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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers Š2011 Metrosa Inc.

Cover photo by Sara Sanger. Cover design by Tabi Dolan.


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AN AMERICAN CANCER SOCIET Y GALA | AUGUST 18, 2012

This street art message brought to you by Francis Albert Sinatra. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

‘Though I’m not drunk and haven’t lost any testicles, I still feel slightly woozy.’ COVE R STORY P15

The ‘Other Green Party’ Candidate THE PA P E R P 8

Preserving Napa’s Oral History ARTS & IDEAS P19

Mr. White & Nerdy Himself MUS IC P 2 3 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Green Zone p10 Dining p11 Wineries p14

Swirl p14 Cover Story p15 Culture Crush p18 Arts & Ideas p19 Stage p20

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nb SOUND ADVICE A simple ‘I love you’ means more than money—and with a kiss or two, life is sunny. Tell her you love her, tell her you love her each day!

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Napa & Sonoma Counties


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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Strategic Value As the earth heats up, consider all solutions BY PAUL J. VON HARTMANN

T

he compounding imbalances that we’ve imposed on Earth’s atmosphere threaten everyone with irreversible systemic collapse. If we don’t reverse the accelerating climate changes, then the quality of life on this planet will continue to degenerate at an unpredictable rate.

Over the past two decades, the number of days per year that “extreme” levels of UVB occur has more than doubled, and the scale of measurement has been increased to accommodate these higher levels of intensity. Elevated UVB exposure is known to cause genetic mutation, immune suppression, abnormal cell growth, increasing global temperatures and declining crop production. In 2007, it was reported by climate scientists that fragrant aerosols called “monoterpenes” produced by the world’s boreal forests reflect UVB radiation away from the planet and seed cloud formation, shielding the earth from the sun. Since the 1950s, half of the boreal forests have been cut down (mainly to produce paper) or have died from increasing insect pest infestation caused by global warming. Cannabis is the only crop that has the potential to produce sufficient quantities of monoterpenes needed to replace what has been lost and in the time that we may have left to make a difference. Cannabis hemp is also capable of producing adequate quantities of organic, renewable feedstock needed for making paper, reducing industry pressure for continued forest destruction. On March 16, President Obama became the seventh American president to sign an executive order acknowledging the “strategic” value of hemp. Three other federal documents pertaining to emergency preparedness reference “essential civilian demand” as a protocol for access to strategic resources. Science, reason and mobilized public demand must overwhelm the failed rhetoric of an expensive and counterproductive “drug war” very soon. It is critical that people see beyond tired myths about “the dangers of marijuana” to recognize the much greater danger resulting from an imposed cannabis scarcity. Cannabis is, in fact, essential for helping resolve atmospheric imbalances, whose unthinkable consequences our children will otherwise be condemned to endure. Paul J. von Hartmann is the founder of the California Cannabis Ministry. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Buns Galore

Great article (“Sandwiches!” July 25)! Two other amazing sandwich places I would add are Chloe’s French Cafe (3883 Airway Drive, Ste. 145, Santa Rosa), whose jambon brie sandwich with warm ham, brie, pears and brown mustard is amazing (but so are a bunch of their other sandwiches), and Pearson & Co., an old favorite. I love all their different focaccia bread sandwiches particularly, but their meatloaf sandwich on ciabatta is a standout.

CHRISTINA PANZA Santa Rosa

Great sandwich issue, writing and photography, but I have to call you to task for not including the fabulous prosciutto caprese sandwich at Bill & Deb’s Downtown Deli in Santa Rosa. Bill and Deb quite fortunately came over to Fourth Street from Traverso’s and are doing a commendable job in carrying on the ages-old sandwich tradition of the Traverso family. I hope this letter provides the already busy pair with the additional recognition which they so richly deserve.

ED COLETTI Santa Rosa Editor’s note: I can personally vouch for the kickassedness of the sandwiches mentioned above.

Market Options What about markets like Trader Joe’s and Target on Santa Rosa Avenue (“Express Lane,” July 25)? They have a ton of food. Then there’s Lola’s. They are all within walking distance of the Circuit City site. I guess it’s all right if they let another grocery store in, but use common sense, please. It would be nice if it were safer to ride a bike or walk on Santa Rosa Avenue.

ERIN BARK Santa Rosa

Lasting Impact

Thank you to Ryan White for his compassionate and informative piece on this marginalized community in Sausalito (“The Anchor-Outs,” July 18). It is a pleasant reminder that quality journalism persists. Such work expands intelligent discourse and has lasting impact. May you thrive.

VICTORIA HANSON West Marin

Attack of the Dragonfly Drones I’m not particularly new to conspiracy theories, having been one of the JFK assassination baby boomers (“Bogus Bohemia,” July 11), so I was not surprised by the flyers, magazines and booths dedicated to one conspiracy theory or another on the day of the Creation of Care. In fact, one magazine was actually titled Paranoia. And at that booth you could purchase special CDs or DVDs that somehow told the tale that there was mind-control going on all around us, and that Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin actually admitted there was no real moon landing, no one great leap for mankind. It was a warm, sunny day in downtown Monte Rio. The amphitheater, a grassy field that slanted toward a stage, was hosting the Creation of Care, also known as Occupy Bohemian Grove. There were many locals, the good, the bad and the ugly on hand in their beach chairs along with a few young activists. They politely put up with the day’s speakers yet were probably hoping for a little action. There were musicians, a marching band, the Fukushima Mothers, Code Pink and Cindy Sheehan who roused the crowd yelling, “Fuck them. I hate them. I don’t want to be like them!” The day was really quite lovely, and as the afternoon was winding down a sheriff’s helicopter began to circle the small crowd on the field—an annoying hum while a lone guitarist on the stage


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sang Woody Guthrie songs. It made me wonder about the oversized dragonďŹ&#x201A;ies Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d seen earlier. I was sitting on the grass when I noticed them. Big bugs. Two of them, circling as well. Never landing, but their loud little wings had attracted my attention, along with that of a two-yearold who mistook them for hummingbirds. The thought crossed my mind and I let it pass. Drones? Insects with cameras? Someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s science project? I felt like I hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t noticed dragonďŹ&#x201A;ies like these in, like, ever. What was the likelihood? The most powerful men in America (and the world) were hanging out just blocks away, just a short stroll from town. I had seen few police that day, sheriff or highway patrol, just one helicopter and two dragonďŹ&#x201A;ies. Was the future here and now? Was I under surveillance? Did man ever walk on the moon? These days, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to say.

GAIL KING Monte Rio

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Rants

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7


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Paper

Nicolas Grizzle

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

8

FIRED UP If elected, Robert Jacob would be the first-ever councilmember who also owns a medical-marijuana dispensary.

Green Indeed

Sebastopol’s Robert Jacob: marijuana dispensary owner, city council candidate BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

S

ebastopol City Council candidate Robert Jacob, quick with a smile, is a businessman, a member of the local chamber of commerce and Rotary Club, and a good listener. What separates him from other politicians is his job: he’s the founder and executive director of a medical-marijuana dispensary.

If elected, the Sebastopol planning commissioner would likely be the first city council member in the state whose occupation and livelihood are directly linked to the precarious balance among state, local and federal laws on marijuana. Jacob’s Peace in Medicine dispensaries, in Sebastopol and Santa Rosa, are hailed as model operations; Jacob himself worked closely with city officials to craft Sebastopol’s

ordinance regulating dispensaries. In his campaign, Jacob doesn’t shy away from the issue, and neither he nor his campaign consultant, Craig Litwin, feels it hinders his electability. “Some people don’t appreciate that, and they’ll be turned off,” says Litwin, a former Sebastopol city council member. “But the majority of the people see that and see it’s being done the right way, and really understand that Robert’s the right person for the job.”

The issues Jacob says he’s passionate about, aside from medical marijuana, are the environment and local business. At a kickoff fundraiser Saturday afternoon at the Permaculture Neighborhood Center in Sebastopol, Jacobs promoted these values to a crowd of about 80 supporters. “When we continue to move in a direction that is about bettering ourselves, about developing a Main Street by not bringing in strip malls to bring in fake economic development, ghost economic development in our town, we are moving in the right direction,” he told the crowd. Though Jacob did not directly declare opposition to the controversial CVS/Chase Bank development proposal at the intersection of highways 12 and 116, he did tell the Bohemian that the city’s design review board is “doing its job.” (The board has so far rejected four different proposals by CVS.) As a planning commissioner, Jacob hasn’t yet had to vote on the issue, but his position may be a foregone conclusion: he is a steering committee member of Cittaslow Sebastopol, whose core values lie in direct opposition to the development. “When we are different than the homogeny of the 101 corridor or Rohnert Park,” Jacobs said Saturday, taking a dig at the bedroom community which has outlawed medical-marijuana dispensaries, “then we are right.” Sebastopol is no stranger to progressive government, and has three times elected Green Party members to its city council. But Jacobs is the first serious candidate so publicly tied to marijuana, and his endorsement list is substantial. In attendance Saturday were several of those endorsers, including Assemblyman Michael Allen, several current and former Sebastopol, Santa Rosa and Petaluma city council members, and former Sonoma County planning commissioners. State Sen. Noreen Evans has also endorsed Jacob, and sent a representative in her place on Saturday. “When I see assembly members show up,” says Litwin, “it indicates we’re ready on all levels of state and local government, at least in


Sebastopol may be the most marijuanafriendly city in the county. But Cotati still takes the brownie for unofficially mixing cannabis and government. Former Cotati City Council member George Barich had a political career after being arrested on suspicion of growing 500 marijuana plants in his home in 1996. He pleaded no contest to the charge, but never wavered from his “those weren’t my plants” stance. The conservative politician ran for city council several times after that, winning a seat briefly in 2008 before being recalled in a muchballyhooed special election in 2009. And there’s that infamous tale of Cotati City Council members in the 1970s planting marijuana outside the front steps of city hall in an act of protest. (The plants were promptly removed and no arrests were made.) In Sebastopol, Jacob is one of five candidates vying for two open seats on the city council. He’s running against one current councilmember, two former councilmembers and one outspoken war critic often seen at council meetings. Though he is a strong medicalmarijuana advocate (he has admitted to using the drug for medicinal purposes in the past), he says, “the core value of why I’m running is I believe in maintaining Sebastopol’s unique character as a small town.”

Surplus Showdown After July 20 revelations that the California Department of Parks and Recreation had been sitting on a hidden $54 million surplus, local organizations are asking for a refund. Bike Monkey, a Sonoma County nonprofit cycling-advocacy organization, has taken its complaint to the state, demanding the return of $40,000 raised for state parks last year from the Annadel XC bike race. “We’re extremely disappointed in 15 different directions,” says Greg Fisher, editor of Bike Monkey magazine. “Public faith and goodwill has been expended.” Proceeds from Bike Monkey’s 2012 Annadel XC on Aug. 18 will benefit the Sonoma County Regional Parks system, which took over operations of Annadel on July 1. But Fisher says that fundraising efforts for a state park system that evidently did not need the help has damaged credibility. “Last year, the budget enclosure news came down and upped the dire component of the event,” he says. “It sold out after that. Everyone cared that mountain bikers could contribute to the park; a lot of steam has been taken out of that by this revelation.” Bike Monkey has only recently begun the process of asking for a return of monies by going through administrative channels. Fisher says the intent isn’t to be obnoxious, but rather to plainly and firmly ask for the funds back. While the state has yet to respond to the request, it’ll be interesting to see whether the department returns the funds that could be handed over to the regional parks. “Whatever entity manages it,” says Fisher, “we want to support that entity, because we want to keep it open for mountain bikers.” —Leilani Clark

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

9 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

the majority, to move through this issue and figure out how to really help our nation.” Sebastopol may be the most marijuana-friendly city in the county, with 66 percent of its voters saying yes to Proposition 19, the failed 2010 effort to legalize marijuana in California.


