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RUTH HENRICHS AND LUTHERAN FAMILY SERVICES ConneCting our Community

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in this ISSUE

connecting our community

features

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32

MOVING FORWARD • SERVING ALL

holiday GIFT GUIDE

lutheran family services

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HELPING OTHERS TO BE THEIR BEST heartland family service • the BIG connection!

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HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE holiday deals from our advertising partners

departments/columns

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OUT FRONT • UP CLOSE local executives share their giving culture

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VIPS: VERY INSPIRATIONAL PEOPLE our series of continuing inspiring profiles

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connecting to our leadership

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connecting to our gift giving

THE BIG connection

GAME CHANGERS • LINDA LOVGREN presented by planitomaha

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HOSPITALITY HALL OF FAME omaha restaurant association

OMAHA COMMUNITY FOUNDATION omaha giving

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connecting to our mission

metroSPIRIT with mary vandenack

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VW LAW

connecting to our integrity

planning matters

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SWARTZBAUGH, FARBER & ASSOC. todays savings

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STEPHANIE VONDRAK impact!

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WAKING WORDS FROM ROB KILLMER self-improvement spreadsheet

events

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SCENE highlights from recent charity & cultural events

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SAVE THE DATE upcoming events in the coming quarter

connecting to our vision

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connecting to our conviviality

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NOV/DeC/JaN 2017/18 • VOl. 29 NO. 4 Press releases and other editorial information may be sent to: P.O. BOx 241611, OmaHa, Ne 68124 or e-mailed to: editor@spiritofOmaha.com Publisher/Editor-in-Chief

Creative Collaboration

andrea l. “andee” Hoig

leo adam Biga Jim Fackler elissa Joy Debra Kaplan Wendy moore Omaha Community Foundation

Editor/Creative Director

robert P. “rOB” Killmer Community Engagement

tracy Fisher

Jim scholz Kara schweiss swartzbaugh-Farber & associates

Special Thanks

Counterparts Printco graphics

VW law stephanie Vondrak D.D.s. m ichael J. Weaver, J.D.

metromagaziNe /

quarterly is wholly owned and operated by the publisher and is not affiliated with any other publication, operating solely on subscription and advertising revenues and the good will of the agencies and charities we support; all of which are very important to the continuing growth and quality of this publication. thank you to all who support this endeavor. OFFICE/SALES

402.932.3522 | sales@spiritofOmaha.com MISSION STATEMENT alH Publications exists to inform, inspire and connect those who give back to the community through volunteerism and philanthropy, recognizing the ongoing efforts of area businesses, organizations and individuals who better our community. Contents of this magazine are copyrighted by alH Publications, inc. in their entirety. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored, or transmitted in any form or by any means - electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without prior written consent of the publisher. ©Copyright 1990 – 2017 alH Publications, inc. all rights reserved.

402.932.3522 • CONNECT@SpiritofOmaha.com

advertise with us... MAKE THE CONNECTION! “We have generations of individuals that have passion, and generations that have need. When those two meet, great relationships occur. metroMAGAZINE and mQUARTERLY consistently help connect and foster those relationships.” ~ NATE DODGE PresiDeNt, NP DODge COmPaNy

