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MetLiveArts

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Spring 2018


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MetLiveArts is the largest, most diverse museum-based performing arts series in the world. This essential showcase features the work of groundbreaking creators who, through rigorous inquiry and artistic exploration, deepen our understanding of the past, the present, and the Other. This season, compelling works abound: multimedia artist Sussan Deyhim reconsiders the life and work of legendary Iranian feminist, poet, and filmmaker Forough Farrokhzad; the irrepressible performance artist Astrid Haddad explodes preconceptions about her native Mexico in a manic and withering cabaret performance; and the imaginative choreographer Andrea Miller creates a new work interrogating The Met exhibition Like Life: Sculpture, Color, and the Body, adding a temporal dimension to its subject.

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New Commissions and Premieres George Lewis: Assemblage New York Premiere Sun Feb 25, 2 pm Featuring Ensemble Dal Niente Composer, trombonist, and experimentalist George Lewis says his ideas tend to come in a rush, like “driving on an Alpine road in your fancy Alfa Romeo and there are all these sharp turns, corners, and sudden stops.” From that wild ride comes Lewis’s composition Assemblage, full of its own hairpin shifts in tempo and texture, inspired by the titular collage-like technique from the visual arts. Chicago’s “superb contemporary-music collective” (The New York Times) Ensemble Dal Niente, for whom the piece was written, gives the New York-premiere performance along with three other works by Lewis in this exhilarating program. A talk with Lewis and multimedia artist Camille Norment follows the performance. Free with Museum admission (Online registration recommended: metmuseum.org/georgelewis) The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

The House is Black Media Project New York Premiere Sat Mar 10, 7 pm “Sussan Deyhim is one of Iran’s most potent voices in exile. She wails and coos and ululates, the sound of the soul in translation.” —Los Angeles Times The creative visions of two of Iran’s most fiercely creative female artists converge on stage in this mesmerizing multimedia tribute to the late Forough Farrokhzad, the irrepressible feminist poet and filmmaker. Performance artist and composer Sussan Deyhim, whose vocals can be heard in films such as Argo and The Kite Runner, combines visual projections, archival footage—including Farrokhzad’s 1965 interview with Bernardo Bertolucci—and an original score, cowritten with Golden Globe–winning composer Richard Horowitz, in this gripping homage. Tickets start at $35 The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

Sting’s intimate appearance reflects on the painter Thomas Cole and the environmental devastation of the Industrial Revolution. From the restless imagination of the brilliant George Lewis comes a new composition, which animates and extends the practice of assemblage by way of a sculptural performance piece. Join us this season at The Met—and bring your curiosity. Limor Tomer General Manager, MetLiveArts MetLiveArts Spring 2018

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New Commissions and Premieres

Chiara String Quartet: Philip Glass Premiere Sat May 12, 2 pm Rebecca Fischer, violin Hyeyung Yoon, violin Jonah Sirota, viola Gregory Beaver, cello With special guests Paul Barnes, piano, and the Axion Estin Chanters After a triumphant residency at The Met, the Chiara String Quartet returns to give its final performance ever. The celebrated ensemble ends its eighteen-year partnership with a contemplative program centered on the New York premiere of Philip Glass’s Piano Quintet No. 1 (“Annunciation”), based on a Greek Orthodox hymn and featuring pianist Paul Barnes and the Byzantine strains of the Axion Estin Chanters. The program opens with Nico Muhly’s Diacritical Marks, written for the quartet, and finishes with Beethoven’s String Quartet in A Minor, Op.132—one of the composer’s most poignant and haunting final works. Tickets start at $45 The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

This page: Chiara String Quartet. Photo by Lisa-Marie Mazzucco Opposite page: Sussan Deyhim. Photo courtesy of the artist

metmuseum.org/tickets

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New Commissions and Premieres

2017–18 Artist in Residence

Gallim

“Her viscerally physical movement wrings every inch of life from her dancers—and you’ll be holding your breath, too.” —New York Magazine Andrea Miller, choreographer and artistic director of the “excellent, inventive, impressive” (The New York Times) dance company Gallim creates a visceral and emotionally charged new work, which will be created in front of a live audience.

New Work World Premiere May 18–20, 22–24 During Museum hours Open rehearsals: May 8–13, 15–17 During Museum hours Get a behind-the-scenes look at Miller’s creative process during open rehearsals held during Museum hours. Then, see it all come together in the world premiere performances of this thoughtful, invigorating integration of art, architecture, and movement. Inspired by the exhibition Like Life: Sculpture, Color, and the Body, on view at The Met Breuer March 20–July 22, 2018. Free with Museum admission The Met Breuer, Floor 5 Visit metmuseum.org/gallim

MetLiveArts Spring 2018

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Chamber Music

This page: Aizuri Quartet. Photo by Erica Lyn Opposite page: Gallim. Photo by Stephanie Berger

2017–18 Quartet in Residence

Aizuri Quartet Miho Saegusa and Ariana Kim, violins Ayane Kozasa, viola Karen Ouzounian, cello Japan Across the World