Green Zone

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

10

On the Go Carpool app makes ridesharing simple BY JULIANE POIRIER

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eidi Fiedler turns her car into a bus sometimes. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a set schedule, because neither does she. But it also doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have toâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;using the WeGo Sonoma app, Feidler can rideshare in a new, spontaneous way. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve carpooled with people in the past, but my schedule is pretty random and it didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work well,â&#x20AC;? says Fiedler. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What I thought was really neat about this program is that you can potentially ďŹ nd riders or drivers at any time you need to go. They use the term â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;critical mass,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; and once they achieve that, and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plenty of folks on the ride board, you can set your starting point and destination and it will ďŹ&#x201A;ag you.â&#x20AC;? WeGo, available in Sonoma, Marin and Contra Costa counties, is being funded by the Metropolitan Transportation Commission. The Sonoma

County version is made possible by the Transportation Authority (SCTA), which named the Climate Protection Campaign in Santa Rosa as program managers. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s their job to keep the critical mass building. But participants like Fiedler help that happen. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I live in Rohnert Park and work in Santa Rosa,â&#x20AC;? Fiedler tells the Bohemian. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And since most of the Santa Rosa Junior College is participating, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be able to pick up students and reduce my carbon footprint. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m interested in doingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;lessening my impact on the environment.â&#x20AC;? As part of the program launch, drivers earn incentive points each time they carry passengers. And riders contribute to the gas costs. The minimal cost-share for this service is transacted using an electronic walletâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;something like a reďŹ llable BART cardâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;so no cash passes hands. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The part I like also is that when you decide whether to accept a rider, you have a picture and a rating from other drivers,â&#x20AC;? Fiedler explained. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So you can kind of pick and choose people who have ďŹ ve stars if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re intimidated, but I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t yet run into anyone I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have had lunch with.â&#x20AC;? Using an application developed by Avego, based in Ireland, WeGo Sonoma was included among rideshare pilot programs reviewed by the New York Times in July. Critical mass, it seems, is building across the nation, and more strangers are sharing rides. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I signed up because I work at Agilent, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of the participating employers. I got a car kit and learned about the incentives. I could even earn an iPad,â&#x20AC;? says Feidler, laughing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d love to have an iPad!â&#x20AC;? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not out of reach, eitherâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need to drive her â&#x20AC;&#x153;busâ&#x20AC;? 50 times to earn it. For more, see www.wegorideshare.com.


FIVE-POINT DUO Chef Ari Weiswasser and his wife, Erinn Benziger-Weiswasser, bring top-tier dining to Glen Ellen.

A Star Is Born

Glen Ellen Star a luminous twinkle in small-town orbit BY STETT HOLBROOK

F

or all its smalltown, wine country charm, Glen Ellen doesn’t have a restaurant that delivers completely on its prime location and access to great ingredients and wine. Or at least it didn’t, until the Glen Ellen Star opened two months ago. The little restaurant does just about everything right, and that’s why it’s packed most days of the

week. Chef and co-owner Ari Weiswasser has worked in top-tier kitchens like the French Laundry and New York’s Corton, but the food at Glen Ellen Star is served at a far lower price in a more relaxed, everyday setting. You’ve got to love a place that offers a pig roast for groups of eight or more and throws in a case of Pabst Blue Ribbon. The food here comes off as casual and fun, but make no mistake: the four-man crew crammed in the matchbox of a

kitchen are stone-cold killers. Take a seat at the counter and watch this squad do their stuff; it’s like looking in on a submarine crew in combat. While the food is definitely the draw, the service is right up there with it. Over the course of two visits, I was struck by the style and ease of the floor staff. These servers are cool professionals, casual yet attentive, low-key but knowledgeable about the food and the short, well-curated wine list. The restaurant is the long held

dream of Weiswasser and his wife, Erinn Benziger-Weiswasser, daughter of winemaker Mike Benziger. They moved back to Benziger-Weiswasser’s hometown to start the restaurant—and a new life, too, with young daughter Noa. The food is Mediterranean in the fundamentals, but there are layers of flavors and ingredients from Mexico, North Africa, Greece and Turkey that create a style of food which I think in time will grow into a cuisine of its own. The menu revolves around the wood-burning oven. There are excellent, thin crust pizzas ($12– $16) but also a number of small dishes that show Weiswasser’s wide-ranging culinary interests. The little dishes ($8 each) are served in a cast-iron skillet and are a great way to start a meal. I loved the roasted vegetables with pickled green tomatoes, and the tzatziki with thin strips of crispy lavash. Weiswasser steers miles clear of the beet-and-goatsalad cliché and instead roasts the golden chioggia beets to a caramelized brown and tops them with harissa (a North Africa dried pepper mixture) and blood orange oil. He also likes to deconstruct dishes or present familiar flavors in new ways. The roasted corn with queso fresco, chipotle powder and lime is like an uptown version of elote, grilled corn slathered with butter, lime juice and chile powder, a Mexican street-vendor classic. The only wood-fired dish that didn’t work was the still-in-the-pod fava beans in a goopy, curry-sabayon sauce. For something lighter, the bitter green-watermelon panzanella ($8) is a great taste-of-summer salad. And with tomatoes just now coming into their sweet peak, the silken gazpacho ($9) is as good as it gets. For entrées, I was floored by the al pastor–style pork ribs ($21), another deconstructed take on a Mexican classic that uses pork ribs instead of pork loin, but with the same chile) 12

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Michael Amsler

Dining

11


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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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cumin-pineapple marinade. It was clever and delicious. Not as clever, but equally good, is the striped bass ($22). The white, meaty fish is sautéed and then finished in the wood oven and paired with a sweet, creamy succotash and candy-sweet cherry tomatoes. The brick chicken ($21), juicy and tender and dusted with earthy flavor of Turkish Urfa chiles, is solid but still just a chicken dish. The dessert choice is easy: ice cream. The restaurant makes its own and serves it in little halfpint cartons ($5). The flavors are inventive (peach-verbena sorbet, salt peanut, vanilla maple bourbon) but the texture isn’t quite orthodox. It’s thick but airy, kind of like frozen Cool Whip. Still, it’s a cute, light-hearted way to end the meal. Weiswasser’s goal was to create an easy-going, neighborhood restaurant that draws on local and international flavors. He’s nailed it, and Glen Ellen Star is sure to draw diners from well outside the neighborhood.

Corner of Montgomery & Summerfield *Dine-in only. Offer cannot be combined with any other promotion. Exp. 8-31-12. Not valid on major holidays.

Glen Ellen Star, 13648 Arnold Drive., Glen Ellen. 707.343.1384.


Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OMA CO U N TY Buck’s American. $$. Small plates complement classic fare at Guerneville staple. Prime rib weekend nights! Dinner, Wed– Sat; brunch and dinner, Sun. 16440 Fourth St, Guerneville. 707.869.3608.

Chelino’s Mexican Restaurant Mexican. $. Standout generous taqueria fare with fresh ingredients daily. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1079 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.571.7478.

Dempsey’s Alehouse Gourmet pub fare. $-$$. Popular brewpub and bistro, award-winning handcrafted beers, outdoor dining in summer and pork chops to die for. Lunch and dinner daily. 50 E Washington St, Petaluma. 707.765.9694.

Flavor California cuisine. $-$$. Fresh and organic white-tablecloth food at paper-napkin prices. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 96 Old Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa. 707.573.9695.

Hikuni Sushi Bar & Hibachi Japanese. $$$. Terrific teppanyaki plus a full sushi bar, tonkatsu, udon and bento. Lunch and dinner daily. 4100 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.539.9188.

Mac’s Delicatessen Diner. $. Large selection of Jewish-style sandwiches; excellent cole slaw. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Sat. 630 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.3785.

Papa’s Taverna Greek. $$. Satisfying food in riverside setting. Sun afternoons, Greek dancing. Lunch and dinner daily. 5688 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma. 707.769.8545.

Sapporo Japanese. $$. An excellent choice when the sushi urge hits. Lunch and

dinner, Mon-Sat. 518 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.575.0631.

Easy Street Cafe American. $. Take a gander at the extensive list of Easy Street specials and get a spot by the window to watch Red Hill shoppers wander by. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 882 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.453.1984.

Shangri-La Nepalese. $-$$. Authentic and enriching Nepalese cuisine. As its name suggests, a culinary paradise. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 1708 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.793.0300.

Fish Seafood. $$-$$$.

Stark’s Steakhouse

Fradelizio’s Italian. $$.

Steakhouse. $$$$. Could be the best steak you’ll ever have. “Other than steak” menu changes seasonally. Happy hour Mon-Fri, 3 to 6. Dinner daily; lunch, Mon-Fri. 521 Adams St, Santa Rosa. 707.546.5100.

Tolay Californian. $$-$$$. Sonoma County cuisine is the specialty, with entrees focusing on local wild and farmed foods. In the Sheraton Sonoma County, 745 Baywood Drive, Petaluma. 707.283.2900.

Yao-Kiku Japanese. $$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from Japan steals the show in this popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180.

Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Sat. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

country casual. $$. Wine shop and bistro with maverick moxie for the wine cowboy. Premium bottles for sale, also. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun; open late, Thurs-Sat. 975 First St, Napa. 707.255.0622.

Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen Eclectic. $$-$$$. As

Pizzeria Picco Pizza. $-$$. The wood-fired oven keeps things cozy, and the organic ingredients and produce make it all tasty. Lunch and dinner, Sat-Sun; dinner only, Mon-Fri. 32o Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.8900. Salito’s Crab House

Sol Food Puerto Rican. $.

Fantastic East-meets-West fusion of Indian, Mexican, Italian and American, with dishes customized to your palate. Lunch and dinner, MonSat. 2656 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.8083.

Flavorful, authentic and homestyle at this Puerto Rican eatery, which is as hole-inthe-wall as they come. Lunch and dinner daily. Two San Rafael locations: 732 Fourth St. 415.451.4765. 901 Lincoln Ave. 415.256.8903.

American. $$-$$$. A Marin County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless

Bounty Hunter Wine

Marin Brewing Co Pub food. $-$$. Excellent soups, salads, pub grub and awardwinning pork-beer sausage. Lunch and dinner daily. 1809 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.4677.

Avatar’s Indian-plus. $.

Buckeye Roadhouse

Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487.

Checkers California. $$.

MARIN CO U N T Y

$$$$. Enjoy flavorful and rich regional fare in the rustic décor of an Argentinean ranch. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 340 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.833.0901.

N A PA CO U N T Y

Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

Seafood . $$$. Waterfront setting with extensive marine menu plus steak and other American staples. Lunch and dinner daily. 1200 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.331.3226.

Boca South American. $$$-

Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

Tommy’s Wok Chinese. $-$$. Tasty and filling Chinese fare without the greasy weigh-down. Nice vegetarian selections, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun.3001 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.5818. Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special

Perfect casual spot for dinner before the movie. Try the panéed chicken and butternut squash ravioli. Lunch and dinner daily. 1414 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9300.

comfortable as it sounds, with a rich and varied melting pot of a menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 1327 Railroad Ave, St Helena. 707.963.1200.

Cole’s Chop House American steakhouse. $$$$$. Handsome, upscale 1950s-era steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dryaged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a “nostalgia” cocktail. Dinner daily. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.224.6328.

Compadres Rio Grille Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark.

13

SMALL BITES

Time to Flourish The former Copperfield’s Books usedbook annex in downtown Sebastopol is being transformed into a community kitchen geared around creating healthy meals for those with health conditions such as diabetes, auto-immune disorders, malnutrition and obesity. Flourish, a project of the Aushadi Health Foundation, will feature a cafe serving food prepared in the ayurvedic approach to nutrition, which in part views food as medicine. There will also be a small retail store with locally made products. In the back half of the space, there will be a commercial kitchen to support a variety of cooking and educational classes. The facility also plans an herbal apothecary and herb-processing facility, drying racks, a fermentation area and a cheesemaking station. The space will also serve as an incubator for startup food companies in need of a certified kitchen. Laura Barncard, board member for the Aushadi Health Foundation, says Flourish will also provide free food boxes to those with diabetes. She hopes for construction to begin in December after a $200,000 fundraising goal is reached. For more, see www.aushadihealth.com.—Stett Holbrook

Lunch and dinner daily. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner, Wed-Sun. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Miguel’s MexicanCalifornian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.226.2633.

Ubuntu Vegetarian. $$$$. Some of the most remarkable specimens of high-end vegetables and fruits available on a restaurant plate. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1140 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5656.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Dining

service, and a convivial atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.331.2600.


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

14

Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N T Y DaVero Sonoma Get lubed with spicy extra virgin from California’s first Tuscan olive trees; rare Sagrantino wine is in a different league. Jams, soaps and balm from the farm, too. 766 Westside Road, Healdsburg. 10am-5pm daily except Tuesday. Nominal fee $15. 707.431.8000.

Göpfrich Winery Accomplished dentist Ray Göpfrich found a new career in gladly helping to stain your teeth purple. Dry Creek Valley Cab, and sweet treats: Riesling, Silvaner and Huxelrebe from friends in Germany. 7462 West Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. By appointment, Saturdays. 707.433.1645.

Hawley Winery Barrelfermented Viognier, kiwistyle Sauvignon Blanc, plus toothsome reds. Winemaker John Hawley helped to grow some of the big-name brands; now his sons have joined him in this small, Dry Creek Valley family business. 36 North St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am– 6pm; $5 fee. 707.473.9500.

