiness that will have you in tears. At Whole Foods they run close to $6 for four fat gluten-free bagels. Think of it as a buck-and-a-half a piece. If you had abandoned hopes of ever being able to enjoy a bagel again, this is indeed a bargain. We also found them in the freezer section of New Leaf Market. Yay! This gluten-free upsurge is a veritable movement, driven by consumers who want to live without the issues surrounding gluten, and yet refuse to compromise. I am genuflecting (to Canyon Bakehouse) as I write this.

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

OWL’S BREW

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WHO’S HOOT Owl’s Brew tea mixers a new twist on mixology at Cafe Ivéta. PHOTO: KEANA PARKER

Party in the Kitchen Holiday menus with the help of Whole Foods, Owl’s Brew cocktails and a tamale cooking class BY CHRISTINA WATERS

O

ne down, two to go— holiday meals, that is. The folks at Whole Foods have their act together as far as helping both savvy home chefs and the semi-clueless ones (we know who we are) make sure the Hanukkah and Christmas tables look fabulous. You can sit down at the holiday table at the front of the store and work with Whole Foods planners to order a complete meal for your guests, or perhaps

simply a tray of mouth-watering antipasti for that upcoming open house. If you have your act together, you can order your Diestel turkey from Whole Foods, pick it up, take it home and roast it in your own oven. There are, of course, all of the side dishes ready to pick up and serve, and classic desserts including—yes, even a gluten-free pumpkin pie. To order your holiday meal—from chopped liver paté, to vegan, to

spiral-cut ham, simply swing by the store at 911 Soquel Ave., (or call 4269901), place your order and make a date to pick it up. Simplicity itself. Now all you need to do for dinner is show up and look good . . . And, while you’re at Whole Foods, check out the holy grail of gluten-free items: the bagel. Canyon Bakehouse has shattered the gluten-free ceiling with its new, sensational 100-percent whole-grain bagels. Yes. Bagels.

A new discovery from Owl’s Brew, and wow this stuff is tasty: Owl’s Brew tea “syrup” crafted for cocktails. We found this at the ever on-the-edge Cafe Ivéta on Delaware Avenue, where bottles (of various sizes) of this fun new mixer are available. I was offered a sample taste, which I didn’t refuse. So here’s what it is: An intense infusion of Darjeeling hibiscus tea, tinged with the floral notes of strawberry and a sass of lemon (sweetened with organic agave), this syrup is exceptional swirled into a cup of green tea, or a tall glass of lemonade. Or. An updated Kir Royale—just add champagne! At Iveta, where we discovered this delicious concoction, they add it to glasses of white wine. Patrons love it. If you’re looking ahead to throwing a holiday cocktail party, you might want to pick up a bottle of Owl’s Brew. You will be celebrated throughout the county.

A BETTER TAMALE

My father searched high and low for a tamale to match the ones he tasted as a boy at Mrs. Omnes’ boarding house in Boulder Creek. Chances are he would approve of the ones you’ll learn to make with Melissa’s Mexican Made Easy, on Sunday Dec. 4. From 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., join Melissa at the Westside New Leaf Market, where for $65 you’ll learn to make two kinds of tamales with chicken, salsa verde, jalapeño, and cheese. You’ll make sauces, a fiesta salad and hibiscus punch—and you’ll take home six tamales! Class includes lunch, recipes, supplies, and music. Bring an apron and an appetite. To register, email info@melissasmexicanmadeeasy. com or call 251-5640.


Celebrate the Holidays

CAFÉ CRUZ GIFT CARDS MAKE WONDERFUL GIFTS!

