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8.7.19

GoodTimes.SC SantaCruz.com

ROUGH WATERS Rescues are up along the Santa Cruz coastline, but many lifeguards are struggling to make ends meet P20


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INSIDE Volume 45, No.19 August 7-13, 2019

HOPE FOR HEALING A long road to recovery after the Gilroy Garlic Festival shooting P12

TOWER POWER Diving deep into the sun-bleached world of Santa Cruz lifeguards P20

PLAYING TRIBUTE Perla Batalla finds levity in the work of folk icon Leonard Cohen P26

Opinion 4 News 12 Cover Story 20 A&E 26 Events 32

Film 44 Dining 48 Risa’s Stars 52 Classifieds 53

Cover design by Tabi Zarrinnaal. Good Times is free of charge, limited to one copy per issue per person. Entire contents copyrighted © 2019 Nuz, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form is prohibited without publisher’s written permission. Good Times is printed at a LEED-certified facility. Good Times office: 107 Dakota Ave., Santa Cruz, CA 95060

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FEATURES

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OPINION

EDITOR’S NOTE As a community newspaper grounded in the alt-weekly tradition, one of the things we like to do here at GT is explore interesting Santa Cruz subcultures. We also write fairly often about locals with interesting or offbeat professions. But this is the first time I can remember publishing a cover story about a subculture that is also a profession. Considering that lifeguards are integral to our beach culture, and that our lives may at

LETTERS

AUGUST 7-13, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

HISTORIES REVEALED

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Kudos to Good Times and Geoffrey Dunn for the engrossing article on the mysterious presence (and yet mystifying absence) of Ah Fook in the 7/10 issue of GT. I have lived in Santa Cruz since 1987, and consider myself an adopted local. Across those decades, I have caught various murmurings of our legendary local Chinatown, mostly the Front Street incarnation (which I believe burned at some point, possibly from arson?), but never have I felt a true insight into this whole muffled chapter of our history. This piece at last changed all that for me and, with its bellringing photo of our noble local entrepreneur and philanthropist George Ow as a child beside Ah Fook himself, I felt a tangible “aha” moment as this secretive, private, and sometimes illicit but almost always industrial society of Chinese immigrants and their American descendants became palpable through Dunn’s transparent and subtly eloquent writing. May Ah Fook and his community continue to haunt us—all lovers of this wonderful town—as long as we have history to tell! JOHN ROEVEKAMP | SCOTTS VALLEY

EXTINCTION REBELLION It is relieving to see the Good Times—which, formerly as Metro Santa Cruz and the Santa Cruz Weekly, too, has often been on the cutting edge of news reporting here—make a foray into reporting on the current climate crisis. It’s true that as other species “go,”

some point be in their hands, it’s kind of surprising that we don’t know more about the people in the towers and what they have to go through to get there. I think you’ll find this piece by G.P. Scheppler pretty enlightening, as well as entertaining. One thing we didn’t know when we first conceived this story months ago was how poorly most of our local lifeguards are paid for looking out for us. As often happens with these stories, this unexpected element of the story turned out to be one of the most important things that it revealed. Thank you to our local lifeguards, and thanks for reading! STEVE PALOPOLI | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

so too will we. Of course, lizards are not the only species that speak to the profound effects the crisis is having now, here, and the potential for full-blown catastrophe if we reach certain global tipping points— many of which look alarmingly, alarmingly (!) tippy now. UCSC professors and local biologists are studying the decline of coastal bull kelp beds and sea stars, particularly the Sunflower Sea Star, as related to “wasting syndrome,” atmospheric heating, and the heating of our oceans in response. UCSC Professor Mark Carr says of the Sunflower Star: “We cannot find them anywhere,” and this has led to an explosion of sea urchins and creation of patchy urchin barrens, where urchins have eaten up kelp beds, in Pacific Grove, for example. The further implications of a heating, acidifying ocean on kelp (which thrives within a narrow temperature band) on the oceanic food chain, as well as increasingly severe weather along the global grain belt, cannot be overstated at this time. As much as we may not want to acknowledge this, we are now in an “all hands on deck” planetary crisis; and that means the City Council, the Board of Supervisors, Anna Eshoo and Jimmy Panetta, along with our state reps and senators must do everything in their power to both educate the public (Extinction Rebellion Demand #1: “Tell the Truth”) about the current state of emergency, and work full-tilt toward mobilization of the population to respond in a manner that may save at least some parts of the ecosystem for generations to come, including current generations. >8

PHOTO CONTEST WAVE OF MODULATION The photographer who got this shot at the open rehearsal for the Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music reports, “Yesterday I went to open rehearsal at the Civic and body surfed the awesome sound waves of new music coming from the CFCM Orchestra. What a ride!” Photograph by Don Eggers.

Submit to photos@goodtimes.sc. Include information (location, etc.) and your name. Photos may be cropped. Preferably, photos should be 4 inches by 4 inches and minimum 250 dpi.

GOOD IDEA

GOOD WORK

PARTY AND PARCEL

CORPS SUPPORT

Any Santa Cruz resident who has been thinking about getting their neighbors together or wants a car-free afternoon on their street is in for a treat. The Santa Cruz Neighbors 11th-Annual Block Party is coming up on Sunday, Sept. 29. It will run from noon-8 p.m. that afternoon. Santa Cruz Neighbors has directions on how to reach out to neighbors and register an individual block for the event. Forms are due Sept. 19. For more info email email@santacruzneighbors.org, call 423-0745 or visit santacruzneighbors.com.

A married Santa Cruz couple returned from volunteering in the Peace Corps in Senegal and felt that their work wasn’t done. Abby Edwards and Chad Oliver established a GoFundMe. com campaign in December, and within four days, they raised $4,000, enough for Peace Corps Senegal employee Youssoupha Boye to fulfill his lifelong dream of visiting the U.S. In Washington D.C., Boye, who’s worked for working for Peace Corps Senegal in 2003, was able to meet with Peace Corps Director Jody Olsen.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“The problem with the gene pool is that there’s no lifeguard.” — DAVID GERROLD

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ROB BREZSNY FREE WILL ASTROLOGY Week of August 7 ARIES Mar21–Apr19 When it came time to write your horoscope, I was feeling unusually lazy. I could barely summon enough energy to draw up the planetary charts. I said a weak prayer to the astrological muses, pleading, “Please don’t make me work too hard to discover the message that Aries people need to hear; just make the message appear in my mind.” As if in response, a voice in my head said, “Try bibliomancy.” So I strolled to my bookcase, shut my eyes, pulled out the first book I felt and went to a random page. Here’s what I saw when I opened my eyes: “The Taoist concept of wu-wei is the notion that our creative active forces are dependent on and nourished by inactivity; and that doing absolutely nothing may be a good way to get something done.”

TAURUS Apr20–May20 There’s an old Rosicrucian vow you might have fun trying out: “I pledge to interpret every experience that comes my way as a communication of God with my soul.” If you carry out this intention with relaxed playfulness, every bird song you hear is an emblem of divine thought; every eavesdropped conversation provides hints of the creator’s current mood; the shape that spilled milk takes on your tabletop is an intimation of eternity breaking into our time-gripped realm. In my years of offering you advice, I have never before suggested you try this exercise because I didn’t think you were receptive. But I do now. (If you’re an atheist, you can replace “God,” “divine,” and “creator” with “life.”)

GEMINI May21–June20 Below are unheralded gifts possessed by many Geminis but not commonly identified by traditional astrologers: 1. A skill for deprogramming yourself, for unlearning defunct teachings that might otherwise interfere with your ability to develop your highest potentials; 2. A sixth sense about recognizing artificial motivations, then shedding them; 3. A tendency to attract epiphanies that show you why and how to break taboos that may once have been necessary but aren’t any longer; 4. An ability to avoid becoming overwhelmed and controlled by situations you manage or supervise.

AUGUST 7-13, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

CANCER Jun21–Jul22

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In 1993, I began writing a book titled The Televisionary Oracle. By 1995, I had generated over 2,000 pages of material that I didn’t like. Although I was driven by a yearning to express insights that had been welling up in me for a long time, nothing about the work felt right. I was stuck. But finally I discovered an approach that broke me free: I started to articulate difficult truths about aspects of my life about which I was embarrassed, puzzled and ashamed. Then everything fell into place. The process that had been agonizing and fruitless became fluidic and joyful. I recommend that you try this strategy to dissolve any mental blocks you may be suffering from: dive into and explore what makes you feel ashamed, puzzled or embarrassed. I bet it will lead to triumph and fulfillment, as happened for me.

LE0 Jul23–Aug22 I am overjoyed that you’re not competing for easy rewards or comparing yourself to the mediocre crowd. Some people in your sphere may not be overjoyed, though. To those whose sense of self isn’t strong, you may be like an itchy allergen; they may accuse you of showing off or acting puffed up. But freaks like me appreciate creative egotists like you when you treat your personality as a work of art. In my view, you’re a stirring example of how to be true to one’s smartest passions. Keep up the good work! Continue to have too much fun! I’m guessing that for now, you can get away with doing just about anything you want as long as it doesn’t hurt anyone.

VIRGO Aug23–Sep22 Let’s enjoy a moment of poignant silence in honor of your expired illusions. They were soulful mirages: full of misplaced idealism and sweet ignorance and innocent misunderstandings. Generous in ways you may not yet

realize, they exuded an agitated beauty that aroused both courage and resourcefulness. Now, as those illusions dissolve, they will begin to serve you anew, turning into fertile compost for your next big production.

LIBRA Sep23–Oct 22 Old rules and traditions about how best to conduct intimate relationships are breaking down. New rules are still incubating. Right now, the details about how people express their needs to give and receive love seem to be riddles for which there are no correct answers. So what do you do? How do you proceed with the necessary blend of confidence and receptivity? Can you figure out flexible strategies for being true both to your need for independence and your need for interdependence? I bring these ruminations to your attention, Libra, just in time for the “Transforming Togetherness” phase of your cycle.

SCORPIO Oct23–Nov21 It’s time for your once-a-year shoutout to your most audacious possibilities. Ready? Go ahead and say, “Hallelujah! Hosanna! Happiness! Hooray for my brilliant future!” Next, go ahead and say, “I have more than enough power to create my world in the image of my wisest dreams.” Now do a dance of triumph and whisper to yourself, “I’m going to make very sure I always know exactly what my wisest dreams are.”

SAGITTARIUS Nov22–Dec21 During the next three weeks, I advise you to load up on copious amounts of caffeine from Monday at 8 a.m. until Friday at 6 p.m. Then drastically cut back on the coffee and consume large amounts of alcohol and/or marijuana from 6:01 p.m. on Friday through 6 p.m. on Sunday. This is the ideal recipe for success. JUST KIDDING! I lied. Here’s the truth, Sagittarius: Astrological indicators suggest you would benefit from making the coming weeks be the most un-drugged, alcohol-free time ever. Your potential for achieving natural highs will be extraordinary, as will your potential to generate crucial breakthroughs while enjoying those natural highs. Take advantage!

CAPRICORN Dec22–Jan19 I don’t presume you should or will gleefully embrace the assignment I’ll propose. The task may indeed be too daunting for you to manage right now. If that’s the case, don’t worry. You’ll get another chance in a few months. But if you are indeed ready for a breathtaking challenge, here it is: Be a benevolent force of wild nature; be a tender dispenser of creative destruction; be a bold servant of your soulful dreams—as you demolish outmoded beliefs and structures that have been keeping a crucial part of your vitality shackled and latent.

AQUARIUS Jan20–Feb18 I have cast a feisty love spell that will be triggered in anyone who reads the first line of this horoscope. And since you have done that, you are now becoming even smarter than you already were about getting the most out of your intimate alliances. You’re primed to experiment with the delights of feeling with your head and thinking with your heart. Soon, you’ll be visited by revelations about any unconscious glitches that might be subtly undermining your togetherness, and you’ll get good ideas about how to correct those glitches. Astrological rhythms will be flowing in your relationships’ favor for the next seven weeks!

PISCES Feb19–Mar20 I estimate that about 25% of your fear results from your hesitation to love as deeply and openly and bravely as you could. Another 13% originates in an inclination to mistake some of your teachers for adversaries, and 21% from your reluctance to negotiate with the misunderstood monsters in your closet. But I suspect that fully 37% of your fear comes from the free-floating angst that you telepathically absorb from the other 7.69 billion humans on our planet. So what about the remaining 4%? Is that based on real risks and worth paying attention to? Yes! And the coming weeks will be an excellent time to make progress in diminishing its hold on you.

Homework: Make a playful effort to change something you’ve always assumed you could never change. freewillastrology.com.

© Copyright 2019


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OPINION FOR SAL E

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If there is any doubt a climate emergency is at hand, ask the people of the Micronesian Islands—currently disappearing—of Isle de Jean Charles in Louisiana and of Norfolk, Virginia. Ask the Guatemalans, fleeing, in part, because they can no longer farm due to severe drought. If we think there is no crisis, it is only because our focus is overly and dangerously narrow. AMI CHEN MILLS-NAIM | SANTA CRUZ

Thanks, Ami! (For those who don’t know, she was formerly a star reporter at Metro Santa Cruz.) We’ve actually done quite a

lot of reporting on climate change over the last few years. I recommend readers search for the phrase at goodtimes.sc to see the local and global angles we’ve tackled on the subject. — Editor

CORRECTION In last week’s review of Cabrillo Stage’s “Into the Woods,” the names of the actors who play the stepsisters were incorrectly listed. They are Morgan Peters and Catrina Contini. Also, Melissa Harrison’s name was misspelled in the photo caption. We regret the errors.

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REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Local nonprofits are eligible to apply to Santa Cruz Gives, a holiday fundraising program, organized by Good Times with the support of the Volunteer Center, with additional partners to be announced.

JULY 24-30, AUGUST 7-13,2019 2019| |GOODTIMES.SC GOODTIMES.SC| |SANTACRUZ.COM SANTACRUZ.COM

Approximately 30 organizations will be selected for this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campaign. In the future, as the amount of funds raised increases, more groups will be included. Criteria for selection is posted in the FAQ at SantaCruzGives.org.

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501(c)(3) nonprofits must be based in Santa Cruz County and benefit Santa Cruz County, or any area within it. The public will learn about each nonprofit and a project chosen for this campaign in the November 13 issue of Good Times and at SantaCruzGives.org. A leaderboard will track donations online in real time. An ad campaign via print, radio, web and social media will spread the word.

Apply at SantaCruzGives.org/rfp Or simply click on the link at the top of the home page: 2019 APPLICATION Deadline for proposals: Monday, September 2 Selections will be announced: September 25-27 For more information contact SantaCruzGives@GoodTimes.sc


WELLNESS

BUDDING FESTIVAL L.A.-based Latin rock band Ozomatli will headline the Power of Flower event.

Flower Power Santa Cruz Naturals plans county’s first public 420-friendly event BY GEORGIA JOHNSON a public marijuana consumption event (no alcohol allowed). There will be 30-plus vendors selling joints, edibles and more for attendees 21 and over to enjoy on-site. Planning began in April after the idea surfaced during a Santa Cruz Naturals team meeting. The county fairgrounds only had one open date that would work, so Disheroon and his team hit the ground running. “Frankly, it’s a pretty substantial undertaking to put an event like this together,” Disheroon says. “You have to get three different types of licences to do it, plus the large amount of money and the team dedicated to producing it.” Typically, large-scale cannabis events include a separate area for

consumption, like a lounge, that restricts use to one area, he says. There hasn’t been a music event with open consumption in the state, or even in the country, as far as Disheroon knows. “Part of the reason why there haven’t been any consumption events at the Santa Cruz County Fairgrounds until now is because the regulations around cannabis events have been evolving,” he says. This is Disheroon’s first time managing a major music event, let alone one that includes public consumption. Although he didn’t disclose a total budget, he says that between normal event expenses, fees and insurance, “It has not been cheap.” The amount of bureaucracy

Power of Flower will take place noon-10 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 10. powerofflower.org. $30 adv/$40 door.

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 7-13, 2019

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hen Colin Disheroon was planning Santa Cruz County’s first ever public, cannabis-friendly event and music festival, he didn’t know the logistics would spill over into his European honeymoon, too. “It was a nine-hour time difference, and I was dealing with the bureaucracy from California trying to get a license for the event,” says Disheroon, the CEO of Aptos-based dispensary Santa Cruz Naturals. “The Bureau of Cannabis Control is overwhelmed right now.” The Power of Flower event is first and foremost a music festival, with Ozomatli and The Dirty Dozen Brass Band headlining, but it’s also

involved was also surprising. “It was above and beyond what I think is reasonable,” Disheroon says. “It’s the first legal, licensed cannabis consumption event in the whole region. With that came a lot of interesting political stuff.” Many other local dispensaries, including West Cliff Wellness and KindPeoples, would also like to see on-site consumption allowed, but permitting has lagged demand. Public consumption at events is allowed if organizers have the time and funding to jump through hoops on the state level. The Power of Flower event is one of only four consumption events that could be allowed annually at the County Fairgrounds under a 2018 resolution passed by the Board of Supervisors. Another cannabis event is scheduled for October, but similar events are not allowed elsewhere in the county. “While the Fairgrounds has hosted cannabis-related events before, this is the first to allow on-site consumption,” Santa Cruz County spokesman Jason Hoppin told GT in an email. “In this case, the operator has a state license and the county granted a temporary use permit.” Event organizers are also ramping up security after the Gilroy Garlic Festival shooting on July 28, when three people were killed. “We are going to be the next local music event after the Gilroy tragedy happened,” Disheroon says. “Though the likelihood of something like that happening again in close proximity is extremely low, we want to make sure we are ensuring the safety of attendees.” All proceeds from the festival will be donated to local charities, including one that supports those affected by the Gilroy shooting. The other is a Watsonville-based organization that focuses on job development. The names of both beneficiaries will not be released since they receive federal funding, and federal law still prohibits cannabis use. “It’s a passion for me to be able to have music and cannabis together, legally,” Disheroon says.

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NEWS STETHOSCOPING Mayor Martine Watkins wants Santa Cruz to start making health-oriented decisions about its future

AUGUST 7-13, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

BY ALISHA GREEN

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Santa Cruz mayors often pick an area of focus for their one-year term. In 2017, Mayor Cynthia Chase zeroed in on the housing crisis. Last year, Mayor David Terrazas talked of wanting to work on issues surrounding property crime, homelessness, drug addiction, and mental health. This year, Mayor Martine Watkins has set her sights on public health, spearheading a framework she calls “Health in All Policies.” It’s the kind of high-level program that can be difficult to conceptualize, but she’s found that it helps when people use their imaginations. While talking to a UCSC public-policy class in the spring, Watkins asked the students to picture an unhealthy, unsustainable community. They said that it might have a depressed economy, blight, poor safety, and aging infrastructure. She then prodded the class for details about the opposite: How would a healthy, sustainable community look? It would be safe, they said. It would have quality education, good roads, secure parks. Watkins’ Health in All Policies concept centers around promoting equity, sustainability and well-being in government decision-making, with an emphasis on engaging a wide range of community members and improving collaboration between the public and private sectors. Watkins says the approach could take the shape of funding after-school programs, for example, or reducing air pollution. Santa Cruz is far from the first to adopt the idea. The city of Richmond, which implemented a Health in All Policies plan of its own, has set aside funds for collegebound students, made plans to develop new green spaces and a park, and built low-income family housing. Watkins, who works at the county Office of Education, has brought in policymakers from Monterey County and the city of Gonzales to talk with the Santa Cruz City Council about their experiences implementing similar programs. Watkins also has a key partner >16

PRESSING TOPIC Santa Cruz County residents Gabriella Gaus (left) and Brynn Ota-Matthews addressed the media last week

about their recoveries from the Gilroy Garlic Festival shooting. PHOTO: JENNIFER WADSWORTH

Gilroy Aftermath

Local victims of the Garlic Festival shooting share their stories BY JACOB PIERCE AND JAQUELINE MCCOOL

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endy Towner was standing behind the vendor tent for her family business, the Honey Ladies, at the Gilroy Garlic Festival on Sunday, July 28. A staple at many Bay Area farmers markets, the Honey Ladies was selling its garlic and habanero varieties that afternoon. Then, Wendy saw a man climbing a fence behind the row of booths and carrying an assault rifle. The mother of two ran toward him, screaming, “No, you’re not gonna do this here! This isn’t gonna happen!” says Wendy’s sister Christine, who lives high in the Santa Cruz

Mountains, as does Wendy. Christine wasn’t at the festival, but she’s kept in close contact with those who were, particularly her sister. Over the course of about a minute, the gunman injured 12 victims and took the lives of three more: 6-yearold Stephen Romero, 13-year-old Keyla Salazar and 25-year-old Trevor Irby, a recent Santa Cruz transplant. Christine believes that her sister prevented the death toll from climbing even higher. In charging gunman Santino William Legan, Wendy momentarily startled him and alerted others to

take cover, Christine says. “She was just trying to stop it and slow it down and hope that she could save everybody,” Christine says. “She was so upset that she couldn’t save those three lives.” Wendy was the first one shot that day. Her husband Francisco Aguilar, who ran after her, was the second. After the first two victims fell, Legan’s gun jammed. He walked over to where Wendy and Aguilar lay in the grass and asked, in a calm voice, if they were OK, Christine says her sister recalls. They played dead. Then, Legan dropped his magazine next to Wendy’s head and >14


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opened fire on the crowd. Wendy and Aguilar’s 3-yearold son was playing on a nearby inflatable slide, and he started running through the gunfire toward his parents. A family friend’s 11-year-old granddaughter grabbed the boy and pulled him into the booth and under a table. Santa Cruz’s Brynn Ota-Matthews, 26, and Gabriella Gaus, 26, were also on the slide when Legan opened fire. The two friends, who work together at Westside pizza restaurant Bantam, ran to the festival parking lot. “We didn’t ever look back,” Gaus said at a press conference last week. There was a moment when she thought the noise of the gun was some kind of joke, but once she saw the shooter, she said her body told her to run. Legan shot and killed himself once police arrived upon the scene, about a minute after the shooting began.