La Follette Wines You’ve heard of the brands he’s helped to create or save— Flowers, La Crema—but do you know Greg La Follette? Find out why the man behind “big-hair Pinot” is reinventing himself at intimate monthly tastings. “Terroir Tour with Greg,” select Fridays, 10:30am to 12pm. 4900 West Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. $30; call for reservations. 707.395.3902. Nalle Winery Rising above the vineyards like some kind of New Age bunker, the rosemary-shrouded winery houses a down-toearth father-and-son team dedicated to low-alcohol Dry Creek Zinfandel. Greeters Lila and Pella present soggy tennis balls. 2385 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Saturdays, noon– 5pm. No fee. 707.433.1040. Red Car Wine Co. Lay

some track to the “Gateway to Graton” and take your palate on a ride with Boxcar Syrah and Trolley Pinot from Sonoma Coast vineyards. Next stop: Côte-Rôtie on the way to Beaune. 8400 Graton Road, Sebastopol. Thursday-Monday 10am-4:30pm. Tasting fee $10. 707.829.8500.

Sonoma County Wine Collective Small, local wineries take turns in the spotlight in the midst of friendly, upscale-casual woodfired pizzeria. Selections may include Atascadero Creek Winery, Lattanzio Wines, Radio-Coteau, Claypool Cellars, Scherrer Winery, County Line and Baker Lane Vineyards. Olive oil tasting and full restaurant menu also available. At the Pizzavino707 restaurant. 6948 Sebastopol Ave., Sebastopol. Friday–Sunday, noon-6pm, $12 fee (restaurant open Wednesday–Sunday). 707.829.9500.

N A PA CO U N TY Charles Krug Winery Founded 1861, and owned by the Peter Mondavi family since only 1943, Krug is among Napa’s most historic wineries. Taste awardwinning Sauvignon Blanc and reserve Cab in unassuming low building across from the original stone winery. Ask about the Johannesburger Riesling. 2800 Main St., St. Helena. Tasting daily, 10:30am to 5pm. Fees vary; complimentary for “Napa neighbors.” 707.967.2229.

Fantesca Estate & Winery (WC) Set on land that was the dowry gift when Charles Krug married in 1860, this estate winery specializing in Cab features a wine-aging cave built right into the side of Spring Mountain. 2920 Spring Mountain Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.968.9229.

On the Edge A key stop for devotees of the cult to Charbono. 1255 Lincoln Ave.,

Calistoga. Open daily, 10am– 5:30pm. 707.942.7410.

Robert Sinskey Vineyards In the lofty, barnlike hall–as elegant as a theater, as solid as a ski lodge–visitors can take in the tank room action; at least, the gleaming stainless steel, framed by wood and stonework and brewpub-style chalkboard menus imbues the space with a sense of energetic immediacy. “Gluttonous Flight” pairs savory munchables prepared in the gourmet demonstration kitchen with biodynamically farmed Careros Pinot Noir and Bordeaux varietals. Not to worry: there’s no flight for ascetics offered, so go for it. 6320 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open 10am–4:30pm daily. 707.944.9090.

Summers Estate Wines Excellent Merlot and that rarest of beasts, Charbono. Small tasting room and friendly staff. 1171 Tubbs Lane, Calistoga. Open daily, 10am– 4:30pm. 707.942.5508.

Velo Vino Napa Valley Cycling-themed bungalow is filled with enough gear to outfit a peloton, plus wine and espresso, too. Tastings include spiced nuts and dried cherries, but sample-sized Clif and Luna Bars are readily available for your impromptu energy bar and wine pairings. 709 Main St., St. Helena. Daily, 10am– 6pm. $10–$25. 707.968.0625.

Vincent Arroyo Winery Small, tasting room is essentially a barn with a table near some barrels, but very friendly, with good wines. 2361 Greenwood Ave., Calistoga. Open daily, 10am– 4:30pm. 707.942.6995.

The Wine Garage Defunct filling station with a mandate: No wines over $25. Well chosen from Napa Valley and beyond, plus half-gallon house jugs for $29.99. 1020-C Foothill Blvd., Calistoga. Monday–Saturday 11am–6:30pm; Sunday to 4:30pm. Tasting fee $5–$10. 707.942.5332.

Repris Wines New crew reignites a blast from the past BY JAMES KNIGHT

M

oon Mountain Road is a dead-end onelaner that climbs the hills north of Sonoma through stunted oaks and chaparral. Raptors glide between branches and perch on poles, unfazed by passing cars as they track jackrabbits. Across two cattle grates, the driveway to Moon Mountain Vineyard clings to the sides of a volcanic bowl framed by ancient lava flows and craggy peaks. Even as I approach the winery, a wild, feline form stalks out of the undergrowth.

If this seems like one of those last-frontier, blue-sky wine follies just recently grafted onto impractically remote hills by people with money to burn, it isn’t. Not exactly. But let’s start with the cat. Stella, a domestic cat merely on her rounds, came bundled with the winery—as did Frankie, whom we find napping in the lab—after being sold by its most recent corporate owner. The charismatic facility was built into a dynamited hillside in 1981 for Chalone’s Carmenet project; grapes had already been grown on these steep slopes, uphill from famed Monte Rosso, since the 19th century. Repris is a new effort to bring visitors back to this dramatic site, led by a group of friends including winemaker Erich Bradley and tech VC Christian Borcher. They’ve retained some of the veteran human staff, too, and seem to have fostered—as Borcher’s upbeat manner would seem to suggest—a friendly, easygoing vibe. Or maybe it’s the view. The tour starts with a welcome glass of Chardonnay and swings through the cool network of caves bored out of solid volcanic rock, where a cheesemaking operation is slated to join the sleeping wines. Next we hop on an all-terrain vehicle, taking in the smell of bay leaf in the air as the Polaris dips into a wooded ravine along a seasonal creek. We gain altitude past 60-year-old Zinfandel vines bordered by sunflowers and fruit trees, a haven for beneficial insects and birds. The air warms only a little, although we’re in brilliant sunlight at 1,800 feet, San Francisco and the bridges poking out of the fog on the horizon. Tasted fresh from the barrel, the 2011 Bizmark Vineyard Chardonnay ($58 when bottled) comes from just over the hill. Full malo but neutral oak, it’s refreshingly lively with lean pineapple and lychee fruit over light caramel flavor. Last year’s Cabernet Franc, this vineyard’s starring varietal wine, fills the palate with concentrated black fruit and cocoa, and the 2010 Left Bank Blend ($125) is a credible Bordeaux-styled red dominated by graphite notes over black fruit. Borcher says that thin soils make such wines—that, and the cool mountain air. Or maybe it’s the view. Repris, 1700 Moon Mountain Road, Sonoma. Tours and tastings three times daily, by advance reservation only. $40–$60. 707.933.8514.


Comedy open mics are proliferating all over the North Bay. What’s so funny?

Sara Sanger

BY LEILANI CLARK

O

So how is it I’ve ended up on a brightly lit stage, microphone gripped in my sweaty palm, about to try and make a bunch of strangers laugh? My journey to this particularly terrifying scenario started months ago, after a friend who was taking classes at the San Francisco Comedy College started doing standup in the North Bay. Rather than moving to San Francisco, more and more aspiring comics seemed to be sticking it out in Sonoma County, making something out of what was once nothing. “How hard can standup comedy really be?” I thought. And with that, I started checking out the scene for myself. My first stop is at a surprising venue: Guayakí Mate Bar in Sebastopol. Since 2010, after answering a Craigslist ad for a comedy show host, Heidi Bartlett has hosted the “Horsin’ Around” open mic night at the organic tea bar. The first night Bartlett booked was less than stellar attendance-wise, with only Guayakí’s David Turconi, his wife and son and two others in the audience. “I was like, how am I going to fill two hours?” says Bartlett. She didn’t have to worry for long, however, as Guayakí’s monthly comedy night ended up taking off. Now audiences number in the high dozens, a mix of comedians and fans who come out to see about 15 comics perform along with a headliner. “I have to turn people away,” says Bartlett. With sign-ups required, there’s always a waiting list for that five minutes of fame. ) 16

15 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Laughing Matter

ut of all the terrible, horrible, no-good, very bad things that can happen to a person in this world, there are two of which I’m most afraid: death by fiery plane crash is the first, followed closely by performing standup comedy.


A

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

16 Laughing Matter ( 15

W

hat people do with that five minutes varies, and performers on this Wednesday night are hit-andmiss. There’s a hilarious bit about the Petaluma corn maze from a middle-aged, self-proclaimed “Republican comic”; there’s also a not-funny-in-the-least bit about how women get ugly and wrinkled as they get older from a red-faced, wrinkly fellow with a British accent. It’s a reminder that making people laugh is probably one of the most difficult and subjective tasks around. What’s acceptable to one person (Daniel Tosh’s notorious gang-rape “joke,” for example) might rightly send another into a frenzy. Still, the diversity of comics at Guayakí, whether clever or offensive, is a sign of a scene that’s in high gear. “Before our show took place, there weren’t any [open mic nights],” Bartlett says. “Now there’s more than one a week. The scene has exploded. Because the demand was so high for my show, a number of people created their own shows throughout the county.” Ricky Del Rosario, a Sonoma County–based comedian who once shared a manager with George Lopez, recently began hosting an open mic at Heritage Public House in Santa Rosa. After cultivating a thriving standup career beginning in 1994, the SSU graduate took a nine-year break to focus on his wife and children. He returned to the scene in 2009, and says there’s been a zero-to-60 jump in venues. “There was no comedy scene back when I started,” he says. “At the time, I was going to San Francisco, L.A—but I had nowhere around here to really practice my new material. When I started up again, I started going to open mics, and after that they just started popping up everywhere. It’s fantastic. I have a chance to practice all new material all the time.” The open mic at Doc Holliday’s Saloon, where I eventually make my “debut,” sprang up this past year. Hosted by local standup comedian (and, by day, Home Depot carpet guy) Marty Carrion,

WAGON WHEELER Juan Carlos used to have to drive for hours to open mics.

it’s become one of the more popular “rooms.” On a recent night, Helen Pachynski, a retired financial adviser and former society matron who lives in Santa Rosa, takes the stage at Doc Holliday’s. A pixyish woman with an Audrey Hepburn haircut, Pachynski is all style and grace, even while making jokes about vibrators and sex with the gardener. Her routine revolves around re-entering the dating scene after the death of her husband three years ago. Best joke? “At my age, men are like parking spaces. The good ones are all taken and the rest are handicapped.” Onstage, Pachynski’s a firecracker, and she absolutely kills. She’s got the audience eating out of her hand. I’ll soon take this same stage, and I know I can learn something from her.

I

’m the Betty White of Sonoma County,” Pachynski tells me with a laugh. “I’m always the oldest at any venue. I’m 67 years old, and I make no bones about it.”

Pachynski’s got a pro attitude, and she assures me that comedy is possible for almost everyone— with preparation. She’s been at this comedy thing for two years, since debuting at the Guayakí Mate Bar. Now she performs in front of hundreds of people at a time, everywhere from San Francisco’s Purple Onion to the Moose Lodge (“A lot of bluehairs there,” she says). “Most comedy is based on personal experience,” she advises. “It’s just relating these little ordinary things. They become funny in the way that you present them or talk about them.” The most important thing is to prepare and practice ahead of time, she adds. “It gives you confidence, and you know you have another line to back you up,” says Pachynski. This is essential, because inevitably, as I’m soon to learn from first-hand experience, aspiring comics will end up at one time or another with a stone-faced audience that doesn’t laugh at a punch line. And what are you going to do then? Cry?

fter her first night at Guayakí, Pachynski kept returning to perform and perfect her material. It was there that she met Juan Carlos, another up-and-coming comedian. Juan Carlos is one-third of the crew behind Monkey Fight Productions, which hosts regular comedy showcase nights at the Sweet River Grill and Bar (where deadpan comedy master Mitch Hedberg once performed in the ’90s), Christy’s on the Square and Gaia’s Garden. With jokes that often revolve around being a chronically single Latino man and a Mexican immigrant who’s been in the country illegally since he was nine and can’t seem to catch a citizenship break from the U.S. government, Juan Carlos turns tragedy into comedy. “I come from a really poor family, so around the household we didn’t have Disneyland or Great America; we didn’t have the dream to go to those places, so we kept entertaining each other, doing jokes and stuff,” he says. The 33-year-old Santa Rosa resident says that when he first started doing comedy four years ago, he had to travel as far as Dublin for comedy open mics. “Now these people are really spoiled,” he says. “When I first started, I traveled three hours to this tiny Chinese restaurant where they had an open mic and there were three people there. I went up for a minute and a half, and for the first minute, the host talked over my set!” But the invitations started coming in, from places like the Punchline and the Purple Onion in San Francisco, and soon, Juan Carlos was asked to perform at Mark Pitta and Friends, a weekly showcase at 142 Throckmorton Theatre in Mill Valley. Pitta is renowned for giving new comics a chance, and even more so, for attracting spontaneous appearances by famous friends like Dana Carvey and Robin Williams. Juan Carlos says he wanted to bring what he’d learned from experiences in the bigger rooms of the Bay Area back to his hometown. He started Monkey Fight Productions in 2011 with Marco Alvarez and Mike Olsen, as a way to expand on the open mic


concept. They bring in a different headliner each month and ask local comics to “open” with five- to seven-minute bits. “I go to a lot of open mics to try my own material, and I’ll see who’s putting an effort into it, who’s becoming more polished in their act, and invite them to a show,” Juan Carlos says. Recently, he asked “Uncle” Charlie Adams (whose “claim to semi-fame” is rapping, including the “Angry Old Guy Rap”) to perform in one of the showcases after seeing him perform. “You see a change in people, even down to their posture,” says Juan Carlos. “They do their showcase, and do well, and you can tell they’re different people, they’re better people. It’s like a miracle.” He says the growth in the Sonoma County comedy scene is like a “one-eighty,” where an aspiring comic might have an opportunity to check out an open mic or a comedy showcase three times a week. Marco Alvarez, his partner in Monkey Fight, agrees. “It’s blowing up,” Alvarez says. “It’s cool because we don’t have to take the drive to the city, but it does get you comfortable, and you don’t want to get too comfortable in the scene.” Alvarez began pursuing standup after taking a comedy class with Santa Rosa Junior College communications professor Nick Hoffman. A thin, wiry man with rockabilly style, Alvarez tosses around the word “fuck” and references to cocaine

liberally during his act. This isn’t clean comedy, by any means. I ask Alvarez for advice about how to make an audience laugh, and he says it’s all about delivery. “Funny is relative to your audience,” he explains. “You can be a jerk about it or you can be the guy that people want to hang out with.”