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Tues. Night "ITALIAN NIGHT"

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Steaks • Chicken • Pasta Beer & Wine Breakfast favorites and generous por tions All You Can Eat Brunch Buffet Sat & Sun 8-2

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2119 F. Mt Hermon Rd., Scotts Valley

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121 Soquel Avenue at Front Street, Santa Cruz 831.423.7427 CLOSED MONDAY

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

"GARY'S RIB NIGHT" ALL NIGHT HAPPY HOUR

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ON TAP

FOODIE FILE

Meine Stein! Eight German Beers on Tap Hand-Pulled, Cask-Conditioned Ales 21517 East Cliff Drive @ 17th Ave

(831) 713-5540

eastcliffbrewing.com Mon & Tues 3-9 pm Wed-Fri 3-10 pm Saturday 12-10 pm Sunday 12-9 pm

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DISHING UP DECADENCE Alex Potter, co-owner at Persephone, with their

signature truffle cheese tortiglioni dish. PHOTO: CHIP SCHEUER

Persephone

Bringing a touch of fine dining back to the scene BY AARON CARNES

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

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t some point, casual-upscale became the norm for new restaurants in Santa Cruz. But Persephone, which opened where Aptos Pizza used to be, is kind of an ode to the old-school, fine-dining style of restaurant that used to be more common. The food is Mediterranean, with lots of local flavors and an emphasis on the dining experience. We spoke with Alex Potter, the co-owner who runs the front of the house and oversees the vast wine selection. His sister, Cori Goudge-Ayer, is also the head chef— local foodies may be familiar with her work at Laili and Süda.

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It’s good. We’re a close family. We have lots of mutual respect. My sister is almost 10 years older than me. We are doing her passion project. My background has been guest service and bartending and serving for years. It made sense for me to do the front of the house. I’m kind of like the wine guy. My sister is such an amazing chef.

Define ‘Mediterranean’ cuisine. It’s more about techniques. Rather

than French techniques of butters and creams, it’s oil-based cooking, a little bit lighter. Pastas, seafood. In terms of ingredients, it’s really local. We’re sourcing almost everything. We’ve got local farmers, all small organic guys. We’ve got fishermen bringing us fish fresh from the harbor. Even the meat is mostly within 100 miles or so. Santa Cruz County has a similar climate to the Mediterranean climate. So a lot of or ingredients are similar.

How much will your menu change with the seasons? Some of our most popular [dishes] will stay on the menu pretty much forever. A lot of it will change every couple of months, depending on what’s fresh and local. Right now, one dish I know will probably always be there is the truffle cheese tortiglioni. That’s a crowd favorite. The budino is an appetizer that will always be there. It’s a savory parmesan custard. We serve it with different seasonal squash. Certain things will change. Parts of the dishes might change depending on the local ingredients. 7945 Soquel Drive, Aptos, 612-6511.


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VINE TIME

VINE & DINE

WINE TASTING SATURDAYS ALL YEAR SUNDAYS ALL SUMMER

420 HAMES RD. CORRALITOS 831.728.5172 | ALFAROWINE.COM

Join Us for Oysters on Sat. Dec. 10th

BOLD BOTTLE Artist Sonya Paz, who designed the label for Villa Del Monte

Winery’s Vintner’s Select Reserve 2012. PHOTO: MARK KOVICH Handcrafted in the Santa Cruz Mountains

Wed-Fri 3-6 Sat & Sun 1-6 334-C Ingalls Street • Santa Cruz www.equinoxwine.com • 831.471.8608

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NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

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Tastings every 3rd Saturday & Sunday of the month 12-4pm

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SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL WINEMAKERS!

stopped by Villa Del Monte Winery recently for a tasting of their wonderful wines, including one in particular I had been wanting to try—a velvety 2012 red wine blend called Vintner’s Select Reserve. The striking artwork on the label is the first thing to notice. Created exclusively for Villa Del Monte by artist Sonya Paz, a pattern of bold shapes and colors adds such pizzazz to the bottle, it makes you want to buy it regardless of the contents. But you have a double whammy here: a truly well-made nectar in an extremely eye-catching bottle. It’s the perfect holiday gift, in fact. Luscious and intense, this delicious blend of Santa Cruz Mountains Cabernet Sauvignon and Carneros Merlot is a gorgeous mouthful of dark fruit with wellbalanced structure. Aged for 24 months in French and American oak barrels, it sells for $43, with a discount for wine club members. Winemakers John Overstreet and Neil Perrelli take great pride in producing Villa del Monte’s extraordinary wines, and it is well worth paying them a visit for a tasting,

especially if you’re a Pinot lover. Villa del Monte Winery, 23076 Summit Road, Los Gatos, 408-3530995 or 888-788-4583. Open just once a month; the next dates are Dec. 17 and 18. Check villadelmontewinery. com for exact dates and times.

