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INSIDE Volume 44, No.24 September 12-18, 2018

FROM CANADA, EH! NO SECOND CHANCE? Second Story’s closure worries local mental-health advocates P11

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OPINION

EDITOR’S NOTE It’s funny how so many people who never had opinions about football suddenly have opinions about football. And most of those opinions don’t even have to do with game itself. After Colin Kaepernick’s anthem-kneeling became a political issue, there were even people I know who had never been interested in the NFL, but felt like, “Well, I guess I have to watch football now, just to support him.” I don’t think they really did, though, and then when NFL owners shut Kaepernick out of the game before the 2017 season, those politically motivated almostfans were off the hook. But then when the president’s tweets about

anthem protests turned watching the NFL into an anti-Trump statement, I started hearing the same talk again. Being a theoretical football fan has really been a roller coaster ride. Another common refrain I’ve heard about the sport is, “Who would let their kid play football now?” Well, a lot of people. As Jacob Pierce’s cover story points out, it’s still far and away the most popular high school sport. His story gets underneath that question to examine why Santa Cruz County youth are still playing football, and how the controversies over head injuries at the pro level have affected—or not affected—how they play. The answers provide some real insight and a much-needed dose of reality at a time when the discussion around these issues seems to be all-too abstract.

SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

EXTREME MEASURE

CIRCULAR LOGIC

Re: “Control Groups” (GT, 9/5): We highly value our Constitutional rights to free speech, privacy, and property rights. Unfortunately, these rights were all violated Thursday morning after midnight. We had displayed two large signs—one for Richelle Noroyan’s city council campaign and the other for No on M. That political fanatics trespassed and stole our property, including the 12-foot mounting frame, is shocking but not surprising. We do not own rental property, but we’re against Measure M because it will have negative impacts on our downtown neighborhood. Rental property owners will lose control of who lives in their houses, condos, and apartments. Since the trespass and theft occurred, we have found out that many other signs posted by our neighbors for Richelle and against M were stolen, thus violating the entire community’s rights to speech, privacy, and property rights. These thefts are not isolated incidents, but coordinated efforts on the part of self-righteous thugs who seek to disrupt the electoral process. But we refuse to be intimidated by anti-social behavior and will replace all the stolen signs.

Re: “Trestle Mania” (GT, 8/29): My wife and I moved to Santa Cruz in the early ’70s. It was a time of slow growth/no growth. The facilities that were in existence then were sufficient to get us from place to place fairly efficiently. The Santa Cruz to San Jose railroad had seen its last days in 1940. It wasn’t needed then. Its tracks were ripped up and its right-ofway transferred into private hands. By 1970, the main roads in the county, 1 and 17, were adequate to serve our transit needs, both from Santa Cruz to Watsonville and from Santa Cruz to San Jose. Fast forward to today. The population of this county has exploded, despite the growth ordinances, and there are more people coming to live in this county or just going through it to get over the hill. Our roads are basically the same as they were in 1970, but the population sure isn’t. What was adequate in 1970 is totally inadequate today. In hindsight, it was a major error of our predecessors to ignore the possibility of some highway expansion and to totally wipe out rail transportation. We could really use both right now. Now to my point: we made a mistake years ago by ignoring >8

DETLEF AND MONIKA ADAM | SANTA CRUZ

TO-DEW LIST A foggy morning on Depot Hill in Capitola. Photograph by Kasia Palermo. Submit to photos@goodtimes.sc. Include information (location, etc.) and your name. Photos may be cropped. Preferably, photos should be 4 inches by 4 inches and minimum 250 dpi.

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LETTERS

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PHOTO CONTEST

GOOD IDEA

GOOD WORK

BRUSH WITH SUCCESS

BUILDING SOMETHING

The Santa Cruz County Arts Commission is accepting nominations for Artist of the Year through Friday, Sept. 14. For 33 years, the Arts Commission has selected outstanding artists nominated by the public and honored them through the award, which recognizes outstanding achievement in performing, visual or literary arts. Among the qualifications, nominees must be county residents and have national or international reputation. For more information, visit scparks.com.

The city of Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz Small Business Development Center and California Manufacturing Technology Consulting are partnering to host a meet-up for small and medium-sized manufacturers in Santa Cruz County. The free event will be from 5-7 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 26, at the R. Blitzer Gallery in the Wrigley building, 2801 Mission St., Santa Cruz. To RSVP, email kwyatt@cmtc.com, or call 737-7944. RSVPs are also accepted via Facebook, Eventbrite and MeetUp.com.

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LOCAL TALK

What’s your best ground score? BY MATTHEW COLE SCOTT

Only The Sun Will Outlast Our Panels.

I was working in the bar and someone left their sunglasses at a table. So I ran to find them, but they were gone. $275 Prada sunglasses. PRESTON DILLON SANTA CRUZ | BARTENDER

Great Woods, Massachusetts, at a Phish show. A quartz crystal bigger than my hand, in a port-a-potty. AUSTIN CARLSON SANTA CRUZ | PEST CONTROL MANAGER

A megalodon tooth in the sand hills by Scotts Valley. SEBASTIAN MANJON CUBERO SANTA CRUZ | FOUNDER/OWNER OF VIDA JUICE

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One time while running through Henry Cowell, I came across a half an ounce of weed, and I stopped my run and I smoked it.

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ROB BREZSNY FREE WILL ASTROLOGY Week of September 12-18 ARIES Mar21–Apr19

LIBRA Sep23–Oct 22

Author Anne Carson describes part of her creative process in this way: “Sometimes I dream a sentence and write it down. It’s usually nonsense, but sometimes it seems a key to another world.” I suspect you might be able to benefit from using a comparable trick in the coming days. That’s why you should monitor any odd dreams, seemingly irrational impulses, or weird fantasies that arise in you. Although they may not be of any practical value in themselves, they could spur a train of thought that leads you to interesting breakthroughs.

Libra blogger Ana-Sofia Cardelle writes candidly about her relationship with herself. She keeps us up to date with the ever-shifting self-images that float through her awareness. Here’s one of her bulletins: “Stage 1. me: I’m the cutest thing in the world. Stage 2. me, two seconds later: no, I’m a freaking goblin. Stage 3. me, two seconds after that: I’m the cutest goblin in the world.” I’m guessing that many of you Libras have reached the end of your own personal version of Stage 2. You’ve either already slipped into Stage 3, or soon will. No later than Oct. 1, you’ll be preparing to glide back into Stage 1 again.

TAURUS Apr20–May20

SCORPIO Oct23–Nov21

“The idea of liberation through the suppression of desire is the greatest foolishness ever conceived by the human mind,” wrote philosopher E. M. Cioran. I agree that trying to deny or stifle or ignore our desires can’t emancipate us. In fact, I’m inclined to believe that freedom is only possible if we celebrate and honor our desires, marvel at their enigmas, and respect their power. Only then can we hope to refine them. Only then can we craft them into beautiful, useful forces that serve us rather than confuse and undermine us. The coming weeks will be an excellent time for you to engage in this spiritual practice, Taurus.

“There’s no such thing as love,” said Scorpio painter Pablo Picasso, “there are only proofs of love.” I’m tempted to believe that’s true, especially as I contemplate the current chapter of your life story. The evidence seems clear: you will thrive by engaging in practical demonstrations of how much you care. You’ll be wise to tangibly help and support and encourage and inspire everyone and everything you love. To do so will make you eligible for blessings that are, as of this moment, still hidden or unavailable.

GEMINI May21–June20 “Remember that sometimes not getting what you want is a wonderful stroke of luck,” says the Dalai Lama. Ain’t that the truth! When I was 22 years old, there were two different women I desperately yearned for as if they were the Muse Queens of Heaven who would transform me into a great artist and quench my infinite passion. Fortunately, they both rejected me. They decisively set me free of my bondage to them. Later, when I was older and wiser, I realized that blending my fortunes with either of them would have led me away from my true destiny. I got lucky! In a similar but less melodramatic way, Gemini, I suspect you will also get lucky sometime soon.

SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

CANCER Jun21–Jul22

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Don’ts for Boys or Errors of Conduct Corrected was an advice book for boys published in 1902. Among many other strictures and warnings, it offered this advice: “Don’t giggle. For the love of decency, never giggle.” There was additional counsel in the same vein: “Don’t be noisy. The guffaw evinces less enjoyment than the quiet smile.” Another exhortation: “Don’t tease. Be witty, but impersonal.” In accordance with astrological omens, I hereby proclaim that all of those instructions are utterly wrong for you right now. To sweetly align yourself with cosmic rhythms, you should giggle and guffaw and tease freely. If you’re witty—and I hope you will be—it’ll serve you well to be affectionate and personable.

SAGITTARIUS Nov22–Dec21 According to a Pew Research Study, nearly 75 percent of Americans say they talk to God, but only 30 percent get a reply. I’m guessing the latter figure will rise dramatically for Sagittarias Americans in the next three weeks, however. Why? Because the astrological indicators suggest that authorities of all kinds will be more responsive than usual to Sagittarians of all nationalities. Help from higher powers is likely to be both more palpable and more forthcoming. Any communications you initiate with honchos, directors, and leaders have a better-than-normal chance of being well-received.

CAPRICORN Dec22–Jan19 One day in October 1926, author Virginia Woolf inscribed in her diary, “I am the usual battlefield of emotions.” It was a complaint, but also a brag. In fact, she drew on this constant turmoil to fuel her substantial output of creative writing. But the fact is that not all of us thrive on such ongoing uproar. As perversely glamorous and appealing as it may seem to certain people, many of us can do fine without it. According to my analysis, that will be true for you in the coming weeks. If you have a diary, you might justifiably write, “Hallelujah! I am not a battlefield of emotions right now!”

AQUARIUS Jan20–Feb18

“Simplicity is about subtracting the obvious and adding the meaningful,” writes designer John Maeda. “The ability to simplify means to eliminate the unnecessary so that the necessary may speak up,” says artist Hans Hofmann. “Simplicity strips away the superfluous to reveal the essence,” declares a blogger named Cheo. I hope these quotes provide you with helpful pointers, Leo. You now have the opportunity to cultivate a masterful version of simplicity.

Anthropologist Margaret Mead had definite ideas about “the ways to get insight.” She named them as follows: “to study infants; to study animals; to study indigenous people; to be psychoanalyzed; to have a religious conversion and get over it; to have a psychotic episode and get over it.” I have my own list of ways to spur insight and inspiration, which includes: to do walking meditations in the woods on a regular basis, no matter what the weather; to engage in long, slow sex with a person you love; to spend a few hours reviewing in detail your entire life history; to dance to music you adore for as long as you can before you collapse from delighted exhaustion. What about you, Aquarius? What are your reliable ways to get insight? I suggest you engage in some of them, and also discover a new one. You’re in the Flood of Radical Fresh Insights Phase of your astrological cycle.

VIRGO Aug23–Sep22

PISCES Feb19–Mar20

Your keynote is the Japanese word shizuka. According to photographer Masao Yamamoto, it means “cleansed, pure, clear, and untainted.” One of his artistic practices is to wander around forests looking in the soil for “treasures” that emanate shizuka. So in his definition, the term isn’t about being scrubbed or sanitized. Rather, he’s interested in pristine natural phenomena that are unspoiled by civilization. He regards them as food for his soul. I mention this, Virgo, because now is an excellent time for you to get big doses of people and places and things that are cleansed, pure, clear, and untainted.

Stanley Kubrick made masterful films, but most of them bore me. I regard John Ashbery as a clever and innovative poet, but I’ve never been excited by his work. As for painter Mark Rothko, I recognize his talent and intelligence, but his art leaves me empty. The music of Norah Jones is pretty and technically impeccable, but it doesn’t move me. In the coming weeks, Pisces, I invite you to make the kinds of fine distinctions I’m describing here. It will be important for you to be faithful to your subjective responses to things, even as you maintain an objective perspective about them and treat them with respect.

LE0 Jul23–Aug22

Homework: Make two fresh promises to yourself: one that’s easy to keep and one that’s at the edge of your capacity to live up to.

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OPINION

<4

the rail option. Had we kept the rail and ultimately utilized it, I imagine that traffic on Highway 17 would be far lighter than it is today. Let’s not make the same mistake by tearing up the Santa Cruz-Watsonville rail line. One day we could use rail transit to go from Watsonville to Santa Cruz to San Jose. Sure, maybe we can’t use the existing rails very effectively today, but at least it will still be there for future generations. I probably won’t be around to see it happen, but I would really hate to have this same letter written by my great-grandson.

ONLINE COMMENTS

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RE: RENT CONTROL Nice article, but leaving out that the Rent Control Board outlined in the ballot measure wouldn’t have to answer to the City Council or City Manager, and are in charge of their own salaries, seems to me worth mentioning. Not sure where the money for their salaries is supposed to come from either. Nothing mentioned about UCSC adding students without building adequate housing for years, putting pressure on rents, also seemed to me an oversight. Just saying.

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NEWS SPREADING THEIR WINGS Digital NEST organizes new conference to support diversity in tech BY ALISHA GREEN

HOUR TIME Tracy Kennedy (left), an assistant manager at Second Story, and peer counselor Jessica Brown discuss employee

shifts at the Second Story respite home, which is closing this fall. PHOTO: HUGH MCCORMICK

End of the Story

The closure of Second Story may have dire consequences for mental health care in Santa Cruz County BY HUGH MCCORMICK

T

he concentric circle of dark green semicolons covering Carleen Neuman’s left wrist has become a source of pride and a symbol of resiliency. Each of the six punctuation marks represent a time when she could have chosen to end her life, but didn’t. Neuman’s intricate tattoo covers up a long series of deep, jagged scars that evidence a lifetime of razor blade cutting and burning. It provides a daily reminder that her story isn’t over yet—and that she should tell it. “There’s a lot not right with the mental health system in Santa Cruz,” Neuman says. “Second Story was the one thing that worked. If it weren’t for my three stays at Second Story,

I’d probably be dead. My story would be over.” The news that Second Story Peer Run Respite House—Santa Cruz’s only alternative to inpatient psychiatric hospitalization—is closing its doors at the end of November is hitting guests like Neuman, as well as the program’s 14 staffers and other members of the mental health community, extremely hard. “The funding for Second Story is no longer available,” Santa Cruz County Mental Health Director Erik Riera wrote to county staff in an Aug. 23 email. “The decision to close Second Story was very difficult for me as the county behavioral health director,

as we have been very invested in building and expanding peer services in our community” Many leaders in Santa Cruz County’s mental health system are angry about the decision to close Second Story. “It was essentially done behind closed doors, so to the community it came as a brutal shock,” says Yana Jacobs, who was instrumental in establishing Second Story a little over eight years ago. “And the closure notice is such a short time frame. A few months. This announcement has been traumatic, and people are having difficulty processing it.” As the first entirely peer-run respite house in California, >12

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018

If Silicon Valley wants to keep arguing that its lack of diversity is due to a talent pipeline problem, it’s going to have to answer to Jacob Martinez. Martinez, founder and executive director of Watsonville-based nonprofit Digital NEST, is expanding on the vision of the NEST’s free tech training program for youth with the launch of a new conference this fall bringing top local talent together with companies looking to hire. He’s gathering 300 high school seniors and college students from the region to attend workshops and panels. The students will also meet with recruiters on Oct. 13 in Watsonville at the inaugural NEST Flight conference. Martinez is looking to prove wrong any and all Silicon Valley tech executives who say they can’t find a diverse pool of talent to draw from. And he has a similar message for local companies who say they can’t find talented workers without looking to places like Stanford University or Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. “I look around here and see tons of people with tons of talent, and they’re diverse,” he says. To those companies that haven’t changed their recruiting practices, Martinez says: “I’m doing the work for you.” He’s landed big corporate- and techworld names on the list of conference sponsors, including Adobe, Comcast, Kaiser Permanente, Plantronics, SurveyMonkey, and GitHub. Martinez wants to get the word out to other companies interested in recruiting now, as well as to high school students who might want to sign up. His goal is to stem the brain drain of young talent in South County. “Ultimately, what we are trying to do is get the young people in our community the skills, network and connections to get the betterpaying jobs in their community,” he says. If they stay local and land good jobs, Martinez says, it will “spark economic development from within” as they buy homes and push back on the gentrification that’s been spiraling out into rural areas. Martinez has been focused >14

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NEWS END OF THE STORY <11

A PLEA FOR A SANE APPROACH TO RENT CONTROL By Datta Khalsa, Broker By the time you read this, the Santa Cruz City Council will have conducted the First Reading of their proposed Exorbitant Rent Increase Ordinance which is intended to take effect if Measure M does not go through in November. With a little luck, they will have continued discussion and you can join in before they unilaterally pass it. I recently expressed my thoughts in an open letter to them, echoing some of the sentiments expressed by the local group Santa Cruz Together: Honorable Council Members,

I have become aware of your upcoming proposal to limit rent increases to 10% in any given year and 15% in any two-year period. As a housing professional who manages over 150 rental units, I am in support of such measures as they are in compliance with accepted standards of practice of good taste recognized by CAA and other organizations who promote healthy landlord-tenant relations.

SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

What is not in compliance with such standards are concepts such as “just cause” eviction provisions which provide a disincentive to housing providers and create a negative impact on the already sub-standard supply of rental housing stock in our community. In fact, I have had multiple clients who own rental property in Santa Cruz who have asked me to provide current opinion of market value in anticipation for selling their properties off in the event that Measure M or even a toned-down version of any ordinance containing just cause eviction measures goes into effect, which would constitute a wrongful taking of their property if it were kept as a rental.

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In order to avoid this impact, each of these property owners would respond to by selling the property off, which in all likelihood under the Ellis act would displace their current tenants for a period of TEN YEARS, to be replaced by homebuyers who generally need a Silicon Valley income to be able to afford the prices around here. And while I would certainly profit from every rental property that that each of these clients sell off, I feel the overall effect would be a negative impact on our community by taking away places for tenants to live, thereby increasing long-range commuting and the probability of homelessness amongst the entry-level workers of our community. Housing policy is complicated and tremendously important to the future of everyone in the city of Santa Cruz. Any ordinance beyond this added tenant protection requires a thorough process of community input combined with a serious and complete study of impacts. It would be reckless to make fast changes that affect the future of Santa Cruz housing and the quality of life in Santa Cruz. For example, “just cause” eviction provisions that supersede lease terms will drive people away from providing rental housing. I applaud the work you are doing in seeking ways to effectively address the high cost of housing and sincerely hope you will not consider any last-minute changes to your housing policy without involving the community and including all interested parties. You can learn more on the effort to preserve rental housing stock in our area at santacruztogether.org and express your concerns to the City Council at citycouncil@cityofsantacruz.com. Datta Khalsa is the broker and owner at Main Street Realtors in Soquel. He can be reached at (831)818-0181 or datta@mainstrealtors.com Paid Advertorial

Second Story quickly became a flagship program, and a model for almost a dozen other respite houses across the nation. It was an experiment that worked—until now. The men and women who run Second Story have always prided themselves on making it a sanctuary; a safe place where men and women with a mental illness can go when they feel like they need extra support, someone to talk to, a shoulder to cry on, or a place to go when they feel things are starting to unravel. Guests can stay at the six-bed residential program for up to two weeks. There, they can get 24-hour-a-day community, advice, and comprehensive support from highly trained individuals who truly understand the people they’re serving and have helped many of the people they serve avoid inpatient hospitalization. The November closure of Second Story “is going to leave a huge hole that can’t be replaced,” says Jacobs. “People will isolate in their homes, and by the time someone notices, they will end up in a hospital. Which might be avoided if there was a peer

respite to go to early on.” The decision to cut Second Story was made in collaboration with Riera, Director of Adult Services Pam Rogers Wyman, and Encompass CEO Monica Martinez. Like many things, it came down to money. Multiple employees providing services around the clock make the annual cost to run the program around $700,000—and that number has been rising in recent years. The grant from SAMHSA that supported the full cost of operating the program expired in 2015. Since then, Santa Cruz County has provided cash to keep the program going, while also searching for a longterm sustainable source of funding. Because peer services are not considered Medi-Cal eligible, there haven’t been any matching funds to help the county support it. When Encompass, which does contract management for Second Story, received a grant from the California Health Facilities Finance Authority (CHFFA) to buy a new permanent home in Aptos earlier this year, hopes were high for Second Story’s future. The facility even moved into its new home.