A

couple of days later, after Sparks introduces me to Doc Holliday’s audience, telling them that it’s my first time onstage, my hands are shaking, and though I’m not drunk and haven’t lost any testicles, I feel slightly woozy. My routine ends up being spotty, with inklings of some

bright moments; a joke about how dogs are allowed to copyedit the Bohemian gets some laughs, but another about cat-fur-loving aunts falls flatter than a pancake in a mosh pit—the tomatoes are going to start flying at any moment. I soldier on, mic in hand. Luckily, a joke about Paula Abdul gets the audience on my side again. Before I know it, my time is up and I’ve survived without crashing and burning. With such a thriving comedy scene, if I so choose, I could do it again the next day, and again and again until my act maybe gets some finesse to it. It’s a scene that’s moving “forward,” not backward, says Ricky Del Rosario. And who knows? Maybe one of these intrepid amateurs will become the next Robin Williams. With so many options for honing comedy and creating community in Sonoma County, it’s not such a laughable proposition.

I

take this as a sign that I need to work on my stage persona, especially since my humor tends towards sarcasm, a trait that’s gotten me into trouble more times than I can count. And so I reach out to Tony Sparks, whose name has come up in my conversations with many comics. I’m hoping Sparks, nicknamed the “godfather” of the comedy scene and host of the long-running Brainwash comedy open mic in San Francisco, can teach me how not to bomb. Sparks lives between Santa Rosa and San Francisco, and he’s been at this comedy thing for a long time. The Brainwash open mic just celebrated its 14-year anniversary. He’s also heavily on the scene in Sonoma County, hosting Monkey Fight shows at Sweet River and Christy’s on the Square, and checking out open mics at Jasper O’ Farrell’s and Spancky’s on a regular basis. Sonoma County audiences are hungry to see new talent and new comedy, Sparks explains. Whereas in the city, people don’t tend to be impressed by much, here it’s a “brand-new frontier.” “You have a phenomenal group of people, and they understand the

MAKE ’EM LAUGH Comedy open mics in Sonoma County • Doc Holliday’s Saloon, Tuesdays, 8:30pm. 138 Calistoga Road, Santa Rosa. 707.539.4811. • “Horsin’ Around” at Guayakí Yerba Mate Bar, first Wednesday, 7pm. 6782 Sebastopol Ave., Sebastopol. Sign up ahead of time at horsinaroundopenmic@yahoo.com. • “Short Bus Wednesdays” at Spancky’s, second and fourth Wednesdays. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169. Signups at 8pm, show at 9pm. • Gaia’s Garden, third Wednesday, 9pm.1899 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491. Sign up ahead of time at helen.pachynski@gmail.com. • “Pro/Am Open Mic” at Heritage Public House, first and third Thursdays, 8pm. 1305-A Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

17 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

GOLDEN GIRL Helen Pachynski calls herself ‘the Betty White of Sonoma County.’

business of comedy as a whole,” says Sparks. “They understand that we all need one another in the community to make it grow, and they work together.” People should do comedy because they really want to, not because they think they’ll make money, says Sparks. Also, study what it takes to write a good joke. And don’t get drunk. “It’s like playing the piano. If you don’t learn the basics, you can’t compose your own aria. And by no means, no matter what happens— you lose an eye, an arm, a testicle— don’t give up,” he says.


NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | AUGUST 1-7, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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The week’s events: a selective guide

CULTURE

Crush NICASIO

The Pugilist Is your marriage unfulfilling? Do your relatives piss you off? Ever want to split your boss’s lip? With bluesy rock-and-roll and a few jokes, Paul Thorn can ease your pain. Once a factory worker, skydiver and professional boxer before making it in music, Thorn’s between-song bluecollar humor is as much a reason to see his concerts as are his blues. Thoroughly Southern and thoroughly Americana, Thorn will play songs from all 10 of his albums in a two-night stand this weekend. If the music and laughs don’t do it for you, maybe you can stay late and ask the former Mid-South middleweight champion for some help with those back wages your boss owes you. Thorn plays Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 4 (8:30pm) and Aug. 5 (4pm), at Rancho Nicasio. 1 Old Rancheria Road, Nicasio. $27–$30. 415.662.2219.

M I L L VA L L E Y

Mitt on Crack All right, Newt Gingrich, you’re a ditzy bachelorette on a dating game show, and Herman Cain, Joe Biden and Ron Paul are the contestants. Freeze! What movie style is it, audience? Sci-fi? Go! Now, Rick Santorum and Mitt Romney: find 20 unconventional uses for this cucumber! Barack Obama, dub Michele Bachmann and Rick Perry’s silent conversation! Freeze! Rick, now the room’s getting inexplicably warm. Even warmer! Go! No, unfortunately the 2012 election won’t do improv for you this weekend. But you can see the 2012 election interpreted through sketches, music and improv when the Holy City Zoo Players present an “Improvised Guide to the 2012 Election” this Saturday, Aug. 4, at 142 Throckmorton Theatre. 142 Throckmorton Ave., Mill Valley. $16. 8pm. 415.383.9600.

SA N R A FA E L

Daddy Is Working During a set in Paris a few years ago, comedian Scott Capurro illustrated his job by drawing a line in the air with his fingers. “Line. Crossing it. Moving line,” he explained. Much of the rest of the set wouldn’t be tremendously wise to reprint in all its graphic detail, but really, should anyone be that offended by a gay man joking about gay sex in 2012 anyway? Watch Capurro move the line forward while expertly shutting down hecklers and stroking the microphone stand on Wednesday, Aug. 1, at George’s Nightclub. 842 Fourth St., San Rafael. $10–$15. 8:30pm. 415.226.0262.

S A N TA R O S A

Mad World

BEDHEAD Sean Hayes plays Long Meadow Ranch Winery on Aug. 5. See Concerts, p24.

Big-ass forehead. Squinty eyes all squished together. Mouth gaping like a shark’s, with nearly as many teeth. Caricature is funny because our brains do it already: to recognize thousands of people whose facial features differ only by millimeters, we exaggerate the two or three things that set them apart. Caricaturists like Tom Richmond, Mad magazine illustrator and winner of this year’s Reuben Award for Outstanding Cartoonist of the Year, just exaggerates a little more. Richmond gives caricature lessons and speaks about his new instructional book on Saturday, Aug. 4, at the Schulz Museum. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Class, $35–$40, 10am. Book signing, free, 2pm. 707.579.4452.

—Jay Scherf


BYGONE Bill Hamamoto, whose family was sent to an internment camp in WWII, at the old family home in Carneros.

Portals of the Past Digging for Napa Valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s untapped roots BY CATHERINE ZAW

I

n the middle of hiking a trail in her home state of Minnesota, Wendy Ward tells me over the phone where her heart really lies. The Preservation Napa Valley founder may have grown up in the Land of 10,000 lakes, but after 13 years in Napa, she feels like a native. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Napa is my home and I love the place,â&#x20AC;? she says.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very specialâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a unique place with unique problems,â&#x20AC;? she adds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I saw a lot of things that I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t understand and that I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like, and I began to wonder why things didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work and how it all happened. I wanted to take care of my community.â&#x20AC;? Ward is the organizer of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Memory Bank II,â&#x20AC;? a ďŹ lm and photography exhibit opening Aug. 11 at the Napa Valley Museum. Last year, during Preservation Napa Valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual barn tour, Ward noticed that people loved listening

to the â&#x20AC;&#x153;old timersâ&#x20AC;? and realized there could be ways to breathe life into what she calls their â&#x20AC;&#x153;colorful, rich and untapped stories.â&#x20AC;? A fan of powerful photography reminiscent of Dorothea Langeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Migrant Woman, Ward chose to document the eldersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; experiences in black and white. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just the personalities of the individual subjects,â&#x20AC;? states Sally Seymour, one of the photographers featured in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Memory Bank,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;but also showing the viewers in their contextsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;how they sit in Napaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s environment

today and how theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve participated in Napaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history.â&#x20AC;? One can practically weave through time and history with the crisp contrasts in the photographs and documentaries. A total of six photographers and one ďŹ lmmaker worked on the project, and Seymour herself estimates she spent at least 20 hours with each of her subjects. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not like it was 20 hours that I had to spend with them,â&#x20AC;? Seymour says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They have a rich history and a great understanding about the changes that have happened in Napa. But theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not locked in nostalgia.â&#x20AC;? She then recounts one of her 80-year-old subjects. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had a hard time getting on her calendar. I told her, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;You guys are too busy,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; and she replied, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;You know, at my age, if I can swing my legs over the bed, I ďŹ gure itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good day and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to do something.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Ward and her team sought no particular themes or topics. This year, however, the team was pleased to capture a truer cultural heritage of Napaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;with Chinese seniors, Japanese immigrants who underwent internment and Latino farmworker pioneers who shaped Napaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agricultural history. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the problems with oral history is that it tends to be a process that is approached with explicit rules with how you do it,â&#x20AC;? Seymour explains. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the things that I ďŹ nd exciting is that Wendy has found some perhaps famous or ordinary people who could be our grandparents or neighbors or high school teachers, and pulled together an engaging way to ďŹ nd our countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Memory Bank IIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; opens Saturday, Aug. 11, and runs through Sept. 23 at the Napa Valley Museum. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Reception, Aug. 11, 5:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7:30pm. $2.50â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$5. 707.944.0500.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Jess Knubis

ArtsIdeas

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Stage

ROYAL RIOT Scott Coopwood manages to make King John funny.

Big Bad ‘John’ Against the odds, MSC’s ‘King John’ is rich entertainment BY DAVID TEMPLETON

W

illiam Shakespeare’s King John is not, at first glance, the kind of play one expects would be much fun to watch.

Densely packed with 13thcentury political wheeler-dealers revolving around a monarch widely known to have been inept, insecure and evil, King John does not have a riveting historical figure at its core. Indeed, over the centuries, when John does appear in legends and stories, it’s usually as the foppish foil to Robin Hood, who may not even have actually existed. All of this leads one to suspect that the play might be less than riotous entertainment. It all depends on what you do with it.

In the larger-than-life production currently running in San Rafael, the Marin Shakespeare Company stages King John with the clear understanding that the play needs a little help to achieve mass appeal. Under the direction of Lesley Schisgall Currier, the play becomes less a historical relic and more a comic melodrama, with John’s enemies transformed into wacky caricatures with outrageous Monty Python accents and the action staged like a Medieval soap opera, complete with ominous organ music to accompany appearances of certain bad-guy characters. The weird thing is, it works. Though the cast is uneven and the pacing a bit too plodding in the first act, this is a King John that truly entertains, especially in the second half, when Shakespeare’s plot really starts cooking. As John, Scott Coopwood is a blast, careening from moments of pompous selfcontrol to a late-career meltdown that’s both tragic and funny. Coopwood even wrings laughs from the scene where he sneakily sentences his own boyish nephew to death. As John’s other nephew, Philip the Bastard, Erik MacRay is wonderful, assaying a spectacular arc from conniving social climber to Errol Flynn–style hero. Coincidentally, King John is just one of two shows currently running in the North Bay to feature John as a character. James Goldman’s Lion in Winter (running through Aug. 18 at Main Stage West in Sebastopol) presents John as a conniving 16-year-old, pitched in a chesslike match of wits against his entire family. Onstage at Forest Meadows, the John who once schemed to become king has done so, but begins to wonder why he bothered. Marin Shakespeare Company’s production isn’t the most subtle version of King John you’ll ever see, if you do ever see another. And it’s unlikely to be the classiest. But it might be the most fun. ‘King John’ runs Friday–Sunday through Aug. 12 at the Forest Meadows Amphitheater at Dominican University. 890 Belle Ave., San Rafael. Showtimes vary. $20–$35. 415.499.4488.