THE TURKEY BOAT

A cute little eatery in Pajaro called The Turkey Boat has got you covered if you’re still craving turkey. Fancy a Turkey Pesto Salad, some Turkey & Vegetable Soup, or a Turkey Boat Sandwich bursting at the seams with potatoes, stuffing, cranberries, and gravy? This is where you go: The Turkey Boat, 7 San Juan Road, Pajaro, 536-5351. Call for hours or email owner Linda Flores at theturkeyboat@yahoo.com.

TOQUE BLANCHE

Toque Blanche is the new name for the eclectic kitchen supply store in downtown Santa Cruz formerly known as Chefworks. The store still carries an amazing selection of goods for all your cooking and baking needs. And just in case you didn’t know, a toque is a chef’s hat. Toque Blanche is at 1527 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, 426-1351. mytoque.com


H RISA’S STARS BY RISA D’ANGELES ADVENT, LITURGY, LIGHT IN THE DARKNESS, ST. NICHOLAS Esoteric Astrology as news for week of Nov. 30, 2016

December—month of hopes and expectations (and for the little ones, suspense)—is filled with festivals of light in the ever-increasing darkness. There is a feeling that something new is about to occur. Everywhere, preparations are being made. Advent, from the Latin word “adventus,” is a preparatory celebration in the Christian churches. Literally, it means “something’s coming”—winter, solstice, new light, birth, holidays, parties, festivities, revelations. Advent lasts four weeks; evergreen Advent wreaths with four colored candles (three violet, one rose) are made, and each Sunday night a new candle is lit. The candles represent light glowing in the solemn darkness. We light our candles in the dark half of the year, awaiting the light half of the year. As each year is divided into four seasons, the Liturgy of the Christian church divides the year into “liturgical seasons.” “Liturgical” is Greek

for “the work of the people”—a communal participation in the “sacred” through worship, praise, tithing, prayer, acts of kindness and mercy. Each season has a different mood, theological emphasis, mode of prayer, decorations, colors, readings, themes and scriptures. In the Ageless Wisdom teachings, the year is divided into six seasons for the Three Laws and Three Principles of the Aquarian Age. The season we have just begun (Nov. 21–Dec. 20) focuses on the Principle of Essential Divinity (divine fire at the heart of all matter). As we light our candles in the dark in December, we are reminded that the Essential Divinity within us is a fire, Agni. And each of us is a light in the darkness. Tuesday, Dec. 6, is St. Nicholas’ feast day. Nicholas was generous and kind, a protector of those in need. He loved children. St. Nicholas is the Advent saint. He is Santa Claus.

LIBRA Sep23–Oct22

You’re out and about, in and of the world. You can’t help it. The world, people, events, food, travel, adventures, mountain peaks, plains, culture, civilization—all summoning you to participate. Perhaps you will consider writing a book, perhaps publishing becomes interesting, Think deeply on your goals. Create more. Ponder upon this statement: “I see the goal, I reach that goal and then I see another.”

Being out and about in the neighborhood, dropping in on neighbors, driving around town seeking the most dramatic holiday decorations, having dinner with friends, gathering holiday decorations, seeing relatives, talking on the phone, sending holiday cards—all of these things you love to do. You look forward to the beauty of this season all year. Who is your family these days?

TAURUS Apr21–May21

SCORPIO Oct23–Nov21

I ask that you also read and ponder upon the statement at the end of Aries. And then observe the many and varied goals, dreams, hopes and wishes filtering through your mind each day. There’s not enough time each day to accomplish everything. Time seems to have changed, accelerated. You have many plans to fulfill. Visualize yourself in the midst of abundant resources and money. See yourself as the Law of Attraction. Accomplishing all dreams.