Gaus was grazed by several bullets across her back, and she was treated and released. Ota-Matthews was shot in the back and said she will now live her life with a bullet in her liver. At the press conference, the first person Gaus thanked was a man named John—at least she thought that was his name. He was the one who picked the two up in his car and drove them to the hospital. She said she didn’t feel safe until she was in the car. For Wendy’s husband Aguilar, the minutes after the attack were precarious. He was losing blood quickly, and first responders initially didn’t think that he would survive. He was shot twice in the shoulder and twice in the leg. One bullet hit his femoral artery. “They were not sure he was gonna make it to the hospital,” Christine says, adding that the doctors now expect both victims to make a “pretty good recovery.” Wendy will need plastic surgery, and she will wear a leg brace for the rest of her

life. Aguilar will need skin grafts. Between the two of them, they’ve had nine surgeries. In the initial days of the couple’s hospitalizations, Christine brought a cell phone so they could Facetime from separate hospitals. Now, the two are staying in nearby rooms, and Wendy is able to visit her husband in a wheelchair. Gaus and Ota-Matthews say they’ve been unable to stop the same images from constantly replaying in their minds: escaping the inflatable jungle gym, running through the crowd of people, Gaus screaming at the realization she had been hit. “It was just the most terrifying place for us to be,” Ota-Matthews said. The women struggled to understand the gunman’s motives, which federal authorities are now scrutinizing in a domestic terrorism investigation announced on Tuesday. Photos released of 19-yearold Legan seemed in sharp contrast to the memories of Gaus, who said she looked the shooter in >17

NUZ

AUGUST 7-13, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

ROGER GRIGSBY’S PROBABLY AN IDIOT

14

Over the past year and a half, GT has been getting bigoted online comments from an email address that seems to belong to Roger Grigsby, Nuz has learned. Grigbsy, of course, is the one-time local Chinese restaurant owner who earned the wrath of the Santa Cruz community for his $500 campaign contribution to former KKK Grand Wizard David Duke in the white supremacist’s Louisiana campaign for the U.S. Senate. Before everyone could forget about the fiasco, he became even more infamous for quickly doubling down, decrying “a war on whites” for bringing an end to his business.

These more recent comments compare GT’s reporters to rats and cockroaches. Oh and also, he’s all in on this whole racism thing. The “social space,” this latest comment argues, can be divided into just two camps: “pro-whites” and “anti-whites.” You’ll never guess which side he says GT is on. Anyway, although we weren’t able to 100% confirm that the email belongs to Grigsby, the same address has been linked in online listings to Shen’s Gallery, which was associated with the now-retired restaurateur for years. If he isn’t the guy leaving these racially motivated comments, he really should let us know.

WHEREFORE ART THOU? Now that Chip has left the Downtown Association and

moved to Boulder, Colorado, his wife Abra Alan has temporarily taken the reins as interim executive director—a role she’s expected to hold until moving out to the Rocky Mountain State herself. The Arts Council also has an interim executive director right now, as does the Museum of Art and History. Could all this portend a change in vision for the downtown Santa Cruz arts scene? Nuz hopes so … ’cuz that ugly automobile-oriented art on the side of the Soquel/ Front Garage has been up for 10 years too long, and we’ve just been waiting for an excuse to say something. It looks like it was dreamt up by a 4-year-old with a lousy black-and-white photo album and overzealous Adderall prescription.

NO LESSON PLAN Santa Cruz Mayor Martine Watkins will receive an award from the Santa Cruz County Chamber of Commerce at a gala this October. Old-timers occasionally reminisce on the toughest mayoral years in Santa Cruz history. There was Mardi Wormhoudt’s 1989 term, when the Loma Prieta Earthquake struck, and then Hilary Bryant’s 2013 stint when two police officers were killed, putting the town’s crime rate under a microscope. But given the level of dysfunction at the city right now, Watkins’ 2019 term has got to be up there. Whereas Wormhoudt and Bryant were remembered as courageous heroes, Watkins’ role is more thankless in nature—sometimes more akin to that of an especially underpaid preschool teacher.


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NEWS

16

HIPPOCRATIC GROWTH Mayor Martine Watkins says a “Health in All Policies” plan could lead to more

funding for after-school programs or efforts to reduce air pollution. PHOTO: TARMO HANNULA

STETHOSCOPING <12 in Mimi Hall, director of the Santa Cruz County Health Services Agency, who previously led an award-winning program using the same framework in Plumas County. A City Council subcommittee anchored by Watkins, Vice Mayor Justin Cummings and Councilmember Cynthia Mathews is looking into how health-centric policies may already be at work in Santa Cruz. Watkins hopes to embed a long-term approach that outlasts her year as mayor.

City department heads have already taken to the program, she says. “People are seeing how it fits within their work and what they do,” Watkins says. “It also is a really nice way to name some of the efforts that are already currently underway.” Watkins has scheduled meetings with groups including schools, businesses, nonprofits, and health providers to gather feedback and talk about ways they can collaborate. As a result, Watkins says the full council should get to vote on a policy

recommendation and implementation plan by the end of the year. The biggest challenge may simply be for staff and councilmembers to carve out the time for a different way of thinking. “We have a lot of big issues happening in our city,” Watkins says. “It’s really hard when you have major crises on your hands … You’re trying to put out the fire that’s in front of you. So this is a long-term vision and approach, and to shift that requires a different level of capacity.” The city is hosting a community meeting on

Sunday, Aug. 11, at 11:30 am at the downtown library, where Watkins and other employees will share information and seek input. Hall says one key benefit of a Health in All Policies approach is that related programs can help address multiple root causes of “seemingly insurmountable problems,” like homelessness, food insecurity and access to healthcare. The government, she says, doesn’t have the capacity or the resources to fix these programs alone. “So we have to work with those who impact where people spend their time,” such as businesses and nonprofit groups, she says. Hall is no stranger to tackling big issues. Plumas County had the highest opioid-related death rate of any county in California, and she helped lead a 20,000 Lives initiative to improve health overall. Opioid safety was the subject of the initiative’s first workgroup. The county joined forces with the three district hospitals in its borders, a tribal group and more than 20 community organizations. “The concept was we have everything that we need to make a difference in our community,” Hall says. “We don’t say we’re not going to address the opiate problem unless we get additional funding or unless we get a grant. Let’s use the resources and the partnerships that we have already to make whatever we can.” The effort, which successfully helped lower the opioid-related death rate to zero in Plumas County, earned the 2016 Innovation Award from the California State Association of Counties. Now, Hall is drawing on lessons from that initiative in looking at how Santa Cruz County can collaborate with cities and regional partners. “There’s no single entity, or even two or three together, that are going to be able to solve these huge problems that we have,” Hall says. Gonzales City Manager Rene Mendez, who gave a presentation on the topic at a June 4 Santa Cruz City Council study session, tells GT that the framework is an important way to start a community conversation about quality-of-life issues. His recommendation for Santa Cruz? “Don’t shortcut the public participation. Sometimes the hardest thing we can do— and we all struggle with this—is listening,” Mendez says.

The city will hold a community meeting to discuss Health in All Policies on Sunday, Aug. 11, from 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. at the Santa Cruz Public Library Downtown Branch, 224 Church St., Santa Cruz. For more details, go to cityofsantacruz.com.


NEWS GILROY AFTERMATH <14 I’M EXCITED AND SAD TO ANNOUNCE MY DEPARTURE FROM SANTA CRUZ My last day of full practice at Thrive Natural Medicine will be August 9th, 2019.

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the eye seconds before she realized what was happening. “I remember looking at him and just like staring at him until he started rapid-firing. Shot once, pause, and then rapid fire,” Gaus said. “So I remember in between those few seconds just staring at him, and he was like a trained military professional.” The women said neither of them have fully grasped how this will change their day-to-day life. Gaus was discharged from the hospital the night of the shooting but had barely left her house four days later. “I sound really bleak and sad, but I hope that I feel a sense of general trust towards humanity—because right now, I really don’t,” said Gaus. “I feel paranoid when I leave my house. I don’t know who I can trust. Even going to the grocery store, people are looking at me, and you don’t know I’m a victim because my clothes cover my wounds and whatever. But it just feels really sickening to me every time I leave my house. So, I think someday, I hope to feel really positive, to have a positive outlook. But right now, it’s not really there.” Neither Ota-Matthews nor Gaus have health insurance, but as of Monday, GoFundMe.com campaigns had raised $36,000 for OtaMatthews and $15,000 for Gaus. Two other GoFundMe fundraisers for the Towner and Aguilar family had raised $94,000 combined, in addition to another by Mountain Bible Church. The family has felt positively overwhelmed by the wave of support. Christine can’t forget when she first arrived at the hospital with Wendy’s 15-year-old daughter, their pulses racing and pumping with adrenaline. Wendy had a breathing mask over her face and was wrapped up in cords attached to machines. But as soon as the two of them saw Wendy, they felt a sense of relief wash over them. “It’s one thing to have someone tell you that your family member’s alive,” Christine says. “It’s another to actually see them and physically touch them. That sense of relief that they’re actually OK—you don’t get that full effect until you can actually see for yourself.”

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SANTA CRUZ COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION LOCAL SPOTLIGHT

Organization Profile:

WAMM

Santa Cruz-based Wo/ Men’s Alliance for Medical Marijuana (WAMM) is the first and longest running medical marijuana organization in the U.S. In 2018, they had to shut down because they wouldn’t be able to afford to comply with the new legal compliances in the wake of the legalization of medical marijuana. After a year and a half, WAMM is finally opening back up late this fall in a new location.

Born out of a deep desire to help heal people, Leveroni

“We want to build a democratic workplace and eventually a work around collective. We are pushing back against concept that has surrounded cannabis more recently and hoping to return it to it’s roots of awareness that the plant can bring into your health

and consciousness,” Leveroni Corral says. “Profit is not just about money and revenue, it’s about wellness. There is a profit in feeling well and being happy. There is a profit in finding relief to suffering, that’s what is important in life.” The new space will include a center for alternative applications of physiotherapist and plant medicines. There will be practitioners onsite providing wellness services. Leveroni Corral envisions the space as an old coffee shop, where people can gather, talk and host events like comedy nights and potlucks. “We want to help people find the best path to heal themselves,” Leveroni Corral says. “I’m really happy about this new adventure. It’s what we have always done but now we can do it on a grander scale.”

WAMM has partnered with the Santa Cruz Community Credit Union (SCCCU) for more than twenty years. “They have been amazing...profoundly helpful,” she says. “For one, it’s a credit union. It’s important to me that I’m not banking with a monster. Two, it’s a member driven company. And three, it’s so personable, local is personable. That’s what’s really important to me.” wamm.org.

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SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 7-13, 2019

“WAMM is reopening in the Sullivan building across from the old Santa Cruz Hospital in Branciforte Plaza,” WAMM cofounder Valerie Leveroni Corral says. “It’ll be the first time that it’s not a doctor’s office since 1937 when it was built. We will be opening as a dispensary and a community wellness center.”

Corral says WAMM’s mission has been about much more than profit since it began. Leveroni Corral founded WAMM with her now exhusband, Mike Corral, in the middle of the AIDS epidemic. Although they had been growing marijuana illegally for years to help with their own health ailments, they started WAMM to, among many things, help alleviate the suffering of their friends living with AIDS. WAMM is a non-profit donation-based dispensary, and does not discriminate based on finances or illness.

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AUGUST 7-13, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

On Guards

20

P

Inside the intense culture of local lifeguarding, where saving lives doesn’t always mean they can make enough to live in Santa Cruz County BY G.P. SCHEPPLER

erched atop baby-blue towers scattered along the coast, the lifeguards who watch the water from behind polarized sunglasses and thick layers of zinc are a staple of the beaches that sustain the Central Coast. The mix of authority, adrenaline, sun, and sand make for a perfect summer job for many of the roughly 140 seasonal guards who swell the county’s ranks from Memorial Day through Labor Day each year.

“I grew up idolizing the lifeguards,” says Patricia Jake Stark, who joined the local Junior Lifeguards at age 8. “I knew from a very young age that ocean rescue was what I wanted to do.” Lifeguards and their gear are routinely fetishized in movies and TV shows as abnormally attractive watchdogs of the sun-soaked masses. Every pool, lake or beach

has a Billy Hargrove prowling to “Moving in Stereo,” or a Wendy Peppercorn like the Sandlot boys drool over. Still, lifeguarding is rarely a viable long-term career. Stark, a 21-year-old Santa Cruz High alum, is one of many whose dreams of patrolling the sand eventually morph into the pursuit of betterpaid and more plentiful jobs in local

fire departments, the military or emergency medicine. In Stark’s case, lifeguarding led to becoming a search and rescue swimmer who jumps out of helicopters for the U.S. Navy. Part of the challenge is that the pressure of preventing drowning doesn’t necessarily translate to high pay. Most local lifeguards make $15-20 an hour, on par with many local restaurants or service sector jobs. “You don’t get into lifeguarding to get rich,” says Anaiis Nysether, a


22-year-old seasonal lifeguard who plays water polo at Cabrillo College. “Most of us have either another job, or this is just a summer gig while they are home from school.” The bulk of the local lifeguarding industry is seasonal. The Santa Cruz Fire Department has two full-time lifeguards who oversee the dozens of guards hired each summer. Also on staff are a captain, a marine safety officer and three lieutenants who supervise day-to-day operations of towers overseen by the city. At state beaches, the California Department of Parks and Recreation

employs two full-time lifeguards charged with enforcing the law at beaches they patrol. These guards also lean on seasonal guards, many of whom return for multiple summers, to help manage tasks like dispatch, scheduling and communication with the public. All told, Santa Cruz area lifeguards have saved 7,657 souls and presided over more than 66 million beach visitors since the United States Lifesaving Association started keeping records in 1968. Each year, they’ll rescue about 200 people from local waters and keep watch over

about 1 million beachgoers. The result is “a culture that transcends specific postings,” Stark says. On a personal level, she says being a lifeguard “helped me find my voice. I learned how to be assertive in emergency situations, and that I wanted to make a career out of saving lives.”

THE PIPELINE On any given weekday from June through August, the hundreds of little bodies skittering around the sand at Cowell Beach create the same kind of choreographed frenzy as a flock of

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SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 7-13, 2019

WORK IN PROGRESS A group of junior guards go through their morning calisthenics routine at Cowell Beach in July. PHOTO: G.P. SCHEPPLER

Starlings. It takes a cadre of seasoned instructors to corral the Junior Lifeguards decked out in bright reds and navy blues. “OK guys, let’s keep the energy up for these push-ups,” an instructor yells to a loosely assembled group of nearly two dozen 12-year-olds on a recent Tuesday. “I can feel my sweats filling with sand,” one junior guard whispers to another as they dive down into plank position. On this mid-July day, a thick layer of clouds keeps the temperature brisk at the water’s edge. Some make the rookie mistake of starting their daily calisthenics routine while still wearing sweat suits. Veterans know to always ditch your gear before the workout; much like a rescue, you never know how long the push-ups, crunches, lunges, and flutter kicks will last. By now a rite of passage in Santa Cruz and neighboring cities, the summer Junior Lifeguard program supplies a steady stream of young athletic talent to keep towers around the county staffed. Over 1,000 junior guards enroll in various city and state parks programs each year to learn the basics of ocean safety and conservation. For Jason Sweatt, a 42-year-old Capitola transplant originally from Alabama, signing his 5-year-old son Cody up for junior guards was a no-brainer. With a lifetime spent in the water as a surf instructor, and as a former lifeguard himself, Sweatt is more familiar than most with the skills his son is learning. “I have pulled people out of the water that were unconscious in Waikiki and required CPR,” says Sweatt, who co-founded the Santa Cruz Veterans Alliance in 2011 after spending his first few years postArmy service working in Hawaii as a surf instructor. “It’s those basic lifesaving skills that you carry on and never let go. I want that for Cody." It takes time to develop a good lifeguard. In addition to runs and workouts on the sand, basic lessons like how to identify a water emergency eventually evolve into more advanced mock-rescue drills. During more intense rescue drills, a fellow guard simulates the behaviors of someone drowning, such as frantically trying to climb onto a rescuer in the surf. Uninitiated lifeguards can easily find themselves in danger

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from not only rough water, but the person they’re trying to save. “We are exposed to some dangerous environmental factors,” says Anna Marie Scott, a 19-yearold in her third season as a summer lifeguard, from riptides and rocks to skin cancer. Still, it’s hard to argue with the benefits of working on the beach. Isaiah Mullen, a 21-year-old Santa Cruz native, saw it as a natural step when he became a seasonal guard four years ago while enrolled at UCSC. “After doing junior guards for years, it just felt like I was setup,” says Mullen, a legal studies major who previously studied and played water polo at Cabrillo. “And who wouldn’t want to work at the beach while they are in college?”

MURKY WATERS With a steady pipeline of junior guards growing up idolizing heroes in red and blue uniforms, lifeguarding has endured and

evolved despite pay that—like many jobs in Santa Cruz County—has struggled to keep pace with the skyrocketing costs of living. “Everybody knows it’s difficult living in Santa Cruz,” says Brendan Daly, a 33-year-old marine safety officer who transitioned to a fulltime position with the Santa Cruz Fire Department after 11 years as a seasonal guard. “You have to really grind to find a job that will allow you to stay in a place like this.” Virtually every city guard in the towers is a seasonal, part-time employee earning between $1420 an hour with limited benefits, including health insurance for job-related incidents. Leadership positions like beach lieutenants and beach captains pay $17-24 per hour, compared to a full-time firefighter salary of $35-50 per hour. At state beaches, the majority of lifeguards are also seasonal, with pay starting at $15 per hour and limited benefits. Full-time state peace officers are generally


ON GUARDS

DOLPHIN-DIVING IN To become a city lifeguard in Santa Cruz, applicants must survive a gauntlet of physical challenges. Just to earn the chance to interview, an aspiring guard must complete a 1,000-meter open water swim in under 20 minutes, then a 200-meter run, 400-meter swim and

another 200-meter run all in under 10 minutes. With the scarcity of full-time lifeguarding jobs, aspiring guards often try to separate themselves from their peers by shelling out for professional certifications, gym memberships or specialized personal trainers. Many participate in sports like swimming and water polo during the offseason, sometimes while also studying for credentials such as emergency medical technician, or EMT. “Being an EMT isn’t a requirement,” Daly says, “but it is preferred.” If city lifeguards want to advance beyond entry-level pay, holding an EMT certification becomes a necessity. Being familiar with the Central Coast isn’t a requirement, but there is an inherent advantage for those who start training nearby. “I was lucky to be local and have grown up here in the junior guards program,” Stark says. “I saw outsiders come in and struggle to paddle or navigate the kelp fields or handle the cold water.” For Stark and other guards, a typical day on the tower starts around 10:30 a.m. and runs until about 6:30 p.m. Aside from a daily fitness break or nature’s occasional call, lifeguards must stay focused on the water while surrounded by a sea of distractions that has only grown with the region’s tourism industry. Local lifeguards have completed 1,283 reported rescues since 2015. Most often, they leave their towers to help beachgoers who have either over-indulged in seaside libations or overestimated their ability—usually, some combination of the two. Hazards like riptides, shore breaks, cliff falls, sneaker waves, and medical emergencies on the beach all present potential threats at land’s end. Just go to Youtube and search “Santa Cruz water rescue,” and all kinds of drone footage and news reports will surface. In recent years, the number of rescues has spiked during busy warmer months. Last month, rescue swimmers pulled a young boy whose head was the only part of his body visible

24>

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 7-13, 2019

the guards driving white pick-up trucks outfitted with long rifles that supervise and patrol the shoreline, who earn $20-33 an hour. “In Santa Cruz, (lifeguarding) is not a feasible career,” says seasonal guard Nysether. The tradeoff, she says, is that the job has allowed her to gain emergency medical experience while doing student nursing work at Dominican Hospital. Nysether is also one of many guards who pursues year-round work as a rescue swimmer with the fire department’s Marine Safety Unit. While lifeguards do the legwork of standing long rotations in the towers watching the water line, rescue swimmers are emergency responders with specialized medical and rescue training. Unlike lifeguards, rescue swimmers typically have other duties as firefighters, police officers or medical specialists. Before he became a full-time marine safety officer with the state parks department, Daly says he worked a variety of jobs to make ends meet, like doing surf photography or videography for the Monterey Bay Aquarium. At 33, this is Daly’s 16th year as a lifeguard and fifth in a fulltime role supervising a small army of seasonal guards. He studied cultural anthropology at UC Santa Barbara, and after graduation was discouraged to find that most of the tribes of the world had already been discovered. He went back to working as a lifeguard as he’d done over summers in college, and though the career path hasn’t always been clear, Daly says the intangible benefits of training young people how to save lives makes up for it. “Just last year we had several former junior guards rescue a swimmer in distress,” Daly says.