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words FROM MY HEART

mquarterly • letter frOm tHe publiSHer

connection

As we come to the close of 2017 I reflect back on all of the amazing and challenging experiences that I have had during the course of the past twelve months. I started this year off with a commitment to participating in fifty 5K events, and to date I have completed forty-two as this issue prepares for press. That’s 210-plus kilometers I’ve put behind me one step-at-a-time since the year started, and let me tell you, I’ve felt every one of them physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually; it’s “put feet to my prayers!” What started off as more of a physical challenge…something intended to encourage me along my health and wellness journey (as well as encouraging me to shed a few more pounds) has evolved into so much more. I am not a runner by any means and not especially interested in the competitive aspects of such events, but something else about them has become very important to me…connection. With all of the responsibilities and stresses that come with running a business I often feel that I may be missing out on important opportunities to truly connect with people. My focus must often be directed to the bottom line (which is very important in any business) or to the quality of the product that we put out (also important), or the impact that our efforts are having in service to our clients and our community (equally important.) Being faithful to these priorities often leaves me little time for personal connection with the very people we are here to support and encourage. For much of my career I have been a “hands-on” and “on-location” publisher and photographer attending thousands of charity events. I have enjoyed connecting with people through my camera lens or public appearances. Over time my duties as a publisher/entrepreneur required that I spent less time “on location” and more time “behind-the-scenes” advancing our efforts at connecting our community, but a byproduct of those efforts is that I, personally, lost much of the connection I thrive on. Last year we began a new initiative, our MAD•25 event promotion, where ALHP commits to participate in at least 25 run/walk-type events. That commitment placed me back in the mix again, and restored opportunities for me to get out and connect! The ultimate by-product of my own MAD•25 participation was a newly acquired zeal for taking on those fifty 5Ks, and expanding my engagement and connection with people I would otherwise never have had the privilege of knowing! Once again I am taking photos at all of these events, documenting the journey as I had for so many years in the past. The act of connecting with people through my camera has reawakened something in me, rekindling the fulfillment I receive as I connect with people. As I reflect on my own sense of fulfillment at this restored sense of personal connection, I am reminded why I’m so proud and grateful to be engaged in what we do here (and have been doing for the past quarter-century!) This publishing house—and literally everything we do—is about connecting the community: about connecting charitable and cultural organizations with those who are committed to supporting them in making a difference in our community. I hope that our efforts in this edition provide you the same sense of connection, and offer you many ways to “put feet to your prayers!”

aNDrea l. HOig ahoig@SpiritofOmaha.com

NOTE: Be sure to check out our Letter from the Editor on the last page of every metroMAGAZINE/mQUARTERLY, for timely insights and inspiration from ROB KILLMER

~ Andee!

COVER PHOTO BY JIM FACKLER

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DATE! E H T SAVE GAZINE’S

MA metro EVENT G I B e 8 Th 18, 201 er y r a u n t Ja gn Cen i s e D a Omah 8pm 5pm –

This year’s FINALISTS The following events & organizations were selected by their followers who participated in this year’s nominations. VOTE for your favorites among these events before DECEMBER 15, 2017. BEST EVENT THEME

BEST EVENT FOOD & WINE

BEST WALK / RUN

Vintage Affaire VIII - Jockeys and Juleps • Autism Action Partnership Blue Jean Ball: A Night of Stars • Make-A-Wish Nebraska For the Kids Benefit: A Day at the Races • Omaha Children's Museum Bubbly with Barbra • Omaha Community Playhouse Jumpin' Juleps: Kentucky Derby Benefit • Take Flight Farms

Pinot, PIgs & Poets • Completely KIDS Brew Haha • Habitat for Humanity of Omaha enVISION 2016: FOOD TRUCK TOUR • Justice for Our Neighbors-NE vinNEBRASKA • Partnership 4 Kids Art & Soup • Visiting Nurse Association

5K Superhero Run for CASA • CASA of Douglas County HEALS to the Pavement • HEALing Embrace Walk for the Animals • Nebraska Humane Society Monster Mash 2016 • Suburban Rotary/Children's Hospital & Medical Center Claussen-Leahy Maverick Run • UNO Athletic Department

BEST EVENT UNDER 500

BEST EVENT OVER 500

Wine, Women & Shoes • Children's Hospital & Medical Center Open Space Soirée • KANEKO Let's Go Steady, An Evening of Firsts • Nebraska Ataxia "Beautifully Broken" Key to Freedom Banquet • Rejuvenating Women Sentimental Journey • The Durham Museum

Omaha Heart and Stroke Ball • American Heart Association Cabaret • Child Saving Institute 20th Annual JDRF Promise Gala - Past, Present, Cure • JDRF There's No Place Like Home Auction & Dinner • Open Door Mission Property Brothers' Luncheon • Rebuilding Together Omaha

Deadline to vote is DECEMBER 15, 2017! • Go to www.SpiritofOmaha.com/TheBigEvent-VOTE/

WINNERS will be announced at The BIG Event 2018! Voting begins NOVEMBER 1st!

*

Winners in each category will be eligible to compete for:

VOTING deadline is DECEMBER 15, 2017!

• Go to www.SpiritofOmaha.com/TheBigEvent-VOTE/


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mission MILESTONES

lutheran family services

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stOry by KARA SCHWEISS | phOtOgraphy COurtesy Of LUTHERAN FAMILY SERVICES

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lutheran family services started out as two orphanages 125 years ago. today it’s a comprehensive nonprofit organization offering a continuum of human care services that serve more than 45,000 people each year under a mission to express god’s love for all people.