JESUS! A short film about Bobby Jindal’s college days has the GOP abuzz.

Jindal’s Exorcism

Bizarre ritual by Louisiana governor subject of short film BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

T

he filmmaker of tomorrow, John Waters once wrote, could take a morning’s news scandal and have a theater-ready feature film done by the afternoon. CultJamProductions and San Jose–based director Mario Glaviano took a little more time, but they’ve sourced the news in a way worthy of Waters in their short shocker Ivy League Exorcist: The Bobby Jindal Story.

Today, Louisiana’s governor is short-listed for the Republican vice-president nomination. But Ivy League Exorcist had been planned some time before Jindal’s political possibilities heated up. Last year, writer-producer Troy Davis discovered Jindal’s 1994 essay in the New Oxford Review, “Beating a Demon: Physical Dimensions of Spiritual Warfare.” In it, the governor describes participating in a 1990 exorcism of a fellow student named Susan, aided by his friends in the University Christian Fellowship. Davis immediately envisioned the film, “made just as the article described the events.” Making the film, says Glaviano, “was a pretty speedy process.” Mark Balunis, with a black wig and some walnut-toned makeup, plays a very worried Jindal. Ivy League Exorcist’s Susan is Caitlin Dissinger, who shrieks Linda Blair–worthy blasphemies: “You whiny-ass titty-babies! I queef on your Bible!” Terrifying? Yes. Scarier still is that they’re aware of the film in Louisiana. Reporter Michelle Millhollon of Baton Rouge’s Advocate got no response from Jindal, but the governor’s spokesman Kyle Plotkin went on record: “That movie is insane. It’s just plain absurd.” When we spoke, Davis had just gotten the news that Jindal’s people had seen the film. “‘Insane and absurd!’” he says via phone from Los Angeles. “That’s music to my ears.” “People do stupid things in college. My stupid things were more like waking up on the shower floor of the girl’s dorm,” Davis says. “But it wasn’t like Jindal was trying to do anything bad. Even Obama and Biden did stupid things in school, but they weren’t cinematic stupid things.” ‘Ivy League Exorcist: The Bobby Jindal Story’ is on YouTube.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Film

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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PAUL ZOE ANTONIO ANNETTE STEVE ELLIOTT CHRIS

DANO KAZAN BANDERAS BENING COOGAN GOULD MESSINA

“A magical, MODERN-DAY LOVE STORY, one with razor-sharp edges and a tender heart.” “INGENIOUS AND DELIGHTFUL... Zany and sweet.”

Film

Film capsules by Gary Brandt and Richard von Busack.

NEW MOVIES Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days (PG; 94 min.) Third in the franchise based on the popular young adult series by Jeff Kinney co-stars Zachary Gregory and Robert Capron, with Steve Zahn. (GB)

Step Up Revolution (PG-13; 99 min.) Young hearts just gotta dance in fourth installment of Step Up series, this one set in Miami. (GB)

Total Recall (PG-13; 118 min.) Colin Farrell takes on the role played by your former governor in remake of the 1990 sci-fi semi-classic. From the director of Underworld, and

ALSO PLAYING The Amazing Spider-Man (PG-13; 136 min.) Purposeless reboot from director Marc Webb ((500) Days of Summer) co-stars Andrew Garfield (The Social Network) as Peter Parker and Emma Stone as Gwen Stacy. Martin Sheen plays Uncle Ben! (GB)

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT SANTA ROSA Summerfield Cinemas (707) 522-0330 STARTS FRIDAY, AUGUST 3

The Avengers (PG-13; 142 min.) Marvel Studios rounds up characters from recent hits for an ensemble superhero thriller directed by Joss Whedon. Stars Robert Downey Jr. (Iron Man), Chris Evans (Captain America), Chris Hemsworth (Thor), Samuel L . Jackson and Scarlett Johansson. (GB) Bernie (R; 104 min.) Richard (Slacker, School of Rock) Linklater’s latest stars Jack Black as Texas mortician, choir leader and murderer Bernie Tiede. Based on a true story. Co-stars Shirley MacLaine and Matthew McConaughey. (GB)

Real Arts Real News Real Culture

Beasts of the Southern Wild (PG-13; 91 min.) In a swampravaged town, a gumption-crazed little girl daydreams of melting glaciers and advancing monsters in apocalyptic fantasy from first-time director Benh Zeitlin. (RvB)

The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (PG-13; 124 min.) John Madden (Shakespeare in Love) directs an all-star cast playing British retirees in India in adaptation of Deborah Moggach’s novel These Foolish Things. (GB)

Bill W (NR; 103 min.) Documentary about Alcoholics Anonymous founder Bill Wilson features

The new Bohemian.com

interviews, re-creations and archival footage. Thursday, Aug. 2, show with filmmaker Dan Carracino soldout; second show added, without filmmaker, Aug. 9, 6:45pm. At the Rafael Film Center. (GB)

Brave (PG; 93 min.) In Pixar’s newest, a young princess in ancient Scotland must use her skills as an archer to reverse a curse put on her family. With the voices of Kelly Macdonald (Gosford Park), Emma Thompson and Billy Connolly. (GB) Dark Horse (R; 86 min.) Hulking, overgrown man-boy Abe, cocooned in his parents’ Long Island house, falls for a luckless, humiliated woman in Todd Solondz’s latest, a sharp retort to frat-pack celebrations of the adult big-baby experience. Like John Waters’ films, Solondz’s have gone past the excruciation point and come out funny—and, lately, strangely reasonable. (RvB)

The Dark Knight Rises (PG-13; 164 min.) Set eight years after The Dark Knight, Christopher Nolan’s final installment in his Batman series finds the crusader battling Bane, the new threat to Gotham, while struggling to restore his name, sullied by crimes he didn’t commit. Anne Hathaway plays the ambiguously aligned Catwoman. (GB)

An Evening with H. P. Lovecraft (NR) Rafael Film Center presents two works from the H.P. Lovecraft Historical Society, a group dedicated to bringing new, low-budget Lovecraft works to the screen. Showings of The Call of Cthulu (2005) and The Whisperer in the Dark (2011) are followed by discussion with Whisperer filmmaker Andrew Lehman. Aug. 3, 7pm. (GB )

Ice Age: Continental Drift (PG; 94 min.) Saber-toothed squirrel Scrat precipitates the breakup of Pangaea through a search for acorns in the fourth installment of animated fave. With the voices of Wanda Sykes, Ray Romano, Queen Latifah, Denis Leary and Peter Dinklage. (GB)

Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted (PG; 85 min.) Still trying to get back to New York, the gang find themselves in a traveling circus show in Europe. With the voices of Ben Stiller, Chris Rock, Martin Short and Frances McDormand. (GB)

Magic Mike (R; 110 min.) Steven Soderbergh’s latest stars Channing Tatum as a veteran male stripper teaching the ropes to newcomer Alex Pettyfer. With Matthew McConaughey. (GB)

Men in Black 3 (PG-13; 106 min.) Agent J (Will Smith) travels back in time to 1969 to save a young Agent K (Josh Brolin)—and the planet—in third installment of hit sci-fi comedy. Also stars Tommy Lee Jones. (GB) Moonrise Kingdom (PG-13; 94 min.) In September 1965, gifted 12-year-olds Suzy and Sam head off to the wilderness of a fictional New England island, not knowing Hurrican Maybelline is heading for them. Directed by Wes Anderson (Rushmore, Fantastic Mr. Fox) with dollhouse aesthetics and New Yorker cartoon punch lines. (RvB)

Prometheus (R; 124 min.) Ridley Scott directs this (sort of) sequel to the Alien franchise about the link between the aliens and humanity’s origins. Co-stars Charlize Theron, Guy Pearce and Noomi Rapace (Girl with the Dragon Tattoo). (GB)

Savages (R; 113 min.) Nice-guy pot growers go toe-to-toe with a Mexican drug cartel who kidnapped their hippie girlfriend in crime thriller directed by Oliver Stone. (GB)

Ted (R; 106 min.) John Bennett (Mark Wahlberg) finds the teddy bear he wished for in childhood cramping his attempt to embrace adulthood in comedy from the creator of Family Guy. (GB) To Rome with Love (R; 102 min.) New romantic-comedy ensemble piece from Woody Allen continues his enchantment with Europe. With Penélope Cruz, the great Judy Davis, Alec Baldwin, Jesse Eisenberg and Greta Gerwig. (GB)

Katy Perry: Part of Me

The Watch (R; 98 min.)

(PG; 97 min.) Documentary of the popular singer follows her on- and offstage, and features interviews with handsome young people I’m too old to care about. Also in 3-D, for reasons unknown. (GB)

Suburbanites form a neighborhood watch and uncover an alien plot to enslave Earth in sci-fi comedy costarring Ben Still, Vince Vaughn and Jonah Hill. Directed by Lonely Island comedy trouper Kiv Schaffer. (GB)

NORTH BAY MOVIE TIMES SonomaMovieTimes.com | MarinMovieTimes.com | NapaMovieTimes.com


POLKA FACE Though he didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t legally need to, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Weird Alâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Yankovic sought and barely eked out approval from Lady Gaga for â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Perform This Way.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Murdering the Hits At 52, Weird Al is as relevant as ever BY JESSICA DUR TAYLOR

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;

W

eird Alâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Yankovic is as much the eye as he is the storm. Though the accordionplaying, wacky-haired nerd has made a career out of poking people with his satirical pencil, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a genuinely unaffected and nice guy. So nice, in fact, that he always gets permission directly from artists before he parodies them (Coolio snafu aside), even though he is legally protected under the fair use clause of U.S. copyright law. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want the artist in on the joke,â&#x20AC;? he tells me over the phone, while on vacation with his family in Hawaii. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to have a beef with anybody.â&#x20AC;? And so, because he wanted to parody Lady Gagaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hit â&#x20AC;&#x153;Born This Way,â&#x20AC;? he agreed to write and record â&#x20AC;&#x153;Perform This Wayâ&#x20AC;? beforehand in hopes of getting the divaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ultimate approval. This was a ďŹ rst. Artists had always either given him permission or not.

Overwhelmingly, most had. (The artist formerly known as the Artist Formerly Known as Prince had not.) But Yankovic, a self-described â&#x20AC;&#x153;sensitive guy,â&#x20AC;? agreed to jump through Gagaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hoops, cranking out the lyrics while on tour and then cutting a vacation short in order to hit the recording studio. When Gaga said no, Yankovic and his Twittering fans were crushedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;for a day. Turns out, she hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even heard the song, thanks to a rogue manager. In the end, she gave Yankovic her blessing, and with his â&#x20AC;&#x153;pop culture juggernautâ&#x20AC;? in place, Alpocalypse, his 13th studio album, was complete. With his ears tuned to pop musicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ever-changing rhythms, Yankovic not only captures but also augments the Zeitgeist. The Grammy-nominated Alpocalypse, his ďŹ rst major album since 2006â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Straight Outta Lynwood, parodies songs by Taylor Swift, T.I., B.o.B and Miley Cyrus. The requisite polka medley, called (what else?) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Polka Face,â&#x20AC;? includes songs by Justin Bieber, Britney Spears, Flo Rida, Pink, Katy Perry and Lady Gaga.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Weird Alâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Yankovic plays Thursday, Aug. 9, at the Uptown Theatre. 1350 Third St., Napa. 8pm. $55. 707.259.0123.

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NO RTH BAY BAY BOHEMIAN BO H E M I AN || AUGUST AUGUST 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7, 1-7, 20 1 2 || BOH EMI A N.COM NORTH 2012 BOHEMIAN.COM

Music

A hilarious homage to the Doors, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Craigslistâ&#x20AC;? actually features Doors keyboardist Ray Manzarek, while â&#x20AC;&#x153;CNRâ&#x20AC;? pokes fun at the lionizing of Chuck Norris by channeling the White Stripes. Alfred Matthew Yankovic grew up in the L.A. suburb of Lynwood, not far from Compton (â&#x20AC;&#x153;By proximity, I should be allowed to say Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m from the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;hoodâ&#x20AC;?), which might help explain his affinity for rap. Much was made of his â&#x20AC;&#x153;feudâ&#x20AC;? with Coolio over the parody â&#x20AC;&#x153;Amish Paradise,â&#x20AC;? but it was â&#x20AC;&#x153;White and Nerdy,â&#x20AC;? his parody of Chamillionaireâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ridinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;,â&#x20AC;? that landed Yankovic his ďŹ rst Top 10 single. But just because his anthem to geekdom is the perfect antidote to the bling-worshipping, anti-intellectual, hyper-masculinity of much gangster rap, Yankovic maintains that he isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t â&#x20AC;&#x153;trying to shoehorn any point of viewâ&#x20AC;? into his music. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just going for laughs,â&#x20AC;? he says. The evolution of the mass media has coincided nicely with Yankovicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 36-year career. As a teenager in 1976, he landed his ďŹ rst airplay on Dr. Dementoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cult radio show. Just a year after MTV aired in 1981, he released his video â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eat It,â&#x20AC;? a brilliant shot-by-shot parody of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beat It,â&#x20AC;? to an audience already worshipping the King of Pop. (Yankovic credits Michael Jackson with jumpstarting his career). And just when it seemed like he might be going the way of UHF, his video of â&#x20AC;&#x153;White and Nerdyâ&#x20AC;? caught the trail of YouTubeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rising star, instantly going viral. Last year Yankovic became a New York Times bestselling author with his Shel Silversteinâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;esque childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book When I Grow Up. But despite his steady success, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s characteristically humble about his creative process. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more OCD than art, really,â&#x20AC;? he laughs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even though some people might see them as silly, novelty songs,â&#x20AC;? he tells me, â&#x20AC;&#x153;theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not dashed off.â&#x20AC;? With a career that started long before Lady Gaga was even born, how does Weird Al continue to stay inspired? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always something ridiculous about pop music,â&#x20AC;? he laughs, â&#x20AC;&#x153;always something to make fun of.â&#x20AC;?