For the next several weeks you sense a light shining on you. You’ll feel lucky, able, capable, resourceful, wealthy, emotionally supported. Don’t run out, however, and buy everything shining brightly you fancy. Unless it’s for a loved one. Then be lavish. However, most appreciated would be your heart, given to another. Even if it’s to a friend. We think of you as internal, hidden, watchful. Give a little more of yourself for a while.

GEMINI May 22–June 20

SAGITTARIUS Nov22–Dec20

What are you planning for the holidays? Will you prepare with family and friends? With someone in particular? Tend carefully to the one closest to you. A silver light is shining on your relationship. Communicative intimacy is being called for. Past, present and future seem to be bundled together. You and another need to travel. Down a river or lake somewhere. Blue mountains ahead.

All parts of you are active, energetic, hopeful (we hope). You also become a bit more impulsive, quick to anger, impatient, wanting your own way (for a time). We see you as being more assertive, daring like a warrior. You become very attractive. However, be careful with everything—communicating, driving, walking, running, using tools, implements. Things red, hot and sharp (all of which, to some, you are) might attack. You’re laughing. That’s good. Caution with language.

CANCER Jun21–Jul20

CAPRICORN Dec21–Jan20

Your health at this time is what matters most. Focusing on health is good because you have the capacity to purify, harmonize and heal more quickly now. Foods are also on your mind. Are you considering preparing food to give as gifts? Are endless tasks and responsibilities appearing moment by moment? Till you have no time? Say no to some. You need rest.

You may be fatigued, weary, drained, worn out, depleted of major nutrients and in need of rest. Soon you will need to be out and about in the public more, so take this time to draw back, do less work. You can still plan and create goals. However, do not act upon them immediately, instead making health, rest, and well-being your central focus. Allow these to be your directives for at least a month.

LE0 Jul21–Aug22

AQUARIUS Jan21–Feb18

Your heart seeks more adventure, fun, play and being tended to in a very creative way. You need to accept invitations to parties and festivities, be with friends, attend plays, art shows, dances, and visit other people’s homes. You need both a Christmas tree and a Hanukkah bush with lights and candles everywhere. You need to be loved, cared for, recognized and then loved some more. Who can do this?

As you go out and about be careful not to be too reckless. You have energy and enthusiasm, you have hopes and wishes, you have opportunities and invitations. Amidst the many possibilities, attend only one or two at a time. Say thank you, exit gracefully, then focus on several more. Pay all bills promptly, don’t worry about money. You always have the needed resources and connections to resourceful people.

VIRGO Aug23–Sep22 You are the light of the world to your family. You are the one who must connect them, one to the other, create festivities that make them feel at home. You must begin to plan a large gathering so that those who have no family are welcomed (where you are). You must merge separate realities, unify oppositions, and synthesize all the parts and pieces. You love these tasks.

PISCES Feb19–Mar20 You become more public, and more of your leadership qualities are summoned. A forum or group invites you to teach, to offer your gifts of communication, counseling, intelligence and knowledge. You prepare. However, you are aware that at any time, things dissolve away. So you are hopeful, patient, accepting, acquiescing, yet you are also wary, cautious, circumspect, careful and coiled like a kundalini snake, which is OK (for now).

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SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

ARIES Mar21–Apr20

Your Place

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Classifieds classifieds PHONE: 831.458.1100 | EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@GOODTIMES.SC | DISPLAY DEADLINE: THURSDAY 2PM | LINE AD DEADLINE: FRIDAY 2PM

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 16-1973 The following Individual is doing business as MHB VOLLEYBALL OAS. 400 MARTIN DRIVE, SCOTTS VALLEY, CA 95066. County of Santa Cruz. MARK H. BREWER. 400 MARTIN DRIVE, SCOTTS VALLEY, CA 95066. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: MARK H. BREWER. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Nov. 17, 2016. Nov. 30, & Dec. 7, 14, 21.