However, the CHFFA grant required expansion from six to eight beds, which turned out to be impossible due to the permit process and license requirements. The CHFFA grant also required a 20-year commitment and the county was unwilling to sign on to spending more than $700,000 each year for two decades. Riera recognizes that the demand for services in other areas of the mental health system continues to increase, and says that Encompass will transition Second Story from a facility- based program to a community-based one starting Dec.1. The house will be sold, and Reira says the 14 workers who have made Second Story their home and community for more than eight years will be offered other positions with the county and Encompass. The prospect of shuttering Second Story—essentially gutting the program—is not going over well with many of its current staff. Fanne Fernow, who has worked at Second Story for two and half years, says that she is “pretty certain that [she] would not feel comfortable working in a more traditional model of care.” The red headed 65-year-old started as a volunteer at Second >16

NEWS BRIEFS BLUE BOOK Local Democrats with two years worth of pent-up energy are eager to make a difference this November. And one way to do that, they’ve decided, is to look outside the county. Santa Cruz Indivisible has set its sights on two districts, California’s 21st Congressional District, home to Republican Congressmember David Valadao and its 22nd, home to Congressmember Devin Nunes. The forecasting website FiveThirtyEight gives Democrats the edge to take back the House, and it gives the Democratic Party anywhere from a 26-71

percent chance of unseating Valadao. The same experts give Democrats between a 3 and 13 percent chance of unseating Nunes, who has earned special ire from liberals over his acrobatic contortions, bending over backwards to defend President Donald Trump. Winning Nunes’ seat may sound like a long shot for challenger Andrew Janz, but Communications Director Amanda Harris Altice says that Indivisible has picked its districts based mostly on geography, and, given Democratic feelings about Nunes, the challenge of taking him on might be more of a blessing than a curse. Altice, who has already started

canvassing the Central Valley district, says that Nunes doesn’t talk to his constituents, and that the voters she’s talked to—including Republicans— have been listening. “If you reach people that way, who knows? We ended up with Trump. We didn’t think that would happen,” says Harris Altice, who helped organize a volunteer recruitment event at the Santa Cruz Civic Auditorium on Saturday, Sept. 8. The summit included canvassing workshops, and it got about 150 people through the door, but there’s still plenty of time to sign up and help. Chris Bowman, who manages merchandise for Santa Cruz Indivisible, says

that by pooling the zeal of its various teams, Indivisible can fill areas that may not fall into purview of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. “A lot of people are putting in their free energy, and nobody’s getting paid or anything like that, just working hard and smart,” Bowman says, lugging a box of shirts to her car after Saturday’s event. “A lot of people are ready to go because we need to fix things and save our country, basically.” JACOB PIERCE

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PHOTO SHOP Digital NEST founder Jacob Martinez helps intern Josue Sanchez on a project, while Remy Rodriguez plays guitar and looks on. PHOTO: KEANA PARKER

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on this mission for years. Before starting Digital NEST, he worked for nearly a decade on diversifying the tech workforce. When he paused in 2013 to reflect on his efforts, he realized that not enough had changed nationally or locally when it came to adding more women and people of color in tech— and, in some cases, the numbers were actually getting worse. Martinez used to take students on field trips, via Watsonville TEC, to be face-toface with the newest tech at companies like Google, Facebook and Apple. Then, he had to bring them back to schools that too often had outdated machines. “The tech industry was creating these environments to spark innovation and drive creativity, but the educational system was doing the complete opposite,” Martinez says. In 2014, he raised more than $300,000 in four months to open Digital NEST in Watsonville. A second location opened in

Salinas in April 2017. In total, the program has had more than 2,000 youth, from high school students to twentysomethings, sign up for its programs. The 4,500-square-foot space in Watsonville is bathed in all the allure of a Silicon Valley tech office, with neon lights, music, and some 120 machines loaded with software from Adobe and connected to Plantronics headsets, Logitech gear and more. There’s also a range of free, organic, locally grown food and snacks in the kitchen. Upstairs, there’s a recording studio, cameras, music equipment and largeformat printers. “The biggest feedback we get is they vote with their feet,” Martinez says, counting at least 30 students at the NEST on a recent Friday afternoon. “Nobody has to be here.” Marcus Cisneros, a graphic design student at San Jose State University, says being part of Digital NEST makes him feel like he’s ahead of his college peers, because he gets to put what he’s learning into practice. As

part of Digital NEST’s youth consultant group bizzNEST, he’s been able to put his video editing and graphic design skills to work for clients. BizzNEST clients have included UCSC, American Express and Martinelli’s. These days, when Cisneros visits tech companies or conferences, it feels like a bigger version of what he’s already experienced through Digital NEST. “At its core, the energy and atmosphere is the same,” he says. The experience is not only technical, says Cisneros, but also collaborative, playful, nurturing, exciting, and inspirational. When he goes to NEST Flight in October, he’s most interested in talking with recruiters to learn what they’re looking for and what he needs to improve on, he says. Companies like Watsonville-based California Giant Berry Farms are eager to meet with local tech talent like Cisneros. As soon as the berry company’s managers heard about Martinez’s idea for the conference, they were on board with the goal of keeping tech talent in

the community, says Cindy Jewell, the company’s vice president of marketing. The world of agriculture is becoming more techfocused, after all, and it needs to draw on the next generation for those skills. “We don’t want them going to Silicon Valley, either,” Jewell says. But to many youth, “the money and the prestige is all up in the Bay Area. That is where kids want to go.” Masha Chernyak, vice president of programs and policy at the San Franciscobased Latino Community Foundation, which is a lead sponsor of NEST Flight, sees the conference as a win-win for employers and local talent. Since Latino youth make up the majority of California’s young people, Chernyak says, their future is the future of the state, and they’re full of brilliant ideas. “We have never tapped into their true potential,” Chernyak says. “And once we do, we are all going to benefit from it.”

For more information, visit nestflight.org.


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Story—baking cakes and cooking food for staff events and birthdays—and quickly fell in love with the program. She says that she treasures the community, her late-night chats over cookies and milk and working on her art with guests. “The powers that be are trying to convince us that there can be such a thing as a ‘nonresidential peer respite,’” she says. “I do not agree.” The six beds that Second Story provides men and women in the local behavioral health system are unique—and, by most accounts, vital to the Santa Cruz County mental health system. The demand for beds at Second Story is consistently strong and the program operates at capacity year-round. Carol Williamson, president of NAMI Santa Cruz, has been closely monitoring the events surrounding Second Story’s closure. “We desperately need more beds at all levels, not fewer. It is unacceptable to lose any beds now. Whenever a bed is lost or a program closes, the impact is tremendous,” she says. Williamson notes that Santa Cruz County already has a shortage of crisis beds—only 16 in the locked psychiatric health facility—and many people in crisis (estimates say half of them) are sent out of county to Fremont and as far as Sacramento. The 12 beds at the county’s only step down facility, El Dorado Center, are always overbooked. As are those at Telos—Santa Cruz County’s only crisis residential program. Mental health beds of all kinds are scarce and overbooked with waiting lists,” says Williamson. “If six beds are not available at Second Story, where will clients go to stabilize when an episode is coming on—suicidal depression, psychosis?” The effects of Second Story’s closure may reach far beyond county lines. There’s a chance that the local closure could be one domino in a larger statewide chain reaction. “This is a national issue, particularly for states that do not have peer services as a Medicaidreimbursable service,” wrote Riera. “We have heard from other counties that they are facing the same challenges and are moving toward other models.”


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Who’s playing high school football in the year 2018? By Jacob Pierce

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an Lorenzo Valley High vs. Santa Cruz High scrimmage, Aug. 17: Scotts Valley quarterback Kyle Rajala stands five yards back from the line of scrimmage, his offensive team lined up in shotgun formation. He catches the snap and immediately scans the field for an open receiver as his teammates sprint downfield, while a pocket of swarming defensive linemen collapses quickly around him. Rajala spins right and sees an opening, a gap between the linemen wide enough to drive a semi through. He starts sprinting forward, then hesitates. The hole disappears. Rajala backpedals, spinning again—this time rolling to his left, with practically a third of the Santa Cruz High defense within arm’s reach, eager to bring him to the ground or at least chase him out of bounds. Moments before Rajala reaches the sideline, he sees what he’s looking for: an open man. Tight end Will Schwartz is sprinting toward the end zone. Rajala launches a high-arching pass about a yard beyond Schwartz, who leaps into the air before making the catch and sliding to the

artificial turf on the three-yard line, skidding forward as his body kicks up the rubbery pellets that fill the green Cabrillo College field. The awe-inspiring catch from the high school senior brings an odd, bittersweet sense of relief to the crowd. Just a short time earlier, the entire scrimmage came to a halt when the Falcons’ Elias Avalos went down with a broken femur, stopping play for 15 minutes, while both teams waited for the offensive tackle, who eventually got wheeled

off the field on a stretcher. But it brings chills to sports super fan Jennifer Lang, a mom who’s standing just beyond the end zone a few yards away. Jennifer is here tonight at this August pre-season jamboree to watch one of her three kids—CJ, a San Lorenzo Valley High senior—play. Jennifer is a lifelong football fan who proudly rooted for the Wolverine during her time at the University of Michigan. As much as she loves to see that her kids have taken to the sport, she says


UP FRONT Aptos High’s formidable offensive line grapples with Monte Vista Christian’s

defense, looking for room at the line of scrimmage. PHOTO: KEANA PARKER

more bad for him than I do for the football team,” Scotts Valley Head Coach Louie Walters later tells me. Media coverage in recent years has put football injuries under a microscope, less for broken bones than for concussions and the degenerative neurological disease Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), which some researchers have linked to the sport. San Lorenzo Valley blazed a new trail nearly three years ago, when it unveiled new cushioned caps

covering its team’s football helmets, designed to limit the impact from blows to the head. This year, however, few of the Cougars are wearing them. On this chilly August night at Cabrillo, Jennifer Lang turns to her husband Steve to ask him why most players, their son CJ included, stopped wearing their caps. “Family’s choice,” Steve tells her, meaning it’s up to each player and his family. “Well, why isn’t he wearing his

20>

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018

it’s impossible not to watch a little differently as a parent. She would hate to see one of her kids get hurt, and she feels for Avalos and his family. Before his senior season ever got properly underway, high school football is now over for Avalos, a two-way player who also played defensive end and was the team’s defensive player two seasons running. The Falcons felt his absence immediately, but the tinges of pain run deeper than that. “I feel

then?” Jennifer screams in only half-joking exasperation. “They’re just like high school girls,” she turns to me and says, grinning and shaking her head. “They want to look good out there.” A few players on other local teams from around the area are now wearing those same impactreducing caps, but not many. Jennifer suggests that it may have been easier for SLV to fully embrace the cushioned helmets long-term if the trend had spread countywide, although Head Coach Dave Poetzinger tells me the recent change was based on his “conversations with parents” and had nothing to do with aesthetics. In any case, Jennifer admits to sometimes wondering how much of a difference the caps really made in the first place, as she could often hear the impact of colliding helmets from the stands anyway. Most local high school coaches have seen participation in their football programs drop in recent years—a shift they generally attribute to concern about injuries, although the coaches themselves seem to believe the fears are overblown. Last year, participation in high school football dropped for the second straight season nationally— and for the third straight season in California, where it fell 6 percent from 2015 to 2017—while participation in high school sports climbed overall. Football remains far and away the most popular high school sport around, with more than 1 million participants nationwide, 97,000 of them in California. Football’s existential crisis extends to the NFL and college level; viewership is dropping for both, although no one can agree on the reasons. CJ, SLV’s strong safety, says his own general well-being does cross his mind, but that he hasn’t gotten a concussion. He relishes practice time with his teammates, including the offseason workouts, for which he gladly woke up at 6 a.m. each of the past three winters to stay in shape. “We’re like a brotherhood,” CJ says. “We care for each other, play for each other.”

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*** Soquel High vs. San Lorenzo High, Aug. 17 scrimmage: One of Soquel High School’s star receivers is jogging back to his sideline, shortly after bringing in a catch for what nearly counted as a touchdown—were it not for him narrowly stepping out of bounds. Three members of the opposing San Lorenzo Valley secondary jaw with the receiver as he jogs away, and he starts snapping back at them. A whistle blows. While a nearby official starts reaching for a yellow flag at his belt, the receiver gives a forceful tap to the nearest defensive back on his helmet facemask. The defender retaliates, hitting back a little harder before the receiver suddenly tackles his opponent, and a swarm of angry football players sprint into a mountainous dog pile, with athletes from the sidelines jumping in from every direction, as officials start blowing rapid-fire whistles and running over to stop the fight. After the refs and coaches break up the brawl, the San Lorenzo Valley Cougars walk to the far sideline, while

the Soquel Knights walk to their end zone, where newly hired coach Dwight Lowery proceeds to yell at them. The players, circled around him, slowly unclip their chin straps, take off their helmets and hang their heads. There are a couple minutes left on the Cabrillo scoreboard overhead, but there’s no point in finishing this final preseason match. Both teams walk to their respective buses. “It’s embarrassing,” Lowery later tells me, recapping his remarks to the team that evening’s Cabrillo jamboree. “If you’re gonna fight somebody, fight ’em between the whistle. This is the only game you can play where it’s literally organized violence, and you won’t go to jail when it’s whistle to whistle. So why is it that, when the whistle’s blown, you want to fight somebody? It doesn’t make sense to me. You’re throwin’ a punch at a guy that has a helmet on. If you throw the punch hard enough and break your hand, was that punch worth it?” San Lorenzo Valley Head Coach

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Dave Poetzinger feels similarly embarrassed by what transpired. “When we set foot on the field, we say ‘no personal fouls.’ And the same basic principles go for life, too. We play the game with intensity and with respect,” says Poetzinger, who asks me not to use any of the players’ names involved and assures me they have been disciplined. “I hope we grow from it and move on.” Lowery, Soquel’s newly hired head coach, went to Soquel himself—graduating in 2004 after dominating as a defensive back and running back who once scored seven touchdowns in one game. He then went on to play for Cabrillo College, San Jose State and eventually the NFL, where he spent nine seasons as a free safety. Lowery’s a selfdescribed “nerd” who says he had to grow up too fast as a kid, and he still nurtures his inner child. Along with a game ball from his time with the New York Jets, the decorations in his office include Star Wars figurines and comic book memorabilia. Lowery says his Soquel Knights need to learn structure, both on the football field and off of it. The values he believes he’s instilling—showing up on time, following instructions, staying focused, teamwork—apply to every other avenue of life, he says. No other sport, he argues, requires so much buy-in and communication from so many individuals on a team for the group to be successful. Soquel’s squad, he adds, has been in need of a culture change. Lowery was upset, for example, when he learned that some of his players had gone running through a girls’ volleyball practice half-naked. “I’ve had to punish these guys hard— because if not, it’s never gonna change, unless I start kicking guys off the football team. And right now, we don’t got enough guys to be doing that type of stuff,” Lowery says. “You either learn, or you kick yourself off the team.” For all of the attention in football given to being disciplined, many of the sport’s headlines at the national level are gobbled up by a U.S. leader weak on self-control and big on running his mouth. Last season,

President Donald Trump began attacking NFL players for kneeling instead of standing during pregame national anthems. The players were protesting incidents of police brutality and shootings of black Americans. Trump has suggested that any player who chose not to stand was a “son of a bitch” that should be “fired.” Many pundits and NFL players have fumed at Trump’s words over the past year. But local players and coaches at the high school level say they aren’t ruffled by the president’s comments. But that doesn’t mean that those comments have gone unnoticed. “We’re Santa Cruz County, so with some of the stuff Trump does and says, you don’t have to be a football coach to wonder why things are the way they are,” Poetzinger says. At the national level, Brendon Ayanbadejo, a Santa Cruz High grad who went on to have a 10-year career in the NFL, has watched with pride as professional football players have grown more social justiceoriented. When he got criticized for supporting Maryland’s gay marriage ballot measure in 2012, he worried that he actually might get fired. Things are different now, he says, and if he were playing today, he would definitely be participating in the protests. “The national anthem is near and dear to me, but so is the Constitution,” says Ayanbadejo, who took his message about LGBT rights to the highest level when his Baltimore Ravens won the Super Bowl in 2013, Ayanbadejo’s final season. Leaning back into the couch in his office, Lowery says he isn’t sure whether or not he would be participating in the anthem protests were he still playing in the NFL this season. “I understand both sides of the argument,” Lowery explains, as Soquel Athletic Director Stu Walters opens the door, walking into the office to sit down next to the new coach on the couch. “I think the bottom line is we all need to stop being assholes,”


YARD WORK Lowery continues, “whether it’s not supporting the country, or whether it’s injustice. Just try not to be an asshole.” “That’s our motto,” Walters says, leaning forward into the conversation with a smile. “Don’t be a dick.” ***

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Monte Vista Christian vs. Aptos High, Sept. 7: It’s Aptos’ first offensive play against Monte Vista, and quarterback Hunter Matys is lined up under center. After the snap, Matys brings the ball toward the belly of fullback Josh Powell, who’s running full-steam ahead for a possible handoff. But as Matys swivels his head around, he reads the defense charging toward them and opts to keep the ball instead, running around Powell, who bulldozes ahead into the nearest defensive end several inches taller than him for a hard-nosed block. Matys turns the corner and starts sprinting down the sideline, past linebackers who try to cut him off. He has one man to beat, speedy Monte Vista outside linebacker Daniel Brierley, who angles down field a little behind the quarterback. Once Brierley reaches the 10-yard line, he lunges forward at Matys’ striding legs to bring him down just shy of the goal line and prevent the touchdown. Two days before what would become a 35-0 win over Monte Vista, the Aptos Mariners are gathered for a 7 p.m. practice on their home turf, Trent Dilfer Memorial Stadium— named for their alma mater quarterback, who would go on to win a Super Bowl with the 2000 Ravens. A dome-like marine layer hangs overhead, and by the time 7 p.m. rolls around, the practice is well underway, as the whole team has shown up early. Center Hayden Mennie has been leading offensive line drills with guard Josh SousaJimenez. Coach Randy Blankenship refers to these two seniors as his “coaches on the field.” Along with their fellow linemen, these “soldiers,” as Blankenship also calls them, have been opening up big holes for Matys, Powell and running back Marcos Reyes, who went on to break the school’s all-time

rushing record Friday night. The undefeated Mariners have squashed their opponents 146-27 over their first three games, and the offense hasn’t punted much, thanks largely to a smart offensive line, anchored by Minnie and Sousa-Jimenez, that pushes defenses downfield. When it comes to injuries, no-nonsense Minnie has a special technique. “I don’t think about injuries,” he says, catching his breath in between reps at practice. Aptos’ program is going strong, with 46 players on its varsity team. Unlike some schools, Aptos still has enough players for its own freshman team, in addition to a junior varsity one. Blankenship believes participation has dropped more generally across the region because “we’ve got a lot of soft people in California.” Over the past 15 years, researchers, many of them at Boston University, have studied the neurodegenerative CTE, which is caused by repeated hits to the head, as well as its link to football. It’s difficult to get a clear look at how widespread the problem is, as the condition can only be diagnosed via an autopsy, during which a doctor runs brain scans and dissects the tissue. Among CTE’s symptoms are memory loss, suicidal thoughts and personality and mood changes. Diagnosed players include former San Diego Chargers linebacker Junior Seau, who shot himself in the chest at age 43, and former New England Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez, who hung himself at 27, while serving a life sentence for murder. According to a Boston University report released last summer, experts found that the brains of 110 out of 111 former players tested did, in fact, have the disease—as did 48 of 53 college players and three out of 14 high school players. Football coaches are quick to note the inherent risks of other sports. Blankenship says that, instead of football, people should be pointing fingers at soccer for its risk of concussions. A report found that girls’ soccer had the highest per capita rate of concussions in

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the country. And SLV’s water polo team, Poetzinger tells me, had more concussions last year than its football team. But the truth is that concussions aren’t really the problem, at least not when it comes to CTE. Chris Nowinski, co-founding CEO of the Concussion Legacy Foundation, says that what has become clear in recent years is that the only thing that’s been linked to the disease is the number of total hits. “They’re looking at the wrong question,” Nowinski says of coaches raising such issues. “The question is, ‘Did you play 10 years of football, and take 10,000 hits to the head?’” Nonetheless, Nowinski, a former WWE wrestler who played defensive tackle at Harvard, says that anyone playing four years of high school football will almost certainly be fine. “It doesn’t mean their risk is zero. The best guidance we can give is to limit the amount of years you play,” he says. High school football, particularly here in California, may be safer than ever. The California Interscholastic Federation (CIF) has cut down fullcontact practice to two days a week for no more than 45 minutes per day. Coaches have changed the way they teach fundamentals in order to reduce helmet-to-helmet contact. Under an increasingly strict rule book, officials are also flagging players for reckless in-game hits. Ayanbadejo, who graduated from Santa Cruz High in 1994, says he wonders pretty much every day if he’ll eventually develop CTE. He says he’s already had five of his friends either die or develop amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), which some experts believe could also have a football connection. “I would hit people on the football field, and I would think to myself, ‘There’s no way this isn’t gonna affect me later on in life, but at this juncture, there isn’t any data that says that it’s going to,’” Ayanbadejo remembers. “Later on, we learned that the NFL was withholding information on what really happens—not just from concussions, but from repetitive hits to the head. It definitely changed the way I played,

hopefully not too late for me.” Nowinski is working with other experts at Boston University’s CTE Center to study possible ways to diagnose CTE in living people. He hopes to have information within five years. When scanning national headlines, it sometimes seems like in between toxic political arguments and questions about player safety, the entire sport of football has become oddly tainted. And yet, when Aptos High’s Friday night lights come on, no one is fighting about the validity of nonviolent protests or starting arguments on Twitter. In high school—where the levels of discourse and safety are much different than the NFL—football appears—on the surface, at least— largely free of the ills that have left an increasingly bad taste in the mouths of many football fans. Even the collegiate level hasn’t been immune to controversy. The biggest university football programs in the country, like Alabama and Ohio State, rake in tens of millions of dollars annually from their teams, and that dynamic has opened an often ugly debate about whether or not the NCAA should loosen regulations that currently forbid schools from paying student athletes. But again, that issue doesn’t affect high school football. “We’re pretty pure in that way,” Poetzinger says. Poetzinger, also an English teacher, stresses that it’s possible to have a winless season and still have great success stories. With declining participation, he worries about some of the kids who might have decided to suit up several years ago, but now decide against it. “I see kids that aren’t involved, and they’re falling off the map,” he says. Santa Cruz High School senior Alonzo Rodriguez relishes the opportunity to make hard blocks and tackles as an outlet for his aggressive energy, which he apparently has plenty of. A fullback built with the frame of a wild boar on deceptively quick legs, he did try other sports as a kid, but they never held his interest. Rodriguez


YARD WORK says that he once fouled out of a basketball game in less than a minute of playing time, accruing five fouls in just 48 seconds. “Football helps me be more Zen, more at peace,” he tells me minutes before a Thursday afternoon practice gets underway at Santa Cruz High. On the following night, a special rivalry match plays out on Santa Cruz High’s field. For four straight seasons, Santa Cruz was the winner of the annual “stump game” against Soquel High. This year, though, Coach Lowery’s Knights pull off a 20-13 win with a strong come-from-behind second-half performance against the Cardinals—good for a 3-0 start to their season, their first in years. After the final buzzer sounds, exuberant Soquel players high-five in the middle of Santa Cruz High’s field

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and scream into the heavens. They pass around the game’s trophy—a stump-like slab of redwood with each school’s logos painted on. The Knights players feel grains in the wood, while parents take out their phones to snap pictures. Every player gets a photograph with this piece of county history. Friends swarm the field to congratulate the strong-willed Lowery, who is all smiles for the moment. Jumping up and down, senior Zeke Thomas starts a chant of “We’ve got the stump!” to the tune of Parliament’s “Give Up the Funk.” Thomas, who stiff-armed a cornerback for the game’s final touchdown, praises the sense of structure that Lowery has brought to Soquel, calling him the “coach of year.” “All this hard work!” Thomas yells. “He told us that as long as we put in the work, it’ll pay off.”