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

24

Music Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Friday Night Live Cloverdale’s summer-long series features Jelly Bread on Aug 3. 7pm. Free. Cloverdale Plaza, Cloverdale Boulevard between First and Second streets, Cloverdale.

ringleader Chris Votek returns with new group; also playing are Girls in Suede, Kinship and Giggleparty. Aug 4, 7pm. Arlene Francis Theater, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Tuesdays on the Plaza Summer concert series in Healdsburg plaza features Cahoots on Aug 7. 6pm. Free. Downtown Plaza, Healdsburg Ave and Matheson St, Hbg.

Sean Hayes Free-spirited romanticism with echoes from the Blue Ridge Mountains linger in this songwriter’s music. Aug 5, 3pm. $30-$40. Long Meadow Ranch Winery, 738 Main St, St Helena. 415.394.6500.

Honey Island Swamp Band Fusing bluegrass, funk, reggae and country, these displaced New Orleanians refer to their sound as “Bayou Americana.” Aug 5, 4pm. $20-$25. Rocker Oysterfeller’s, 14415 Hwy 1, Valley Ford. 707.876.1983.

Albert Lee Guitarist who’s played with the Everly Brothers, Eric Clapton, Roseanne Cash and his own band, Hogan’s Heroes. Aug 2, 8pm. $20-$25. Last Day Saloon, 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

NAPA COUNTY Calistoga Summer Concert Series Featuring Later Dayz Band on Aug 2. 6:30pm. Free. Pioneer Park, Cedar and Elm streets, Calistoga.

Chris Isaak Bay Area treasure returns. Aug 5, 7pm. $75-$90. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Ottmar Liebert One of the foremost players of nouveau flamenco, this guitarist has nominated for five Grammys. Aug 1, 8pm. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Opry at the Opera House Benefit for education with the Silverado Pickups, Striking Matches & Radney Foster. Aug 8, 7pm. $35-$75. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

BEYOND Gaia Festival A weekend in nature featuring Michael Franti & Spearhead, Yonder Mountain String Band, Kinky, Sierra Leone Refuge All Stars, Dumpstaphunk and many others. Aug 3-5. $40$220. Black Oak Ranch, 3000 Branscomb Rd, Laytonville.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Arlene Francis Theater Aug 4, Girls in Suede, Tes Elations, Kinship, Giggleparty. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Cafe Aquatica Aug 5, Jen Tucker Band. 10439 Hwy 1, Jenner. 707.865.2251.

Doc Holliday’s Saloon Aug 4, Poyntlyss Sisters.

Live at Juilliard Evening shows in park feature Pepperland on Aug . 6pm. Free. Juilliard Park, 227 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa.

Peacetown Summer Concert Series Featuring music from Michael Boliver Band on Aug 1. 5pm. Free. Ives Park, Willow Street and Jewell Avenue, Sebastopol.

Petaluma Music Festival Fifth annual fest features Jackie Greene, the Pimps of Joytime, Poor Man’s Whiskey and many others. Aug 4. $75. Petaluma Fairgrounds, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma.

Summer Nights on the Green Outdoor summer shows in Windsor include Maria Muldaur & Her Red Hot Bluesiana Band on Aug 2. 6pm. Free. Windsor Town Green, Bell Road and McClelland Drive, Windsor.

Tes Elations

MAD HATTER Jackie Greene headlines the great

Former Triste Sin Richard

Petaluma Music Festival on Aug 4. See Concerts, above.


CRITIC’S CHOICE

Hotel Healdsburg

Isis Oasis Aug 4, Anton Mizerak & Laura Berry Hill. 20889 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville.

Jasper O’Farrell’s Aug 1, BrainStorm. Aug 2, Saffell. Aug 3, Thawobbler. Aug 4, Family Room. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Good Gaia Gaia Festival eco-madness in the key of ‘get down’ It’s all about Earth at the Gaia Festival. No one-time-use plastic bottles are seen on the grass, and fans use their own silverware from home to dig into the organic cuisine. Power is generated from fryer grease and bike-powered motors. You can even join organized bike tours to get to the festival. And of course, there are the artists, including Michael Franti and Spearhead, Yonder Mountain String Band, Kinky (above), and Hot Buttered Rum, among many other musicians and bands. Inspirational speakers like Caroline Casey, a visionary activist astrologer, and Jeff Baker, a conduit and empathic healer, will be sharing microphones. Under the same sky, yoga and qigong workshops are offered, along with classes titled “Cooking with the Sun,” “Singing: The Fastest Way to Enlightenment” and even “Intelligent Evolution: What to Do When the Shift Hits the Fan.” Don’t miss out on this countdown: five stages for amazing bands, four directions in which to drive to this party, three days of inspiration and discussion, too much fun and one love for Mother Earth. Pack tents for Friday–Sunday, Aug. 3–5, at Black Oak Ranch in Laytonville. $45–$220; ages 11 and under free. 866.558.4253.—Catherine Zaw

Lagunitas Tap Room Aug 1, Jigsaw. Aug 2, Solid Air. Aug 3, the Gravel Spreaders. Aug 4, the Rivereens. Aug 5, Lipbone Redding. Aug 8, Shade. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Last Day Saloon Aug 3, Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs. Aug 4, Invasion: A Tribute to an Era. Aug 5, Devil Mountain Jazz Band. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Main Street Station Aug 4, Frankye Kelly. Aug 5, Phil Edwards. Aug 1, Hand Me Down. Aug 3, Susan Sutton. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mavericks Aug 3, McKenna Faith. 397 Aviation Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.765.2515.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Aug 2, Tony Gibson. Aug 3, Liz Brown &True Grit. Aug 5, Acoustic Celtic Jam. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

My Friend Joe Aug 4, Drunken Prayer. 1810 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.829.3403.

Mystic Theatre Aug 8, the Lee Boys. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Raven Theater Aug 3, Lydia Pense & Cold Blood with Ray Charles Project. 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

Redwood Cafe Aug 3, Djinn. Aug 4, Choppin’ Broccoli. Aug 7, Rock Overtime. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

138 Calistoga Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.623.5453.

Flamingo Lounge Aug 3-4, Crossfire. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Gaia’s Garden Aug 1, Shade. Aug 4, Harvest Band Now. Aug 8, French

Session. Aug 6, De Corazon a Son. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Hopmonk Tavern Aug 2, Blame Sally. Aug 4, Free Peoples. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Rocker Oysterfeller’s Aug 5, Honey Island Swamp Band. 14415 Hwy 1, Valley Ford. 707.876.1983.

The Rocks Bar & Lounge Fri and Sat, Top 40 DJs hosted by

) 26

25 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Aug 3, Si Perkoff & Gary Digman. Aug 4, Eric Markowitz Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

26

Music ( 25 DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.

Russian River Brewing Co Aug 5, Rovetti & Meatballs. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Society: Culture House Wed, Gallery Wednesday. DJs and art curated by Jared Powell. Thurs, Casa Rasta. First Friday of every month, Neon with DJ Paul Timbermann and guests. Sun, Rock ‘n’ Roll Sunday School. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Spancky’s Aug 3, Wake the Neighbors. Aug 4, Counterbalance. Thurs, 9pm, DJ Dray Lopez. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Sprenger’s Tap Room Wed, Sonoma County Blues Society live music. 446 B St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8277.

Toad in the Hole Pub Mon, open mic. First Sunday of every month, Robert Herrera, Brianna Lee, Josh Barrett. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Tradewinds

Good Time Band. Mon, 9pm, open mic. Tues, 9pm, Uzilevsky Korty Duo with special guests. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Sausalito Seahorse

No Name Bar

Smiley’s

First Monday of every month, 8:30pm, Kimrea. Tues, 8:30pm, open mic with Damir. Fri, 9pm, Michael Aragon Quartet. Sun, 3pm, Mal Sharpe’s Dixieland. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Aug 2, Larisa Migachyov. | Aug 3, Jenny Kerr Band. Aug 4, Eldon Brown Band. Mon, reggae. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Aug 2, Shelley Mackay. Aug 3, the Core Society. Aug 4, James Moseley. Aug 5, Rumbache. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

NAPA COUNTY

Old Western Saloon Aug 3, Mike Saliani Band. Aug 4, Kyle Jester Band. Main Street, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1661.

Peri’s Silver Dollar Aug 1, Elvis Johnson. Aug 2, Blackout Cowboys. Aug 3, Swamp Thang. Aug 4, Deep Bench. Mon, acoustic open mic. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio

Calistoga Inn Mon, Tues, Alvon. Wed, Fri, Tom Duarte. Thurs, Taylor Brown. Sat, Sun, Lloyd Gregory. 1250 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.4101.

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Sun, DJ Night. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Napa Valley Opera House

Aug 3, Bobby Joe Owens. Aug 4, Paul Thorn Band. Aug 5, Paul Thorn Band, Tiny Television. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Aug 1, Ottmar Liebert. Aug 8, Opry at the Opera House. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

San Geronimo Valley Community Center

Aug 3, Sing-a-song. Aug 4, Grass Child. Aug 8, Jim “Kimo” West. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Aug 5, Carrie & Michael Kline. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

Silo’s

Mon, Donny Maderos’ Pro Jam. Tues, Jeremy’s Open Mic. Thurs, DJ Dave. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Vino di Amore Aug 4, Adam Traum. 105 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.6166.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Mon, Open Mic with Derek Smith. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

San Francisco’s City Guide

Squarepusher UK’s most spastic knob-turner runs a slalom of free jazz, erratic pop and wild beats. Aug 2 at the Regency Ballroom.

Woods Brooklyn’s folksiest prefer to leave every gem unpolished; with Peaking Lights. Aug 3 at Great American Music Hall.

Finnegan’s Marin Mon, open mic with KC Turner. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.225.7495.

George’s Nightclub

Soul Asylum It’s the new rule: every single band from the 1990s must reunite. Aug 3 at the Independent.

Aug 1, Scott Capurro. Aug 3, Duran Duran Duran. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Meek Mill

Nickel Rose

Ravi Coltrane

Mon, Wed-Sun, DJ dance. 848 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.5551.

Twenty-five-year-old MC from Philly signed originally by T.I., then Rick Ross and now Jay-Z. Aug 4 at the Fillmore.

Royal bloodline appears in support of excellent new Blue Note album, “Spirit Fiction.” Aug 6-7 at Yoshi’s Oakland.

19 Broadway Club Aug 1, Sonny Walker’s Tao of Rock. Aug 2, Black Rock Roller Disco Precompression. Aug 3, Mobay Prodygal. Aug 4, Equipto. Aug 5, 19 Broadway

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.


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29

Galleries

14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Hammerfriar Gallery

OPENINGS Aug 3 At 6pm. Guerneville Library, Sonoma County artists featured in show. 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Aug 4 At 4pm. Gallery Bergelli, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Duende: Junkyard Melodies,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Tim Weldon. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454. At 5pm. Napa Valley Museum, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Secret Life of Paper,â&#x20AC;? celebrating paper as an art medium. Includes work by Patti Brown, Deborah Donahower and others. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 707.944.0500.

SONOMA COUNTY Calabi Gallery Through Aug 19, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art Inspired by the Natural Worldâ&#x20AC;? with work from Fran Hardy, Alexander Loemans and others. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Cornerstone Sonoma Through Sep 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heads Up,â&#x20AC;? the human head interpreted by seven sculptors in different mediums. 23570 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. Daily 10 to 4 707.933.3010.

Gallery One Through Sep 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Paint to the Music,â&#x20AC;? juried show open to all artists. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Graton Gallery Through Aug 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dog Treatsâ&#x20AC;? work by Mylette Welch, including guest artists Susie Peterson, Richard Moore, Linda Schroeter and Gen Zorich. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. TuesSun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Guerneville Library Aug 4-18, Sonoma County artists featured in show. Reception, Aug 3, 6pm.