Seven Last Words

Music and Migration

Fri Feb 23, 7 pm

Sat Mar 31, 2 pm

Fri Jun 1, 7 pm

With guest artist Kojiro Umezaki, shakuhachi player and composer

With spoken word artist Denice Frohman

With guest artist Kinan Azmeh, clarinettist and composer

The Aizuri Quartet offers a sampling of Japanese composers who have developed distinct musical voices in different parts of the world. JapaneseDanish performer and composer Kojiro Umezaki, a member of Grammy Award– winning Silk Road Ensemble, joins the quartet on shakuhachi—a traditional Japanese bamboo flute—for a fascinating look at the diversity of Japanese music around the globe. Tickets start at $65 Gallery 217, The Astor Court

metmuseum.org/tickets

Award-winning poet and performer Denice Frohman joins the Aizuri Quartet for The Seven Last Words of Christ on the Cross, Haydn’s profound account of Christ’s final utterances at Calvary. Commissioned in 1786 for the Good Friday services at a church in Cádiz, Spain and later adapted for string quartet, Haydn’s work originally featured a priest interpreting the titular words attributed to Jesus. In this updated version, Frohman replaces those words with new poems—all written especially for The Met performance.

The Aizuri Quartet continues its Met residency with this exploration of music in migration with renowned Syrian clarinettist and composer Kinan Azmeh, a member of the Grammy Award-winning Silk Road Ensemble, featuring works by Azmeh, Béla Bartók, and Lembit Beecher, plus a suite of short commissions by contemporary composers. Tickets start at $35 The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

Tickets start at $65 The Fuentidueña Chapel at The Met Cloisters 5


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Chamber Music

The Gypsies in the Court

This page: Red Priest. Photo courtesy of the artist

Wed Feb 28, 7 pm

Opposite page: Michelangelo Buonarroti, Studies for the Three Labors of Hercules (detail), ca. 1530. Image: Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, 2017.

Red Priest Named after flame-haired composer Antonio Vivaldi, whose nickname was “The Red Priest,” this London-based Baroque ensemble has been mixing music and mayhem for two decades. In this program, the foursome returns to The Met to ponder the connections— real and imagined—between gypsy musicians and the court composers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, including Biber, Telemann, Handel, and the group’s namesake, Vivaldi. Who inspired whom? Red Priest attempts to answer using its trademark mix of virtuosity and flamboyance. Tickets start at $50 The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

MetLiveArts Spring 2018

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Sight and Sound Leon Botstein and The Orchestra Now Conductor and music historian Leon Botstein and The Orchestra Now explore parallels between music and the visual arts in this rich series. Events begin with a discussion of artworks paired with musical excerpts, followed by a full performance and audience Q&A. Shostakovich, Michelangelo, and the Artistic Conscience Sun Feb 11, 2 pm With Tyler Duncan, baritone To commemorate the 500th anniversary of Michelangelo’s birth, Shostakovich set eleven poems by the Renaissance master to music. The resulting symphonic song cycle illuminates the timeless struggle of artists across the ages— from Michelangelo and Beethoven to Shostakovich himself—in their quest to remain free. Presented in conjunction with Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer, on view at The Met Fifth Avenue through February 12, 2018. Tickets start at $30 The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium Beyond Realism: Debussy and French Painting Sun May 20, 2 pm Debussy’s Nocturnes have long been celebrated for their ability to evoke the colors and light of the fleeting moment. But are they really music’s answer to Impressionist painting? Comparing Debussy’s works to those of Manet, Degas, and Whistler—who created his own series of “nocturnes”—illuminates how the artistic response to nature differs in music and painting. Presented in conjunction with Public Parks, Private Gardens: Paris to Provence, on view at The Met Fifth Avenue March 12–July 29, 2018. Tickets start at $30 The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

metmuseum.org/tickets

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Vocal Music at The Met

Palestrina’s Missa Papae Marcelli

Women’s Voices

The Feast of Saint Gregory

Sat Mar 24, 7 pm

Fri Apr 6, 7 pm

Emel Mathlouthi Alsarah & The Nubatones Farah Siraj

U.S. Premiere Sun Mar 11, 1 & 3 pm

The Clarion Choir & Brass Consort from The Clarion Orchestra Steven Fox, conductor The beloved Clarion Choir, joined by brass players from The Clarion Orchestra, returns to The Met with one of the great musical masterpieces of the Italian Renaissance. Composed for Pope Marcellus II, whose reign lasted only twenty-two days, Palestrina’s Missa Papae Marcelli has lived on for centuries—not least as a staple of papal coronations at St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome. This performance takes place in The Met’s Medieval Sculpture Hall, where the voices will resound in glorious polyphony. Tickets start at $75 The Medieval Sculpture Hall