IN DIVISION For the second straight year, California Interscholastic Federation (CIF) has shaken up the local football divisions. This year, all of the Monterey Bay high school teams are in a new Pacific Coast Athletic League (PCAL), which has been divided into four sections. The downside of the new approach, explains Santa Cruz High Coach Jesse “Bubba” Trumbull, is that teams have to travel farther for league matches, and they don’t have many rivals in their own divisions. The upside, at least in theory, is parity. Trumbull says he does like the “concept of an equity league, where you’re playing teams that should be close to your same student population and turnout for the sport.”

The next level under Gabilan, the Mission Division, has three county teams— Watsonville (3-0), Scotts Valley (2-1) and Monte Vista Christian (0-3). Watsonville and Scotts Valley have shown the ability to wear opponents down with their strong power running games. Monte Vista has its own bag of tricks under new head coach Jubenal Rodriguez that could win some big games, once the Mustangs’ rough early-season schedule calms down. After that, the Cypress Division is the new home of San Lorenzo Valley (2-1), St. Francis (2-1) and the Santa Cruz Cardinals (0-3), who are still winless, in spite of some fun-to-watch skilled players and an intriguing spread offense tailored to the abilities of quarterback Dillon Danner. Two of their losses have been to Scotts Valley and Watsonville, both teams that are in the higher tier. The fourth division, Santa Lucia, has three county teams, Soquel (3-0), Harbor (0-2) and Pajaro Valley (0-3). Some wins this season could move those teams back up again, and given the fluidity in recent years, there could soon be whispers of further tweaking—if not reinventing—the setup the whole set up again, anyway.

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“If the divisions are only based on geographics, there’s gonna be haves and have-nots in one small area,” he adds. That’s the scenario that the new setup is attempting to avoid. Each division has seven teams. Dominant Aptos High (3-0) is grouped in with other Monterey Bay powerhouses that are similarly competitive to form PCAL’s Gabilan Division. Divisional games won’t start for another couple weeks, but the Mariners have set the goal of winning the league title.

GREY BEARS HARVEST PICNIC Tuesday, Sept 18, HarveyWest Park

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THEATER

KITCHEN CONFIDENTIAL Left to right: Julie James, Andrew Davids and Karel K. Wright in ‘The Beauty Queen of Leenane.’ PHOTO: STEVE DIBARTOLOMEO

SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Irish ‘Beauty’

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Intriguingly dark but uneven comedy opens the Jewel Theatre season BY CHRISTINA WATERS

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he mercurial voice of Karel K. Wright croons, teases, bellows, and begs to epic effect in Jewel Theatre’s lurid sitcom production of The Beauty Queen of Leenane. If only Anglo-Irish playwright Martin McDonagh had given her part as the controlling

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matriarch more inspiring lines to explore. McDonagh (recently famous as the writer/director of Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri) earned his rock star reputation with theatrical trilogies set in the brooding backwaters of an Emerald Isle

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that may or may not have existed somewhere in the 1930s. Set in the perpetual rain and gloom of Ireland’s west coast, Beauty Queen portrays the richly toxic bond of demanding mother Mag (Wright) and her spinster daughter Maureen (Julie James), trapped in a ceili dance

of codependency. The emotional pressure cooker finds some release through Pato Dooley (Andrew Davids), a handsome neighbor who meets Maureen at a party and affords her one night of escape from matriarchal hell. Pato’s slacker brother Ray (a hilarious Travis

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THEATER

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A cartoon of a frumpy manipulating hag, Wright commands the stage. She weedles, whines, and pouts as she pushes her careworn daughter to fetch her tea, fix her porridge, turn up the radio, and stoke the fire of their drab lives. Wright’s timing is as razor-sharp as her vocal range.

wished for tighter scenes, filled with enough dynamic tension to inspire an agonizing climax. And it’s hard to tell whether this was the fault of the play, the empty spaces of which eroded too much emotional energy, or the pacing of director Susan Myer Silton. Opening night audience had difficulty with some of the dialogue, thanks to the use of broad Irish accents throughout the performance. The chilling exchanges between Wright and James never landed with quite the raw, emotional fireworks that the set-up—and finale—required. It might have been otherwise with different casting. McDonagh has given us two endings to this play, and while that might work in Pinter, Albee, and Caryl Churchill, here it neutralized the climax. But the sight of hyperactive Travis Rynders going ballistic over the loss of a favorite childhood ball was worth the entire evening. And pacing will surely quicken as the show fine tunes its coming performances. Choice little moments, the unsentimental portrait of an Ireland down on its luck, and the ambidextrous artistry of Wright’s vocal timing, still manage to make The Beauty Queen of Leenane a rewarding evening of theater. ‘The Beauty Queen of Leenane’ by Martin McDonagh runs at the Colligan Theater through Sept. 30. jeweltheatre.net.

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Rynders) stops by the cottage from time to time out of sheer boredom. The quartet pushes against numbing isolation with results the playwright hopes will shock and amuse. And the play does both— sometimes to deliciously malevolent effect. A cartoon of a frumpy manipulating hag, Wright commands the stage. She weedles, whines, and pouts as she pushes her careworn daughter to fetch her tea, fix her porridge, turn up the radio, and stoke the fire of their drab lives. Wright’s timing is as razorsharp as her vocal range, and when the director allows, she can raise the rafters, as well as cajole with teatime sweetness. Mother Mag is a major pain in the ass, and no one feels it as sharply as her daughter. The light went out long ago in Maureen’s dreams for a future of her own, as her mother continuously reminds her. So when Pato comes home with her after a party, we know how much just one night of romance can mean. Darkening the ray of hope represented by Pato, and the occasional jolt of youthful energy represented by Ray, is the relentless tide of the harrowing mother/ daughter struggle. It is a game, or a dance, or a prizefight they’ve waged for decades. And from the very start, we can see where it will all lead. For some viewers, that will make Queen too predictable and obvious, the work of an inexperienced playwright in his mid-twenties. I didn’t mind seeing where it was going. I just

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Banff Centre Mountain Film Festival World Tour Radical Reels Night September 21 @ 7 pm Rio Theatre, 1205 Soquel Ave. SC

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ART

WOMAN OF THE WEIRD Nancy Lynn Jarvis is the editor of the new ‘Santa Cruz Weird’ anthology.

Getting ‘Weird’ New anthology backs up Santa Cruz’s rallying cry BY CHRISTINA WATERS

O

n Sunday, Sept. 16, the authors of stories collected in the new Santa Cruz Weird anthology will gather at the Santa Cruz Art Center to launch the newest literary snapshot of our endlessly weird city. “We have the Food Lounge from 6:30 to 8:30 [p.m.],” explains the editor, Nancy Lynn Jarvis, “so there will be plenty of time for attendees to listen to a little introductory talk, hear authors read from their stories, have a question and answer session, and then book signings.” Jarvis explains that Santa Cruz Weird is a follow-up response to the recently published Santa Cruz Noir short story collection. She’s a firm believer that the true vibe of our region is a weird one. “We have those bumper stickers, after all,” she notes wryly. So Jarvis put out the call for submissions last year to selected local writers. “The ground rules were pretty broad,” she

admits. “I told people their stories needed to entertain me and not be too dark.” Jarvis also met with writers she knew, and “a number of writers’ groups, to scout submissions.” The collected results range from Ed Sams’ tale about the Harmonic Convergence to Vinnie Hansen’s mystery tour of local tourist destinations, and Nancy Wood’s saga of the Great Santa Cruz Treasure Hunt. Hansen herself relishes writing short stories. “They’re great. There’s a single conflict and an arc I can see in its entirety from the start,” she says. “I can rough out the shape of a short story in a day, and then spend time endlessly fussing over word choices and nuances.” The launch party for ‘Santa Cruz Weird’ will be at 6:30 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 16, at the Santa Cruz Art Center, 1001 Center St., Santa Cruz. More info at misteriopress.com.


MUSIC

SONGS FOR A FUTURE GENERATION The B-52s’ music is experiencing a popular and critical resurgence.

Deep Impact ‘B

oys in bikinis, girls with surfboards,” snarled Fred Schneider on the B-52s’ first single, “Rock Lobster.” It’s a line that’s easy to miss in the band’s incredible five-minute beach-party fever dream about crustaceans, tanning butter, matching towels and whatever the hell a bikini whale is. But to me, it’s a lyric that represents everything that makes the B-52s great. Think about what it meant in 1978, when the song was released as the band’s first single. It was a time when surf culture was approaching its peak levels of macho toxicity, and the wahini revolution of women’s surfing was still years

away. But the B-52s used this simple gender flip to undermine conventional notions of sexual identity—in the middle of one of the greatest party songs in rock ’n’ roll history. With a debut like this, the world should have known what was coming. But somehow, as the band celebrates the 40th anniversary of their first hit, pop culture is still coming around to what the B-52s have been sneaking into their party mix for the last four decades. Between songs at the band’s show in Saratoga last summer, Schneider quipped, “an article just came out calling us the most subversive band ever, or something like that. Looks like somebody finally noticed.” That article, a salon.com

piece by Annie Zaleski titled “No Novelty, the B-52s May Be the Most Subversive Band America Ever Gave Us,” brilliantly gave the B-52s the long-overdue credit they deserve as cultural vanguards. A few months later, when I saw the band at the Growlers’ annual music festival in L.A., there were so many kids moshing, crowd-surfing and stage-diving to “Rock Lobster,” “Private Idaho,” “Planet Claire” and other songs from their careerspanning set that you would have thought you were at a punk show. They played like a band possessed, with an intensity that more than one person close to them told me they haven’t seen at this level in years.

The B-52s perform at Mountain Winery on Tuesday, Sept. 18 and Wednesday, Sept. 19, sharing a bill with Culture Club. The Thompson Twins’ Tom Bailey opens. More info at mountainwinery.com.

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018

The B-52s celebrate the 40th anniversary of ‘Rock Lobster,’ and the world finally gets them BY STEVE PALOPOLI

The B-52s are having a cultural moment, for sure. Founding member Kate Pierson says she remembers the first time something like this happened, when the group stunned the music industry with their megahit 1989 album Cosmic Thing, which went four times platinum and produced the top 10 singles “Love Shack” and “Roam.” “We’ve gone through various stages, I guess,” Pierson said in a phone interview earlier this year. “From the beginning, when people were like, ‘What is this?’—because there were aliens and it was something startling and different—to this sort of, ‘Well, they’re just kind of silly,’ focusing very much on our look and the wigs and everything. Then Cosmic Thing came along, and there was this sense of recognition. So I guess the memo-to-self there is ‘Don’t listen to whatever people say.’” But this time around, it’s a different kind of acknowledgement. It’s about legacy, not commercial success— although the band never thought much about the latter even in their pop heyday, Pierson says. That helps explain why their hits were some of the strangest things on the radio, and why their body of work is getting a critical reappraisal now. “To be called ‘subversive’ is really interesting,” says Pierson. “In a lot of ways we were, because we were never really commercial, but somehow we became popular. We have a lot of messages—we’ve always tried to not hit you over the head with them too much in our songs, although we do have political songs. And, of course, we’re a mostly gay band, too. And having a sense of humor, which made us very different. Our sensibility was different.” The question is: what took everybody so long to catch on? Pierson is neither begrudging nor particularly surprised. “I think it was subtle,” she says of the band’s subversive streak. “I guess a lot of times people were overwhelmed by the wigs and the sense of humor and the look of things.”

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CALENDAR

GREEN FIX

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Free calendar listings in print and online are available for community events. Listings show up online within 24 hours. Submissions of free events and those $15 or less received by Thursday at noon, six days prior to the Good Times publication date, will be prioritized for print (space available). All listings must specify a day, start time, location and price (or ‘free’ if applicable). Listings can be set to repeat every week or month, and can be edited by the poster as needed. Ongoing events must be updated quarterly. It is the responsibility of the person submitting an event to cancel or modify the listing. Register at our website at santacruz.com in order to SUBMIT EVENTS ONLINE. E-mail calendar@goodtimes.sc or call 458.1100 with any questions.

UPCYCLING ART They say one person’s trash is another’s treasure, but any trash can be made into treasures, really. Join the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Exploration Center for an Upcycling trash challenge for kids in elementary and middle school. Sanitized trash collected from Cowell Beach will be used to make new inventions and artwork. There will be a raffle, and endless opportunities to explore the Marine Sanctuary and learn about the rich marine ecosystem in the Monterey Bay. Proceeds from the event will be donated to the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation.

WEDNESDAY 9/12

INFO: 2 p.m Saturday, Sept. 15. Monterey Bay Sanctuary Exploration Center. 35 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. 201-0808. $22.

CLASSES

SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

ART SEEN

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RADIUS GALLERY’S ‘IN THE INDUSTRY: THE ECONOMICS OF AN ARTIST’ In order to avoid the “starving artist” lifestyle, many local artists work in the service industry or have part-time supplemental jobs to help pay the bills. “In the Industry” connects five artists who balance a studio art practice and a professional position in the service industry, and brings the artists’ everyday lives into focus. See the other, more creative, side of servers and bartenders from Oswald, Linda’s Seabreeze Cafe, and West End Tap and Kitchen. INFO: Exhibition runs through September 30 with a First Friday artists talk at 2 p.m. Sept. 9. Radius Gallery. 1050 River St #127, Santa Cruz. 706-1620. radiusgallery.com. Free.

ARTS POETS’ CIRCLE POETRY READING SERIES Join distinguished faculty from Cabrillo College, Adela Najarro, Maggie Paul, Stan Rushworth, Lisa Simon, and David Allen Sullivan for a special back-to-school reading. Open mic to follow. Refreshments provided. Sponsored by the Friends of the Watsonville Library and hosted by Magdalena Montagne. 7-9 p.m. Watsonville Public Library, 275 Main St. Suite 100, Watsonville. poetrycirclewithmagdalena.com. Free.

BONE BROTH WORKSHOP Learn how to choose, roast, boil, simmer, and chop your way to a deeply nourishing pot of bone broth. Sample beef, chicken, and pork bone broths with favorite flavor additions. With Kitchen Witch Co-Founder and Nutritional Director Magali Brecke. 6-7:30 p.m. New Leaf Market, 1101 Fair Ave., Santa Cruz. newleaf.com.

THE LABOR TOOLKIT Open to all expectant couples, these sessions are a great way to connect with other growing families. Come with questions and leave feeling relaxed and prepared for the journey to come. 7-8 p.m. Luma Yoga and Family Center, 1010 Center St., Santa Cruz. lumayoga.com. $18. SANTA CRUZ HOMELESS SERVICES CAMPUS TOUR The second to last of HSC’s summer campus tours for the community. Come learn how we work to end homelessness in our community, and how you can help. 5:30 p.m. Homeless Services Center, 115 Coral St., Santa Cruz. santacruzhsc.org. Free.

FOOD & WINE DOWNTOWN SANTA CRUZ FARMERS MARKET In addition to a large variety of farm products, this market offers a great selection of local artisan foodstuffs, delicious baked goods, and lots of options for lunch and dinner. 1-6 p.m. Cedar and Lincoln streets, Santa Cruz. 454-0566. WEDNESDAY NIGHT TRIVIA Grab your

THURSDAY 9/13 INTRO TO THE KETOGENIC DIET What’s all the buzz around “going keto?” Is it like gluten-free, raw master cleanse, Bulletproof and ear-stapling diets? Er, not really. The keto diet is a high-fat and protein, low-carb diet that encourages the burning of fats rather than carbs. This class will teach the basics of the keto diet, and how switching from burning sugar to fat can increase mental clarity and physical energy, and even protect against degenerative disease. Anti-Inflammatory chef Magali Brecke, co-founder and nutritional director of Kitchen Witch Bone Broth, will go over the whys and hows of ketogenic diets, and discuss the current media and research outpouring on it. At the end of class, attendees will share a keto meal. INFO: 6-8:30 p.m. New Leaf Community Markets. 1101 Fair Ave., Santa Cruz. 426-1306. newleaf.com. $40.

smartest group of friends and get ready for a challenge! We’ve got the rest. Wine. Beer. Cider. Tapas. 8-10 p.m. Cantine Wine Pub, 8050 Soquel Drive, Aptos. cantinewinepub.com.

HEALTH B12 HAPPY HOUR Come and get your Happy Hour B12 shot. Your body needs B12 to create energy and is not well absorbed from the diet or in capsule form. Everyone can benefit from a B12 shot. After B12 injections many patients feel a natural boost in energy. 3-6 p.m. Santa Cruz Naturopathic Medical Center, 736 Chestnut St., Santa Cruz. 477-1377 or scnmc.com. $29/$17.

B12 HAPPY HOUR B12 deficiencies are common, as the vitamin is used up by stress, causing fatigue, depression, anxiety, insomnia and more. Not well absorbed in the gut, B12 injections can be effective in helping to support energy, mood, sleep, immunity, metabolism and stress resilience. Come get a discounted shot from 1:30-4:30 p.m. Thrive Natural Medicine, 2840 Park Ave., Soquel. thrivenatmed.com/b12injections or 515-8699. $15.

VOLUNTEER SANTA CRUZ BEACH CLEANUP Join CamelBak and Nomadix in the effort to ditch disposable plastic at a Bare

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events.ucsc.edu

SEP T/OCT 2 018

JOIN US AS W E SHA RE THE EXCIT EMENT OF LE ARNING

Science Sunday: The Secret Lives of California Great White Sharks SEPTEMBER 16, 1:30–2:30PM SEYMOUR MARINE DISCOVERY CENTER FREE WITH ADMISSION TO THE CENTER

Modern tracking technologies reveal deep mysteries about one of Earth’s most ancient and successful predators. Join us as Salvador Jorgensen dispels myths and shares discoveries resulting from his decade and a half of great white shark research and exploration.

SEPTEMBER 13 & 27, 1PM UC SANTA CRUZ FARM & GARDEN FREE ADMISSION

SEPTEMBER 16 & 20, 10:30AM SEYMOUR MARINE DISCOVERY CENTER FREE WITH ADMISSION TO THE CENTER

This tour is specially designed for people who may be interested in applying for the 6-month ecological horticulture organic farm and garden training apprenticeship program. Learn more at casfs.ucsc.edu/apprenticeship.

This 90-minute, behind-the-scenes hiking tour takes visitors into Younger Lagoon Reserve adjacent to the Seymour Marine Discovery Center. Younger Lagoon Reserve contains diverse coastal habitat and is home to birds of prey, migrating sea birds, bobcats, and other wildlife.

Sunday Seaside Crafts SEPTEMBER 16, 1–3PM SEYMOUR MARINE DISCOVERY CENTER FREE WITH ADMISSION TO THE CENTER

Make it and take it! Come create and take home a fun souvenir—an activity for the whole family to share. For example, find out what gray whales eat by creating a bright sun catcher for your window, or create a fancy fish with paper, paint, and color. Build a seal or sea lion puppet decorated with your own special seal nose, complete with whiskers!

