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the holidays SEASON OF INSPIRATION

CONNECTING OUR COMMUNITY

SPIRITOFOMAHA.COM

NOV/DEC/JAN 2015/16


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in this ISSUE

features

12 26 34 36 46

VIPS: VERY INSPIRATIONAL PEOPLE

5 in a series of 25 inspiring anniversary profiles

36

46

JOURNEYS the wayfarer: stuart chittenden’s quest for community

TRANSITIONS omaha home for boys • jacobs’ place

MAN TO MAN NuMale medical center

connecting to our care

SUPPORTING SCHOLARSHIP

connecting to our future

aksarben coronation ball cxix

departments/columns

22

CONNECTING OUR COMMUNITY

GAME CHANGERS • CHRIS LAFEVER

12

presented by planitOmaha

38

HE SAID/SHE SAID mike & mary from KMTV’s morning blend

39 41 42 43 52 53 53

TOP HOLIDAY GIFT IDEAS metroSPIRIT with mary vandenack

connecting to our courage

OMAHA COMMUNITY FOUNDATION giving with your family

150 YEARS OF THE “Y” ymca

HVW LAW pre-approved retirement plans

connecting to our leadership

SWARTZBAUGH, FARBER & ASSOC. are we there yet?

VONDRAK DENTAL why you should want to pay for dental care

112 WAKING WORDS FROM ROB KILLMER race into the fire!

22

events

63

connecting to our communities

SCENE highlights from recent charity & cultural events

106 SAVE THE DATE

upcoming events through february

bravo! CELEBRATING THE ARTS

101 DICKENS DUO

joslyn castle literary festival

104 BRAVO! TOP PICKS

our picks for your cultural calendar

26

connecting to our culture

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101


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NOV/DEC/JAN 2015/16 • VOL. 27 NO. 4 Press releases and other editorial information may be sent to: P.O. BOX 241611, OMAHA, NE 68124 or e-mailed to: Editor@SpiritofOmaha.com Publisher/Editor-in-Chief

Creative Collaboration

Andrea L. “Andee” Hoig

David Baumann Leo Adam Biga Matt Darling Joshua A. Diveley Daniel Flanigan Roger Humphries Elissa Joy Mark Kresl Wendy Moore MORNING BLEND’s “Mike & Mary” Jim Scholz Kara Schweiss Mary Vandenack Stephanie Vondrak D.D.S.

Editor/Creative Director

Robert P. “ROB” Killmer Community Engagement

Dana Carlton-Flint Tracy Fisher Special Thanks

Counterparts Printco Graphics

metroMAGAZINE /

QUARTERLY is wholly owned and operated by the publisher and is not affiliated with any other publication, operating solely on subscription and advertising revenues and the good will of the agencies and charities we support; all of which are very important to the continuing growth and quality of this publication. Thank you to all who support this endeavor. OFFICE/SALES

402.932.3522 | sales@SpiritofOmaha.com MISSION STATEMENT ALH Publications exists to inform, inspire and connect those who give back to the community through volunteerism and philanthropy, recognizing the ongoing efforts of area businesses, organizations and individuals who better our community. Contents of this magazine are copyrighted by ALH Publications, Inc. in their entirety. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored, or transmitted in any form or by any means - electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without prior written consent of the publisher. ©Copyright 1990 – 2015 ALH Publications, Inc. All rights reserved.

402.932.3522 • CONNECT@SpiritofOmaha.com

advertise with us... MAKE THE CONNECTION! “We have generations of individuals that have passion, and generations that have need. When those two meet, great relationships occur. metroMAGAZINE and mQUARTERLY consistently help connect and foster those relationships.” ~ NATE DODGE PRESIDENT, NP DODGE COMPANY

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words FROM MY HEART

mQUARTERLY • LETTER FROM THE PUBLISHER

inspired!

Inspiration is a beautiful thing. We all have opportunities to inspire and to be inspired each and every day. Rarely does a day go by for me anymore where I don’t experience one or both of these opportunities in my own life; and I do find it interesting to consider the ebb and flow of inspiration. In order for us to inspire we must ourselves be inspired. Can we thrive apart from the sources of our own inspiration? Can we prosper apart from being granted the opportunity to be a source of inspiration to others? Can one exist with the other? Perhaps not. The sources of my own inspiration are many, many of which are deeply private for me, as they are for most of us – grounded in intimate and valued practices adopted through years of exploration and experimentation. Among the sources of my inspiration are so many of the people in this community, many of whom appear in this issue of metroMAGAZINE’s mQUARTERLY.

Those featured here, whether in attendance at local fundraising events for our community’s charitable and cultural undertakings, or among those celebrated in our human interest articles, are doing really great things on a regular basis – and many of these inspirational “points of light” often go unnoticed. Our goal here at ALH Publications has always been to call attention to as many of these inspiring acts as possible, and to the people behind them. As we approach our 25th anniversary in 2016, I am pleased to announce a new series of feature articles spotlighting such people. We are calling this our VIP series: Very Inspiring People. Beginning in this, our November 2015 issue, we will spotlight 5 VIPs each issue throughout 2016. Combining this current issue (which introduces our Silver Anniversary celebrations) with our four quarterly issues next year, we will continue to spotlight these VIPs through year’s end…for a total of 25 VIPs.

ANDREA L. HOIG ahoig@SpiritofOmaha.com

Speaking of inspiration: my colleague and editor, Rob Killmer, shares his inspirational column, entitled Waking Words, at the back of every quarterly publication. Look for his latest contribution to walking an inspired path on page 112. And now, please permit me to wish you all a safe, happy and inspired holiday season! Until next year… ~ Andee

Consistent with what I shared above, we’re not content merely to offer our readers the opportunity to be inspired, but to inspire others, so we wish to share this process with all of you. You may know one of the “lightbearers” in our community, but their attitudes, deeds and impact may be unknown to most of us. Therefore, we are asking our readers and followers to nominate your own VIPs for consideration and possible inclusion in this 25th Anniversary “Celebration of Inspiration!” We’ll review the nominees submitted, and you may find their story published alongside other sources of our shared inspiration. In order to participate, please visit our nominations page at www.SpiritofOmaha.com/VIP-Noms/.

inspire (definition, orig. Greek – εμπνέω): “To breath life into.”~DAVID ‘AVOCAD

In this Winter 2015 edition we are also announcing the twelve finalists for the 2nd annual $10,000 BIG CONNECTION, which is being held in conjunction with our annual presentation of The BIG Event! This second round of voting involves the twelve winners in each category, selected by voters from 60 finalists from The BIG Event. Now these twelve winners will enlist support to win this $10,000 promotional and funding prize. Voting for this round officially begins on November 2nd, and public votes will account for 50% of the final tally. Please look for the complete list of these “Final 12” on page eleven. We would ask you as well, to SAVE THIS DATE: The BIG Event, coinciding with our 25th Anniversary, and the release of our 11th edition of The Giving Guide & Event Book, will take place at The Durham Museum on Thursday, January 21st. Tickets will be available on our website at www.SpiritofOmaha.com. Watch for additional information in our weeklyCONNECTOR weekly e-newsletter and on our facebook page. 9

celebrating 25 years in 2016!

The $10K Round! See this year’s WINNERS on page 11 mQUARTERLY • NOV/DEC/JAN 2015/16


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give a gift that makes a difference. Give the gift of metroMAGAZINE’S mQUARTERLY this holiday season

and your guests receive The Event Book & Giving Guide 2016 plus 101 Things to Love about the metro™

An entire year of relevant, elegantly presented content that connects discriminating readers

with the charitable & cultural organizations and businesses making a difference in our community!

we make a difference. make the connection!

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save over 60%!

Click the SUBSCRIBE link just under the METRO MAGAZINE tab at SPIRITOFOMAHA.COM and select GIFT SUBSCRIPTION. If prompted to enter a code enter “MMSUB_GIFT”.

(P.S. You can give it to yourself, we won’t tell Santa!)


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celebrating 25 years in 2016!

“and the WINNERS are…” The following events & organizations were selected by thousands of followers who participated in this year’s voting. These organizations won in category for events presented between June 1, 2013 & May 31, 2014. BEST EVENT: 1st – 2nd Annual Susan G. Komen Nebraska: PiNK RibboN Gala

BEST EVENT: Young Professional habitat for humanity omaha young Professionals: bREW haha 2014

BEST EVENT: Over 1,000 Visiting Nurses association: aRt & SouP

BEST EVENT: Pet & Animal Nebraska humane Society: DiNiNG With DoGS

BEST EVENT: Over 500 Qli: aN EVENiNG at thE FaiR

BEST EVENT: Walk/Run ted E. bear hollow: REMEMbRaNCE WalK

BEST EVENT: Under 500 Children's hospital & Medical Center: WiNE, WoMEN & ShoES BEST EVENT: Health & Wellness JDRF: Promise Gala: RoCKiN' FoR a CuRE BEST EVENT: Theme heartland Family Service: “CaRNiVal oF loVE” Gala BEST EVENT: Food & Wine

Food bank for the heartland: CElEbRity ChEF featuring Geoffrey Zakarian BEST EVENT: Education Creighton Prep: baSh 2015 GaMEDay

BEST EVENT: Speaker/Guest the Kim Foundation: a tiME FoR hoPE & hEaliNG with Mariel hemingway

OUTSTANDING GUILD AWARD to bE aNNouNCED at the biG Event 2016!

THE NEXT ROUND OF VOTING IS HERE! NOVEMBER 2ND THRU DECEMBER 11TH THESE ORGANIZATIONS WILL NOW COMPETE TO WIN...

DATE! E H T SAVE EVENT

G The BI AZINE’S n MAG bratio e l metro e C sary nniver A 016 h t 5 2 ry 21, 2 a u n a J eum m Mus a h r u The D

Voting deadline is DECEMBER 11, 2015! Vote NOW! • Go to www.SPIRITOFOMAHA.COM/TheBigEvent-VOTE/


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VIP

VIPS

• VERY inspirational PEOPLE

SILVER ANNIV. MEMBER

IN THE SPRING OF 1988, David Spence was 22 years old and on top of the world. He had just graduated magna cum laude from Georgetown University with a BSBA in finance and was poised to launch a promising career and begin crafting his adult life.

Last May, to mark his 25-year anniversary of being released from cancer treatment, Spence raised $339,000, crediting the help of family and friends. He’s seen treatment options expand and cancer survival rates, including for Hodgkin’s, improve over the years. Nevertheless, “we’re still working on it. There’s still a lot left to do, and it’s not an easy task.”

“But a week after I graduated from college, I found out I had Hodgkin’s disease,” As he knows firsthand, “cancer is ubiquitous.” In the 27 years since his own diagnosis, Spence said. cancer has stricken the Spence family twice more, but both of Spence’s parents were Instead of spending the months after graduation (as most of his colleagues were doing) successfully treated for their different types of cancers. “We’re all survivors. We’re all here!” looking for his first serious job, Spence underwent exploratory surgery to stage the cancer, Spence said. a type of lymphoma. This was followed by six months of chemotherapy and three months of radiation treatment. Youth and fitness were seemingly on his side – Spence even biked Spence has served on the boards of both the Friends of the Eppley Cancer Center and the to some of his cancer treatments – and the expectations of all involved remained high that Storz Cancer Institute of Clarkson Hospital (now part of the University of Nebraska Medical Center) and his work with the Cancer Fund is ongoing. However, Spence said, the whole cancer experience would soon be a faint memory and that Davis “I don’t like to be defined by cancer.” His personal focus is to look forward Spence would once again resume the next chapters of a normal life. and live a meaningful life. “I was well for about four or five months…when my cancer came back again. Things were fairly serious before.” he said. “But when I got sick again…it was not a good sign. It was A meaningful life “I wanted to give back to a tough time.” In 1994 he channeled a passion for history, architecture the people that saved my and authenticity into a reclamation business, Antique Treatment escalated with even more intensive Brick Warehouse (www.antiquebrickwarehouse.com). life and also make other chemotherapy followed by an autologous bone marrow Today, Spence is a respected expert in the art of finding lives better.” transplant – using the patient’s own bone marrow was a new life for antique street-paving bricks, cobblestones, new procedure then – at the University of Nebraska building brick and common brick pavers. In an amusing DAVID SPENCE Medical Center. At the time, only around 60 percent of F juxtaposition to his labor-intensive day job, Spence patients like Spence survived. “There was a significant chance I occasionally takes on modeling gigs, a side career he fell into at wouldn’t make it,” he said. the late age of 28 after an agent approached him. “At night in the hospital, buzzers would go off and nurses would race into a “I thought it was kind of a kick, and it never impeded on my business,” he said. He’s modeled patient’s room; I knew someone was dying,” he recalled. “It was like waiting for the grim for an array of clients from locally-based Gordmans to Calvin Klein in New York (using reaper to come.” some of the travel opportunities to make contacts for his business), but he admitted with Even after being released from the hospital post-transplant, he said, “I was really just a chuckle: “I have zero sense of fashion, never had it,” he said. “I’m most comfortable in a waiting. I didn’t realize it at the time that I was still…fighting to live, but that was part white T-shirt and jeans.” of the trauma. You just think, ‘When is the other shoe going to drop? When is it coming back and I’m going to be given my death sentence?’”

In the off-season for Antique Brick Warehouse, Spence enjoys traveling and exploring new cultures; he’s taught English in Thailand and he mentors a refugee family from Burma. A stint as an adoption counselor with the Nebraska Humane Society brought his “wonderful” dog Pushka into his life. And 25 years after cancer, Spence still has a heightened sense of appreciation.

Raising funds, raising hope Cancer consumed nearly two years of Spence’s life, but it didn’t return a third time. At the five-year mark of being cancer-free, he commemorated the milestone by starting the “I think my friendships that I have now are much more rich and my emotional discourse is Cancer Fund (cancerfundonline.com). certainly more fluid and more full,” he said. “Because of what I went through, I think I have “I wanted to raise some money to give back to cancer research and the bone marrow a greater empathy for people.” transplant center,” he explained. “So I threw what was basically a party 20 years ago and set up the 501 (c)(3), raised some money and gave it away.”The Cancer Fund has continued The Cancer Fund is a reflection of his changed self as well, Spence said. “I wanted to give to be a conduit for supporting research and other causes relating to all types of cancers back to the people that saved my life and also make other lives better. I felt it was my since then. The organization allocates no funds whatsoever to administrative fees and responsibility and something I wanted to embrace. I wanted to be some type of a change Spence said he looks for opportunities to “turn money into more money” through matching. agent and potentially a beacon of hope.”

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• mQUARTERLY

STORY BY KARA SCHWEISS | PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK KRESL

celebrating 25 years in 2016!

A meaningful LIFE


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VIP

VIPS

• VERY inspirational PEOPLE

SILVER ANNIV. MEMBER

MOST COMPANIES BEGIN with a business concept and build from there. But for Leslie Fischer and Holly Baker – co-founders of Together A Greater Good (TAGG), which offers a free mobile app enabling people to support a cause when they patronize participating businesses – the start-up process actually worked in reverse.

The participating nonprofit recipients clearly benefit from TAGG donations, but businesses gain an easy means of giving back, bringing in customers and getting some insight about their customer base through the data TAGG provides. Plus, they benefit through the social media tie-ins built into the program.

“I can’t even specifically say what it was that made me call Holly, but I called her and “I love the sharing factor on social media, because the business gets credit for being asked her to have drinks at Roja, and I said, ‘I think I really want to start my own company charitable,” Fischer explained. “And Omaha has some of the most charitable businesses and I feel like you’re supposed to be my business partner.’” Fischer said. “Holly and I had I’ve ever seen.” worked together at GiftCertificates.com about 10 years ago. We worked together just a very short time, but we had a good working relationship.” Bigger way to fundraise This summer, Baker and Fischer announced that 88 Restaurant Group is now matching Both had eventually gone on from GiftCertificates.com to different career paths, which the first $1,000 raised every month through all participating businesses. And the cohad crossed from time to time over the years. Fischer began contemplating founders said they hope to bring TAGG to even more local businesses and entrepreneurship in 2011 while on maternity leave from a position nonprofits (their 300 participants represent less than 10 percent of the where she “liked the people, but the job was no longer what I registered 501(c)(3)s in Douglas County) and they have recently wanted to do.” Baker’s position had changed substantially after started to expand into Lincoln. Eventually, they’d like to be a a buyout, and she, too, felt her career was not in a national entity, but continue the community-based model. particularly happy place at that time. “We thought there could “I think what makes us different than everything else out there is that we are all about supporting local small The two women spent some time brainstorming at their really be a win/win here business,” Fischer added. “So not only are you getting to seminal meetup, but aside from identifying a few common for the businesses and support a cause, you’re supporting your own community. goals including a desire to serve the community, they were all the causes.” TAGG is a designation tool for businesses to empower their unable to determine what kind of business they wanted to customers to choose where their charitable contributions go.” launch. They parted with a resolve to revisit the idea in the HOLLY BAKER future once they came up with a viable list of possibilities. F Baker and Fischer, both married mothers, said TAGG represents the changing nature of fundraising for their demographic. Better way to fundraise Serendipitously, fundraising campaigns happened to be in season. “It hit “We’re in the age group that has small children at home,” Fischer explained. “We don’t me one night when someone came to my door, and I called up Leslie and said, ‘There has got to be a better way to fundraise.’ And that’s where the initial idea came from; we have a lot of funds or time, but we want to be able to support (causes). TAGG is a way to saw the need for refreshing fundraising,” Baker said. “Leslie and I both have marketing start engaging this generation of givers.” backgrounds, and we know that businesses are always looking for ways to get their name out there without spending a lot of money. And we thought there could really be a “Because people are not spending their own money, TAGG allows you to do good without affecting your budget,” Baker added. “And it’s just convenient; you don’t have to think win/win here for the businesses and all the causes.” ahead. If you’re out and about, you can get out your phone and do good.” The basic idea behind TAGG was to give consumers a way to conveniently support designated causes in the community through their everyday purchases from local retailers, Beginning way to fundraise restaurants and other businesses, who donate five percent of each “TAGGED” transaction. Plus, they added, TAGG is a great tool with which to teach youngsters about the concept TAGG grew quickly and three years after its founding, 300-plus nonprofits, schools, and of giving, and not just when they’re old enough to be consumers themselves. Younger teams are signed on. Originally based on a voucher system, its technology evolved as well children are able to influence their parents to use the app to support their schools, teams and now users execute TAGG via a mobile app. The app, “Together A Greater Good”, is a and other causes in which they have an interest. free download available in both the App Store (iPhone) and Google Play (Android). “My first-grader saw the TAGG sign in the front window when we were out to dinner at “TAGG offers a free smartphone app that allows anyone with a smartphone to give back Brewsky’s. She is kind of starting to ‘get it’ that this can help her school,” Baker said. to their favorite school, nonprofit or team of choice simply by using the app at over 125 local businesses,” Baker said. “When it’s time to pay, simply tell your cashier you’d like to “For me, what’s exciting is that we’re raising our kids to be a little more aware,” Fischer said. TAGG your purchase, and they provide a card for you to scan. The donation gets done “That’s one of the biggest opportunities with TAGG; it empowers even younger people to feel like they’re making an impact.” behind the scenes.”

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STORY BY KARA SCHWEISS | PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK KRESL

• mQUARTERLY celebrating 25 years in 2016!

TOGETHER A greater GOOD V


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VIP

VIPS

• VERY inspirational PEOPLE

SILVER ANNIV. MEMBER

“THEY WOULD NORMALLY tear it down, bulldoze it, dig a hole, burn it, and bury it,” Jason Gilbreath, president and founder of Reclaimed Enterprises, said. Instead, his company was able to turn a century-old, dilapidated barn into 13,000 board-feet of usable lumber and another success story for a year-old company that is already fulfilling its tagline – “Reuse. Rebuild. Reclaim.” – on an increasingly expanding scale. “We facilitate the use of reclaimed materials locally sourced from obsolete properties,” Gilbreath explained. “There are salvage companies, demolition companies here in town that save materials. But as I built Reclaimed Enterprises, my thought was that we could be saving more buildings than we are. But to do that, we would have to partner in ways we hadn’t in the past. And so I looked for firms that were open to changing demolition practices, and didn’t see any that were readily offering that full deconstruction service.”

he said. “Our focus – and you’ll see this in the way we change our business as we go forward – will be to get more material processed, collected, gathered; and tell the story of that material; and get it into the hands of people who can give it a new life.” Everyone wins, and that includes the city of Omaha and its ongoing struggle to address blight in aging neighborhoods. “It’s tough, but the thing is, it’s not a lost cause. It’s something we can actually use to help improve our community and if we take advantage of that, we can start to solve the problem in a more meaningful way,” he said.

Vision and Expansion Reclaimed Enterprises occupies a building downtown on 11th Street just north of Cuming that houses 5,000 square feet of warehouse space for Gilbreath researched national organizations like The ReUse People of materials and a 3,000-square-foot workshop for prep work from America and Habitat for Humanity, and then proposed several de-nailing to planing. Gilbreath and his wife are also pilot projects with Habitat to explore the possibilities. “The best way for people developing another facility on the property for office space that will serve both Reclaimed Enterprises and JG Interiors, “We found that we could take down a building, salvage the out in the community to Jenny’s interior decorating business. material, and make it profitable by saving 90-plus percent help us with this effort of the material as opposed to putting in a landfill.” “We’ve been working very collaboratively,” Gilbreath said. would be to seriously And the couple’s four children – spanning elementary, Seeing the potential consider locally sourced middle and high school – help out when they can. Taught by his father and grandfather, Gilbreath started out reclaimed materials as a casual hobbyist making furniture pieces from materials and products.” salvaged from barns and other structures. But he spent his Fostering creative re-use professional life identifying and pursuing opportunities with Not all material produced by a demolition is salvageable, JASON GILBREATH unrealized potential working in the consulting, venture capital, Gilbreath said. Omaha has no facilities to reclaim shingles, for F technology, consumer products, transportation, and banking industries. instance. Ceramic tile can rarely be pulled up intact, and plaster and Gilbreath’s business acumen, entrepreneurial spirit, appreciation for storytelling, and anything containing asbestos can’t be reclaimed at all. But he also said that a little desire to reduce waste – plus his skills as a craftsman – integrated to give rise to Reclaimed creativity can foster reincarnation for almost every facet of a former residential or Enterprises. commercial structure. “We actually have more houses become blighted each year than we as a city have a budget “We can take angle iron or a steel door from a warehouse and turn it into a tabletop. We to take down. Blighted buildings negatively impact our communities, with over 50 percent take doors that aren’t being used because they’re an odd size for the current period of of these obsolete properties in north and south Omaha east of 42nd Street,” he said. “I housing, so we turn those into raised-panel cabinets. It’s just a creative re-use,” he said. was drawn to the opportunity to provide a solution that would help us reduce blight, “What people are often surprised by is the number of different uses for windows, doors, divert waste and reuse materials. I saw that we could preserve the materials and their hardware, machined parts – things like that.” history by building unique pieces or using the materials in new spaces.” Reclaimed Enterprises works with various types of customers, whether they need a single Not only is Reclaimed Enterprises already helping to reduce blight and divert waste, piece of reclaimed wood, a custom furniture piece, or enough material to complete a full Gilbreath said, the company’s work stimulates other businesses related to reclamation design project. Gilbreath emphasized that all levels of reclamation effort are collectively and over time will also create jobs around the conservation movement. He even uses his valuable and should be encouraged. business experience to help partners build and develop their own businesses as they work toward their common goal. “The best way for people out in the community to help us with this effort would be to seriously consider locally sourced reclaimed materials and products as they go forward Bringing new life to old materials in their projects, and to reach out to us if they have questions as to what’s possible,” he “One of the greatest challenges in reclaiming this material and keeping it out of the landfill said. “It is pretty amazing that you can take a piece of material that’s been saved from a is connecting buyers and sellers; connecting the material itself with those who need it,” landfill and incorporate it and its history into your own life.”

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STORY BY KARA SCHWEISS | PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK KRESL

• mQUARTERLY celebrating 25 years in 2016!

reclaimed ENTERPRISES


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VIP

VIPS

• VERY inspirational PEOPLE

SILVER ANNIV. MEMBER

WHEN LAURA STASTNY takes her work home, it’s not exactly a stack of files and folders. In recent weeks she’s brought home six opossums, three woodchucks, nine squirrels, a dozen birds, and 14 rabbits. She has one of those jobs where she gets her hands dirty…and sometimes scratched, quilled, pecked or nipped, too. Stastny’s position as the executive director of Nebraska Wildlife Rehab, Inc. is technically part-time, but she puts in as many as 100 hours per week overseeing the day-to-day operations of the organization like fundraising, marketing, accounting, coordinating and recruiting volunteers, training caretakers, and of course providing direct care to wild creatures needing a safe haven during their rehabilitation period.

Human action/environmental reaction Much as she loves her work with NWRI, she also said she wishes the organization’s services weren’t needed. She explained that animals are hurt in collisions with cars, injured by weapons, and mauled by predators. Shelter gets destroyed through land development and animals are displaced. Babies are left behind when their mothers are hunted, accidentally killed or even trapped and relocated. Humans refuse to share habitat with animals acclimated to living in urban and suburban environments, sometimes unwittingly attracting them in the first place with accessible pet bowls or the use of greener lawn care practices that allow for the proliferation of tasty insects and small prey.

“I do a little bit of everything for the organization, but to be clear: we have a huge group “My favorite thing to say is ‘I would like to work myself out of a job.’ Because more than 90 of dedicated volunteers who are just amazing.” Under the objective to “rescue, rehabilitate percent of the animals we receive, we receive because of something people have done. It and release,” up to 500 animals may be in the organization’s care at one time. is often human action – intentional or unintentional – that causes animals to “I can’t deny that I’m often really tired and I’m always looking for more have to come in to rehab. If we could educate people on the right thing help and more resources, but I have gotten to the point where I to do and when not to intervene with wildlife, and if we can educate couldn’t see myself doing anything else,” Stastny said. students early and utilize our animals to teach lessons of human action/environmental reaction, we can make a difference for the future,” Stastny said of the organization’s long-term Animal advocacy “It’s quite a humbling vision, which is “To create a community in which wildlife She originally started out as just another NWRI volunteer, experience to work with and natural habitats are valued and protected, and in but a highly experienced and skilled one. Stastny came which youth are educated and inspired to become leaders wildlife and help them from an executive director position at a humane society in environmental conservation and the sciences.” in northern Minnesota, where she stayed after attending return to the wild, to help college at Bemidji State University. them on their journey.” “The rehabilitation and return of wildlife is important for so many reasons. Animals deserve that chance to live in the wild “I always had it in my head that I was going to go to veterinary LAURA STASTNY F where they belong. Part of our mission is balancing the scales school, but after working in a veterinary clinic, I decided that for them a little bit,” Stastny said. “My life is enriched by wildlife and wasn’t what I really was interested in,” she said, adding that she simply by nature, and I want students to have the opportunities I have had. For took her compassion for animals in another direction. In 2000, family reasons that reason I believe just as strongly in the education part of our mission which compelled her to return to her native Omaha, and she decided to take a break from the provides these learning opportunities for students as I do in the rehab side.” sometimes heartbreaking animal rescue field. Soon after starting a new job with Ameritrade (later TD Ameritrade), where she stayed for 13 years – and still holds her Series 7 and 66 broker and investment advisor licenses – Stastny realized she “missed animals a lot.” So she decided to volunteer for a wildlife rescue organization, thinking it “wouldn’t be as emotionally taxing” as working with domesticated animals…and chuckles now at her naiveté. She helped NWRI evolve from an all-volunteer organization to a major operation housed out of a wildlife center in Louisville and expand its mission to include community education and engagement. “It just seemed as the years passed, given my background in animal rescue and veterinary medicine, I began taking on more and more responsibilities when it came to the animal care side.” Her animal cruelty investigation experience and animal disaster relief experience also came in handy. “It seemed like I just naturally, organically, was taking on more and more responsibilities. I became a volunteer operations chair starting in 2008. As the demand for services grew, the organization kind of outgrew this loose volunteer framework. A few years ago we received a generous grant from a private donor to begin paying me part-time for my work,”she said. “It felt really natural to step in there and do what I could to move the organization forward. I am a huge fan of small nonprofits and I have loved this one since I entered it in 2001.”