MOVING FORWARD

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mission MILESTONES

lutheran family services AS SHE approaches HER RETIREMENT, LUTHERAN FAMILY SERVICES (LFS) PRESIDENT AND CEO RUTH HENRICHS SAID THAT AS SHE LOOKS BACK AT HER 41 YEARS WITH THE ORGANIZATION SHE’S LED SINCE 1985, SHE HOPES PEOPLE KNOW SHE ALWAYS STRIVED TO DO THE RIGHT THING. “I want to be remembered as a leader who had moral courage and integrity,” she said. “I’ve made mistakes just like anyone else, but I want to be remembered as somebody who could admit those mistakes and someone who made tough decisions—or joyous decisions—with moral courage.” It’s a direct reflection of the mission of the 125-year-old organization, which originated as Trinity Lutheran Church orphanage in Fremont and Immanuel Children’s Home in Omaha, both founded by Lutheran pastors. In the 1940s, programs branched out to cover foster care and adoption. A refugee settlement program emerged in the 1970s, and in the 1980s, treatment programs for substance abuse and outpatient mental health began. Most recently, LFS has added crisis response, veterans programs and integrated care. CONTINUUM OF SERVICES Today’s Lutheran Family Services offers a continuum of human care services that provide safety, hope and well-being for more than 45,000 individuals annually and boasts a client satisfaction rate of 95 percent. LFS’s present-day broad service areas fall under three umbrellas: behavioral health, children services, and community services. Behavioral health services encompass outpatient mental health therapy and community services; substance use treatment; sexual abuse/incest treatment; round-the-clock mobile crisis response; peer support; At Ease therapeutic support for active military, veterans and their loved ones; Health 360 Integrated Care in Lincoln; and specialized counseling for children, adolescents, adults and families. Services for children include providing parenting support and prevention/early intervention programs; “RSafe®” treatment for children and families impacted by sexual abuse; infant, international and foster care adoption services and searches; “Right Turn®” post-adoption services; foster care; pregnancy counseling; maternal health care and family support services; and youth diversion services. Nebraska Children’s Home Society is collaborating with LFS on the program.

So I’m really proud of all the different things we have done over the years in response to a community crisis or a community need,” she said. “We serve the community of faith and people who have no faith at all.” It’s not always easy, she admitted, to meet the “wide diversity of needs in the community,” which includes addressing challenging and heartbreaking problems like substance use, domestic violence and homelessness, or providing assistance to people who have troubled pasts. “Our history comes out of children’s services, and that was the only thing we did in the first 40 years of the organization’s existence. But then we began to see the growing mental health and substance use problems. LFS responded to those challenges in the ‘80s. Then it was LFS doing our small part to welcome the strangers among us,” she said. “I think the community needs LFS because we’re not afraid to take on difficult problems in our community… someone once looked at me straight in the eyes and said, ‘We are not called to be comfortable, but faithful.’ Faithfulness for me is the care of our neighbor and expressing God’s love for all people.” HELPING HUMANKIND Terry McClain, chair of the LFS Foundation board of directors, said he’s proud that LFS has taken on tough issues and provided services that “are not politically popular but are very necessary” like sexual abuse counseling or transition assistance for inmates. “LFS has stood by their principles of helping humankind, period,” McClain said. “I’ve been proud of the fact that LFS has stood up for real needs in the community and addressed the real issues.” McClain and his wife Linda were recipients of the organization’s 2017 Immanuel Award acknowledging their years of commitment and leadership, particularly in garnering community support for the Rupert Dunklau Center for Healthy Families in their home community of Fremont. “My wife and I used LFS services many years ago and I started volunteering when they had some needs in terms of local fundraising” he said. Eventually, McClain joined the board.