LE ARN MORE AT

Citizen Science: Arboretum Phenology Walk SEPTEMBER 22, 11AM UC SANTA CRUZ ARBORETUM & BOTANIC GARDEN $0–$5 ADMISSION

Do you enjoy watching plants change through the seasons? Would you like to be a part of a national effort to monitor the effects of climate change? Help us gather data on seasonal changes in plants. Advance registration recommended.

events.ucsc.edu

THROUGH JANUARY 17; OPEN DURING REGULAR LIBRARY HOURS UC SANTA CRUZ MCHENRY LIBRARY THIRD-FLOOR GALLERY FREE ADMISSION

Writing the Space Age ponders worlds and futures beyond our own in an exhibition that explores books, magazines, and comics that were created and consumed during the rise of the Space Age, with a special focus on Robert Heinlein.

Future Garden for the Central Coast of California OPEN DURING ARBORETUM HOURS UC SANTA CRUZ ARBORETUM & BOTANIC GARDEN $0–$5 ADMISSION

Reyna Grande Book Launch: A Dream Called Home OCTOBER 2, 7PM PEACE UNITED CHURCH FREE ADMISSION

A major art and science project by Newton Harrison and his late wife, Helen Mayer Harrison. The Harrisons worked with scientists and botanists to create trial gardens within the geodesic domes in which native plant species are subjected to the temperatures and water conditions that scientists see for the region in the near future.

A Dream Called Home tells the story of UCSC alumna Reyna Grande’s pursuit to become the first in her family to earn a college degree and to find her place in her adoptive country.

Forest Law Opening Reception OCTOBER 3, 5–7PM MARY PORTER SESNON ART GALLERY FREE ADMISSION

Forest Law, 2014, is a video installation and photo/text assemblage by artists Ursula Biemann and Paulo Tavares. Set in the Ecuadorian Amazon, it considers the legal cases that plead for the rights of nature against the dramatic expansion of extraction activities in the region.

UPCOMING EVENTS OCTOBER 12–14

Strange Window: The Turn of the Screw OCTOBER 20

Founders Celebration OCTOBER 24

Be Bold, Go Bald! for Childhood Cancer Research

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018

Visit the Market Cart for wonderful, fresh organic produce and beautiful flower bouquets grown at the UCSC Farm & Alan Chadwick Garden! Cash, check, and EBT/SNAP benefits accepted.

Writing the Space Age

Photo credit: Terry Goss

Younger Lagoon Reserve Tours

SEPTEMBER 14, 12–6PM CORNER OF BAY AND HIGH STREETS FREE ADMISSION

ONGOING EVENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 11AM–5PM UC SANTA CRUZ FARM & GARDEN $0–$5 ADMISSION

Enjoy the beauty of the 30-acre organic campus farm at our biggest “open farm house” of the year, with live music, workshops, farm tours, kids’ crafts and activities, and much more! Don’t forget to enter the apple pie baking contest!

Apprentice Orientation Tour

Farm & Garden Market Cart

Fall Harvest Festival

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CALENDAR

Flying

Crane Spa

therapeutic massage for the whole family

Foot massage $24 Body massage $49

Scotts Valley

245Q Mt. Hermon Rd. Safeway center

Santa Cruz

2381 Mission St. bet. Fair & Swift

Capitola

1501 41st. Ave. #J OSH center

515-8380 288-5888 687-8188

SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Gift certificates and discount cards available Open 7 days 10 am to 10 pm Walk-ins welcome. www.flyingcranemassage.com

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Santa Cruz Naturopathic Medical Center

BOOST YOUR MOOD, ENERGY & WELL-BEING

B-12 HAPPY HOUR

Wednesdays 3-6 PM Saturdays 10AM-12PM Walk-Ins Welcome

736 Chestnut Street downtown Santa Cruz 831.477.1377 www.scnmc.com

<32 Coast Beach Cleanup. Verve Coffee Roasters will be on site to provide delicious coffee. We will not provide disposable cups, so please bring your own reusable cup for coffee. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Cowell’s Beach, Santa Cruz. camelbak.com/barecoast.

THURSDAY 9/13 ARTS MIXED-MEDIA ART CLASS FOR ADULTS This is a fun class that will bring your creativity. The class will introduce you to a variety of materials and techniques. You do not need any experience for this class. We will be using pastels, watercolors, dyes, wax, acrylics, wood and more. 3 p.m. Santa Cruz Adult School, 319 La Fonda Ave., Santa Cruz. waae-pajaro-ca.schoolloop.com. WFF PRESENTS: ‘MAIZE IN TIMES OF WAR’ Maize in Times of War / Maíz en Tiempos de Guerra is an immersive experience into the yearly cycle of four indigenous maize gardens (called milpas due to the diversity of crops involved). 6-9 p.m. Appleton Grill and Event Lounge, 410 Rodriguez St., Watsonville. watsonvillefilmfest.org. Free.

CLASSES EAST COAST SWING: BEGINNING SERIES This class will get you out of your seat and on to the dance floor enjoying the upcoming events on your calendar. The class is for teens and adults, singles and couples with little or no partner dance experience. In six weeks, you will become comfortable with swing basics and be ready for summer celebrations. 6-7 p.m. Jade Street Park, 4400 Jade St., Santa Cruz. apm. activecommunities.com. $64/$50. BRAIN FITNESS: HOW ADVENTURE AND RISK-TAKING IMPROVES QUALITY OF LIFE Join author, explorer, and adventurer David Miln Smith to learn how to convert the fear of change from an enemy to an ally, and reframe risk from aversion to excitement. His talk is sponsored by the Friends of the Scotts Valley Library. 6 p.m. Scotts Valley Library, 251 Kings Village Road, Scotts Valley. fsvpl.org.

HEALTH B12 HAPPY HOUR B12 helps support energy, mood, sleep, immunity, metabolism and stress resilience. Since B12 is not absorbed well during digestion, and all

B vitamins are depleted by stress, most Americans are deficient. Having B12 in the form of an injection bypasses the malabsorption problem, and people often feel an immediate difference. Every Thursday morning, we offer discounted vitamin B12 by walk-in or appointment. 9 a.m.-Noon. Thrive Natural Medicine, 2840 Park Ave., Soquel. thrivenatmed.com or 515-8699. $15.

FRIDAY 9/14 CLASSES SALSA NIGHT Intermediate and beginner salsa lessons, and afterward join us for a hot salsa dance party with DJ CongaBoy. Check out our website for more information. 7:30-11:30 p.m. El Palomar Ballroom, 1344 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. 426-1221 or palomarballroom.com. $14/$6.

FOOD & WINE WATSONVILLE FARMERS MARKET This market is in the heart of the famously bountiful Pajaro Valley. Peaceful and family-oriented, the Latino heritage of this community gives this market a “mercado” feel. 2-7 p.m. 200 Main St., Watsonville. NIGHT MARKET It’s time for our monthly night market. Held on the second Friday of every month. Come out for this deliciously exciting evening of local food, craft cocktails and live music, all with about a dozen different food vendors. You won’t want to miss out. 4-9 p.m. Santa Cruz Food Lounge, 1001 Center St., Santa Cruz. 212-5399. Free.

GROUPS DOWNTOWN BIRDFUN FESTIVAL Make a bird mask, pose for your portrait, fly with the mini-migration. Welcome all bird lovers, families and fashionistas. Bring special bird costumes or crafting materials if you want, but we will have all of the basics for making masks too. 5-8 p.m. Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History, 705 Front St., Santa Cruz. mailchi.mp. Free.

HEALTH VITAMIN B12 FRIDAY Every Friday is B12 Happy Hour at Thrive Natural Medicine. B12 improves energy, memory, mood, immunity, sleep, metabolism and stress resilience. Come on down for a discounted shot and start your weekend off right! Walk-ins only. 3-6 p.m. Thrive Natural Medicine, 2840


CALENDAR

PIVOT presents...

HALL of FASHION September 22, 7:30pm

SUNDAY 9/16 PIE FOR THE PEOPLE With fall right around the corner, now is the time to start testing and tasting pies for the holidays. Local fundraising group Pie for the People is holding a fundraiser to benefit the NAACP Santa Cruz Branch’s Scholarship Fund and the work of the Education Committee. A great opportunity to try out new recipes or break out the ol’ faithful family pie, the community pie potluck welcomes all vegetarian sweet or savory pies. Don’t forget your own plate, utensils, napkin and cup. INFO: 1-3 p.m. The Homeless Garden Project Farm. Shaffer Road at Delaware Avenue, Santa Cruz. pieforthepeople-santacruz.org. $5 donation suggested plus a pie.

Park Ave., Soquel. thrivenatmed.com/b12injections or 515-8699. $15.

SATURDAY 9/15 CLASSES

FOOD & WINE APTOS FARMERS MARKET AT CABRILLO COLLEGE Voted Good Times best farmers market in Santa Cruz County. With more than 90 vendors, the Aptos Farmers Market offers an unmatched selection of locally grown produce and specialty foods. 8 a.m.-Noon, Saturdays, Cabrillo College. montereybayfarmers.org or akeller@ montereybayfarmers.org. Free.

SUSTAIN SUPPER BENEFITING THE HOMELESS GARDEN PROJECT We’re excited to invite you to our organic farm for a gourmet, four-course dinner prepared by exceptional, local chefs featuring fresh food grown on our farm. Enjoy a farm tour, drinks—including special wine pairings—live music, and engaging talks by speakers focusing on sustainability, including our fantastic keynote speaker, Nikiko Masumoto. 3:30-7 p.m. Homeless Garden Project Farm, Shaffer Road and Delaware Avenue, Santa Cruz. homelessgardenproject.org. FENG SHUI: CHINESE MEDICINE FOR YOUR HOME Learn to tap into the wisdom of Nature to support health and balance. Feng shui is an ancient, intricate art >36

TICKETS:

brownpapertickets.com/event/3527322 Old Wrigley Building 2801 Mission Street Santa Cruz, CA 95060 Anne and Mark’s Art Party The Old Wrigley Building Joshua Scott Construction

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018

A NIGHT WITH DAVID ALLFREY We are excited to present Bay Area native and Pacific Edge alumnus David Allfrey as he shares stories from his time on the vertical high seas. Proceeds will benefit the Climbing Grief Fund. 7 p.m. Pacific Edge Climbing Gym, 104 Bronson St. #12, Santa Cruz. pacificedgeclimbinggym.com. Donation/$10.

WESTSIDE FARMERS MARKET The Westside Farmers Market takes place every week at the corner of Highway 1 and Western Drive, situated on the northern edge of Santa Cruz’s greenbelt. This market serves the communities of the west-end of Santa Cruz including Bonny Doon, North Coast, UCSC Campus and is a short trip from downtown. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Mission Street and Western Drive, Santa Cruz. 454-0566.

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CALENDAR <35 of bringing balance between our living environment and ourselves. By tapping into the natural flow of the universe you can encourage harmony, prosperity and good health. 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Pacific Cultural Center, 1307 Seabright Ave., Santa Cruz. windandwaterblessings.com. $40.

HEALTH B12 HAPPY HOUR Come and get your Happy Hour B12 shot. Your body needs B12 to create energy and is not well absorbed from the diet or in capsule form. Everyone can benefit from a B12 shot! After B12 injections many patients feel a natural boost in energy. 10 a.m.-Noon. Santa Cruz Naturopathic Medical Center, 736 Chestnut St., Santa Cruz. 477-1377 or scnmc.com. $29/$17.

MUSIC UGLY BEAUTY PLAYS BEAUTIFUL JAZZ Ugly Beauty is a piano trio with tenor saxophonist who doubles on clarinet. Their repertoire ranges from Bebop and ballads to the music of Thelonious Sphere Monk, Gershwin, Porter, Ellington, Dameron, Strayhorn, and other jazz greats. Family-friendly venue. 6-9 p.m. Davenport Roadhouse and Inn, 1 Davenport Ave., Davenport. Davenportroadhouse.com. Free.

SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

VOLUNTEER

36

VOLUNTEER TO FEED THE HUNGRY WITH FOOD NOT BOMBS We need help sharing vegan meals with the hungry every Saturday and Sunday in downtown Santa Cruz: Cooking from Noon-3 p.m, 418 Front St., Santa Cruz. 515-8234. Serving from 4-6 p.m. at the Post Office, 840 Front St., Santa Cruz. ANNUAL COASTAL CLEANUP DAY Join Save Our Shores and help out at Annual Coastal Cleanup Day by attending one of the dozens of beach cleanups across the Monterey Bay. Whether it’s just you or a whole crew of folks, they'd love your help. Since there will be hundreds of volunteers on this day, Save Our Shores requires signups to help with the allocation of supplies. 9 a.m.-Noon. Santa Cruz Municipal Wharf, 21 Municipal Wharf, Santa Cruz. saveourshores.org/ annualcoastalcleanup. Free.

SUNDAY 9/16 ARTS SUNDAY SEASIDE CRAFTS Make it and

take it! Come create and take home a fun souvenir, an activity for the whole family to share. Join the hands-on fun in the crafts room every Sunday. 1-3 p.m. Seymour Marine Discovery Center, 100 McAllister Way, Santa Cruz. seymourcenter.ucsc.edu. SCM MAKERS MARKET POP-UP AT STEEL BONNET BREWING CO. Steel Bonnet Brewing Company and the SCM Makers Market are teaming up to bring you a pop-up event featuring live music all day from Sugar by the Pound, more than 20 local artists, Sleight of Hand Pizza and, of course, Steel Bonnet Brewing Company will be pouring beer. 1-6 p.m. Steel Bonnet Brewing, 20 Victor Square, Scotts Valley. scmmakersmarket.com. Free. LAVENDER DAY OPEN HOUSE Take this opportunity to learn more about the College of Botanical Healing Arts (COBHA) while observing a lavender distillation and enjoying lavender-infused treats. Learn about upcoming classes, workshops, books, essential oils and events. Bring your family and friends. 11 a.m. The College of Botanical Healing Arts, 4170 Gross Road, Ext. 35, Capitola. cobha.com. Free.

CLASSES SCIENCE SUNDAY: THE SECRET LIVES OF CALIFORNIA GREAT WHITE SHARKS Join the Seymour Center for our September Science Sunday! The Secret Lives of California Great White Sharks: Modern tracking technologies reveal deep mysteries about one of Earth’s most ancient and successful predators. 1:30-2:30 p.m. Seymour Marine Discovery Center, 100 McAllister Way, Santa Cruz. seymourcenter.ucsc.edu.

MUSIC COSI FAN TUTTE OPERA AT THE CAPITOLA ESPLANADE STAGE Bay Shore Lyric Opera will present Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s opera Cosi fan Tutte at the Capitola Esplanade in one of three free, family-friendly productions in beautiful outdoor venues as part of their 2018 season. Noon. Esplanade Park, 110 Monterey Ave., Capitola. bslopera.com. Free.

OUTDOOR WATSONVILLE NATURE WALKS Come experience the incredible bird life that the Wetlands of Watsonville have to offer. Located along the globally important Pacific

SATURDAY 9/15 ‘THRILLER’ FLASH MOB CLASSES ’Cause this is thrillerrrrr! Thrillerrrrr night (insert fancy dance moves here). Learn the infamous “Thriller” dance and be a part of the world’s largest flash mob. Plus, Michael Jackson would have just celebrated his 60th birthday last month. We aren’t crying, you’re crying! But one doesn’t simply become a “Thriller” dance expert overnight. There are six classes offered, leading up to the simultaneous group dance on Saturday, Oct. 27. All ages are encouraged. INFO: 10 a.m.-Noon. Louden Nelson Community Center, 301 Center St., Santa Cruz. 420-6177. Free.

Flyway, the Wetlands of Watsonville provide a resting stop for birds on their migratory journey. 1:30 p.m. City of Watsonville Nature Center, 130 Harkins Slough Road, Watsonville. cityofwatsonville.org. Free.

MONDAY 9/17 ARTS POETRY OPEN MIC A project of the Legendary Collective, the weekly Santa Cruz Word Church poetry open mic is a community of local writers who recognize the power of spoken word. They gather every Monday for a community writing workshop, then host a 15-slot open mic followed by a different featured poet each week. 4 p.m. Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History, 705 Front St., Santa Cruz. santacruzmah.org. Free.

FOOD & WINE TRIVIA Discover the Joy of Trivia with your friends! Win food and beer for your otherwise trivial knowledge. 7:30 p.m. Rosie McCann’s Irish Pub, 1220 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. rosiemccanns.com. Free.

TUESDAY 9/18 ARTS ACRYLIC PAINTING CLASS This is a class for anybody who has any desire to paint. Open to complete beginners and those with experience. Paintings are broken down into steps if you wish to follow along. You will learn a variety of techniques to create your own masterpieces. Please call for more information on enrollment. 3 p.m. Santa Cruz Adult School, 319 La Fonda Ave., Santa Cruz. 429-3966.

MUSIC WILD AND BLUE WITH GUEST PATTI MAXINE Heart-warming Americana music by a powerful father-daughter duo. Steve Bennett on acoustic guitar, and April sings, bringing her dad’s creative songwriting to life with her sweetly melancholy voice. With Patti Maxine on lap steel guitar. 6-9 p.m. Davenport Roadhouse Restaurant and Inn, 1 Davenport Ave., Davenport. davenportroadhouse.com. Free.


MIDTOWN Summer Sale! 30% OFF All Merchandise

UNIQUE ORIGINAL MERMAID DESIGNS In-House Screen Printed and Embroidered Clothing, Hats, Home Decor “Shell” Phone: (831) 345-3162 • 718 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz

HOURS: MON-FRI 9-5PM, SAT 12-4PM Instagram.com/The_Mermaid_Shop_ Etsy.com/shop/SantaCruzMermaidShop Facebook.com/SantaCruzMermaidShop

Hawaiian, Coastal and Tropical Furniture. Beach & Home Decor. Tropical Treasures & Gifts. 730 Soquel Avenue Santa Cruz 831.426.6102 ElementHomeFurnishings.com

w/this coupon

Ancient Chinese Full Body Deep Tissue Table Massage

Pack (1) $28/hr. ~ Pack (2) $48/hr. Locally owned business serving local people living healthy lives.

China Foot Massage & Reflexology

Get ready for holiday gatherings with stylish new shades and save.

McCARTY’S WINDOW FASHIONS

100

M-F: 10am-4pm Sat: By Appointment

REBATES STARTING AT

$

Call for appointment 831-464-0168 4140 Ste. “T” Capitola Rd (By Big 5, Near D.M.V.) Open 7 days a week 10am–10pm

on qualifying purchases* SEPTEMBER 22– DECEMBER 10, 2018

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1224 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz 831.466.9167

mccartyswindowfashions.com Silhouette® Window Shadings

*Manufacturer’s mail-in rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made 9/22/18-12/10/18 from participating dealers in the U.S. only. Offer excludes HDOrigins™ and McCarty's Window Fashions Nantucket™ Window Shadings, a collection of Silhouette® Window Shadings. Rebate will be issued in the form of a prepaid reward card and mailed within 4 weeks of rebate Soquel claim approval. Funds do not expire. Subject to1224 applicable law, aAve $2.00 monthly fee will be assessed against card balance 6 months after card issuance and each month Santacard. Cruz, CA limitations may apply. Ask participating dealer for details and rebate form. ©2018 Hunter Douglas. All thereafter. See complete terms distributed with reward Additional 10:00 amof- Hunter 4:00 pm rights reserved. All trademarks used hereinM-F: are the property Douglas or their respective owners. 18Q4NBSIC1 Sat: By Appointment Sun: Closed 831-466-9167 www.mccartyswindowfashions.com

*Manufacturer’s mail-in rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made 9/22/18–12/10/18 from participating dealers in the U.S. only. Offer excludes HDOrigins™

VINTAGE

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1127 B Soquel Ave 831-359-8323

Located behind Childish Toy Store

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018

$3 Off

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MUSIC CALENDAR

LOVE YOUR

LOCAL BAND

AUGUST SUN When putting together his new band August Sun, Santa Cruz guitarist/ vocalist Christian Walsh gave a lot of thought to what had gone wrong with his previous group, Poor Beggar Thieves, which dissolved last year. “We didn’t try hard enough. And I wanted to try harder,” Walsh says. “So I was just like, ‘It’s go time.’ I started booking and booking and booking.”

SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

That was last September, when August Sun started as a trio with a punky sound. By the end of the year, they’d expanded into a five-piece with two guitars (Walsh and Dan Knox), bass (Brendan Brose), drums (Jonny Hampton), keys (Tony Whittaker), and multiple members providing backing vocals. And their music evolved quickly, as well.

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“I’d say it’s centered around straightahead rock ’n’ roll,” Walsh says. “Over time, as we’ve grown our sound, we really delved into more classic sounds.” In 2017, the band played 25 shows. They’ve already more than doubled that this year, while recording and releasing the full-length album Mountainside, and writing several songs for a follow-up album. “We’re playing four to six gigs a month. We practice twice a week. We like to treat this like a job, because that’s what it is,” Walsh says. “We’re working hard. I want this to happen. I’m not getting any younger.” AARON CARNES INFO: 9 p.m. Friday, Sept. 14. Crepe Place, 1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. $10. 429-6994.

ORGONE

WEDNESDAY 9/12 ALT-COUNTRY

LASERS LASERS BIRMINGHAM Southern Californians have been playing country-influenced music as long as guitars have had strings. (Well, maybe not that long). But few artists in recent memory have given country such a distinctly L.A. feel as Lasers Lasers Birmingham (aka Alex Owen); he even sings about L.A. smog and references Laurel Canyon. The music is jaded, downtrodden, and just a wee bit psychedelic, set to a twangy guitar and subdued country melody. AARON CARNES INFO: 7:30 p.m. Flynn’s Cabaret & Steakhouse, 6275 Hwy. 9, Felton. $15/adv, $18/door. 335-2800.