Three of today’s most creative and expressive singers and songwriters from Muslim regions of the world share the stage in this extraordinary concert. Jordanian vocalist Farah Siraj is known as her country’s “musical ambassadress.” Alsarah escaped the stifling political climate of her native Sudan to craft her compelling “East African retro pop.” And Emel Mathlouthi’s protest songs became symbols of hope during the Arab Spring and 2011 Tunisian Revolution. Through music inspired by their homelands, they issue a powerful call for freedom, unity, and peace. Tickets start at $35 The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

Axion Estin Chanters Eleftherios Eleftheriadis, director Pomerium Alexander Blachly, director The Met marks the eve of the feast day of Saint Gregory the Great—the papal namesake of Gregorian chant—with this scholarly program of early music. The Axion Estin Chanters, who are experts in the Byzantine repertoire, and Pomerium, considered to be the “consummate U.S. interpreter of early chapel choir music” (The Washington Post), offer up sonorous Greek chants and western hymns dedicated to the saint, who enjoyed equal veneration in the East and West. Tickets start at $40 The Fuentidueña Chapel at The Met Cloisters

Women’s Voices is presented in collaboration with the World Music Institute.

MetLiveArts Spring 2018

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Vocal Music at The Met

This page: The Unicorn in Captivity (detail) (from the Unicorn Tapestries). Netherlandish, 1495–1505. Wool warp with wool, silk, silver, and gilt wefts, 144 7/8 x 99 in. (368 x 251.5 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of John D. Rockefeller Jr., 1937 (37.80.6) Opposite page: Axion Estin Chanters. Photo by Stephanie Berger

Music for the Unicorn Tapestries Room Sun Apr 15, 1 & 3 pm José Lemos, countertenor Dongmyung Ahn, vielle and rebec Christa Patton, harp, recorder, and flute Deborah Fox, lute “Big, colorful, and sexy” with “almost recklessly brilliant coloratura.” That is how The Boston Globe described the voice of José Lemos, the award-winning Brazilian countertenor. Lemos performs a program designed specifically for the Unicorn Tapestries Room at The Met Cloisters, marking the debut of the intimate space as a concert venue. Songs by twelfthcentury troubadours and other medieval French compositions intertwine with Renaissance court music dating from the time of the tapestries, weaving their own embroidery of textures fitting for the room’s storied subject. Tickets start at $65 The Unicorn Tapestries Room at The Met Cloisters

metmuseum.org/tickets

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Masters at The Met Charles Lloyd and The Marvels Fri Jan 26, 7 pm Charles Lloyd, saxophone and flute Bill Frisell, guitar Greg Leisz, pedal steel guitar Reuben Rogers, bass Eric Harland, drums The iconic Charles Lloyd—jazz saxophonist, flutist, composer, and arranger—celebrates his eightieth birthday in 2018, riding high on a second wave of popularity and innovation. The 2015 National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master’s latest offerings, with his ace ensemble The Marvels, include traditional hymns, antiwar protest songs, and reimagined originals that evoke “an uncommon state of grace.” (NPR) Tickets start at $65 The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

MetLiveArts Spring 2018

Many Fathoms Deep: A Valentine from Alan Cumming

Der Wanderer: Songs of Travel from the Middle Ages

Wed Feb 14, 7 pm

Benjamin Bagby, voice and medieval harps

Love is no ordinary emotion, and Alan Cumming is no ordinary performer. Bringing a taste of Club Cumming—his debauched and delightful East Village bar—uptown to The Met, the Tony Award–winning star hosts an evening of amour-themed song, spoken word, and all else that the cabaret has to offer. Cumming’s musical director and longtime collaborator Lance Horne and special guests will also be on hand for this bawdy tribute to St. Valentine.

Benjamin Bagby—the consummate raconteur—employs a “peculiar genius […] daring and imagination” to reimagine thousand-year-old songs and epic poems, enticing his audience to join him on an adventurous romp through the Middle Ages. By way of texts like the Old English tale Beowulf, rife with monsters and kings, and the famous Anglo-Saxon elegy The Wanderer, Bagby “comes as close to holding hundreds of people in a spell as ever a man has” (The New York Times).

Tickets start at $75; Bring the Kids for $1 tickets are not available for this event. The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

Tickets start at $50 The Fuentidueña Chapel at The Met Cloisters

Sun Mar 4, 3 pm

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Exhibitions Amplified

This page: Fan, ca. 1780-85. Front of leaf colored over an engraving by Antoine Aveline, French, Paris 1691–1743. Fan leaf: gouache on paper. Ivory mount: pierced, engraved and colored with gouache and gold, open: 12 3/16 in. (31 cm) Leaf height: 6 5/16 in. (16 cm). Musée Lambinet, Versailles Opposite page: Alan Cumming. Photo by Stephanie Berger

Three unique programs inspired by Visitors to Versailles (1682–1789), on view at The Met April 16–July 29, 2018