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every Wednesday night at 6pm. Dr. Dawn presents science news you can use, practical health advice and answers your live calls and emails. RESCUE SEASON Fourth-year local lifeguard Isaiah Mullen says junior guards set him up to spend summer breaks from college watching the water. PHOTO: G.P. SCHEPPLER

Dr. Dawn Motyka is also available for private consultation at her office on Santa Cruz Westside.

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in rough water near Sunny Cove. In July of last year, a 10-year-old was rushed to the hospital after he was buried in sand while digging a tunnel and had to be pulled out by a lifeguard. Just south in Monterey County, both a lifeguard and a swimmer in duress about 30 feet from shore had to be pulled out of the waves by Cal Fire crews last fall. Hearing from lifeguards first-hand about these incidents, however, is rare. Lifeguards are bound by the same medical privacy laws as doctors and nurses, and they’re notoriously tightlipped about their most harrowing rescues. Rather, they speak in general terms about “an unconscious male” or “distressed elderly female bather” swept out to sea. “These moments are some of the most traumatic in people’s lives,” Mullen says. “It’s important to

always keep that in perspective when talking about the rescues we make.”

POLICING THE BEACH Depending which department they work for, lifeguards’ tools of the trade might include jet skis, pick-up trucks, rescue boards, helicopters, swim fins, rescue buoys—or, sometimes, guns. Full-time State Parks Lifeguards are trained peace officers whose authority extends across California. As a result, they carry 9 mm pistols on their hips and a long rife in their trucks during shifts on the beach. Unlike their seasonal counterparts, peace officers are charged with enforcing state laws and issuing citations, or potentially making arrests. Far from Baywatch stereotypes, the role many lifeguards play in the


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FUTURE GUARDS

and surging costs of living. Local law enforcement departments and the U.S. military increasingly say that recruiting can be a struggle thanks to a shift away from physical labor and the difficulty of paying for housing and other necessities on low starting salaries. Lifeguarding is something of an outlier because of the job’s unusual sun-soaked allure, but state and local departments have expanded junior guard programs in recent years to keep the pond stocked with able-bodied candidates. Like cops or firefighters, there’s also a hierarchy to lifeguarding. For those who excel in junior guards, like former fire department Lifeguard of the Year Henry Tobias, there are distinctions to strive for. One mark of prestige is becoming part of “Captain's Corp,” or the Marine Safety Unit within the fire department. Looking ahead, Tobias hopes that lifeguarding will help give him a leg up applying to state and local fire departments. “Working as a lifeguard helped me get exposure to local fire departments, and that motivated me to get my paramedic degree,” Tobias said. “I grew up wanting to be a lifeguard and a firefighter.” He may get the chance to realize both dreams in the same place. In addition to the Marine Safety Unit, 17 local firefighters are certified as rescue swimmers, enabling them to provide emergency water response during the offseason from fire engines. The 15-year-old program was adopted by the fire department to increase its capacity to protect ocean-goers during the offseason when summer lifeguards go back to school or work. For those who return to the towers year after year, like State Parks guard Shaffer-Yunger, lifeguarding comes with a sense of purpose that can be hard to replicate. “Working for State Parks has been one of the best jobs I have ever worked,” he says. “I have bussed tables, worked in food prep and hung drywall, but nothing as rewarding an experience as lifeguarding.”

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coastal ecosystem is as much that of warden as rescuer. They’re the first line of defense in preventing emergencies by telling the public about rapidly changing coastal hazards, shark sightings and more. “I view myself as an educator and informer, not as an enforcer,” says seventh-season State Parks Lifeguard Jackson Shaffer-Yunger, 28, who went to Harbor High and played water polo at Cabrillo. “I recognize that not everyone who comes to our beaches has grown up with the ocean the way I did, so I try to be patient.” The vast and dynamic 29 miles of coastline in Santa Cruz County are watched by a network of emergency water-rescue units and personnel from the Santa Cruz Fire Department, Central Fire Protection District, Aptos Fire Department, California State Parks Lifeguards, and the U.S. Coast Guard. These federal, state and local agencies monitor and respond to everything from rocky shores to high-traffic beaches, all on the edge of one of the nation’s largest underwater sanctuaries. When a water emergency happens somewhere in the county, the agencies use a grid to decide who will respond. Guards who work under the city’s fire department cover Cowell, Main and Capitola beaches. State Parks guards cover state parks and sections of unincorporated Santa Cruz County. Often, the work is more pragmatic than high-risk rescue scenarios. “We reunite lost children with their families every day,” Nysether, says. It’s this kind of work, says State Parks Lifeguard Supervisor Eddie Rhee-Pizan, that keeps the county’s most popular beaches safe. “It’s the seasonal guards that are the unsung heroes,” Rhee-Pizano says. “These young people step up and make it possible to open up as many towers as we do.”

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ON GUARDS

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RIGHT HERE IN THE TOWER OF SONG Perla Batalla, a close friend of Leonard Cohen who sang on two of his tours, performs his songs Friday, Aug. 9, at the Kuumbwa.

AUGUST 7-13, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

House of Love

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Perla Batalla’s House of Cohen show is more than just covers of Leonard Cohen’s songs BY STEVE PALOPOLI

W

atch closely when Perla Batalla sings Leonard Cohen’s “Famous Blue Raincoat” and you might notice

HOT TICKET

something unusual: she’s smiling. Cohen’s iconic song about a devastating love triangle—which features lines like “And you treated my woman to a flake of your life/

And when she came back, she was nobody’s wife”—is famous for its moody melancholy. But Batalla thinks it’s rather misunderstood, as is Cohen himself.

THEATER

MUSIC Jazz

Shakespeare goes camp in updated ‘Comedy of Errors’

trumpeter Marquis Hill plays the long game P29

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“It’s also very positive, and it’s so funny,” she says of the song. “That’s one of the major misconceptions about Cohen, that he’s gloomy. He was one of the funniest people I’ve

FILM Podcast royalty Marc Maron stars in ‘Sword of Trust’ P44


ARTS

his very last recordings, because I thought it would be too hard for me emotionally. I thought I couldn’t take it,” says Batalla. “But someone in Germany asked me if I would sing ‘You Want It Darker.’ So I was sort of forced to listen to it to see if it would resonate with me. And it’s incredible. The song is so amazing and deep and profound that I did it, and I have been singing it. It’s a very strong and healing experience.” It seems especially fitting, considering that Batalla first worked with Cohen while he was releasing his mid-career songs like “I’m Your Man,” “First We Take Manhattan,” “The Future” and “Waiting for the Miracle,” all of which came from a middleaged perspective that was in some ways very different from the sly-but-bold romanticism of his popular early songs like “Suzanne” and “Bird on a Wire.” You Want It Darker—his final album, released just three weeks before his death in 2016 at age 82—brought everything full circle. “That last record is more like, ‘No, I’m not your man anymore,’” says Batalla. “He has a higher power. There’s a lot of God in that last one. There’s a lot of that higher whatever force that you’re about to face. It’s super intense.” Just as she has tried to reveal a different side of Leonard Cohen to the world, so have his songs opened up a new perspective for her. “What I’ve been experiencing with these concerts, very openly, is just the idea of what grief is and what it is to deal with and experience. That it’s not a bad thing,” says Batalla. “It’s a very complex thing. I’ve been taking grief and sort of recognizing it as a friend, as something that brings up memories that are very comforting to me. It’s seen as a negative thing so often, and I no longer see it that way.” Perla Batalla performs at 7 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 9, at the Kuumbwa Jazz Center, 320 Cedar St., Santa Cruz. $25/$40 gold circle. snazzyproductions.com.

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 7-13, 2019

ever known in my life.” And Batalla knew him well, beginning with her stint singing on his legendary 1988 European tour, during which he was riding high on the success of his comeback record I’m Your Man. On that tour, she was introduced to the lighter side of the man who had been defined in the public consciousness by his haunting vocals and intense lyrics. “When he introduced ‘Chelsea Hotel,’ he was like a stand-up comic,” she remembers. “He got laugh after laugh. And it was always different—every time he told the story, it would be different.” That’s why she wants House of Cohen—the project she’ll bring to Kuumbwa on Friday, Aug. 9—to do more than just keep the songs of her late friend alive. “My mission is to get people to know this man, and how complex he was—including the qualities that you probably never heard about,” she says. “So I do try to share some of his stories, and some of the things that he found delight in, that just make me laugh whenever I think about them.” The project’s name symbolizes that same intimacy. For many years, Batalla—who also performed on Cohen’s 1993 tour— lived near Cohen, and would drop by his house to sit and chat over a cup of coffee at his kitchen table. “I started doing these concerts of Leonard Cohen songbook years before he passed, because I loved the work so much. And then after he passed away, I really felt a strong connection to being with him in his kitchen,” she says. “That’s when it all came to me. It was about being in his house. It’s almost like a church to me, the house of Leonard Cohen.” Certain songs like “Take This Waltz” and “Anthem” are constants in her set because they relate directly to her relationship with Cohen in ways that she explains when she performs them live. Others cycle in and out depending on the tour, or even the particular night. But the most recent addition surprised even her. “I didn’t even want to listen to

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THEATER

TOTALLY RADICAL REIMAGINING Left to right: Madeline Wall, Patty Gallagher and Mike Ryan in SSC’s 1980s-themed ‘The Comedy of Errors.’ PHOTO: RR JONES

AUGUST 7-13, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Stranger Flings

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Madcap physical comedy and ’80s camp in Santa Cruz Shakespeare’s ‘The Comedy of Errors’ BY STEVE PALOPOLI

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s a producer or director, do you need a good reason to choose a particular era for your play? I’d say no. Purists may get annoyed if the setting seems too random or wacky, but having seen a few of Danny Scheie’s Shakespeare Santa Cruz plays back in the day—some of which “wacky” doesn’t begin to describe—I can honestly say I’ve never been bothered by even the most anachronistic tweaking of Shakespeare convention. I’m there for your trailer park Two Gentlemen of Verona! Temporal displacement is fun, people! In the program notes for Santa

Cruz Shakespeare’s new production of The Comedy of Errors, director Kirsten Brandt says she chose to set it in the “identity-searching ’80s” because, “The play compels us to consider ideas of family, marriage, gender, and identity.” Uh, no. This production doesn’t uncover layers of meaning in what has got to be Shakespeare’s most ridiculous farce, because there are no layers. The plot, such as it is, requires us to believe that characters with no outward signs of brain damage would not be able to tell the difference between two sets of twins with entirely different personalities and ways of speaking, not to mention that these

long-lost twins have to have the same exact names (wait, did their parents give them those names, ’cause that really makes no sense) and for some reason be dressed exactly the same for the entire day or so over which the story takes place. It’s just plain silly. My point is that there doesn’t need to be a fancy, schmancy reason to set this absurdist craziness in the ’80s. It just works. The neon and pastels of designer Dipu Gupta’s set is the perfect cross between Miami Vice and “Girls Just Want to Have Fun” (both the song and the movie). The Fast Times at Ridgemont High daze that the cast maintains as they

sway and bob through every scene is just right for the material, but more importantly, they understand (as does director Brandt, clearly) that the laughs for a 2019 audience are not really going to come from the story. Heck, maybe this was true in 1619, as well. After all, does anyone remember the plot to Harold Lloyd or Buster Keaton movies? Of course not. We remember the gags. The cast here, from Jennifer Erdmann and Patty Gallagher—both doing double duty as the separated twin sisters and their twin servants, respectively—to Mike Ryan, Madeline Wall, Uche Elueze and others in very funny supporting roles, recognize this as setup for some old-school physical comedy, and they go all out. I’m talking spontaneous dance parties, wet willies, slow-motion pro-wrestling moves, Three-Stooges-type eye pokes, and extended crotch-kick routines. If you’re thinking that sounds pretty lowbrow … well, yeah! This is Shakespeare comedy, baby! The only thing that’s really thoughtprovoking at all is that the decision to gender-swap the two sets of twins (all four characters are men in Shakespeare’s original) leads to an interesting queer-romance angle between Erdmann as the visiting Antiphola of Syracuse and Wall as Luciana, sister-in-law of Antiphola of Ephesus, where the action is set. The actors tease out some interesting lines in the dialogue that make this choice seem pretty natural. But again, I don’t think it even needs a rationale—it’s fun. A decade of ’80s revival, and especially the last few years of Stranger Things fever, have set us up to enjoy this take on The Comedy of Errors. Kudos to whoever put together the soundtrack of eraappropriate songs that float through the show, from Wang Chung to Tears for Fears to Depeche Mode. If, like me, you’re not always a fan of Shakespeare’s goofier comedies, you’ll appreciate how far this cast and crew are willing to go for laughs. ‘The Comedy of Errors’ runs through Sept. 1 at the Grove in DeLaveaga Park, 501 Upper Park Rd., Santa Cruz. $35-$60. santacruzshakespeare.org.


MUSIC

THERE’LL BE HILL TO PLAY Jazz trumpeter Marquis Hill brings his Blacktet to the Kuumbwa on Thursday, Aug. 8.

Keeping Time Marquis Hill on black music’s evolution BY MIKE HUGUENOR on an episode of Jazz Night in America. Last November, Hill released Modern Flows Vol. II, a bold, exciting album which develops his theory on music and time. Though it’s very much a jazz record musically, it is as in touch with contemporary musicians like Lamar and Flying Lotus as it is with Miles Davis, Roy Hargrove or Donald Byrd. Often, it puts them all in the same conversation at once. In a rare move, the album opens with a kind of mission statement. Before a single note is played, the listener hears a voice: “My flow is rooted. My flow is modern. Modern Flows Vol. II.”

The speaker is Chicago rapper Brandon Alexander Williams, who reappears periodically throughout the album. Over a hypnotic vibraphone line, Williams develops the album’s themes: black history, art, time, and consciousness. On the next track, the vibraphone line morphs slightly, a shift in its own musical continuum, as it leads the charge for the excellent “Twin Flame.” Sprightly and packed with melodies, it’s almost easy to forget that you’re listening to jazz music until the two-minute mark, when the song opens up for Hill and saxophonist Josh Johnson to trade improvisational passages. The two

Marquis Hill performs at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 8, at Kuumbwa Jazz, 320-2 Cedar St., Santa Cruz. $29.40 adv/$34.65 door. 427-2227.

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 7-13, 2019

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arquis Hill has a theory about time. “I look at it as I’m a part of this continuum,” says the 32-year-old trumpeter. “If you listen to someone like Kendrick Lamar—the rhythms that he’s spitting when he raps—and you listen to someone like Charlie Parker, or Dizzy Gillespie—the types of bebop, tapdance rhythms that they’re playing— it’s the same thing. The flow is exactly the same.” Hill first rose to international acclaim in 2014, when he won the prestigious Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition. The following year, he was profiled by PBS

go back and forth, trading bars like battle rappers before meeting back up again on the melody. “Twin Flame” leads to the metamorphic “Ego vs. Spirit,” a track which features J Dilla style beats, a Miles Davis-like melody, and a choir straight out of Kamasi Washington—and that’s all before the spoken word passage kicks in. Somehow, it all hangs together, each element sounding less like separate pieces stitched together, and more like points of reference along a line. “It keeps bringing me back to that word ‘continuum,’” Hill says. “We’re all connected.” Raised in a music-loving household on the south side of Chicago, Hill picked up the trumpet at age 10, playing in his elementary school’s jazz band. There, he was forever changed when he heard the music of Lee Morgan. “It was mind-blowing,” he says. “I had never heard that form of black music before. I had heard the horn solos on Marvin Gaye records, and on Al Green records, but never heard actual Lee Morgan, Dizzy Gillespie— actual jazz, from the diaspora of bebop. I believe that I fell in love with the music at that moment. I’m grateful that I was exposed to it at a young age.” An early point on his own continuum, Hill still credits that Lee Morgan record with shaping his sound today. “Specifically the tone on track two, ‘Since I Fell For You,’” he says. “I’ll never forget, I heard that track and just fell in love. He had a very warm, dark, fluffy sound on that record, and it just stuck with me.” While he keeps his early influences present today, Hill always keeps his eye on the far end of the continuum: the future, and the musical possibilities it brings. “Everything is very open musically now,” he says. “I think it’s beautiful. It creates newness. It creates new ideas. It creates new sounds. It creates new concepts and directions. It’s a beautiful thing, and I’m just happy to be a part of it.”

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AUGUST 7-13, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

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OZOMATLI, DIRTY DOZEN BRASS BAND

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Bring a blanket and some beach chairs, spread out on the grass and get ready to experience a day of great music, an array of cannabis products, food, drink and fun in the sun!

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CALENDAR

GREEN FIX

See hundreds more events at santacruz. com.

COWELL BEACH CLEAN UP Cowell Beach has been on the “beach bummer” list for nine years running. Let’s lend a helping hand. We suggest dressing in layers, wearing sunscreen and bringing a reusable water bottle, since drinking fountains (and restrooms) are available onsite. Volunteers under the age of 18 must be accompanied by an adult, and closedtoed shoes are also required. Parking is limited, so make or bring a friend and carpool. Meet at the base of the stairs to Cowell Beach; no RSVPs necessary, but you can print and complete the Save Our Shores waiver online beforehand to save time. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Cowell Beach, 21 Municipal Wharf, Santa Cruz. saveourshores.org, nia@saveourshores.org. Free.

ART SEEN

Free calendar listings in print and online are available for community events. Listings show up online within 24 hours. Submissions of free events and those $15 or less received by Thursday at noon, six days prior to the Good Times publication date, will be prioritized for print (space available). All listings must specify a day, start time, location and price (or ‘free’ if applicable). Listings can be set to repeat every week or month, and can be edited by the poster as needed. Ongoing events must be updated quarterly. It is the responsibility of the person submitting an event to cancel or modify the listing. Register at our website at santacruz.com in order to SUBMIT EVENTS ONLINE. E-mail calendar@goodtimes.sc or call 458.1100 with any questions.

WEDNESDAY 8/7 ARTS ‘OPEN SHOW SANTA CRUZ’ The story of “what I did for summer vacation” has never been so enthralling! Open Show Santa Cruz on Aug. 7 will showcase four photographers and one video that show us places near and far, in new and wondrous ways. 6-8:30 p.m. DNA’s Comedy Lab, 155 River St., Santa Cruz. $10/$15.

CLASSES BALANCED HORMONES FOR HEALTHY SEXUALITY Join Dr. Shunney for an exploration into the ways in which dietary and lifestyle strategies, stress management, supplements, herbal medicine, and bioidentical hormones can optimize sexual function and pleasure, while also improving energy, sleep, mood, cognitive function, and even weight. In short, balancing your hormones can help you balance your life! 6-8 p.m. OneSource Compounding Pharmacy, 104 Whispering Pines Drive Ste. 105, Scotts Valley.

ONGOING CONGA DRUMMING CLASS WITH JIM GREINER IN SOQUEL Play

AUGUST 7-13, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

CREATIVITY THRIVES: NINE WOMEN ARTISTS

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Doodles are thought of as absentminded toss-offs, but in fact, they can be as artistic as any still life. R. Blitzer Gallery is showcasing the work of a group of local women artists working mostly in oil and acrylics, and some of these artists’ work is influenced by doodling. With nature, people and current event themes in mind, this highly personal, unconscious way of working from internal impulses makes the resulting piece authentic to each person. Exhibit runs Friday, Aug. 2-Saturday Aug. 31 with an artist talk at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 17. R. Blitzer Gallery, 2801 Mission St., Santa Cruz. 458-1217, rblitzergallery.com. Free.

Conga drums with multiple award-winning percussionist and educator Jim Greiner for fun and as a positive life practice. Release stress, ground and center yourself, tap into your innate ability to enter the flow state, learn fundamental and rhythmic principles, and celebrate life. All levels are welcome. Instruments provided and bring your own. 7-8:30 p.m. Jim Greiner’s Hands-On Drumming Events, 2745 Daubenbiss Ave., Soquel. 462-3786. $80.