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Small but mighty Stastny hopes to see NWRI continue to expand in coming years. The organization’s growth plans include expanding her position, adding critical paid staff members and eventually acquiring 60 to 100 acres of land in Douglas, Sarpy, Cass or Washington County representing diverse or restorable habitat for outdoor cages and “soft” releases. And someday soon: building a specialized wildlife hospital and rehabilitation center. Since 2010, Stastny has also worked for another “small but mighty” nonprofit, the Institute for Holocaust Education, in an administrative and grant writing position, as well as Feline Friendz in Nebraska . “I strongly believe in the power of small nonprofits to make a difference in our community. I love that work and I feel honored every day to be a part of the nonprofit world,” she said. “Not to mention it’s quite a humbling experience to work with wildlife and help them return to the wild, to help them on their journey.” “I’m often sleepless, but never bored,” she said. “I really thought I’d be back in Bemidji in five years. And now it’s 15 years later and I‘m still here, but I have absolutely no regrets. Omaha is such a diverse and interesting place to live and the people here are kind and generous.”

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• mQUARTERLY celebrating 25 years in 2016!

STORY BY KARA SCHWEISS | PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK KRESL


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VIP

VIPS

• VERY inspirational PEOPLE

SILVER ANNIV. MEMBER

“IT IS A FUNNY STORY,” S. Scott Moore says of his beginnings fifteen years ago as a charity gala auctioneer. Because not only was playing any role in charity auctions not on the horizon (except maybe attending the festivities as a guest), he had no idea he was signed on for his debut event – the Nebraska Humane Society’s Black Tie & Tails gala – to begin with.

Will ya give me… Moore, who’s never had to promote his services, is in high demand throughout the year (“I’ve done three events in a row: a Thursday, Friday and Saturday. I’ve even done two events in one day.”) not only for his bid-calling skills and stage presence, but his reputation for taking the job seriously.

His father, Jim Moore, had volunteered him without asking first and Moore decided he “I am at the event to do the best I can, to raise as much money as possible. Even if I don’t get paid, people have high expectations. I need to be prepared and I need to be might as well go along with it. focused,” he said. “And if I make a commitment, I stick with it.” “He said, ‘You’ll be fine, don’t worry’. I had no idea what I was doing. But apparently it In addition, Moore has garnered widespread appreciation for the simple reason that he went okay,” Moore said, wryly. “And that’s how it started.” makes a point to avoid resorting to pressuring or guilting people into participating. In this case, Father did know best. Since 1999, Moore has raised millions “I’m the one who gets them to part with their money with a smile on of dollars for various nonprofits, schools and community their face. My job is to make sure everybody feels extremely organizations – breaking many of their fundraising records – comfortable giving money,” he said. “Let’s have a great time. while performing numerous charity auctions each year in If you can give – awesome. If you can’t – no problem. It addition to pursuing his full-time career as a sought-after “Let’s have a great time. all balances out in the end.” commercial real estate broker with World Group If you can give – awesome. Commercial Real Estate. Moore himself keeps having a great time and finding If you can’t – no problem. balance. “I do have fun, and there’s some benefit I get Moore admits he had a bit of an edge going into that It all balances out in the end. out of doing this,” he said, adding that he’s gained some first auction, having been recruited in his youth to help I’m actually entertaining wonderful relationships through his auction work, with events for his father’s former auction activities, which just keeps rolling in. “People keep asking me to though he had never served in any capacity where he had the audience.” help. Omaha is an amazingly generous community and been required to stand behind a microphone. filled with incredible people, and it’s hard to say no to a lot of S. SCOTT MOORE F these causes; they’re just great.” “In the ‘80s, my dad would simply say, ‘You’re helping me tonight. Put on a suit coat,’” Moore said. Hammer price Opening bid Moore also serves great causes through his activity with nonprofit and community Not only had Moore seen many auctions firsthand, he had also occasionally sung and organizations beyond his volunteer work as an auctioneer. He currently serves as the played piano in various venues, so he was able to transfer that stage experience to his chairman for the Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Advisory Board and he serves or earliest auctions. has served many other boards including the Omaha Ethics Alliance, the Strategic Air & Space Museum, Prevent Blindness Nebraska, River City Roundup, Nature Conservancy “I was used to performing in front of people,” he said. “I look at what I do as a performance. of Nebraska, Merrymakers Association, Douglas County Fair and more. I’m actually entertaining the audience.” Moore and his wife, Wendy, have even made their community and nonprofit work a He is referring to more than just his auction chant. Moore has sung “Come Fly with Me” family affair. at a Zoo auction (sharing the stage with humorist Mary Maxwell dressed up as a butterfly), he has sung in a trio for the Nebraska State Bar Association “Barristers’ Ball” “We’ve participated in a lot of fundraisers and my wife and I have chaired events. gala, and he’s played the piano at several other events. He’s put on various costumes for Our three oldest daughters have always been involved helping at events,” he said. many different event themes. The amiable Moore said he’s game for almost anything as The couple is now raising and in the process of adopting Moore’s 10-year-old triplet long as it doesn’t overshadow his duties or take away from the fundraising objective. nieces and 12-year-old nephew, who Moore said will follow suit. “We want our children to understand the importance of community involvement.” “If there’s a theme to the event, I want to be a part of it,” Moore said. “I think the most memorable event that people in Omaha would remember is that one year for the Boys Serving the community as a family is just another legacy of his late father, whose words and Girls Club I shaved my head. And my brother – who is an artist – painted a skull Moore has now taken as his own: “Omaha has always been extremely generous to us tattoo on the back of my head. It was so real, people didn’t know it was me.” and our family, and this is how you can give back: your time, talent and treasure.”

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STORY BY KARA SCHWEISS | PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK KRESL

• mQUARTERLY celebrating 25 years in 2016!

GOING…GOING…gone!


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game CHANGERS

• PRESENTED BY

IN everything THAT I DO, I ALWAYS realize THERE IS SOMEONE’S LIFE, LOVED ONE OR A CHILD AT THE center OF IT. ~ CHRIS LAFEVER PRESIDENT AND CEO NATIONAL PHARMACEUTICAL SERVICES

as president and ceo of national pharmaceutical services, chris lafever is known for outstanding leadership distinguished by compassion, a quality she first started practicing in a much earlier role filling water pitchers, plumping up pillows and fetching personal belongings.

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STORY BY KARA SCHWEISS | PHOTOGRAPHY BY JIM SCHOLZ

• mQUARTERLY celebrating 25 years in 2016!

CHRIS LAFEVER PRESIDENT AND CEO NATIONAL PHARMACEUTICAL SERVICES

PRESENTS game

changers

CHRIS LAFEVER

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game CHANGERS

• PRESENTED BY

2.0 “I WAS A candy striper at Bergan Mercy Hospital for four years,” cHris lafever explained.

People Person

Community Booster

Her concern about the human side of things extends to her interaction with the people she works with as well.

lafever not only touts the talent of the employees of national pharmaceutical services, but also the benefits of her beloved hometown. or as she puts it, “i have never lived anywhere else and i have no desire to live anywhere else.”

“i was tHere every single wednesday after scHool for tHree Hours – Because tHat was tHe “in my business dealings or with my employees, i not only Max you could Be tHere – and i always worked care about the professional development of the person, on tHe pediatric floor. i aBsolutely loved it; i but the person themselves and what is going on with could Help Make soMeone Happy and Make tHeM their personal life,” she said. “anyone can do the technical sMile. tHat kind of led Me to wHere i aM now.” part of things; that’s the easy part. i try and concentrate on the soft side; that’s what matters: keeping the culture in her executive role with omaha-based national good here, the management of people and their pharmaceutical services, a national prescription claims temperaments. those are all very important things (to processor, lafever still emphasizes the need to act with manage) or we will not succeed as a company.” compassion. as she tells the 200 employees she oversees, you never know what life-changing event or health crisis this insight into what makes people tick is a great a particular customer is facing. management asset because it helps lafever find the best fit for every employee, she said. “when somebody calls us, we don’t know what the person on the other end of the line is experiencing,” she said. “i am fortunate to lead over 200 people. in order to keep “they could have just found out they have cancer. they everyone focused and keep everyone happy, i have to find could have just found out that their parent has a disease. people’s strengths. i have learned it is not only important we need to be empathetic; they’re calling us because to have the right people on our proverbial bus, but it is they need help and we need to help them. the healthcare equally important to have those people in the right seats,” field is very challenging and very confusing, and we want she explained. “i have amazing people here. i have the right people, in the right seats on the bus, and the entire the best possible outcome for them. customer service is company’s success is due to them.” critical in what we do.”

“recruiting is hard to begin with, so when you get those people, you want to keep them. and when we’re recruiting nationally, i have to sell them on omaha, too. i can’t sell the city unless i’m involved in the city and i know what’s going on in the city so i can point out all the amazing things that omaha has to offer,” she said. “My business can only be as successful as the community that it’s in, so if we don’t give back to the city we’re in, it undermines the whole base of the city.”

Active Volunteer lafever’s philosophy of being involved in the community is backed by many years of personally stepping up, including service on the board of children’s Hospital, the board of Heartland family service, the omaha symphony guild, the fashion institute Midwest guild, the child saving institute guild, the stephen center guild, opera omaha’s cotillion, and angels among us…to name a few. she’s also passed her community spirit on to her children – a son in his first semester of college at arizona state university and a daughter in her sophomore year at Millard north High school – who were first recruited to assist their mom with activities like stuffing envelopes and now have found and pursued their own volunteer activities. lafever said she’s proud of her children’s inclination toward leadership, but treasures her role as mother and family time above all, especially now that her son and daughter are becoming adults.

I HAVE amazing PEOPLE HERE. I HAVE THE RIGHT PEOPLE, IN THE RIGHT SEATS ON THE BUS, AND THE entire COMPANY’S SUCCESS IS DUE TO them. ~ CHRIS LAFEVER PRESIDENT AND CEO NATIONAL PHARMACEUTICAL SERVICES

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“My kids are my world,” lafever said. she hopes to expand that world to include foster children once she retires. “in everything that i do, i always realize there is someone’s life, loved one or a child at the center of it.” lafever said her success as an executive has been influenced by many factors, from growing up seeing the inner workings of the family business (Bill doran company, a wholesale florist with 19 locations across the country) to learning from good leaders all along the way.

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• mQUARTERLY celebrating 25 years in 2016!

CHRIS LAFEVER EVERY DAY I MAKE A conscientious CHOICE IN ALL THAT I DO TO ENSURE I inspire SOMEONE AROUND ME. This special feature is sponsored by planitomaha.

~ CHRIS LAFEVER PRESIDENT AND CEO NATIONAL PHARMACEUTICAL SERVICES

planitomaha is dedicated to honoring women whose influence not only impacts the boardroom but the community.

“i think the path i’ve had and the experiences i’ve had in other businesses has helped me a great deal. i’ve had great mentors. i’ve been on the board of this company since 1993. so growing up from a small business just starting out in omaha to now employing over 200 people, i’ve seen the changes we’ve made and need to make to be successful. i’ve grown with the company,” she said.

“Welcome to

one of the largest and most prestigious meeting planning firms in the midwest omaha magazine B2B winners since 2008 national, regional and local meetings and events

Evolving Leader lafever added that her willingness to evolve to become a mentor and influencer herself has also helped her navigate her journey to the company’s top leadership position.

nationally recognized as a leader in the meetings & event industry supporting our community through our non-profit work and the boards/organizations we are members of

“we just have a responsibility to teach and to mentor and to inspire, to motivate. if we have the enthusiasm to get people involved, that draws people in. and you have to share that knowledge,” she explained. “i learned early in life the value of community and that you not only need to lead a life that not only demonstrates this is all that you do, but have a passion and commitment for what you do and inspire those around you to challenge conventional beliefs and look for unique or original ways to solve problems and serve others. every day i make a conscientious choice in all that i do to ensure i inspire someone around me. My main goal every day is what i can do to make someone more successful, inspire them, or find a way to help.”

planitomaha has been providing event and meeting management solutions for over 15 years. we are a client-centric firm that provides unmatched service and professionalism. while proudly located in the midwest, our crazy-talented event team works from new york to la and everywhere in the middle. PRESENTS game

changers

CHRIS LAFEVER


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global AWARENESS

STORY BY LEO ADAM BIGA | PHOTOGRAPHY BY STUART CHITTENDEN

stuart chittenden’s magnificent obsession led to an epic road trip… a summer sojourn across the state centered around community and conversation.

LEAVE IT TO AN EX-PAT brit... He says the project was “founded in my belief “My reactions to the state are that it’s remarkably diverse, very historic. There are areas of natural beauty conversation is a way we connect better and form really quite remarkable. Physically the state is an community.” It was also his opportunity to discover intriguing, lovely and delightful place to go and how people across the state talk about community. explore. In terms of the culture, I was surprised by how vibrantly pioneering the west of the state feels. “I was very aware of the supposed divides between rural and urban. Also I wanted to put to the test my beliefs In Scottsbluff several people demonstrated this zest for about conversation to see if it really has that kind of Traveling alone in a rented RV, Stuart Chittenden, 46, self-determination, for sustaining themselves and power or potency.” stopped in urban and rural settings, on main streets coming together as they need to. Billy Estes of the and side streets, in libraries, coffee shops, barber shops, Midwest Theater and others there credit that spirit to Tom Schroeder in Dannebrog told Chittenden how bars, town squares and private homes to chew the fat the legacy of the pioneers. community requires genuine personal, emotional with folks. He shared the fruits of his travels and investment. Community often came up in the sense of conversations across social media via his project “In a more remote community like Valentine it also the safety it offers. Others spoke about community in website, Instagram posts and Twitter tweets. He also means you don’t have any other choice but to fix terms of the appreciation they have for their town. did radio dispatches for KIOS 91.5 FM. things or make things. You do it for yourself or it doesn’t get done. To see that spirit is to really Chittenden made the August 10-September 5 trip for appreciate it. I thought most rural communities would Though Chittenden’s lived in Omaha many years – his project A Couple of 830 Mile Long Conversations. seem somewhat tired – and there are those towns that his wife Amy is a native – the journey was his first real foray across the state with the intention of finding the Nebraska is about 430 miles from east to west but his do appear to be in a position of uncertainty – they heart of things and closely observing and recording purposely meandering, circuitous route nearly don’t know what circumstances are going to do to them. That’s why he opted to follow the road less doubled that distance between Omaha and Scottsbluff. them and so they feel in flux. But then there are those traveled – taking highways and byways rather than other towns that aren’t allowing circumstances to He will be making public presentations about the dictate what happens. They are looking at the available Interstate 80. project across the state this fall. Beyond that, he’s resources they have and managing those things in considering what to do with the 100 hours of recorded ways that make them sustainable.” Making sense of it all interviews he collected. Still fresh from meeting people wherever he found Individuals made their mark, too. them, he’s been weighing what these encounters and The project received an $8,000 Humanities Nebraska dialogues reveal. He says it was only at the end of the grant matched by monies from an online Indie Go-Go “Owen Timothy Hake in St. Paul touched on the trip he began “to formulate some ideas around what Crowd Funding campaign. courage needed in the choice to sit and talk with community means to people.” a stranger.” ...TO TRAVEL NEBRASKA IN SEARCH OF WHAT MAKES COMMUNITY IN THIS MIDWESTERN PLACE. HE DID IT THE OLD-FASHIONED WAY, TOO, BY ENGAGING IN DOZENS OF FACE-TOFACE CONVERSATIONS WITH RESIDENTS ACROSS THE WIDTH AND BREADTH OF THE STATE OVER A MONTH-LONG JOURNEY .

American archetypes

The experience fulfilled a lifelong fascination he’s cultivated with American archetypes. He’s long wanted to see for himself the places and characters who’ve fired his “fertile imagination” about pioneers, cowboys, ranchers, rugged individualists. indigenous cultures and immense open spaces. The project gave him an excuse to “follow the archetypal American adventure to go west.” Not surprisingly, the experience made quite an impression.

“Some of these incipient thoughts around community R. Mark Swanson in Valentine recounted how are that it’s paradoxical,” he says. “I heard a lot of conversation was therapeutic for him in the wake of people talk about things like it’s trusting, it’s his father’s suicide and losing his 16-year-old son. He told Chittenden that stories are “a form of freedom.” supporting each other and it’s feeling safe and not locking your doors, et cetera, and that’s all true. But it didn’t really ever quite get to the heart of the matter. The project was also an extension of work And the more people talked the more other elements Chittenden’s been doing with conversation as a started to come out that suggested to me community is mediation and relationship tool. He wanted as well to a paradox. If you try to create it by saying, ‘I’m going assess the facility of this human communication medium as a means for finding consensus around the to make my neighborhood a good community,’ it’s a idea of community. very difficult thing to do.

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• mQUARTERLY celebrating 25 years in 2016!

STUART CHITTENDEN

THE wayfarer. LEAD PHOTO BY MARK KRESL

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global AWARENESS

Community instead is a deliberate individual choice to behave and do things in ways that invest in something not directly related to you. “It’s a very individual action and it’s a very deliberate choice. The people that are active and altruistic and do something that isn’t selfish – the effect of that is community.”

Not his first rodeo All of this is an extension of a path he’s been on to use conversation as a community building instrument. It started when he first came to Omaha to work as a business development director for David Day Associates, a branding agency he still works at today. “Being new in town required me to network. I found there to be an arid landscape for engagement of a depth beyond one inch and that was not satisfying to me. I didn’t want to be in a new community and establish networking connections that had no merit other than just superficial Nebraska nice. So that was one provocation that led me to desire more meaningful conversations with people. IV BRUMMELS

©COPYRIGHT STUART CHITTENDEN

“The second track is that the more I look around me in Omaha and in communities across the nation I see increasing division and inequality – wrapped up in very casual stereotypes and bigotry to people on the other side of the fence – and I am morally outraged by that situation. I’ve begun to see that my contribution to the better health of our society is just to increase understanding of ‘The Other’ and the way to do that is to engage people in conversation. You don’t have to like them, you don’t have to agree with them, but if you can do anything to increase rapport and understanding, you’ve already taken very bold steps to a more cohesive society.” He felt strongly enough about these things that he and Amy hosted a series of by-invitation-only conversation salon evenings in their mid-town home beginning in 2010. “People would come together and talk about issues without an agenda and move beyond the superficial,” he says.

ANDREA RISING

©COPYRIGHT STUART CHITTENDEN

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That morphed into salons led by similarly-minded creatives. But after two-plus years it got to be more than the couple could handle at home. At Amy’s insistence, he looked long and hard at how much he wanted to continue doing it and the need to take the model out into the world.

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• mQUARTERLY

STUART CHITTENDEN:

“It was something incredibly meaningful and fulfilling for me and therefore I wanted to see if it had merit beyond the personal in our home,” Chittenden says. He then formed Squishtalks, a for-profit platform for conversation-based interventions and experiences he develops and facilitates for organizations, corporations and communities. The 830 Nebraska project amplified everything Squishtalks represents and reinforced what he feels his purpose in life is shaping up to be. “Conversation is not only something of benefit to communities and to individuals but what I’m learning is that it’s my calling.”

To be or not to be

THE wayfarer.

the gas station to ask where the old-timers were. It was that balance between allowing serendipity to reign and if no one came and sat with me for two hours, that’s what happened, that’s how that was meant to be.” At each stop, he says, “...maybe 95 percent of people would acknowledge me warmly or would respond to my greeting warmly. Maybe 2 in 10 would ask what’s going on and then 1 in 10 would sit down. And the reasons why the other people didn’t will remain unknown and I think that’s totally fine.” Wherever he set up with his sign reading “Hello! Please sit and chat with me” he surrendered himself to take whomever fate offered in this intersection of outsider-meets-local. He was not disappointed.

Not soon forgotten

Calling or not, Chittenden felt the project pulling him “The list of people that will stay with me from this in different directions. project and whom I intend to maintain connection is quite long.” “I wrestled [with whether I should] heavily promote the project in the places I was going to or not promote Two unforgettable characters were Lukas Rix and things at all but literally just turn up somewhere totally Mark Kanitz in Wayne. unannounced. The difficulty with over-promotion is “They’re in an open gay partnership in town. They are that what happens is you run the risk of getting a queue of people who want to talk at you and you miss live wires. Very sophisticated, smart, lovely, generous, warm people running a business on main street called other people. People self-select for reasons that Rustic Treasures. They’re very interesting just because perhaps aren’t the reasons you want them to sit down and talk to you. At the other end, if you just roll in and of who they are and the choice they made to be openly gay out in rural America. They talked about how if you don’t tell anybody – I could be sitting around places do make that choice you can never turn it off – you and having no conversations with anybody.” become the barometer of gay issues for everything. He resolved this dilemma by playing it down the We talked about that tension.” middle “so things weren’t contrived but I’d also have Chittenden also heard their disenchantment. people to talk to,” adding, “That was an interesting dance and I don’t know whether it was right or wrong, one could never really know. But I feel as if I struck a “The business success they’ve created there is remarkable yet Lukas spoke of the ambivalence they balance between reaching out to a few interesting people in advance, reaching out to library directors to experience from the Omaha young professional and entrepreneurial scene. That was my first taste of a work with them, and then just showing up. community or group of people doing things that are genuinely interesting but facing the arrogant antipathy “Actually getting on the road, the experience was very of the big urban center because we think it’s all much working out – where do people convene, where irrelevant beyond the city limits.” does anybody convene in any environment for any purpose, where do people go to protest, to celebrate, to He found in college towns like Wayne and Chadron a feel a safe environment for provocative conversation? tension between the campus and town cultures. All of these things were occurring to me.” Early into the experience, he says, “I realized I had to “I was told it’s like the seasons in how the vibrancy of a town ebbs and flows depending upon the student adjust my initial formal plan of just setting up in a public space to put myself into places where people did population. A professor in Wayne made a remark about ‘town and gown’ and that division between convene and often that meant a bar, more likely a faculty-campus life and in-town residents. coffee shop or the donut place and maybe stopping at

FORT ROBINSON

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global AWARENESS

He talked about some of those differences and how these groups could do better to maybe be more integrated. In Chadron they call it the 10th Street Divide.” There were characters and then there were characters.

Characters “A guy called Butch Blecher in Neligh had a lot to say for himself between chain-smoking and chewing tobacco and telling me about how he’s in poor health. I was just across main street photographing something and he was on the other side in his wheelchair when he called out to me and I went across and sat down on the pavement for an hour-and-a-half while he talked about everything and anything.

WAYNE MILLS

©COPYRIGHT STUART CHITTENDEN

“It was all storytelling. He interjected a tone of casual prejudice around Latinos being illegal immigrants and criminals and in the same conversation went on to talk about how much he liked a lady called Maria he bonded with. He let her get things from his garden and she cooked exquisite homemade Mexican meals for him. He was sad when she had to abruptly leave because she was illegal. “It was fascinating to hear someone move from casual stereotypes into personal stories that defied those stereotypes.” Chittenden says the exchange reminded him “we’re always informed in some way by our circumstances and it takes a lot of thought to step outside ourselves and recognize that must be true of everybody,” adding, “It’s difficult to judge people unless you get a sense of the landscape in which their lives and viewpoints were formed.” In Alliance, Chittenden found a story of transformation and redemption in Native American Edison Red Nest III.

JOHN NELSON, MIKE HOCHSTETTER AND RUSSELL POWERS

©COPYRIGHT STUART CHITTENDEN

30

“He spoke powerfully and with brutal candor about the hope of his upbringing, the potential for success and how it all fell off the rails. He started doing drugs, dealing drugs, robbing places. He found himself in a Tecumseh state correctional facility. He came out of jail, cleaned up and found himself again because Native American elders reintroduced a pride in his culture. He is now working in the community to help Native American children perceive the richness of their history and culture.”

mQUARTERLY • NOV/DEC/JAN 2015/16


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• mQUARTERLY

STUART CHITTENDEN:

THE wayfarer.

More Characters Near Bayard, Chittenden got a guided tour of Chimney Rock from his ride, Gordon Howard. “He’s by his own description a curmudgeonly S.O.B. and that’s exactly what he is. He put me in his truck, smoked his cigars and told me his stories as he drove up remnants of the Oregon Trail. Then we sat outside the rock for awhile.” In Valentine, Chittenden was taken with Episcopal preacher R. Mark Swanson. “He impressed me with his philosophical take on community and life and how people adjust to hardships. Swanson’s had his share of hardships and Chittenden says “he’s ministered to people who have experienced difficulties.” “Mark and his wife Margaret were living up on the Rosebud Reservation. She was a teacher at one of the schools. He just struck me by how sensitive he is to relationships people form between themselves. There was an intelligence borne of ministering to hundreds if not thousands of people over his lifetime that just made me feel very warmly about him.

TOM AND ALEISHA BRAGG

©COPYRIGHT STUART CHITTENDEN

“He spoke very intelligently about the nature of the church and community and ministering and how people relate.” In Loomis Tama Sundquist runs a convenience storediner called Mrs. T’s that Chittenden found charming. “I roll in and I’m chatting with the two girls at the counter and then Tama comes over and like any good proprietor she is all chit-chat and wanting to know what’s going on. She and her family race these small go-carts all around the region. She’s incredibly bubbly and has a lot of smarts about her. She’s the kind of person that fills a room up. She had plenty to say about the nature of the town. I asked her what community is and she joked, ‘It’s a group of people too poor to leave.’ But I did have that impression of Loomis.” The snob in him initially discounted having lunch there but the aroma, sight and sound of that day’s sizzling steak special won him over. “This was the best steak I have had for a long time. It was fantastic.”

EDISON RED NEST III

©COPYRIGHT STUART CHITTENDEN

CONTINUED


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global AWARENESS

In Dannebrog, where all things are Danish, his visit to the bakery reminded him of an Irish pub. The old cronies enjoying coffee and dunkers there – John Nelson, Mike Hochstetter and Russell Powers – welcomed the stranger with good-natured ribbing, “These guys were so funny with their bantering and joking. Russell told how he had been confused by a tourist for Roger Welsch (Dannebrog’s most famous citizen for his best-selling books), so he just played it up and persisted in being Roger Welsch. “John had had some surgery and never spoke, he just smiled, kicked his legs and gestured. Incredibly endearing the way he responded – the physicality of his presence so affirming.

SCOTTSBLUFF

©COPYRIGHT STUART CHITTENDEN

“Mike is like 6-foot-7. He’s gigantic. He just seemed to be the epitome of everything I think about as the pioneering immigrant Scandinavian farmer – just from his look, his size, his poise. He wasn’t verbose but what he said was not wasted words. He was smart and intelligent with what he had to say. Like many other people I asked what community means and he just opened his big arms and warmly gestured, saying, ‘It’s what you see here.’ It was this idea that here’s this community place where people can come and talk about anything they want to. “The money’s on the counter, non-molested. No one’s going to steal. People pay what they should pay. You’re welcome anytime.” Chittenden, who shaves his head, needed a shape-up at one point and got it from Chadron barber Don Dotson, whom he says is in “the great mold of barbers” as philosophers, psychologists and pundits. “Don talked about community in somewhat predictable terms in the sense of this being a rightsized community, people know each other, that sort of thing. But he also warmly reflected on the fact that as one of only two barbers where Chadron once had more than 20 his place is now an even more important venue for community. “He made it clear I was welcome to stay as long as I wanted to chat with him and the guys in there.” One of those guys, Phil Cary, is a Chadron State College math professor.

RIVERSIDE PARK

©COPYRIGHT STUART CHITTENDEN

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“He came down to Chadron because he wanted a place he felt was the right environment to raise his boys.

mQUARTERLY • NOV/DEC/JAN 2015/16


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• mQUARTERLY

STUART CHITTENDEN:

THE wayfarer.

I’VE BEGUN TO SEE THAT MY CONTRIBUTION…IS JUST TO INCREASE UNDERSTANDING OF ‘the other’ AND… TO ENGAGE PEOPLE IN conversation. YOU DON’T HAVE TO LIKE THEM… [OR] AGREE WITH THEM, BUT IF YOU…

make the connection!

INCREASE rapport AND UNDERSTANDING, YOU’VE ALREADY TAKEN VERY bold STEPS TO A MORE cohesive SOCIETY.