Versailles Reconsidered Time Travelers to Versailles

Opera in Versailles

Sat Apr 21, 7 pm

Thu May 3, 7 pm

Inbal Segev, cello TENET Metropolis Ensemble Andrew Cyr, conductor

Opera Lafayette Anna Reinhold, mezzo-soprano Aaron Sheehan, tenor Victor Sicard, baritone Opera Lafayette Orchestra Ryan Brown, conductor

Early-music vocal group TENET and the contemporary Metropolis Ensemble come together for a hall-of-mirrors time warp. Charpentier’s masterpiece Les Plaisirs de Versailles is coupled with two world premieres: a new cello concerto by Timo Andres inspired by John Vanderlyn’s Panoramic View of the Palace and Gardens of Versailles, and a new work for period and modern instruments by Pulitzer Prize–winner Caroline Shaw inspired by the exhibition. Tickets start at $50 The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

Versailles has welcomed visitors—from royalty to riffraff—since Louis XIV turned a small hunting lodge into the splendid palace and gardens the world knows today. Opera Lafayette, devoted to French repertoire from the eighteenth century, considers the music those visitors might have heard, offering up a regal program ranging from the time of the Sun King to the French Revolution. Lully’s Acis et Galatée and Grétry’s Richard Cœur de Lion hold court alongside works by Gluck, Monsigny, and Rameau.

Feast of Versailles with Yotam Ottolenghi Tue, Jun 19, 7 pm Wed, Jun 20, 7 pm Yotam Ottolenghi, chef, author, and restaurateur Continuing his culinary foray into major exhibitions at The Met, master chef and food writer Yotam Ottolenghi turns to Versailles in an exploration of power and privilege through pastry. A cadre of the world’s leading pastry chefs comes to The Met to create spectacular and imaginative cakes in tribute to the court’s decadent cuisine. Dress for the occasion and enjoy a Versailles-themed dinner as part of the festivities. Tickets start at $250; Bring the Kids for $1 tickets are not available for this event. The Petrie Court Café

Tickets start at $30 The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium metmuseum.org/tickets

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Exhibitions Amplified

This page: David Hockney (British, b. 1937). Christopher Isherwood and Don Bachardy, 1968. Acrylic on canvas. Private collection © David Hockney Opposite page: John Singer Sargent (American, 1856–1925). Madame X (Madame Pierre Gautreau) 1883–84. Oil on canvas, 82 1/8 x 43 1/4in. (208.6 x 109.9cm) Framed: 95 3/4 x 56 5/8 x 5 in. (243.2 x 143.8 x 12.7 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Arthur Hoppock Hearn Fund, 1916 (16.53)

The Animals: Love Letters Between Christopher Isherwood and Don Bachardy

Sting: Atlantic Crossing

Tue, Feb 13, 7 pm

Step into the private world of celebrated novelist and screenwriter Christopher Isherwood and artist Don Bachardy—with help from a woman who couldn’t resist reading their mail. Acclaimed stage and screen actors Simon Callow and Alan Cumming, together with writer and scholar Katherine Bucknell, enliven the emotional correspondence of the two men, who shared their love through letters while daring to be openly gay in conservative mid-century Hollywood. David Hockney’s 1968 portrait of the pair—which Callow and Cumming recreate—provides the inspiration for this loving tribute to two extraordinary men. Presented in conjunction with David Hockney, on view at The Met Fifth Avenue November 27, 2017–February 25, 2018.

World-renowned musician Sting has often mined his childhood memories of Northern England for creative inspiration. In this MetLiveArts exclusive, the peerless songwriter finds his muse in another former denizen of the industrial north: the painter Thomas Cole, founder of the Hudson River School. Both artists saw their respective landscapes destroyed by modern intrusions—one by the collapse of England’s shipping industry, the other by incursions of the Industrial Revolution into the American wilderness. In a intimate acoustic performance, Sting weaves together storytelling and song against a visual scenescape created by artist Stephen Hannock. The evening begins with a special opportunity to view the galleries after Museum hours, free from the crowds. Presented in conjunction with Thomas Cole’s Journey: Atlantic Crossings, on view at The Met Fifth Avenue January 30–May 13, 2018.

Tickets start at $45 The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

Tickets start at $125 The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

A dramatic reading by Alan Cumming and Simon Callow

Tue Apr 24*, Wed Apr 25, Thu Apr 26 6 pm private exhibition viewing 7:30 pm performance

The Baroque Cabaret of Astrid Hadad Sat Apr 28, 7 pm One look at Astrid Hadad on stage— flamboyantly costumed and outfitted with outrageous props—and you know you’re in for a night like none other. The legendary Mexican singer and performance artist has an irreverent and iconoclastic view of Mexican art, history, and cultural stereotypes, which she offers up with equal parts camp, satire, and keen intellect—and with plenty of feathers. This MetLiveArts commission is inspired by the exhibition Painted in Mexico, 1700–1790: Pinxit Mexici, on view at The Met Fifth Avenue April 24–July 22, 2018. Tickets start at $35 The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

*This performance is for Members only. Please call 212-570-3753 for details on becoming a Member.