MUSIC CABRILLO FESTIVAL OPEN REHEARSALS You’re invited to discover what increasing numbers of festival fans have already realized—Open Rehearsals are a dynamic precursor to the concerts themselves. As the community of conductors, musicians, and composers sculpt pieces for performances, you have the chance to watch the music come to life. Free

SUNDAY 8/11 THE 42ND-ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL MUSICAL SAW FESTIVAL The musical saw, also known as the singing saw, may not be the kind of instrument you find in music class, but it is still one of the most unique music-makers around. In fact, a group of 53 musical sawists hold the world record for largest live saw ensemble event. Santa Cruz’s Musical Saw Festival is a collection of the world’s greatest saw players, plus other acoustic musicians. There will be bluegrass, country, folk, gospel, blues, classical works, and show tunes throughout the day, plus a musical saw contest and workshop. 10 a.m.-5p.m Roaring Camp Railroads, 5401 Graham Hill Rd., Felton. sawplayers.org. Free.

open rehearsals run almost daily through Friday, Aug. 9 at the Santa Cruz Civic Auditorium, 307 Church St., Santa Cruz. cabrillomusic.org/open-rehearsals. Free.

THURSDAY 8/8 CLASSES TRIYOGA BASICS CLASS WITH TERRI TriYoga flows are presented with personalized guided alignment assistance.

9:30 a.m. TriYoga Center, 708 Washington St., Santa Cruz. triyoga-santacruz.com. $15.

VINYASA & YIN YOGA WITH LIVE SAXOPHONE Join Brendan Sick, professional musician and Yoga instructor, for a warming and mindfully-paced Vinyasa practice followed by a meditative soak in Yin Yoga postures. Bask in the beautiful stream of Brendan’s live music on the saxophone. 5:45-6:45 p.m. Watsonville Yoga, Dance and Healing Arts, 375 N. Main St., Watsonville. >34 watsonville.yoga.


events.ucsc.edu

AU G US T 2019

JOIN US AS W E SHARE THE E XCIT EMENT OF LE ARNING

Sketching in the Garden AUGUST 24, 9:30–11:30AM ALAN CHADWICK GARDEN $5–$40/PERSON

Cabrillo Festival Community Night AUGUST 8, 7–9 PM SANTA CRUZ CIVIC AUDITORIUM PAY WHAT YOU CAN

Music Director Cristi Macelaru and members of the Festival Orchestra have designed another captivating concert of new or recent chamber works showcasing these extraordinary musicians as soloists and in small ensembles. Sure to be another high-spirited evening of live music!

AUGUST 10, 12–3PM SANTA CRUZ MUNICIPAL WHARF FREE ADMISSION

Learn about Monterey Bay from a vantage point a half-mile out to sea, without ever leaving land! Seymour Marine Discovery Center volunteers are available to answer your marine science questions every Saturday from noon to 3 PM, through August 24. Look for the people wearing khaki pants and navy blue Seymour Center shirts.

In this class, cultivate your observational skills and artistic talent with inspiration from the Alan Chadwick Garden. Instructor will guide our garden artists when needed with composition, technique, or direction. Bring your own materials. Instructor will provide sample materials to experiment with. Register in advance at https://gardenart.bpt.me/.

Join Shakespeare scholars and artists for two days of lectures, discussions, and demonstrations about the 2019 Santa Cruz Shakespeare main stage productions, The Winter’sTale andThe Comedy of Errors.

home a fun souvenir—an activity for the whole family to share. For example, build a seal or sea lion puppet decorated with your own special seal nose, complete with whiskers!

Changing phenology is a key indicator of climate change; for example, your garden plants blooming earlier during warm years. Monitor California native plants while touring the Arboretum. Data will be used in national research and land management. Register in advance at arboretum.ucsc.edu.

Science on Tap @ the Catalyst

Community Science: Summer Phenology Walk AUGUST 18, 11AM–1PM UC SANTA CRUZ ARBORETUM & BOTANIC GARDEN FREE WITH ADMISSION TO THE ARBORETUM

AUGUST 12, 7PM THE CATALYST, 1011 PACIFIC AVE., SANTA CRUZ FREE ADMISSION

Understanding how stem cells make decisions to become blood cells in development, adulthood, and aging offers enormous potential for new regenerative medicine and stem cell therapies. Atesh Worthington and Donna Poscablo present “They Grow Up So Fast: Development and Aging of Blood.” For ages 21 and older.

Sunday Seaside Crafts AUGUST 11, 1–3PM SEYMOUR MARINE DISCOVERY CENTER FREE WITH ADMISSION TO THE CENTER

Make it and take it! Come create and take

LE ARN MORE AT

AUGUST 17 & 18, 12–4PM HUMANITIES 1 BUILDING, ROOM 210 FREE ADMISSION

events.ucsc.edu

ONGOING EVENTS

Future Garden for the Central Coast of California DURING ARBORETUM HOURS UC SANTA CRUZ ARBORETUM & BOTANIC GARDEN FREE WITH ADMISSION TO THE ARBORETUM

A major art and science project by Newton and Helen Mayer Harrison. The Harrisons worked with scientists and botanists to create trial gardens in the geodesic domes, where native plant species respond to the temperatures and water conditions scientists foresee for the next 50 years.

Songs of Labor & Transcendence: The Trianon Press Archive DURING LIBRARY HOURS UC SANTA CRUZ MCHENRY LIBRARY FREE ADMISSION

Founded in Paris in 1947, the Trianon Press published an astonishing catalog of fine art books in the latter half of the 20th century. This exhibit explores the breadth of this renowned press’s publications and the highly skilled printers’ art behind each edition’s creation.

UPCOMING EVENTS

Photography Walks with Bill & Ferd AUGUST 24, 9–11AM UC SANTA CRUZ ARBORETUM & BOTANIC GARDEN FREE WITH ADMISSION TO THE ARBORETUM

Each walk begins with a short instructional presentation. Before heading out to the gardens to practice, get tips from each other and our volunteer instructors. Bring a water bottle, layers of clothing, walking shoes, and your camera (smartphone cameras welcome). Register in advance at arboretum.ucsc.edu.

SEPTEMBER 8

Garden Herbalism for Digestive and Respiratory Health SEPTEMBER 19

Colson Whitehead Reading: The Nickel Boys SEPTEMBER 21

An Evening with Malcolm Gladwell in San Mateo

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 7-13, 2019

Santa Cruz Municipal Wharf Experience

Weekend with Shakespeare

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CALENDAR

SATURDAY 8/10 RIVER HEALTH DAY Join the Coastal Watershed Council in celebrating the San Lorenzo River. Volunteers will lend a hand removing invasive plants, planting native species and maintaining the site to promote the well-being of the river. Gloves, tools and light refreshments will be provided; it’s recommended that all volunteers dress in comfortable gardening clothes, including long pants, socks and sturdy closed-toe shoes. Bring layers, sun protection and a reusable water bottle. All ages and abilities are welcome, but volunteers under the age of 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Can’t make this one? No problem, the event happens every second Saturday of the month, though meeting location will vary each time. 9:30 a.m. Coastal Watershed Council, 107 Dakota Ave. #4, Santa Cruz. 464-9200 x104. coastal-watershed.org/san-lorenzo-river/our-approach/habitat. Free.

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FOOD & WINE

AUGUST 7-13, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

POPUP PICNICS IN THE PARK Take

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Santa Cruz

Capitola

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1501-K 41st Avenue 464-2700 Open 7 days a week

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on any cash purchase of $20 or more! Anything in stock... even on sale!

Thank you for shopping locally! Cash, check or bank card only. Limit one per customer per day. Not valid with other coupons. Must present coupon at time of purchase. #600-391 Exp. 10/15/19

a break to enjoy tacos on the terrazza, with food by Taquitos Gabriel available for purchase. The full menu includes tacos, plates, burritos, quesadillas, and drinks with occasional specials, such as mole. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Santa Cruz Mission Historic State Park, 144 School St., Santa Cruz. thatsmypark.org.

GROUPS CCC MONTEREY BAY CENTER INFO SESSIONS The California Conservation Corps Monterey Bay Center hosts information sessions every Thursday for interested parents and future Corps members wanting to know more about the Corps. 10 a.m. CCC Monterey Bay Center, 30 Aviation Way, Watsonville. ccc.ca.gov. Free

LIVELY ENGLISH COUNTRY DANCE English country dance is a lively, social form of folk dance that was popular in the Renaissance era. You might have seen it performed at the Renaissance Faire. Couples dance in sets of various shapes and weave through various patterns as they interact with other couples. It's easy to learn. Beginners are very welcome -- all dances taught and prompted. Gender-neutral roles/ calling (larks/ravens). Peace United Church of Christ, Santa Cruz, 900 High St., Santa Cruz. 7:30-9:30 p.m. englishcountrydancing. info/contact.html.

MUSIC COMMUNITY NIGHT “PAY WHAT YOU CAN” CONCERT Cabrillo Festival Music Director Cristi Macelaru and members of the Festival Orchestra open the Civic Auditorium doors wide with a captivating concert of


CALENDAR new or recent chamber works showcasing these extraordinary musicians as soloists and in small ensembles. This is an invitation to pay-what-you-can for a more intimate perspective on the talented artists who come from across the globe to be a part of this phenomenal orchestra. Pricing is on a pay-what-you-can basis to ensure access for all. 7 p.m. Santa Cruz Civic Auditorium, 307 Church St., Santa Cruz.

FEATPRINTS—THE ALL-STAR TRIBUTE TO LITTLE FEAT The nation’s most recognized all-star collaboration celebrating 50 years of Little Feat music. Check out the All-Star pedigree of the members of FeatPrints. FeatPrints is nation’s most recognized all-star tribute to the wildly eclectic Little Feat. 8 p.m. Michael’s on Main, 2591 S Main St., Soquel.

FRIDAY 8/9 ARTS ‘A NIGHT AMONG THE STARS’ Broadway in Santa Cruz presents A Night Among the Stars concert. Direct from Broadway, stars of hit musicals Wicked, Newsies, Cats, Mean Girls, Tarzan, and more comes to Santa Cruz to perform live! A cabaret style concert with singing and dancing to some of Broadway’s greatest musicals. A concert you do not want to miss! 8 p.m. Aptos High School Performing Arts Center, 100 Mariner Way, Aptos.

‘INTO THE WOODS’ James Lapine and

CLASSES GENTLE YOGA / YOGA FOR SENIORS Join us for a very enjoyable and relaxing deep stretch through a variety of postures clearly narrated and slowly paced for safety and personalization; with meditation and pranayama offered. Seated and reclined poses that are relaxing and build flexibility and joint mobility are highlighted. 10:30 a.m. Watsonville Yoga, Dance and Healing Arts, 375 N. Main St., Watsonville. watsonville.yoga.

FOOD & WINE NIGHT MARKET Night Market is back at

MUSIC FIDDLING CRICKET PRESENTS A CO-BILL WITH GARY STOCKDALE AND DAN FRECHETTE Fiddling Cricket Presents a co-bill with Emmy nominated Songwriter and composer Gary Stockdale/ Eclectic Canadian-American Roots-Folk Duo Dan Frechette and Laurel Thomsen. 7:30 P.M. The Ugly Mug, 4640 Soquel Drive, Soquel.

LIVING COLOUR The Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk’s free Friday Night Bands on the Beach concert series features top 40 bands from the ’70s, ’80s, and ’90s with free shows at 6:30 and 8:30 p.m. on the Boardwalk’s beach bandstand. Living Colour is an American rock band from New York City, formed in 1984. Stylistically, the band’s music is a creative fusion influenced by heavy metal, funk, jazz, hip hop, punk, and alternative rock. They rose to fame with their debut album Vivid in 1988. Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk, 400 Beach St., Santa Cruz. 6:30 p.m.

BE BE CAREFUL CAREFUL WHAT WHAT YOU YOU WISH WISH FOR! FOR!

SATURDAY 8/10 FOOD & WINE GREAT STARTS PRODUCE POP UP Patagonia Santa Cruz is pleased to announce that Great Starts, our community nonprofit produce pop-up, will continue in August at the store. Join us on the deck to pick up fresh produce and vegetable starts provided by small farms including Green Planet Organics, Common Roots Farm, Mesa Verde Gardens, and The Homeless Garden Project. These small, local farm and garden organizations seek to foster connections and strengthen relationships and wellbeing within our community through farm skills training, horticulture education and sustainable agricultural practices. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Patagonia, 415 River St. Suite C, Santa Cruz.

MUSIC JOIN US FOR DANCING, DJS & DRINK SPECIALS @MOTIVSC SATURDAYS. >36

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Stephen Sondheim take everyone’s favorite storybook characters and bring them together for a timeless, yet relevant, piece ... and a rare modern classic. 7:30 p.m. Cabrillo Crocker Theater, 6500 Soquel Drive, Aptos. cabrillostage.com. $26/$16.

Food Lounge for the summer! Held on the second Friday of every month through fall, this is your chance to experience it back in full force! Come out for this delicious evening of local food, craft cocktails and live music. 4-9 p.m. Santa Cruz Food Lounge, 1001 Center St., Santa Cruz. scfoodlounge.com.

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CALENDAR

CLASSES

OUTDOOR

WOMEN’S JOURNEY TO WHOLENESS: THE INNOCENT TO THE MAGICIAN

27TH-ANNUAL DAY ON THE MONTEREY BAY REGATTA You can enter

In this workshop, you will see yourself as a hero in your life’s journey. We explore the six archetypes that exist in all of us to discover where we are now and the tasks we are challenged to master to progress towards the magician’s stage. Women who are experiencing or anticipating a life transition will find it particularly valuable. 2-6 p.m. Bloomwork, 682 Nobel Drive, Santa Cruz. 421-9822. $60/$70.

a boat in the reverse start course, watch the race as you sail on the Chardonnay II or attend the dinner and party. There will also be live music, a silent auction, and a raffle. 1 p.m. Santa Cruz Yacht Club, 244 4th Ave., Santa Cruz.

HEALTH

HIROSHIMA-NAGASAKI DAY

SANTA CRUZ PSYCHIC AND HEALING ARTS FAIR Please join some of the area’s

Noon-3 p.m. Santa Cruz Town Clock, Santa Cruz. Free.

<35 IT’S TIME FOR HOMO HAPPY HOUR, GIRL Spend the early evening with

AUGUST 7-13, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

and Cristi In Conversation. Jazz legend and composer Wynton Marsalis sits down with his friend and collaborator Cristi M?celaru to talk about music-making and the works to be performed this evening; includes questions submitted by the audience in advance. 3:30 p.m. Santa Cruz Civic Auditorium, 307 Church St., Santa Cruz.

SATURDAY 8/10 On the 74th anniversary of the fateful Hiroshima-Nagasaki bombings, there will be a vigil honoring the tens of thousands of victims, plus reflections and songs meant to call attention to those lives lost with the intention of learning from the past to create a more just and nuclear-free future.

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legacy of Sayers, who has created a refuge for indigenous communities in her ancestral land called the Indian Canyon to reclaim their culture and Native roots. Also meet filmmaker Rucha Chitnis and Ohlone artist, graphic designer Kanyon Sayers-Roods. 3-5 p.m. Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History (MAH), 705 Front St., Santa Cruz.

the friendliest LGBTQ crowd in town. Gay, straight, trans or just plain kinky? All LGBTQ allies and orientations are welcome. Make that move. 3-7 p.m. Motiv, 1209 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. motivsc.com.

OUTDOOR PINK DAY AT THE CHALLENGER The 4th-annual Pink Day event raises funds for Jacob’s Heart (children’s cancer support) and WomenCARE (women’s cancer advocacy, resources and education). Pink Day spectator tickets include the professional men’s tennis semi-finals at the Challenger along with a reserved seating area, continental breakfast, BBQ lunch, raffle prizes, a silent auction, and prizes for the best Pink outfit. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Seascape Sports Club, 1505 Seascape Blvd., Aptos. ssc-pinkday.com. $40.

SUNDAY 8/11 ARTS SUNDAY SEASIDE CRAFTS AT THE SEYMOUR CENTER Come create and take home a fun souvenir, an activity for the whole family to share! For example, find out what gray whales eat by creating a bright sun catcher for your window, or create a fancy fish with paper, paint, and color. Build a seal or sea lion puppet decorated with your own special seal nose, complete with whiskers! Join the hands-on fun at the crafts table every Sunday. Free with admission to the Seymour Center. 1-3 p.m. Seymour Marine Discovery Center, 100 McAllister Way, Santa Cruz.

WERE ARE STILL HERE ‘IN THE LAND OF MY ANCESTORS’ Come enjoy a film screening of In the Land of My Ancestors, followed by a community dialogue with beloved Ohlone elder, Ann Marie Sayers. This documentary celebrates the living

most respected authorities on health, wealth, love, and happiness at the Santa Cruz Psychic & Healing Arts Fair at Avalon Visions Center For Creative Spirituality in Soquel. 10 a.m. Avalon Visions Center for Creative Spirituality, 2815 Porter St., Soquel. newearthevents.com/santacruz.

MUSIC

GARDEN RAILROAD OPEN HOUSE The Fern Creek and Western Garden Railroad will once again open to the public for its 5th Anniversary Open House! We will have lots of trains running around the railroad for the entire event! Kids and adults alike will love to watch the G scale trains run around the yard, through tunnels, over bridges, and between the towns that can be found all over this little railroad. There is going to be a lot to see at this open house, and for our returning visitors, we have added lots of new features. So come join us for some fun in the garden, we hope to see you there! 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Fern Creek and Western Garden Railroad, 419 Ocean View Ave., Santa Cruz.

CELEBRATION CHOIR’S ANNUAL SPIRITUALS NIGHT BENEFIT CONCERT Fifty singers from the Monterey

MONDAY 8/12

and Santa Cruz areas, directed by Connie Fortunato, perform in this popular, energetic annual concert with saxophonist Tony Bolivar, pianist Marti Williams and accompanying combo band. 7:30 p.m. Holy Cross Church, 126 High St., Santa Cruz.

SIR MONTHLY LUNCHEON/SPEAKER MEETING This month’s Sons In Retirement

SUNDAY ART AND MUSIC AT THE BEACH Sponsored by the Capitola Art & Cultural Commission, the Sunday Art & Music at the Beach event takes place six Sundays throughout the summer at Esplanade Park in Capitola Village. Enjoy quality artwork from local artists and live music on the Esplanade Stage. 11 a.m. Esplanade Park, 110 Monterey Ave., Capitola. Free.

WYNTON AND CRISTI IN CONVERSATION Begin your 2019 Cabrillo Festival grand finale experience with Wynton

GROUPS speaker is is Jack Healey, the longest tenured unpaid sportscaster in Santa Clara County history. For over two decades, Jack did the radio play-by-play for Santa Clara University football and basketball games along with some Pacific Coast League baseball. Jack will tell us how he got into this expensive hobby and why left it. He'll include the snafus and mix ups that happened in the broadcast booth. Senior Slow Pitch Softball and SF Giants' Fantasy Camp will also be topics of his discussion. 11:30 a.m. Santa Cruz Elks Lodge, 150 Jewell St., Santa Cruz. sirinc2.org/branch20. 227-4326. A full-course buffet meal at $18 per person will precede the talk.


CALENDAR

TUESDAY 8/13 ARTS APTOS MOVIES IN THE PARK Movies TBD visit our poll on the discussion tab to vote. Come out to support our 3rd annual Back-ToSchool Movie Night, a local community event at Aptos Village Park, on Saturday, August 3rd. The event will coincide with a school supplies drive benefiting the school(s) of your choice or donations for the Live Like Coco Foundation. Food trucks, bake sale, face painting, photo booth, crafts, popcorn and two movies for the young and older kids. The younger crowds movie will begin at 5pm in the community center the older crowds movie will begin at dusk in the park. Aptos Village Park, 100 Aptos Creek Rd., Aptos. Admission by school supplies for donation.

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FOOD & WINE BREWS FOR BERNIE 2020 AT HUMBLE SEA “Bernie can’t be bought, but at least

TACO TUESDAY On Tuesdays we eat tacos! Two delicious tacos and a locally crafted beer for $10. If the mood suits you, add a side of guacamole or a single order of tacos! 6-9 p.m. Hotel Paradox, 611 Ocean St., Santa Cruz.

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HAVE A LIFE… Your Way! • Find a new career! • Get a better salary! • Find passion in your work! • Successful career change! • Start up a business!

John Axel Hansen, MA, JCTC Career Counselor Job & Career Transition Coach careers@havealife.com

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SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 7-13, 2019

you can buy him a beer!” Join us! Tuesday, Aug. 13, at Humble Sea Brewing Co. for happy hour all day! For every beer you buy, we ask you to “buy one” for Bernie and donate the cost of that second beer to the campaign. There will be “tabs” for Bernie at one of our tables :). Sample great beer and buy beers for Bernie. Meet others who #FeelTheBern. Find out how you can help the Bernie movement all over Santa Cruz. We will have lots of events for this new campaign and welcome your energy and ideas. 5:30-9 p.m. Humble Sea Brewery, 820 Swift St., Santa Cruz. RSVP at act.berniesanders.com/ event/community-canvass/11599/signup

Treatment to Decrease Heart Disease Risk

Continuing Education for Nurses and Nurse Practitioners

CLASSES CASA INFORMATIONAL MEETING Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) of Santa Cruz County seeks adult volunteers to advocate for children that have been abused, neglected or abandoned. If you can devote 2-4 hours per week, make a one-year-plus commitment to help guide a child through a complex system of social workers, foster parents, therapists and lawyers, while building a consistent, caring, mentoring relationship, then contact CASA of Santa Cruz County today at 761-2956. 6-7 p.m. Live Oak Family Resource Center, 1740 17th Ave., Santa Cruz, CA

hormones making you crazy? Are your

ROLFING

®

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MUSIC CALENDAR

LOVE YOUR

LOCAL BAND

BRAD SANZENBACHER Sadness is a running theme in local singer-songwriter Brad Sanzenbacher’s music. But the songs he’s written the past few years were on a whole new level—full of “crippling despair” and “sardonic self-awareness,” he says. As Sanzenbacher observed the tone of his new material, he decided it was time to pick some songs that really vibed and put together a new EP. “I probably could have not articulated these things about myself without a guitar in my hands. It’s like a therapy session,” Sanzenbacher says. “I’m a stream-of-consciousness kind of writer. I don’t sit down and say, ‘I want to write a song about this or that.’”