Through Sep 8, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Second Nature,â&#x20AC;? paintings and collages of Jenny Honnert Abell, reflects on the abundance of the natural world. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts Aug 2-27, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Go Figure,â&#x20AC;? an exploration of body image, self reference, emotion and imagination. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

Quicksilver Mine Company Through Aug 12, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Collectaneaâ&#x20AC;? features the accumulations, agglomerations and assortments of many local artists. 6671 Front St, Forestville. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 707.887.0799.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Sep 9, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Showinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; on the River,â&#x20AC;? juried fine art featuring 25 artists. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Through Sep 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Face Meâ&#x20AC;? captures the likeness, the personality or even the mood of a person in a self-portrait or portrait. Ninety-one pieces. 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sebastopol Gallery Through Aug 12, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spontaneous Journeysâ&#x20AC;? features Teri Sloatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s landscapes and folk art. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

Sonoma County Museum Through Aug 12, 11am-5pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chinatown,â&#x20AC;? exhibition explores how Chinese communities developed in Sonoma County, with special attention on Santa Rosa. Curator tour, Aug 3, noon. $5-$7. Through Sep 9, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Treesâ&#x20AC;? featuring the large-scale oil paintings of Chester Arnold. Through Sep 9, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sonoma Oaks: Points of Viewâ&#x20AC;? featuring Hugh Livingstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s multimedia installations on the patterns

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Arts Events and sounds of California oak habitats. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Sep 13, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cross Pollination,â&#x20AC;? the art of painter Lawrence Ferlinghetti. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. WedSun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Towers Gallery Through Sep 30, Frank Oravetz, photography and Melissa Cox, watercolors, celebrate the summer. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Aug 1-31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;California Visions,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Sherrill Miller. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Gallery Bergelli Through Aug 22, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Duende: Junkyard Melodies,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Tim Weldon. Artist demo, reception, Aug 4, 4pm. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Marin Community Foundation Through Sep 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beyond Landscapeâ&#x20AC;? features artwork focused on sustaining nature and taking care of the planet. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Marin MOCA Through Aug 19, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Horizons,â&#x20AC;? an artist members exhibition runs concurrent with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jeffrey Sully: Poetic Contours.â&#x20AC;? Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Spreckels Performing Arts Center 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park 6SUHFNHOV%R[2IÂżFHÂ&#x2021;VSUHFNHOVRQOLQHFRP

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Aug 3-29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Have a Look-See,â&#x20AC;? the photography of Andrew Spalding, shows the hidden wonders of Marin County. Reception, Aug 12, 4pm. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

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Smith Anderson North Gallery Through Aug 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Williams, Waitsâ&#x20AC;? features the work of Franklin Williams and Kellesimone Waits, who share a playful obsession for acquiring and incorporating ) discarded relics. 20

30

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Arts Events

30 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Greenfield Ave, San Anselmo. 415.457.8847.

NAPA COUNTY di Rosa Through Sep 23, “Entering the Wild” featuring the work of Trish Carney, Adriane Colburn and others. Panel discussion, Aug 1. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

Napa Valley Museum Through Aug 5, “Modern” features the abstract expressionist paintings of Ira Yeager. Aug 4-Sep 29, “Secret Life of Paper,” celebrating paper as an art medium. Includes work by Patti Brown, Deborah Donahower and others. Reception, Aug 4, 5pm. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 707.944.0500.

Robert Mondavi Winery Through Sep 6, “Land, Sea and the People Within,” oil paintings by Dorallen Davis. free. 7801 St Helena Hwy, Oakville. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.968.2203.

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Yo el Rey Roasting and Arthouse

Improvised Guide to 2012 Election Holy City Zoo Players offer a comedic look at the political state of affairs and take suggestions from the audience.

( 29 Aug 4, 8pm. $16-$26. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Santa Rosa Comedy Nights Comedy open mic hosted by MC Ricky Del Rosario. First Thurs of every month. Free. Heritage Public House, 1305 Cleveland Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

Scott Capurro Controversial gay comedian from the Bay Area. Aug 1, 8:30pm. $10-$15. George’s Nightclub, 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-and-comers Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Events Big Event Fundraiser for Bodega Volunteer Fire Dept. featuring a barbecue, “the world’s shortest parade” and music by Tom Finn Band. Aug 5, 10am-5pm. Free. Downtown Bodega, Bodega Hwy, Bodega.

Cocktails & Characters Drinks and tasty bites mingle with characters in costume from the Raven Players. Aug 5,

4:30pm. $50. Hotel Healdsburg, 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Family Wellness Fair Includes a 6k walk/run, music and food. Aug 4, 8am-1pm. $20. Sonoma County Indian Health Project, 144 Stony Point Rd, Santa Rosa.

National Night Out Safety fair and community barbecue. Take back the night! Aug 7, 6-8pm. Free. Prince Gateway Park, Sonoma and Santa Rosa avenues, Santa Rosa.

Walk for Animals One-mile walk through Downtown Napa in support of companion animals throughout the Napa Valley. Aug 5, 7:30am. Donation. Veterans Memorial Park, Third and Main, Napa.

Field Trips Ring Around the Bay A morning of stewardship activities to restore native wetland habitat Corte Madera Creek in Mill Valley. Aug 4, 9am. Free. REI Corte Madera, 213 Corte Madera Town Center, Corte Madera. 415.927.1938.

Tour de Cru Hiking, biking and food, oh, my! Of course, there’s wine, too. Aug 4-5, 8am-4pm. $15$35. Windsor Oaks Vineyards & Winery, 10810 Hillview Rd, Windsor. 707.433.3810.

Pgg

1217 Washington St Downtown Calistoga www.yoelrey.com 707.942.1180

"Artificial Intelligence" YPsjhjobm!Boujrvf!up!Npefso!Eftjhot !'!Boojwfstbsz!Cboet ! YXfeejoh  YMpdbmmz!Pxofe 

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Artworks by Levi Miller Saturday August 4, 8pm 

ECHO ART GALLERY 1348A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga

“Bright Moments”

WHISTLER’S WILD Melanie Laurent stars in ‘The Day I Saw Your Heart,’ playing

Aug. 4 at the SF Jewish Film Festival at the Rafael Film Center. See Film, adjacent.


CRITIC’S CHOICE

vary. Aug 4-6. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

31

www.raventheater.org

In his new book, The Bar Mitzvah and the Beast: One Family’s Cross-Country Ride of Passage by Bike, Matt Biers-Ariel tells the story of traveling cross-country with his wife, 12-year-old son Yonah and younger son Solomon. As the family bikes across the United States, encountering desert heat, erratic drivers, numerous flats, bad weather and motel meals, Yonah is provided a unique rite of passage, of transitioning into young adulthood via the road instead of bar mitzvah; along the way, the family gathers signatures for a global warming awareness petition to be presented to Congress. Based in Davis, Biers-Ariel commutes by bike to his teaching job in Winters for most of the year and edits the “Davis Bicycles” column for the Davis Enterprise. He delivers an interactive presentation on how to prepare for and undertake a serious family adventure, mixed with readings from his new book (expect plenty of humor and beer references) on Tuesday, Aug. 7, at REI. 2715 Santa Rosa Ave., Santa Rosa. 7pm. Free. Registration required at 707.540.9025. —Leilani Clark

Film Dive: Living off America’s Waste In this documentary, Jeremy Seifert and friends dumpster dive in back alleys and gated garbage receptacles of Los

Angeles supermarkets. Aug 7, 7pm. $7. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Jewish Film Festival Over 10 films in three days presented as part of the largest Jewish film festival in the world. Times and prices

433-6335

LYDIA PENSE & COLD BLOOD plus RAY CHARLES PROJECT plus

Deszon Claiborne Dave Mathews

Clifford Coulter DeWayne Pate

Tony Lindsay Glenn Walters

Friday, August 3 8 PM

Food & Drink

Doors open 7PM. $30 general seating; ages 21+ only TICKETS: (online) raventheater.org; (cash/check) Copperfield’s in Healdsburg or Last Record Store in Santa Rosa www.raventheater.org

Bruce Aidells Sausage master sits down with Exene Cervanka’s alter ego Michele Anna Jordan in fundraiser for Sonoma County Book Festival. Aug 5, 2-5pm. $40-$60. Windrush Farm, 2263 Chileno Valley Rd, Petaluma. 707.523.1977.

THE WILD CATAHOULAS

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary

Saturday, Aug 4

Red, White & Wood-Fired Series of wood-fired meals paired with wine. Themes vary. Sat, Aug 4, 5:30pm. $65. Lynmar Winery, 3909 Frei Rd, Sebastopol. 707.829.3374.

Wednesday Night Market Over 130 vendors and all the people you went to elementary school with flood downtown Santa Rosa. Wed. Free. Downtown Santa Rosa, Fourth and B streets, Santa Rosa.

Wed, Aug 1 8:45–9:45am; 4:30–5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 10am–12:15pm Scottish Country Dance Youth & Family 7–10pm Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club Thur, Aug 2 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–10pm Circles N’ Squares Square Dance Club Fri, Aug 3 7–10pm

8:45–9:45am Jazzercise DJ Steve Luther hosts a WEST COAST SWING PARTY

Sat, Aug 4 7–11pm

8:30–9:30am Jazzercise DJ Steve Luther brings you THE WILD CATAHOULAS

Sun, Aug 5 5–9:30pm

8:30–9:30am Jazzercise DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING $10

Lectures

Mon, Aug 6 8:45–9:45am; 4:30–5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–10pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING

Animal Tracking: Constructal Law

Tues, Aug 7 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:30–10pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC DANCE

Science Buzz Cafe features Jim Sullivan. Aug 2, 7pm. $4. French Garden, 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030. )

32

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

Come see us! Wed–Fri, 2–9 Sat & Sun, 11:30–8

Brewery Tours Daily at 3! 1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

w w w.L AGU N ITAS.com

433-6335

For many Americans, a trip to the local Chuck E. Cheese counts as high adventure. But for the BiersAriel family, an outing looks more like a 3,804 bicycle trip from San Francisco to Washington, D.C.

Documentary about traditional gymnasia where a unique form of Iranian sport is practiced to the accompaniment of drumming, sung poetry and expressions of Shi’a devotion. Aug 7, 6pm. Free. Bay Model Visitor Center, 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.3871.

www.raventheater.org

Cyling coast-to-coast

Zurkhaneh: The House of Strength

a tribute to Etta James

www.raventheater.org

Road Mitzvah

Film night in the park featuring Pixar’s foodie rat on an adventure in Paris. Aug 3, 8pm. Donation. Creekside Park, 231 Bon Air Rd, Greenbrae.

433-6335

Ratatouille

433-6335

Paris Opera Ballet showcases the major work of dancer Rudolf Nureyev, set in lush, exotic India. Tues, Aug 7, 6:30pm. $12-$15. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

La Bayadére


32

Arts Events

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Bar Mitzvah & the Beast Matt Biers-Ariel talks about riding his bike cross-country. Aug 7, 7pm. REI Santa Rosa, Southside Shopping Center, 2715 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.9025.

Making Your Art Dreams a Reality Painter Peggy Sebera leads an interactive workshop on tapping into intuition and promoting your own art. Aug 7, 7:30pm. Petaluma Arts Center, 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Tom Richmond Mad Magazine cartoonist demonstrates techniques and signs copies of his new book. Aug 4, 10am. $35-$40. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Wise Water Management Three-hour site tour of the centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s conservation hydrology demonstration projects. Aug 5, 10am. Free. Occidental Arts and Ecology Center, 15290 Coleman Valley Rd, Occidental. 707.874.1557.

gun bun summer fun film festival

Readings

saturday august 4th thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something about

mary

Book Passage DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

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"REAKFASTs,UNCHs$INNER WED 8/8s0-$//23ss FUNK & GOSPEL BAND

THE LEE BOYS

PLUS THE PINE NEEDLES

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STEVE KIMOCK WITH BERNIE WORRELL, WALLY INGRAM, AND ANDY HESS FRI 8/24s8PM DOORSss DANCE HITS/PARTY BAND

POP FICTION PLUS METAL SHOP

35.s7PM DOORSss ROCK/POP

7pm: doors open live music by FIVE AM Dusk (~8:45pm): film begins $15 advance; $20 @ door VIP package $99/couple Picnic dinners available for purchase

www.gunbun.com/movie GUNDLACH BUNDSCHU WINERY 2000 DENMARK STREET, SONOMA 707/938-5277 :: GUNBUN.COM

BROWNOUT

3!4s8PM DOORSs!$6$/3s AMRICAN SINGER/SONGWRITER

LANGHORNE SLIM & THE LAW

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Aug 1, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Teach Your Children Well: Parenting for Authentic Successâ&#x20AC;? with Madeline Levine. Aug 2, 6pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Northern California Craft Beer Guideâ&#x20AC;? with Ken Weaver. Aug 2, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Year Up: How A Pioneering Program Teaches Young Adults Real Skills for Real Jobsâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;With Real Successâ&#x20AC;? with Gerald Chertavian. Aug 3, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Beauty of the Real: What Hollywood Can Learn from Contemporary French Actressesâ&#x20AC;? with Mick LaSalle. Aug 4, 1pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Scientific American Healthy Aging Brain: The Neuroscience of Making the Most of Your Mature Mindâ&#x20AC;? with Judith Horstman. Aug 4, 4pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Light Between Oceansâ&#x20AC;? with ML Stedman. Aug 5, 1pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Houses Made of Wood and Light: The Life and Architecture of Hank Schubartâ&#x20AC;? with Michele Dunkerley. Aug 5, 4pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Travelerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wine Guide to Californiaâ&#x20AC;? with Robert Holmes. Aug 6, 7pm, Left Coast Writers: Daniel Riviera.