MetLiveArts Spring 2018

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MetSpeaks John Singer Sargent Masterworks Two-part series John Singer Sargent’s dazzling use of light and color has made him one of the most well-known and well-loved of the American Impressionists. In this two-part series, Met curators use new research to provide an essential overview and a more nuanced understanding of the great American painter. Tickets start at $30; $50 for the series The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium Sargent and Diamonds Tue, Feb 27, 11 am Stephanie L. Herdrich, Assistant Curator of American Painting and Sculpture, The Met, and Soyoung Lee, Curator of Korean Art, The Met John Singer Sargent spent much of his childhood in Italy, returning often, both in person and in his paintings. In this cross-cultural program, curators Stephanie L. Herdrich and Soyoung Lee look to the glittering Diamond Mountains of the Korean Peninsula and beyond to explore ways our environment creates a longing that registers in our art. Presented in conjunction with The Met Fifth Avenue exhibitions Diamond Mountains: Travel and Nostalgia in Korean Art, on view February 7–May 20, 2018 and American Painters in Italy: From Copley to Sargent, on view February 13–June 17, 2018. Sargent’s “Brilliant” Portraits Tue, May 22, 11 am Stephanie L. Herdrich, Assistant Curator of American Painting and Sculpture, The Met As evidenced by his infamous portrait Madame X (Madame Pierre Gautreau), on view at The Met Fifth Avenue, consummate cosmopolitan John Singer Sargent was a master at capturing the aristocrats and upwardly mobile bourgeoisie of his era. Inspired by a lush new book devoted to his best works, curator Stephanie L. Herdrich brings a fresh perspective to these and other sensual works. A book signing follows the talk.

metmuseum.org/tickets

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MetSpeaks

The Painter’s Eye: Peter Doig on Edvard Munch Thu Jan 18, 6:30 pm Artist Peter Doig and Sheena Wagstaff, Leonard A. Lauder Chairman, Department of Modern and Contemporary Art, The Met What do artists see when they look at the influential work of another? In this conversation with Met curator Sheena Wagstaff, renowned figurative painter Peter Doig shares his invaluable perspective on the late paintings of Edvard Munch, illuminating the expressionist master’s canvases as only a fellow artist could. Presented in conjunction with Edvard Munch: Between the Clock and the Bed, on view at The Met Breuer through February 4, 2018. Tickets start at $30 The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

The Poetry of Nature in Japanese Art Three-part series John T. Carpenter, Mary Griggs Burke Curator of Japanese Art, The Met The intermingling of art and literature in Japanese culture is the subject of this lecture series with curator John T. Carpenter, which focuses on painting, poetry, and calligraphy in the Edo period (1615–1868). An era when traditional forms of poetry were still cherished, the Edo years also saw the revival of the witty thirty-one-syllable kyōka and the emergence of the seventeen-syllable haiku, intended to evoke images of their own. Held in conjunction with The Poetry of Nature: Edo Paintings from the Fishbein-Bender Collection, on view at The Met Fifth Avenue February 27, 2018–January 21, 2019. Tickets start at $30; $75 for the series The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium Drawing on the Canon of Chinese Poetry in Literati Painting Tue Mar 6, 11 am Ancient Japanese Courtly Verse in Edo-Period Paintings Tue Mar 13, 11 am Popular Verse in Late-Edo Painting, Prints, and Books Tue Mar 20, 11 am MetLiveArts Spring 2018

Artists Respond to Thomas Cole: Ed Ruscha in Conversation with Tom McCarthy Sun, Apr 8, 2 pm Join Pop Art trailblazer Ed Ruscha in conversation with artist and author Tom McCarthy as they discuss the influence that nineteenth-century landscape painter Thomas Cole has had on their careers. Presented in conjunction with Thomas Cole’s Journey: Atlantic Crossings, on view at The Met Fifth Avenue January 30–May 13, 2018. Tickets start at $30 The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

Crowning Glory: Inside Britain’s Royal Collection Two-part series Kathryn Calley Galitz, art historian and Associate Museum Educator, The Met Art historian Kathryn Calley Galitz shares insights from her recent study of the paintings at Buckingham Palace and Windsor Castle, focusing on King George IV and Queen Victoria as art patrons and tastemakers in eighteenth and nineteenth-century Britain. Works discussed in the series range from Renaissance masterpieces to Thomas Lawrence’s Waterloo paintings and intimate portraits of the royal family by Edwin Henry Landseer and Franz Xaver Winterhalter. Tickets start at $30; $50 for the series The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium George Collects Wed Apr 11, 11 am From the late eighteenth century through the end of his reign, in 1830, George IV was a passionate collector of art. This lecture explores his eclectic interests, which ranged from Dutch and Flemish masters to contemporary British painters, including George Stubbs, Sir David Wilkie, and Thomas Lawrence.