NO. 16-1982 The following Limited Liability Company is doing business as VISTA 500 CONSULTING, LLC. 2549 HARPER STREET, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. VISTA 500 CONSULTING, LLC. 2549 HARPER STREET, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. AI# 24210200. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company signed: RUDOLPH V. ESCALANTE. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 11/22/2016. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Nov. 22, 2016. Nov. 30, & Dec. 7, 14, 21.

BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 16-1904 The following Married Couple is doing business as SOLIS GARDENING SERVICES. 37 WEBB ROAD, WATSONVILLE, CA 95076. County of Santa Cruz. JORGE SOLIS BIZARRO & MARIA R. SOLIS. 37 WEBB ROAD, WATSONVILLE, CA 95076. This business is conducted by a Married Couple signed: MARIA R. SOLIS. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Nov. 4, 2016. Nov. 16, 23, 30 & Dec. 7.

FICTITIOUS

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT FILE NO. 16-1855 The following Individual is doing business as MONTEREY BAY ORGANICS. 335 SPRECKLES DR., SUITE A, APTOS, CA 95003. County of Santa Cruz. DANIEL MCCOURT. 335 SPRECKLES DR., SUITE A, APTOS, CA 95003. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: DANIEL MCCOURT. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Oct. 24, 2016. Nov. 9, 16, 23, 30.

business as LOCO 831, LOCO USA. 2435 FELT STREET #13, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. TOM HAID. 2435 FELT STREET #13, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: TOM HAID. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Nov. 10, 2016. Nov. 16, 23, 30 & Dec 7.

SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. THE ROD BECKSTROM GROUP 2030 EAST CLIFF DRIVE, SANTA CRUZ,CA 95062. Al# 2786084. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: ROD A. BECKSTROM. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Nov. 2, 2016. Nov. 9, 16, 23, 30.

CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. RAISED BY WOLVES, LLC. 202 BERKSHIRE AVENUE, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. AI# 29910629. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company signed: MICHELLE GRAFF. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Nov. 9, 2016. Nov. 16, 23, 30, & Dec. 7.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 16-1919 The following Limited Liability Company is doing business as RAISED BY WOLVES. 202 BERKSHIRE AVENUE, SANTA

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 16-1731 The following Limited Liability Company is doing business as CUSTOM PINATAS DESIGN. 303 POTRERO ST BLDG

43, OFFICE 201, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. CUSTOM PINATAS DESIGN LLC. 303 POTRERO ST BLDG 43, OFFICE 201, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. AI# 23810154. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company signed: STEVEN RANKIN. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 1/1/2016. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Sept. 29, 2016. Nov. 9, 16, 23, 30.

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

real estate

66

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 16-1927 The following Individual is doing

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 16-1892 The following Corporation is doing business as BECKSTROM. 2030 EAST CLIFF DRIVE,


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67


Where the locals shop since 1938. VOTED BEST BUTCHER SHOP BEST WINE SELECTION BEST CHEESE SELECTION BEST LOCALLY OWNED GROCERY STORE BEST MURAL /PUBLIC ART

Family owned & operated 78 years. 622 Soquel Avenue, Santa Cruz

OUR 78 TH YEAR

WEEKLY SPECIALS

BUTCHER SHOP

A PARMESAN-CRUSTED PORK CHOPS WINE & FOOD PAIRING Ingredients

• 2 large eggs • 1 cup dried Italian-style bread crumbs • 3/4 cups freshly grated Parmesan • 4 (1/2 to 3/4-inch thick) center-cut pork loin chops (each about 10 to 12 ounces) • Salt and freshly ground black pepper • 6 tablespoons olive oil • Lemon wedges, for serving

Directions

Whisk the eggs in a pie plate to blend. Place the bread crumbs in another pie plate. Place the cheese in a third pie plate. Sprinkle the pork chops generously with salt and pepper. Coat the chops completely with the cheese, patting to adhere. Dip the chops into the eggs, then coat completely with the bread crumbs, patting to adhere. Heat 3 tablespoons of oil in a very large skillet over medium heat. Add pork chops, in batches if necessary, and cook until golden brown and the center reaches 150 degrees, about 6 minutes per side. Transfer the chops to plates and serve with lemon wedges.