“We have supported LFS for many years because of the services they provide to the Community services include refugee resettlement, immigration legal services, interpretation services, case management, and education and employment services communities they are involved with; they’re a Nebraska-wide organization and they do a lot for families and individuals,” he said. “We think they’re one of the best for new populations. human services providers around.” “We serve everyone, regardless of race, religion, creed or ability to pay. We serve the lifespan from young children to the elderly, we speak between 27 and 35 languages REACHING OUT “They really do make a difference,” Connie, a recipient of services, agreed. She at any given time on our staff. We don’t just use the word ‘diversity,’ we live the first connected to LFS three years ago when “through a series of events” she found word ‘diversity,’” Henrichs said. herself living in a homeless shelter and battling clinical depression. “Life then wasn’t functional. I wasn’t ‘me’.” ROOTED IN FAITH The shelter director helped her reach out for assistance. Henrichs, a nationally renowned leader in the Lutheran community, emphasized, “Crisis response, therapy, medication management and community support are “It is out of our faith that we formed this organization. I am very, very proud that we are Lutheran Family Services, but our mission is to express God’s love for all people. the services I received,” she recalled, explaining that community support extends

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serving all •

TIMELINE

WHILE NO TIMELINE OF EVENTS can adequately sum up an organization’s history and contributions, the following is an attempt to highlight Lutheran Family Services’ prominent milestones, accomplishments and achievements: 1892

Pastor Peter Graef founds the Trinity Lutheran Church orphanage in Fremont, Nebraska

1901

Pastor Erik Fogelstrom founds Immanuel Children’s Home on the campus of the Immanuel Deaconess Institute in Omaha

1918

Second Immanuel Children’s home constructed

1940s

Organization begins offering whole family support, adoption and foster care programming

1960s

Fremont and Omaha efforts combine with shared office space at Omaha Church Center

1975

First refugee resettlement program begins in Omaha

1978

North Platte offices open

1980s

Expansion encompasses programming in Columbus, Grand Island, Lincoln and North Platte

1984

North Omaha office opens to offer counseling

1984

Ruth Henrichs named president and CEO

1985

Lutheran Family Services name adopted

1986

LFS provides counseling for those affected by the farm crisis

1987

Treatment programs for substance use and outpatient mental health begin

1989

RSafe® sexual abuse treatment program begins

1990s

Over $5 million raised through the Share the Hope capital campaign, the first major LFS statewide fund appeal

1990s

First accreditation by Council on Accreditation received

1991

Omaha Church Center purchased for corporate headquarters and downtown Omaha counseling center and renamed The Dunklau Building

1991

HIV/AIDS counseling offered

2004

International adoption services begin

2007

Rupert Dunklau Center for Healthy Families opens in Fremont on the site of original 1892 orphanage

2007

International Center of the Heartland, a partnership between LFS and United Way of the Midlands, opens

2010

Crisis response program launches in Douglas, Dodge and Washington Counties

2010

Care for veterans expand and At Ease program formed

2016

Health 360 building opens in Lincoln to provide general and behavioral health care at one central location

2017

125 years of Expressing God’s Love for All People celebrated

2017

Kountze Commons, a partnership that includes LFS mental health services, opens in Omaha