The Museum of Lost Art: Noah Charney Mon May 14, 6:30 pm Noah Charney, art historian and novelist, and Carrie Rebora Barratt, Deputy Director for Collections and Administration, The Met Many of the world’s greatest artworks have been stolen, vandalized, lost at sea or to war, or even destroyed. Yet miraculously, many have been recovered, thanks to dramatic investigations and brain-bending scientific sleuthing. Best-selling author and art crime expert Noah Charney and The Met’s Carrie Rebora Barratt discuss the true stories of art rescued from oblivion, including artifacts excavated from Pompeii, Tullio Lombardo’s shattered Adam—painstakingly restored by Met conservationists—and other works in The Met collection. Tickets start at $30 The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

Bruegel’s Harvesters: A Met Masterpiece Tue May 15, 11 am Maryan Ainsworth, Curator of European Paintings, The Met It is one of The Met’s most visited works: The Harvesters, a sixteenth-century masterpiece by the great Flemish painter Pieter Bruegel the Elder. On the eve of the 450th anniversary of the artist’s death, immerse yourself in this revolutionary humanist landscape, and discover why Bruegel’s vivid depiction of quotidian life is considered a watershed moment in the history of Western art. Tickets start at $30 The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

Victoria Collects Wed Apr 18, 11 am Queen Victoria amassed an imposing art collection during her time. But how Victorian was Victoria’s taste? This lecture focuses on works by some of the Queen’s favorite contemporary British artists.

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MetSpeaks

The Better Angels of Our Wardrobes: Art, Clothing, and the Catholic Imagination Three-part series Anne Higonnet, Anne Whitney Olin Professor of Art History, Barnard College, Columbia University In a series inspired by the Costume Institute exhibition, Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination, on view at The Met Fifth Avenue May 10–October 8, 2018, art historian Anne Higonnet shows how painters from Hieronymus Bosch to Fra Angelico provided inspiration for some of the most astonishing and thought-provoking fashions by everyone from Elsa Schiaparelli to Jean-Paul Gaultier. Tickets start at $30; $75 for the series The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

metmuseum.org/tickets

Angelic Visions of Fashion Wed May 2, 11 am Angels imagined by such artists as Van der Weyden, Fra Angelico, Raphael, Reni, and Villalpando have inspired designers like Jeanne Lanvin, Thierry Mugler, and Kate and Laura Mulleavy of Rodarte. Gorgeous (In)Vestments Wed May 23, 11 am For hundreds of years, male prelates wore the most splendid garments. To understand the religious intentions of these sacred vestments, there is no better guide than the great paintings, and especially portraits, that feature them.

This page: Left: El Greco (Domenikos Theotokopoulos) (Greek, 1540/41–1614). Cardinal Fernando Niño de Guevara (1541–1609), ca. 1600. Oil on canvas, 67 1/4 x 42 1/2 in. (170.8 x 108 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, H. O. Havemeyer Collection, Bequest of Mrs. H. O. Havemeyer, 1929 (29.100.5). Right: Cristóbal Balenciaga (Spanish, 1895– 1972) for House of Balenciaga (French, founded 1937). Evening coat, autumn/winter 1954–55. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of Mrs. Bryon C. Foy, 1957 (C.I.57.29.8). Digital composite scan by Katerina Jebb

Monastic Sublime Wed May 30, 11 am Designers like Cristobal Balenciaga, Madame Grès, Claire McCardell, and Pierpaolo Picciolo of Valentino have translated the monastic models of Francisco de Zurbarán into three-dimensional works of art. 15