Wine:

Beringer The Waymaker Red Blend 2013, Reg 34.99 Best Price Anywhere at 9.99!!! The 2013 Waymaker Red Wine has enticing aromatics of blue fruits and pomegranate with hints of savory characteristics. Medium-bodied and juicy, the blend shows off firm tannins, accented by ripe plum, cocoa and a seductive mouthfeel.

LL NATURAL USDA Choice beef & lamb only corn-fed Midwest pork, Rocky free-range chickens, Mary’s air-chilled chickens, wild-caught seafood, Boar’s Head products. ■ PORK CHOPS, Center Cut/ 3.98 Lb ■ PORK SIRLOIN CHOPS/ 2.98 Lb ■ PORK CHOPS, Thick Cut/ 3.98 Lb ■ PORK SIRLOIN ROAST, Boneless/ 3.98 Lb ■ PORK SHOULDER ROAST, Boneless/ 3.29 Lb ■ PORK COUNTRY STYLE RIBS/ 2.98 Lb ■ PORK BABY BACK RIBS/ 4.39 Lb ■ BOARS HEAD BOLOGNA/ 6.49 Lb ■ BOARS HEAD CHICKEN BREAST/ 8.98 Lb ■ BOARS HEAD MORTADELLA/ 6.49 Lb ■ CREATIVE KING SALMON, Fillet/ 17.98 Lb ■ AHI TUNA STEAKS, Thick Cut/ 14.98 Lb ■ CAJUN CATFISH FILLETS/ 9.98 Lb

C

ALIFORNIA-FRESH, blemish free, local/ organic: Arrow Citrus Co., Lakeside Organic, Happy Boy Farms, Route 1 Farms.

■ RED YAMS, Premium Quality/ 1.49 Lb ■ ZUCCHINI SQUASH, Fresh and Tender/ .99 Lb ■ BABY CELLO CARROTS / 1.19 Ea ■ SWEET POTATOES, Top Quality/ 1.49 Lb ■ GREEN ONIONS & RADISHES / .49 Ea ■ AVOCADOS, Ripe and Ready to Eat/ 1.59 Ea ■ BANANAS, Always Ripe/ .89 Lb ■ SATSUMA TANGERINES, Ripe and Sweet/ 1.79 Lb ■ RUSSET POTATOES, Great for Mashed Potatoes/ .79 Lb ■ YELLOW ONIONS, A Kitchen Must Have/ .49 Lb ■ BROCCOLI CROWNS, Fresh from the Field/ 1.49 Lb ■ LOOSE CARROTS, Peak Quality/ .79 Lb ■ ORGANIC BANANAS, A Healthy Snack / .99 Lb ■ NAVEL ORANGES, Sweet and Juicy/ 1.19 Lb ■ SEEDLESS GRAPES, Red and Green/ 2.99 Lb ■ POTATOES, Red and Yukon/ 1.19 Lb ■ CLUSTER TOMATOES, Ripe on the Vine/ 2.29 Lb ■ PINEAPPLE, Ripe and Juicy/ 1.09 Lb ■ CELLO ROMAINE HEARTS, Fresh and Ready to Eat/ 2.99 Ea ■ CAULIFLOWER, Great as a Side Dish/ 2.29 Ea ■ ROMA TOMATOES, Fresh and Firm / 1.19 Ea ■ GRAPEFRUIT, Pink Flesh Grapefruit/ .89 Ea ■ RED ONIONS, Good Size, Great Flavor/ .99 Lb ■ LARGE TOMATOES, Great for Slicing/ 1.49 Lb

GROCERY

BEER/WINE/SPIRITS

■ BECKMANN’S, Nine Grain Sour Loaf, 24oz/ 3.89 ■ WHOLE GRAIN, California Black, 30oz/ 4.19 ■ KELLY’S, Sour Cheddar, 16oz/ 3.89 ■ GAYLE’S, Olive Capitola Sourdough, 30oz/ 5.29 ■ SUMANO’S, Sourdough Loaf, 1 Lb/ 3.99