ROCK/SOUL

DAVE MASON & STEVE CROPPER “All Along the Watchtower,” “(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay,” “Green Onions,” “Feelin’ Alright”—these are just a few of the era-defining songs on which you’ve heard Dave Mason

and Steve Cropper. A founding member of Traffic, Mason was with Jimi Hendrix when the guitar god first heard “Watchtower.” That lush 12-string you hear all over Hendrix’s version is Mason’s work. Cropper, in addition to playing on nearly every classic Stax record (and founding Booker T and the MGs), co-wrote “Dock of the Bay” with Otis Redding. MIKE HUGUENOR

INFO: 8 p.m. Rio Theatre, 1205 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz, $35. 423-8209.

THURSDAY 9/13 BLUES/ROCK

CORKY SIEGEL & MARCELLA DETROIT In addition to forming influential Chicago group the Siegel-Schwall Band, harmonica virtuoso Corky Siegel has created something truly unique in his chamber blues project. You’ll ask yourself if his fusing of classical instruments and blues music is a bold new direction for the genre, or is it a Frankensteinian (and perhaps misunderstood) monster? Siegel’s musicianship is

certainly monstrous, intimidating in its swagger and confidence. With him at Michael’s on Main is Marcella Detroit, whose powerful and expansive voice is heard on duets with Eric Clapton and Elton John, the Shakespeare Sisters, and her 1994 solo hit “I Believe.” MH INFO: 7:30 p.m. Michael’s on Main, 2591 Main St., Soquel, $20/adv, $25/door. 479-9777.

FRIDAY 9/14 AMERICANA

LOST DOG STREET BAND The Lost Dog Street Band has a repertoire of dusty ditties and twangy tunes just waiting to be heard. Formed in 2011 by wife and husband Ashley Mae and Benjamin Tod, the group continues the tradition of the American troubadours of lore. Lucky for us, they’ve moved from playing street corners to more comfortable concert venues. As they travel from city to city, the Lost Dog Street Band takes the audience to a simpler time. MAT WEIR INFO: 9 p.m. Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $10/adv, $12/door. 423-1338.


MUSIC

BE OUR GUEST DEVOTCHKA

HONNE

SATURDAY 9/15 FUNK

ORGONE

INFO: 9 p.m. Moe’s Alley, 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz. $20/adv, $25/door. 479-1854.

SUNDAY 9/16 ELECTRONIC

HONNE Have you ever wanted to run away from your life? Not because you’re depressed, but because you’re so excited to live, and you want to move to another country and savor every

INFO: 8 p.m. Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $18/adv, $20/door. 423-1338.

POST ROCK

ADORE//REPEL For post-rock, it’s not the destination, it’s the journey. So why not let four blokes from West Yorkshire guide you through a realm they have creatively navigated to success since 2013? The ethereal tunes combine nuanced rock, jazz, electronic and so many other genres into a cohesive mix of their own. Dreamy melodies lead into wild highs and deep lows as the music evolves through the course of a single song. For a glimpse of the fantastic aural voyage that awaits, listen to last year’s Empty Orchestra LP. MW INFO: 9 p.m. Crepe Place, 1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. $10/door. 429-6994.

MONDAY 9/17 JAZZ

STILL DREAMING More than a supergroup or all-star assemblage, Still Dreaming brings together four singular improvisers with deep and abiding ties to Old and New Dreams, the beloved and consistently bracing 1970s quartet featuring four now-departed masters inextricably linked to Ornette Coleman. Joshua Redman, of course, is the son of saxophone legend Dewey Redman, and the supremely lyrical cornetist Ron Miles absorbed the telegraphic concision of trumpeter Don Cherry. Big-toned bassist Scott Colley studied with Charlie Haden at CalArts, while Brian Blade shares Ed Blackwell’s Louisiana roots and a rhythmic flow that makes even the most volatile passages fit for dancing. Whether interpreting tunes associated with Old and New Dreams or originals, Still Dreaming creates music to wake the soul. ANDREW GILBERT INFO: 7 and 9 p.m. Kuumbwa Jazz, 320 Cedar St. #2, Santa Cruz. $36.75 - $52.50. 427-2227.

INFO: 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 25. Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $25/adv, $30/door. WANT TO GO? Go to santacruz.com/giveaways before 11 a.m. on Monday, Sept. 17 to find out how you could win a pair of tickets to the show.

IN THE QUEUE ORQUESTA SABORICUA

Latin dance band from over the hill. Friday at Moe’s Alley HERB ALPERT & LANI HALL

Platinum-selling jazz-pop icon. Saturday at Rio Theatre TERRY BROWN

Legendary cowboy entertainer. Saturday at Flynn’s Cabaret & Steakhouse. POLY VARGHESE

Hindustani classical guitarist. Sunday at Flynn’s Cabaret & Steakhouse TRAINWRECK

Southern rock comedy. Tuesday at Catalyst

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018

There’s something captivating about a live eight-piece band whose sole purpose is to get a person out on the dance floor. Even the most introverted, just-came-here-to-gawk voyeur will find the fat and gritty grooves of Orgone irresistible—sooner or later, all will succumb to the catchy, vibrant beats that faithfully harken back to the best soul of the ’60s and ’70s. And to any dance floor holdouts, founding guitarist Sergio Rios will be glad to give, as he puts it, a “love shove.” AB

breath of fresh air? I know that’s a really specific feeling, but it’s one that the U.K. electronic duo Honne explores on the opening cut of its sophomore album Love Me, Love Me Not. It’s a sleek, bouncy robot-funk record that feels part in-the-moment joy and part longing for even more joy. AC

If you can imagine a cabaret band where the members all moonlight as film score composers, then you might begin to get an idea of the truly unique influences that go into creating the music of DeVotchka. The Denver band originally started as a backing band for a burlesque troupe; as they broke out on their own, they started getting interest from filmmakers who liked their sound. (You can hear their music in Little Miss Sunshine and Everything Is Illuminated.) It’s larger-than-life and theatrical, with musical influences from Latin America to Eastern Europe. The group just released its newest album, The Night Falls Forever, last month.

39


LIVE MUSIC

Thursday September 13th – 8/9pm $10/15 Live Reggae Music

ARISE ROOTS + ANCESTREE

Friday September 14th – 8/9pm $10/15 Latin Double Bill Dance Party

ORQUESTA SABORICUA + FLOR DE CAÑA Saturday September 15th – 8/9pm $20/25 Funk & Soul Favorites

ORGÓNE

Sunday September 16th – 3/4pm $10/15 Afternoon Blues Series

MATHEW CURRY Sunday September 16th – 8:30/9pm $10/15 Live Reggae Music

MIKE PINTO

+ PACIFIC GROWN Tuesday September 18th – 8/8:30pm $8/12

American Roots Music From Nashville TN

SMOOTH HOUND SMITH + PATRICK MAGUIRE & RYEDAWN

Wednesday September 19th – 8/8:30pm $8/12

WED

9/12

THE APPLETON GRILL 410 Rodriguez St, Watsonville

SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

40

Sept 27 Sept 28 Sept 29 Oct 4 Oct 5 Oct 6 Oct 7 Oct 7 Oct 10 Oct 11 Oct 12 Oct 13 Oct 14 Oct 18 Oct 19 Oct 20 Oct 21

MOESALLEY.COM

1535 Commercial Way Santa Cruz 831.479.1854

9/14

Watsonville Film Festival Presents 7p

Noche Sonidera Cumbiambero 9p

Al Frisby 6-8p

Preacher Boy Duo 6-8p

Virgil Thrasher & Rick Stevens 6-8p

BLUE LAGOON 923 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Live Bands 9p

Comedy Night, ’80s Night Free 8:30p

BOARDWALK BOWL 115 Cliff St, Santa Cruz

Karaoke 8p-Close

Karaoke 8p-Close

BOCCI’S CELLAR 140 Encinal St, Santa Cruz

Lou, Sunday Humphries Karaoke Free 8p 8p

SAT

9/15

Lloyd Whitley 1p Jeffrey Halford 6-8p

9/18

Live Bands/Club 2000 Live VJ Dancing 9p Free 9p

The Box (Goth Night) 9p

Post Punk Dance Floor 9p

Funk Night w/ DJ Ed 9p

Benny Basset 9:30-12:45p

Karaoke 6p-Close

Karaoke 6p-Close

Karaoke 6p-Close

Karaoke 8p-Close

Swing Dance $5 5:30p Crispy Bits 8p

Marmalade Knives 8p

SC Jazz Society, Beat Weekend w/ DJ Monk Earl Free 3:30p

TBA 6:30-9:30p

Mike PZ w/ Rich Rodriguez 7-10p

Gerard Egan 7-10p

CILANTROS 1934 Main St, Watsonville

TUE

Scott Miller 6-8p

CAPITOLA WINE BAR 115 San Jose Ave, Capitola

CHAMINADE RESORT 1 Chaminade Ln, Santa Cruz

9/17

Broken Shades 6-8p

Karaoke 9-12:30a

Drake Bell $15-$35 8:30p

MON

Rob Vye 6-8p

Karaoke 9-12:30a

CATALYST ATRIUM 1011 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

9/16

Dia De Independencia Mexicana 4p

Alex Lucero & Friends 8p

CATALYST 1011 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

SUN

Kit Bragg Free 7:30-9:30p

BRITANNIA ARMS 110 Monterey Ave, Capitola

Comedy Night w/ Shwa Free 8p

Tim Bennet w/ Angela Bennett 3-6p

Said the Sky $20-$30 8p

Honne $18/$20 7p

Lost Dog Street Band $10/$12 8:30p

E.N Young, Mystic Roots $12/$15 8p

Trainwreck $10/$12 8:30p Ten O’Clock Lunch 5:30p

Hippo Happy Hour 5:30-7:30p

+ KING DREAM Sept 21 Sept 22 Sept 23 Sept 23 Sept 24 Sept 25 Sept 26

FRI

APTOS ST. BBQ 8059 Aptos St, Aptos

SOFT WHITE SIXTIES + LAUREN WAHL & SIMPLY PUT JON CLEARY TRIO HURRICANE ROSES, HENRY CHADWICK SELWYN BIRCHWOOD (afternoon) LARA PRICE (eve) GONDWANA HAILU MERGIA TOM FREUND, WALLY INGRAM, STEVE ADAMS JOHN DOE FOLK TRIO SOULWISE, FOR PEACE BAND, RISE UP HUMAN EXPERIENCE, KR3TURE AUGUST SUN PREZIDENT BROWN WAYNE HANCOCK + DALE WATSON COCO MONTOYA (afternoon) RED ELVISES (eve) MONKS OF DOOM (members of Camper Van Beethoven & Counting Crows) MORGAN HERITAGE DICK DALE + The Mermen ERIC LINDELL – CD Release LYDIA PENSE & COLD BLOOD MOTOPONY + JOSIAH (Head & The Heart) B-SIDE PLAYERS COFFIS BROTHERS + TAYLOR RAE CHRIS CAIN

9/13

Green Dog Free 6:30-9p

Rock N’ Roll CD Release

Sept 20 BON BON VIVANT

THU

ABBOTT SQUARE 118 Cooper St, Santa Cruz

THE

CREPE PLACE OPEN LATE - EVERY NIGHT!

ADVANCE TICKETS ON TICKETWEB WEDNESDAY 9/12 WESTERN WEDNESDAY

CAROLYN SEALS COMBO PLAYS THE MUSIC OF PATSY CLINE

SHOW 8PM - $10 DOOR OR $7 W/ COWBOY BOOTS

THURSDAY 9/13

GEIST & THE SACRED ENSEMBLE w/ Z PATTERN SHOW 9PM - $8 DOOR FRIDAY 9/14

AUGUST SUN

w/ LOFI SATELLITES & THE VIRTUALS SHOW 9PM - $10 DOOR SATURDAY 9/15

EVA & VAGABOND TALES w/ ALEX RAMIREZ & SEAN SHIRLEY SHOW 9PM - $8 DOOR SUNDAY 9/16

OPEN BLUEGRASS JAM FREE IN THE GARDEN - 5PM TO 8PM SUNDAY 9/16

ADORE//REPEL

w/ CEMENT SHIP & FULMINANTE SHOW 9PM - $10 DOOR TUESDAY 9/18

7 COME 11

9 UNTIL MIDNIGHT

WEDNESDAY 9/19

NO FUN AT ALL

(SWEDEN)

w/ SEDERRA & GIVE YOU NOTHING

SHOW 9PM - $15 ADV - $20 DOOR MIDTOWN SANTA CRUZ

1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz 429-6994

KPIG Happy Hour 5:30-7:30p


LIVE MUSIC WED CORK AND FORK 312 Capitola Ave, Capitola

9/12

Open Mic Free 7-10p

THU

9/13

Steve’s Jazz Kitchen Free 7-10p

CORRALITOS CULTURAL CENTER 127 Hames Rd., Corralitos

FRI

9/14

TBA Free 7-10

SAT

9/15

Bonny June & Bonfire Free 7-10p

SUN

9/16

MON

9/17

TUE

9/18

John Michael Sings Sinatra Free 5-8p

SEXMOB PLAYS FELLINI WITH STEVEN BERNSTEIN, BRIGGAN KRAUSS, TONY SCHERR & KENNY WOLLESEN Deconstructing the music of Fellini’s classic films.

Acoustic Open Jam 3-5p

Open Mic 7-10p

Wednesday, September 12 • 7:30 PM

1/2 PRICE NIGHT FOR STUDENTS!

THE CREPE PLACE 1134 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz

Western Wednesday w/ The Carolyn Sills $7/$10 8p

Geist & the Sacred Ensemble w/ Z Patten $8 9p

August Sun w/ LoFi Satillites & the Virtuals $10 9p

Eva & the Vagabond Tales w/ Alex Ramirez $8 9p

Open Bluegrass Jam Free 5p Adore/Repel w/ Cement $10 9p

Funk Night ft. 7 Come 11 $6 9p-12a

CROW’S NEST 2218 E. Cliff Dr, Santa Cruz

Stella By Barlight $5 8p

Sarah Jane & Friends $5 8:30p

Groovity $6 9p

Jive Machine $7 9:30p

SF Comedy Competition $10 9p

WaveLength $5 8:30p

A true legend, from The Tijuana Brass to A&M Records, featuring Hall on vocals.

Wild & Blue w/ Patti Maxine Free 6-9p

Sunday, September 16 • 7 PM

DAV. ROADHOUSE 1 Davenport Ave, Davenport DISCRETION BREWING 2703 41st Ave, Soquel

Ugly Beauty Free 6-9p Gary Blackburn Free 6:30-8:30p

GABRIELLA CAFE 910 Cedar St., Santa Cruz

AT RIO THEATRE

SWEET SEASONS - THE MUSIC OF CAROLE KING Monday, September 17 • 7 PM & 9 PM

Southsiders Lasers Lasers BirmingDiggin’ Dirt w/ Southern ham w/ Davey & the Pacific $15 8:30p Midnights $15/$18 8:30p Jeannine Bonstelle Linc Russin & Sweeney Schragg 7-9p 6:30-9:30p

JACK O’NEILL LOUNGE Santa Cruz Dream Inn 175 W Cliff Dr. Santa Cruz

HERB ALPERT & LANI HALL

Tickets: brownpapertickets.com

THE FISH HOUSE 972 Main St, Watsonville FLYNN’S CABARET 6275 Hwy 9, Felton

Saturday, September 15 • 7:30 PM

Brian Fitzgerald Group Free 7-10p

Aardvark w/ Wheelhouse $15/$18 9p

Terry Brown w/ Gary Blackburn $18/$20 8p

Poly Varghese $15 7p

Ernest Troost $15 8:30p

STILL DREAMING WITH JOSHUA REDMAN, RON MILES, SCOTT COLLEY & BRIAN BLADE A sublime quartet.

Thursday, September 20 • 7 PM Scott Slaughter Free 7-10p

Brian Fitzgerald Group Free 7-10p

KUUMBWA JAZZ 320-2 Cedar St, Santa Cruz

Sexmob Plays Fellini w/ Steven Bernstein & more $29.40/$34.65 7p

Sweet Seasons-The Music of Carole King $20/$25 6:30p

MICHAEL’S ON MAIN 2591 Main St, Soquel

Star La’Moan & the Corky Siegal & Marcella Michael Martyn Free 5p Crooked Branches & Kitchenettes $10 7:30p Detroit $20/$25 7:30p Extra Large $10 8p Wild Iris $10 8p

Grateful Sundays Free 5:30p

Still Dreaming w/ Joshua Redman & more $47.25/$52.507&9p

TRUE BLUES: COREY HARRIS & GUY DAVIS

Chronicling the culture of the blues in an evening of music and conversation.

1/2 PRICE NIGHT FOR STUDENTS!

Friday, September 21 • 7:30 PM

CAFE MUSIQUE

Tickets: snazzyproductions.com Saturday, September 22 • 5 PM

10th ANNUAL SONGFEST FOR PROSTATE CANCER AWARENESS FREE

Thursday, September 27 • 7 PM

TORD GUSTAVSEN TRIO

Crystalline and ethereal melodies, with abundant space and depth.

1/2 PRICE NIGHT FOR STUDENTS! Monday, October 1 • 7 PM

San Francisco Comedy Competition This Sunday! $10 cover.

LOCATED ON THE BEACH

Amazing waterfront deck views.

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

See live music grid for this week’s bands.

STAND-UP COMEDY

Three live comedians every Sunday night.

HAPPY HOUR

Mon–Fri from 3:00pm. Wednesday all night!

VISIT OUR BEACH MARKET

Wood-fired pizza, ice cream, unique fine gifts.

CLASSIC SPECIALS

Good deals in the dining room, Monday-Thursday, lunch and dinner.

NOW SERVING BREAKFAST

Distinctive saxophonist and soundscape artist’s 80s-influenced new project.

1/2 PRICE NIGHT FOR STUDENTS! Wednesday, October 3 • 7:30 PM

CHICK COREA: VIGILETTE AT RIO THEATRE

Saturday, October 6 • 8 PM

THE 5th ANNUAL SANTA CRUZ COMEDY FESTIVAL Tickets: brownpapertickets.com

‘18/’19 KUUMBWA JAZZ HONOR BAND Auditions will be held on Tuesday, September 18. Please visit kuumbwajazz.org/education for more information. Unless noted, advance tickets at kuumbwajazz.org Dinner served one hour before Kuumbwa prsented concerts. Premium wines & beer available. All ages welcome.