AUGUST 7-13, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

He recorded with former local engineer Kenny Schick, now located in Nashville. Schick played all the backing instruments on the album, aside from a fiddle. The result is a gorgeous, melancholy country record with lush vocal harmonies. The EP, Dying Old Flower, was released on July 15.

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This is also the first studio recording Sanzenbacher has done in a decade. He made a homemade, bootleg-style live album a few years ago. His first record, released in 2011, was called Fear and Drought. Part of what inspired his new batch of songs was that he could envision them as fully flushed-out songs, not just on his acoustic guitar. At the same time, he’s been looking for material to highlight where he is now. “The goal of the record is to reintroduce myself, and show people what I can do,” Sanzenbacher says. “I’m hoping this new record will help me get new shows and help me find a new audience by showing them how I sound now. ” AARON CARNES bradsanzmusic.bandcamp.com.

GRETCHEN PETERS

WEDNESDAY 8/7 COUNTRY

GRETCHEN PETERS As a tunesmith for hire, Gretchen Peters’ list of clients is like a music industry who’s who. Not limited to fellow country artists like Shania Twain, Martina McBride and George Strait, the Nashville singer has also written for Bryan Adams, Etta James and even the “Jewish Elvis” himself, Neil Diamond. While recent years have seen country bend towards big pop hooks and commercial viability, Peters’ songwriting has remained heartfelt and mature, focusing on the dusty magic of life’s small moments. MIKE HUGUENOR

7:30 p.m. Michael’s On Main, 2591 Main St., Soquel. $17 adv/$20 door. 479-9777.

COUNTRY

THE BOXMASTERS Since getting back together in 2015, the Boxmasters has reigned in some of its historic hillbilly-country leanings and focused more on an affable, rockabilly vibe with large doses of ‘60s British-pop hooks. Billy Bob Thornton, aka “Bud,” delivers an earnest performance as the frontman

of a touring band. His voice is like a wheezy Tom Petty, and he charms as he sings about the loves, desires and troubles of the average person. His cohorts J.D. (guitar) and Teddy (keyboard) hold it together in the back, playing sidekick to Bud’s winsome country-guy antics with steady, understated poise. AMY BEE 8 p.m. Felton Music Hall, 6275 Hwy. 9, Felton. $38 adv/$44 door. 704-7113.

THURSDAY 8/8 JAM

HERE COMES SUNSHINE Grateful Dead tribute bands are their own unique genre of music. These musicians love the Dead so much that paying tribute to the almightiest of jam bands means capturing the band’s essence, not playing note for note. Here Comes Sunshine is Scott Guberman’s project. He plays with Phil Lesh and has jammed with other Dead members. He gets the Dead. The rest of the band is made up of the member’s of Jerry’s Middle Finger, one of the top L.A. Dead bands around. AC 8:30 p.m. Moe’s Alley, 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz. $10 adv/$15 door. 479-1854.

FOLK-PUNK

LOST DOG STREET BAND Break out the hobo satchel and dust off your cap, because the Lost Dog Street Band returns for a night of traveling tunes. Fresh off the release of their fifth album Weight of a Trigger, this year finds the bluesy, folk-punk group a trio, with the addition of Jeff Loops to founders Ashley Mae and Benjamin Tod. This year also finds the band digging deeper and darker, investigating the violence of human nature. Despite the demons driving the music, the Lost Dog Street Band keeps things upbeat and whimsical with fiddles and banjos. MAT WEIR 9 p.m. Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $15. 423-1338.

FRIDAY 8/9 SOUL

TOKEN GIRL What exactly is progressive soul? For Oakland’s Token Girl, it’s both a genre and a philosophy. While soul music has moved people for generations, even modern soul acts like Sharon Jones (RIP) and the Soft White


MUSIC

BE OUR GUEST GABRIEL ROYAL

TOKEN GIRL

Sixties tend to lean back towards the genre’s roots. Token Girl, on the other hand, aims to push the genre forward, incorporating buzzing synths and experimental elements into songs. This February, the three-piece dropped Two Fold, a solid two-song EP with their most snaky, sinuous songs to date. Stretch that soul. MH 9 p.m. Blue Lagoon, 923 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz. $10. 423-7117.

COMEDY Mike E. Winfield disarms the crowd with a giant grin, and 10 minutes later, they’re laughing at stuff they probably shouldn’t. This talent of his to flow from benign to inappropriate and back again is probably why people refer to him as “almost family-friendly.” Winefield often explores his family and marriage on stage. His stepson is almost Winefield’s age, and his wife sometimes treats Winfield like a child in public. Obviously, troubles and misunderstandings abound. This thematic goldmine, plus Winefield’s high energy and willing candor, always keeps the audience on his side. AB 7 & 9:30 p.m. DNA’s Comedy Lab, 155 S River St., Santa Cruz. $20 adv/$25 door. 900-5123.

ALTERNATIVE

KATASTRO What exactly were 311? Hip-hop? Rock? Alternative? If your answer is, “Shut up, man, they were awesome! Quit categorizing everything!” then Tempe, Arizona, band Katastro is the band for you. It’s sort of rap, but also an alt-rock band with funk and a bit of blues. It’s all of these genres, but really it’s a whole vibe predicated on danceable grooves. Is that your thing? If it’s not, you got a seriously negative attitude that needs to be addressed, bro! Grab a spliff and chill out to the million genres of Katastro. AC 8 p.m. Felton Music Hall, 6275 Hwy. 9, Felton. $12 adv/$14 door. 704-7113.

PUNK

MDC For anyone keeping score, the ’80’s and early ’90s are here again. Neon colors. Stranger Things. An old white guy in the Oval Office with a campaign slogan ripped from the KKK. It’s no wonder there has been an onslaught of O.G. punk-rock reunions. Thankfully, Dave Dictor and MDC won’t have any of that money-grabbing crap. They’re back at

the Blue Lagoon with a little help from fellow Texan punk pioneers Verbal Abuse, Bay Area originals Fang and new local degenerates Kemper’s Temper and Monty Montgomery & His Band of Kooks. MW 9 p.m. The Blue Lagoon, 923 Pacific Ave. $15 adv/$20 door. 423-7117.

MONDAY 8/12 JAZZ

EMMET COHEN TRIO Emmet Cohen’s ascendance as jazz’s most celebrated pianist under 30 was capped off in April, when he won the American Pianists Association’s rigorous Cole Porter Fellowship and the accompanying $50,000 prize and recording contract with Mack Avenue Records. In many ways, the competition confirmed Cohen’s accomplishments, as he’s doggedly sought out veteran masters like drum legend Jimmy Cobb and bass maestro Ron Carter for his Masters Legacy Series albums. Along with Benny Green, he’s been a steady accompanist for the sensational 25-year-old vocalist Veronica Swift. With his own trio, he’s a jaw-dropping improviser. ANDREW GILBERT 7 p.m. Kuumbwa Jazz, 320-2 Cedar St., Santa Cruz. $26.25 adv/$31.50 door. 427-2227.

7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 15, Kuumbwa Jazz Center, 320-2 Cedar St., Santa Cruz. $26.25 adv/$31.50 door. Information: kuumbwajazz.org. WANT TO GO? Go to santacruz.com/giveaways before 11 a.m. on Thursday, Aug. 8, to find out how you could win a pair of tickets to the show.

IN THE QUEUE DREAM PHASES

L.A. Flower power band. Wednesday at Crepe Place DIRTY REVIVAL

One nation under groove! Friday at Moe’s Alley PERLA BATALLA IN THE HOUSE OF COHEN

The best Leonard Cohen tribute out there. Friday at Kuumbwa Jazz Center ZEBOP!

The music of Santana. Saturday at Michael’s On Main DECREPIT BIRTH

The brutalest of local death-metal outfits. Tuesday at Catalyst

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 7-13, 2019

MIKE E. WINFIELD

SATURDAY 8/10

“The cello is the most human of instruments,” says Gabriel Royal, a singer-songwriter who plucks a cello the way most troubadours pick at an acoustic guitar. The instrument suits him. He’s got a classical music side that’s balanced with a strong pop sensibility. He truly makes the cello sing, almost like a duo with the stringed instrument. Originally from Oklahoma, Royal moved to Brooklyn, where he got his start busking in New York subway stations. Now, with his gentle arrangements and melodies, he’s become a touring musician of note.

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Thursday August 8 –8/8:30pm $10/15

Scott Guberman + Members Of Jerry’s Middle Finger

HERE COMES SUNSHINE

LIVE MUSIC

Friday August 9 –8/9pm $10/15

Funk & Soul Favorites - Lisa’s B-Day Bash

DIRTY REVIVAL + VITAMINS

Saturday August 10 –7:30/8:30pm $14/18 KPIG & Moe’s Present A Co-Bill w/ THE

COFFIS BROTHERS + DAVID LUNING

Tuesday August 13 –8/8:30pm $10/15 Double BIll Dance Party

EMINENCE ENSEMBLE + TV BROKEN 3rd EYE OPEN Wednesday August 14 –7/8pm $25/30 Hawaii’s Musical Treasure Returns

BOARDWALK BOWL 115 Cliff St, Santa Cruz

Karaoke 8p-Close

Karaoke 8p-Close

BRITANNIA ARMS 110 Monterey Ave, Capitola CAPITOLA WINE BAR 115 San Jose Ave, Capitola THE CATALYST 1011 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Devin the Dude w/ J. Lately $18 9p

Santa Cruz 831.479.1854

CORRALITOS CULTURAL CENTER 127 Hames Rd., Corralitos

THE

CREPE PLACE OPEN LATE - EVERY NIGHT!

ADVANCE TICKETS ON TICKETWEB WEDNESDAY 8/7

DREAM PHASES w/ LOW HUM 9PM - $7 DOOR

THURSDAY 8/8

BAY FACTION

w/ FASHION JACKSON, SOLLOMON HALLOW 9PM - $8 DOOR FRIDAY 8/9

AC Myles Free 6-8p

8/10

SUN

Remix 9:15p-12:45a

Karaoke 6p-Close

Karaoke 6p-Close

Alex Lucero & Friends 8p

Karaoke 9-12:30a

Karaoke 9-12:30a

Mikey Bilello 6:30-9:30p

Nomad 7-10p

Ryan Price 7-10p

w/ DRINKS AND CHILL? TUESDAY 8/13

FUNK NIGHT w/ SPACE HEATER

9:30 PM UNTIL MIDNIGHT

WEEKEND BRUNCH FULL BAR MIDTOWN SANTA CRUZ

1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz 429-6994

Karaoke 8p-Close

Behold the Arctopus Lost Dog Street Band Indubious, Sol Seed w/ w/ Imperial Triumphant w/ Matt Heckler $15 9p Pacific Roots $10 9p $12 9p

Mojo Mix Free 6-8p

Karaoke 8p-Close

Matisyahu $26. 50 9p Decrepit Birth $12 8:30p

KPIG Happy Hour 5:30-7:30p Paperback Ryders Free 7-10p

Bonny June & Bonfire Free 7-10p

Open Mic 7-10p

Laura Strange Free 5-8p Acoustic Open Jam 3-5p

THE MOTHER HIPS plus EXTRA CLASSIC HALF MOON BAY SAT AUG 24

MATTSON 2 CREPE 9/18 + 19

Gretchen Peters

Wed. Aug. 7 7:30pm $17 adv./$20 door seated <21 w/parent

FeatPrints

Thu. Aug. 8 8:00pm All-Star Tribute to Little Feat $10 adv./$10 door Dance – ages 21 +

Big Sur 9/8

HENRY MILLER MEMORIAL LIBRARY

Kool Bop

Fri. Aug. 9 5:00pm HAPPY HOUR / NO COVER

Please CARPOOL / RIDEHSARE to Big Sur.

Fri. Aug. 9 8:30pm

The Jerry Celebration Band $15 adv./$15 door Dance – ages 21 +

Please CARPOOL / RIDEHSARE to Big Sur.

YO LA TENGO KEVIN MORBY

PURPLE MOUNTAINS (Silver Jews)

Sat. Aug. 10 2:00pm

Gary Blackburn Band

+ Special Guests 2pm Matinee

$10 adv./$10 door Dance – ages 21 +

Woodstock Turns 50

Sun. Aug. 10 8:00pm with ZEBOP!, Liquid Sky,

Piece of My Heart

Santana, Jimi & Janis Joplin Tributes $10 adv./$10 door seated <21 w/parent

IN THE BEAUTIFUL GARDEN 5PM

ALL DAY - ALL NIGHT

Broken Shades Free 6-8p

Eli 3-6p

FREE BLUEGRASS MASSIVE MONDAYS

8/13

Gearheart & Madison Loz Troubadours, The The Box: Gothic/ Grove w/ Coastal Greet- Eldorados, & Star K.O. Industrial Night Free 9p ing & more $5 9p $5 9p

SUNDAY 8/11

MONDAY 8/12

TUE

MDC, Verbal Abuse, Fang & more $5 9p

SATURDAY 8/10

9PM - $10 DOOR

8/12

Jimmy Dewrance Free 6-8p

9PM - $6 DOOR

w/ APPLE CITY SLOUGH BAND

MON

Steve Freund Free 6-8p

IGNANT BENCHES w/ BUDDHA TRIXIE & GUEST LIGHT THE BAND

8/11

Roadside Honey Free 7p

Burn Burn Burn!, Lucky Comedy Night w/ Eegits, & Enemy Of My Chree, Retro Dance Enemy $5 9p Party Free 9p

Open Mic Night Free 7-10p

WWW.MOESALLEY.COM 1535 Commercial Way

SAT

BLUE LAGOON 923 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

CORK AND FORK 312 Capitola Ave, Capitola

Aug 17 FLOR DE CAÑA Aug 18 JIMMY THACKERY Aug 21 WAYNE HANCOCK Aug 22 HOMELAND REVIVAL featuring JAMES DURBIN & NICK GALLANT Aug 23 DAVE ALVIN + JIMMIE DALE GILMORE Aug 24 GONDWANA + Fayuca Aug 25 ERIC LINDELL + ANSON FUNDERBURGH Aug 28 JESSE DANIEL + VINCENT NEIL EMERSON Aug 29 THE BLASTERS + Jesse Dayton Aug 30, 31 METALACHI Sep 1 POPA CHUBBY Sep 4 THE YAWPERS + Thanks Buddy Sep 7 KATCHAFIRE Sep 6 SAN GERONIMO Sep 8 JUNIOR BROWN Sep 13 BEN MORRISON + RON ARTIS II Sep 14 BOOSTIVE Sep 15 RICK ESTRIN Sep 18 TUBBY LOVE, AMBER LILY & PETER HARPER Sep 19 MIKE WATT + THE MISSINGMEN Sep 20 DELVON LAMARR ORGAN TRIO Sep 21 BLACKALICIOUS Sep 22 COLD BLOOD Sep 25 PAUL CAUTHEN Sep 27 HENRY CHADWICK Sep 28 HILLSTOMP + Caitlin Jemma Oct 4 LITTLE HURRICANE Oct 5 LA MISA NEGRA Oct 6 JIMBO MATHUS

8/9

Kid Anderson & John Blues Boyd Free 6-8p Token Girl, Infinite Neck, & Jordie Gets Visual $5 9p

Hippo Happy Hour 5:30-7:30p

KATDELIC

FRI

Al Frisby Free 6-8p

CILANTROS 1934 Main St, Watsonville

All-Star Funk Band

8/8

APTOS ST. BBQ 8059 Aptos St, Aptos

Funk Featuring Members of Pimps Of Joytime

Friday August 16 –8/9pm $10/15

THU

Boardinghouse Free 6:30p

CHAMINADE RESORT 1 Chaminade Ln, Santa Cruz

DIGGIN DIRT + WALK TALK

AUGUST 7-13, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

8/7

WILLIE K

Thursday August 15 –8/8:30pm $10/15

40

WED ABBOTT SQUARE 118 Cooper St, Santa Cruz

Sachiko Kanenobu +++ MORE BENEFIT CAMPING WEEKEND FERNWOOD BIG SUR SEPT 20 + 21

FRUIT BATS FELTON 10/4

Please CARPOOL / RIDEHSARE to Big Sur.

13 OCT

BIG

SUR

TODD SNIDER + RAMBLIN JACK RIO 10/24

Grateful Sunday

Sun. Aug. 11 5:30pm GRATEFUL DEAD TUNES / NO COVER

Phil Marsh

Wed. Aug. 14 7:30pm w/Patti Maxine and

Terry Shields

$10 adv./$10 door seated <21 w/parent Thu. Aug. 15 Fri. Aug. 16 Sat. Aug. 17 Wed. Aug. 21

COMING UP

New World String Project Jerry Brown & Friends The Sun Kings Beatles Tribute Cruz Control

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Full Concert Calendar : MichaelsonMainMusic.com

2591 Main St, Soquel, CA 95073


LIVE MUSIC

Thursday, August 8 • 7 PM

MARQUIS HILL BLACKTET

8/7

THE CREPE PLACE 1134 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz CROW’S NEST 2218 E. Cliff Dr, Santa Cruz

8/8

8/9

8/10

THU FRI Bay Faction w/ Fashion Ignany Benches w/ Jackson, Sollomon Buddha Trixie & BB Hollow & more 9p Sinclair $6 9p

SAT SUN Light the Band w/ Open Bluegrass Jam Apple City Slough Band Free 5p $10 9p

Yuji Tojo $3 8p

Soulwise Free 5:30p Hall Pass $5 8:30p

Blue Ocean Rockers $7 9:30p

DISCRETION BREWING 2703 41st Ave, Soquel

Nomad Free 6:30-8:30p

DNA’S COMEDY LAB 155 River St, Santa Cruz

Blind Tiger Open Mic Night 8p

The Messiahs $6 9p

Art Critique 8p

Mike E. Winfield 7 & 9:30p

8/12

TUE

8/13

Funk Night w/ Space Heater $6 9p-12a

Live Comedy $7 9p

Wildflower & the Bees $5 8p

One of jazz’s most thrilling, rising-star trumpeters.

1/2 PRICE STUDENT TICKETS Friday, August 9 • 7:30 PM

PERLA BATALLA IN THE HOUSE OF COHEN Saturday, August 10 • 8:30 PM

SIN SISTERS BURLESQUE

Dan Van Kirk 7 & 9:30p Katastro & Pacific Dub w/ Tyrone’s Jacket $12/$14 7p

THE FISH HOUSE 972 Main St, Watsonville

Soul Doubt 8p Linc Russin 7-9p

MON

Tickets: snazzyproductions.com

FELTON MUSIC HALL 6275 Hwy 9, Felton

GABRIELLA CAFE 910 Cedar St., Santa Cruz

8/11

WED Dream Phases w/ Low Hum & Rose the Band $7 9p

Tickets: eventbrite.com

Monday, August 12 • 7 PM

EMMET COHEN TRIO

A prominent talent in a new generation of virtuoso pianists.

1/2 PRICE STUDENT TICKETS

Bob Basa 6:30-9:30p

JACK O’NEILL RESTAURANT & LOUNGE 175 W Cliff Dr. Santa Cruz

Mark Creech 6:30-9:30p

KUUMBWA JAZZ 320-2 Cedar St, Santa Cruz

Marquis Hill Blacktet $29.40/$34.65 7p

MICHAEL’S ON MAIN 2591 Main St, Soquel

Gretchen Peters $17/$20 7:30p

FeatPrints $10 8p

MISSION ST. BBQ 1618 Mission St, Santa Cruz

Blind Rick Free 6p

Al Frisby Free 6p

Thursday, August 15 • 7 PM Scott Slaughter 6:30-9:30p Perla Batalla in the House of Cohen $24/$40 7:30p Kool Bop Free 5p The Jerry Celebration Band $15 8:30p Lloyd Whitley Free 6p

GABRIEL ROYAL

Two Rivers 6:30-9:30p

Spellbinding cello and vocals.