See the extended, enhanced and expanded version of this article online in our Digital Edition, featuring additional photos & content

Since they’ve grown and left he’s come to love the community and doesn’t want to leave.” Not everyone Chittenden met and spoke with wanted to be recorded. One of those who declined was 83year-old Dee from Broken Bow . “She asked if I wanted to see a photo of the barn her father had built. I replied yes. She returned with a box. She was showing me some old photos and at one point her eyes lit up and, pointing at one photo, she said, ‘I remember!’ Dee then looked at me and said, ‘Perhaps it is a good thing you are here.’ We talked for threeand-a-half hours.” Two of the three African-Americans he spoke to for the project – the paucity of blacks in greater Nebraska dismayed him – declined to be recorded. He surmised they didn’t want to go on the record about the spontaneous dialogue tocuhing on what it’s like being black in a state where they are such a decided minority.

~ STUART CHITTENDEN

Reflections Between the 830-mile jaunt and various detours and side trips along the way, Chittenden logged 1,902 miles. The only formal route he followed was from Omaha to Scottsbluff. Everything else, including the return trip, was “random and digressive.” “I had roughly mapped out the trip beforehand. On the road I used Google Maps and asked people for suggestions.” He managed getting lost just once and then for only a brief while. He avoided any traffic tickets. But he did contend with some mechanical problems in the form of a bum water heater and various closet snafus that stops at a repair shop and a Menards, respectively, afforded the necessary – if temporary – fixes.

He slept every night away aboard the RV. In terms of lessons learned or affirmed, he says, in order to engage in conversation “you have to be willing to be vulnerable. If you don’t present yourself, you can’t expect other people to do this. If you approach any environment with a sincere openness and willingness to appreciate someone else’s voice, then the door opens.” In the end, he may have found out more about himself than anything. “I don’t ascribe things to a divine hand. But if I’m going to make meaning from my life and think the net result of my being here was positive, then maybe conversation is the gift or the tool or the challenge I have before me to make this a meaningful existence.”

Mother Nature spared him any weather extremes. An enduring sight after a rainstorm was “a delightful double rainbow on my last night out at the westernmost point of the trip in Scottsbluff.”

For more about his project, visit http://830nebraska.com/.


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non profit SPOTLIGHT

jacobs’ place transitional living celebrates 20 years of changing – and saving – lives in 2015. it’s one of a very few programs of its kind in the region.

TRINITY. LANDON. MICHAELA. TRE. SADE. CHRIS. many Names oN a piece of paper to maNy – but to others, youNg meN aNd womeN eager for a better life aNd sometimes a secoNd chaNce. fortunately, because of the foresight and passion of a former omaha home for boys board member, there’s been a place for the past 20 years where young men and women like landon and sade can find sanctuary and a new beginning. when youth “age out” of foster care or experience stress that can lead to homelessness or even probation, they face challenges in life other teenagers with stable families often don’t. studies show once young men and women leave foster care or experience financial hardship or a lack of housing, they face greater challenges and risks to their success than other youth. Jacobs’ place provides the services and opportunities to help these and other at-risk youth face and often conquer these challenges. “being at Jacobs’ place has taught me a lot about budgeting and has given me a chance at a new start,” said trinity, who recently graduated from the Jacobs’ place program and now works full time and lives in her own apartment.

care about you,” chris said. “i not only learned about budgeting my money but managing my time and learning to live independently. i know i wouldn’t be where i am right now if it wasn’t for Jacobs’ place.”

A Valuable Community Resource Jacobs’ place serves the community as a valuable resource for young men and women ages 17-20 who struggle with a lack of housing, support, education and independent living skills because of multiple out-ofhome placements.

residents do not pay utilities, giving them the opportunity to get a strong start toward a stable, successful future. youth receive medical, dental and vision checkups, as well as mental health and substance abuse treatment and therapy. transitional living assistants, specialists, a coordinator and program manager are available 24/7 to support youth anytime, anywhere if they are having a problem, need to talk or are facing a crisis.

“our program is set up to help these young men and women – many who are coming out of foster care and it was established in 1995 and named after former omaha are homeless after aging out of the system – and helping them break down their dreams into sizable bites home for boys board member, pat Jacobs, who had the so they can accomplish them,” said brandy gustoff, vision for the program years later and helped fund it manager of transition services at Jacobs’ place and the through gifts bequeathed in his will following his death. omaha home for boys. a two-building apartment complex was purchased in the “we aim to empower our residents to see their individual 48th and cuming area. housing up to nine young men progress in small increments so it doesn’t feel and as many young woman at capacity, more than 500 youth have been served over the past 20 years by Jacobs’ overwhelming or daunting. they can see themselves succeeding along the way.” place. shortly after purchase, the buildings and grounds were remodeled and updated for program youth.

Transitioning To Success

“Jacobs’ place is the key to getting off on the right foot for many young adults in the community, and many times, they come from the home’s residential care program as a next step in a continuum of care,” said home president “before coming here, i didn’t know how to handle or save and ceo Jeff moran. “this program serves as a model for others interested in helping lift young men and women money and i wouldn’t have been able to manage living during a trying, critical time in their lives.” on my own. Now, i feel i have the skills and confidence because of my time at Jacobs’ place.” the program provides skills-based structure, safe chris and older brother, tre, both recently graduated from environment and caring staff to help young women and men move toward independence. residents have access the program, credit Jacobs’ place staff for teaching them to the 4,000-square-foot combs learning center and a the life skills to successfully transition to independence. skills-based curriculum to assist youth with completing or continuing their education as well as job training and chris recently earned his cdl license, and the two are living together and forging their own path toward living other assistance. the center was made possible by a generous gift from carol combs, a longtime supporter of and functioning on their own. the home and descendant of one of its founders. “everyone at Jp really becomes your surrogate parents what makes Jacobs’ place unique and special are the while you’re here – and even after you leave if you care enough to keep in touch,” said tre, who started as a boy in opportunities offered through this life-changing program. the home’s [we890=residential care program before transitioning to Jacobs’ place after high school graduation. after a resident’s first month of employment, rent is established and set for the remainder of his or her stay. “they really help you by talking out your problems and let upon completion of the program, 80 percent of the total rent paid may be returned. you know that there are people out there who really do

34

mQUARTERLY •

the transitional living program’s core components include specialists assigned to each youth to assist them in developing and implementing an “independency plan;” employment training and support with housing, food and essentials; community life skills curriculum, including resume writing, job search and interviewing skills; job placement assistance and work-to-train program; college planning and scholarship assistance; and aftercare network. if they admit to the program without their high school diploma, specialists work with them to gain their diploma or ged, plan for college and apply for scholarships and assist them in finding community – among many other things. last winter, gustoff attended the alliance leadership conference and learned about the transition to successtm program, which teaches a model of care that frames and treats poverty as a disease and is designed to move impoverished youth, families and adults to economic self-sufficiency. gustoff, as well as the home’s branching out independent living program manager, tierra o’Neal,

NOV/DEC/JAN 2015/16


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STORY BY MIKE WATKINS | PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF OMAHA HOME FOR BOYS

• mQUARTERLY celebrating 25 years in 2016!

OMAHA HOME FOR BOYS jacobs’ place became certified tts trainers and have already implemented the program’s principles and practices into their curriculum. “it’s really been a short time that we started using tts, and we’re already seeing a positive change in our youth,” said gustoff, who earned her m.s. degree in human services from bellevue university and is working toward her master’s in public administration. “we rewrote our program in 2013 to better serve our youth as well as the organization, but tts is an evidence-based model that truly treats the condition of poverty.” the program works toward changing outcomes by using a self-sufficiency matrix that measures financial literacy, health care and volunteerism. “tts helps youth map out their dreams and is transparent for both the program and the youth involved,” gustoff said. “this has allowed our staff to learn much more about the kids entering our program – and it also allows the young people coming in to know more about what we offer, too.”

Independence is the Goal once in the program, each program participant works with staff to create a personalized independent living plan. this plan includes goals, objectives, methods and outcomes identified for residents through a youthdirected and staff-guided exercise. youth track their plan along with their transitional living specialist throughout their time there. youth receive free, independent living training and learn skills necessary for success such as cooking, how to build a resume, dressing for an interview, college planning, health and wellness and how to find a safe apartment. once they complete the program, Jacobs’ place staff refers graduates to another omaha home for boys program – branching out® independent living. Jacobs’ place and branching out staff works in concert to help youth find safe and affordable housing in the community. through this continuum of care, youth are able to receive continued support and access other financial assistance as they need to sustain a successful, independent future. “people ask me if i have kids, and i often tell them, ‘yes, i have 18-plus on any given day,’” gustoff said. “it’s tremendously rewarding to work with these young people and know that i, along with our staff, make a difference in their lives every day. that’s why we’re here.” transitioning to independence

OMAHA HOME FOR BOYS JACOBS’ PLACE


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spotlight on

• MEN’S HEALTH & AGING

NuMale • Man to Man

TRANSFORMING LIVES AND RELATIONSHIPS

It’s a man’s world at Omaha’s NuMale Medical Center – and that’s not just referring to the clinic’s all-male staff or its focus on men’s health issues like sexual dysfunction, low testosterone and hair loss. Every detail of the atmosphere and operations of NuMale is optimized for masculine sensibilities, owner Chuck Sederstrom explained. First of all, respect is paramount: “Nobody sits in a waiting room,” he said. “We immediately escort you into a private exam room.” Also, clients communicate with a single point person for service coordination and follow-up, so there’s no complicated tangle of phone calls and emails just to make an appointment or get a question or concern addressed.

MOST OF OUR PATIENTS ARE VERY, VERY RELIEVED THAT THEY HAVE FINALLY FOUND A TREATMENT THAT [ADDRESSES THEIR NEEDS]. MANY…THOUGHT THERE WAS NO HOPE OUT THERE.

For instance, certain patients may qualify and benefit from the NuMale Eros Procedure, a rejuvenation option that uses the body’s own platelet-rich Fibrin Matrix (PRFM) to improve the health and vitality of the penis. “In today’s world it’s not about 60, or 70, or 75-year-old guys wanting to reproduce,” Sederstrom said. “But for a lot of those guys, they’re at the peak of their lives. Why should they not be able to still have a very active sexual life?” Another common issue men experience after age 30 (and sometimes sooner) is low testosterone, which can be exacerbated by underlying health conditions or caused by age alone. The symptoms are wide-ranging, from decreased muscle tone and increased fat storage to loss of libido, diminished energy and even depression or irritability. NuMale can diagnose low testosterone and offer a precise, customized treatment to help patients feel younger, stronger and healthier. “We look at all the key features to what could be causing this. So not only are we treating erectile dysfunction or premature ejaculation, we are also treating the issues that are actually causing them, the hormonal imbalance,” Patient Counselor Justin Streff explained. “We really take an approach where the provider tailors to what the patient needs; every treatment is customized exactly for that patient.”

~ JOHN OLIN, PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT Another feature that appeals to male clientele is the presence of lab facilities on site, which means getting concrete information from blood panels without delay. And best of all? The center offers the latest and finest treatments, with fast results. “We’re proud of the fact that we have the most cutting-edge procedures; all FDAapproved science and medicine,” Sederstrom said. Sederstrom opened the Omaha NuMale Medical Center – located in Regency – in partnership with Medical Director Dr. Christopher Asandra, a nationally recognized expert in men’s health and anti-aging and the founder of NuMale, along with similarly respected Dr. Carlos Feliciano. “Over three years ago I started a journey that was intended to bring to Omaha a premier, state-of-the-art medical clinic focused on men’s health. Nothing like this had existed prior to that time,” Sederstrom explained. “It’s one of the most fulfilling things I’ve ever done, because of the men’s lives that we’ve changed; and not just the men, but their relationships. And so it is not only a much-needed facility for specific men’s issues, but also one that understands the unique dynamic of men’s health. We know that this [addresses the needs of a huge group].”

For men of all ages It’s not just men of a certain age who seek the services of the clinic, Sederstrom emphasized. NuMale offers the NeoGraft Hair Transplant System, the first FDA-approved automated hair transplant device utilizing the FUE (follicular unit extraction) method. FUE minimizes the possibility of scarring, bleeding or nerve damage associated with other methods. NuMale also offers treatment options for premature ejaculation (PE), which can affect men of any age and lead to intimacy problems with a man’s partner as well as psychological distress. Another treatment area for men both young and older is medical weight loss that considers multiple male factors. Even when a problem is affecting their quality of life, men tend to hesitate when faced with health issues, especially those of a sexual nature, Olin said. “But the sooner you look for options for treatment, the sooner you’ll experience a healthier lifestyle and healthier relationships,” he explained. “Most of our patients are very, very relieved that they have finally found a treatment that can improve whatever it is they are seeking treatment for. [Many men] may have thought there was no hope out there.” Even patients who’ve undergone treatment in the past can find new and better options at NuMale, Streff added.

Feel like your young self again One common problem NuMale Medical Center specializes in treating is erectile dysfunction (ED). The clinic is able to treat ED successfully in more than 98 percent of cases, but treatments are very individualized depending on what factors are involved. “Just about everything is affected by age. With ED, there are a lot of comorbidities that affect it like diabetes, hypertension and high cholesterol, but even a healthy male will have some hardening and narrowing of the arteries that are just age-related,” Physician Assistant John Olin, PA-C, said. “But there are treatments out there available to help diminish age-related changes.” 36

“Sometimes you just need to take the first step in saying, ‘I want to change and want to get better.’ Once a man hears that NuMale ad, they say, ‘I wonder if something better is out there?’ And they seek a better treatment and results than what they’ve had in the past,” Streff said. “Sometimes patients will have some skepticism on whether or not we can do what we say we can do, and when we do a test dose with them they say, ‘Holy smokes, this really works!’” For more information, visit http://omaha.numalemedical.com/ or call the clinic at (402) 507-4717. mQUARTERLY • NOV/DEC/JAN 2015/16


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STORY BY KARA SCHWEISS | PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK KRESL

• mQUARTERLY celebrating 25 years in 2016!

DANIEL ESPINOZA, ROBERT RANDOF, JOHN OLIN, JUSTIN STREFF AND MICHAEL JOYCE


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KMTV MORNING BLEND’S

SHE SAID

mike & mary Who is Your VIP? Your Very Inspiring Person?

~ Mike DiGiacomo His ...

Hers ... ~ Mary Nelson

The movie Rocky was a 1970s classic. The film, centered on a small-time boxer who goes the distance for his self-respect, continues to inspire and motivate athletes. But it’s not the “storyline” that has had a major impact on my life. Listen closely, and you may hear it.

I was a few years into my time at Eastern Kentucky University – studying broadcast news and political science. A media law professor talked to our class one day about an opportunity with the Legislative Research Commission.

The theme song, “Gonna Fly Now”, topped the charts, and a jazz version landed in the top 30 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1977. I can hear the song now, performed by legendary jazz trumpeter Maynard Ferguson.

The LRC is expressly non-partisan. Its resources are available to elected officials and all citizens of the commonwealth. I applied for and was accepted into the LRC’s internship program. Neutrality was the name of the game. You were required to check your political beliefs at the door.

While many people point to presidents, teachers or mentors, my inspiration growing up was Ferguson. It may sound trivial, considering all of the important people who have guided me throughout my life.

But it was hard for a young woman who was convinced she knew it all. Enter: Sheila Mason.

I first picked up a trumpet as a toddler, and started taking “real” lessons in elementary school. Maynard Ferguson was who I aspired to be. I always wanted to be better than him – those screaming high notes, his melodic tone.

She has worked for the LRC for 35 years. Early on, I realized there was something extraordinary about Sheila. She could listen, and hear you, better than anyone I’d ever met. Sheila challenged me. When I’d take a hard line on an issue, she encouraged empathy. If she felt like I was getting soft – she would light a fire under my tail. There was a constant push and pull.

In 1991, my senior year at Central High School, we hosted Ferguson and his band at his show in Omaha. He was well known for putting on clinics across the country for young musicians. I got to know him somewhat, and even sat with him briefly for dinner.

We not only stayed in touch after that semester in Frankfort, but Sheila became a very dear friend. She has been an incredible advisor on my best and worst days.

It’s amazing how one person can inspire you to work hard, never give up and to reach your goals. The thing is, his influence went beyond music. And, when you become inspired, you can do almost anything – just ask Rocky.

There’s not an aspect of who I am today that Sheila didn’t influence. By example, she inspired me to be a better friend, a better daughter, a better citizen… a better human.

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holiday GIFT GUIDE

dish up indulgence Looking for that one perfect gift that will make this holiday season memorable? Surprise them with an unforgettable gift in that signature silver box and burgundy ribbon. These Geometric Diamond Pavé Earrings will add a modern twist to any wardrobe. Available in 14 karat yellow, white, or rose gold. Retail Price: $460 Borsheims Price: $310 BORSHEIMS FINE JEWELRY AND GIFTS Regency Court • 120 Regency Parkway, Omaha | borsheims.com I 800.642.GIFT

21st century gift-giving! Grillbots are going to be the must have gift this holiday season for those who don’t care to clean up after grilling. It’s also great for those who are difficult to buy for, and makes the perfect novelty gift for just about anyone! Just charge it up, push a button and close the grill and it will be clean before you know it. Available in Nebraska Red or Fashionable Black. Grillbots sell for $125.00. PERIWINKLES Village Pointe Shopping Center, Omaha | 402.289.0975 Bel-Air Plaza • 120th & Center, Omaha | 402.916.4789

ruby & diamond ring 18 karat white gold Ruby and Diamond Ring set with a natural 4 carat emerald cut ruby and over 1.25 carat total weight in diamonds. Exclusively at Gunderson’s, Village Pointe. GUNDERSON’S Village Pointe • 402.935.6332 | www.gundersons.com

fab holiday fashion Looking to update your personal style, or just need a few pieces to spice up your seasonal wardrobe? Bliss Boutique delivers an unexpected mix of casual chic basics to sophisticated holiday glam. Our collections are hand-selected by our owners with style, comfort and fit in mind. All at moderate boutique prices. Let the experienced stylists at Bliss help you to look and feel your best this holiday season! BLISS BOUTIQUE | Bel-Air Plaza • 12100 W. Center Rd. #607, Omaha 402.991.3595 | facebook.com/BlissBoutiqueOmaha

curb service! Tired of the shopping mall hassle? Shop local this season. Lewis Art Gallery has gifts to fit your list. Park at the door! Omaha’s largest art gallery offers an extensive selection of art, accessories, lamps, mirrors and more. Take advantage of our affordable one-week custom framing. Hours: M-F 9-6 and Sat. 9-3 LEWIS ART GALLERY 8600 Cass St. (86th & Dodge) Omaha • 402.391.7733 | www.lewisartgallery.com

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MARY E. VANDENACK Mary Vandenack, while a lawyer by profession, has studied extensively in mind/body areas of fitness and wellness. She is Yoga Alliance RYT-200, Power Pilates certified and ACE certified.

mindfulness: JUST THE beginning “THE PRESENT MOMENT IS FILLED WITH JOY AND HAPPINESS. IF YOU ARE ATTENTIVE, YOU WILL SEE IT.” ~ Thích Nhất Hạnh Jon Kabat-Zinn’s definition of mindfulness is “paying attention in a particular way; on purpose, in the present moment, and nonjudgmentally.” The Buddhist definition of mindfulness is “awareness.” As a long time yogi, I have studied a reasonable amount on the Buddhist definition of mindfulness as well as some of the roots of that tradition. Most recently, I have become a student of mindfulness as presented in mindfulness-based stress reduction programs. I am particularly studying the work of Jon Kabat-Zinn and note that some of the concepts presented herein are based on such studies. I also note that the underlying aspects of mindfulness, whether of origin in Eastern traditions or Western medicine, have similarities in approach and effect. Regardless of the background of the mindfulness concept, research is supporting that incorporating mindfulness into one’s life correlates to wellbeing and health. An aspect of mindfulness practice acknowledges that pain in life is inevitable but that suffering is optional. In mindfulness-based stress reduction programs, some participants are better able to manage chronic pain or illness using mindfulness techniques. Additionally, there is success with depression, anxiety and other mental illness.

Paying Attention. Mindfulness practice cultivates the ability to simply notice. Recently, I was discussing movement practice with a fellow yoga instructor. She was talking about mindfulness and stated: “I was quite frustrated in teaching my class this week as I was trying to get my students to be mindful about noticing the engagement of their serratus anterior in this particular pose.” While listening to that, I gained a deeper understanding of simply paying attention. Mindfulness in yoga isn’t trying to force yourself into a particular pose in a certain manner. Rather, mindfulness would be a matter of simply noticing and becoming aware of your body as you seek a pose. If you really tune in to your body, you may not need to know what the rhomboid is but you will simply know that moving your arms differently will make the pose work for you. Non-Judging. In mindfulness practice, we become an impartial witness to our own experience. In the beginning of mindfulness practice, we often find that we have runaway thoughts with judgment attached thereto. The judgment may be of others but is often self-judgment and the self-judgment is often hypercritical.

By way of example of the optional nature of suffering, assume that you just bought a new kayak and you join your friend James to go kayaking. James indicates he knows how to load the kayaks on top of your car but while doing so, he breaks the windshield of your two-month-old Lexus.

Beginner’s Mind. In mindfulness practice, we want to see things as they are right now. In a beginner’s mind, everything is new and fresh. In a beginner’s mind, there is possibility. A mindfulness practice notices that about us just as it is right now without attaching judgment from prior experience. Finding a beginner’s mind can remove us from being stuck in the way we see things.

Having your windshield broken in this manner may invoke “pain” in that it is inconvenient, frustrating and an unexpected expense. Additionally, you didn’t even get to the lake to go kayaking, so your desires for the day have been frustrated. Where you have a choice is to acknowledge and accept the frustration and inconvenience or to go into an autopilot tirade of injury to yourself and James over the event: “I knew I shouldn’t have trusted James to load the kayak. The guy is such an idiot! I am never doing anything with James again. What was I thinking? I’m an idiot!” Perhaps you go so far as to call James an idiot, threaten horrible things if he doesn’t fix your Lexus immediately, and impose your frustration on him.

A Beginning Mindfulness Practice. For a very simple attempt at mindfulness practice, find a quiet spot where you can sit or lie down comfortably. (Avoid being so comfortable that you will fall asleep.) Set the timer on your smartphone for five minutes. Close your eyes and focus on your breath for the entirety of the five minutes. Thoughts will show up. Each time you find yourself shifting attention to the thoughts that are floating through, gently remind yourself to return to noticing your breath.

Even for five minutes, it can be difficult to focus only on your breath. An experienced practitioner in mindfulness would note the thoughts and Thoughts can be like unruly children and the judgment that attaches to not react rather than going into an autopilot of reactive thinking and actions. them can be quick reactions. Further down the road, there are strategies to That is, mindfulness involves non-reaction to inner experience rather than practice related to the thoughts and even feelings but the starting point is reaction. the simple focus on the breath. 41

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omaha giving

• OMAHA COMMUNITY FOUNDATION

BUILDING giving WITH YOUR giving WITH YOUR family There is nothing more important than the time we spend with the ones we love. Nothing more precious than the memories we create together. A natural way to extend this time is to give together as a family. When families spend time together giving, the quality of the time itself changes. Coming together to give means coming together to share experiences and charitable passions.

The individual values are merged together and the most common are chosen as the family’s strongest values. With the combination of the vision and values and a bit of wordsmithing, a family mission statement begins to emerge.

For parents of younger children, it’s a way to instill generosity and responsibility. For older children, it’s an opportunity to express their identity, to assert themselves in the family dynamic. And for extended families, it’s an opportunity to spend time together doing something that engages everyone.

The mission statement is a tool for the family to use as they identify causes and organizations to support, ensuring that their collective giving aligns with the mindset of the entire family. It is important that each family recognize its own culture and realize that differences will arise. Setting guidelines at the beginning will help you to prevent some unnecessary conflict and transition through any challenges or changes that happen within your family.

Each family as well as each individual has their own unique set of experiences that shape their choices and their giving strategies. Giving together requires finding common ground; something everyone can rally around. But when families begin the process of giving together, it can be a daunting task to put structure around their giving, values and expected outcomes. Some of the most successful giving strategies have come from the collective defining of the family’s mission, vision and values. The creation of a mission statement is appropriate for families that give at any level and frequency. The process begins with the identification of the vision of each family member and the family as a whole. This would include answering questions around areas of benefit, expected outcomes and duration of impact. The vision creates the platform that supports the family giving structure. The process continues with the navigation of a large pool of defined values, each family member selecting a small number that fit their personalities and daily lives.

42

matt darling, CAP®

Remembering why you choose to give as a family and recognizing the rewards that it brings will help to keep your family focused on making a difference. Use this opportunity to learn from each other and grow as a family. The shared experience will bring you closer. There's no telling what your family can accomplish – both for the community and for yourselves. You'll find your family’s unique character will express itself through your giving. Your charitable acts quickly become traditions, and an ongoing way for you to connect on life's blessings and what matters most. For more information, contact us at (402) 342-3458 or www.omahafoundation.org. Matt Darling, CAP®, Vice President of Donor Services at Omaha Community Foundation

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serving all

• YMCA OF GREATER OMAHA

BUILDING giving WITH YOUR 150 years OF THE Y YMCA of Greater Omaha’s roots in the Omaha metropolitan area are woven into the fabric of the community. Founded in 1866 by a Union Pacific employee, the Y first began its impact on the Omaha area as a place to serve young Christian men working on the transcontinental railroad. Since then, the YMCA of Greater Omaha has grown to be a leader in providing first experiences to families, individuals and youth for 150 years. With 10 locations in the Omaha area, spanning four counties in two states, the YMCA of Greater Omaha works to strengthen communities by offering programs and services in three focus areas: youth development, healthy living and social responsibility. For 150 years, we’ve strived to understand our community needs, providing services and programs that cater specifically to the issues our children, families and neighborhoods face. Through crucial partnerships with over 150 not-for-profit agencies, schools and organizations, we continue to work hard to reach as many people as possible to make a lasting difference. Today, the Y provides a variety of programs that support educational achievement, alternatives to teen violence, health/wellness, chronic disease intervention, child care, summer day camp, water safety, refugee assimilation, homework help, special needs integration and family programs.

Additionally, the Y is open to all people regardless of their ability to pay for programs and services, and as a result we provide over $1,000,000 of financial assistance each year. By investing in our kids, our health and our neighbors, the YMCA of Greater Omaha ensures that everyone, regardless of age, income or background, has the opportunity to thrive—thereby strengthening our community. The Strong Communities Campaign is the YMCA of Greater Omaha’s annual campaign to ensure that everyone has the opportunity to succeed. Your meaningful gift to the campaign goes directly toward providing financial assistance for those in our community who wouldn’t otherwise have access to Y programs and facilities. With the help of the Strong Communities Campaign, we are able to provide over $1.3 million in financial assistance throughout our 10 locations. In 2016, the YMCA of Greater Omaha plans to honor our milestone year by celebrating 150 Years of Providing First in 2016. This year-long commemoration will increase public awareness about programs at the YMCA and how they strengthen communities through youth development, healthy living and social responsibility. Some events surrounding the celebration will include activities that engage the community through YMCA branches, a historical overview of the Y at the Durham Museum and an end-of-year gala. YMCA of Greater Omaha | 430 S. 20th Street Omaha, NE 68102 402-341-1600 • www.metroymca.org

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planning matters

• WITH HVW LAW

mandatory restatement OF PRE-APPROVED RETIREMENT PLANS

Sponsors of defined contribution plans (such as 410(k) plans and profit sharing plans) using a plan document which has been pre-approved by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) must restate their retirement plans in full by April 30, 2016. Plan sponsors that do not restate their plans by the deadline risk disqualification of their plans or potentially costly corrective actions. Why Are Restatements Required? Retirement plans must be restated every 5 or 6 years depending on whether the plan is an “individually designed plan” or plan that has been pre-approved by the IRS. Currently, it is estimated that more than 80% of all defined contribution plans use a pre-approved document. Regular restatements are required in order to update the plan to comply with current law. Each of these 5-6 year periods is called a remedial amendment cycle. The

current remedial amendment cycle is for The Pension Protection Act of 2006 (PPA). In addition to plans being restated periodically, employers must also adopt various interim amendments in between restatement periods. joshua a. diveley Retirement plan documents that have not been pre-approved by the IRS are called “individually designed plans” or “IDPs”. IDPs are required to be restated every five years. Restatement deadlines for IDPs are staggered over the fiveyear restatement period based on the last digit of the employer identification number (EIN) of the employer adopting the plan. The deadline for adoption of the PPA restatement for individually designed plans ranges from January 31, 2012 to January 31, 2016. For example, employers with a 5 or 0 as the last digit of their EIN must restate for PPA no later than January 31, 2016. In contrast, all employers adopting preapproved plan documents share a common deadline for restatement. Pre-approved plan documents were last restated for The Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001 (EGTRRA). EGTRRA restatements were required for pre-approved plans on or before April 30, 2010. PPA restatements for pre-approved plans are ongoing currently and must be completed by no later than April 30, 2016. What’s Included In the Current Restatement? The PPA restatement permanently incorporates various amendments that took place due to change in law since the EGTRRA restatement, including: • • • • • •

The Pension Protection Act of 2006 Issuance of final section 415 regulations The Heroes Earnings Assistance and Relief Tax Act (HEART) The Worker, Retiree, and Employer Recovery Act (WRERA) The Katrina Emergency Tax Relief Act of 2005 (KETRA) The Gulf Opportunity Zone Act of 2005 (GOZone)

What If An Employer Fails to Restate or Adopt Necessary Amendments? If a qualified retirement plan is not restated by the applicable deadline or required interim amendments are not adopted, the plan document will not be in compliant with current law and could result in disqualification of the plan or the need to submit the plan for correction with the IRS under its Voluntary Correction Program (VCP). The VCP can be costly and requires payment of a compliance fee. Current compliance fees for VCP submissions range from $300 to up to $25,000, and the fee may be increased in cases involving egregious failures requiring use of the VCP.