Open for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Daily

320-2 Cedar St | Santa Cruz

crowsnest-santacruz.com

kuumbwajazz.org

(831) 476-4560

831.427.2227

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018

LOGAN RICHARDSON’S BLUES PEOPLE

41


LIVE MUSIC

Thank you for your patience! We are now open daily for lunch and dinner. Stop by for an amazing farm to table dining experience! Wed Sept 12

Lasers Lasers Birmingham w/Davey and the Midnights High lonesome and highly

unusual Country music $15 adv./$18 door seated – <21w/parent 8:30pm Thu Sept 13

Diggin’ Dirt w/Southern Pacific Groovin’ Soul music from Humboldt County

$15 adv./$15 door seated – ages 21+ 8:30pm Fri Sept 14

Fri Sept 21 Sat Sept 22

The Program 9:30p

Poly Varghese The great Hindustani classical guitarist

THE RED 200 Locust St, Santa Cruz

Ernest Troost Kerrville New Folk Winner and Emmy-winning

THE REEF 120 Union St, Santa Cruz

Acoustic Music 6:30p

RIO THEATRE 1205 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz

Dave Mason & Steve Cropper $35-$73 8p

$15 adv./$15 door seated – <21w/parent 8:30pm

ROSIE MCCANN’S 1220 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Comedy Night 9p

$15 adv./$15 door Dance – ages 21+ 9pm

THE SAND BAR 211 Esplanade, Capitola

Rhinestone A salute to the songs & career of Glen Campbell What The Funk! Classic R&B, Soul and Funk

Funky Joe and the Mofos w/Shawn Andrews Band & Deep Pocket Local Rock and Roll/Funk Favorites

THU

9/13

FRI

Trivia 8p

9/14

SAT

9/15

SUN

9/16

Virgil Thrasher & Rick Stevens 1p Blues Mechanics 6p

Dennis Herrera Free 6p

Orquestra Saboricua Arise Roots & Ancestree & Flor De Caña $10/$15 9p $10/$15 8p

Orgone Album Release $20/$25 9p

Mathew Curry $10/$15 3p Mike Pinto & Pacific Grown $10/$15 8:30p

Libation Lab w/ King

Adam Cova 9:30p

Brandon Fox 9:30p

Devine & Company Free 7p

Apple City Slough Free 7p

Kind Andersen Band Free 6p

NEW BOHEMIA BREWERY 1030 41st Ave, Santa Cruz

PARADISE BEACH 215 Esplanade, Capitola

composer $15 adv./$15 door seated – <21w/parent 8:30pm Wed Sept 19

MOTIV 1209 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Terry Brown w/Gary Blackburn Award-winning Singer, Songwriter,

$15 adv./$15 door seated – <21w/parent 7pm Tue Sept 18

MOE’S ALLEY 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz

99 BOTTLES 110 Walnut Ave, Santa Cruz

Cowboy Entertainer $18 adv./$20 door seated – <21w/parent 8pm Sun Sept 16

9/12

Little Jonny Lawton Free 6p

Aardvark w/Wheelhouse The Music of the Grateful Dead $15 adv./$15 door Dance - ages 21+ 9pm

Sat Sept 15

WED MISSION ST. BBQ 1618 Mission St, Santa Cruz

Lloyd Whitlley Free 6p

MON

9/17

Stephan Sams Free 6p

TUE

9/18

Jimmy Dewrance Free 6p Smooth Hound Smith, Patrick Maguire & RyeDawn $8/$12 8p Turn Up Tuesday w/ Cali

Pint & Pottery 6p

Taco Trivia Tuesday 6:30p

Shotgun Suitor Free 10p-12a Alex Lucero 6-9p

Isis & Friends 2-5p

POET & PATRIOT 320 E. Cedar St, Santa Cruz

Dolce Musica 2-5p

Erin Avila 6-9p Comedy Open Mic 8:30p

Open Mic 4p

Open Mic 8p ‘Geeks Who Drink’ Trivia Night 8p

Traditional Hawaiian Music 6:30p

Acoustic Music 6:30p

Acoustic Music 12:30 & 6:30p

Acoustic Music 12:30 & 6p

Acoustic Music 6:30p

Acoustic Music 6:30p

Herb Alpert & Lani Hall $37-$60 7:30p First & Third Celtic Jam

Live DJ

Live DJ

Trivia 7:30p

Don Caruth Open Jam Free 7:30-11p

Silent Footsteps $5 8:30p-12:30a

The John Michael Band $5 8:30p-12a

Dennis Dove Open Jam 7-11p

Alex Lucero & Friends Free 7:30-11p

$15 adv./$15 door seated – ages 21+ 9pm Wed Sept 26

Shaky Hand String Band Original music from the heart of the Rocky Mountains $15 adv./$15 door Dance – ages 21+ 8:30pm

Sat Sept 29

Beggar Kings Live recreation of classic Rolling Stones albums $15 adv./$15 door Dance – ages 21+ 9pm

Fri Oct 5

Drew Harrison’s in the Spirit of Lennon w/Come Together A tribute to John Lennon, and interpretation

SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

of his music $15 adv./$20 door seated – <21w/parent 9pm

42

Sat Oct 6 Sun Oct 7 Thu Oct 11

It’s a Beautiful Day David Laflamme Presents the Music of IABD

Wed. Sept 12 7:30pm Thu. Sept 13 7:30pm Fri. Sept 14 5pm Fri. Sept 14 8pm

$10 adv./$12 door Dance – ages 21+ 8pm

Sat. Sept 15 8pm

Kikagaku Moyo Psychedelic Band from Japan

Michael Cosyn Group w/ Mike Osborn Band Hard Driving Blues / Rock n’ Roll $15 adv./$18 door Dance – ages 21+ 9pm

Sat Oct 13

Be Natural Youth Concert/Fundraiser & Halloween Costume Contest

$7 adv./$7 door SEATED - ALL AGES 1PM COMIN G RIGH T U P

Sat, Oct 13 China Cats 9pm Sun, Oct 14 Tracy Grammer Wed, Oct 17 Augustus Thurs, Oct 18 Southern Pacific w/Mud Frog Sat, Oct 20 Tom Petty Birthday Party Sun, Oct 21 Elie Mabanza

Tickets Now Online at flynnscabaret.com 6275 Hwy 9, Felton | 831.335.2800

Rockin'Church Service Every Sunday ELEVATION at 10am-11:15am

$10 adv./$10 door Dance – ages 21 +

Corky Siegel & Marcella Detroit Blues Legend y & Pop Diva

$20 adv./$25 door seated <21 w/parent

Michael Martyn Good Medicine

Sun. Sept 16 5:30pm Wed. Sept 19 7:30pm

A Play Faire Production

WEEKENDS SEPT 15th - OCT 21st

NO COVER

EXTRA LARGE

Reggae, Latin & Rock Fun

$10 adv./$10 door Dance– ages 21 +

Crooked Branches Wild Iris

plus

Americana, Alt-country, Bluegrass Dance

$15 adv./$20 door Dance – ages 21+ 8:30pm Fri Oct 12

Gypsy Jazz & New Orleans R&B

HAPPY HOUR

$15 adv./$18 door Dance – ages 21+ 9pm

Blood Relatives Psychedelic Jazz Fusion from Santa Cruz, CA

Star La’Moan & The Kitchenettes

$10 adv./$10 door Dance– ages 21 +

Grateful Sunday Grateful Dead Tunes NO COVER

Mira Goto

Nashville & Northern California Country

$12 adv./$15 door seated <21 w/parent

COMING UP

Thu Sept 20 The Village Green A Tribute to The Kinks Fri Sept 21 Grateful Bluegrass Boys Sat Sept 22 THE LOUISIANA PICNIC & DANCE 2pm Matinee Andre Thierry & Zydeco Magic Sat Sept 22 The Unauthorized Rolling Stones plus Rudy & The King (URS Salute to ELVIS) Tue Sept 25 One For The Foxes from Ireland

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Full Concert Calendar : MichaelsonMainMusic.com

2591 Main St, Soquel, CA 95073

Opening Weekend Online Discount! Rock Concert Series FREE Every Saturday Children 12 & under FREE Every Weekend

NorCalRenFaire.com


LIVE MUSIC WED

9/12

THU

9/13

SANDERLINGS 1 Seascape Resort, Aptos

FRI

9/14

SAT

Sambassa Free 7:30-10:30p

SEABRIGHT BREWERY 519 Seabright, Santa Cruz

9/15

SUN

9/16

MON

9/17

TUE

9/18

We Three Free 7:30-10:30p

Live Again

SEVERINO’S BAR & GRILL 7500 Old Dominion Court, Aptos

Don McCaslin & the Amazing Jazz Geezers 6-10p

Bonedrivers 8-11:30p

Patio Acoustics 1-4p Tsunami 8-11:30p

Patio Acoustics w/ Alex Lucero 2-5p

Greg Webber 7-9p

Ken Constable 6:30-9:30p

Ken Constable 6:30-9:30p

Brooker D. & the Mellow Fellows Free 6p

Ravi Lamb Free 6p

Sugar By the Pound Free 2p

SHADOWBROOK 1750 Wharf Rd, Capitola

Ken Constable 6:30-9:30p

Joe Ferrara 6:30-9:30p

SHANTY SHACK BREWING 138 Fern St., Santa Cruz

Joe Kaplow Free 6p

Spencer Vantress Free 6p

SID’S SMOKEHOUSE 10110 Soquel Dr, Aptos

George Zafares & Richie the Lip Free 7-9p

STEEL BONNET 20 Victor Square, Scotts Valley

The Luckless Pedestrians Free 5p

Jive Machine Free 5p

SUSHI GARDEN S.V. 5600 Scotts Valley Dr. Scotts Valley

Toby Gray Free 5:30p

Dave Muldawer Free 5:30p

UGLY MUG 4640 Soquel Ave, Soquel

Acoustic Soul 6-9p Ken Constable 6:30-9:30p

Ken Constable 6:30-9:30p

Ronstadt Brothers Roots $15/$18 7:30p

WHARFHOUSE 1400 Wharf Road, Capitola YOUR PLACE 1719 Mission St, Santa Cruz

Ziggy Tarr 6-8p

Willy Bacon 7:30-8:30p

ZELDA’S 203 Esplanade, Capitola

Broken Shades

Amy Lou’s Blues

Ziggy Tarr 7-9p

Ziggy Tarr 7-9p

Ziggy Tarr 11a-1p

The Joint Chiefs 9:30p

DJ Scott T Akrop 9:30p

1011 PACIFIC AVE. SANTA CRUZ 831-429-4135 Thursday, September 13 • In the Atrium • Age s 16+

DRAKE BELL

plus Kira Kosarin

Friday, September 14 • Age s 16+

Sept-Nov 2018 Kuumbwa

Fri, Sept 21

7:30 pm $25 Gen. Adv. $32 Gold Circle

SAID THE SKY

Friday, September 14 • In the Atrium • Age s 16+

LOST DOG STREET BAND

Sunday, September 16 • Age s 16+

Fri, Oct 26

Kuumbwa

7:30 pm $25 Gen. Adv. $35 Gold Circle

TRAINWRECK

Hank and Ella & The Fine Country Band Open

Joe Kaplow and Friends 8:00pm

Thur, Nov 8 Sun, Dec 8

7:30pm 7:30pm

Amy Winehouse Tribute Tish Hinojosa

Gold Circle: Rio Theatre: first 8 rows (100 seats), Kuumbwa: First 3 rows including 2 seats each side (40 seats). Additional $4 for each ticket purchased at the door. Tax is included.

E.N YOUNG • MYSTIC ROOTS

Tuesday, September 18 • In the Atrium • Age s 16+

$10 Adv/$15 Door $15 Adv/$15 Door

Sep 19 Dean Ween Group (Ages 21+) Sep 20 Dirty Heads/ Just Loud (Ages 16+) Sep 22 E-40/ Nef The Pharaoh (Ages 16+) Sep 23 Houndmouth (Ages 16+) Sep 24 JOHNNY MARR (Ages 21+) Sep 25 DeVotchKa (Ages 16+) Sep 27 Black Tiger Sex Machine (Ages 16+) Sep 28 The Holdup (Ages 16+) Oct 3 Seven Lions/ Jason Ross (Ages 18+) Oct 4 Reel Big Fish (Ages 16+) Oct 5 & 6 Hippie Sabotage (Ages 16+) Oct 7 The Front Bottoms (Ages 16+) Oct 8 Pigeons Playing Ping Pong (Ages 16+) Oct 9 Eden/ Kacy Hill (Ages 16+) Oct 12 & 13 The Growlers (Ages 16+) Oct 14 Ekali/ 1788-L (Ages 18+) Oct 15 Hobo Johnson & The Lovemakers (Ages 16+) Oct 16 Jay Rock/ Trouble (Ages 16+) Oct 17 Whethan/ Louis Futon (Ages 18+) Oct 18 Alkaline Trio (Ages 16+) Oct 25 Tech N9ne/ Futuristic (Ages 16+)

Unless otherwise noted, all shows are dance shows with limited seating.

Tickets subject to city tax & service charge by phone 877-987-6487 & online

www.catalystclub.com

Follow the Rio Theatre on Facebook & Twitter! 831.423.8209 www.riotheatre.com

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES Main Street Realtors

GOURMET BAKED GOODS CO. $30,000 Santa Cruz FRANCHISE SANDWICH DELI $75,000 Seaside REGIONAL SANDWICH DELI $75,000 Carmel

ICONIC BAKERY & COFFEE SHOP $425,000 Carmel ESTABLISHED RESTAURANT $499,500 Santa Cruz

DATTA KHALSA,CABB Cal DRE#01161050 831.818.0181

datta@mainstrealtors.com

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018

Honne

Sunday, September 16 • In the Atrium • Age s 16+

Upcoming Shows

SEP 12 Dave Mason & Steve Cropper SEP 15 Herb Alpert and Lani Hall SEP 21 Banff Mountain Film Festival SEP 22 The Head and the Heart SEP 26 Al Di Meola OCT 03 Chick Corea OCT 05-06 Santa Cruz Surf Film Festival OCT 08 Jarvis Cocker OCT 09 The Simon & Garfunkel Story OCT 12 Basia OCT 13 Get The Led Out OCT 14 Popovich Comedy Pet OCT 16 Vicente Amigo OCT 19 Lee Scratch Perry OCT 20 Simrit Live in Concert OCT 22 Ty Segall (Solo) OCT 26 Jesse Colin Young Band OCT 27 Lecture: Henry Rollins OCT 28 Celebrating Lile Cruse NOV 08 Todd Rundgren NOV 10 Estas Tonne NOV 11 Mountainfilm on Tour DEC 09 Mariachi Reyna DEC 11 Béla Fleck & Abigail Washburn DEC 20 Windham Hill Winter Solstice DEC 28 Cash & King

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FILM

TWO-TIRED FOR LOVE Rose Byrne stars in the droll romace ‘Juliet, Naked.’

Comic Turmoil SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Obsessed fan vs. idol in wry, amusing ‘Juliet, Naked’ BY LISA JENSEN

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O

nce, on a TV talk show interview, Janis Joplin scoffed at critics who pounce on rock music for hidden, deeper meanings, when (as she put it), “it’s just some guy going ‘shoobie-doobie.’” Janis might have been describing the middle-aged music fan whose obsession with an obscure, hasbeen rocker fuels the plot in Juliet, Naked. It’s a wry divertimento for three voices: the obsessed fan, his neglected, fed-up girlfriend, and the reclusive rocker himself, the fantasy figure whose unexpected appearance in the others’ lives throws all of their worlds into comic turmoil. The movie is based on a novel by Nick Hornby, that droll English scribe so adept at probing those tricky

places where pop-culture fantasy and messy reality collide, especially in his first novel, High Fidelity. This movie adaptation, directed by TV comedy veteran Jesse Peretz, is not quite as successful as that one, story-wise, but it has enough acute comedy moments to keep viewers chuckling. Adapted by screenwriters Evgenia Peretz and husband-and-wife Jim Taylor and Tamara Jenkins, the story is set in a fading seaside village on the English coast. Annie (a chipper and charming Rose Byrne) runs the local history museum inherited from her father. Approaching 40 herself, she’s spent years in a relationship with Duncan (Chris O’Dowd), a transplanted Irishman who teaches literature courses at the local college. But Duncan spends most of his

time in the basement, administering his website devoted to all things Tucker Crowe, an American singersongwriter who was on his way to cult status among a chosen few fans before he disappeared from the music scene 25 years earlier. In private, Annie calls Duncan’s online audience “a community of 250 middle-aged men who deconstruct Crowe’s music,” discuss every minute detail of his career, and speculate wildly on what might have become of him. When a previously lost demo tape of what would become Crowe’s most famous album, Juliet (the demo tape is called Juliet, Naked), surfaces in Duncan’s mailbox, he’s almost too overcome with emotion to boot it up. Annie, exasperated, posts a scathing review of the tape on Duncan’s

website, which starts to fracture their already stale relationship. (When Duncan learns that Annie listened to the tape before he did, he feels “betrayed.”) But Annie’s online review does garner one fan—Tucker Crowe himself (a frisky Ethan Hawke, rebounding from the gloom of First Reformed). He agrees that the workin-progress tape should never have been made public, and the two strike up an unlikely email correspondence. After a lifetime of romantic liaisons producing multiple offspring, Tucker is long out of the music business, living in a garage on the property of his last girlfriend in upstate New York, raising their young son, Jackson (Azhy Robertson). But his and Annie’s separate worlds collide when Tucker and Jackson are called to London, where his teenage daughter is about to give birth. Although Duncan has moved out of Annie’s house by the time Tucker comes calling (“I’d rather spend my time (online) with people who get Tucker Crowe,” he huffs), an uneasy triangle between the three of them is inevitable, or there’d be no story. Duncan’s awestruck disbelief at meeting his hero in the flesh (a very funny scene, largely improvised), is matched only by the pomposity with which Duncan tries to prove he knows more about Tucker than Tucker does himself. The story itself is predictable at times, unresolved at others (a looming family crisis for Tucker is left hanging when the plot suddenly fast-forwards by a year). But the handling of the material is everything. The dialogue is sharp and witty. (When Tucker stumbles upon the shrine Duncan erected to him in Annie’s basement, he cries, “This is that syndrome where you fall in love with your captor!”) And the character relationships are well thought-out, especially the graduallyevolving friendship between Annie and Tucker. This isn’t a weighty film, but its pleasures are consistently entertaining. JULIET, NAKED *** (out of four) With Rose Byrne, Ethan Hawke and Chris O’Dowd. Written by Evgenia Peretz and Jim Taylor & Tamara Jenkins. Directed by Jesse Peretz. A Lionsgate/Roadside Attractions release. Rated R. 98 minutes.


MOVIE TIMES

September 12-18

All times are PM unless otherwise noted.

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BLACKKKLANSMAN Wed 9/12, Thu 9/13, Fri 9/14, Sat 9/15, Sun 9/16 Mon 9/17, Tue 9/18 1, 4, 7, 9:50 SEARCHING Wed 9/12, Thu 9/13, Fri 9/14 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:40; Sat 9/15, Sun 9/16 noon, 2:20, 4:50, 7:20,

9:40; Mon 9/17, Tue 9/18 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:40 THE WIFE Wed 9/12, Thu 9/13, Fri 9/14 2, 4:30, 7:10, 9:30; Sat 9/15, Sun 9/16 11:40, 2, 4:30, 7:10, 9:30; Mon

9/17, Tue 9/18 2, 4:30, 7:10, 9:30

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SKATE KITCHEN Wed 9/12, Thu 9/13 2, 4:40, 7:20, 9:50 JULIET, NAKED Wed 9/12, Thu 9/13, Fri 9/14 2:10, 4:50, 7:30, 9:45; Sat 9/15, Sun 9/16 11:40, 2:10, 4:50, 7:30,

9:45; Mon 9/17, Tue 9/18 2:10, 4:50, 7:30, 9:45 OPERATION FINALE Wed 9/12, Thu 9/13, Fri 9/14 1:40, 4:20, 7, 9:35; Sat 9/15, Sun 9/16 11, 1:40, 4:20, 7, 9:35;

Mon 9/17, Tue 9/18 1:40, 4:20, 7, 9:35 THE BOOKSHOP Wed 9/12, Thu 9/13, Fri 9/14 1:50, 4:30, 7:10, 9:40; Sat 9/15, Sun 9/16 11:10, 1:50, 4:30, 7:10,

9:40; Mon 9/17, Tue 9/18 1:50, 4:30, 7:10, 9:40 WE THE ANIMALS Fri 9/14 2, 4:40, 7:20, 9:30; Sat 9/15, Sun 9/16 11:30, 2, 4:40, 7:20, 9:30; Mon 9/17, Tue 9/18

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4:30, 6:45, 9:15; Mon 9/17, Tue 9/18 2, 4:30, 6:45, 9:15 CRAZY RICH ASIANS Wed 9/12, Thu 9/13 1:25, 4:15, 7:05, 9:55; Fri 9/14, Sat 9/15, Sun 9/16, Mon 9/17, Tue

9/18 1, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15

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6:10, 8:45 PEPPERMINT Wed 9/12, Thu 9/13 1:30, 4:15, 7, 9:45; Fri 9/14 1:40, 4:20, 7, 9:40; Sat 9/15, Sun 9/16 11, 1:40,

4:20, 7, 9:40; Mon 9/17, Tue 9/18 1:40, 4:20, 7, 9:40; THE NUN (ENGLISH) Wed 9/12, Thu 9/13 2, 4:40, 7:20, 10; Fri 9/14 2, 7:20, 10; Sat 9/15, Sun 9/16 11:20, 2, 7:20,

THE NUN (SPANISH) Wed 9/12, Thu 9/13 3:20, 6, 8:40; Fri 9/14, Sat 9/15, Sun 9/16, Mon 9/17, Tue 9/18 4:40 THE PREDATOR Thu 9/13 7, 9:45; Fri 9/14 1:45, 3:05, 4:30, 5:50, 7:15 8:35, 10:00; Sat 9/15, Sun 9/16 11, 12:20,

septEMBER 20 7 pm del mar theatre santa cruz

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1:45, 3:05, 4:30, 5:50, 7:15, 8:35, 10:00; Mon 9/17, Tue 9/18 1:45, 3:05, 4:30, 5:50, 7:15, 8:35, 10:00 WHITE BOY RICK Fri 9/14 1:25, 4:10, 6:55, 9:40; Sat 9/15, Sun 9/16 10:45, 1:25, 4:10, 6:55, 9:40; Mon 9/17, Tue

A SIMPLE FAVOR Fri 9/14 1:25, 4:15, 7:05, 9:55; Sat 9/15, Sun 9/16 1:25, 4:15, 7:05, 9:55; Mon 9/17, Tue 9/18

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SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018

10; Mon 9/17, Tue 9/18 2, 7:20, 10

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FILM NEW RELEASES A SIMPLE FAVOR A mommyblogger tries to uncover the truth about her best friend’s disappearance, while still explaining to you why you’re raising your kid wrong. Directed by Paul Feig. Starring Anna Kendrick, Blake Lively and Henry Golding. (R) 117 minutes. (SP)

SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

THE PREDATOR I loved the Bay Area band Arnocorps; all of their songs were based on Schwarzenegger movies and they had put together a bizarre band mythology that combined action movies, ancient gods and physical fitness. They seem to be gigging again, and I’m tired of explaining the same damn plot over and over again with every new Predator movie, so instead I’ll just quote the lyrics of the Arnocorps song “Predator”: “There’s something out there waiting for us, and it ain’t no man … I’m here, kill me, come on, kill me, I’m here! Come on, do it now! Run! Get to the chopper!” That’s all you need to know, I swear. Directed by Shane Black. Starring Boyd Holbrook, Trevante Rhodes and Jacob Tremblay. (R) 107 minutes. (SP)

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WE THE ANIMALS Justin Torres’ acclaimed 2011 novel We the Animals was extremely personal, partially based on his family’s struggles during his childhood in New York. It was also a very loose narrative, with a lot of story threads, so it will be interesting to see how director and co-writer Jeremiah Zagar pulls them together for this film adaptation that follows three brothers as they scrap, battle and bond in a volatile family situation. Starring Isaiah Kristian, Josiah Gabriel and Evan Rosado. (R) 94 minutes. (SP) WHITE BOY RICK Matthew McConaughey plays the worst dad ever in this true story of Ricky Wershe Jr. (played by Richie Merritt), whose troubled home life in 1980s Detroit leads him to become a drug dealer—and then the FBI’s youngest-ever informant. That probably worked out great, right? Definitely not with a life sentence in prison or anything. Directed by Yann DeMange. Co-

starring Jennifer Jason Leigh, Piper Laurie and Bruce Dern. (R) 110 minutes. (SP) CONTINUING EVENT: LET’S TALK ABOUT THE MOVIES Film buffs are invited Wednesday nights at 7 p.m. to downtown Santa Cruz, where each week the group discusses a different current release. For location and discussion topic, go to https:// groups.google.com/group/LTATM.