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Calendar January

February

March

April

Thu 18

6:30 pm

GRR

The Painter’s Eye: Peter Doig on Edvard Munch

Fri 26

7 pm

GRR

Charles Lloyd and The Marvels

Sun 11

2 pm

GRR

Sight and Sound: Shostakovich, Michelangelo, and the Artistic Conscience

Tue 13

7 pm

GRR

The Animals: Love Letters Between Christopher Isherwood and Don Bachardy

12

Wed 14

7 pm

GRR

Many Fathoms Deep: A Valentine from Alan Cumming

10

Fri 23

7 pm

AC

Aizuri Quartet: Japan Across the World

5

Sun 25

2 pm

GRR

George Lewis: Assemblage

2

Tue 27

11 am

GRR

John Singer Sargent Masterworks: Sargent and Diamonds

13

Wed 28

7 pm

GRR

Red Priest: The Gypsies in the Court

6

Sun 4

3 pm

Cloisters

Der Wanderer: Songs of Travel from the Middle Ages

10

Tue 6, 13, 20

11 am

GRR

The Poetry of Nature in Japanese Art

14

Sat 10

7 pm

GRR

The House is Black Media Project

2

Sun 11

1 & 3 pm

Cloisters

The Feast of Saint Gregory

8

Sat 24

7 pm

GRR

Women’s Voices

8

Sat 31

2 pm

Cloisters

Aizuri Quartet: Seven Last Words

5

Fri 6

7 pm

MSH

Palestrina’s Missa Papae Marcelli

8

Sun 8

2 pm

GRR

Artists Respond to Thomas Cole: Ed Ruscha in Conversation with Tom McCarthy

14

Wed 11, 18

11 am

GRR

Crowning Glory: Inside Britain’s Royal Collection

14

Sun 15

1 & 3 pm

Cloisters

Music for the Unicorn Tapestries Room

9

Sat 21

7 pm

GRR

Time Travelers to Versailles

11

Tue–Thu 24*, 25, 26

7:30 pm

GRR

Sting: Atlantic Crossing

12

Sat 28

7 pm

GRR

The Baroque Cabaret of Astrid Hadad

12

MetLiveArts Spring 2018

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Calendar

May

June

Wed 2, 23, 30

11 am

GRR

The Better Angels of Our Wardrobes: Art, Clothing, and the Catholic Imagination

15

Thu 3

7 pm

GRR

Opera in Versailles

11

Sat 12

2 pm

GRR

Chiara String Quartet: Philip Glass Premiere

3

Tue–Sun 8–13, Tue–Thur 15–17

Museum hours

Breuer

Gallim: New Work (Open rehearsals)

4

Mon 14

6:30 pm

GRR

The Museum of Lost Art: Noah Charney

14

Tue 15

11 am

GRR

Bruegel’s Harvesters: A Met Masterpiece

14

Fri–Sun 18–20, Tue–Thu 22–24

Museum hours

Breuer

Gallim: New Work

4

Sun 20

2 pm

GRR

Sight and Sound: Debussy and French Painting

7

Tue 22

11 am

GRR

John Singer Sargent Masterworks: Sargent’s “Brilliant” Portraits

13

Fri 1

7 pm

GRR

Aizuri Quartet: Music and Migration

5

Tue 19, Wed 20

7 pm

Petrie

Feast of Versailles with Yotam Ottolenghi

11

*Members only Performance Talk GRR MSH Cloisters Petrie AC Breuer metmuseum.org/tickets

The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium Medieval Sculpture Hall The Fuentidueña Chapel at The Met Cloisters The Petrie Court Café The Astor Court The Met Breuer, Floor 5 17


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Tickets Your ticket includes Museum admission on the day of the event. Online 

metmuseum.org/tickets Phone

212 570 3949 In Person

The Great Hall Box Office Mon–Sat, 10 am–3:30 pm Bring the Kids

The Met’s Bring the Kids program encourages families to attend performances together by allowing the purchase of up to three kids tickets for $1 each with one full-price adult ticket. Turn your kids on to the power and passion of music, dance, theater, and opera. You’ll give your child the gift of a lifelong passion for and curiosity about the arts. And with $1 tickets, it’s cheaper than leaving them home! Bring the Kids is for children ages 7–16 and includes all MetLiveArts performances, with the exception of Many Fathoms Deep: A Valentine from Alan Cumming and Feast of Versailles with Yotam Ottolenghi.

30 & Under Rush A limited number of $15 tickets for audience members 30 years and under are available for select performances when purchased the day of the event. Call 212-570-3750 on the day of the event for availability.

Groups Groups of 15 or more: call 212-570-3750.

Auditorium Bar Enjoy a pre-performance drink in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium at select performances. Wine, prosecco, and water will be available for purchase. Doors will open approximately one hour prior to the event.

Balcony Bar On Friday and Saturday evenings, appetizers and cocktails from our full bar are available, accompanied by live music from the string quartet ETHEL (hailed by Pitchfork as “a necessary jet of cold water in the contemporary classical scene”) and guest artists. Expect familiar and new classics, performed with ETHEL’s signature style.

Assistive listening devices (with headsets or neck loops) are available from an usher at all MetLiveArts programs in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium.

Make checks payable to The Metropolitan Museum of Art. There is a $5 handling fee per ticket. Tickets purchased at the Museum on the day of the event are subject to an additional handling fee. Delivery fees apply. All sales are final. Programs, dates, and artists subject to change. Print at Home tickets are available; if you choose this option, you will receive a separate email and PDF within an hour of your purchase. Print the PDF and it will serve as your entry to the event. Events are initially offered exclusively to Museum Members. To become a Member, call 212-570-3753. Please note: Ticket prices are subject to change. Cover: Astrid Hadad. Photo by Rodrigo Vázquez Gallim. Photo by Stephanie Berger

Occasionally, we share our mailing lists with carefully screened organizations whose productions and services may be of interest to you. If you prefer not to receive third-party mailings, or mailings or emails from MetLiveArts, please email MetEventTix@metmuseum.org or call 212-570-3750. See metmuseum.org/information/privacy-policy for our updated Privacy Policy.