For more information visit www.hvwlawyers.com

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todays savings

impact!

• SWARTZBAUGH-FARBER & ASSOCIATES, INC.

WHY YOU SHOULD want TO PAY FOR

ARE WE

there yet?

• YOUR DENTAL HEALTH

david baumann

FOR ANYONE

on a family vacation, at some point there inevitably is one question voiced by an individual in the back seat: “Are we there yet?” You can almost hear the lack of enthusiasm/patience in the voice the closer you get to the destination. My Dad made us look at the road map so we would have a better understanding of where we were going and what path we were taking to get there. That way, when we asked, “Are we there yet?” Dad would tell us to “Check the map!”These days, technology allows you to plug in your destination, receive multiple choices of routes to help you reach your destination and avoid the attempts to fold that crazy map. For business owners, farmers and entrepreneurs, a similar question may come to mind: “When can I retire?” a.k.a. “Are we there yet?” Like a road trip, you can choose from several routes on the map. Many questions need to be addressed, What are we doing with our business? Who are the potential buyers? What is a good price evaluation? Am I liquid enough? Do I have the right planning in place? What are my capital gains or estate taxes going to look like? And these are just a few of the items you need to review. One option to address a number of these concerns is a more advanced planning vehicle called Premium Financed Life Insurance. In order for businesses and high-net-worth individuals to continue to grow and protect their wealth, they may need to take advantage of leverage and actively look for investment opportunities that can potentially yield returns greater than the cost of capital. Life insurance can address inheritance, business and estate tax issues and provide tax deferred growth while being a very tax efficient income supplement in retirement. Premium Financed life insurance is not free insurance and is not without some risk. The insurance premium is typically paid by a bank. The owner of the policy pays interest back to the bank annually, and a smaller portion of net assets are collateralized to the bank until loan repayment. It is an efficient tool to reduce the out-of-pocket expenses related to purchasing higher, more significant life insurance planning. For the owner of the policy, it offers the potential to keep more of their money working for them in either the business or other investments of their choice. Family businesses account for 50% of the gross domestic product and are responsible for 60% of the nation’s employment. Despite those great numbers, family-owned businesses face difficult challenges and hurdles. One of the most difficult on the list is generational transition. Premium financing can incorporate a well-rounded strategy without having to liquidate a portion of the business to help support the next generation. It incorporates a multi-purpose design by offering death benefit protection, wealth accumulation and tax efficiencies. What is the best route for you to take? Does this planning make sense for you? We don’t know, but we would be happy to look at your road map, your financial strategy, and identify if Premium Financing is a viable solution. So…”Are we there yet?” Not yet, but we are getting closer. For more information, please contact your trusted advisor at Swartzbaugh-Farber – ‘Client Centered – Client Advocates™’. This material is intended for informational purposes only and should not be construed as legal or tax advice and is not intended to replace the advice of a qualified attorney, tax advisor or plan provider. Securities Offered through M Holdings Securities, Inc., a Registered Broker Dealer, Member FINRA/SIPC. Swartzbaugh-Farber & Associates, Inc. is independently owned and operated.

dental care

stephanie vondrak d.d.s.

AS THE TIME draws near to “sign up” for 2016

dental plans…the importance of this article is clear: Why you should want to pay for your dental care. My answer: “Maintain your freedom of choice! “ As individuals we choose who cuts our hair, where we buy groceries, what clothes we wear and what cars we drive. We make these choices based on personal values. Some choose fancy cars and cheap haircuts. Others desire name-brand clothing and generic cheese. The point is that as Americans…we get to choose. Dental insurance plans, network provider plans, and corporate-owned dental offices choose for us. Restrictions are placed on the patient and on the dentist. They limit the dentist’s choice of materials, like silver mercury (almost universally regarded in the profession as less effective and less healthy) versus white composite fillings. They dictate when a filling (less expensive copay) is “acceptable” verses a crown (more expensive copay). Insurance and network providers change the rules frequently and without warning, reimbursing the provider (the dentist) and the patient for pennies on the dollar. Dentists bound by these plans are obligated to treat as many patients as possible as rapidly as possible to cover expenses and maintain profitability of their practices. Corporate dentistry, masked behind large lush offices, operates in a similar manor. These offices, often owned by hedge fund managers – as opposed to health-care providers – dictate the same procedural limitations found in network provider plans but also require that their employees (the dentists) fulfill quotas based on strict production directives like “x” crowns per month or day. This volume based, corporate model of “the more dentistry completed (or paid for by insurance) the better” is not found in the oath we take as doctors. It is simply not possible for these plans and corporations to consider your longterm, individual health. By design, they consider the bottom line before any specific dental needs. But remember, you have a choice. As a patient, you can choose your dentist based on care, skill and judgement. You can weigh the costs and benefits of a network provider plan verses the care you wish to receive. You can choose what is right for you. As a health-centered dentist, I am among those in the profession who are committed to long-term solutions according to individual dental needs. We spend time with our patients and give them the opportunity to choose how and when their dentistry is completed. Don’t misunderstand, we still honor insurance benefits and provide financial assistance but our decisions are based on specific circumstances rather than an insurance mandate. By maintaining our freedom of choice, we have the opportunity to treat one patient at a time, use the materials we deem best and offer both short-term and long-term dental solutions. We are a small, tight-knit, highly educated team of dental professionals. As an example: our office is cozy and comfortable, a living room-like setting designed for individualized care. By understanding the connection between excellent dental health and overall systemic health, the relationships we have with our patients and the range of services we provide offer a clear alternative to the latest assembly-line approach to general dentistry. The choice is yours. Who do you trust with your dental future? *Look for our ad in this issue of mQUARTERLY Dr. Stephanie Vondrak has been treating TMJ and head and neck pain in her private practice for over 10 years. She has completed Residency and earned Fellowship status with the American Academy of Crainofacial Pain. She is also Board Certified by the American Academy of Craniofacial Dental Sleep Medicine and the American Academy of Facial Esthetics

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coronation KEEPSAKES

AKSARBEN HoNoRS JoHN “JAcK” KoRAlESKi AS 119th monarch AlmoSt fifty yEARS AftER REcEiviNg AN AKSARBEN collEgE ScHolARSHip, JoHN “JAcK” KoRAlESKi will SERvE AS tHE 119tH KiNg of AKSARBEN ANd HElp RAiSE ScHolARSHip dollARS foR HuNdREdS of NEBRASKA ANd wEStERN iowA StudENtS. A true business leader in the omaha community, Koraleski was honored for his achievements at the AKSARBEN coronation and Scholarship Ball on october 17, 2015, at the new Baxter Arena at the university of Nebraska at omaha. A crowd of nearly 2,000 attendees witnessed the crowning of Koraleski as the 119th King of AKSARBEN. the event also included the formal introduction of the 2015 court of Quivira, which once again honored over 200 Heartland families and proudly introduced 50 Horatio Alger Scholarship recipients and 175 career scholars. Koraleski, who has worked at union pacific since graduating from uNo in 1972, was named executive chairman of the board of directors for union pacific corporation on february 5, 2015. previously, he had been elected chairman in march 2014, and named president and chief executive officer of the corporation in march 2012. After a successful and storied career at union pacific, Koraleski officially retired last month on September 30. Since joining the railroad, Koraleski had served in a number of senior leadership roles, including controller of union pacific corporation, executive vice presidentmarketing and Sales and executive vice presidentfinance and information technology for union pacific Railroad which also included responsibility for the Real Estate and Administrative departments. Koraleski is an omaha native who graduated from Archbishop Ryan High School where he met his wife, the former Stephanie Scholtes. He attended the university of Nebraska at omaha, as an AKSARBEN scholar, where he graduated with an undergraduate business degree in 1972, and a masters degree in Business Administration in 1981.

Koraleski is a member of the Board of Heritage Services, Koraleski has been recognized for his professional and community activities: the Stratcom consultation committee, and the Board of trustees of lauritzen gardens. He is a former chairman and current member the uNo college of • Institutional Investors 2015 Best CEO for Airfreight & Business National Advisory Board, a trustee of the Surface Transportation university of Nebraska foundation, and an honorary • UNO College of Business Distinguished Alumni Award trustee of creighton university. He is also on the Board • The ICAN Tim Rouse 2009 Advocate for Women in of trustees of the Business Ethics Alliance. Leadership Award Koraleski is an honorary member of the board of directors of the Nebraska methodist Hospital, as well as the Nebraska methodist Hospital foundation and serves on the advisory board of the women's center for Advancement. in addition to his position at union pacific, Koraleski has also served as past chairman of the Board of Bridges investment fund, chairman of the Board of the Association of America Railroads, a Board member of the ferromex Railroad in mexico, and the treasure and member of the Executive committee of the American institute for managing diversity in Atlanta, georgia.

• UNO Citation for Alumni Achievement • Methodist Hospital F. E. Borchers Award for Community Service • Komen Pink Tie Guy in addition, Jack and Stephanie were honored as uNo lucas Society members and also received the inclusive communities Humanitarian Award.

Koraleski and Stephanie have been married for 43 years and have four children: Andy, chris, Jeff and catie. catie was a part of this year’s Royal court, serving as a princess. Stephanie is cEo of A time to Heal foundation and is in private practice in psychology and spiritual mentoring. She is co-chairman of the Nebraska Breast cancer control plan healthy lifestyles task force and serves on the advisory council of the Nebraska Breast cancer control plan. She serves on the boards of wings of Hope, duchesne Academy and the omaha chapter of the American cancer Society. the Koraleski’s have been active in the community throughout the years, chairing and co-chairing a variety of charitable events: community Alliance “Breaking the Silence”; durham museum Sentimental Journey; Black Student catholic Scholarship fund; latino catholic Scholarship fund; franciscan monastery of St. clare fundraiser; American Heart Association’s Heartwalk; catholic charities’ 85th Anniversary celebration; and, past community wide fund drives for the wcA (formerly the ywcA).

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• mQUARTERLY celebrating 25 years in 2016!

AKSARBEN coRoNAtioN BAll 2015

supporting scholarship

PHOTOS COURTESY OF DWYER PHOTOGRAPHY supporting scholarship

AKSARBEN CORONATION BALL CXIX

CONTINUED


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coronation KEEPSAKES

AKSARBEN HoNoRS KRoEgER fAmily tHE KRoEgER fAmily of omAHA, NEBRASKA, wAS HoNoREd foR tHEiR civic lEAdERSHip ANd commuNity SERvicE oN octoBER 17, 2015, duRiNg tHE ANNuAl AKSARBEN coRoNAtioN ANd ScHolARSHip BAll At tHE NEw BAxtER ARENA At tHE uNivERSity of NEBRASKA At omAHA. terry and Jacqueline “Jackie” Kroeger’s daughter, molly Rose, was crowned the 119th Queen of AKSARBEN. A crowd of nearly 2,000 attendees witnessed the crowning of molly as the 119th Queen of AKSARBEN. the event also included the formal introduction of the 2015 court of Quivira, which honored over 200 Heartland families and proudly introduced 50 Horatio Alger Scholarship recipients and 175 career scholars. the new queen expects to obtain a nursing degree from xavier university next spring. molly is on the xavier university swim team and was selected to be a part of the 2014-15 and 2013-2014 Big EASt All-Academic team. molly was a part of the 2013-2014 All Big EASt team where she and her team won a silver medal in the 400 free Relay and a bronze medal in the 200 free Relay. the Kroeger’s service has been honored by AKSARBEN over the last decade. molly was a page in 2001. Her siblings were pages as well — Jake in 2009, Ellie in 2004 and maggie in 2003. Her father, terry, is a governor of the Knights of AKSARBEN. Kroeger is the president and chief Executive officer of BH media group, a subsidiary of Berkshire Hathaway. Kroeger is also the publisher of the omaha world-Herald, Nebraska’s largest daily newspaper. Kroeger is a native of omaha and a graduate of the university of Nebraskalincoln, with a degree in finance and economics.

PHOTO COURTESY OF DWYER PHOTOGRAPHY

48

He has been with the omaha world-Herald company for over 30 years, starting as assistant purchasing agent and property manager in 1985. from 1986 -1989 he was Business manager at the company owned Kearney Hub. in 1991, he was named director of community Newspaper operations.

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• mQUARTERLY

witH queen honor from 1994 - 1998, he served as publisher of the Record in Stockton, california. He was named vice president of the omaha world-Herald company and joined its board of directors in 1996. in 1999, he returned to omaha to lead the construction of the world-Herald’s freedom center production facility. He became president and chief operating officer of the company in 2005, becoming chief Executive officer in 2008. Kroeger serves on the Board of directors of westside community Schools foundation, the omaha Symphony, creighton university, the united way of the midlands, the greater omaha chamber of commerce and on the Strategic command consultation committee. He is the chair of the Board of the children’s Scholarship fund of omaha. Kroeger also serves on the Board of directors of the Associated press and the Newspaper Association of America. the princess’s mother, the former Jacqueline pfeifer, is past president of the vocal music parents Association and Swim parents Association at westside High. She is co-founder of the omaha conservatory of music’s “Big gig” fundraiser. She is a former president of the Swanson Elementary School community club and a longtime youth volleyball coach. the Kroegers are the current chairs of the tocqueville Society of the united way of the midlands.

supporting scholarship

AKSARBEN CORONATION BALL CXIX

CONTINUED


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coronation KEEPSAKES

AKSARBEN coRoNAtioN BAll 2015

HORATIO ALGER SCHOLARS MISS BETHANY G. ABERLE franklin public High School Franklin, NE

MISS ALYIAH R. FRANCIS Stanton community School Stanton, NE

MR. TYRELL E. LOPEZ papillion-lavista High School LaVista, NE

MISS JAYME C. TRAINER david city High School Linwood, NE

MISS APRIL M. BAYER west point Jr/Sr High School West Point, NE

MISS MAKAELA C. FRANZEN gothenburg public High School Gothenburg, NE

MISS SONOOR J. MAJID lincoln High School Lincoln, NE

MISS TAYLOR T. VASA Arthur county High School Keystone, NE

MR. JOSEPH A. BEACOM wisner pilger Jr/Sr High School Wisner, NE

MISS ERIKA M. GARCIA omaha South High School Omaha, NE

MISS JANE E. MATTINGLY david city High School David City, NE

MISS RADIOUS WALKER-WOODS lincoln Northeast High School Lincoln, NE

MISS JADE A. BOTTGER wayne High School Laurel, NE

MISS CHEYENNE M. GIBBONS Norfolk Senior High School Norfolk, NE

MR. JOSEPH J. NASH omaha North High magnet School Omaha, NE

MISS MAEKAYLA H. WARD lawrence/Nelson community School Nelson, NE

MR. DAVID H. BROWN creighton prep High School Omaha, NE

MISS SELENA M. GONZALEZ west point Jr/Sr High School West Point, NE

MR. ETHAN E. NELSON Home School clearing House Dalton, NE

MISS AWA YOUM lincoln North Star High School Lincoln, NE

MR. TRISTAN BRUCE franklin public High School Franklin, NE

MISS BOBBY J. HANSEN west point Jr/Sr High School West Point, NE

MISS KATIE C. ODVODY crete High School Wilber, NE

MISS CAITLYNN J. CHAPMAN thomas Jefferson High School Council Bluffs, IA

MISS KRISTY L. HANSEN west point Jr/Sr High School West Point, NE

MISS MARIE K. PALMER corning High School Corning, IA

MISS RACHAEL L. COLE Southern High School Wymore, NE

MR. MUSTAFA HASAN lincoln Northeast High School Lincoln, NE

MR. JONAH W. PETERSON central city High School Central City, NE

MISS JENNIFER J. DAVIS fremont Senior High School Fremont, NE

MR. FABRICIO HERNANDEZ Bryan High School Bellevue, NE

MISS CORINNE V. PETERSON millard North High School Omaha, NE

MISS BAILEY M. DESHONG Riverside High School Oakland, IA

MISS ALAYNAH M. HYBERG ogallala High School Ogallala, NE

MISS SARA RAMIREZ washington High School Cherokee, IA

MISS EMELY G. DIAZ omaha South High School Bellevue, NE

MISS MELISSA J. JECH gordon-Rushville High School Rushville, NE

MISS ABRIL RANGEL-PACHECO omaha South High School Omaha, NE

MR. TIMOTHY T. EAVES Bryan High School Omaha, NE

MR. ZACHARY S. JORDENING falls city High School Falls City, NE

MR. DONALD SAW Northwest High School Omaha, NE

MR. RODGER B. FARR medicine valley public School Curtis, NE

MISS KAYLA A. KIRCHHOFF griswold High School Lewis, IA

MISS NAYELI SERRANO omaha South High School Omaha, NE

MISS CARRIE M. FELDMANN Battle creek High School Meadow Grove, NE

MR. CALAN G. KOCH millard west High School Omaha, NE

MISS ALLISON N. STEWART Sutherland High School Sutherland, NE

MISS ANNA FLORES crete High School Crete, NE

MISS TAYLYN R. LAWRENCE North Star High School Lincoln, NE

MR. ZACHARY SUTTON Kearney High School Kearney, NE

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• mQUARTERLY

AKSARBEN coRoNAtioN BAll 2015

CAREER CONNECTORS SCHOLARS

Y

VANTONIO AGUIRRE Omaha, NE KAELI ALLEN Omaha, NE WENDY ALLEN Omaha, NE MARISSA ALSIDEZ Omaha, NE DOROTHY-JEAN ALSTON Omaha, NE MELISSA AMARILLAS Omaha, NE LUCAS ANSON Omaha, NE CODY AVALOS Omaha, NE VIKTORIANNE BARNES Omaha, NE CORIN BARNETT Bellevue, NE GARY BRENDEN Bellevue, NE CHEQUILIA BROWN Omaha, NE JALYNN BROWN Omaha, NE JASMILLA BROWN Omaha, NE SCHUYLER BROWN Bellevue, NE OSVALDO BUGARIN Bellevue, NE LEONDRA BURLEY Omaha, NE TREVON BURNS Omaha, NE JADYN CASE Omaha, NE JONATHAN CASTELAN Omaha, NE ALAN CHAVEZ La Vista, NE BRANDON CHEEK Bellevue, NE SHELBY CHRISMAN Omaha, NE LATRICIA CLARK Omaha, NE KALIE-MAE CODY Valley, NE QUINTON CROSS Omaha, NE COLLIN CROUCH Omaha, NE AYELE DALMEIDA La Vista, NE ABBIGAIL DAVEY Ralston, NE ADRIAN DIAZ Omaha, NE MARVIN DIAZ Bellevue, NE SANTIAGO DIEGO Omaha, NE

KASIE EARNEST Omaha, NE CHARLITA EDMONSON Omaha, NE HUGO ELIZONDO RUIZ Omaha, NE MONROE (TREY) EVANS Omaha, NE ANTHONY FAST-HORSE Omaha, NE TRE FAUBION Ralston, NE MARLEN FERNANDEZ RAMIREZ Omaha, NE ANA FRANCISCO Omaha, NE ALYSSA FRITZ Omaha, NE PABLO GALLARDO GARCIA Omaha, NE JENNIFER GALVAN Omaha, NE KAYTLYNN GANTNER Omaha, NE KRYSTLE GANTNER Omaha, NE MARTHA GARCIA Omaha, NE MARIA DE LA LUZ GARCIA ALVARADO Omaha, NE CHASE GIBSON Omaha, NE NICOLE GOMEZ Ralston, NE JESSICA GONZALEZ Omaha, NE BRYAN GRAFFT Bellevue, NE ZAFIRO GUDINO Bellevue, NE BROOKE GUTE Ralston, NE ADOLFO GUTIERREZ Omaha, NE DAMETRAH GUTIERREZ Omaha, NE RACHEL HAMILTON Bennington, NE MAIGAN HANNER Papillion, NE AMANDA HANSEN Ralston, NE LUIS HARO Omaha, NE LENZEL HAYES-BROWN Omaha, NE ANTONIO HEATON Bellevue, NE KAI-JAHN HENRY Omaha, NE TRISTON HERING Omaha, NE

HECTOR HERNANDEZ Omaha, NE KARLA HERNANDEZ Omaha, NE MARTIN HERNANDEZ Omaha, NE RUTH HILL Omaha, NE LEAANN ELIZABETH HILLIARD Omaha, NE RANEIQUA HOVEY Omaha, NE TUCKER HOWARD Ralston, NE JENNIFER INTERIANO Omaha, NE EMMANUEL ISSOUNGA Omaha, NE PAIGE JACOBSEN Omaha, NE JAMIE JOHNSON Omaha, NE LAUREN JOHNSON Omaha, NE DIEGO JUAREZ Omaha, NE QUENTEL JUELFS-HILL Ralston, NE TYLER KASPER Omaha, NE EXTACY KEERAN Omaha, NE ALEX KENT Omaha, NE BRYCE KOCH Omaha, NE SAVANNA LAWLESS Omaha, NE SUI THA LIAN Omaha, NE ZACKARIE LINDERMAN Ralston, NE ROMAN LONG Omaha, NE ISABELLA LOPEZ Omaha, NE MORGAN MANTHE Omaha, NE DANIEL MARTINEZ Omaha, NE GENESIS MARTINEZ-NUNEZ Omaha, NE ALEXANDER MATTHEWS Omaha, NE ALEXIS MCCOY Omaha, NE JOSHUA MICKOW Omaha, NE CHAD MILLER Omaha, NE NATALYA MILLER Omaha, NE YWA DOE MOE Omaha, NE

supporting scholarship

EDUARDO MONTES Bellevue, NE MELISSA MONTES Bellevue, NE SHENTAVIONE MOORE Omaha, NE RYAN MORRIS Omaha, NE AQUIL MUHAMMAD Omaha, NE EDUARDO MUNOZ Omaha, NE JALEN MURPHY Omaha, NE ZURRI MURRELL Omaha, NE ROYALE MUSE Omaha, NE DAVID NAVARRO Bellevue, NE KATHY NAVARRO VALLIN Omaha, NE ASYA NELSON Omaha, NE EVAN NEWBURY Omaha, NE ANA OCHOA Omaha, NE CHRISTINE OLVERA Omaha, NE ARTURO OROZCO-MERCADO, JR. Omaha, NE DONTE PACKETT Omaha, NE DIANA PALACIOS Omaha, NE CONNOR PATTON Bellevue, NE JAVIER PEREZ-ARRENDONDO Omaha, NE OLIVIA PIKE Omaha, NE BREANNA POLLOCK Omaha, NE TERRANCE PRATER Omaha, NE YVES (EVE) QUIAH Omaha, NE LEANDRO RAMIREZ-SILVA Omaha, NE DANIEL RANDOLPH Omaha, NE SU REH Omaha, NE OMAR RIVERA MONREAL Omaha, NE HECTOR RODRIGUEZ Omaha, NE JESUS RODRIGUEZ LOPEZ Omaha, NE ANGELICA ROJAS Bellevue, NE

AKSARBEN CORONATION BALL CXIX

ZITLALY ROMERO Omaha, NE ALEXIS SANCHEZ Bellevue, NE CODY DYLAN SIMPSON Omaha, NE TY'LESHA SKIPPER Omaha, NE CHRISTIN SMITH Omaha, NE HAYLEY STEVENS Omaha, NE AUTUMN SULENTIC Omaha, NE ZACHARY SUMMERS Omaha, NE CIERRA TAYLOR Omaha, NE AARON TERRAZAS Bellevue, NE KRISTIN THOMPSON La Vista, NE CARMELO TORRES Omaha, NE MYAHA TOVAR Omaha, NE ELAM TURNER Omaha, NE JEFFERY TUZZIO Bellevue, NE LAQUISHA VALENTINE Omaha, NE MASON VANDALSEM Gretna, NE ALEXANDER VARGAS Omaha, NE BREANNA VILLARREAL Omaha, NE KAYLEA WALKER Omaha, NE CLAYTON WALL Omaha, NE ALEXANDRA WATSON Omaha, NE ADAYSHIA WATTS Omaha, NE TYLER WHITE Omaha, NE PAUL HARRISON WISE Elkhorn, NE CHOUDIER WOL Omaha, NE BAYLEE WORTMAN Omaha, NE RAYMOND WRIGHT Ralston, NE TAYLOR WRIGHT Omaha, NE SHANTEE ZAMORA Omaha, NE LANA ZELLMER Omaha, NE

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coronation KEEPSAKES

AKSARBEN coRoNAtioN BAll 2015

COURT OF HONOR tHE couRt of HoNoR iS oNE of tHE AKSARBEN fouNdAtioN’S moSt pREStigiouS AwARdS. tHE REcogNitioN iS givEN ANNuAlly to iNdividuAlS wHo HAvE ExcEllEd iN oNE of tHE followiNg cAtEgoRiES: AgRicultuRE, ARtS, BuSiNESS ANd iNduStRy, commuNity SERvicE, EducAtioN, pHilANtHRopy, pRofESSioNS, puBlic SERvicE, SpoRtS oR youtH.

THE 2015 HONOREES: Carl Mammel (Philanthropy) co-founder of SilverStone group

Sue Morris (Professions) president of Heritage Services

Jeff Raikes (Business) co-founder of the Raikes foundation; former cEo of the Bill & melinda gates foundation; former president of the microsoft Business division

Thomas Wilkins (Arts)

Carl Mammel (Philanthropy)

Sue Morris (Professions)

carl mammel graduated in 1955 with his Bachelors degree from the college of Business Administration at the university of Nebraska-lincoln. As a student, he was affiliated with Beta theta pi.

As president of Heritage Services since 1995, Sue morris has been involved with numerous capital campaigns, totaling over $550 million, including the $75 million capital and endowment campaign supporting Joslyn Art museum and the durham museum, the development of the $107 million Holland performing Arts center, td Ameritrade park to host the college world Series and, most recently, doSpace – a new digital library scheduled to open in November of 2015.