NOW PLAYING A.X.L. Writer-director Oliver Daly originally made this family-friendly sci-fi story about a bike-racing boy who befriends a cutting-edge military dog robot as a seven-minute short film funded through Kickstarter. I watched it—it doesn’t make a whole lot of sense narratively, but the chrome dog looks really damn cool. Plus, there are some sweet dirt-biking scenes—which, let’s face it, is all any Hollywood exec really wants in a movie. Add in the fact that it’s basically E.T. without the Reese’s Pieces and space travel, and I can see why A.X.L. got a green light. Starring Thomas Jane, Becky G and Alex Neustaedter. (PG) 100 minutes. (SP) BLACKKKLANSMAN Based on the story of a real-life AfricanAmerican police detective who infiltrated David Duke’s Ku Klux Klan in 1979, BlacKkKlansman screams “comeback film” for Spike Lee in every way. From its cultural relevance in the age of government-supported white supremacists to the way it plays with questions of racial identity (as in Sorry to Bother You, an AfricanAmerican protagonist has to find his “white voice”) to its showcase for his trademark mix of brutal truth and humor, this is the kind of joint Lee was born to make. Starring John David Washington, Adam Driver and Topher Grace. (R) 135 minutes. (SP) THE BOOKSHOP Emily Mortimer plays a widow who opens a bookstore in a coastal town in Suffolk in the 1950s. Bill Nighy plays Mr. Brundish, a mysterious man who is her number one customer, and Patricia Clarkson is Mrs. Gamart, an influential town figure who could destroy her business. Directed by Isabel Coixet.

(PG) 113 minutes. (SP) CRAZY RICH ASIANS Ugh, you gotta feel for the multiracial actors cast in this rom-com based on the book by Kevin Kwan. This is the first big-budget Hollywood film to feature a predominantly Asian cast in 25 years, but for some people, they’re just not Asian enough. The criticism over the casting for this movie—about a Chinese-American professor who accompanies her boyfriend to Singapore and discovers that his family is not only crazy rich, but just plain crazy—got so ridiculous that at one point a Korean American actress who had been turned down for a role complained in an interviews about the “loopholes” in ethnically conscious casting. The problem: she herself had played the Chinese character Mulan in the TV series Once Upon a Time. Directed by Jon M. Chu. Starring Constance Wu, Henry Golding, Ken Jeong and Michelle Yeoh. (PG-13) 104 minutes. (SP) THE HAPPYTIME MURDERS A lot of people seem up in arms about the idea behind this movie: putting Muppets in kid-unfriendly settings. Sesame Street even sued the producers! So, uh, they never heard of Avenue Q? Or Peter Jackson’s truly disturbed Meet the Feebles? C’mon, people, Muppets doing inappropriate things is a creepy but hilarious thing to see! Anyway, for the most part this black comedy/crime thriller about a murder in a world where puppets co-exist with people (but are treated like second-class citizens) is really more of a dirtier riff on Who Framed Roger Rabbit? Directed by Brian Henson. Starring Melissa McCarthy, Maya Rudolph and Joel McHale. (R) 91 minutes. (SP) JULIET, NAKED Reviewed this issue. Directed by Jesse Peretz. (R) 105 minutes. (SP) KIN Kin is based on the well-made short film Bag Man, in which a troubled black kid takes a mysterious trip out of the city. When he gets there, we learn he’s come to test out a weapon of obviously alien origin that he’s somehow found. He gets a chance to do so in an unexpected way when he comes across a mob hit in progress. Kin attempts to answer

the questions raised by the short film—how did he find that thing, anyway, and who did it belong to, and do they want it back?—while fleshing out the crime and family drama that surrounds the main character. Directed by Jonathan Baker and Josh Baker. Starring Jack Reynor, Zoe Kravitz, Dennis Quaid and James Franco. (PG-13) 102 minutes. (SP) THE MEG Yes, we all wish this horror movie was about a giant Meg Ryan chasing people around, but you’ll have to settle for a 70-foot prehistoric shark stalking Jason Statham. Directed by Jon Turteltaub. Costarring Ruby Rose, Rainn Wilson and Bingbing Li. (PG-13) 113 minutes. (SP) MISSION IMPOSSIBLE: FALLOUT I thought I was crazy when I first noticed that the popularity of Mission: Impossible movies seem to grow the more Tom Cruise gets hurt. To put it a little more accurately, the more the movies undercut Cruise’s veneer of action-hero flawlessness, the more people flock to them. But I’m not the only person who thinks this, because the trailer for the latest one features a scene where Cruise’s character Ethan Hunt is scared to jump out a window. And it’s really funny! For some reason, Tom Cruise getting owned just never gets tired. Hell, isn’t that why we all watched Edge of Tomorrow, to see him get killed over and over again? Directed by Christopher McQuarrie. Co-starring Henry Cavill, Ving Rhames and Simon Pegg. 147 minutes. (SP) THE NUN It’s time to play everybody’s favorite horror-movie game show, Prequel or Sequel? This week’s question: If Annabelle was a prequel to The Conjuring, and Annabelle: Creation was a prequel to Annabelle, is The Nun—which is set after Annabelle: Creation but before Annabelle—a prequel or a sequel to The Conjuring? Oh, I’m sorry, it was a trick question. The Nun is actually a prequel to The Conjuring 2! Even more hilariously, you don’t even really need to have seen any of the previous four films going into this stand-alone spin-off that has a priest and a nun investigating the mysterious suicide in a 1950s Romanian monastery. Directed by Corin Hardy. Starring

Demian Bichir, Taissa Farmiga and Ingrid Bisu. (R) 96 minutes. (SP) OPERATION FINALE It’s been almost 15 years since Ben Kingsley really got to chew his way through a bad-guy role as only he can. He was an absolutely terrifying gangster in Sexy Beast, but this time he goes straight to the heart of evil playing Adolf Eichmann in this Nazi-hunting drama based on the true story of the Israeli spies who tracked the notorious SS officer down in Argentina. Directed by Chris Weitz. Co-starring Oscar Isaac, Melanie Laurent and Nick Kroll. (PG-13) (SP) PEPPERMINT From the people who brought you Taken comes this revenge drama starring Jennifer Garner as a woman determined to murder everyone who took her family away from her. So, basically, Taken if Liam Neeson didn’t get there in time. Directed by Pierre Morel. Starring Garner, John Gallagher Jr. and John Ortiz. (R) (SP) SEARCHING Since Crazy Rich Asians is the “surprise” hit of the summer (really Hollywood, you thought people wouldn’t go to that movie because it had an Asian cast?), it seems like as good a time as any to roll out the first mainstream thriller made in this country starring an Asian-American actor. John Chu plays a father whose 16-year-old girl goes missing, leading him to try to use a technological trail to find her. Directed by Aneesh Chaganty. Co-starring Debra Messing and Sean O’Bryan. (PG-13) 102 minutes. (SP) THE WIFE Glenn Close gives what some are calling the performance of her career as a woman who accompanies her writer husband to Stockholm when he is awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for Literature. However, things are revealed to be much different than they appear on the surface as the truth about “the wife” comes out. Directed by Bjorn Runge. Co-starring Jonathan Pryce and Christian Slater. (R) 100 minutes. (SP)


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FOOD & DRINK favorite with tourists who seem to know they’re in the presence of Santa Cruz history, Zoccoli’s has won every single local heart over the years, for three generations. Go, order, eat, and give thanks that some establishments still have what it takes. Zoccoli’s, 1534 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz—next to Verve near the top of Pacific and Front streets. Open daily from 8 a.m.-6 p.m., from 10 a.m. on Sunday.

A BETTER BENEFIT Santa Cruz Chef’s Dinner 2018 pulls out all of the gourmet stops to help raise funds for the righteous work of the Second Harvest Food Bank. On Sept. 12, at 6 p.m., the event begins with a six-course meal—paired with top local wines—prepared by featured chefs Anthony Kresge, Steve Wilson (Cafe Cruz), Peter Henry (Cremer House), Ella King (Ella’s at the Airport), Scott Cater (Paradise Beach Grille) and Geoffrey Hargrave (West End Tap and Kitchen). $275/ person. At the Holy Cross Church Annex, 126 High St., Santa Cruz.

WINE OF THE WEEK

GOING HALFSIES Zoccoli’s still makes Santa Cruz’s favorite sandwiches. PHOTO: KEANA PARKER

SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Case in Point

48

Why Zoccoli’s is a local delicatessan legend BY CHRISTINA WATERS

T

he mighty Mediterranean still delivers the East Coast/Italian goods, on a huge fresh sourdough roll. Prosciutto, mortadella, salami, provolone and finely diced olive relish, plus chopped pickled peppers—all nicely drenched in a spicy vinaigrette. That’s a lot of flavor excitement for $8.25. But then, that’s Zoccoli’s Italian Delicatessen for you. A place where you can walk from one street to another through a clean, welllit deli filled with custom-made sandwiches, relishes, chips, crackers, chocolate, wine, beer and more. The old hardwood floors have

been scrubbed to a soft worn sheen over the 70 years that Zoccoli’s has filled this family-run space with the aromas of another time and place. But the consistency remains. The Mediterranean is still a wonder of old-school hoagie, and side dishes compete for attention. Those deviled eggs! The faintly sweet grated carrot salad! Dolmas so juicy and drenched with olive oil, you’ll think you’re in Genoa. Speaking of which, Zoccoli’s is lined with authenticity. Long salami hang from the rafters along one wall, while woven baskets stack high above the wall of buns, breads, and rolls for sandwich-making. Lasagne

and ravioli, sausage and meatball sandwiches await those who like it hot. And for those who crave cool, the refrigerator case is loaded with beautiful salads all ready to carry out with your favorite dressing. You take a number. You place your order. Consider your dessert options at the checkout counter—I always love the spice-laden homemade carrot cake ($3.50 per slab)— pay, and wait for your number to be called. If you work nearby, you might take a table outside on Pacific Avenue. Or, if you’re like the Italian couple I saw there last week, you might grab a bottle of wine and one of the little inside tables. A perennial

The 2016 Chenin Blanc from Birichino. More sensuous than its 2015 sibling, this is an unpretentious 12.5 percent alcohol creation from Alex Krause and John Locke. Loaded with delicate moving parts, lychee, geranium, stone fruit, it loves to accompany pretzels, tamales, and green olives, but not all at the same time. $22. Available at the postmodern Birichino tasting room on Church Street.

OF FURTHER BENEFIT The Fall Sustain Supper at the Homeless Garden Project features organic farmer/speaker Nikiko Masumoto, the al fresco entrees by Marci Carl of Suda, and an oyster bar by Jeffrey Wall of the soon-to-open Alderwood. Andrea Mollenauer of Lifestyle Culinary Arts does salad, Justin Williams and Danny Mendoza of Kickin’ Chicken make additional appetizers, and Anna Bartolini of Carmel’s La Balena does dessert. A wonderful event. $150, including farm tour. Sept. 15, 3:30-7 p.m. HomelessGardenProject.org.


FOODIE FILE

&

LA VIDA LOCA Sebastian Cubero says his ViDA Juice offers a healthier,

more refined kombucha alternative.

ViDA Juice

Can probiotic Jun catch on as an alternative to kombucha? BY GEORGIA JOHNSON

V

What inspired the latest flavors? SEBASTIAN MANJON: I always wanted the classic flavor, that’s what I started homebrewing. It’s where it all came from. The classic brew is my personal favorite, because it showcases the green tea and honey, and also the maker and crafter behind it. It’s the most transparent of all of the flavors; you can taste what goes into it.

Why brew Jun? Jun itself is kind of considered the champagne of the probiotic industry. It’s like a champagne versus a white wine—you are dealing with a few more variables in brewing Jun versus kombucha, plus it has a more elegant taste and is lighter. It’s harder to brew, more delicate and there’s a bit more craft in it. A lot of the kombucha companies you see on the shelf are very flavor packed and taste, like a Jolly Rancher versus tea. So we are trying to go where your palate is looking for the flavors rather than the flavors smacking you in the face. View full listings of events and stores carrying ViDA Juice at vidajuicery.com.

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iDA Juice founder Sebastian Cubero is taking a different approach to the fermentation craze with Jun, a sister tonic to kombucha that’s made up of green tea and raw honey instead of black tea and cane sugar—the typical ingredients used in kombucha. It’s milder and less acidic than kombucha, while still using a similar fermentation methods. Cubero was born in Costa Rica, graduated from Le Cordon Bleu Culinary Academy, and worked as a traveling chef for 10 years before starting ViDA Juice Inc. California native and co-founder Carrie Clark has always been rooted in holistic nutrition, and joined Cubero to promote a healthier lifestyle and well-being. Until last week, ViDA juice only offered spirulina, turmeric and dragon fruit flavors of Jun tonics in local breweries and stores. Now they have added spicy hibiscus “classic” flavors to the family, and will publicly release a rose-flavored tonic soon. The ViDA family is also expanding into more breweries, including Sante Adairius, Lupulo and Beer Thirty.

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VINE TIME

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VINE & DINE

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SWIRL SEASONS Silver Mountain Wineries celebrates 40 years of harvests

in the Santa Cruz Mountains.

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL WINEMAKERS!

Silver Mountain Chardonnay from one of the oldest vineyards in the county BY JOSIE COWDEN

SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

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his month, Jerold O’Brien, owner of Silver Mountain Vineyards, marks 40 years of harvests in the Santa Cruz Mountains and four decades of experience in the wine business. During the month of September, Silver Mountain is celebrating by rolling back prices to 40 years ago— and select wines will be $144 a case, both at the Los Gatos winery and at the Santa Cruz tasting room. “Come in to either location to discover this incredible deal,” says O’Brien. O’Brien’s philosophy is to be “a good steward of the land,” and kudos are due to him for being at the forefront of organic growing. His Chardonnay estate-grown grapes are grown on what was probably the first certified-organic vineyard in the county. His Silver Mountain Vineyards’ 2013 Estate Chardonnay ($34) is an elegant, Burgundy-style wine—and 100 percent organically grown. Aromas of vanilla and citrus peel are followed by palate-pleasing notes of minerals, pineapple, apple, with subtle hints of lemon-vanilla sorbet, pineapple and starfruit. Zesty and refreshing, it pairs well with different kinds of food, especially

seafood, and, of course, French Brie. So, put your feet up and try a glass! Silver Mountain Vineyards, 402 Ingalls St., Santa Cruz, and 269 Silver Mountain Drive, Los Gatos (off San Jose-Soquel Road), 408-353-2278. silvermtn.com.

STEAM TO TABLE DINNER

All aboard for a unique culinary journey—a romantic steam-train ride through the redwoods with dinner prepared by Roaring Camp’s Chef Alessio Casagrande. Wander through the Cathedral Grove of redwoods at Bear Mountain and enjoy a glass of wine and local beers from a redwood bar—with no-host wine and beer also available for purchase from Hallcrest Vineyards. The event is 4:30-8:30 p.m. Sept. 29 and tickets are $99. For more info and tickets visit roaringcamp.com/ events#steam-table.

VINO LOCALE OPENING

Roll out the barrel for the grand opening of Vino Locale on Friday, Sept. 14 on the Santa Cruz Municipal Wharf—in the space once occupied by Vino Prima. Vino Locale (they have another location in Palo Alto) will be serving wine, beer, tapas and more. 55 Municipal Wharf, Santa Cruz, 426-0750. vinolocalesantacruz.com.


H RISA’S STARS BY RISA D’ANGELES CALLING HUMANITY TO RECONCILIATION Esoteric Astrology as news for week of Sept. 12, 2018

Sunday was the first night of Rosh Hashanah, Jewish New Year (the year 5779), which ended Tuesday evening. Rosh Hashanah celebrates creation and we contemplate upon humanity’s role in G-d’s world. It begins Days of Forgiveness and Awe. The shofar (ram’s horn) was sounded, calling humanity to reconciliation. Rosh Hashanah is the first of the 10 days of repentance culminating in Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement, Tuesday, Sept. 18, sundown to Wednesday, Sept. 19). During Rosh Hashanah, we gathered and ate apples dipped in honey asking for a “sweet year” ahead. In these days we bless one another with the words “L’shanah tovah.” (May you have a good and sweet year.) Creation is the theme of Rosh Hashanah. Celebrating Adam and Eve (the two polarities

ARIES Mar21–Apr20 Interactions, thinking, working with colleagues, planning and agendas begin to proceed forward, and communication becomes less difficult. Everything does, actually. There are many daily responsibilities to consider, focus upon, order and organize. Financial consideration in terms of relationships will intensify. Bring order and organization to relationships, too, surrounded with love.

TAURUS Apr21–May21

in Libra) and Creation (in Genesis). “And the Word was made flesh.” And the “Word” (sound, vowels) became the intelligent substance of form and matter. It became the Mother (Virgo). Matter maintains itself through the light and direction of the Soul (which Virgo “hides” in the “cave of the heart”). Humanity is asked to speak with kindness and with care during these days of awe, forgiveness and repentance, in order to “not lose the language of the heart.” And then we lift up matter to the “Kingdoms of Beauty,” restoring humanity’s happiness, truth and well-being. Rosh Hashanah is a purifying festival of allowing and compassionate forgiving. in your house of retreat, solitude, prayer, religion and contemplation. Now, in Libra, Mercury offers a new selfidentity. It also encourages reading, which harbors you, calms anxieties and nerves, allows you to imagine more and removes you from the usual responsibilities. You’re recognized for your capabilities and excellent gifts. Try and save more (money), tithe to those in need, and offer forgiveness. It comes when you yourself “love more.”

SCORPIO Oct23–Nov21 The months have brought forth great changes, which will continue. Scorpio, sign of life and death, transformation and regeneration, the phoenix rising out of the ashes, lives a life of daily constant change. You ask others to join you. They are afraid (of you, of death, transformation, regeneration experiences). You often feel alone. This is a planned situation for Scorpios—an evolutionary one. You’re to become the Disciple. The New Group of World Servers calls.

GEMINI May 22–June 20

SAGITTARIUS Nov22–Dec20

Corita Kent (artist) did a serigraph with the words “Slo Down.” When looking at Gemini’s chart, I see that there is a natural slowing down process occurring due to Saturn in Capricorn affecting your work in the world. Saturn is creating a new structure of patience and of beauty. In turn, as you contemplate Right Relations with all the kingdoms, especially the Devas, you bring forth a new inner creativity and it brings forth a new life direction.

Each sign’s light flows through a specific planet in order to reach the Earth. For Sagittarius, that planet is Jupiter, Ray 2 of Love/Wisdom. Sagittarius is the great philosopher and Teacher. The sign of Sag comes with a great task. To gather the love and wisdom within yourself and radiate it out into the world of a thirsty humanity. Love heals, soothes, protects and transforms. It’s your turn to do this now. It’s your awakened task.

CANCER Jun21–Jul20

CAPRICORN Dec21–Jan20

It’s important to begin speaking with truth and clarity about your own personal needs as you simultaneously tend to the needs of everyone else—family, friends, animal and plant kingdom. Cancer nourishes the whole world. You need nourishment, too, and it’s important to ponder and brood upon what that is. Tending children is one type of nourishment. There are other types that you specifically need. What are they?

You seek a time of no complications, few responsibilities, where you can contemplate goals, aspirations, future objectives and family needs. Tend to all personal and professional obligations early each day. Allow domestic situations to be viewed with calm observation. There are answers. Capricorns are in a transformational state. Pluto in your sign makes your life powerful, potent, effective, forceful, and compelling. A bit intoxicating, too. Careful!

LE0 Jul21–Aug22 Are you attempting to pull back on financial expenditures, while thinking more, trying to plan, seeking facts and figures, and gradually realizing your home needs tending, clearing, cleaning, ordering and perhaps even re-doing somewhere? For now, organizing finances is the important focus. Should you need money, now is a good time to ask. Careful at home with electricity, things fiery, red and hot.

VIRGO Aug23–Sep22 It’s time to look in the mirror and realize a new self-image is needed. New wardrobe, colors, clothes, new hair, shoes and a new perception of self. Think “style.” Style makes one more exciting, fashionable and on the edge. You’re capable of this, with Sun in your sign. It’s easy for you to become habitual; looking, acting and believing the same old things. Stand up, shake off the old, set new goals, become who you want to be—and happy birthday!