Sin Sisters Burlesque $20-$40 8:30p

1/2 PRICE STUDENT TICKETS

Emmet Cohen Trio $26.25/$31.50 7p

Monday, August 19 • 7 PM

Gary Blackburn Band Grateful Sunday Concert $10 2p Woodstock 50th Series Free 5:30p $10 8p Jeffrey Halford Free 6p

Steve Freund Free 6p

Kid Anderson & John Blues Boyd Free 6p

Johnny Fabulous Free 6p

JOHN PIZZARELLI TRIO – FOR CENTENNIAL REASONS: 100 YEAR SALUTE TO NAT KING COLE

A beloved interpreter of the Great American Songbook, celebrating Cole. Thursday, August 22 • 7 PM

HRISTO VITCHEV QUARTET

Guitar artistry full of intensity, beauty, and passion.

1/2 PRICE STUDENT TICKETS Saturday, August 24 • 8 PM

MALIMA KONE

Tickets: brownpapertickets.com Monday, August 26 • 7 PM

WIL BLADES’ 40TH BIRTHDAY PARTY WITH DONALD HARRISON JR., JEFF PARKER, SCOTT AMENDOLA & MIKE CLARK

An all-star birthday celebration for Blades.

1/2 PRICE STUDENT TICKETS

KRISTEN STROM GROUP: THE MUSIC OF JOHN SHIFFLETT

Paying homage to a local jazz figurehead.

1/2 PRICE STUDENT TICKETS Wednesday, September 4 • 7 PM

THE HOT SARDINES

The self-described “mischief makers” of hot jazz. Monday, September 9 • 7 PM

OPTIONS FEATURING BENNIE MAUPIN, ERIC REVIS & NASHEET WAITS A convening of peerless artists.

Unless noted, advance tickets at kuumbwajazz.org and dinner served one hour before Kuumbwa presented concerts. Premium wine & beer available. All ages welcome.

320-2 Cedar St | Santa Cruz 831.427.2227 kuumbwajazz.org

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 7-13, 2019

Thursday, August 29 • 7 PM

41


U P C O M I N G

SHOWS

LIVE MUSIC

AUG 10TH WED

KATASTRO & PACIFIC DUB WITH TYRONES JACKET

AUG 16TH THE

DO RIGHTS BURLESQUE & HOMEBREW

AUG 17TH

THE NUDE PARTY · PINKY PINKY AUG 18TH

MOTIV 1209 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Hi Ya! By Little John 9:30p

THU

8/8

FRI

Here Comes Sunshine ft. Scott Guberman & more $10/$15 8p Libation Lab w/ King Wizard & Chief Transcend 9:30p

NEW BOHEMIA BREWERY 1030 41st Ave, Santa Cruz 99 BOTTLES 110 Walnut Ave, Santa Cruz

Trivia 8p

PARADISE BEACH 215 Esplanade, Capitola POET & PATRIOT 320 E. Cedar St, Santa Cruz

8/9

SAT

8/10

SUN

8/11

MON

8/12

The Coffis Brothers Dirty Revival & Vitamins & David Luning Band $10/$15 8p $14/$18 7:30p Adam Cova 9:30p

D-Roc, Kid Vicious 9:30p

Alex Lucero Free 7p

Jazz the Dog Free 7p

TUE

8/13

Eminence Ensemble & TV Broken 3rd Eye Open $10/$15 8p Rasta Cruz Reggae Party 9:30p

The Takeover, Hip Hop w/ DJ Marc 9:30p Tacos & Trivia Free 6:30p

Cement Ship Free 10p-12a Alex Lucero 2-5p

Vinny Johnson 2-5p

Winterwind, Astral Caverns, Bullvine Free 8:30p

The Joint Chiefs 2-5p

Erin Avila 6-9p

Open Mic Free 4-7p Olde Blue Free 9p

Comedy Free 8p

THE RED 200 Locust St, Santa Cruz THE REEF 120 Union St, Santa Cruz

DEVOTCHKA

8/7

MOE’S ALLEY 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz

Open Mic Free 8-11p ‘Geeks Who Drink’ Trivia Night 8p

Variety Show w/ Toby Gray 6:30p

Acoustic Reggae Jam 6:30p

Aloha Friday 6:30p

Featured Acts 6:30p

ROSIE MCCANN’S 1220 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Comedy Night 9p

First & Third Celtic Jam

Live DJ

Live DJ

THE SAND BAR 211 Esplanade, Capitola

The John Michael Band 8p

The Joint Chiefs & Friends 8p

The Human Juke Box 6p

Open Mic 6p

Tuesday Trivia Night 6:30p

RIO THEATRE 1205 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz

AUG 20TH MAKAI (OF NAHKO MIKE LOVE &W/CHASE MEDICINE FOR THE PEOPLE)

Touch’d Too Much 8p

Trivia 7:30p Don Caruth Open Jam 7:30p

Alex Lucero & Friends 8p

AUG 22ND JULIAN MARLEY & THE UPRISING WITH RASTAN

1011 PACIFIC AVE. SANTA CRUZ 831-429-4135

AUG 23RD

PHUTUREPRIMITIVE W/ KR3TURE

Wednesday, August 7 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

RESTAURANT NOW OPEN

Thursday, August 8 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

WED-SUN 4-9PM

FELTONMUSICHALL.COM

DEVIN THE DUDE

plus J.Lately

LOST DOG STREET BAND

Friday, August 9 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

The Last Great

BEHOLD THE ARCTOPUS

Saturday, August 10 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

INDUBIOUS • SOL SEED

Tuesday, August 13 • Ages 16+

AUGUST 7-13, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Matisyahu

42

Free Beach BBQ Party every Thursday!

Tuesday, August 13 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

DECREPIT BIRTH

$3

OFF

$2

OFF

Pancake Breakfast, Basic Burger Basic Breakfast Exp. 8/16/19 Tues-Fri with coupon

Open Tues–Sun, 7-2:30p

819 pacific ave., santa cruz 427.0646

Aug 16 The Original Wailers (Ages 16+) Aug 22 Tuxedo/ DJ Kurse (Ages 16+) Aug 24 Los Cafres (Ages 16+) Aug 27 Protoje/ Lila Ike (Ages 16+) Aug 31 Danny Duncan (All Ages) Sep 2 Xavier Rudd (Ages 16+) Sep 12 Gogol Bordello (Ages 16+) Sep 13 Iya Terra/ For Peace Band (Ages 16+) Sep 14 The California Honeydrops (Ages 16+) Sep 15 Lil Keed/ Lil Gotit (Ages 16+) Sep 24 Hot Chip/ Holy Fuck (Ages 16+) Sep 28 & 29 Durand Jones & The Indications (Ages 16+) Oct 3 PNB Rock/ NoCap (Ages 16+) Oct 10 Collie Buddz (Ages 16+) Oct 11 Riot Ten/ Al Ross (Ages 18+) Oct 12 Manila Killa (Ages 16+) Oct 14 Yung Gravy (Ages 16+) Oct 19 & 20 Santa Cruz Music Festival (Ages 16+) Oct 23 The Distillers (Ages 16+) Oct 31 Skizzy Mars (Ages 16+) Nov 2 Elephante/ PLS&TY (Ages 16+) Unless otherwise noted, all shows are dance shows with limited seating. Tickets subject to city tax & service charge by phone 877-987-6487 & online

www.catalystclub.com

LOCATED ON THE BEACH

Amazing waterfront deck views.

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

See live music grid for this week’s bands.

STAND-UP COMEDY

Three live comedians every Sunday night.

HAPPY HOUR

Mon–Fri from 3:00pm. Wednesday all night!

VISIT OUR BEACH MARKET

Wood-fired pizza, ice cream, unique fine gifts.

Radio Station

FREE BEACH BBQ PARTIES

Live Music, Thursdays, 5:30pm, All Ages

OCEANVIEW BREAKFAST DAILY

Open for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Daily

(831) 476-4560

crowsnest-santacruz.com


LIVE MUSIC WED

8/7

THU

8/8

FRI

8/9

SANDERLINGS 1 Seascape Resort, Aptos

Now & Then Trio 7:30-10:30p

SEABRIGHT BREWERY 519 Seabright, Santa Cruz

Blue 6:30p

SAT

8/10

SEVERINO’S BAR & GRILL 7500 Old Dominion Court, Aptos

Don McCaslin & the Amazing Jazz Geezers 6-9p

Nora Cruz Band 8-11:30p

Patio Acoustics 1-4p Matt Masih & the Messengers 8-11:30p

SHADOWBROOK 1750 Wharf Rd, Capitola

Ken Constable 6:30-9:30p

Joe Ferrara 6:30-9:30p

Claudio Melega 7-10p

Ryan Price Free 6-9p

Eric Morrison & the Mysteries Free 6-9p

Rory Lynch Free 6-9p

STEEL BONNET 20 Victor Square, Scotts Valley

Soul Doubt Free 5p

John Mann Free 5p

SUSHI GARDEN S.V. 5600 Scotts Valley Dr, Scotts Valley

Toby Gray Free 5:30p

Paul Trugman Free 5:30p

UGLY MUG 4640 Soquel Ave, Soquel

Gary Stockdale, Dan & Laurel $18/$20 7:30p

SHANTY SHACK BREWING 138 Fern St, Santa Cruz

Cement Ship Free 6-9p

VINOCRUZ 4901 Soquel Drive, Soquel

Bobby Markowitz Flamenco 6-9p

VINO LOCALE 55 Municipal Wharf, Santa Cruz

Joe Leonard 6-8p

Steve Ryan 6-8p

WHARF HOUSE 1400 Wharf Road, Capitola

The Joint Chiefs 9:30p

M U S I C

MON

8/12

Patio Acoustics 1-4p

TUE

8/13

Highway Buddha 6-9p

Beat Weekend w/ DJ Monk Earl Free 6-9p

Joe Leonard & Brian Fitzgerald 6-8p

The Stone Drifters 9:30p

PRESENTS

TWICE the TEQUILA!

8/11

Open Mic w/ Steven David 5:30p

The Next Blues Band 1p

ZELDA’S 203 Esplanade, Capitola

SUN

Calico 7:30-10:30p

TWICE the TACOS!

Beach Cowboys 1p

Upcoming Shows

SEP 07 Int. Ocean Film Tour Vol. 6 SEP 15 Kevin Nealon SEP 20 Banff Centre Mountain Film SEP 21 Pivot: The Art of Fashion SEP 23 Bobby McFerrin SEP 28 Jim Messina OCT 01 Madeleine Peyroux OCT 05 Dave Mason OCT 08 Namibia: Land of the Cheetah OCT 24 Todd Snider and Ramblin’ Jack Elliott NOV 08 Richard Thompson NOV 09 Mountainfilm on Tour NOV 17 Jesse Cook NOV 20 A Tuba to Cuba NOV 21 Built To Spill NOV 25 Kirtan with Krishna Das DEC 05 Lecture with Rob Bell DEC 09 Tommy Emmanuel FEB 25 Teada

Follow the Rio Theatre on Facebook & Twitter! info@riotheatre.com www.riotheatre.com

F E S T I V A L

AUGUST 24 + 25

DOWNTOWN SANTA CRUZ SATURDAY T+T FESTIVAL TOP-SHELF TEQUILA SAMPLING! TEQUILA $40 GOURMET STREET TACOS! ADMISSION AWARD WINNING MARGARITAS! GENERAL $10 LIVE MUSIC ALL DAY! ADMISSION

SUNDAY MAS MARGARITAS AWARD WINNING MARGARITAS! GENERAL $10 GOURMET STREET TACOS! ADMISSION LIVE ENTERTAINMENT! TONE LOC! TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW! PURCHASE TODAY!

TequilaAndTacoMusicFestival.com CBF PRODUCTIONS

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 7-13, 2019

11:30am-6pm SAN LORENZO PARK

43


FILM

SOUTH BOUND Marc Maron of ‘WTF’ podcasting fame (third from left) leads the cast of Lynn Shelton’s comedy ‘Sword of Trust,’ about a pawn shop owner who comes across a sword that may prove the Confederacy won the Civil War.

Pawn Scars AUGUST 7-13, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Dry wit sharpens culture clash in ‘Sword Of Trust’ BY LISA JENSEN

44

H

e’s just past the expiration date to qualify as a hipster. At 54, rumpled, technologychallenged Mel has seen his rock dreams fade away in New York City, only to wind up improbably running a low-rent pawn shop in Birmingham, Alabama. Although he’s not especially political, he has reason to be wary when he’s thrust into the dark heart of Southern redneck culture in Lynn Shelton’s very funny comedy Sword Of Trust. Mel is played by Marc Maron, better known as a stand-up comedy performer and podcaster. Filmmaker Shelton conceived the part of Mel as a showcase for Maron’s dry wit

and scruffy sarcasm beneath a facade of rational cool—all on full display here, since so much of the movie’s dialogue was improvised. And Maron is up to the task; funny on a dime, yet just as persuasive in the character’s more serious and revealing moments. He provides the grounding for the rest of the excellent cast to build on. (An accomplished guitarist, he also composed and plays the bluesy guitar riffs on the soundtrack.) Mel is the proprietor of Delta Pawn, a business he inherited from an uncle. His only employee, Nathaniel (Jon Bass), is kind of a good-natured dimbulb, and not much use around

the shop, but he knows how to use the phone and do research online. Mel has an easygoing friendship with Jimmy (a terrific Al Elliott), the African-American owner of the diner next door who pops in periodically to trade jokes. Into the shop one day walks Mary (Michaela Watkins), a no-nonsense outlier with an urban vibe, and her more pliant girlfriend Cynthia (Jillian Bell), whose Southern roots are still slightly traceable in her accent. They’ve just come from the estate of Cynthia’s deceased granddaddy, and while she didn’t inherit the house itself, Cynthia brings in the one item that was left

to her—a Civil War sword. But not just any sword. Enclosed documentation claims it “proves” that the South won the war. Mel is ready to laugh them out of the shop—until Nathaniel discovers an entire subculture of “provers” online. Convinced that the truth about the South actually winning the war has been “buried by the Deep State,” these folks are dedicated to collecting evidence that proves otherwise—and ready to pay big bucks for it. (Watching one online video post exhorting viewers to search their attics, Mel cracks, “Is this Antiques Roadshow for racists?”) When a potential buyer makes a sizeable offer, and Mel and Mary agree they should join forces and split the profit, their journey down the rabbit hole begins. The shop is visited by a fellow called Hog Jaws (Toby Huss) for a preliminary look at the merchandise. A couple of junior-league bigots try to menace Mel for being an “East Coaster” (i.e., Jewish)—although he’s actually from New Mexico. Finally, it’s time for Hog Jaws to escort the four uneasy business partners—Mel, Nathaniel, Mary, and Cynthia—along with the sword, out to meet “the boss.” It’s a long journey into the woods, shut up in a van without windows or seats but with an entirely carpeted interior. “This is how people die,” they remind each other, as they realize they’re entering into “the brain” of redneck craziness. “Apparently, it’s carpeted.” Irony won’t be much of a weapon if things get dire, but it’s all they’ve got. More than this I won’t reveal, storywise—the little twists and turns of the plot are way more delicious to discover along the way. The conversations are sharp and funny, with a few poignant moments sprinkled in. The actors are perfectly cast, including Dan Bakkedahl as the fearsome boss of the provers, and director Shelton herself in a key scene as Deirdre, Mel’s outwardly perky but fragile ex, who just can’t get herself clean. It’s a wellcrafted movie of many small pleasures that add up to big fun. SWORD OF TRUST ***1/2 (out of four) With Marc Maron, Jillian Bell, Michaela Watkins, and Jon Bass. Written by Lynn Shelton and Mike O’Brien. Directed by Lynn Shelton. Rated R. 89 minutes.


MOVIE TIMES

August 7-13

All times are PM unless otherwise noted.

DEL MAR THEATRE

831.359.4447

YESTERDAY Wed 8/7, Thu 8/8 2, 4:30, 7, Fri 8/9 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30; Sat 8/10, Sun 8/11 11:30, 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30; Mon

8/12, Tue 8/13 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30 THE ART OF SELF-DEFENSE Wed 8/7, Thu 8/8 2:10, 4:40, 7:10 LOST & FOUND Wed 8/7 2:20, 4:50, 7:20; Thu 8/8 2:20, 4:50; Fri 8/10 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:40; Sat 8/11, Sun 8/12

11:50, 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:40; Tue 8/13 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:40 BRIAN BANKS Thu 8/8 7; Fri 8/9 2:10, 4:40, 7:10, 9:35; Sat 8/10, Sun 8/11 11:40, 2:10, 4:40, 7:10, 9:35; Mon

8/12, Tue 8/13 2:10, 4:40, 7:10, 9:35 BLINDED BY THE LIGHT Mon 8/12 7

NICKELODEON

831.359.4523

MAIDEN Wed 8/7, Thu 8/8, Fri 8/9 2:30, 4:50, 7:20, 9:35; Sat 8/10, Sun 8/11 12:10, 2:30, 4:50, 7:20, 9:35; Mon

8/12, Tue 8/13 2:30, 4:50, 7:20, 9:35 THE FAREWELL Wed 8/7, Thu 8/8, Fri 8/9 2:10, 4:30, 7, 9:20; Sat 8/10, Sun 8/11 11:50, 2:10, 4:30, 7, 9:20; Mon

8/12, Tue 8/13 2:10, 4:30, 7, 9:20 MARIANNE & LEONARD: WORDS OF LOVE Wed 8/7, Thu 8/8 2:20, 4:40, 7:10, 9:30 SWORD OF TRUST Wed 8/7, Thu 8/8 2:40, 5, 7:30, 9:40 THEM THAT FOLLOW Fri 8/9 2:20, 4:40, 7:10, 9:30; Sat 8/10, Sun 8/11 12, 2:20, 4:40, 7:10, 9:30; Mon 8/12, Tue

8/13 2:20, 4:40, 7:10, 9:30 MIKE WALLACE IS HERE Fri 8/9 2:40, 5, 7:30, 9:40; Sat 8/10, Sun 8/11 12:20, 2:40, 5, 7:30, 9:40; Mon 8/12, Tue

8/13 2:40, 5, 7:30, 9:40

GREEN VALLEY CINEMA 9

831.761.8200

TOY STORY 4 Wed 8/7, Thu 8/8 1:10, 3:50, 6:30, 9:10 SPIDER-MAN: FAR FROM HOME Wed 8/7, Thu 8/8 1:05, 3:55, 6:45, 9:35 THE LION KING Wed 8/7 1:15, 2:35, 4, 6:45, 8:05, 9:30, Thu 8/8 1:15, 2:35, 4, 6:45, 9:30; Fri 8/9 1:15, 4, 6:45,

9:30; Sat 8/10, Sun 8/11 10:30, 1:15, 4, 6:45, 9:30; Mon 8/12, Tue 8/13 1:15, 4, 6:45, 9:30 THE LION KING 3D Wed 8/7 5:20 ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD Wed 8/7 12:30, 2:10, 3:55, 5:35, 7:20, 9; Thu 8/8 12:30, 2:10, 3:55, 7:20;

Fri 8/9 12:30, 4, 7:30; Sat 8/10, Sun 8/11 12:30, 4, 7:30; Mon 8/12, Tue 8/13 12:30, 4, 7:30 FAST & FURIOUS PRESENTS: HOBBS & SHAW Wed 8/7 1, 2:05, 3:10, 4:15, 5:20, 6:25, 7:30, 8:35, 9:40; Thu 8/8

1, 3:10, 4:15, 6:25, 7:30, 9:40; Fri 8/9, Sat 8/10, Sun 8/11, Mon 8/12, Tue 8/13 12:30, 3:35, 6:40, 9:45 DORA AND THE LOST CITY OF GOLD Thu 8/8 4, 6:30, 9; Fri 8/9 1, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15; Sat 8/10, Sun 8/11 10:15, 1,

THE ART OF RACING IN THE RAIN Thu 8/8 6, 8:45; Fri 8/9 1:15, 4, 6:45, 9:30; Sat 8/10, Sun 8/11 10:30, 1:15, 4,

6:45, 9:30; Mon 8/12, Tue 8/13 1:15, 4, 6:45, 9:30 SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK Thu 8/8 7, 9:45; Fri 8/9 1:30, 4:15, 7, 9:45; Sat 8/11, Sun 8/12 10:45,

1:30, 4:15, 7, 9:45; Mon 8/12, Tue 8/13 1:30, 4:15, 7, 9:45 THE KITCHEN Fri 8/9 1, 4, 7, 9:45, Sat 8/10, Sun 8/11 10:15, 1, 4, 7, 9:45; Mon 8/12, Tue 8/13 1, 4, 7, 9:45 THE ANGRY BIRDS MOVIE 2 Tue 8/13 4, 6:30, 9

CINELUX SCOTTS VALLEY CINEMA

831.438.3260

Call theater for showtimes.

CINELUX 41ST AVENUE CINEMA 831.479.3504 Call theater for showtimes.