He founded mammel, Schropp, Swartzbaugh, Engler and Jones, inc in 1959. their consulting firm provided services in executive benefits, employee benefits planning, and wealth transfer planning. in 1991 the firm merged with the Redland group, which is now SilverStone group. He still sits on the board of SilverStone group. carl is also a member of the Salvation Army Advisory Board, children’s Hospital Advisory Board, and member of the board for the omaha performing Arts Society, minnesota lakes maritime museum, Kaneko, and for the university of Nebraska foundation, and a trustee for lauritzen gardens. He is a past board member of the omaha Symphony and the omaha community foundation, where he served as chairman. carl is a retired member of m financial Holdings.

music director of the omaha Symphony orchestra the contributions to the community of these individuals were celebrated at the AKSARBEN coronation and Scholarship Ball on october 17, 2015, at the uNo/community Arena.

carl has two daughters, Ann Balusek and Nancy mammel and a son, Jim, and three grandchildren.

the AKSARBEN coronation and Scholarship Ball, which now funds two key Heartland scholarship programs, has a mission of promoting, recognizing and celebrating volunteerism, philanthropy and community pride.

in addition, morris was part of the visioning and fund raising team for the community/uNo hockey arena, partnering with the university of Nebraska foundation. Although morris is widely recognized for her ability to raise money, her skills include conducting feasibility studies, financing and project management. morris has implemented new educational programs, unique to the fundraising community, providing training to over 75 fundraising professionals, as well as assisting Boards of directors. She is currently a member of the durham museum Board of directors. morris fulfills leadership roles in the christian church (disciples of christ) denomination, locally, regionally and nationally. She served as chairman of the Board of directors for the denomination’s pension fund, overseeing retirement investment funds for nearly 13,000 clergy and lay employees. in 2017 she will be installed as the denomination’s moderator at its general Assembly in indianapolis. She has also been a member of the Board of trustees for phillips theological Seminary in tulsa, oklahoma. Sue morris is a graduate of wayne State college with a degree in music. prior to Heritage Services she held positions with the omaha world-Herald, college of Saint mary and Nebraska medical center.

the Ball is a fundraising vehicle for two AKSARBEN college scholarship funds, the long-standing 4-year program, called the AKSARBEN Scholars program and operated in partnership with the Horatio Alger foundation and teammates, and the new 2-year community college program, called the AKSARBEN Scholars career connectors program, that will fund 1,000 scholarships at community colleges once the program is fully realized. AKSARBEN foundation scholarship programs have generated $10 million in philanthropy in the past decade and the foundation events have generated $200 million in direct economic impact. for more information log on to www.aksarben.org.

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• mQUARTERLY

supporting scholarship PHOTOS COURTESY OF DWYER PHOTOGRAPHY

Jeff Raikes (Business)

Thomas Wilkins (Arts)

Jeff Raikes is the former chief executive officer of the Bill & melinda gates foundation, where he led the foundation’s efforts to promote equity for all people around the world. during his more than five years there, Jeff set strategic priorities, oversaw significant growth of the organization, and facilitated relationships with key partners. in 2011 he was named the puget Sound Business Journal’s Executive of the year.

thomas wilkins is music director of the omaha Symphony, a position he has held since 2005. last fall, he renewed his contract with the omaha Symphony through the 2017/2018 season. Since 2011 he has served as principal guest conductor of the Hollywood Bowl orchestra. this past spring, he was promoted to principal conductor. He also holds the germeshausen family and youth concert conductor chair with the Boston Symphony. past positions have included resident conductor of the detroit Symphony and florida orchestra (tampa Bay), and associate conductor of the Richmond (vA) Symphony. He also has  served on the music faculties of North park university (chicago), the university of tennessee in chattanooga, and virginia commonwealth university in Richmond. 

with his wife, tricia, Jeff now co-leads the Raikes foundation, which they founded in 2002 with a mission to empower young people to transform their lives. Based in Seattle, the Raikes foundation’s priorities are preventing and ending youth homelessness in King county; improving the quality of after school programs in washington State; and helping students across the country develop “student agency” - the academic mindsets and learning strategies that have been demonstrated to advance achievement. Jeff and tricia have committed to significantly increase the foundation's grant-making capacity over the next decade. Before joining the gates foundation, Jeff was a member of microsoft's senior leadership team, which sets overall strategy and direction for the company. Jeff was president of the microsoft Business division and oversaw the information worker, Server & tools Business and microsoft Business Solutions groups. He previously served as group vice president of the worldwide Sales and Support group, where he was responsible for providing strategic leadership for microsoft's sales, marketing, and service initiatives. Before that, he served as senior vice president of microsoft North America. Jeff, a Nebraska native, holds a Bachelor of Science degree in engineering-economic systems from Stanford university. He and his wife, tricia, have three children. in addition to being founders of the Raikes foundation they are also active members of the united way of King county, where they served as cochairs of the 2006-2007 fundraising campaign. in June 2008, the Board of Regents at the university of Nebraska-lincoln renamed the J.d. Edwards Honors program in computer Science and management to the Jeffrey S. Raikes School of computer Science and management. A longtime supporter of the highly selective and renowned school, Jeff was a part of the initial conceptualization and has served on the advisory board since its inception in 2001.

CARL MAMMEL

following his highly successful first season with the Boston Symphony, the Boston globe named him among the “Best people and ideas of 2011.” in 2014, wilkins received the prestigious “outstanding Artist” award at the Nebraska governor’s Arts Awards, for his significant contribution to music in the state. during his conducting career, he has led orchestras throughout the united States, including the cleveland orchestra, the Atlanta Symphony, the Rochester philharmonic, the cincinnati Symphony, the dallas Symphony, the Houston Symphony, the Buffalo philharmonic, the Baltimore Symphony, the utah Symphony, and the National Symphony in washington, d.c., to name a few. His commitment to community has been demonstrated by his participation on several boards of directors, including the greater omaha chamber of commerce, the charles drew Health center (omaha), the center Against Spouse Abuse in tampa Bay, and the museum of fine Arts as well as the Academy preparatory center both in St. petersburg, fl. currently he serves as chairman of the board for the Raymond James charitable Endowment fund and as national ambassador for the non-profit world pediatric project headquartered in Richmond, vA, which provides children throughout central America and the caribbean with critical surgical and diagnostic care.

SUE MORRIS

JEFF RAIKES

A native of Norfolk, vA, thomas wilkins is a graduate of the Shenandoah conservatory of music and the New England conservatory of music in Boston. He resides with his wife Sheri-lee in omaha.  they are the proud parents of twin daughters, Erica and Nicole.

supporting scholarship

THOMAS WILKINS AKSARBEN CORONATION BALL CXIX

CONTINUED


PHOTOS-AKSARBEN-1115_- 10/20/15 5:32 PM Page 54

PRE-BALL

reception

TOM, MARY AND CHRISTI JANSSEN

aksarben coronation ball

CAROLINE, ZACHARY, ANNE AND MATT JETTER

MICHELLE KORALESKI, SAMANTHA KORALESKI, JESSIE KORALESKI, OLIVIA HERSHISER AND MARGARET HERSHISER

GAIL YANNEY, WALTER SCOTT, SUE MORRIS AND MIKE YANNEY

FIRST LADY SUSANNE SHORE AND GOVERNOR PETE RICKETTS

SARAH AND SEAN MOYLAN WITH PATRICK AND ADRIENNE FAY

DAVID, STEPHANIE AND LIZZY VONDRAK

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| cxix • supporting scholarship

MICHAEL ALBINO AND MARY VANDENACK

DELL AND PHYLLIS TOBBEN WITH JUDY BATES AND BEVERLY AND DR. HAL MAURER

DARREN, RAE AND LOGAN ZANARDI

REECE WATANABE, MIKE WALDRON, ANNIE BRADFORD AND CORA WATANABE

DR. JOE AND MAYOR JEAN STOTHERT

KYLE AND MIKE ROBINO

supporting scholarship

AKSARBEN CORONATION BALL CXIX

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAN FLANIGAN

DICK HOLLAND, ANDY HOLLAND AND MARIAN LEARY

CHRIS AND PATTY KIRCHER

KENNY AND MAKAYLA MCMORRIS


PHOTOS-AKSARBEN-1115_- 10/20/15 5:34 PM Page 56

PRE-BALL

reception

TARA ARNOLD, TABITHA THRASHER AND TAYLOR KERSCHKE

aksarben coronation ball

CHRISTI WATSON, SARAH LIVINGSTON AND ELIZABETH SIMPSON

ANDREW WAHL WITH CINDY AND DOMINIC VACCARO

LORI SAJEVIC, SARA RAHN, ELIZABETH SAJEVIC AND BROOKE SAJEVIC 56

MARC WISDOM, MICHAEL HOCH, MARK CARLSON AND ANTHONY PASTERNAK

KIM AND STACEY HORD

JOHN AND ANDREA MARSHALL

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| cxix • supporting scholarship

AK

ANNIKA AND STEPHEN GEORGE

JONO BRADFORD AND GINA MCDEVITT WITH KATE AND DAN PARKER

BETSY OBERMOLLER, NICK RANSLEM, STEPHANIE HARLAN, KARI MILFORD AND TONY TERP

JIM AND KELLIE MURPHY WITH MELANIE AND JEFF HOFFMANN

DIDN’T SEE your photo? CONNECTING OUR COMMUNITY

make the connection!

people. parties. passion. purpose.

See DOZENS more photo pages in our expanded version of this keepsake feature online in our Expanded Digital Edition! Browse through HUNDREDS of AKSARBEN CXIX photos available for purchase or download at our online Photo Store: http://metroscene.zenfolio.com/ supporting scholarship

AKSARBEN CORONATION BALL CXIX

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAN FLANIGAN

CRAIG AND KATIE CHRISTENSON WITH DR. DAVID STEARNES

JONO BRADFORD, CLARK LAURITZEN, MICHAEL MCDEVITT AND CHASE SUTTON


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PRE-BALL

reception

MIKE AND TERRI DUNLAP WITH CATHI PANKONIN

aksarben coronation ball

DOUG AND MELISSA HEGARTY, PATRICK AND CARLY TURNER AND JAMI AND DRU HEIDEMANN

TODD AND DEB SCHUITEMAN WITH JACKIE AND GREER ALMQUIST

58

KARI MILFORD AND TONY TERP

KATE AND BRAD GRABILL

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| cxix • supporting scholarship

ADAM SIMPSON AND JOSH LIVINGSTON WITH MARK AND CHRISTINA OSTRONIC

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAN FLANIGAN

DAVE MCCONNELL FAMILY

JUDY AND PAUL TAMISIEA

FAHEY FAMILY

RIZZUTO, SCHNEIDER AND GILLILAND FAMILIES

KAREN SUNDELL, STEPHANIE MURPHY, ANDEE SCIOLI AND KIM BANAT

TRACI AND TIM HARRISON supporting scholarship

AKSARBEN CORONATION BALL CXIX

ALLISON OSTDIEK, KARLIE NELSON, DAVID OSTDIEK, ERIC NELSON AND AMY OSTDIEK

CLAIRE WILSON, ZANE WATANABE AND VICTORIA LIAKOS

LISA GRAVELLE, ANDEE SCIOLI AND CARRIE JENKINS


PHOTOS-AKSARBEN-1115_- 10/20/15 5:38 PM Page 60

PRE-BALL

reception

aksarben coronation ball

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAN FLANIGAN

MEG DODGE, RUTH ANN EHM AND COURTNEY HELLMAN

JAMES JOHNSON AND JENNIFER KATZ

ANTHONY AND ANDEE SCIOLI

BEVERLY WHITE AND MICHELLE FRANCIS

ASHLEY DIECKMAN AND JORDAN PETERSON

ROB AND JENNIFER ZATECHKA

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62-95-SCENE-1115_EVENTS 10/15/15 12:59 PM Page 63

event galleries

look for the LEARN MORE ABOUT THESE ORGANIZATIONS IN THE EVENT BOOK 2015!

LUTHERAN FAMILY SERVICES PINOT, PIGS & POETS

AKSARBEN FOUNDATION SALUTE TO AKSARBEN SCHOLARS

HERITAGE SERVICES BAXTER ARENA DONOR CELEBRATION

NEBRASKA CHILDREN & FAMILES FOUNDATION CHANGEMAKERS

VOICES FOR CHILDREN IN NEBERASKA SPOTLIGHT GALA

HEART MINISTRY CENTER HOLY SMOKES

JUSTICE FOR OUR NEIGHBORS-NE ENVISION 2015: FOOD TRUCK WORLD TOUR

OMAHA ZOO FOUNDATION ZOOFARI

• VIEW & PURCHASE ADDITIONAL PHOTOS OF THESE EVENTS now! AT SPIRITOFOMAHA.COM

Purchase photos from these events online or from your smartphone, and metroMAGAZINE will donate 10% back to that organization. Join us in giving back! Enter the code “GIVE10” on the checkout page of your shopping cart. • please remember to trade with our advertisers, whose support helps make our promotion of these important events possible

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FEATURED EVENT

spotlight

ne children & families fdtn.

NEBRASKA CHILDREN & FAMILIES FOUNDATION

leading change

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK KRESL

ESSENTIALS: When: Tuesday, September 8 Where: Embassy Suites, La Vista Why: Annual celebration of champions for children. Grace Abbott Award ceremony in a VIP pre-event, plus an inspirational keynote speaker during the luncheon Special Guests: First Lady Susanne Shore, Senator Joni Craighead, Douglas County Treasurer John Ewing, Sandy Parker, Linda Daugherty, Connie Duncan, Jodie Mackintosh, Carol Russell, Gary Stangler, Kristin Williams

NATE MILLESON

Sponsors: Parker Family Foundation, David Scott Foundation, Amy L. Scott Foundation, Dixon Family Foundation, Duncan Family Trust, Jodie and Bill Mackintosh, First National Bank, Security National Bank, Union Bank and Trust, Nonprofit Film School, P&L Technology, Cline Williams, Peetz & Company Event Planners: Mary Kate Gulick, Kareen Hickman, Jen Thielen Attendance: 475 Amount Raised: Nearly $60,000 Mission: We create positive change for Nebraska’s children through community engagement. About: Nebraska Children and Families Foundation supports children, young adults and families at risk with the overall goal of giving our state's most vulnerable kids what they need to reach their full potential. We do this by building strong communities that support families so their children can grow up to be thriving, productive adults. For more information: NebraskaChildren.org

DOUGLAS COUNTY TREASURER JOHN W. EWING, DR. DOUG CHRISTENSEN, SARA WOODS, STATE SENATOR JONI CRAIGHEAD AND JAIME HEMMERLING 64

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mQUARTERLY

| changemakers

GARY STANGLER WITH BETTY MEDINGER

MARY JO PANKOKE, JOHN W. EWING, DR. DOUG CHRISTENSEN, SARA WOODS, SENATOR JONI CRAIGHEAD, JAIME HEMMERLING, AND LEIGH ANNE TUOHY

EMCEE KETV’S JEREMY MASKELL

MARY JO PANKOKE AND TERI TEUTSCH

KRISTIN WILLIAMS, GRACE ABBOTT AWARD WINNER GARY STANGLER, AND NCFF PRESIDENT AND CEO MARY JO PANKOKE

DOUGLAS COUNTY TREASURER JOHN EWING, DR. VIV EWING AND KRISTIN WILLIAMS

MARY JO PANKOKE WITH FORMER FIRST LADY SALLY GANEM AND GUEST

BRYCE HARVEY WITH LEIGH ANNE TUOHY

KRISTIN WILLIAMS AND GARY STANGLER

DOUGLAS COUNTY TREASURER JOHN W. EWING AND LEIGH ANNE TUOHY

LEIGH ANNE TUOHY

DR. HELEN RAIKES AND DR. DOUGH CHRISTENSEN


62-95-SCENE-1115_EVENTS 10/14/15 4:46 PM Page 66

event galleries

Photography by Dan Flanigan

LEGACIES OF

Leadership Heritage Services Baxter Arena Donor Celebration When: Saturday, October 3

JOHN CHRISTENSEN, TREV ALBERTS, SUE MORRIS AND WALTER SCOTT

Where: Baxter Arena, UNO Campus, Omaha Why: Thank donors and celebrate the opening of the Baxter Arena Special Guests: Team USA Figure Skating, Walter Scott, Jr., University of Nebraska President Hank Bounds, University of Nebraska Omaha Chancellor John Christensen, Philanthropist Richard Holland, Rhonda and Howard Hawks Attendance: 180 For more information 402.391.3190

DAVID AND LORI SCOTT WITH CINDY AND MOGENS BAY

SUSIE AND HANK BOUNDS

DICK HOLLAND AND MARIAN LEARY

JAN AND JOHN CHRISTENSEN, MICKY ANDERSON WITH HOWARD AND RHONDA HAWKS

JAMES AND PAULA BLACKLEDGE WITH KATHY AND GARY GATES

MORGAN DESIGIO, LUKAS KAUGARS, DICK HOLLAND, KARINA MANTA AND JOE JOHNSON

FRANCIE PRIER, AMY SCOTT AND JEANIE JONES

JOHN AND CARMEN GOTTSCHALK

NANCY AND MIKE MCCARTHY

DR. GAIL YANNEY, SHARON MARVIN GRIFFIN AND MELISSA MARVIN

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event galleries

Photography courtesy of Omaha Zoo Foundation

HEAR US Roar

Omaha Zoo Foundation Zoofari 2015 - Rock and Roar When: September 11

Where: Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium

CINDY SMITH AND DENNIS PATE

TINA CHERICA AND DR. LEE SIMMONS

Why: Funds raised through Zoofari help support Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium, ensuring it remains one of the best zoos in the world. Special Guests: Honorary Chairs Shirley and Dan Neary Caterer: Hap Abraham Catering Attendance: 1,300 Amount Raised: $2.1 million

ELLEN WRIGHT AND MARIE SIMMONS

KEN ANDERSEN, JANE MILLER, JEAN FLOTT, GINA HIGGINS AND TIM HIGGINS

HONORARY CHAIRS DAN AND SHIRLEY NEARY

TERRY AND CAROL WILLIAMS, BRANDON AND EMILY SMITH WITH CAMILLE BLACKWELL AND MARK BLACKWELL

Mission: The Omaha Zoo Foundation is dedicated to supporting the mission and programs of Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium About: Covering more 130 acres, Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium is Nebraska’s largest tourist attraction and is consistently ranked among the top zoos in the world. Seventeen major building and animal enclosures along with expansive outdoor exhibits showcase more than 17,000 animals amidst gardens, visitor amenities, and world-class research facilities, making Omaha’s Zoo a living classroom enjoyed by 1.7 million people annually. For more information: 402.738.2073 | www.omahazoofoundation.org

MEGAN RIEBE, SHELLY MARSH, LINDSEY BUCHANAN AND TINA NELSON

CHRIS SCABIS AND ORVILLE THE POSSUM

KAREN ROMERO, LISA WEBB AND CHRIS THRAN 67

KELLIE AND BILL HARRY

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event galleries

Photography by Dan Flanigan

PURPLE Passion AKSARBEN Foundation AKSARBEN Buyer’s Club Purple Ribbon Auction When: Sunday September 27

LORI AND DAVID SCOTT

STEVE AND BARBARA GRANDFIELD

NICK RANSLEM AND STEPHANIE HARLAN WITH SARA AND JUSTIN KOHLL

HAL AND MARY DAUB WITH JOHN CHRISTENSEN AND DR. JACK AND KATHY LEWIS

Where: CenturyLink Center Why: The Purple Ribbon Auction is the pinnacle event of the AKSARBEN Stock Show and takes place at the culmination of the week’s activities and serves as a fundraising vehicle for AKSARBEN Foundation scholarships. Special Guests: AKSARBEN Stock Show & Rodeo Board Chairman, Steve Grandfield; AKSARBEN Buyer’s Club Chair, Stephanie Harlan; Honorary Chairs David and Lori Scott; Grand Marshals The Schaben Family; Hero’s Award recipient, Matt Gunderson Event Planner: Sally Brittan Attendance: over 300 Amount Raised: $270,000 Mission: Our mission is leveraging collective business leadership to build a more prosperous Heartland. Representing the premier employers in Nebraska and western Iowa, AKSARBEN Foundation works as a unified network to influence change for the betterment of youth, the economy and Heartland communities.

ROSS HOEFLING WITH CHAMPION BUYER’S CLUB

For more information: www.aksarbenrodeo.com

LEXI BERRY WITH L.B.’S NORTH 40

CHLOE GORETSKA WITH WALTER AND SUZANNE SCOTT FOUNDATION

BRODY NEMECEK WITH THE MAVERICK’S

MELISSA DAHIR, MONIKA JOHANNSEN AND KARIE MILFORD 68

ROGER SEALOCK AND BEV KARRER

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STEWARDS OF

Scholarship AKSARBEN Foundation A Salute to AKSARBEN Scholars

FREDDIE GRAY, ELAM TURNER AND BEN GRAY

GEORGE AND ANNA LITTLE

WALTER SCOTT, JR., MIKE YANNEY, DR. TOM OSBORNE AND KEN BIRD

VAN DEEB, TRACY FISHER AND MARLEN FERNANDEZ-RAMIREZ

Recipients of the AKSARBEN/Horatio Alger Career Scholarship and AKSARBEN/Horatio Alger State Scholarship were honored on Sunday October 4, 2015. The event, “Salute to AKSARBEN Scholars,” was hosted by the AKSARBEN Foundation and Mike and Gail Yanney at the Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha. Over 200 AKSARBEN/Horatio Alger Scholars were honored for their pursuit of post-secondary education in the face of adverse financial circumstance. Prior to dinner, AKSARBEN Foundation President, Jon Burt, welcomed the over 300 guests in attendance, including Governors and Councillors of the Knights of AKSARBEN, members of the Women’s Ball Committee, partnering organizations Avenue Scholars Foundation and TeamMates Mentoring Program, area education and non-profit leaders, and scholarship recipients and guests. Burt noted that in 2015 over 200 AKSARBEN/Horatio Alger Scholarships valued at $600,000 were awarded to Nebraska and western Iowa youths . “Such wonderful opportunities do not just happen, they are the product of strong vision, strong leadership and the commitment and sacrifices of many,” Burt stated.

ROB AND JENNIFER ZATECHKA

DELE AND ARIKE DAVIES WITH WALTER AND RUTH UTMAN AND DR. GAIL WALLING YANNEY

NANCY AND RANDY SCHMAILZL AND DR. GAIL WALLING YANNEY

ANDEE SCIOLI AND KIM BANAT WITH MATT AND LISA GRAVELLE

Following dinner, guests were provided with an inspirational program in the historic Witherspoon Concert Hall. Opening remarks were provided by George Little, CEO & Chairman of HDR, AKSARBEN Foundation Governor, and 2015 Coronation & Scholarship Ball Committee Chairman. Little encouraged the scholars to, “Take full advantage of this opportunity. Our community is only as strong as you are; your development and success is vital to the future of the Heartland.” The evening’s emcees were Marlen Fernadez-Ramirez and Elam Turner, current AKSARBEN Scholars. The featured guest speakers included Mike Yanney, Walter Scott, Jr. and Dr. Tom Osborne. A patriotic musical program was provided by Love’s Jazz & Arts Center, RawDawgs after-school program and Russian violin virtuoso Olga Smola. AKSARBEN Foundation, in partnership with the Horatio Alger Association, Avenue Scholars and Metropolitan Community College launched the new AKSARBEN/Horatio Alger Career Scholarship in 2015. The program aims to annually award up to 300 two-year community college scholarships to Douglas and Sarpy county students from low-income families who are pursuing careers in high-demand, high-skilled occupations. For more information 402.554.9600 | www.aksarben.org

PAMELA DAVEY, ABBI DAVIE, MASON VAN DALSEM AND MISSY VAN DALSEM

PATTY AND CHRIS KIRCHER AND JIM GROTRIAN 69

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DISTINGUISHED

Dinsdale

Arthritis Foundation Heartland Region - Nebraska 42nd Annual Woman of the Year Gala When: Thursday, October 8

MOGENS AND CINDY BAY

DAWN AND SID DINSDALE

Where: Embassy Suites - La Vista Why: Dawn Dinsdale was honored as the 42nd Annual Arthritis Foundation’s Woman of the Year. Dawn’s phenomenal work as a community volunteer and champion of giving back, exemplifies the spirit of philanthropy that this honor recognizes. This event is a major fundraiser for the Arthritis Foundation’s programs and services.

JOY WATANABE, DAWN DINSDALE AND AMY DEARDORFF

LIN SIMMONDS WITH ROBERT AND MARY JO LANGDON

Special Guests: Honoree Dawn Dinsdale, Dawn’s husband Sid Dinsdale, Alison & J.R. Johnson (daughter & son-in-law), Paige & Brian Ritter (daughter & son-in law), Shenna & Matt Dinsdale (daughter-in-law & son), Former Mayor Mike Fahey, Chairman of the Arthritis Foundation Nebraska Leadership Board: Carlo Rinaldi, Emcee: Malorie Maddox, Key to the Cure Auctioneer: Andrew Liakos Event Co-chairs: Amy Deardorff and Joy Watanabe Patron Party Hosts: Cindy and Mogens Bay Attendance: 225

JR AND ALISON JOHNSON, BRIAN AND PAIGE RITTER, DAWN AND SID DINSDALE WITH SHEENA AND MATT DINSDALE

Amount Raised: $175,000 Mission: The Arthritis Foundation exists to improve lives through the leadership in prevention, control and cure of arthritis and related diseases. The Arthritis Foundation is committed to raising awareness and reducing the unacceptable impact of arthritis, which strikes in Nebraska alone, 340,000 adults and 1,800 children, and is the nation’s leading cause of disability.

KEN AND ANN STINSON, PAT AND SHARON MCNEIL AND KATHY MERWALD WITH MIKE FAHEY

DEB SCHMADEKE, KATHY MERWALD, DARLENE MUELLER, JANE POHLMAN, DAWN DINSDALE AND MARY JO LANGDON

For more information: 402.201.2864 | www.arthritis.org/nebraska

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CASTLE

Classics Joslyn Castle

Joslyn Castle Classic Car Show When: July 26 Where: Joslyn Castle, 3902 Davenport Street

1933 PONTIAC 601 CABRIOLET OWNED BY DAVE AND MARILYN UNDERWOOD

1924 DODGE TOURING OWNED BY GARY WIBLISHOUSER

Why: All proceeds benefit the Joslyn Castle, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit. The Castle preserves and shares the historic Joslyn Castle, its grounds, and history to enrich the community, arts, culture, and education. Classic Car Show Committee: Alan Tast, Kelsey Bugjo, Tom Knox, Tom Johnson, George Rogers and Sherri Moore Attendance: More than 900 spectators, 75 car show exhibitors, their families, guests and volunteers. About: The Joslyn Castle was built as a private residence by George and Sarah Joslyn and graces over five acres of beautifully landscaped grounds atop a hill overlooking downtown Omaha, Nebraska.

DELOREAN DMC-12 2 DOOR GULLWING COUPE OWNED BY THOM DONALDSON

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For more information 402.595.2199 | www.JoslynCastle.com/CarClassic

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FORMS OF Faith

Lutheran Family Services of Nebraska, Inc. Faith in Action® When: Sunday, September 13

Where: Embassy Suites Omaha-La Vista Conference Center

LINDA AND TIM DAUGHERTY WITH MIKE AND NANCY MCCARTHY

MARGIE AND JAMES SR. TIMMERMAN, JAMES JR AND ANN TIMMERMAN WITH ELIZABETH AND BRIAN BOWMAN

NORM AND JOYCE RIFFEL WITH RUTH HENRICHS

GERALD TIMMERMAN, ROLAND TEMME AND LACEY STUDNICKA

Why: To recognize community leaders whose actions demonstrate their commitment to faith-based values and humble service. This year’s Faith in Action® event celebrated those who generously advance safety, hope and well-being for all people. The honorees are Dick and Dolores Zolnosky (2015 Douglas E. Parrott Faith in Action® Award recipients), People’s Health Center (2015 Community Partner of the Year), Forever Families Guild (2015 Volunteer Group of the Year) and Betsy Timmerman (2015 Volunteer of the Year). Sponsors: Immanuel, The Mundt Foundation, The Bill Kernen Family, and The Rev. Dr. William G. & Martha B. Moorhead. Attendance: 230 Mission: Lutheran Family Services of Nebraska expresses God’s love for all people by providing quality human care services that build and strengthen individual, family and community life.