RUTH HENRICHS

PASTOR PETER GRAEF • CIRCA 1892

PASTOR E.A. FOGELSTROM • CIRCA 1901

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lutheran family services beyond the immediate crisis and helped her LONG-TERM VISION employees and a $25 million operating budget. Over Henrichs has positioned LFS for the transition to both long-term therapy and a more the years since Henrichs started out as a social worker implementation of a long-term vision to build a stable situation that includes a steady job and a better with LFS’s pregnancy counseling and adoption Campus for Healthy Families in downtown Omaha. life. Her family has benefited, too: Connie’s now-adult programs and even since she became its president Over the past 20 years, LFS purchased the entire city daughter is also gainfully employed and her son is and CEO 32 years ago—around the same time the block at 24th Street between Douglas and Dodge starting college. name Lutheran Family Services of Nebraska, Inc. was Streets. Just this fall, LFS opened an outpatient mental “It’s a big 180 now,” she said. “It’s important for implemented—she’s seen the organization’s services health office in the new Kountze Commons building people to know you can come to Lutheran Family shift in response to changes in the needs of the in Midtown. Services. Don’t [avoid coming because of pride.] If you community. That adaptability, she said, has “We’ve been dreaming of a campus at 24th and need services, if you need help, definitely reach out.” contributed to LFS’s longevity. Dodge for two decades. I believe it’s time now to And that means helping others reach out, too, “I believe LFS will be around another 125 years bring those architectural drawings to life,” she added. “If someone is struggling, I would say to doing some of our work in new ways,” she said. “We’ll Henrichs said. not judge the person or look down on them. Be the be using more technology to reach more people in LFS’s first integrated care facility, the Health 360 one who helps.” rural areas. We’ll treat old problems with new Integrated Care Clinic, opened its doors in May 2016 Community members can also help, and in near six high-poverty neighborhoods in Lincoln. LFS numerous ways, Henrichs said. Financial support and methods and community partners. “For example, we have provided mental health would like to mirror the Lincoln clinic’s concept to donations of specific items (listed at lfsneb.org) are reach vulnerable populations by addressing their and substance use services since the 1980s. For most always welcome, she explained, but there are also a biological, psychological and social needs in other therapists, they’re used to a 50-minute hour in their host of volunteer opportunities. Some require communities. In its first year of operation, the office. But as delivery of behavioral health services specialized skills but others need nothing more than Lincoln clinic served more than 4,800 people; 71 changes, our therapists are right there changing with enthusiasm and commitment. percent were either uninsured or on Medicaid. that. So we’re going to see more and more behavioral “It may be as simple as collecting clothing for “LFS is where we are called to be in Lincoln,” families, or providing transportation or mentoring, or health services performed via telehealth, and we’re Henrichs said. “These neighborhoods are where the reading to kids. There are a lot of different things that preparing for that right now.” highest concentration of mental health calls to 911 Henrichs said collaboration and partnerships can be done,” McClain said. He added that volunteer come from. It’s where childhood obesity is high, and contributions allow staff hours and other resources to have become more prevalent over the past decade where the highest percentage of people living in be allocated elsewhere. With half of the organization’s “and accelerated in the past five years,” from formal poverty are located in the city.” operating budget coming from program-service fees, arrangements, such as the Right Turn® post-adoption Henrichs, who will officially retire as president a fourth from government grants and contracts and and guardianship program formed with Nebraska and CEO on Dec. 31, said she will remain active as a about 20 percent from contributions and private Children’s Home Society (and now operating under a volunteer in the community. She currently serves on foundations, every effort counts. Volunteer service separate LLC), to more informal collaborations with several local boards, and in past years has served on hours now exceed 19,000 per year. local law enforcement agencies that access LFS the board of directors for Lutheran Immigration and “Going forward, I think there will be a lot of counselors in crisis situations. Refugee Service, Immanuel and Lutheran Services in challenges for not-for-profits in general,” McClain “It used to be that not-for-profits pretty much America. She has served on dozens of other national, said. “The volunteer work that’s done in different state and local boards and community task forces worked alone. We got along and made referrals to locations is critical to LFS’s survival.” throughout her 41 years at LFS. each other, but we had our own set of programs,” she Individual support can also mean participating “The best part of working at LFS the past four said. “Now when we assess the needs in the in awareness events or just promoting awareness of decades is that no matter how difficult any day was, I community, the conversation quickly goes to ‘Who LFS in general. went home knowing that someone’s life was changed else does this?’ and ‘Who can we work with to make “All of us are only one tragedy, one accident, one because all of us at LFS came to work,” Henrichs said. bad judgement call from needing the services of LFS. this better?’” “Now is the right time for a new leader with new energy Evolution has also meant that programs have None of us knows when we are going to be the next and ideas to step in. I have nine grandchildren I want come and gone as other providers emerged or specific person,” Henrichs said. “My hope and prayer is that to spent time with, and lots of fun things I want to do.” community needs diminished. Change has also people would take a breath and think about what life Henrichs said she has complete confidence in her meant consolidation from a high of 32 sites across the staff to carry forward LFS’s mission and vision. might be like for someone to get to the point where they need to reach out for help to continue going on.” state to 18 today (in Bellevue, Blair, Fremont, Grand “For not-for-profits to be successful, they need Island, Lexington, Lincoln, McCook, North Platte, trust from the community and I think that trust and Omaha in Nebraska plus Council Bluffs, Iowa ADAPTABILITY AND LONGEVITY comes from ethical and courageous leadership and and Wichita, Kansas) to maximize efficiencies, When she was named president and CEO in quality staff,” she said. “Without the people who are Henrichs said, and in reflection of “new and 1985, Henrichs had a staff of 25 and a budget of willing to do the work that we do, LFS would not be innovative ways to deliver services.” $850,000. Today, she oversees approximately 365 the respected organization that it is today.”