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FILM NEW RELEASES THE ART OF RACING IN THE RAIN What, another dog movie? Aaaaaaah. Oh god, no, please tell me the dog doesn’t narrate the story about his human family, with all kinds of crappy dog wisdom about life and love? I can’t even right now. Please make it stop. (PG) 109 minutes. Directed by Simon Curtis. Starring Milo Ventimiglia, Amanda Seyfried and the voice of Kevin Costner. (SP)

AUGUST 7-13, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

DORA AND THE LOST CITY OF GOLD I guess it’s been a long time since I checked in on Dora the Explorer, ’cause now she’s turned into Tomb Raider Jr. and is played by 18-year-old Isabela Moner in this live-action adventure adaptation. What happened to,“I’m the map! The map! The map, the map, the map?” Directed by James Bobin. Co-starring Benicio Del Toro, Danny Trejo and Eva Longoria. (PG) 102 minutes.

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MIKE WALLACE IS HERE If you only saw Mike Wallace when he was a zillion years old in his later 60 Minutes years, and you care about the state of journalism, you owe it to yourself to check out this documentary created almost entirely out of what must have been thousands of hours of archival footage. This guy was hardcore. I remember seeing a clip from a ’50s interview where he absolutely brutalized Rod Serling—who was just starting The Twilight Zone—with questions like “So does this mean you’ve given up on doing anything important on television?” Geez, the man was about to create one of the greatest, most innovative shows in the history of TV. But that’s how Wallace was—uncompromising and unflappable, a bastion of integrity in a world of TV journalism that always seemed to be crumbling around him. Directed by Avi Belkin. (PG-13) 90 minutes. (SP) SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK If you haven’t traumatized your kids in a while, why not take them to this adaptation of the 1980s and 1990s series of horror tales that thrilled macabre middleschoolers and angered Christian parents everywhere? What’s really scary is how adults can’t think of any

way to tap into juvenile scares besides recycling their own obsession with meta-entertainment. So, like the Goosebumps movies, this is another film where the stories in the “cursed” book it’s based on start coming true. Directed by Andre Ovredai. Starring Zoe Margaret Coletti and Michael Garza. (PG-13) 111 minutes. (SP) THEM THAT FOLLOW If you’ve been thinking,“Boy, do I wish there was a movie that combined my love of thrillers with my possibly unhealthy interest in Appalachian snake-handling churches,” I’m happy to say that your day has finally come. Directed by Britt Poulton and Dan Madison Savage. Starring Gerald Butler, Olivia Colman and Kaitlyn Dever. (R) 98 minutes. (SP) CONTINUING EVENT: LET’S TALK ABOUT THE MOVIES Film buffs are invited Wednesday nights at 7 p.m. to downtown Santa Cruz, where each week the group discusses a different current release. For location and discussion topic, go to groups.google.com/group/LTATM.

NOW PLAYING THE ART OF SELF-DEFENSE Quién es más macho? Certainly not the sad-sack protagonist in Riley Stearns’ dark, subversive black comedy that skewers the popular notion of “manhood,” and the ridiculous lengths to which some go to pursue it. Jesse Eisenberg stars as a nerdy little guy who suffers humiliation and decides to reshape himself as a tough guy. Determined to stop being a victim who’s afraid of everything, he enrolls at a karate school run by a fierce alpha male (Alessandro Nivola), telling him,“I want to be what intimidates me.” Some satirical bits are predictable (although still amusing), but as the journey becomes ever more brutal and surreal, it plays like a fever dream of Fight Club, as reimagined by Woody Allen. (R) 104 minutes. (LJ) CRAWL Kind of weird to see horror’s early-2000s wunderkind Alexandre Aja, who made the incredible High Tension and the less-incredible-butstill-a-big-deal-at-the-time remake of The Hills Have Eyes, slumming it with

a B-level killer-croc variation on Jaws. But considering that I will watch any and all variations on Jaws no matter how terrible (Orca, anyone? How about those god awful Italian ripoffs like Great White and Deep Blood?), the B-level killer-croc variety actually seems sort of classy! Starring Kaya Scodelario and Barry Pepper. (R) 87 minutes. (SP) THE FAREWELL We all know what this year’s biggest blockbuster was. What? Avengers: Endgame? Never heard of it. No, obviously I’m talking about The Farewell, which made more money at the domestic box office this year than any other film, including that one with the costume people you mentioned. Now, of course, this is only if you’re talking about per-theater average—The Farewell opened in four theaters with a record $87,833 haul per screen (Avengers’ was $76,601 across 4,662 theaters). But still, it’s kind of crazy that an art-house comedy-drama whose biggest star is Awkwafina from Crazy Rich Asians is breaking any kind of box-office record. Writer-director Lulu Wang’s story of a Chinese-American woman who travels back to China to visit her grandmother with a terminal diagnosis (which the family has decided to hide) is also a hit with critics, earning a 100% fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes. (PG) 98 minutes. (SP) FAST AND FURIOUS PRESENTS: HOBBS AND SHAW HOBBS: Me played by Rock! Me hate you, Shaw! SHAW: Me played by Jason Statham! Me hate you, Rock … I mean, Hobbs! BRIXTON LORE: Hello, I’m the villain in this movie. I’m played by Idris Elba. My body has been equipped with cyber-genetic physical technology that has turned me into a sort of supersoldier, and I’ve gone rogue from MI6 to become a terrorist mastermind. HOBBS: What now? You no say big words, Idris Elbow! You want be in Fast and Furious spinoff? You talk like this now! BRIXTON LORE: Uh … OK, very well, very well. Me … make … stuff … blow up now? Hobbs: Ooh, me no hate you now, Shaw! Now me hate blow up guy! SHAW: Let’s drive fast! Directed by David Leitch. (PG-13) 135 minutes. (SP)

THE LION KING To anyone who thought there were no more trees for Disney to shake money out of, I give you what’s being sold as the latest in the company’s series of live-action remakes of hit cartoons. But the thing is, despite the fact that the computergenerated images of its animal cast are photo-realistic, there’s nothing here that’s actually live action, is there? Nope, it’s literally a cartoon remake of a cartoon. Who knew “hakuna matata” actually translates to “milk it for all it’s worth?” Directed by Jon Favreau. Featuring the voices of Donald Glover, John Oliver and James Earl Jones. (PG) 118 minutes. (SP) LOST AND FOUND What a pleasure it is to discover this quiet, quirky little Irish comedy, an anthology of seven interconnected stories.The characters are refreshingly life-sized as their stories play out in and around the lost and found room at a suburban Irish train depot. It was written and directed by Liam O Mochain, who also gives himself the featured role of the new hiree on the job whose story threads in and out of all the others. O Mochain is a personable onscreen presence, game in the face of whatever absurdity comes his way. He and the rest of this very deft cast, and a buoyant, almost Klezmer-like soundtrack, keep things rolling along. (Not rated) 96 minutes. (LJ) MAIDEN This documentary about Tracy Edwards, a charter-boat cook who became the captain of the first all-female crew to take on the Whitbread Round the World Race, takes place in a dark time, long ago, when the world was horribly sexist. Okay, it was 1989, and yeah, sexism hasn’t really gotten much better. All the more reason to enjoy these lady sailors seriously kicking everyone’s ass. (PG) 97 minutes. (SP) MARIANNE & LEONARD: WORDS OF LOVE Though his most famous films are probably the conspiracy-baiting Kurt and Courtney and the flat-out terrible Biggie and Tupac, filmmaker-agitator Nick Broomfield has never actually been that good at making music documentaries. Conversely, I am still

a bit haunted by some of his grittier, more compelling true-crime docs, like the two he made about Aileen Wuornos and the more recent Tales of the Grim Sleeper. He’s certainly the last person I’d expect to make a film chronicling Leonard Cohen’s relationship with Marianne Ihlen, who Cohen fans will know as the inspiration for “So Long, Marianne.” Apparently, however, there is a personal aspect to the story for Broomfield, who briefly dated Ihlen, as well. You can bet it’ll come up in this film, possibly a lot! It’s the Broomfield way. (R) 102 minutes. (SP) ONCE UPON A TIME … IN HOLLYWOOD There was a lot of outrage when Quention Tarantino announced his next movie would include the story of the Manson murders. Apparently, people thought it might glorify Manson, a concern that the casting of beady-eyed Damon “Let Me Be Your Creepy Guy” Herriman in the role should have allayed. Also, this is the filmmaker who killed off Hitler and gave Southern slave owners their comeuppance— fulfilling revenge fantasies is kinda his thing. It’ll be interesting to see how he works this true-crime angle into a fictional story of over-the-hill TV actor Rick Dalton (Leonardo DiCaprio) and his stunt double Cliff Booth (Brad Pitt) in the fading days of 1960s Hollywood. Co-starring Margot Robbie, Kurt Russell and Al Pacino. (R) 161 minutes. (SP) SWORD OF TRUST Reviewed this issue. (R) 88 minutes. (SP) TOY STORY 4 Last night I woke up in the middle of the night and thought, “Should I be worried that both the Child’s Play and Toy Story movies are about a kid named Andy whose toys come to life?” I am definitely not eating spicy foods before bed anymore. In other news, this fourth installment of the animated Pixar franchise is said to be the sweetest and most poignant of them all, which is also what they said about Toy Story 3. And probably what they’ll say about Toy Story 5, as long as Tom Hanks as Woody, Tim Allen as Buzz Lightyear and the rest of the gang keep pouring on the sweet poignancy. Directed by Josh Cooley. (G) 100 minutes. (SP)


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BREWERY BITES Chef Santos Majano brings a focus to the food at Discretion Brewing. PHOTO: TARMO HANNULA

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Matter of Discretion Santos Majano ups the ante on brewery fare BY CHRISTINA WATERS

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o worth looking for, the Kitchen at Discretion. My friend Beverly called it “off the beaten track.” And it might be, unless you live or work in and around the 41st Avenue corridor. Tucked behind an industrial labyrinth of automotive, furniture and repair shops a few clicks from Café Cruz, the Kitchen is run by talented chef Santos Majano, who creates a steady stream of irresistible dishes, plates and ideas

that play cultures, culinary styles and spices off one another. All of it seems perfectly designed to go with Discretion’s fresh brews. Seated outdoors under an arbor of honeysuckle, bordered by strawberries ripening on a hanging garden, we struggled to decide on lunch orders. “There’s nothing on this menu I wouldn’t want!” Ellen confessed before succumbing to snack platters of sweet-and-spicy chicken wings ($16) and a dish of killer tempura eggplant ($12). Betty

and Bev split a knock-out salad of melon and peaches ($11) and two beer-battered local rockfish tacos ($16). I went for a serious main course of beer-braised pork shoulder with black rice and marinated cherry tomatoes ($21). A half-pint of IPA for Bev ($3), and a San Pellegrino Limonata ($3.50) for me. There was a lot of food, and in the interests of total transparency, we demolished it all (except for some of the pork and two chicken wings that I took home for the resident guy.)

Majano is a wizard at using contrasting flavors to heighten the dishes he creates. As exciting to the eye as they are to the tastebuds, each bite produced a shameless chorus of oohs and aahs from the four of us. In a deep, round bowl, a salad of thinly sliced peaches and squares of melon arrived bathed in fresh basil and olive oil, topped with ricotta salata cheese and a fistful of sunflower sprouts. Plump, piquant chicken wings came with various kinds of fresh pickles—pale yellow, green and pink—and a bowl of buttermilk dressing. Everything sprinkled with spicy togarashi. The tacos were spectacular, again inventively topped by cabbage slaw, cilantro and sriracha aioli, plus fat wedges of lime. Betty went for the slivered jalapeños (“I like it spicy!”) My massive plate of braised pork offered tender flesh under a succulent layer of fat. Marinated cherry tomatoes were outstanding, and the sweet-and-sour plum sauce knocked us out. The menu offers an alluring array of fish and meat— including a heavyweight charcuterie and cheese board—but it was that plate of tempura eggplant, with a soy-citrus reduction and aioli, all dusted with red pepper togarashi, that had us well and truly enchanted. I would drive from the Westside, even during rush hour, for this dish. Open daily 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m. The Kitchen at Discretion Brewing, 2703 41st Ave. Ste. A, Soquel. discretionbrewing.com.

OPEN AND SHUT Nick the Greek has opened for gyros and other Mediterranean specialties at the Pacific and Lincoln slot once devoted to Sitar. Nearby, Barceloneta looks poised for lift-off downtown. Shen’s Gallery has closed its Mission Street headquarters of so many years, only to pop up again in a sweet spot at the top of Pacific Avenue, next to the aforementioned Barceloneta. Jaguar has closed on Soquel Avenue, and Surfrider Cafe has closed its Front Street spot after so many years, says proprietor Stephen Wyman. Local start-up Kind Brewery will open in that spot. Flynn’s is now the Felton Music Hall on Highway 9.


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SAY ‘OM’ After catering backstage meals for bands like No Doubt and Def Leppard, chef Stephanie Rentz embraces the calm at Land of Medicine Buddha.

Land of Medicine Rock ’n’ roll chef goes zen BY SUSAN LANDRY

AUGUST 7-13, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

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ucked between hiking trails and Tibetan prayer flags, Land of Medicine Buddha has a oneof-a-kind kitchen. Chef Stephanie Rentz and her team serve organic, vegetarian, buffet-style dishes like Indian curries, tempeh-style chorizo or housemade veggie burgers to retreat guests, hikers and other visitors. Rentz earned her culinary stripes doing backstage catering for music acts like Chris Isaak, No Doubt and Def Leppard. Now, as kitchen manager for LMB, she oversees daily breakfast ($10), lunch ($16) and dinner ($14). Walk-ins are welcome, but space is limited, so call to reserve a spot.

Where do you get your inspiration for your cooking? STEPHANIE RENTZ: A lot of the menus that have become popular when I’m doing the cooking are things I’ve made for my family, or that my mother made for me. If I am delving in for some inspiration, honestly, I think I’m a cookbook hoarder. I have them stacked up in

my living room, stacked up in my bedroom.

A lot of people have an image of Buddhist retreat centers being really calm, zen spaces, but kitchens can also be pretty hectic. Does it ever get stressful? Oh, absolutely. Coming from backstage catering where it’s loud outside, it’s loud inside, the cooks are screaming at each other across the kitchen. Coming to this Buddhist retreat center, I was shushed so many times.

Do you practice Buddhist principles in the kitchen? Our two main rules are not to harm any sentient beings—and sentient to the Buddhist is any living creature, so from the ants to the bugs that come to me with the organic vegetables, I escort them outside … And no intoxicants, no alcohol, so I don’t cook with any wine. Land of Medicine Buddha, 5800 Prescott Rd., Soquel. 462-8383, landofmedicinebuddha.org.


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flavors of raspberries and cherries, which makes a perfect companion to meats, cheeses and Italian food. This small winery does not have a tasting room, but they do have a wine club. albertivineyard.com.

CANTINE TURNS 5

Cantine Winepub is celebrating five years in business with an anniversary party. To thank customers for their support, drink specials will be available all day. The event will run 2-9 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 10, with raffle prizes, a photo booth and live music. DJ Dustbowl will spin vinyl from 2-5 p.m., followed by Cooper Street Music from 6-9 p.m. If you have never been to Cantine, you’ll love the cozy vibe and selection of food and drinks. (It’s located in the same complex with Akira sushi and Armitage Wines’ tasting room.) Cantine Winepub, 8050 Soquel Drive, Aptos. 612-6191, cantinewinepub.com.

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SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 7-13, 2019

ituated in the Santa Cruz Mountains in what is known as the Vine Hill district, Alberti Vineyard is in a sweet spot for growing premium Pinot Noir grapes. “The slope of the vineyard is quite critical,” says owner and winemaker Jim Alberti. The vineyard’s gentle incline allows air to move within the vines, which minimizes frost in early spring when buds and tender shoot tissues are vulnerable. “The slope also allows the heat of the midsummer day to rise, causing a cooling air flow within the vineyard,” Alberti adds. The Alberti Vineyard continues in the tradition of producing an estategrown and limited estate-bottled Pinot from a spot in the Santa Cruz Mountains only 500 meters from the first established vineyard in California, Alberti says. Jim, along with his wife Peggy, is making some outstanding Pinot Noir (around $30)—the only varietal they produce right now—all handmade and aged in French oak barrels. The result is a fine wine with aromatic

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H RISA’S STARS BY RISA D’ANGELES INNER REVOLUTION— URANUS RETROGRADE When planets enter new signs, or retrograde back into previous ones, we change, too. Our time references shift, new possibilities and opportunities occur, we speak differently, our focus switches, things are either revealed or they go into hiding. July was quite a tumultuous month, with two eclipses (things disappeared) activating Saturn, Pluto and the South Node (transforming structures of the past—governments in disarray) and the Mercury retrograde (things turned upside down, inside-out). In August, although we feel we can move forward (Mercury direct, returns Sunday to fiery Leo, where we begin to talk about ourselves again) another retrograde, the higher octave of Mercury (Uranus) is beginning. Uranus, planet of revelation, revolution and sudden, unexpected

changes, stations retrogrades in Taurus Sunday evening. Uranus is the Great Awakener. It shakes us up and breaks everything down. With Uranus retrograde, it’s as if our whole body, our whole lives, are shaking apart. Retrogrades are a time of restructuring the old, making room for the new. Internally, we begin to create new visions, seek new archetypes and new rhythms. Uranus brings us a new order of things, an inner revolution. Our heads are turned around, facing both the past (old realities) and the future (new ideas). Taurus makes sure we stand in the present, with ideas practical, sensible and most of all, comforting.

ARIES Mar21–Apr20

LIBRA Sep23–Oct22

You love and appreciate your work and those you work with, and communication is good with everyone (though you must battle against critical thoughts). You want to help others more, which inspires them, and then work is even better and more fulfilling. Loyalty toward you emerges, new goals are considered and workflow increases, and so does success. It’s like a river flowing harmoniously for everyone. You stand at the river’s beginning.

Plans created long ago are now ready to be implemented, and you’re on the road toward their fulfillment. I hope all that you expected, all that you hoped and waited for, are available. There are some issues hidden behind the scenes, not quite ready for the light of day. For now, you’re ordering and organizing your inner-self so you can order and organize your outer realities, relationships and environments. Did a dream come true?

Esoteric astrology as news for week of Aug. 7, 2019

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You may not be romantic outwardly because of so much work to be done to insure the future’s sustainability. But this doesn’t mean you feel less love. It’s just that you’re focused and determined and disciplined and must follow your instincts and intuition and not let relationship concerns get in the way. You seek intellectual activities that also offer fun and a bit of leisure. The environment is kind to you when you travel. Remember, though: health first!

GEMINI May 22–June 20

SCORPIO Oct23–Nov21 As changes continue, it’s good to have a get together of friends and acquaintances you care about. Include local, sustainable and seasonal foods, scatter several interesting books around, set the music to old jazz standards. Perhaps you could suggest a subject to discuss, like how to create communities (the steps), what people would be attracted, the focus and purpose of community, and how it would prepare everyone for the new times to come. Allow no criticisms. Have a giveaway while saying goodbye.

SAGITTARIUS Nov22–Dec20

Emotional and then physical safety and stability are concerns now, and so you must assess, tend to and create safety measures around your home and self, then ask everyone to help maintain them. Everyone knows you change your mind so often they really can’t make plans with you. But for now, this has eased up and decisions made are decisions you follow through with. Or try to. Something ended last month. What was it?

Do all that you can to create compromise between yourself and those who see issues differently. Small disagreements can escalate quite quickly. Include good things in your compromises, so those around you feel they have been heard and listened to. Ask what they want and need, and this will be reflected back to you in terms of recognition and rewards. Be dashing as you perform these acts of kindness. You’ll become even more attractive and radiant. New vistas beckon ahead.

CANCER Jun21–Jul20

CAPRICORN Dec21–Jan20

You feel the need to communicate with everyone, both casually and in-depth, for you realize everyone has a gift, and if they simply talk enough, that gift emerges and you learn more. You, too, have a gift—in fact, many gifts—and when you speak, when you come out from under your crab shell, then we see your gifts, too, and we learn from them. You are very perceptive now, more than usual.

You could feel a bit overwhelmed due to just too many events flooding your reality, not eating adequately and in a timely matter, or simply because you’ve been “on” for just too long. When you’re upset, you can lash out with words that hurt everyone, including yourself. Lay low for a while, maintain a bit more solitude, rest and recuperate, allow others to perform tasks while you’re in the garden reading. Tell everyone you need tender loving care.

LE0 Jul21–Aug22

AQUARIUS Jan21–Feb18

There’s an inner and outer reality concerning something. They seem to be in opposition. You think you have to choose one over the other. Do you? Oppositions are actually only different sides of the same coin, seeking integration. Eventually they come together and unify. What is occurring that seems in opposition? Is it spiritual or material factors, self or others’ needs or values, being worthy or not worthy? Time will integrate the two.

You may need to discuss issues with someone, perhaps a partner, parent, family, friend, or roomie. Do this openly with candor and ease, always using an informational, neutral tone. Do not be frightened to discuss finances. Information is knowing you’re speaking the truth for you and those listening. Ask for teamwork, understanding and consideration. Maintain humor each day as things change, and then change some more.

VIRGO Aug23–Sep22

PISCES Feb19–Mar20

You want to talk about issues and ideas important to you—things held deep inside and not often communicated: what you believe and how you want to serve; your new emerging identity and all the things you hope, wish and plan to do. You’re practical and inventive, and thoroughly modern in your approach. These may be important and applicable, especially concerning family. You bring a new reality forth. At first, it’s shocking. Then accepted.