MetLiveArts Spring 2018

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Support Leadership support for MetLiveArts provided by: Adrienne Arsht Brodsky Family Foundation Isabel C. Iverson and Walter T. Iverson The Kaplen Brothers Fund Mrs. Joseph H. King Fund The Mossavar-Rahmani Fund for Iranian Art Muriel Kallis Steinberg Newman Fund Stavros Niarchos Foundation Mrs. Donald Oenslager Fund Cynthia Hazen Polsky and Leon Polsky Grace Jarcho Ross and Daniel G. Ross Concert Fund The Giorgio S. Sacerdote Fund Shanghai HYM Culture & Media Company The Howard & Sarah D. Solomon Foundation Sarah Billinghurst Solomon Estate of Kathryn Walter Stein Xerox Foundation Dirk and Natasha Ziff Additional major supporters: Jody and John Arnhold Frank and Lydia Bergen Foundation Chester Dale Fund Emilie and Michael Corey Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art The Isaacson-Draper Foundation The Fan Fox & Leslie R. Samuels Foundation, Inc. Friends of MetLiveArts: Firebirds The Arthur Gillender Fund The Rita and Alex Hillman Foundation Tinku and Ajit Jain Art Jameel Fund Janet and Howard Kagan Lavori Sterling Foundation, Inc. William S. Lieberman Fund Tom and Leslie Maheras New York State Council on the Arts Cyril F. and Marie O’Neil Foundation Kelly and Gerry Pasciucco Samuel White Patterson Lecture Fund Positive Prescription The Jerome Robbins Foundation Beatrice Santo Domingo The Evelyn Sharp Foundation The C.F. Roe Slade Foundation The Harold and Mimi Steinberg Charitable Trust Doris & Stanley Tananbaum Foundation in memory of Doris Tananbaum Nicki and Harold Tanner Ann G. Tenenbaum and Thomas H. Lee Douglas Dockery Thomas TOMS Capital Clara Lloyd-Smith Weber Fund Beth and Leonard Wilf Ann Ziff Anonymous (3) Gifts of $10,000 and above, as of 11/15/17

metmuseum.org/tickets

Like Life: Sculpture, Color, and the Body (1300–now) March 21–July 22, 2018

Painted in Mexico, 1700–1790: Pinxit Mexici April 24–July 22, 2018

The exhibition is supported in part by the Jane and Robert Carroll Fund.

The exhibition is co-organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and Fomento Cultural Banamex.

Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer November 13, 2017–February 12, 2018

Thomas Cole’s Journey: Atlantic Crossings January 30–May 13, 2018

The exhibition is made possible by Morgan Stanley.

The exhibition is made possible by The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation.

Additional support is provided by an anonymous donor, the Gail and Parker Gilbert Fund, the Diane W. and James E. Burke Fund, Dinah Seiver and Thomas E. Foster, Cathrin M. Stickney and Mark P. Gorenberg, Ann M. Spruill and Daniel H. Cantwell, and the Mark Pigott KBE Family.

Additional support is provided by the Henry Luce Foundation, White & Case LLP, and the Terra Foundation for American Art.

It is supported by an Indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities. Public Parks, Private Gardens: Paris to Provence March 12-July 29, 2018 The exhibition is made possible by the Sam and Janet Salz Trust, the Janice H. Levin Fund, and The Florence Gould Foundation.

It is supported by an Indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities. It is organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and The National Gallery, London. David Hockney November 27, 2017–February 25, 2018 The exhibition is made possible in part by The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Jay Pritzker Foundation, the Jane and Robert Carroll Fund, and the Aaron I. Fleischman and Lin Lougheed Fund.

Visitors to Versailles (1682–1789) April 16–July 29, 2018

It is supported by an Indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

The exhibition is made possible by the International Council.

It is organized collaboratively by Tate Britain, London; the Centre Pompidou, Paris; and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Additional support is provided by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation, Beatrice Stern, the Diane W. and James E. Burke Fund, the Gail and Parker Gilbert Fund, The Florence Gould Foundation, The Danny Kaye and Sylvia Fine Kaye Foundation/French Heritage Society, and Sheikh Hamad bin Abdullah Al-Thani. It is organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Palace of Versailles. Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination May 10–October 8, 2018 The exhibition is made possible by Christine and Stephen A. Schwarzman, and Versace. Additional support is provided by Condé Nast. Diamond Mountains: Travel and Nostalgia in Korean Art February 7–May 20, 2018

Edvard Munch: Between the Clock and the Bed November 15, 2017–February 4, 2018 The exhibition is made possible by Leonard A. Lauder. It is supported by an Indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities. It is organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; and The Munch Museum, Oslo. The Poetry of Nature: Edo Paintings from the Fishbein-Bender Collection February 27, 2018–January 21, 2019 The exhibition is made possible by the BenderFishbein-Goodman Family.

The exhibition is made possible by The Met’s collaboration with the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism of the Republic of Korea (MCST) and the National Museum of Korea (NMK).

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1000 Fifth Avenue New York, NY 10028 metmuseum.org

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

MetLiveArts Spring 2018

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The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage Paid The Metropolitan Museum of Art

1000 Fifth Avenue New York, NY 10028 metmuseum.org

MetLiveArts Spring 2018

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MetLiveArts: Spring 2018 Season  
MetLiveArts: Spring 2018 Season  
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