BETSY TIMMERMAN AND FAMILY WITH FORMER REFUGEE FAMILIES

EMILY TONNIGES, JANE TONNIGES, BETSY TONNIGES GOMEZ AND CHRIS TONNIGES

About: Lutheran Family Services of Nebraska (LFS) is a 123-year old statewide human care with locations across Nebraska and in Council Bluffs, Iowa and Wichita, Kansas. LFS’ mission is to provide human care services that build and strengthen individual, family and community life. Last year, LFS served 17,491 through three broad service areas: Behavioral Health, Children Services and Community Services, offering services to immigrants and refugees. For more information: 402.978.5646 | www.LFSneb.org

SARA AND JOHN YOUNG

PETE ZANDBERGEN AND BILL KERNEN

CAPTIONS

CAP72

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Photos courtesy of JDRF Heartland Chapter, Omaha-Council Bluffs

WALK OF Life JDRF Heartland Chapter, Omaha-Council Bluffs JDRF One Walk When: Saturday, August 15 Where: Lewis & Clark Landing, Omaha Why: To raise money for life-changing T1D research.

UNION PACIFIC TEAM

LIVE LIFE SMILING TEAM

Special Guests: Mayor Matt Walsh; Emcee Mary Nelson from The Morning Blend Attendance: More than 4,000 Amount Raised: $562,000 with donations still coming in Mission: JDRF is the leading global organization funding type 1 diabetes (T1D) research. JDRF’s goal is to progressively remove the impact of T1D from people’s lives until we achieve a world without T1D. For more information 402.397.2873 | jdrf.org

JDRF VOLUNTEERS

THE CENTENNIAL CURE CRUSADERS

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ELEGANT

Occasion Omaha Symphony Debutante Ball

50th Anniversary Dinner Dance When: Saturday, August 29

HENRY DAVIS, JOAN HEISTAND WITH MARTHA AND DAVID SLOSBURG, JENNIFER KATZ AND JAMES JOHNSON

MARTHA AND DAVID SLOSBURG

Where: Omaha Country Club Why: 2015 - Commemorates the 50th Anniversary of the Debutante Ball Special Guests: Martha & David Slosburg-Honorary Chairs Joan Squires-Omaha Performing Arts Thomas Wilkins-Conductor of the Omaha Symphony James Johnson-President of Omaha Symphony Association

WALLY AND MINDY DUFF WITH KIM AND JIM SIMON

LAURA DOLL, BRENDA CHRISTENSEN AND ANNE JETTER

Honorary Chairs: Martha and David Slosburg Multi Media: Robert Glazer Band and Sing Sing Orchestra Attendance: 130 Amount Raised: This event marked the second event in 2015 to help us achieve our goal to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Debutante Ball, $50k for both events

SALLY ENGLISH, LIZ OTTERBERG, CHRIS LAFEVER, SHELLY GROTE AND SUE NEMER-HADDIX

ROD KESTEL, LOURI SULLIVAN, BRENDA CHRISTENSEN AND MIKE MORRIS

About: This year, 2015, the Omaha Symphony Debutante Ball commemorates their 50th Anniversary. Event Chairs, Brenda Christensen and Anne Jetter, along with Laura Doll, 2015 Debutante Ball Chairman have had a wonderful experience researching, planning and connecting with the community to share the Debutante Ball’s rich history. For more information: Contact Anne Jetter by phone, 402.510.8851 or email amjetter@gmail.com.

JOAN SQUIRES, MARTHA SLOSBURG, HENRY DAVIS AND JOAN HEISTAND

MIKE AND JAYMIE SCHILKEN

ORNA HOBAN AND JOHN LOHRBERG WITH KATIE AND CHAD RICHTER

CRAIG AND KATHY KNICKREHM, JOHN AND CONNIE KINNEAR, SHAYLA AND CHRIS O’BRIEN WITH ANNE AND MATT JETTER 74

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Photos courtesy of Jennie Edmundson Foundation

JOINING FOR

Jennie

Jennie Edmundson Fdtn. Spirit of Courage, Celebrity Weekend When: August 7- 9 Where: Mid-America Center Council Bluffs, IA

NATIONAL AND LOCAL CELEBRITIES

Why: Spirit of Courage is an annual event to raise money for the Methodist Jennie Edmundson Hospital Cancer Center - Charitable Patient Care Fund. Each year we raise approximately $125,000 to help local cancer patients who need assistance in paying for medications, treatments or transportation. For our most vulnerable patients, this support is literally lifesaving. Attendance: Over 680 attended the Gala, 180 golfers & 75 played poker. Amount Raised: $125,000.00 Mission: To improve the quality of life by caring for the body and mind.

RICHARD DABERKOW’S GOLF TEAM WITH CELEBRITY JOHN KNICELY

KRIS ANGELIS, GRACE BANNON, CARL MARIO WITH JAY FERRIS & VICKI QUAITES-FERRIS

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For more information 712.396.6086 | www.jehfoundation.org

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GREEN AND

Great!

Lauritzen Gardens Antique & Garden Show When: September 24 through 27

DAN AND ALISON O’NEILL WITH JILL AND MICHAEL BYDALEK

CINDY BAY, MARTYN LAWRENCE BULLARD, MARY SEINA AND ALISON O’NEILL

Where: Lauritzen Gardens Why: The Lauritzen Gardens Antique & Garden Show is a weekend-long event that featured a lineup of design experts, authors and trendsetters serving as keynote lecturers all set in the backdrop of the Midwest’s premier botanical center. The one-of-a-kind show brought together more than 30 national and international antique dealers with all genres of fine antiquities. The event is the largest annual fundraiser for Lauritzen Gardens.

JACK AND JUDY BAKER WITH SPENCER CREWS

LAURIE VICTOR KAY, INDIA HICKS AND SARAH YALE

“Everything continues to grow—our splendid plantings from season to season, our schedule of garden-based educational offerings, and the Antique & Garden Show – such an incredible event and fundraiser. It is a pleasure to work with so many amazing people from our staff to our volunteers. It is these efforts that allow us all to flourish year after year.” –Spencer Crews, Executive Director, Lauritzen Gardens Special Guests: India Hicks, Martyn Lawrence Bullard and local chef Cedric Fichepain Caterer: Abraham Catering

CATHY PERRY AND JAN VRANA

DAWN DINSDALE AND SUSAN DENNIS

Mission: Lauritzen Gardens is a living museum of unique four-season plant displays, maintained to the highest standards consistent with environmental stewardship. It provides memorable educational and aesthetic experiences for all. Honorary Chairs: Cindy Bay and Mary Seina 2015 Chair: Alison O’Neill

ROSEMARY AND FRED OHLES

TONY AND MARY SEINA

Attendance: The four day attendance was more than 4,000 guests,the new location of the event tent allowed for a record setting attendance of 575 at the Friday luncheon with India Hicks. Amount Raised: Net total is more than $630,000 For more information: www.OmahaAntiqueShow.org | www.lauritzengardens.org

CLARK AND EMILY LAURITZEN

LANCE AND JULIE FRITZ WITH DONNA WALSH AND GRANT LIPPINCOTT 76

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LEGACY OF

Compassion The Hope Center for Kids The Hope Center for Kids Gala When: Friday, October 2

JOHN AND VIV EWING WITH SHELLEY AND MIKE HOMA

WENDE AND JOHN KOTOUC WITH BRENDA BLOCK

Where: CenturyLink Center, Omaha Why: To fund the year-around programming at The Hope Center for Kids. To celebrate the mission of The Hope Center for Kids passed on by the legacy of The Hope Founders Ty and Terri Schenzel, who passed away in late August. According to Brenda Christensen, board president, “The legacy of Ty and Terri Schenzel belongs to the children and families served by staff and volunteers of The Hope Center.” She said The Hope Center for Kids intends to stay and work in the community “until we are no longer needed.”

PAM NOGEL, JANET ZEHNACKER AND NANCY SHIELDS Honorary Chairs: John & Wende Kotouc Attendance: Close to 1,200 Amount Raised: Over $600,000 Mission: The Hope Center for Kids strives to faithfully inspire hope in youth through education, employability, collaboration and faith.

NISSA JONES, JOY PETERSON, EMILY LANPHIER AND ALYSSA COREY

DAVE AND KARI RIDDER WITH WENDE KOTOUC AND WILLIE BARNEY

About: The Hope Center for Kids faithfully inspires hope in North Omaha and Fremont youth and children through education, employability, collaboration and faith. The Hope Center for Kids provides programming and nutrition, as well as a safe place for fun and relationship building for approximately 1,600 youth and children, ages five to twenty-five each year. For more information 402.341.4673 | www.hopecenterforkids.com

JENNIFER AND JOSH DOTZLER

SCOTT AND JENNI HERCHENBACH, LISA AND SCOTT TAYFOYA WITH LYNETTE FARHART AND BILL ALFORD

JADE AND TURNER SCHENZEL WITH HOPE JEWELL

GRACE WULF, KATIE PINKERTON, BROOKE MURPHY AND STASIA JOHNSON 78

EMILY RICHARDS, REID LANCASTER AND ANISHA WHITCOMB

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Photography by Dan Flanigan

RACING FOR

The Finish Susan G. Komen Nebraska Race for the Cure® When: Sunday, October 4

LEONARD SOMMER AND EMILY SOMMER

LIZ LEDDY, MAYOR JEAN STOTHERT AND CRISTINA CASTRO-MATUKEWICZ

Where: Baxter Arena & Aksarben Village Why: Funds raised support local breast health services and research to find a cure Special Guests: Mayor Jean Stothert Sponsors: Union Pacific, Bakers, Wells Fargo, Baxter Ford, KMTV Action 3 News, Star 104.5 Attendance: 10,000

CHAY KIZZEE AND CRYSTAL COMPTON

Amount Raised: $300,000 Mission: To end breast cancer forever

ANNE THOMPSON, MICHELLE BOECKER, CARLA WELDING AND BARB WILSON

COURTNEY KURYLO, SURVIVOR ROBIN KURYLO, SALLY BANGHART AND BOH KURYLO

About: Susan G. Komen Nebraska raises funds to support the Komen Promise to save lives and end breast cancer forever by empowering people, ensuring quality care for all and energizing science to find the cures. The majority of the funds we raise come to us through the Komen Race for the Cure® events in Nebraska (Omaha) and Central Nebraska (Kearney), held annually in September/October. Other sources of revenue include fundraising events, individual and corporate donations, and memorial or celebration contributions. For more information www.komennebraska.org | 402.502.2979

LEWIS CENTRAL HS

UNO CHEER 79

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Spot ON! Voices for Children in Nebraska Spotlight Gala

EMILY TONNIGES, NOELLE OBERMEYER, JESSICA FREEDMAN AND PATTI KORALESKI

ERIC NELSON, CAROLYN ROOKER, LIZ HRUSKA AND SUSANNE SHORE

Every day there are individuals and organizations who find unique ways to reach out, serve and advocate for the best interests of children. The Spotlight Gala is about honoring and telling the story of four individuals and organizations that are going above and beyond for Nebraska’s kids. The 2015 Spotlight Gala benefiting Voices for Children took place on Saturday, September 19, at the Embassy Suites La Vista. “Across our state, there are individuals and organizations that are doing amazing things to ensure our children have opportunities for a better future. The Spotlight Gala is about shining a light on those who are strengthening our communities and making Nebraska a great place for kids and families.” –Voices for Children Executive Director Carolyn Rooker

LACEY MERICA, DOUG SCHRODER AND SENATOR SARA HOWARD

The 2015 Spotlight Gala’s honorary family was David and Lori Scott, and the presenting sponsor was the David Scott Foundation. The event chairs were Patti Koraleski and Emily Tonniges.

DAVID AND LORI SCOTT

This year’s award winners: Champion for Children, former State Senator Jeremy Nordquist; Individual Award, Liz Hruska; Nonprofit Award, Project Harmony; Youth Award, Circle C Market. The program included award videos produced by Rebel Interactive and a live auction.

ERIC NELSON, JEREMY NORDQUIST, SUSANNE SHORE, CONGRESSMAN BRAD ASHFORD AND CAROLYN ROOKER

RUSSELL BARTHOLOW, JULIE ROGERS, MATT COUCH AND JULIET SUMMERS

Attendees: 750 About: Voices for Children in Nebraska is the independent voice building pathways to opportunity for all children and families through research, policy and community engagement. Our policy priorities are guided by research, data and proven best practices that improve child well-being. We pay close attention to the impact of race, poverty and geography, and seek to address existing disparities within these issues areas. For more information: 402.597.3100 | voicesforchildren.com

JOLEEN RICHWINE, SENATOR SUE CRAWFORD, CONGRESSMAN BRAD ASHFORD, DANIELLE CONRAD AND BRIANNA MCLARTY

JULIE HILKEMANN AND SENATOR ROBERT HILKEMANN

RESIDENTS FROM CODY, NE 80

CAROLYN ROOKER, GENE KLEIN AND SUANNE SHORE

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SPROUTING

Promise City Sprouts Grow with Us Gala When: Sunday, August 16 Where: Lauritzen Gardens

CLAYTON CHAPMAN, ALBERT VARAS, KIRBY SIMMERING, JACK ROUND, JO ANNE GARVEY, MEGAN THOM, KRISTI WILLIS, KELLY BOUXSEIN AND EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR ROXANNE WILLIAMS DRAPER

Why: Celebrating 20 years of Sustaining Communities Through Gardening Caterer: Abraham Catering Attendance: 150 Amount Raised: $30,000 Mission: The mission of City Sprouts is to increase the availability of fresh produce, to educate the community about gardening and sustainability, to provide employment for under-served youth and to build community through gardening. For more information contact: Roxanne Williams Draper, Executive Director, 402.216.9616 or visit omahasprouts.org

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WIDE Open KANEKO Open Space Soirée When: September 18 Where: KANEKO, Omaha

HENRY DAVIS AND JOAN HEISTAND

REE KANEKO, GEORGE NEUBERT AND JUN KANEKO

Why: The Open Space Soirée is KANEKO’s annual fundraising event. Sponsors: Henry Davis, HDR, Inc., Valmont Industries, Inc., Kiewit Corporation, Vicki and David Krecek, Judy and Jack Baker, Blake and Tanya Dillon of Dillon Auto Group, Union Bank & Trust, The Thomas A. and Georgina T. Russo Foundation, Robert and Carol Lynch Caterer: Attitude on Food

ROB AND MAUREEN MAYER

Attendance: 250

BETH AND CLAY SMITH

Mission: KANEKO is a nonprofit cultural organization dedicated to exploring and encouraging the creative process and how it impacts our lives. Established by internationally renowned sculptor Jun Kaneko and his wife, Ree, KANEKO was conceived of as “open space for your mind,” a place where thoughtful examination of others’ ideas through exhibitions and public programs leads us to new and exciting ideas of our own.

CAROL FRANKSEN AND GEORGE FERGUSON

SUSAN SCHONLAU, WENDY RINGLER AND CHRISTINE FIORE

ERYN AND BEN SWAN

JOAN SQUIRES, MARY ANNE VACCARO, TERRI SCHRAGER WITH MARTHA AND DAVID SLOSBURG

For more information: 402.341.3800 | www.thekaneko.org

PAT AND KAREN DRICKEY WITH KIM WYLLIE AND GERRY SULLIVAN

GENE HUEY, CAROL FRANKSEN AND TROIA SCHONLAU 82

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Photos courtesy of Omaha Children’s Museum

Kid FRIENDLY Omaha Children’s Museum Great Friends to Kids Luncheon When: September 14 Where: Omaha Children’s Museum

DAVID COTA AND JOHN BIRGE

JOHN BIRGE, BOB KRUPA, LINDY HOYER, JOE LANG AND JEFF BARNHART

Why: This year Omaha Children’s Museum had the honor of presenting RDG Planning & Design with the Great Friend to Kids award. RDG has been a longtime friend of the Museum, most recently as a sponsor for the LEGO Travel Adventure summer blockbuster exhibit and as a collaborative partner in developing the Maker Space exhibit in the Creative Arts area. Caterer: Eddie’s Catering Attendance: 194 Amount Raised: $19,840 Mission: To engage the imagination and create excitement about learning. For more information www.ocm.org | 402.342.6164

RDG PLANNING & DESIGN AWARD RECIPIENTS

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WESTSIDE Story The Westside Foundation VIVI 2015 “Oh the Places We’ll Go” When: Saturday, October 3 Where: Embassy Suites, LaVista Conference Center

KEN AND ANNIE BYRD

Why: The fundraising goal was $150,000 or $25 per student within District 66. The proceeds will support innovative educational opportunities in every classroom and benefit every student in Westside Community Schools

BLANE AND MARIE MCCANN

Honorary Chairs: Sandy & Dave Parker Event Chairs: Liz and Doug Bisson, Helen Horth and Ken Bayles Event Planner: Executive Director - Laura Iliff, Events & Development Manager - Alexis Boulos Attendance: 470

CATHY HANEY AND SUSAN GASS

Amount Raised: Over $200,000

STEPHANIE AND DAVID COTA

Mission: To generate and raise funds to enhance the District’s ability to meet the expectations of an exemplary education for every student. About: The Westside Foundation provides student scholarships, teacher recognition, classroom grants, facilities improvement and support for Westside Community Schools. For more information 402.390.2168 | www.wcsfoundation66.org

SARAH MCGOWAN AND DENISE HAZELRIGG

WENDI KROEGER, SARAH YALE AND CASSIE ARMESON

MARK AND ANNIE FELDMAN

SAMANTHA WAHI, LAURA DIMAIO AND JILL DIETRICH

HEATHER AND JUSTIN VEIK WITH REBECCA AND BRINKER HARDING

MELISSA AND RICKY ANDERSON

KEN BAYLES, HELEN NORTH, SANDY AND DAVE PARKER WITH LIZ AND DOUG BISSON PHOTO BY: DEBRA KAPLAN 84

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MODELING

Mentors

Midlands Mentoring Partnership Mentoring Awareness Luncheon When: August 3 Where: CenturyLink Center Omaha

DR. TOM OSBORNE, SUSANNE SHORE AND MAYOR JEAN STOTHERT

DR. TOM OSBORNE WITH CAROL RUSSELL AND DR. KENT PEKEL

Why: MMP brought together hundreds of youth providers, mentoring professionals, mentors, school personnel, community & business leaders, the Mayor of Omaha, and a wide audience to focus on best practices for youth mentoring. Attendance: 400 Mission: The Midlands Mentoring Partnership (MMP) is a backbone organization that seeks to increase the quantity and quality of mentoring opportunities available for youth. Our vision is to bring about community-wide, systemic change that will allow mentoring programs to serve more youth with quality services and increased intentionality. For more information 402.715.4175 | www.mmpomaha.org

JOHN EWING

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HEART TO

Heart

Heart Ministry Center 10th Annual Holy Smokes When: Thursday, September 3

JEFF RENSCH, JEFF ZINDEL, JON FIRMATURE AND NANCY NEARY

FATHER TOM FANGMAN, MARY BERIGAN AND RICK HAUTZINGER

Where: Anthony’s Steakhouse Why: Holy Smokes is a fundraiser for the Heart Ministry Center. Mission: Providing food, clothing, healthcare and a way forward to people severely affected by poverty in the Omaha area. Attendance: Over 700 Amount Raised: $209,477.87

LISA AND MIKE MERIDITH

BUFFIE SOMERS AND JIM CLEMENTS

Sample Programs & Services: • Choice Food Pantry - A family of five can receive up to eight bags of groceries per week. And there’s much variety including fresh produce.

• Clothing Closet - Allows clients to shop for clothes at no cost. They can also pick out things like shampoo, toothpaste, soap & laundry detergent.

JANE KELLEY, SHEILA GLEASON, SANDY AGNE AND JUDY HANEY

• Community Outreach - Free school physicals along with a backpack, school supplies, new socks and underwear. Health fairs, screenings and wellness informational sessions in partnership with Creighton. CHRIS HEDICAN, JIM CLEMENTS AND FATHER TOM FANGMAN • Educational Classes - About budgeting and legal rights as a tenant. • Health and Dental Care - Creighton nurse practitioner treats clients at no cost every week. Dentists and pharmacists also volunteer their time. • Holiday Meal Baskets and Gifts - Prepared and delivered to about 600 families a year.

MARK DAHIR, CONOR BERIGAN, MATT CRONIN AND EMILY SCHULTE

CINDY OELKE, JERRY O’BRIEN, LIZ HOOVER AND LAURA OLDEROG

• Resource Center - With a computer room to search for job postings and create a resume. • Youth Mentoring - For at-risk kids, ages 7-16. The kids and their mentors volunteer for the elderly, or at a farm repairing fences and planting trees. • Self-Sufficiency Program - 12-week program designed to help women break the cycle of poverty. For more information: 402.451.2321 | heartministrycenter.org

BRYAN AND TERRI MCFARLAND WITH ANNE AND STEVE BRUCKNER

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Photos courtesy of Youth Emergency Services

DANCING

Machines

Youth Emergency Services Dance for a Chance When: July 31 Where: Omar Bakery Events Center Why: Dance for a Chance raises money to help fund the mission of ending youth homelessness in Omaha. Sponsors: C&A Industries, Nebraska Medicine Caterer: Upstream Brewing Company Attendance: 400

TERRY VARGAS AND MOLLY BYRD

CARMEN BUTLER, DEREK LEATHERS, ERIN POWERS, AND ASHLEY CHRISTENSEN

Amount Raised: $70,000 Mission: To serve homeless and at-risk youth by providing critically-needed resources which empower them to become self-sufficient. For more information www.yesomaha.org | 402.345.5187

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event galleries

Photos courtesy of Opera Omaha

SINGING Out

Opera Omaha Opera Outdoors

When: Friday, September 11

DEB AND BOB CULVER

Where: Turner Park at Midtown Crossing with a pre-show patron party at Brix and a post-party cast party at Cantina Laredo.

JIM AND RUTH KEENE

Why: Opera Omaha has a deep commitment to community engagement and education, and Opera Outdoors allows us to share opera in an accessible format. The free concert is Opera Omaha’s thank you to the community.

SANDRA PIQUES EDDY, JOHN MOORE AND LEAH PARTIDGE

MR. AND MRS. JOHN MCCOLLISTER WITH ROGER WEITZ

Mission: The Omaha Civic Opera Society was founded to meet two needs in the community: • To provide quality opera entertainment through a community-wide organization. • To provide an operatic showcase for the promising vocal talent in the region. Attendance: over 6,000 in attendance at the concert

ANDREW BIDLACK, JOHN MOORE AND SANDRA PIQUES EDDY

About: Opera Omaha, the only professional opera company in Nebraska, began in 1958 as the Omaha Civic Opera Society, a volunteer association. With tremendous community support, it became a fully professional opera company by 1970. From the beginning, Opera Omaha was instilled with a spirit of adventure. In the Civic Opera Society’s first season (1958-1959) along with its premiere production of Puccini’s Madama Butterfly in the Joslyn Art Museum Concert Hall, additional performances followed: Puccini’s Tosca, held at Boys Town; Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Oklahoma!, at Ak-Sar-Ben; and Engelbert Humperdinck’s Hansel and Gretel at Technical High School.

JOHN MOORE

For more information: 402.346.4398 | www.operaomaha.org

DAVID BROWN

ANDREW BIDLACK AND LEAH PARTRIDGE

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Photos courtesy of Omaha Home for Boys

HEADING Home

Omaha Home for Boys

95th Anniversary Celebration When: August 1-2 Where: Omaha Home for Boys main campus and Cooper Farm Pavilion, Omaha

PHYLLIS AND DICK MENDENHALL WITH JEFF LANDHOLD AND RUTH ROOSE

CHARLIE AMIDON AND RODNEY NEIMAN

Why: Celebrate 95 years of saving the lives of young men and women in the community. Former boys, young and old, recent and past, “Came Home” to visit cottages, tour the campus and welcome back old memories and create new ones.

KENA ASHES AND LAUREN CHRISTENSEN WITH OMAHA STREET PERCUSSION

HAROLD NOBLE AND JEFF MORAN

“It was great to reconnect with old friends and welcome back our alumni, some of whom hadn’t been back to the Home in decades,” said President and CEO Jeff Moran. “We really couldn’t have asked for a better opportunity to hear new stories and see new and familiar faces at our celebration. I think everyone really enjoyed themselves.” Special Guests: Judge Patricia Lamberty (board member); Stormy, Omaha Storm Chasers mascot; 5 Man Trio (performed); Omaha Street Percussion (performed) Attendance: 230-plus Amount Raised: This wasn’t a fundraiser, but we did raise about $500 in T-shirt donations and history book purchases

STORMY AND LOGAN WEEKS

OHB YOUTH VERSUS OMAHA POLICE DEPARTMENT

Mission: Strengthening and Supporting Youth, Young Adults and Families About: The Omaha Home for Boys was founded in 1920 by 12 local Masonic lodges and has evolved from sheltering orphaned and homeless boys to providing a continuum of residential, transitional and independent living care programs to young men and women in Nebraska. We serve around 400 youth each year and also work with their families with reunification of the family as the goal.

BRAD YODER AND SON, ELIJAH

OMAHA STREET PERCUSSION

CHRIS SCHWARTZ AND FAMILY WITH GORDON AND LOITA FISHER

For more information: 402.457.7000 | www.omahahomeforboys.org

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Photography by Mark Kresl & Herb Thompson

KEEP ON

Truckin’ Justice For Our Neighbors-NE enVISION 2015: FOOD TRUCK WORLD TOUR When: Thursday, September 24

TODD SIMON

JAKE BLECHA, EMILIANO LERDA, FLORIAN BELLANGER, ATHENA RAMOS AND JUSTIN BLECHA

Where: The Slowdown Why: To support immigration legal services, education and advocacy. Special Guests: The event brought celebrities from the nine seasons of Food Network’s Cupcake Wars television show: Justin and Jake Blecha, who were raised in Omaha and build the cupcake displays, and Florian Bellanger, a French immigrant and world-class French pastry chef who is the show’s permanent judge.

JIM CAVANAUGH AND JOHN KNAPE

ANNETTE AND PAUL SMITH Sponsors: Omaha Steaks, Polina & Robert Schlott, The Weitz Family Foundation, National Justice For Our Neighbors, Carol Gendler/Marathon Realty, Todd & Betiana Simon Foundation, Annette and Paul Smith Caterer: Local Omaha food trucks including 402 BBQ, Maria Bonita and Sweet Lime, and a booth with Omaha Steak sandwiches Event Planner: VGA & Associates

JANE MEYER, DICK JOHNSON, LINDA JOHNSON, JOHN RINGWALT AND PHIL MEYER

JOSH JOHNSON, ESTHER MEJIA, JENEEN SAGON AND DULCE SHERMAN

Attendance: 580 attended: 280 for Patron Party, 300 for After Party Amount Raised: $118,000 Mission: To welcome immigrants by providing free, professional immigration legal services, education and advocacy for low-income individuals and families in Nebraska and southwest Iowa.

RANDY HANSON, SALLY STALNAKER, NANCY HANSON, DANIEL PADILLA AND CAROLINA PADILLA

TONI DEMETRIA SMITH AND MARY UMBERGER

ANDREW BECERRA-FRANCS AND SALLY MCGILL

KAREN DANEU, MELISSA BARON AND GONZALO BARON 92

For more information: 402.898.1349 | www.jfon-ne.org

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Photography by Dan Flanigan

BIGTIME Bash Metro Area Youth Foundation, Inc. Summer Bash for Childhood Cancer When: August 22, 2015 Where: Ramada Inn Omaha

WANDA UTECHT WITH DOC AND MARIE SIMMONS

KARRI, LEYNA AND MITCHELL AHLSCHWED

Why: To raise funds to help families with a child with cancer Special Guests: Honorary Chairs Lee & Robyn Terry, Child Ambassador Leyna Ahlschwede Sponsors: TransCanda, AGP, US Bank, Keast Chevrolet, Prime Time Healthcare, Security National Bank, Arbor Bank, KMA Land Radio, Ronco Construction, Prairie Wealth Advisors, Sid Dillon, Gro Master, Erickson Sederstrom, Nebraska Medicine, Edward Jones - Lori Blum, Riverside Custom Ag

CO-CHAIRS AL PENNER AND WALT KEAST

JAYME AND MRS. NEBRASKA ERIKA SHELTON

Caterer: Ramada Inn Attendance: 350 Amount Raised: Over $100,000 Mission: Western Iowa and Eastern Nebraska Optimists uniting to improve the quality of life for children and their families.