■ STONE BREWING, Tangerine IPA, 22oz Bottle/ 7.99

Bakery “Fresh Daily”

Beer

+CRV ■ ANDERSON VALLEY, Oatmeal Stout, 12oz Bottles/ 6 Pack/ 9.49 +CRV ■ THE DUDES, Double IPA, 16oz Cans/ 4 Pack/ 10.99 Cheese “Best Selection in Santa Cruz” +CRV ■ KONA BREWING, Porter, 12oz Bottles/ 6 Pack/ 8.99 ■ WISCONSIN SHARP CHEDDAR “rBST Free” +CRV ■ Loaf Cuts/ 5.29 Lb, Average Cuts/ 5.99 Lb ■ SIERRA NEVADA, Imperial Stout, 12oz Bottles/ 4 Pack/ ■ RED WITCH, “Made with Raw Cows Milk”/ 14.09 Lb 9.99 +CRV ■ POET’S IRISH CHEDDAR, “Customer Favorite”/ Best Buy Spirits 7.09 Lb ■ JAMESON, Irish Whiskey/ 19.99 ■ WAGON WHEEL, “Cow Girl Creamery”/ 18.09 Lb ■ KETTLE ONE, Vodka/ 19.99 Delicatessen ■ TANQUERAY, London Dry Gin/ 19.99 ■ CHOPIN, Vodka/ 19.99 ■ BELGIOIOSO MASCARPONE, 8oz/ 5.49 Ea ■ PILLSBURY PIE CRUST, “America’s #1 Pie Crust”, ■ HORNITOS, Tequila Reposado/ 17.99

BBQ Reds 14oz/ 2.99 ■ BOAR’S HEAD HUMMUS, “0 Trans Fat & Cholesterol ■ 2011 GIFFT, Red Blend (91WE, Reg 19.99)/ 7.99 ■ 2012 ABRAS, Malbec (94WW, Reg 18.99)/ 8.99 Free”/ 3.29 ■ WILDWOOD TACO CRUMBLES, “Gluten Free”, 8oz/ ■ 2013 DESERT WIND, Cabernet Sauvignon (Gold Metal, Reg 17.99)/ 9.99 2.99 ■ NIMAN RANCH MAPLE BACON, “Center Cut”, 12oz/ ■ 2012 PRIMARIUS, Pinot Noir (90W&S, Reg 19.99)/ 9.99 Best Buy Whites 8.09 ■ 2012 VOCA CORTESE, Piemont (91WW, Reg 16.99)/ Hot Sauce 8.99 ■ GRINGO BANDITO, All Natural, 5oz/ 3.99 ■ 2013 BASILISK, Chardonnay (Reg 20.99)/ 8.99 ■ MARIE SHARPS, “Habanero Sauce”, 6 Kinds, 5oz/ ■ 2014 CHATEAU STE MICHELLE, Chardonnay 5.49 (Reg 14.99)/ 8.99 ■ NANDO’S PERI PERI, “Medium or Hot”, 4.7oz/ 3.29 ■ 2015 VILLA MARIA, Sauvignon Blanc (90WS, Reg 15.99)/ 9.99 ■ PAIN IS GOOD, “Micro Batch”, 7.5oz/ 6.99 ■ 2013 PACIFIC RIM, Dry Reisling (90WE, Reg 19.99)/ 9.99 ■ DAVE’S GOURMET INSANITY SAUCE, 5oz/ 5.99 Tea – Huge Selection

■ NUMI, Organic Tea “Non GMO” 18 Bags/ 6.79 ■ TAZO TEA, 20 Bags/ 4.9 ■ TWININGS of LONDON, “Since 1706” 3.53oz/ 5.49 ■ TRADITIONAL MEDICINALS, “Herbal Supplement” 16 Bags/ 5.49 ■ PG TIPS, “England’s No.1 Tea” 80 Bags/ 7.99