( 31 Aug 7, 7pm, An Evening of Philip Larkinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Poetry and Prose with Barry Kraft. Aug 8, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Saved by Beauty: Adventures of an American Romantic in Iranâ&#x20AC;? with Roger Housden. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Gaiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden Aug 3, 7:30pm, 100,000 Poets for Change. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Santa Rosa Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books Aug 5, 4pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Diamond in the Roughâ&#x20AC;? with Shawn Colvin. Aug 8, 6pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;When We Were the Kennedysâ&#x20AC;? with Monica Wood. 2316 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Petaluma Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books Aug 3, 7pm, Summer Reads Luau and Book Talk. Aug 7, 11am, â&#x20AC;&#x153;When Blue Met Eggâ&#x20AC;? with Lindsay Ward. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.0563.

REI Corte Madera Aug 1, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Appalachian Trials: A Psychological and Emotional Guide to Successfully ThruHiking the Appalachian Trailâ&#x20AC;? with Zach Davis. 213 Corte Madera Town Center, Corte Madera. 415.927.1938.

Theater And Then There Were None

Blithe Spirit An improbable farce by Noel Coward, presented by the Summer Stock Players. Times vary. Fri-Sun through Aug 12. $5-$10. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Circle Mirror Transformation During a six-week adult Creative Drama class, four strangers and their teacher learn more about themselves than they do about acting. Dates and times vary. Aug 2-26. $36-$57. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

Enchanted April Play by Matthew Barber, based on the novel by Elizabeth Von Arnim. Designed, produced and directed by Michael Tabib. Dates and times vary. Fri-Sun through Aug 12. $12-$15. Hall for Performing Arts, 20347 Hwy 116, Monte Rio.

Fantastical Family Night Picnic in the park while Broadway performers belt tunes from your favorite musicals. Aug 3-4, 5pm. $25$35. Jack London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen. 707.938.5216.

Greater Tuna The show focuses on small town Southern life. Dates and times vary. Through Aug 12. $17-$25. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

King John

Silver Moon Theatre presents the Agatha Christie play directed by Nellie Cravens. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Aug 12. $18-$22. Andrews Hall, Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

Marin Shakespeare Companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rendition under the stars is sure to strike a romantic chord. Dates and times vary. Through Aug 12. $20 to $55. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, Dominican University, San Rafael.

Avenue Q

Love Letters

Sesame Street-style puppets acting very much like adults. This show is not for kids, but it is hilarious. Dates and times vary. Through Aug 11. $15-$25. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

Two-person reading of A.R. Gurneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pulitzer-nominated play, starring Mary Clay and Bob Dwyer. Sat, 8:30pm. through Aug 25. Free. Indian Springs Art Gallery, 1506 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga.

Bat Boy: The Musical

A Midsummer Nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dream

Dark comedy about a bat boy discovered in a cave and brought to live with a family in rural West Virginia. Based on a true story? Times vary. Fri-Sun through Aug 5. $14-$30. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Robert Currier directs outdoor production set in Hawaii where the scent of hibiscus and twang of ukuleles will permeate Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s story of lunatics, lovers and poets. Dates and times vary. Through Sep 30. $20-$35. ) Forest Meadows

34


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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

34 Arts Events ( 32

CRITIC’S CHOICE

BY ROB BREZSNY

Amphitheatre, Dominican University, San Rafael.

For the week of August 1

ARIES (March 21–April 19) The astrological omens suggest that you now have a lot in common with the legendary Most Interesting Man in the World— adventurous, unpredictable, interesting, lucky, oneof-a-kind. To create your horoscope, I have therefore borrowed a few selected details from his ad campaign’s descriptions of him. Here we go: In the coming weeks, you will be the life of parties you don’t even attend. Astronauts will be able to see your charisma from outer space. Up to one-third of your body weight will be gravitas. Your cell phone will always have good reception, even in a subway 100 feet underground. Panhandlers will give you money. You could challenge your reflection to a staring contest—and win. You’ll be able to keep one eye on the past while looking into the future. When you sneeze, God will say “God bless you.”

Passion Play Three communities attempt to stage the Easter Passion in three different eras: 1575 northern England, 1934 Bavaria, and Spearfish, South Dakota, from Vietnam through Reagan. Dates and times vary. Through Aug 5. $15-$25. Newman Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4372.

Pinky When a romantic teenager named Pinky appears at the local bowling alley, nerdy highschooler David is instantly smitten. Dates and times vary. Thurs-Sun through Aug 11. $10$25. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Sister Cities Dark comedy written by Colette Freedman, directed by Jacquelyn Wells. Dates and times vary. Fri-Sun through Aug 19. $15. Pegasus Theater Company, Rio Nido Lodge, Canyon Two Rd, Rio Nido.

Sweet Charity This tender look at the adventures in the ways of love features songs like “Hey Big Spender.” Dates and times vary. Through Aug 19. $15$25. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

Winnie the Pooh When Piglet gets roped into Kanga’s household Pooh goes to the rescue, but his appetite for honey gets him stuck in the door. Sat, 11am through Aug 25. $7. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

Xanadu In this musical comedy Greek muse Kira descends from the heavens to Venice Beach, 1980, to inspire the first roller disco. Dates and times vary. Through Aug 5. $15-$25. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian.

Astrology

FREE WILL

TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

Bruuuuuce!

Sausage magnate headlines fundraiser Who says men can’t get pregnant? After all, Bruce Aidells gave birth to the chicken sausage in 1983. We kid, we kid—sort of. Starting with andouille and chicken apple, now the culinary icon’s smiling face graces the packaging on 29 different types of tubed poultry (and three kinds of meatballs!). He’s also penned some of the most authoritative works on meat, like The Complete Meat Cookbook, Bruce Aidells’ Complete Sausage Book and Complete Book of Pork. This weekend, the sausage king speaks, presumably about meat, at a fundraiser for the Sonoma County Book Festival. Honing his skills in Berkeley’s Gourmet Ghetto in the ’70s and ’80s, Aidells became a pioneer when he started making sausage, a traditionally unhealthy food, in a gourmet style that wouldn’t offend the arteries. Having sold the controlling interest of his sausage company in 2002, Aidells now devotes much of his time to writing. His latest book, The Great Meat Cookbook, boasts that it contains “everything you need to know to buy and cook today’s meat.” Hear Aidells in conversation with local food writer Michele Anna Jordan on Sunday, Aug. 5, at Windrush Farm. 2263 Chileno Valley Road, Petaluma. 2–5pm. $40–$60 sliding scale. 707.523.1977.—Nicolas Grizzle

com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing

more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Psychologist Bruno Bettelheim said the dreams we have at night are “the result of inner pressures which have found no relief, of problems which beset a person to which he knows no solution and to which the dream finds none.” That sounds bleak, doesn’t it? If it’s true, why even bother to remember our dreams? Well, because we are often not consciously aware of the feelings they reveal to us. By portraying our buried psychic material in story form, dreams give us insight into what we’ve been missing. So even though they may not provide a solution, they educate us. Take heed, Taurus! Your upcoming dreams will provide useful information you can use to fix one of your longstanding dilemmas.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) When French composer Georges Auric scored the soundtrack for Jean Cocteau’s movie Blood of a Poet, he produced “love music for love scenes, game music for game scenes and funeral music for funeral scenes.” But Cocteau himself had a different idea about how to use Auric’s work. For the love scenes he decided to use the funeral music, for the game scenes the love music and for the funeral scenes the game music. In accordance with the current astrological omens, Gemini, I recommend that you experiment with that style of mixing and matching. Have fun! (Source: A Ned Rorem Reader, by Ned Rorem.) CANCER (June 21–July 22)

“Piglet was so excited at the idea of being useful that he forgot to be frightened any more,” wrote A. A. Milne in his kids’ story Winnie-the-Pooh. That’s my prescription for how to evade the worrisome fantasies that are nipping at you, Cancerian. If no one has invited you to do some engaging and important labor of love, invite yourself. You need to be needed—even more than usual. P.S.: Here’s what Rumi advises: “Be a lamp, or a lifeboat or a ladder.”

LEO (July 23–August 22) You’ve been making pretty good progress in the School of Life. By my estimates, you’re now the equivalent of a sophomore. You’ve mastered enough lessons so that you can no longer be considered a freshman, and yet you’ve got a lot more to learn. Are you familiar with the etymology of the word “sophomore”? It comes from two Greek words meaning “wise” and “fool.” That’ll be a healthy way to think about yourself in the coming weeks. Be smart enough to know what you don’t know. Cultivate the voracious curiosity necessary to lead you to the next rich teachings. VIRGO (August 23–September

22) A few years ago, a Malaysian man named Lim Boon Hwa arranged to have himself “cooked.” For 30 minutes, he sat on a board covering a pan full of simmering dumplings and corn. The fact that no harm came to him was proof, he said, that Taoist devotees like him are protected by their religion’s deities. I advise you not to try a stunt like that, Virgo—including metaphorical versions. This is no time to stew in your own juices. Or boil in your tormented fantasies. Or broil in your nagging doubts. Or be grilled in your self-accusations. You need to be free from the parts of your mind that try to cook you.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) On a spring day in 1973, an engineer named Martin Cooper debuted the world’s first cell phone. He placed a call

as he walked along a New York City street. The phone weighed two and half pounds and resembled a brick. Later he joked that no one would be able to talk very long on his invention, since it took a lot of strength to hold it against one’s ear. Think of how far that amazing device has come since then, Libra. Now imagine some important aspect of your own life that is in a rather primitive state at this moment but could one day be as natural and fully developed as cell phones have become. Are you willing to work hard to make that happen? Now is a good time to intensify your commitment.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

In the coming week, you will lose some clout and selfcommand if you’re too hungry for power. Likewise, if you act too brazenly intelligent, you may alienate potential helpers who are not as mentally wellendowed as you. One other warning, Scorpio: Don’t be so fiercely reasonable that you miss the emotional richness that’s available. In saying these things, I don’t mean to sound as if I’m advising you to dumb yourself down and downplay your strengths. Not at all. Rather, I’m trying to let you know that the best way to get what you really need is to tailor your self-expression to the unique circumstances you find yourself in.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) For a while, French writer Honoré de Balzac (1799– 1850) was very poor. He lived in a place that had no heat and almost no furniture. To enhance his environment, he resorted to the use of fantasy. On one of his bare walls, he wrote the words, “rosewood paneling with ornamental cabinet.” On another, he wrote “Gobelin tapestry with Venetian mirror.” Over the empty fireplace he declared, “Picture by Raphael.” That’s the level of imaginative power I encourage you to summon in the coming weeks, Sagittarius. So much of what you’ll need will come from that simple magic.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) It’s an excellent time to overthrow false gods and topple small-minded authorities and expose fraudulent claims. Anyone and anything in your environment that does not fully deserve the power they claim should get the brunt of your exuberant skepticism. When you’re done cleaning up those messes, turn your attention to your own inner realms. There might be some good work to be done there. Can you think of any hypocrisy that needs fixing? Any excessive self-importance that could use some tamping down? Any pretending that would benefit from a counter dose of authenticity? AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) In old China, people used to cool themselves by sipping hot drinks. After taking a bath, they buffed the excess water from their skin by using a wet towel. When greeting a friend, they shook their own hand instead of the friend’s. To erect a new house, they built the roof first. You’re currently in a phase of your astrological cycle when this kind of behavior makes sense. In fact, I suspect you’re most likely to have a successful week if you’re ready to reverse your usual way of doing things on a regular basis. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

I’m really tired of you not getting all of the appreciation and acknowledgment and rewards you deserve. Is there even a small possibility that you might be harboring some resistance to that good stuff? Could you be giving off a vibe that subtly influences people to withhold the full blessings they might otherwise confer upon you? According to my analysis of the astrological omens, the coming weeks will be an excellent time for you to work on correcting this problem. Do everything you can to make it easy for people to offer you their love and gifts.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.


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