RON AND MURIEL CISAR

SHELLIE AND RUSS ZEEB WITH JULIANNE MCGLADE

About: We provide a short term financial bridge to families who have a child being treated for cancer. We help pay basic living expenses like rent, utilities, car payments so that the families can focus on getting their child’s treatment instead of their finances. We also support the children’s oncology units at Children’s Hospital & Medical Center and Nebraska Medicine and camps for kids with cancer, Camp CoHoLo and Camp Quality. For more information 402.871.4626 | www.summerbashforccc.org

KELLY JOHNSON, ELLEN KEAST, MADDIE KEAST AND AMY KEAST

TERRY AND SHEILA MARX WITH TODD HEISTERKAMP

HAL AND MARY DAUB

ANDY HUETTNER, CONNIE BITZES AND SHERRY MITCHELL 93

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FASHIONABLE

Celebration Fashion Institute Guild Fashion Impact Awards When: September 11 Where: Huber Cadillac Showroom

THE MEN OF HUBER CADILLAC WITH MELISSA DAHIR

Why: A night to honor those making an impact on Midwest fashion and proceeds benefited the Fashion Institute Midwest for designer grants. Honorees: Philanthropic Fashion Impact - Aksarben Women’s Ball Committee, Education Impact - Dr. Barbara Trout, Economic Fashion Impact - Gordmans, The Guild’s Award - Industry Icons Richard Carey & David Scott

RICHARD CAREY, DAVID SCOTT AND ANDEE HOIG

DR. WALLY AND MINDY DUFF WITH ANN MURLEY AND BRAD HESS

Sponsors: Huber Cadillac, Monika Katarina Johannsen, Omaha OB/GYN, Diana & Robert Foster, Events in Bloom, Develop Model Management, Max I. Walker, LIV Lounge, Matt & Lisa Krumwiede/AT&T, Dr. Todd & Lisa Sekundiak, Dr. Wally & Mindy Duff, CRAVE, John Jelinek, Erica Wassinger, Dr. Clarke Stevens Multi Media: United Rent-All, Stahla Services, Skybeam Searchlight, Brix, Grane, DJ Sweet Life, Amy Lynn Photography, Herb Thompson Photography, Heather & Jameson Hooton Photography Attendance: 200

JULIE COLLINS, STACY SIMON AND TRISHNA HORKAN

SANDRA AND DAVE RUSSELL Amount Raised: $50,000 Mission: The Fashion Institute Guild (FIG) supports Midwest fashion designers through time, talent, and treasure to nurture creative talent.

WAYNE VAUGHN AND RIC KLAAS

MARY MITCHELL, DR. BARBARA TROUT, SABRINA JONES AND MARY JOCHIM

About: The Fashion Institute Guild (FIG) is a non-profit organization founded in 2013 to support aspiring Midwest fashion designers. FIG provides a unique opportunity to network with incredibly talents and interesting people to advance the Midwest fashion ecosystem. The guild’s biggest fundraiser is the annual Fashion Impact Awards and additional money is generated through yearly membership dues. Anyone can join the guild and there are several volunteer opportunities as well. This includes designer support in which volunteers directly work with the designers during Omaha Fashion Week and provide hospitality to special guest designers and designer program presenters; communications to assist with managing social media messaging, website updates, and creating signage/invitations for FIG events; membership to organize friendraisers, correspondence with new and existing members, database management, and data collection. For more information: www.fashioninstitutemidwest.org

MARY NELSON

WHITNEY RORAH AND KATIE THOMPSON 94

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Photography by Dan Flanigan

DENNIS MEROTTO AND ALI BABE

TIFFANY AND RUSSELL FALCONER WITH NICOLE HUBER

JOHN AND MELISSA DAHIR WITH ROLLAND AND MONIKA JOHANNSEN

BRANDON CHESTNUTT, JACKIE LANE, SARA KOHLL AND MONIKA JOHANNSEN WITH BRUCE AND STACY SIMON

JASON AND DR. ANN SULLIVAN

ALYSSA DILTS WITH KYLE AND KRISTIN PRATT AND TERESA DILTS

JULIE GREENWOOD, JENNIFER HILL, MELISSA DAHIR, LINDA COLLINS AND JILL BURKE

SUSIE SHOEMAKER, CHRISTIE OBERTO AND MICKI MOYLAN

DR. WALLY DUFF AND WILLY THIESEN

NATASHA ROLLERSON AND JACKIE HENRY

JENNIFER ZATECHKA, KATE GRABILL AND JEANIE JONES

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FEATURED EVENT

spotlight

omaha fashion week

OMAHA FASHION WEEK

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAN FLANIGAN

stunning run

ESSENTIALS: Over 200 invited guests gathered together on January 22nd at The Durham Museum to christen The Event Book & Giving Guide 2014 and to celebrate all of the charitable fundraising events held during 2013 by honoring the winners of The BIG Event 2013 sponsored by metroMAGAZINE & ALH Publications, Inc. The BIG Event is held annually to recognize all of the efforts of those who work tirelessly to raise funds for the many charitable organizations and causes who work so diligently to make a positive difference in the lives of those in our community. The purpose of The BIG Event is to raise awareness and appreciation for all of the work that is done to support non profit, charities and cultural enterprises during the preceding year.

TAMMY MORRIS, ROBERT KNOWLES, LYNN IRWIN, ROBYN THELANDER AND CAROLYN ROOKER

“The whole idea for The BIG Event has always been focused on drawing attention to all the work done by every organization JENNIFER LAUREN AND throughout COLT PAULSENthe year, not just the organizations who are nominated and voted as winners,” said Andrea “Andee” Hoig, President, Founder and Publisher of ALH Publications, Inc. and metroMAGAZINE. “All of the winning organizations really embraced this as a way to celebrate everyone’s achievements during the year. Our impression was that everyone in attendance felt a genuine love and admiration for each others’ efforts. It was one evening where all organizations represented seemed like one big family. We felt that the intimate surroundings and casual atmosphere and program helped make that happen, but it was really the energy and warmth of those attending that set the tone,” added Rob Killmer, ALHP Vice-President.

DESIGNER: TRIPLE THREAD 96

EMILI TANG AND MINDY RUFFALO

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ELIZABETH BOYER, BRIDGID MCCORMICK, MARY LINSTROTH, CYN WHITFIELD AND MARSHA O'GARA

ROLLAND AND MONIKA JOHANNSEN WITH GINA MELTON

MADISON HILL AND CATHERINE LENTSCH

WHITNEY RORAH AND JASON ROSKAM

DREW AND EMILY MEIER

JULIA RUSSELL AND MIKE TIETJEN

JEN BECKMAN, KIM MCMILLAN, LESLIE RICHTER AND TONYA ALLEN

SABRINA JONES AND TAYLOR RYAN

MEGHANN SCHENSE, KYLIE BOLLWITT, MADISON HEBNER, JAMIE NICKESON, BECCA WALTER, AND BROOK AND NICK HUDSON

DEVELOP MODEL MANAGEMENT

MOLLIE AND BRIAN MILES

ALYSA DILTS, TRICIA HULTGREN AND TERESA DILTS


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FEATURED EVENT

spotlight

omaha fashion week

OMAHA FASHION WEEK

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAN FLANIGAN

stunning run

GETTING EXCITED: Over 200 invited guests gathered together on January 22nd at The Durham Museum to christen The Event Book & Giving Guide 2014 and to celebrate all of the charitable fundraising events held during 2013 by honoring the winners of The BIG Event 2013 sponsored by metroMAGAZINE & ALH Publications, Inc. The BIG Event is held annually to recognize all of the efforts of those who work tirelessly to raise funds for the many charitable organizations and causes who work so diligently to make a positive difference in the lives of those in our community. The purpose of The BIG Event is to raise awareness and appreciation for all of the work that is done to support non profit, charities and cultural enterprises during the preceding year.

DESIGNER: DAN RICHTERS

“The whole idea for The BIG Event has always been focused on drawing attention to all the work done by every organization DESIGNER: JUDY BALES throughout the year, not just the organizations who are nominated and voted as winners,” said Andrea “Andee” Hoig, President, Founder and Publisher of ALH Publications, Inc. and metroMAGAZINE. “All of the winning organizations really embraced this as a way to celebrate everyone’s achievements during the year. Our impression was that everyone in attendance felt a genuine love and admiration for each others’ efforts. It was one evening where all organizations represented seemed like one big family. We felt that the intimate surroundings and casual atmosphere and program helped make that happen, but it was really the energy and warmth of those attending that set the tone,” added Rob Killmer, ALHP Vice-President.

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NUEVINTAGE APPAREL

DESIGNER: PAM FINN OF TEHRA & B

DESIGNER: LEAH KETTELSON

DESIGNER: FELLA

DENAE BRAZDA AND ANN WIESELER

MINDY DUFF, KAREN OWEN AND SHARON MCDERMOTT

DESIGNER: CHRIS DIGIORGIO

SAC MONEY DRESS DESIGNED BY KATE WALZ

DESIGNER: ELLENE MCCLAY

SHELL ROBINSON AND RYAN HORST

SANDY AQUILA AND TRISHNA HORKAN


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designing omaha the story behind OMAHA FASHION WEEK HOOTON IMAGES • DEVELOP MODEL MANAGEMENT

sac federal credit union MODEL: KILEY • DESIGNER: ADRIENNE ANDERSEN

MODEL: RACHEL • DESIGNER: LEGALIZED REBELLION

the designers

MODEL: LYNLEE • DESIGNERS: (HAT) JUDY BALES (TOP) MOLLY O'BRIEN • (DRESS) WHITNEY RORAH

MODEL: LARAMY • DESIGNER: KATE WALZ

PHOTOGRAPHY: HOOTON IMAGES

the models

the creatives MODEL: ELISA • DESIGNER: BUF REYNOLDS

MODELS: DEVELOP MODEL MANAGEMENT HAIR & MAKEUP: KAT SONG WHITNEY GRUBB AT VICTOR VICTORIA SALON

SEE THE FULL FEATURE ARTICLE IN OUR AUGUST 2015 EDITION AND THE EXPANDED PHOTO SPREAD ONLINE AT: http://issuu.com/metmago/docs/metroquarterly-fall-2015/12


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STORY BY LEO ADAM BIGA | PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF JOSLYN CASTLE

dickens duo. one-man christmas carol

HIGHLIGHTS JOSLYN CASTLE LITERARY FESTIVAL A LEADING LIGHT OF OMAHA STAGE, JILL ANDERSON, HAS BRUSHED UP HER DICKENS IN PREPARATION FOR THE JOSLYN CASTLE LITERARY FESTIVAL. The five year-old event Anderson formed and serves as artistic director for is celebrating the prolific Charles Dickens after previously highlighting the Brontë sisters, Oscar Wilde, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Bram Stoker. Dickens at the Castle is the latest iteration of this new fixture on Omaha’s cultural calendar. Per tradition, the November 14-18 and December 12-13 festival offers a live theatrical production, panel discussion, lecture and concert. Anchoring it all this time is a oneman performance of A Christmas Carol by actor-director John Hardy. That Dickens classic is the basis for the popular musical adaptation the Omaha Community Playhouse (OCP) has produced for 40 years. That connection compelled OCP and Joslyn Castle Trust (JCT) to partner for the 2015 fest. It’s not the first time they’ve conjoined. Earlier this year OCP held its 90th anniversary party at the Castle. George and Sarah Joslyn built the Scottish Baronial Revival Castle at 3902 Davenport that hosts the festival. These early Omaha philanthropists supported the Playhouse in its infancy. Sarah donated the land for the theater’s first home near the Castle. She later built the Joslyn Art Museum as a memorial to her husband and as a gift to Omaha.

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celebrating THE ARTS

She says audiences should come prepared to be surprised by Hardy’s 40-character rendition.

CONTINUED

None of this legacy is lost on the people who make the festival happen. “We see every event at the Castle as an opportunity to honor the remarkable lives of George and Sarah Joslyn,” says JCT executive director Gina Primmer. “Like Dickens himself, both George and Sarah lacked extensive formal education but were very committed to lifelong learning through the arts and literature. Our festival guests will see firsthand how this magnificent home is designed in celebration of arts, literature and entertainment.”

a well-made match Proceeds from the festival support the work of the Trust, which preserves and shares the Castle and its history through programs that enrich the community through the arts, culture and education. The mansion includes a library, music room and ballroom. Hardy’s show will be in the library. Jill Anderson says “there’s something just kind of fun about presenting a literary classic in the library.” Celebrating great literature in a great home is her idea of paradise. “The Castle is a magical place. It gets your imagination going. This incredible building has been recognized as a treasure to our city. It’s a tremendous blessing to be able to take great literature into a gorgeous space like that with its beautiful architecture and the turrets. It’s enchanting.”

She says even as JCT leadership has changed since launching the fest in 2011, “Consistently the executive director and the staff have recognized the Lit Fest is in line with the Castle’s mission, particularly the portion that deals with the Joslyns’ legacy of cultural enrichment.”

one-man christmas carol She’s excited to have Hardy aboard. She previously brought him to Omaha to perform his original one-man show, Rattlesnake. He’s directed at The Rose Theater and acted-directed for the Nebraska Shakespeare Festival. They met working at the Barter Theatre in Virginia.

Hardy says, “I’ve seen one-man versions of this and it’s nothing like the one I do. The one I do is not storytelling, it’s theater, it’s characters involved in a world from moment to moment.” Anderson says Hardy makes it all seem real. “He brings a startling honesty to his acting style that always takes me off-guard in a wonderful way. He will use very little in terms of set and costume but he will transform things and find every possible way to use the things he does have on stage with him. It’s not about huge production values, it’s about creative transformation.” She says his Carol and the Playhouse’s couldn’t be more different.

“The Playhouse makes it a tremendous spectacle – so much color and beautiful effects and lavish costumes. Music is a major element of it. It’s this kind of confection of a production and it’s lasted all these years because people love it – they eat it right up like candy.”

Anderson says the library is such an intimate space it will require ingenuity by Hardy to make it accommodate his vigorous performance. “Doing theater within a private home, you’ve got to be resourceful and figure out how to make that work. It’s going to be very challenging because he’s going to be adapting it to a much smaller space than he’s accustomed to working in, so that’s going to call upon all his creativity.”

“They can expect a completely unexpected reading of the story. They can expect humor where they least expect it. They can expect some pretty exciting tour-de-force character shifting. And they can expect him to get at the heart of the story. Getting down to what the story really is trying to say fascinates me.”

By contrast, she says Hardy’s “theatrical style is really stripped down, really elemental.” The panel and lecture programs (see side bar facing page) examine Dickens’ influences and motivations.

the dickens formula “Dickens had a powerful agenda with all his novels, It was usually to expose some sort of injustice,” she says. “That was his thing. He was a whistle blower but he didn’t do it in a humorless, dour way. He did it through social satire. What could just be an angry man stridently shouting out discontent with British society is instead clever, it tickles your funny bone, it has great pathos. You can’t miss the social commentary but it’s wrapped up in these episodic stories that are fun to follow. They were actually presented to the public in serial form through different publications, so they’re designed to keep you wanting more. “They feel like they come to you in little delightful parcels and you fall in love with these crazy, amazing characters.”

She admires Dickens’ facility for finding hooks to reel readers in and artfully “He’s just one of those artists who has a spark of genius, keeping them engaged. I think. He’s always pushing for an edgier, very raw, committed style of theater. It has an extra energy that “He is a master of creating characters that are truly pitiful and struggling keeps it unpredictable and exciting. So when it came against poverty or disability. They’re up against tough odds and it all time to choose who the literary figure would be I knew he comes from his biographical background. His father and mother ended had this A Christmas Carol. So, why not do Dickens? It’s up in debtor’s prison, effectively making him an orphan at 10. He had already a world-class drama and we just needed to build the to fend for himself working in a rat-infested factory as a bootblack. festival around it.” He was thrust into the heart of the underclass in Industrial Revolution-era London. The filth, the misery – he lived it. 102

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dickens duo.

dickens at the castle schedule

jill anderson • john hardy

November 14, 6:30 p.m.

JOSLYN CASTLE LITERARY FESTIVAL

John Hardy’s one-man Christmas Carol performance with pre-show panel discussion.

“His examination of class and the disparity between upper class and lower class is something he was very qualified to do.” Hardy believes Dickens was ahead of his time in terms of insight into human psychology. He feels the power of the work also resides in how Dickens propels characters and thus readers through situations. “You only really come to know a character when they’re engaged in doing something and therein lies the key I think to A Christmas Carol. It’s not an accident this story has been made into a play and a movie again and again because it’s so active, somebody’s always engaged in doing something. It’s on its way somewhere a hundred percent of the time. It’s never static, it’s not reflective. It moves past a moment into the next moment. Even as a book it really doesn’t take a breath.

The panel moderated by Jill Anderson will discuss Dickens’ holiday classic. Panelists include University of Nebraska Omaha English professor David Peterson, plus veteran cast and crew of the Playhouse’s version of Carol – Susie Baer Collins, Caroline Rutherford and Jerry Longe – along with one=man Carol interpreter John Hardy. Panelists will contrast two vastly different interpretations of the same story and the process in taking classic literature from page to stage. Guests at the opening performance will receive a ticket to the Dec. 6 performance of the Playhouse’s Carol.

November 15, 2:30 p.m. Hardy’s Christmas Carol matinee performance.

“It’s a series of actions that characters do and that reveals them. So it reveals rather than describes.”

A literary love-in Anderson is moved that area lit lovers reveal their passion for the classics by supporting the festival, whose audience keeps growing. “It’s great there are people in this city who appreciate great literature and recognize it tells us something about the human condition. It’s fantastic we’ve lasted five years. I hope we last five more.”

Several ideas for next year’s theme have already asserted themselves but nothing is definite yet. It’s a fair bet, though, that The Bard will be featured since Anderson’s a self-described “Shakespeare fanatic.”

JCT is inviting a group of students from an area school to put on their own production of A Christmas Carol.

November 18, 7:00 p.m. Hardy’s Christmas Carol performance with pre-show lecture by UNO English professor David Peterson focused on the works, motivations and life of Charles Dickens.

With so much great lit out there, Anderson should never run out of illuminating, stimulating subjects. “If there’s a literary figure that has sparked my passion or my imagination I know I can produce a good festival around that person, I just know it. You have to have the impetus to be able to create something that has energy behind it. The ideas usually hit me like a bolt of lightning out of the blue. I don’t sit around and chew on it a lot. I wish for the inspiration to come.”

November 17, 1:00 p.m. Student matinee performance of Hardy’s Christmas Carol.

December 12, 7:00 p.m. Carols at the Castle – A Victorian Christmas Musical Event featuring Hal France and Jill Anderson.

December 13, 2:30 p.m. Carols at the Castle matinee performance – A Victorian Christmas Musical Event featuring Hal France and Jill Anderson. France is the music director and accompanist for Carols at the Castle. Anderson will lend her fine vocals and be joined by vocalists Curt Isaacson and Alex Himan. “The first part of it we’re kind of loosely naming From the Parlor to the Pub to capture the different styles of music prevalent in Victorian-era England. The second half will be specifically Christmas Music of the Victorian-era from England and France. It’s going to be beautiful and feature a lot of harmony singing,” says Anderson.

Meanwhile, she’ll continue delving into all things Dickens, assured in the knowledge her infatuation will result in a well-rounded experience for attendees.

For details and tickets, visit http://joslyncastle.com/or call 402-595-2199.

HEARTH PHOTO OF BY MAUREEN FRITTS | COVER JOSLYN CASTLE PHOTO BY JAMES FOGARTY


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• mQUARTERLY

TOP PICKS! OUR TOP PICKS FOR GREAT upcoming attractions NOVEMBER 8 • ORCHESTRA OMAHA’S THE MAGIC OF OPERA FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 7020 Cass Street | Omaha The mission of Orchestra Omaha is to provide Omaha-area musicians opportunities to perform in a symphony orchestra while offering the community an artistically engaging experience. The Magic of Opera, a free performance, features soprano Shelby VanNordstrand and baritone Jacob Bartlett and selections include works by Humperdinck, Bizet and Weber. 402-681-4791 | www.orchestraomaha.org/

NOVEMBER 12 • CIRQUE MECHANICS: PEDAL PUNK OMAHA PERFORMING ARTS Orpheum Theater Slosburg Hall | 409 South 16th Street | Omaha Steampunk meets American circus – with bikes – in the one-of-a-kind PEDAL PUNK. A zany bike shop mechanic interacts with cyclists and cycles, repairing more than broken pieces and creating wondrous machines that come to life and inspire the cyclist in all of us to unite with our inner pedal punk. The New York Times calls the Cirque Mechanics “exceptional, evocative, eye-catching and grossly entertaining…in a word, excellent.” 402-661-8501 | www.omahaperformingarts.org/

NOVEMBER 12 – DECEMBER 6 • MAMA’S GIRLS SNAP! PRODUCTIONS 3225 California Street | Omaha Eleven-year-old twins Amelia and Sam argue about everything – Barbies, sports, chores – everything except Sammy’s knowledge that she is a girl trapped in a boy’s body. Amelia fights for everyone and everything opposing Sammy, including their parents. The shrapnel of these conflicts brings Sammy’s transition and the fragility of their parent’s marriage to the fore. 402-341-2757 | www.snapproductions.com

DECEMBER 4 & 6 • 20TH ANNUAL CHRISTMAS AT THE CATHEDRAL OMAHA SYMPHONIC CHORUS St. Cecilia Cathedral | 701 North 40th Street | Omaha The Omaha Symphonic Chorus presents its signature event in the magnificent setting of St. Cecilia Cathedral. Accompanied by the Omaha Symphony Chamber Orchestra, the Chorus will be joined by UNO’s The Moving Company and Nebraska Wesleyan Chorus for a concert featuring both inspiring classics and beloved traditional carols. 402-398-1766 | http://omahasymphonicchorus.org/

DECEMBER 5 & 6 • BALLET NEBRASKA’S THE NUTCRACKER ORPHEUM THEATER | SLOSBURG HALL 409 South 16th Street | Omaha Ballet Nebraska’s The Nutcracker returns with the visual splendor and charming story that make it a family favorite. Set to one of Tchaikovsky’s most famous works, it transports audiences to the enchanting Land of Snow and the opulent Kingdom of Sweets, featuring a breathtaking new Waltz of the Flowers scene. The Nutcracker includes a cast of nearly 150 professional and student dancers and features lavish sets and more than 240 beautiful costumes. 402-541-6946 | balletnebraska.org

JANUARY 22 – FEBRUARY 14 • LOVE, LOSS AND WHAT I WORE OMAHA COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE | HAWKS MAINSTAGE THEATRE 6915 Cass Street | Omaha A play by Nora Ephron and Delia Ephron, Love, Loss and What I Wore is an endearing and witty collection of stories shared by a cast of women sitting side by side, accompanied by illustrations from the original work. The fabric of their tales of life’s struggles and celebrations is woven with the common thread of the all-important outfits they wore for each occasion. 402-553-0800 (box office) | http://www.omahaplayhouse.com/ 104

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community CALENDAR

LEARN MORE details about any of these events by searching our extensive Community Calendar at mQUARTERLY’s website: http://www.SpiritofOmaha.com/Metro-Magazine/Community/Calendar/

NOVEMBER 3

4:30 PM – 8:30 PM

GO RED FOR WOMEN Embassy Suites | 12520 Westport Parkway | La Vista Heart disease is no match for the power of women’s voices. Go Red For Women® celebrates the energy, passion and power we have as women to band together raise our voice and wipe out heart disease and stroke. Heart disease is still the No. 1 killer of women, taking the life of 1 in 3 women each year. This means women just like you - mothers, sisters, friends - are dying at the rate of one per minute because they don't know what you know: heart disease kills. The American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women is the world’s largest network fo women standing together to save women’s lives from heart disease. Millions of women have united to raise their voices about their No. 1 killer. With your help, many more lives can be saved. Make It Your Mission to fight heart disease in women. By sharing this commitment, together we can help save lives. Be a part of this extraordinary movement. $250

NOVEMBER 4 – 5

10:00 AM – 8:00 PM

ASSISTANCE LEAGUE OF OMAHA'S CHRISTMAS CARAVAN Assistance League of Omaha Omaha area homes TBA This popular event benefits ALO's philanthropic programs. Tickets are available for purchase in advance for $15 from vendors, Assistance League Thrift Shop, HyVee Stores, and any Assistance League member. Tickets may also be purchased on the tour date for $20 at any of the homes. $15 prior to event, $20 the day of the event 402-896-5146 | www.ALOmaha.org

NOVEMBER 4

8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

NONPROFIT SUMMIT OF THE MIDLANDS Nonprofit Association of the Midlands Embassy Suites Conference Center | La Vista Convening nonprofit, corporate and phila thropic professionals to learn from outstanding leaderstwork with peers, and gain insight on best practices for enriching the quality of community life throughout Nebraska and Western Iowa. TBD 402-557-5800 | www.nonprofitam.org

NOVEMBER 5

6:00 PM – 9:00 PM

MERRYMAKERS ANNUAL TOAST Merrymakers Association Embassy Suites LaVista | 12540 Westport Parkway | LaVista This is the 25th anniversary of Merrymakers Roast. This year, we're making it a TOAST, honoring the late Omaha philanthropist, Mike Simmonds $200 402-697-0205 | www.merrymakers.org

save the date CONNECT WITH over 100 nonprofits and learn more about their mission and how you can help! Order your copy of The Giving Guide & Event Book 2015 today at mQUARTERLY’s SpiritofOmaha.com.

NOVEMBER 6

6:00 PM – 9:00 PM

8TH ANNUAL ADULT SPELLING BEE Literacy Center for the Midlands Scott Conference Center | 6450 Pine St. | Omaha The evening promises to be full of excitement, as teams of 3 adults battle it out to be the “Best of the Hive” trophy winner. Past community support has helped the Literacy Center provide one-on-one tutoring and small classroom instruction to over 500 adult students working to improve their lives. $75 402-342-7323 | www.giveliteracy.org

NOVEMBER 6

5:30 PM – 10:00 PM

AN EVENING AMONG ANGELS Angels Among Us TBD | Omaha An Evening Among Angels is our annual fall gala. It is a celebration of a year spent helping families that have children being treated for cancer and a fundraiser to allow us to continue that mission. The evening includes dinner, entertainment, live auction, silent auction and visiting with our AAU families.The generosity of our loyal supporters is wonderful to see and makes for a fun evening. Please join us! $100.00/person - Sponsorship opportunities available 402-885-4840 | www.myangelsamongus.org

NOVEMBER 6

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM

BREAKING THE CYCLE LUNCHEON Anthony's Steakhouse 7220 F St | Omaha NOVEMBER is National Homeless Youth Awareness Month. Enjoy lunch while listening to our featured speaker, Justin Reed Early, talk about how being homeless as a young teen changed his life. About the Speaker: Justin Reed Early Justin Reed Early is the author of STREET CHILD: A Memoir. Justin will take the audience on an emotional journey of homelessness, recovery, and ultimate triumph which inspires thousands to stand together to battle social injustices including child abuse and homelessness. $65 402-345-5187 | www.yesomaha.org/luncheon

NOVEMBER 6

6:00 PM – 9:00 PM

TEAMMATES TAILGATE GALA Embassy Suites Omaha - La Vista Hotel 12520 Westport Pkwy | La Vista Help us celebrate the '95 season in support of TeamMates Mentoring Program! Featuring a live auction of the winningest turf in college football history! Astroturf-8 was installed on the field at Memorial Stadium in 1992. Astroturf-8 was the playing surface during the years the Huskers won three National Championships - 1994, 1995, and 1997. Own a piece of Husker history! Incredible silent auction opportunities! Thank you for your support of TeamMates Mentoring Program. $125 (402) 210-3546 | http://teammates.org

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• VIEW & PURCHASE PHOTOS OF THESE AND OTHER EVENTS 365/24/7 AT SPIRITOFOMAHA.COM

NOVEMBER 6

• mQUARTERLY look for the LEARN MORE ABOUT THESE ORGANIZATIONS IN THE GIVING GUIDE 2015!