Shop Local First

■ OUTLAND JAVA COMPANY, 12oz/ 7.69 ■ BONNY DOON FARMS, Honey, 8oz/ 8.99 ■ KURT’Z KREATIONS, Triple “D” Shakers/ 6.69 ■ FARMER FREED, “Seasoning Salt” 2.5oz/ 10.49 ■ BELLE FARMS, “Estate Grown” 1.7oz/ 22.99

Wines from Australia

■ 2008 D’ARENBERG, “Foot Bolt Shiraz” (90W&S, Reg 24.99)/ 19.99 ■ 2014 INSURRECTION, Shiraz/Cabernet (Reg 14.99)/ 11.99 ■ 2013 CLANCY’S, Red Blend (Reg 18.99)/ 15.99 ■ 2011 NINE STONES, “Hilltop Shiraz” (91WS)/ 13.99 ■ 2012 SIBLING RIVALRY, Pinot Gris (93JH)/ 16.99

Connoisseur’s Corner – New Zealand ■ 2011 SPY VALLEY, Riesling (90WS)/ 19.99 ■ 2010 DOG POINT, Pinot Noir (90RP)/ 35.99 ■ 2013 ASTROLABE, Pinot Noir (91WS)/ 26.99 ■ 2011 CLOUDY BAY, Chardonnay (91WS)/ 29.99 ■ 2010 GREYWACKE, Pinot Noir (93WS)/ 39.99

SUE KUNCL, 13-year Customer, Santa Cruz

SHOP PER SPOTLIG HTS

Occupation: Equipment rentals staff manager, Feast for a King Catering Hobbies: Walking the dog, the beach, cooking, wine, sommelier training/Storrs Winery Astrological Sign: Leo

JAY KUNCL, 13-year Customer, Santa Cruz

Occupation: Construction manager, Tesla Motors Hobbies: Sailing, biking, skiing, cooking/barbecuing Astrological Sign: Sagittarius Is there a particular style of cooking you prefer? SUE: “We like to barbecue, slow-cook, or braise chicken, pork shoulder, ribs, brisket, and more. We get all these products from Shopper’s meat department, including the brisket which we special-order.” JAY: Shopper’s also has great steaks! — perfect for the barbecue. All the products are high quality and the butchers are so friendly, accommodating, and knowledgable. They make an effort to provide you what you’re looking for.” SUE: “The holidays are right around the corner. We basically get all that we need for our meals here. It’s the best!”

What’s on your holiday menu? JAY: “We always get a Diestel turkey from Shopper’s— they’re just consistently good.” SUE: “I love the produce here, and we’ll pick up tomatoes, Brussels sprouts, sweet potatoes, and fresh cranberries. I make my own pies. I really like the liquors and wines Shopper’s offers.” JAY: “The whole department — wine, beer liquor — offers really good quality, pricing and variety. It may get crowded shopping here during the holidays but it’s still a pleasure as the staff is always enjoyable.” SUE: “I enjoy grocery shopping. I really like this market and the community aspect of Shopper’s” JAY: “Shopper’s is very supportive and attuned to the community.”

How so? SUE: “It’s such a welcoming store. Shopper’s seems to know what we locals like. Quality ingredients are so important, and that’s one of the reasons I shop here.” JAY: “If you want a one-stop-market where you can get ‘quality everything,’ Shopper’s is where you go.” SUE: “It’s also not expensive; considering what Shopper’s offers, their products are well-priced. It feels good to shop in a such a nice, well-run local business.” JAY: “Shopping local does make a difference. On occasion, when I cannot find something, the crew are always happy to locate it for me. Excellent customer service!”

“The holidays are right around the corner. We basically get all that we need for our meals here. Shopper’s is the best!”

|

Corner: Soquel & Branciforte Avenues 7 Days: 6am-9pm

| Meat: (831) 423-1696 | Produce: (831) 429-1499 | Grocery: (831) 423-1398 | Wine: (831) 429-1804

Superb Products of Value: Local, Natural, Specialty, Gourmet ■ Neighborly Service for 78 Years


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