The focus is on relationships, those close and intimate. This includes work partners and close friends. You find yourself with two trajectories—one seeks to create harmony and goodwill; the other to increase discipline and efficiency, forging ahead with ideas and plans. It seems the two are opposite, and sometimes they are. You will have to bring them together, create a unity and synthesis. It may be difficult. Have willingness, dedication and intention. Then harmony prevails.


Classifieds classifieds Phone: 831.458.1100 | emaIL: CLASSIFIEDS@GOODTIMES.SC | DISPLay DeaDLIne: THURSDAY 2pM | LIne aD DeaDLIne: FRIDAY 2pM

Help Wanted Aide Direct Care. $500 Hiring bonus. Full and pT positions available. Work with intellectually challenged adults. No exp. necessary. We train. Up to $15 per hr. to start. Join our team and make a difference!

Individual is doing business as SANTA CRUZ SUNNY SIDE Up, SUNNY SIDE Up IN SANTA CRUZ. 317 BAY ST., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. JOANNA ELIZABETH MANOFF. 317 BAY ST., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: JOANNA ELIZABETH MANOFF. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT AppLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on July 10, 2019. July 17, 24, 31, & Aug. 7.

24, 31, August 7 & 14. NOTICE OF pETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: ERIC FRANK GREENE CASE NO. 19pR00183. To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: a Petition for Probate has been filed by COLLEEN CASEY in the Superior Court of California, County of SANTA CRUZ. The Petition for Probate requests that COLLEEN CASEY be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent's will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent administration of estates act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. a hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: 08/12/2019 Time: 8:30 AM Dept.: 10 Address of court: 701 OCEAN ST., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. you may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. you may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special notice (form De-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. a Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. petitioner: COLLEEN CASEY 1100 GRAHAM HILL RD., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. (831)-461-4518 July 24, 31, August 7 & 14.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0001224The following Limited Liability Company is doing business as SUNSET SERVICES COLLECTIVE. 629 COLUMBIA ST., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. pApAYA RANCH LLC. 629 COLUMBIA ST., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. AI# 201830910028. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company signed: pApAYA RANCH LLC. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT AppLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on July 12, 2019. July 24, 31, August 7, & 14.

real estate

Apply M – F 9am-3pm (831) 475-0888 . FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0001226 The following Individual is doing business as THREE BLACK DOTS DESIGNS. 1508 A BAY ST., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. ELIZABETH MARTHA HUTCHISON. 1508 A BAY ST., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: ELIZABETH MARTHA HUTCHISON. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is 6/1/2018. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on July 12, 2019. July 17, 24, 31 & August 7. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0001211 The following

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0001203 The following Corporation is doing business as CINNAMON BAY CLOTHING. 6 SEASCApE VILLAGE, ApTOS, CA 95003. County of Santa Cruz. JM3, INC. 6 SEASCApE VILLAGE, ApTOS, CA 95003. Al# 4290606. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: JM3, INC. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 5/10/2019. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on July 9, 2019. July 24, 31, August 7, & 14. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0001244 The following Individual is doing business as JC CONSULTING. 2316 FELT ST. #C, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. JENNIFER LYNNE CARAVELLI. 2316 FELT ST. #C, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: JENNIFER LYNNE CARAVELLI. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT AppLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on July 16, 2019. July

• Antique Restorations • Furniture Design & Repair

• Wooden Boat Works • Musical Instruments • Unique Projects

831-251-0377 isaiahwilliams13@gmail.com mastercraftsman.webs.com

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0001250 The following Individual is doing business as DEER BROOK FARMS. 428 BROWNS VALLEY ROAD, CORRALITOS, CA 95076. County of Santa Cruz. ROSMARIE FRY. 428 BROWNS VALLEY ROAD, CORRALITOS, CA 95076. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: ROSMARIE FRY. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT AppLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on July 18, 2019. July 24, 31, August 7, & 14.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0001243 The following Individual is doing business as SEABRIGHT STICK COMpANY. 307 OWEN ST., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. SEAN JAMES. 307 OWEN ST., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: SEAN JAMES. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT AppLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on July 16, 2019. July 31, August 7, 14, & 21. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0001245 The following Individual is doing business as RESTORE ROYALTY. 605 35TH AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. COLLEEN pATRICIA IGNAITIS. 605 35TH AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: COLLEEN pATRICIA IGNAITIS. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT AppLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on July 17, 2019. July 31, August 7, 14, & 21. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0001274 The following Individual is doing business as LEAHS MAGICAL pIECES. 224 LAUREL ST. A202, SANTA CRUZ, CA, 95060. County of Santa Cruz. LEAH M. pRESTON. 224 LAUREL ST. A202, SANTA CRUZ, CA, 95060. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: LEAH M. pRESTON. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT AppLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on July 22, 2019. July 31, August 7, 14, & 21. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0001273The following Limited Liability Company is doing business as SpORTS CAR MANAGEMENT LLC. 222 BENITO AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. SpORTS CAR MANAGEMENT LLC. 222 BENITO AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. AI# 201535710557. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company signed: SpORTS CAR MANAGEMENT LLC. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 12/23/2015. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on July 22, 2019. July 31, August 7, 14, & 21.

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 7-13, 2019

Kevin Stephen Cook, better known as Tom Cook here in Santa Cruz, was killed on his bicycle on Thursday, May 23rd, just South of Davenport Landing on Highway 1. Tom was born in Peckham, London and was the second youngest of six children. He came to Santa Cruz some time around 1990, took part in the UCSC Farm and Garden apprentice program, and made his California home in the woods of Bonny Doon, where he was known as a master washer of windows, a lover of Shakespeare, and as a true gentleman. In recent years he spent Winters at his flat in London, and Spring and Summer here in Santa Cruz. He was a kind and generous soul, always ready to talk, make new friends, and to share anything that he had. He will be greatly missed here and in England. A celebration of Tom’s life will be held on his birthday, Wednesday August 14th, beginning at 6 p.m. at Davenport Landing Beach. All are welcome and encouraged to bring stories, food, and drink to share. Memorial contributions may be made in Tom’s name to the UCSC Farm and Garden Life Lab where he was an enthusiastic volunteer (https://lifelab.z2systems. com/np/clients/lifelab/donation.jsp). Any questions can be directed to Colin Hannon at 831-345-4372.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0001093 The following Individual is doing business as MOVE MORE SANTA CRUZ. 4145 CLARES ST., CApITOLA CA 95010. County of Santa Cruz. SUSAN MAIA WALTON. 2113 DERBY AVE., CApITOLA CA 95010. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: SUSAN MAIA WALTON. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT AppLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on June 18, 2019. July 17, 24, 31, & Aug. 7.

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PhONe: 831.458.1100 | emaIL: CLASSIFIEDS@GOODTIMES.SC | DISPLay DeaDLINe: THURSDAY 2PM | LINe aD DeaDLINe: FRIDAY 2PM

Supporting your success in 2019

Thinking of Selling?

Summer is a great time to talk to us about your Spring sale.

Tom Brezsny’s

REAL ESTATE OF MIND

Provoking thought since 1990 Daniel Wolford CalBRE# 02050043

dwolford@serenogroup.com (415) 250-6344

Brezsny Associates BrezsnyBallantyne.com

AUGUST 7-13, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0001263 The following Individual is doing business as WESTSIDE SWIM SCHOOL. 100 HANDLEY ST., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. KAREN WILSON. 100 HANDLEY ST., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: KAREN WILSON. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on July 22, 2019. July 31, August 7, 14, & 21.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0001304 The following Individual is doing business as STUSIC AUDIO, STUSIC STUDIOS. 311 BALTUSROL DR., APTOS, CA 95003. County of Santa Cruz. STUART E. WILSON. 311 BALTUSROL DR., APTOS, CA 95003. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: STUART E. WILSON. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on July 29, 2019. August 7, 14, 21 & 28. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0001305 The following Individual is doing business as JB TRUCKING. 14207 OVERPASS RD., WATSONVILLE, CA 95076. County of Santa Cruz. ISAIAS M. BONILLA. 14207 OVERPASS RD., WATSONVILLE, CA 95076. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: ISAIAS M. BONILLA. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on July 29, 2019. August 7, 14, 21 & 28.

Call to understand key forces in this market.

Brezsny Associates

BrezsnyAssociates.com

Tom Brezsny getreal@serenogroup.com 831-818-1431

Terry B Brezsny terry@serenogroup.com 831-588-8485

CalBRE #01063297

CalBRE #01257150

Scarlett Wolford scarlett@serenogroup.com 415-987-0277

Daniel Wolford dwolford@serenogroup.com 415-250-6344

CalBRE# 01735961

CalBRE# 02050043

50 Years of Combined Dedication, Attention to Detail, and Care FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0001309 The following Individual is doing business as BONNY DOON SEA GLASS. 325 CONIFER LANE, BONNY DOON, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. JAMES SALAZAR. 325 CONIFER LANE, BONNY DOON, CA 95060. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: JAMES SALAZAR. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on July 29, 2019. August 7, 14, 21 & 28. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0001336 The following Corporation is doing business as POST TECH. 7960 B SOQUEL DR. #177, APTOS, CA 95003. County of Santa Cruz. POST TECH. 7960 B SOQUEL DR. #177, APTOS, CA 95003. Al# 2852587. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: POST TECH. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 2/2/2006. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on July 31, 2019. August 7, 14, 21, & 28. REFILING OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT WITH CHANGE FILE NO. 2019-0001276. The following Individual is

doing business as SOQUEL AUTO SALES. 1505 SOQUEL AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. FARDAD VAZIRI. 138 SEARIDGE CT. #1., APTOS, CA 95003. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: FARDAD VAZIRI. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 7/17/2009. Original FBN number: 2009-0001437. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on July 23, 2019. August 7, 14, 21, & 28. REFILING OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT WITH CHANGE FILE NO. 2019-0001284. The following Copartnership is doing business as TERRA NOVA ECOLOGICAL LANDSCAPING. 1514 7TH AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. KEN FOSTER. 1514 7TH AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. JILLIAN LAUREL STEINBERGER. 1514 7TH AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. This business is conducted by a Copartnership signed: KEN FOSTER. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 5/15/1987. Original FBN number: 2014-0001482. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on July 24, 2019. August 7, 14, 21, & 28.

Continuing the conversation…strolling down memory lane, looking at the Santa Cruz real estate market and how its relationship with Silicon Valley has changed over the last 30 years. And for better or worse, how our close proximity to one of the most rarefied regions in the world continues to shape the three biggest concerns on everyone’s short list: housing, jobs and traffic. Picking up in the early ‘90s...our market was in a huge downturn between 1990 and 1993. Most locals thought it was the earthquake that did the market in but the truth was, things had already peaked six months prior to the events of October 17th. There was a national recession and the market was down everywhere. When prices around San Jose softened, more of those buyers who had fueled price increases in Santa Cruz in the late ‘80s gravitated back towards the epicenter of the tech economy. Why? Because they could. The inventory of homes here rose to all time highs and levels that haven’t been seen since. Price reductions were common. Days on market more so. It wasn’t unusual for it to take six months to a year to sell a property. All unthinkable by today’s standards. It was a tough time to be a Realtor. There were a lot of lonely open houses. So what happened? The economy started to grind its way out of the recession and Silicon Valley woke up and roared back to life. Tech companies went on an unprecedented hiring binge between 1993 and 1995. One of the seminal periods in the evolution of Silicon Valley came next, as a huge increase in the number of H-1B visas brought an influx of tech workers from all over the world. The complexion of Silicon Valley changed and as the flood of new, higher paying workers settled in, Santa Cruz County saw a steady stream coming its way. Along the way, there was also a shift in the way real estate values were distributed throughout the County. Prior to1995, Aptos was considered the most likely place executive-level wage earners would want to live. As more techies chose to live on this side of the hill, Hwy 1 began to resemble the afternoon parking lot we know today. And as traffic delays increased, there was a notable shift in real estate values away from Aptos and towards Scotts Valley. Suddenly more people wanted to live on the Scotts Valley side of the fishhook. Today, most of the young buyers working for companies like Apple or Google already know they don’t want to live any further south than the Morrissey exit, before they even start looking. More next week...dot.com mania comes to Santa Cruz.

Tom Brezsny

Realtor® DRE#01063297

831-818-1431 getreal@serenogroup.com PA I D A D V E R T O R I A L


services

Phone: 831.458.1100 | email: classifieds@goodtimes.sc | DisPlay DeaDline: thursday 2pm | line aD DeaDline: friday 2pm cooking experience soon!

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AUGUST CUSTOMER APPRECIATION SALE 25 % OFF EVERYTHING SATURDAY, AUGUST 17 OPEN 9 AM- 9 PM

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58 AUGUST 7-13, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM


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Where the locals shop since 1938. VOTED BEST BUTCHER SHOP BEST WINE SELECTION BEST CHEESE SELECTION BEST LOCALLY OWNED GROCERY STORE BEST MURAL /PUBLIC ART

Family owned & operated 80 years. 622 Soquel Avenue, Santa Cruz

OUR 80 TH YEAR

WEEKLY SPECIALS Good th r u 8/13 /19

GRILLED SCAMPI WINE &SHRIMP FOOD PAIRING INGREDIENTS: 12 jumbo shrimp, peeled and deveined ½ cup canola oil 10 cloves garlic ¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes 1 teaspoon ground fennel seed Salt and freshly ground black pepper 1 stick unsalted butter 1 large lemon, zested and juiced 1 tablespoon chopped tarragon leaves 2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves, plus sprigs for garnish ¼ cup chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves, plus extra for garnish

Directions 1. Put the shrimp in a large baking dish. 2. Combine the canola oil, garlic, red pepper flakes and fennel seed in a small food processor and process until the garlic is somewhat paste-like. Pour this mixture over the shrimp and let them marinate for 30 minutes. 3. Light a grill to high heat. 4. Strain the shrimp from the marinade and season them with salt and black pepper, to taste. Grill the shrimp on both sides until they are slightly charred and just cooked through, about 2 minutes per side. Transfer the shrimp to a plate and garnish with thyme and parsley. Cook’s Note: They can be left slightly undercooked since they will cook longer in the butter sauce.

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■ OSCAR MEYER BACON Original/ 7.29

■ OSCAR MEYER TURKEY FRANKS All Natural

California Fresh, Blemish-Free, Organic, Arrow Citrus Co., Lakeside Organics, Happy Boy Farms

/ 6.99 Lb

Cheese – Best Selection in Santa Cruz

■ LEAF LETTUCE Red, Romaine, Butter and Iceberg / 1.49 Ea ■ CANTALOUPE MELONS Ripe and Sweet/ .69 Lb ■ FRESH CORN White and Yellow/ .79 Ea ■ AVOCADOS Always Ripe/ 1.99 Ea ■ BUSHBERRIES Black, Blue and Raspberries/ 2.99 Ea ■ TOMATOES Roma and Large/ 1.69 Lb ■ CELERY Top Quality/ 1.29 Ea ■ HONEYDEW MELONS Great in Fruit Salads/ .99 Lb ■ CLUSTER TOMATOES Ripe on the Vine/ 1.69 Lb ■ CAULIFLOWER Great as a Side Dish/ 2.29 Ea

■ MONTEREY JACK “rBST-Free” Loaf Cuts/ 3.29 Lb

Average Cuts/ 3.49 Lb

■ DOMESTIC FONTINA Great Melted/ 6.99 Lb

■ SHREDDED PARMESAN Domestic/ 6.99 Lb

Best Buys, Local, Regional, International

Beer

■ BARRELS & SONS Napa Valley Pilsner, 6Pk Btls, 12oz/ 9.99 +CRV ■ 2 TOWNS CIDER HOUSE 6Pk Cans, 12oz/ 9.99 +CRV ■ NOVA “EASY KOMBUCHA” Asst Flavors, 16oz/ 3.29 +CRV ■ HERMITAGE BREWING CO Assorted Sours, 375ml/ 6.99 +CRV ■ CORONA Extra, 12Pk Cans, 12oz/ 14.99 +CRV

Whiskey

■ ELIJAH CRAIG Small Batch (93USC)/ 19.99 ■ MAKER’S MARK Handmade/ 21.99 ■ 1792 Small Batch (92JM)/ 26.99 ■ BASIL HAYDEN’S Artfully Aged/ 29.99 ■ HIGH WEST Double Rye/ 29.99

BBQ Reds - Great Values

■ 2015 LOVE NOIR Pinot Noir (Reg 12.99)/ 5.99 ■ 2013 WILD HORSE GSM (Reg 23.99)/ 6.99 ■ 2017 MONTES CLASSIC Cabernet Sauvignon (Reg 12.99)/ 7.99 ■ 2013 TRUVÉE Red Blend (Reg 20.99)/ 8.99 ■ 2014 TWISTED PASO Cabernet Sauvignon (Reg 23.99)/ 9.99

Summertime Whites & Rosé

■ 2015 VILLA BARBI Orvieto (90WE, Reg 17.99)/ 5.99 ■ 2016 GUENOC Sauvignon Blanc (Gold Medal, Reg 15.99)/ 6.99 ■ 2016 SECRET RESERVE Sauvignon Blanc (91JS, Reg 12.99)/ 7.99 ■ 2016 NOBILO Chardonnay (Reg 15.99)/ 8.99 ■ 2017 MIRABEAU Côtes de Provence Rosé (91JS, Reg 20.99)/ 9.99

Connoisseur’s Corner - Bordeaux

■ 2015 CHÂTEAU CAPBERN Saint-Estèphe (93WE)/ ■ STELLA PARMESAN Whole Wheel Cuts/ 7.39 Lb 31.99 Shop Local First ■ 2010 CHÂTEAU TOUR HAUT-CAUSSAN Medoc (90WA)/ 32.99 ■ FARMER FREED Culinary Salts, 3.5oz/ 10.49 ■ 2014 CHÂTEAU LES CRUZELLES Lalande de Pomerol ■ GIZDICH RANCH Jams, 11oz/ 6.99 (91RP)/ 35.99 ■ MEEKS Wildflower Honey, 24oz/ 14.35 ■ 2007 CHÂTEAU BARDE-HAUT Saint-Émilion Grand ■ MARSALA CHAI Instant Blends, 18oz/ 4.99 Cru (92RP)/ 46.99 ■ JAVA BOB’S Coffee “The Connoisseur’s Choice” ■ 2015 CHÂTEAU MALARTIC-LAGRAVIÈRE Pessac-Léognan Grand Cru (96V)/ 74.99 12oz/ 9.99

KARISSA PAXTON, 19 Year Customer, Santa Cruz

S HOPP ER’ S SPOTLIG HT

Occupation: Event planner, CoastsideCouture.com Hobbies: Mountain biking, water aerobics instructor, working out, family life, cooking What first got you shopping here? I remember visiting my grandparents in Santa Cruz when I was maybe three. Now, every time I walk into Shopper’s I think about my grandparents buying Mocha Mix; they used it on everything! Years later, while living in San Luis Obispo, I’d visit my husband-to-be in Santa Cruz and make him dinner after shopping at Shopper’s.Then I’d fill up my cooler with meat from Shopper’s and take it back home for me and my roommates. Shopper’s spoiled us! Eventually, when my husband and I decided to live here, Shopper’s was a major factor in our settling in Santa Cruz.

What do you like to cook? Usually meat or fresh fish— Shopper’s seafood is superb!— on the grill, plus a starch and veggies. My family drools over Shopper’s Santa Maria tri-tip, the skirt steak, too! Shopper’s meatloaf is amazing, and perfect for meat sauce and meatballs. I recently met friends on a mountain biking trip and brought 10 pounds of Guinness bratwurst sausages. I was the star of our party! I was in 4H and learned to appreciate knowing where my food is from. Shopper’s butchers are informative and just wonderful humans.They’ll crack my ham hocks three times because that’s what my grandma did!

You prefer shopping local? Absolutely! — I’m a local business owner. Shopper’s feels really personable.There are many friendly faces at Shopper’s.The butchers and checkers have seen my son, Miles, grow up, and he always chooses Shopper’s when I ask him which market he would like to go to. I think their produce is the best in Santa Cruz, and I like that they carry good local products such as Mrs.A’s Salsa, Sumano’s breads, Harley Farms goat cheese, local beers and more.We shopped other markets when we lived on the Westside. It’s crazy how much money we now save at Shopper’s Corner!

“We shopped other markets when we lived on the Westside. It’s crazy how much money we now save at Shopper’s Corner!”

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Corner: Soquel & Branciforte Avenues 7 Days: 6am-9pm

| Meat: (831) 423-1696 | Produce: (831) 429-1499 | Grocery: (831) 423-1398 | Wine: (831) 429-1804

Superb Products of Value: Local, Natural, Specialty, Gourmet ■ Neighborly Service for 80 Years

Profile for Metro Publishing

Good Times Santa Cruz August 7-13, 2019  

Good Times Santa Cruz August 7-13, 2019