6:00 PM – 7:00 PM

TREE OF LIGHTS KICK-OFF The Salvation Army American National Bank | 8990 W Dodge Rd | Omaha The public is welcome to attend the celebration and lighting ceremony. The Tree of Lights weighs more than 6,000 pounds, stands 75 feet tall and is illuminated by 85,000 LED lights, 657 giant LED starbursts, and a 6’ animated star on top. New special lighting will make the tree shine brightly this season. FREE 402-898-5908 | http://givesalvationarmy.org

NOVEMBER 12

5:00 PM – 9:00 PM

2015 MILAGRO DINNER Historic Livestock Exchange Building 4920 S. 30th Street | Omaha The Milagro Dinner and Silent Auction will be held Thursday, November 12 in the ballroom of the Historic Livestock Exchange Building, 4920 S. 30th Street. The event will honor members of the medical community who have helped further OneWorld’s mission. $125 4026195302 | www.OneWorldOmaha.org

NOVEMBER 13

7:00 PM – 10:00 PM

HOPS & GRAPES FALL FESTIVAL Partnership4Kids The Living Room at Mastercraft | 1111 N. 13th St. | Omaha A feast for the senses, this casual evening event will feature craft beer & wine tasting, live music and much more! All proceeds benefit Partnership 4 Kids (P4K). P4K is a goal setting and group mentoring program that builds hope for underserved students and helps them to create a foundation for success from kindergarten to careers. P4K currently serves 5,100 students in 21 schools of the Omaha Public Schools district. $50 per individual / corporate sponsorship opportunities also available. 402-930-3002

NOVEMBER 13

6:30 PM – 11:00 PM

JOSLYN ART MUSEUM ASSOCIATION ANNUAL GALA Joslyn Art Museum Association Joslyn Art Museum | 2200 Dodge Street | Omaha In support of Joslyn’s education programs, the 2015 gala celebrates the exhibition Go West! Art of the American Frontier from the Buffalo Bill Center of the West. Gala guests will be the first to view 90 paintings, sculptures, and American Indian artifacts created between the 1830s and 1920s from the world-renowned collections of the Buffalo Bill Center of the West. The evening includes cocktails in the Scott Pavilion gallery spaces and dining in the ConAgra Foods Atrium. $175 Individual ($350 Patron; $500 Benefactor) 402-933-8220 | www.joslyn.org

NOVEMBER 14

6:00 PM – 10:00 PM

2015 CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL & MEDICAL CENTER GALA Children's Hospital & Medical Center Foundation CenturyLink Center Omaha | 455 North 10th Street | Omaha You are invited to join the Friends of Children's Hospital & Medical Center for an evening of hope and entertainment featuring LeAnn Rimes! The annual Gala is Children's signature fundraising event, featuring dinner, live and silent auctions, a raffle and live music. Proceeds from the 2015 Gala will support Children’s upcoming campus expansion. This addition to the campus will help Children’s meet increasing needs and stay on the leading edge of care for our region’s children. For Online Ticket Registration, visit www.childrensomaha.org/gala. $175 402.955.6851 | www.ChildrensFoundationOmaha.org

NOVEMBER 17

5:00 PM – 7:30 PM SELL THE FARM - OMAHA AKSARBEN Foundation Scott Conference Center | 6450 Pine Street | Omaha

NOVEMBER 19 5:00 PM – 7:30 PM SELL THE FARM - KEARNEY Younes Convention Center | 416 Talmadge Street | Kearney Sell the Farm is an annual fundraiser in which corporate teams of four (4) bid on auction farm lots in an interactive game. Proceeds benefit scholarships for Heartland youth. The evening includes cocktails, hors d'oeuvres and camaraderie mixed with good-hearted competition buying and selling virtual agricultural farm assets. $1500 per team 402-554-9600 | www.aksarbenrodeo.com/p/events/312 402-554-9600 | www.aksarbenrodeo.com/p/events/312 107

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LEARN MORE details about any of these events by searching our extensive Community Calendar at mQUARTERLY’s website: http://www.SpiritofOmaha.com/Metro-Magazine/Community/Calendar/

community CALENDAR

NOVEMBER 19

save the date NOVEMBER 29

6:00 PM – 9:30 PM

2:00 PM – 4:00 PM

ANNUAL WINE TASTING & VINTNER DINNER Avenue Scholars Foundation

BALLET NEBRASKA NUTCRACKER TEA PARTY AT JOSLYN CASTE Ballet Nebraska Guild Joslyn Castle | 3902 Davenport Street | Omaha

Omaha Prime-Old Market | 415 South 11th Street | Omaha Table Sponsorships available 402-991-5595 | www.avenuescholarsfoundation.oprg

Be part of Omaha's most magical holiday tradition! A benefit for Ballet Nebraska, the Nutcracker Tea Party is an enchanting afternoon of delights and surprises -- featuring catered Nutcracker-themed sweets, classic holiday music, short excerpts from 'The Nutcracker' performed by professional ballet dancers and a visit from the Sugar Plum Fairy and all of her friends. There are few things more cherished than the joy of tradition during the holiday season. $35 Adult $25 Chilld (402) 541-6946 | http://balletnebraska.org/tickets/nutcrackerteaparty

NOVEMBER 20

6:00 PM – 11:00 PM

SENTIMENTAL JOURNEY The Durham Museum 801 South 10th Street | Omaha The Durham Museum invites you to their annual fundraiser, Sentimental Journey. Come celebrate the achievements and milestones of Omaha's Union Station. $175 per person 402-444-5071 | www.DurhamMuseum.org

DECEMBER 3 – 4

NOVEMBER 21

Visit amazing historic homes beautifully decorated for the holidays! Shop in a fantastic holiday boutique featuring many fantastic vendors held at the Joslyn Castle. Tour and shopping is $20 and will be held on December 4 and 5, 2015. A Holiday Patron Party will be held on Thursday, December 3, 2015. Cost will be $75 per person and include early shopping the boutique. The Patron Party runs from 5 PM to 8 PM. $20 for the Tour, $75 for the Patron Preview Party 402-595-2199 | www.joslyncastle.com

6:00 PM – 9:00 PM

17TH ANNUAL BEMIS CENTER ART AUCTION Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts 724 South 12th Street | Omaha The annual auction and exhibition highlights the generosity and diversity that characterize contemporary art. This year's festivities will include a silent and live auction with 250 works of art from top artists, juried by Ellina Kevorkian, artistic director for residency programs, Alex Priest, exhibition manager, and Larry Roots, Modern Arts Midtown gallery director. 402-341-7130 | www.bemiscenter.org/auction/auction.html

NOVEMBER 21

5:30 PM – 10:00 PM

BLUEJAY JAMBOREE Mutual of Omaha and Mutual of Omaha Bank Mutual of Omaha Dome | Omaha The 29th Annual Bluejay Jamboree – the athletic department’s biggest fund-raising event of the year will be held on Saturday, Nov. 21 at the Mutual of Omaha Dome. The evening begins at 5:30 p.m., and hundreds of live, super silent and silent auction items will be available. For more information contact bluejayjamboree@creighton.edu. $160.00 402-280-2720 | http://bidpal.net/bluejayjamboree

NOVEMBER 27 NOVEMBER 27

10:00 AM – 5:00 PM CHRISTMAS AT UNION STATION

5:00 PM – 7:00 PM TREE LIGHTING CEREMONY The Durham Museum | 801 S 10th St | Omaha 402-444-5071 | www.durhammuseum.org

HOLIDAY HISTORIC HOME TOUR AND BOUTIQUE Joslyn Castle Trust Joslyn Castle | 3902 Davenport Street | Omaha

DECEMBER 3

3:00 PM – 6:00 PM

OMAHA HOME FOR BOYS 'HOME' FOR THE HOLIDAYS Omaha Home for Boys 4343 N. 52nd Street | Omaha Kick-off the 2015 Holiday Season at the Omaha Home for Boys' 'Home' for the Holidays celebration Thursday, Dec. 3. Lots of food and fun, including hayrides around the campus, tours of cottages, the annual lighting of the tree in Cottage Circle -- and, of course, a photo with Santa Claus! Come one, come all to enjoy this festive opportunity to celebrate the season! Free to the public 402-457-7014 | www.omahahomeforboys.org

DECEMBER 4

5:00 PM – 9:00 PM

ETHNIC HOLIDAY FESTIVAL The Durham Museum 801 S 10th St | Omaha See how the world celebrates the holidays! 20+ local cultural organizations proudly display their crafts and traditional dress. Enjoy live music and shop hard-to-find ethnic foods and gifts. $9-Adults; $7-Seniors(62+); $6-children(3-12); Free-members and 2 and under 402-444-5071 | www.durhammuseum.org

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DISCOVER THE DIFFERENCE. 108

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CONNECT WITH over 100 nonprofits and learn more about their mission and how you can help! Order your copy of The Giving Guide & Event Book 2015 today at mQUARTERLY’s SpiritofOmaha.com. • VIEW & PURCHASE PHOTOS OF THESE AND OTHER EVENTS 365/24/7 AT SPIRITOFOMAHA.COM

DECEMBER 5

• mQUARTERLY look for the LEARN MORE ABOUT THESE ORGANIZATIONS IN THE GIVING GUIDE 2015!

9:00 PM – MIDNIGHT

NIGHT OF 1000 STARS NAP The Diamond Room | 605 N 13th St. | Omaha A night of cocktails, dancing, desserts and most importantly fundraising for the Nebraska AIDS Project awaits, with honorary chair, Andrew Rannells. Start your evening by enjoying all the fabulous pre-parties and make your way downtown by 9, as you are invited to join the NAP Board of Directors, staff and volunteers at The Diamond Room, an urban chic venue located in the up-and-coming NODO area. General Admission Ticket – $60. PURCHASE VIP or General Admission tickets at the registration website below. 402-552-9260 | https://14770.thankyou4caring.org/night-of-a-thousand-stars-2015

DECEMBER 5

10:00 AM – 5:00 PM

PHYSICIANS MUTUAL AND WOWT HOLIDAY MARKET Aksarben Village 67th & Center streets | Omaha Catch up with some of your favorite vendors at the 2015 Physicians Mutual and WOWT Holiday Market at Aksarben Village. Shop for great holiday gifts from local vendors under a heated tent at 67th & Center streets. Unique gift ideas include holiday decor, festive foods, homemade crafts and more. For more information visit www.omahaholidaymarket.com. FREE

DECEMBER 5

10:00 AM – 5:00 PM

WEEKEND OF GIVING Borsheims Borsheims Fine Jewelry & Gifts | 120 Regency Pkwy | Omaha During the Weekend of Giving, we are selling a special jewelry piece for $25, with $5 of each purchase going directly to Boys and Girls Club of Omaha. We also host a giving tree, where customers can purchase a Borsheims box for $10. Inside of each box is a surprise – anything from jewelry to Borsheims gift cards. Perhaps one of the most exciting parts of the Weekend of Giving is our trunk show that happens in conjunction with the event. We ask some of our finest jewelry designers to bring in extra merchandise just for the weekend. In addition, each brand brings in their own experts who can answer any questions about their respective lines. Free entry www.borsheims.com

DECEMBER 9

10:00 AM – 3:00 PM

SUBSTITUTE SANTA FOR CHILD SAVING INSTITUTE Child Saving Institute Guild Child Saving Institute | 4545 Dodge St | Omaha Please help the CSI Guild provide a joyful holiday for hundreds of children and teens in our community. Donate cash, gifts, or gift cards to the Substitute Santa program serving foster kids, shelter youth, and struggling families this holiday season. Donations for kids 402.504.3661 | http://childsaving.org

DECEMBER 11

7:00 AM – 6:00 PM

CHILD SAVING INSTITUTE RADIOTHON FOR KIDS Child Saving Institute On the air at Mighty 1290 KOIL | Live from Regency Court | 120 Regency Parkway | Omaha Be sure to tune in for CSI's annual Radiothon for at-risk kids. The program will feature heartwarming tales of the many children served in our community as well as surprise visits from special guests. Broadcasting live on The Mighty 1290 KOIL from Regency Court, call in or stop by! FREE 402.504.3664 | http://childsaving.org

DECEMBER 27

6:00 PM – 11:00 PM

OMAHA SYMPHONY GUILD DEBUTANTE BALL Omaha Symphony Guild Debutante Ball Committee Embassy Suites Conference Center – LaVista The annual Omaha Symphony Debutante Ball will be celebrating their 50th anniversary. $125.00 www.omahasymphony.org

DECEMBER 31

10:00 AM – 1:00 PM

NOON YEAR'S EVE The Durham Museum 801 S 10th St | Omaha 3-2-1, Happy New Year! Children of all ages will enjoy live music, crafts and activities. Ring in the noon-year while enjoying the celebratory bubble wrap stomp and the balloon drop at noon. $9-Adults; $7-Seniors(62+); $6-children(3-12); Free-members and 2 and under 402-444-5071 | www.durhammuseum.org 109

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community CALENDAR

JANUARY 16

save the date FEBRUARY 6

6:00 PM – 10:30 PM

MIDLANDS COMMUNITY FOUNDATION 2016 REFLECTION BALL Midlands Community Foundation Embassy Suites | Westport Parkway | LaVista

6:30 PM – 11:00 PM

2016 OMAHA HEART AND STROKE BALL

The Reflection Ball is held every year to recognize an individual(s) who have made a difference in our community through their time, talent and contributions. The net proceeds of the 2016 Reflection Ball will benefit the MCF Education Fund, a designated fund established at Midlands Community Foundation. Donations to the fund will be distributed to various schools, school foundations and other nonprofit organizations serving the needs of Sarpy and Cass counties in the area of education, including but not limited to STEM (science, technology, engineering and math); literacy; arts; leadership, peer and counseling support; backpack and clothing programs. $125 per person 402-991-8027 | www.midlandscommunity.org

Embassy Suites La Vista | 12520 Westport Pkwy | La Vista The 28th Annual Omaha Heart and Stroke Ball, attended by more than 1,000 individuals from Omaha's business, medical and social communities, is the annual black-tie optional gala benefiting the American Heart Association's lifesaving mission of building healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. The evening festivities begin with an opening reception that includes an electronic silent auction and it is followed by a dinner and a program that features entertainment, a live auction and an inspiring survivor story. We will be celebrating our work and mission, our donors and volunteers, and – most importantly – the lives saved and improved because of the American Heart Association and our supporters. $300 individual 402-810-6842 | www.omahaheartball.org

JANUARY 27

FEBRUARY 13

6:00 PM

6:00 PM – 9:00 PM

CARNIVAL OF LOVE GALA Heartland Family Service Embassy Suites La Vista | 12520 Westport Pkwy | La Vista

TEN OUTSTANDING YOUNG OMAHANS BANQUET Omaha Jaycees CenturyLink Center Since 1932, the Omaha Jaycees has presented awards to Ten Outstanding Young Omahans who have exemplified the ideals of their communities and exhibited extraordinary leadership qualities. TOYO! honors individuals between the ages of 21 and 40 who show uncompromised commitment to improving the community through selfless acts of kindness while excelling in their professional careers. These individuals are also nominated for national recognition through The United States Jaycees Foundation. Join us for a cocktail hour and full dinner while we celebrate the 2015 TOYO! honorees. www.omahajaycees.org/clubportal/ClubStatic.cfm?clubID=1447&pubmenuoptID=14865

The Carnival of Love Gala is a fun-filled evening featuring cocktails, hors d'oeuvres, carnival games, dinner, and both silent and live auctions. The proceeds benefit families and individuals in Omaha and surrounding communities in eastern Nebraska and southwest Iowa. $125 Individual Ticket 402-552-7424 | www.HeartlandFamilyService.org

JANUARY 28

Mercy High School's FIESTA 2016 is a dinner auction designed to raise funds for the school's Negotiated Tuition program. The event, February 20, will be held at the Embassy Suites, La Vista and is entitled, A League of Their Own. The fundraiser begins at 4:30 p.m. with Mass, includes a silent and live auction, gourmet dinner and a $10,000 raffle. Details on pricing and other information is available on the school's website at www.mercyhigh.org $125 each; alumnae and parents, two tickets, $75 402-553-9424 | http://mercyhigh.org

5:30 PM – 9:30 PM

GIRLS NITE OUT Girls Inc. of Omaha Hilton Omaha | 1001 Cass St. | Omaha Girls Nite Out is a hilarious, fun-filled event to support the work of Girls Incorporated of Omaha and their mission of Inspiring all Girls to be Strong, Smart and Bold! Join us for drinks, shopping, and the comedy of Kira Soltanovich. $75 per person 402-457-4676 | www.girlsincomaha.org

FEBRUARY 5

FEBRUARY 20

4:30 PM – 10:00 PM

FIESTA 2016 Mercy High School Embassy Suites, La Vista | 12520 Westport Parkway | Omaha

5:30 PM

#MARIANINSPIRES @MARIANFEST 2016 Baxter Arena | 2425 South 67th Street | Omaha Our 34th annual MarianFEST is moving to a new night and a new location! We'll share an evening of socializing and mobile bidding to help fund scholarshipsed-based financial aid and Marian's operating budget. Come hear stories we know you'll like about how Marian is inspiring our girls to make a difference in our community and around the world. Watch www.marianhighschool.net for more details on this inspiring evening. Follow us today on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram at @MarianFEST 2016 to be a part of all the action! 402-571-2618 x 1167 | www.marianhighschool.net

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CONNECT WITH over 100 nonprofits and learn more about their mission and how you can help! Order your copy of The Giving Guide & Event Book 2015 today at mQUARTERLY’s SpiritofOmaha.com. • VIEW & PURCHASE PHOTOS OF THESE AND OTHER EVENTS 365/24/7 AT SPIRITOFOMAHA.COM

• mQUARTERLY look for the LEARN MORE ABOUT THESE ORGANIZATIONS IN THE GIVING GUIDE 2015!

calendar for the arts

NOVEMBER 1

6:00 PM – 9:00 PM

3RD ANNUAL CELEBRACION DIA DE LOS MUERTOS ART SHOW Hot Shops Art Center 1301 Nicholas Street | Omaha Please join us for the 3rd Annual Celebracion Dia De Los Muertos Art Show. October 2 - November 1, 2015 Hot Shops Art Center, Omaha A group art show exploring the sacred Mexican holiday, Dia De Los Muertos, and featuring over 20 local and regional Artists working in a variety of media and styles. The Opening Reception will be held Saturday, October 3, 2015 6-9pm Free Admission / All Ages Free

NOVEMBER 12

5:00 PM – 8:30 PM

PREMIERE OF “OUT OF FRAME: UNSEEN POVERTY IN THE HEARTLAND” Together Aksarben Cinema | 2110 S. 67th Street | Omaha Together, along with Surreal Media Labs, Con Agra Foods, and American National Bank present an exclusive film premiere of Out of Frame; Unseen Poverty in the Heartland in November 2015. The documentary film Out of Frame brings to life an issue and population often ignored – but fully present in our city. Non-existent or low-wage work erodes the middle class, exploding the number of people living in or near poverty, driving a wedge further and further between the “have’s” and the “have not’s.” Time: 5:00pm doors open for conversation, heavy appetizers from Jimi D’s, and wine tasting 6:30pm Premiere of Out of Frame Documentary 7:15pm Panelist Discussion Aileen Brady, Community Alliance Earl Redrick, HUD Hollyanne Fricke, Gretchen Swanson Center for Nutrition Frankie Holeton, Catholic Charities $35 per person, or $60 for two 402-345-8047 x206 | www.outofframedocumentary.com/

NOVEMBER 22

2:00 PM

BALLET NEBRASKA PRESENTS THE NUTCRACKER Iowa Western Arts Center 2700 College Rd | Council Bluffs Always fresh, lively, and thoroughly entertaining, Ballet Nebraska’s The Nutcracker returns with the visual splendor and charming story that make it a family favorite. Set to one of composer Piotr Tchaikovsky’s most famous works, it transports audiences to the enchanting Land of Snow and the opulent Kingdom of Sweets, featuring a breathtaking new Waltz of the Flowers scene. The Nutcracker includes a cast of nearly 150 professional and student dancers and features lavish sets and more than 240 beautiful costumes. Single tickets: $19, $30, $45 http://balletnebraska.org

DECEMBER 5

2:00 PM

BALLET NEBRASKA PRESENTS THE NUTCRACKER Orpheum Theater Single Tickets: $25, $45, $62 www.ticketomaha.com/productions/The-Nutcracker

DECEMBER 4

8:00 PM

20TH ANNUAL CHRISTMAS AT THE CATHEDRAL Omaha Symphonic Chorus St. Cecilia's Cathedral | 701 N 40th Street | Omaha Join the Omaha Symphonic Chorus as they present the 20th Annual Christmas at the Cathedral. Music will include audience favorites and pieces never before presented at the Cathedral by the Chorus. The Chorus is joined by The Omaha Symphony Chamber Orchestra, the Nebraska Wesleyan University Choir, and UNO's The Moving Company. This event is sure to warm your heart and get you in the holiday spirit. For tickets, see our website - www.omahasymphonicchorus.org, or call Ruth at 402-680-6156 $30 / $18 402-650-4971 | www.omahasymphonicchorus.org

FEBRUARY 12

7:30 PM – 10:30 PM • FEBRUARY 14 2:00 PM – 5:00 PM

OPERA OMAHA PRESENTS LA FANCIULLA DEL WEST Opera Omaha Orpheum Theater | 409 S 16th St | Omaha Set in the saloon of a California mining camp during the Gold Rush, La fanciulla del West (The Girl of the Golden West) has all the grit and grandeur of our greatest western films. Puccini’s soaring melodies provide the heartbeat of a dramatic love story filled with passion, redemption, and forgiveness. This period production will be directed by Lillian Groag (Carmen, 2013) and is sure to be a highlight of Westward O!, a city-wide arts festival celebrating the frontier and American West. Sung in Italian with English supertitles. $19-$99 402-346-4398 | www.operaomaha.org

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waking WORDS

mQUARTERLY • LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

ROB KILLMER

into the fire! How many of us find it natural and instinctive to run toward a burning building or the source of gunfire? That immediately strikes us all as borderline insane, yet we do celebrate and honor those who do this very thing, for their courage in facing and embracing their fears and overriding their natural instincts when racing into the fire to rescue other Souls who may be trapped in the midst of searing heat, flame and peril. Is such courage any less worthy of our honor if it is OurSelves we hold nothing back for? For each of us, there are aspects of Who We Are that are no less in need of our heroism. Each of us carries wounds, scars and fears, along with the attitudes and behaviors attached to them, many of which we are also fearful or ashamed of. Left unexamined and unaddressed, these become patterns that “run” us automatically, in ways that do not serve us or those we encounter. We tend to pity or scorn those beset by addictive patterns, but make no mistake – even the most “sound” among us are addicted to our own reinforced patterns of feeling, thinking, perceiving and behaving just as surely as any street junkie, and just as instinctively trapped by them. Our choice of “drugs” may be unique, but the forces driving us to medicate ourselves are quite common. For each of us, there are shocks and traumas that we carry with us along our life journey, long after the initial “point of impact” – and these become the roots of our fears and wounds. Over time we develop (mainly subconscious) mechanisms and devices which assist us in avoiding, defecting, denying or stuffing these wounds. These mechanisms are short-term remedies with long term automation that prevents us from experiencing genuine healing, yet discovering, and then disengaging them, is an essential process deserving our commitment. The Physics of Psychology Among the reasons we express ourselves in compulsive or repetitive behavior is because the Energy of the traumas we carry with us must be expressed in some way. In attempting to understand and treat behavioral issues, the healing community seems to have largely missed the powerful influence and impact – not just of these traumas and mechanisms – but also the indestructible, recycling energies they deposit within us that drive everything! Albert Einstein stated that “energy cannot be created or destroyed, only transformed.” This is an accepted maxim of physics, which is regularly applied to our interpretation of the physical realm but is less generally applied to the psychological realm. The Energy that becomes lodged in our psyche as a result of trauma will follow the path of least resistance or greatest energetic flow. Our avoidance, deflection and denial mechanisms create and reinforce these paths. If we can’t “smoke it out” we will “eat it out”, if we can’t “eat it out” we will “drink it out” (alcohol)…if we can’t “drink it out” we will “drug it out”, if we can’t “drug it out” we will “orgasm it out” (yes, sex is often a very powerful form of self-medication.) If orgasm isn’t enough to momentarily purge the energy, we will cry it out, or most often act it out: project, deflect, defend, attack, scapegoat ourselves or others, all driven by the energy of the trauma still residing in our psyche. Even if we deal with the original “point of impact” through therapy, counseling, prescriptions, even 12-Steps, the energy likely has developed a life of its own – continuing to express itself, keeping us trapped in our mechanisms. We will automatically and instinctively resort to one of these reinforced, engrained energy conduits to experience and express these powerful and “resident” energies we carry. Why? Because they are our least resistant, most familiar ways of working out (but not necessarly through) our “stuff”… and Everyone is directed by these energetic patterns to at least some meaningful extent. The energy we all carry must go somewhere and will find a way of moving itself out. And these energies, since they cannot be destroyed, generate and perpetuate powerful cycles in our lives, repeating inexorably along our life path, every bit as charged as the cycles of energy pulsing through our power lines. Now, just as with those power lines, this is energy that can harm – or kill – if not properly understood, harnassed and directed.

Only by “taking charge” with a process of transformation can we translate these energies into higher, more beneficial and productive forms of expression. Attempting to eliminate these energies is futile…just as attempting to address the related behaviors alone is inadequate and incomplete. These inexhaustible energies will drive us. The good news is, by embracing and collaborating with this indestructible force, we can change everything. We can turn destructive selfautomation into productive self-actualization.

ROBERT P. KILLMER Editor@SpiritofOmaha.com

Understanding this “physics of psychology” helps us approach ourselves and others with much greater understanding and compassion – as opposed to our more primitive prejudices and observations – regarding behavior, beliefs, etc. Our attitudes towards ourselves and others is transformed as we realize that many of our Human attitudes and behaviors are not so much Free Will Choice as they are Energetic Expression. Sit with that for a moment. It can change how you look at your own “expressions of energy” that are powerfully manifesting in your life and the lives of others. That change in perspective is the beginning of a change in how you recognize, and then realize (make real) the energies that are driven through you…resident within you…and are powerfully manipulating you and those you relate to, until you learn how to restore a more original, creative and productive energy flow. This restoration cannot be accomplished through the mechanisms created to insulate us from our darkest fears and doubts about ourselves, it requires that we not only face our fire, but race into it – that we conscientiously and deliberately examine and face our individual “Hearts of Darkness”, understanding that as we learn to face, and even embrace, our “Shadows”, we will discover deeper truths about the patterns that are running us. As we uncover the previously hidden mysteries that our automated mechanisms prevent us from realizing, we will recover more and more of who we really are, disengaging from these false operating mechanisms, and forging new ones. This is true restoration of our free will…and it is not for the faint-hearted! It’s true that running into our Dark Hearts may in fact “do us in” as surely as flames or enemy fire place all heroes in peril. But if (as they often do) we somehow manage to survive our own inner perils, we may rest assured that the Person emerging from such “trial by fire” will have been refined by the trial, having discovered something just as courageous, just as empowering, solidifying and transcendent as other heroes have themselves discovered. Honor will be due! Am I suggesting that we should all carry out our basest instincts – such as the instinct to commit murder – in order to self-actualize? Certainly not! Yet understanding this “physics of psychology” can help us acknowledge the many ways we already murder ourselves and others psychologically every day, offering us a way to reclaim and restore the murderer’s original dignity. Going deeper into the aspects of ourselves we most fear, loathe and feel shameful about, with a commitment to conscientiously and compassionately discern the genuine truths about these more shadowy aspects of Self, affords us insights that will permit us to bring these feelings and core beliefs into greater alignment with our highest and most illuminated intentions and desires – and recovering our own Souls equips us to better assist Others. As we come face to face – again and again – in deeper (perhaps darker) ways, with the Scapegoat or Nemesis within that we so fear, loathe and bury in shame and scorn…we will discover its true identity…It is our Childlike Innocent…chained to our many traumas and survival mechanisms…crying out in the only ways it knows how to…seeking desperately for the parenting, nourishing, nurturing and mentoring that only one adult can truly now provide.

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metroQUARTERLY Winter Edition 2015/16  

metroQUARTERLY’S Winter 2015-16 Issue is online now! metroMAGAZINE/mQUARTERLY is published quarterly by ALH Publications, serving the Omaha/...

metroQUARTERLY Winter Edition 2015/16  

metroQUARTERLY’S Winter 2015-16 Issue is online now! metroMAGAZINE/mQUARTERLY is published quarterly by ALH Publications, serving the Omaha/...