LIBRA Sep23–Oct22 Finally, Mercury is moving forward. It was a long time

AQUARIUS Jan21–Feb18 For years, life has been refining you and affecting your domestic situation. This change continues with finances and resources. Ponder upon what your gifts are. Spend time each day doing your very best, for much will be expected of you in the coming months and years. What you accomplish now will be reflected and expanded later. You have an opportunity to be seen in the world. Think of yourself as about to be reborn. All that you do becomes the seeds of future personal well-being and prosperity.

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PISCES Feb19–Mar20 You feel perhaps that you made mistakes in recent and past choices. You have a sense that you don’t quite know what you’re doing. This creates a vulnerability. You try to be practical and somehow that’s elusive. You want one thing and the opposite appears. Each day has been difficult, and you need a safe harbor, a “cocoon.” Tend carefully to your money, finances, resources. And to your spirit. There is perhaps grief. Remember B vitamins and homeopathic remedy ignatia amara. Wait. Cry. Pray. Forgive.

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Words describing the coming month: creativity, research, food, purity, structure, restructure, money, finances, desire, aspiration, old friends, relationships. All play out, one by one as you simultaneously attempt to understand the spiritual science of how all things are made. You understand that to bring forth the new world, humanity must work with the Devas (Light Beings). You contact them. They respond with joy.

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Classifieds classifieds PHONE: 831.458.1100 | EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@GOODTIMES.SC | DISPLAY DEADLINE: THURSDAY 2PM | LINE AD DEADLINE: FRIDAY 2PM

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0001259 The following Corporation is doing business as SANTA CRUZ NUTRITIONALS. 2200 DELAWARE AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. HARMONY FOODS CORPORATION. 2200 DELAWARE AVE, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. Al# 2080535. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: HARMONY FOODS CORPORATION. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 5/10/2006. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Aug. 6, 2018. Aug. 22, 29, Sept 5, & 12.

Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Aug. 16, 2018. Aug 22, 29, Sept. 5, & 12.

County, on Aug. 15, 2018. Aug. 22, 29, Sept 5, & 12.

statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on August 3, 2018. Aug. 29, Sept. 5, 12, & 19.

95060. A copy of this order to show cause must be published in the Good Times, a newspaper of general circulation printed in Santa Cruz County, California, once a week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: Aug. 21, 2018. Paul P. Burdick, Judge of the Superior Court. Aug 29, Sept. 5, 12, & 19.

NAME CASE NO.18CV02476. THE COURT FINDS that the petitioner BARNYSUE JOY BRUNET has filed a Petition for Change of Name with the clerk of this court for an order changing the applicants name from: BARNYSUE JOY BRUNET to: BONNIESUE JOY BRUNET. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Nov. 2, 2018 at 8:30 am, in Department 5 located at Superior Court of California, 701 Ocean Street. Santa Cruz, CA 95060. A copy of this order to show cause must be published in the Good Times, a newspaper of general circulation printed in Santa Cruz County, California, once a week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: Aug. 29, 2018. Paul P. Burdick, Judge of the Superior Court. Sept. 5, 12, 19, 26.

CHANGE OF NAME IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA CRUZ. PETITION OF CHRISTIAN JAIME ARTEAGA CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO.18CV02251. THE COURT FINDS that the petitioner CHRISTIAN JAIME ARTEAGA has filed a Petition for Change of Name with the clerk of this court for an order changing the applicants name from: CAMERON ZACHARY ARTEAGA to: ZACHARY GAEL ARTEAGA. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Sept. 24, 2018 at 8:30 am, in Department 5 located at Superior Court of California, 701 Ocean Street. Santa Cruz, CA 95060. A copy of this order to show cause must be published in the Good Times, a newspaper of general circulation printed in Santa Cruz

County, California, once a week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: August 9, 2018. Paul P. Burdick, Judge of the Superior Court. Sept. 12, 19, 26, & Oct. 3.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0001315 The following Limited Liability Company is doing business as SALT BOUTIQUE. 311 LAURENT ST., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. SALT BOUTIQUE LLC. 203 NORTHROP PL., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060 AI# 22710001. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company signed: YESENIA CARDONA MULLER. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0001325 The following Individual is doing business as MINERAL NECTAR. 7119 SOMERSET CT., APTOS, CA 95003. County of Santa Cruz. ILANA SHEATS. 7119 SOMERSET CT., APTOS, CA 95003. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: ILANA SHEATS. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is 7/18/2018. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Aug. 17, 2018. Aug. 22, 29, Sept. 5, & 12.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0001317 The following Individual is doing business as TERESA'S ITALY. 1092 PINE FLAT RD., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. TERESA PANE MOHAMED. 1092 PINE FLAT RD., SANTA CRUZ CA 95060. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: TERESA PANE MOHAMED. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 8/16/2018. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0001326 The following Individual is doing business as EULOVARR GLASS. 5560 LINCOLN WAY, FELTON, CA 95018. County of Santa Cruz. ROBERT FREDERICK BARNETT. 5560 LINCOLN WAY, FELTON, CA 95018. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: ROBERT FREDERICK BARNETT. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 6/6/2018. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Aug. 17, 2018. Aug. 29, Sept. 5, 12, & 19. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0001238 The following Corporation is doing business as SEABRIGHT DENTAL STUDIO. 1016 SOQUEL AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. ALANA K. THOMPSON DDS, INC. 1016 SOQUEL AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. Al# 4176662. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: ALANA THOMPSON DDS. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This

CHANGE OF NAME IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA CRUZ. PETITION OF CLAUDIA MONASTERIO CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO.18CV02385. THE COURT FINDS that the petitioner CLAUDIA MONASTERIO has filed a Petition for Change of Name with the clerk of this court for an order changing the applicants name from: CLAUDIA MONASTERIO to: CLAUDIA MONASTERIO MONJARAS. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING October 5, 2018 at 8:30 am, in Department 4 located at Superior Court of California, 701 Ocean Street. Santa Cruz, CA

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0001365 The following Individual is doing business as SANTA CRUZ DRAMA ACADEMY. 3501 HILLTOP ROAD, SOQUEL, CA 95073. County of Santa Cruz. RACHEL ANN NIGH. 3501 HILLTOP ROAD, SOQUEL, CA 95073. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: RACHEL ANN NIGH. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Aug. 24, 2018. Aug 29, Sept. 5, 12, & 19. CHANGE OF NAME IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA CRUZ. CHANGE OF NAME IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA CRUZ.PETITION OF BARNYSUE JOY BRUNET CHANGE OF

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CHANGE OF NAME IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA CRUZ. PETITION OF JENNIFER J. GREY CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO.18CV02463. THE COURT FINDS that the petitioner JENNIFER J. GREY has filed a Petition for Change of Name with

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STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME. The following person (persons) have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: BELLE VOUS SPA. 606 FREDERICK STREET, SANTA CRUZ CA 95062. The fictitious business name referred to above was filed in SANTA CRUZ COUNTY on: 2/13/2018 BELLE VOUS SPA. 606 FREDERICK STREET, SANTA CRUZ CA 95062. This business was conducted by: MARRIED COUPLE: ELISA LORRAINE RHODES AND WILLIAM RICHARD RHODES II. This statement was filed with the County ClerkRecorder of SANTA CRUZ COUNTY on the date indicated by the file stamp: Filed: Aug. 13, 2018. File No.20180000301. Sept. 12, 19, 26, & Oct. 3.

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PHONE: 831.458.1100 | EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@GOODTIMES.SC | DISPLAY DEADLINE: THURSDAY 2PM | LINE AD DEADLINE: FRIDAY 2PM the clerk of this court for an order changing the applicants name from: JEREMY PATRICK HANLON to: JEREMY THOMAS BERCHTOLD. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING October 29, 2018 at 8:30 am, in Department 4 located at Superior Court of California, 701 Ocean Street. Santa Cruz, CA 95060. A copy of this order to show cause must be published in the Good Times, a newspaper of general circulation printed in Santa Cruz County, California, once a week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: Aug. 28, 2018. Paul P. Burdick, Judge of the Superior Court. Sept. 12, 19, 26, & Oct. 3.

doing business as BELLE VOUS SPA 606 FREDERICK STREET, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. ELISA LORRAINE RHOADES. 390 SEARIDGE RD., APT.B, APTOS, CA 95003. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: ELISA LORRAINE RHOADES. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is 8/13/2018. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Aug. 13, 2018. Sept. 12, 19, 26, & Oct. 3. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0001280 The following Individual is doing business as MAMA RAY'S KITCHEN. 225 ESMERALDA DR., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. DENISE DIANE RAY. 225 ESMERALDA DR., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: DENISE DIANE RAY. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Aug. 13, 2018. Sept. 12, 19, 26, & Oct. 3.

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Emptying the rice bowl. Rethinking our relationship with the “stuff ” we buy and cram into our houses as a precursor to designing more graceful strategies for growing older, facing change and moving into the future. Mindfully engaging in real life experiences rather than living lives defined by “things.” It’s a perplexing time for baby boomers. They’re feeling the onset of their own mortality, even as they venture towards the last third of their lives. There’s a dawning awareness that to take that next step in the journey, they need a viable exit strategy for the places they are in now. Making room for the new begins by getting rid of the old: all the baggage that’s been collecting, literally and figuratively, in closets, cabinets, junk drawers and garages. Freeing up space acts as an open invitation to replenish the soul with something different. When you are an over-the-top, habitual collector of “stuff,” it’s helpful to know you aren’t alone in the world, especially if you harbor at least a modicum of self- awareness about your own pack-ratting proclivities. As someone who makes house calls to thousands of homes and regularly peers into the intimate recesses of all those overwrought secret stash and storage spaces, I’m convinced that everyone in America belongs somewhere on the spectrum of a disorder known as the Hoarder’s Scale. Is it a fluke that so many current Reality TV shows are centered around people’s addiction to stuff? How many shows are there about Hoarders? Storage Wars? Pawn Stars? What’s all the morbid fascination really about? Why do we love watching people swimming/drowning in their own seas full of stuff? I think we’ve come to a tipping point in our national crisis of “content(s).” There’s a shift happening for the most privileged generation in history (post-war baby-boomers), a realization that perhaps they’ve been filling their lives up with the wrong form of sustenance all this time. A sense that more really does become less when there’s way too much of it. Sorta like that odd “aha” moment most children of the TV generation have spontaneously had: the more cable channels there are, the less there is that you really want to watch. It’s as good a metaphor as any for the fundamental struggle of our times. Sometimes life is better when the glass is half empty. Or more. Look up the tortured definition of the word “consume.” On one hand, it means eating, drinking and absorbing the nutrition necessary for survival. More often it means the destruction, using up and squandering of anything that gets in its way. Perhaps the ultimate challenge for the baby-boom generation lies in modeling the way for future generations to step out of the bonds of consumer culture.

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SHOP PER SPOTLIG HTS

■ PORK LOIN CHOPS, THICK CUT/ 3.98 LB ■ PORK SHOULDER ROAST, BONELESS, TIED/ 3.29 LB

■ PORK BABY BACK RIBS/ 4.98 LB

SAUSAGE

1.25L/ .99

■ C20 COCONUT WATER Original & With Pulp, 17.5oz/ 1.99 +CRV

■ TEAVANA ICED TEA All Kinds, 14.5oz/ 2.49 +CRV

■ SAN PELLEGRINO SPARKLING JUICE

■ MILLER’S OLD FASHIONED FRANKS/ 6.98 Lb ■ SAAG’S GERMAN FRANKS/ 6.98 Lb

SUMANO’S, Sourdough Sliced Round, 24oz/ 3.99

Delicatessen ■ ORGANIC VALLEY CREAM CHEESE BARS,

FISH ■ BAY SHRIMP MEAT, FULLY COOKED/ 12.98 LB

■ FRESH TILAPIA FILLETS/ 10.98 LB

Tequila!!!

■ EXOTICO, Repo & Blanco/ 11.99 ■ ESPOLON, Repo & Blanco/ 17.99 Local Bakeries “Fresh Daily” ■ ALTOS, Repo & Plata/ 19.99 BECKMANN’S Whole Wheat Sour Round, 24oz/ 3.89 ■ PARTIDA Blanco (Reg 39.99)/ 29.99 ■ PATRON SILVER/ 39.99 WHOLE GRAIN California Black, 30oz/ 4.19 SUMANO’S, Sourdough Sliced Loaf, 24oz/ 3.99

■ LOUISIANA HOT LINKS/ 6.98 Lb

■ STELLA ARTOIS, 6Pk Btls, 12 oz/ 8.99 +CRV ■ GUINNESS “Draught” Stout, 4Pk, 16 oz/ 7.99 +CRV ■ KARL STRAUSS, Asst 6Pk Cans, 12oz/ 9.49 +CRV ■ UINTA BREWING, Regular/Grapefruit/Tangerine Hop Nosh IPA, 6Pk Cans, 12oz/ 8.99 +CRV ■ ELYSIAN BREWERY, “Super Fuzz” Pale, 12oz/ 9.99 +CRV

6 Pack/ 4.99 +CRV

KELLY’S Sour Loaf, 24 oz/ 4.09

■ POLISH KIELBASA LINKS/ 6.98 Lb

Place ribs meat-side down on aluminum foil. Pierce back of rib rack several times with a knife. Generously apply coating of dry rub to all sides of rib rack. With rib rack meat-side down, fold foil around it to create a tight seal. Transfer to a sheet pan. Bake in preheated oven until tender and cooked through, about 2 hours. Remove and cool 15 minutes. Increase oven temperature to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Place rack meat-side up and return to oven, leaving foil open. Bake for 10 minutes, remove from oven, and brush another layer of barbeque sauce on meatside only. Repeat baking and brushing with sauce 4 more times, for a total of 50 minutes baking time. Cut rack into individual rib segments and serve with more barbeque sauce.

■ SIRLOIN PORK CHOPS/ 2.98 LB

■ PORK COUNTRY-STYLE RIBS/ 2.98 LB

Preheat oven to 250 degrees F (120 degrees C). Mix ancho chile powder, white sugar, brown sugar, salt, black pepper, cumin, dry mustard, cayenne pepper and chipotle pepper in a small bowl until combined.

Open foil, drain and discard any accumulated juices and fat. Brush barbeque sauce on all sides of rack.

■ PORK LOIN CHOPS, CENTER CUT/ 3.98 LB

■ CRYSTAL GEYSER SPARKLING WATER

8oz/ 4.09

■ BELGIOIOSO BURRATA, 8oz/ 4.99

Big & Bold Reds- Australia

■ 2013 ANGOVE Red Blend (92TP, Reg 17.99)/ 7.99 ■ 2011 WILLIAM HARDY Shiraz (90TP, Reg 15.99)/ 8.99 ■ 2015 ST HALLETT Faith Shiraz (90W&S, Reg 17.99)/ 9.99 ■ 2014 PEPPERJACK Barossa Red (Reg 26.99)/ 9.99 ■ 2012 MONTES ALPHA Syrah (92WS, Red 25.99)/ 9.99

Best Buy Whites- 90+ Points

■ TRUE STORY HERB CHICKEN BREAST, 6oz/ 6.99 ■ 2016 SANTA RITA RESERVE Sauvignon Blanc ■ WHITE PRAWNS, MEDIUM, DEVEINED/ 10.98 LB ■ FIELD ROAST SAUSAGES, All Flavors, (91JS, Reg 12.99)/ 7.99 ■ 2016 GROVE MILL Sauvignon Blanc 12.95oz/ 5.99 (96D, Reg 15.99)/ 9.99 ■ DI STEFANO SLICED MOZZARELLA, 8oz/ 5.99 ■ 2015 ZACA MESA Z Blanc (91WE, Reg 24.99)/ 9.99 California Fresh, Blemish-Free, Organic, ■ FARMER JOHN BACON, Classic/ 7.99 ■ 2015 DECUGNANO DEI BARBI Orvieto Arrow Citrus Co., Lakeside Organics, Happy (90WE, Reg 18.99)/ 9.99 Cheese - Best Selection in Santa Cruz ■ 2014 TERLATO Chardonnay (90WE, Reg 33.99)/ 13.99 Boy Farms, Route 1 Farms ■ MONTEREY JACK, Great Melting Cheese

PRODUCE

■ BANANAS, Always Ripe/ .79 Lb

Loaf Cuts/ 3.29 Lb Average Cuts/ 3.49 Lb

■ CELERY, Premium Quality/ .99 Ea

■ LONGHORN CHEDDAR, Medium/ 3.99 Lb

■ YELLOW ONIONS, A Kitchen Must Have/ .49 Lb ■ COLBY JACK, Great Price/ 2.99 Lb

■ CLUSTER TOMATOES, Ripe on the Vine/ 1.69 Lb ■ PECORINO ROMANO WHEEL, Imported/ 11.99 Lb ■ AVOCADOS, Table Ripe Ready/ 1.99 Ea ■ ORGANIC BANANAS, A Great Snack/ .99 Lb

Clover Sonoma- Best Prices in Town

■ LEAF LETTUCE, Red, Green, Romaine,

■ LACTOSE FREE MILK 1/2Gal/ 2.99

■ SEEDLESS GRAPES, Red and Green/ 2.99 Lb Butter, Iceberg/ 1.19 Ea

■ WHOLE MILK GREEK YOGURT 5.3oz/ 1.39

■ EURO STYLE BUTTER 1/2Lb/ 2.99

■ TOMATOES, Roma and Large/ 1.69 Lb

■ YUKON GOLD POTATOES, Yellow Flesh/ .99 Lb

■ ORGANIC LOWFAT YOGURT 32oz/ 3.49 ■ ORGANIC MILK Gallon/ 6.99

Côtes Du Rhône

■ 2016 DELAS Saint-Esprit (95D)/ 12.99 ■ 2014 LA FERME DU MONT (91RP)/ 16.99 ■ 2014 DOMAINE DE MOURCHON (90WS)/ 18.99 ■ 2013 SAINT COSME “Deux Albion” (90WA)/ 19.99 ■ 2015 GRAND VENEUR “Les Champauvins” (92WA)/ 22.99

Connoisseur’s Corner- Ridge Super Sale

■ 2016 PASO ROBLES (93RP, Reg 34.99)/ 29.99 ■ 2015 THREE VALLEYS (Reg 28.99)/ 24.99 ■ 2015 PONZO (92WS, Reg 34.99)/ 29.99 ■ 2016 EAST BENCH (94V, Reg 39.99)/ 31.99 ■ 2014 PAGANI RANCH (92V, Reg 41.99)/ 39.99

JESSICA BROOKS, 20-Year Customer, Santa Cruz Occupation: Librarian, Branciforte Middle School running, arts & crafts, cooking Astrological Sign: Virgo

Hobbies: Roller skating, walks,

EDWARD BROOKS, 20-Year Customer, Santa Cruz

Occupation: Construction, H.B. Communications Hobbies: Volkswagen tinkering/ collecting, the beach, the river, fishing, cooking breakfasts Astrological Sign: Gemini

What first got you shopping at Shopper’s? JESSICA:“I was at a girlfriend’s house and we walked here to get margarita mix for a barbecue. Later, we ended up moving into her house and Shopper’s became our go-to store.” EDWARD:“I had heard about their butcher shop, and was not disappointed the first time I came here with Jessica.” You prefer shopping local? JESSICA: “Yes. I used to teach and see former students here working. Other stores don’t hire young teens like Shopper’s does.” EDWARD:“I love shopping local. Our son, Eddie Jr., feels comfortable here because of the family atmosphere.”

What do you like to cook? EDWARD:“I do breakfast — scrambles, French toast and omelets. Shopper’s marinated skirt steak is my good-luck Raiders food.Almost every time I grill it when tailgating they win!” JESSICA:“I make Mexican and Italian dishes. Bolognese sauce is one my specialties. I’ll get pork shoulder when making taco carnitas, ham hocks for soup, plus sausages and lean ground beef. Then there’s my sweet corn and tomato salad! EDWARD: “Shopper’s carries key lime juice — very hard to find — which I need for my key lime pies. Oh, and Jessica makes great banana bread!”

What would you tell someone who’s new to the area about Shopper’s? EDWARD:“Go to Shopper’s for the best meat and the friendliest butchers in town!”JESSICA:“I appreciate that their produce is seasonal, local, with many organic selections.They carry all the local wines like Soquel Vineyards varietals, also local breads, eggs, pies and more. It’s not made here but Shopper’s stocks my favorite breakfast tea, P G Tips.” EDWARD:“Shopper’s is friendly, fun and the perfect size. It’s something the community really enjoys.” JESSICA:“Shopper’s is consistently good with their products, quality and customer service.”

“Shopper’s is consistently good with with their products, quality and customer service.”

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Corner: Soquel & Branciforte Avenues 7 Days: 6am-9pm

| Meat: (831) 423-1696 | Produce: (831) 429-1499 | Grocery: (831) 423-1398 | Wine: (831) 429-1804

Superb Products of Value: Local, Natural, Specialty, Gourmet ■ Neighborly Service for 80 Years

Good Times Santa Cruz 1837  
Good Times Santa Cruz 1837