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MOVING FORWARD • serving all

OMAHA CHURCH CENTER • CIRCA 1991

FREMONT ORPHANAGE • CIRCA 1940

REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT • CIRCA 1975

IMMANUEL DEACONNES INSTITUTE CIRCA 1894

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?• !

giving back

• LEADING THE WAY

OUT FRONT • UP CLOSE WITH... PEG HARRIOTT CHILD SAVING INSTITUTE CHILD SAVING INSTITUTE’S MISSION IS “RESPONDING TO THE CRY OF A CHILD.” WE HAVE NEVER LOST SIGHT OF THAT MISSION. OUR VISION: “ALL CHILDREN HAVE HOMES WHERE HOPE IS KINDLED AND DREAMS CAN BE ACHIEVED. THIS IS OUR WORK, AND THEY ARE ALL OUR CHILDREN.” OUR CORE VALUES: DO WHAT’S BEST FOR KIDS; NEVER GIVE UP ON A KID; WE CAN ALWAYS DO MORE FOR KIDS; AND KIDS DESERVE STRONG, HEALTHY FAMILIES. What is your favorite quotation and by whom?

What does your “perfect day” look like?

A quote that I have positioned on my dresser top for regular review is: “This is the beginning of a new day. You have been given this day to use as you will. You can waste it or use it for good. What you do today is important because you are exchanging a day of your life for it. When tomorrow comes, this day will be gone forever. In its place is something that you have left behind. Let it be something good.”

My perfect day would be having no alarm clock to get up by, hot tea from one of my favorite teapots with a cranberry orange scone, a day of sewing or crafting followed by dinner with friends and family.

~ Author unknown

125 YEARS AGO, CSI STARTED AS AN ORPHANAGE FOR THE CHILDREN OF THE PIONEERS. TODAY, WE OFFER AN ARRAY OF PROGRAMS AND SERVICES TO HELP CHILDREN AND STRENGTHEN FAMILIES.

What historical figure would you most like to meet or be mentored by? I would like to meet and be mentored by First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt for her great sensitivity to those less privileged and vulnerable, her gracious and inclusive presence, her activist intentions and her diplomacy. Who would you like to trade places with for one month?

~ PEG HARRIOTT PRESIDENT & CEO CHILD SAVING INSTITUTE

I would like to trade places with my grandmother Florence in the mid 1930s. She was the reluctant wife of a farmer raising three children in rural Iowa. It would be hard work, but I believe I would gain a better understanding of our rural roots, the impact of the depression on the Midwest, the gender roles of the farming community at that time and the relationships between my father’s siblings and his parents.

If you could give all human beings one virtue, which would you choose and why? A true sense and daily practice of gratitude towards others would be the virtue I would wish for all human beings. Not only can gratitude positively impact the greater community, a neighborhood or a family; but it also provides internal strength to the person sharing the gratitude and kindness. When you were young, what did you most dream of being when you grew up? I had many days of pretending to be Mary Poppins or Maria von Trapp from The Sound of Music and I believed someday I would be a modern-day Mary Poppins or Maria von Trapp. To this day, I rate umbrellas based on their flying ability and I am dedicated to working on making sure children are loved and cherished! What life experience has strengthened you most? One experience that clearly strengthened me was being provided the opportunity to test out my leadership skills in Girl Scouts long before I believed I possessed any leadership qualities. Girl Scouts changed my view of who I was and what I could accomplish in life.

CHILDSAVING.ORG • 402.553.6000

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OUT FRONT • UP CLOSE WITH... LINDY HOYER OMAHA CHILDREN’S MUSEUM THROUGH MY PROFESSIONAL LIFE AND IN MY PERSONAL LIFE, SUPPORTING POSITIVE EXPERIENCES FOR FAMILIES TO NURTURE AND GROW TOGETHER COGNITIVELY, SOCIALLY, SPIRITUALLY AND PHYSICALLY IS A PRIORITY WHEN IT COMES TO GIVING OF MY RESOURCES AND TIME.

What is your favorite quotation and by whom? “If you want to build a ship, teach the men to yearn for the vast and endless sea.” ~ Saint-Exupéry What is the one thing that you love most about the Omaha metro? What I love most about Omaha and what has kept me here for most of my professional career is the big-city, cosmopolitan feel to the vibe and yet the hometown, friendliness and camaraderie of how the community works together to accomplish big goals.

If you decided to go on a personal pilgrimage, where would you go and what would you do? My pilgrimage would be centered around philosophical thoughts and I would go to some remote island off the coast of Europe or South America and take two or three friends along to wander around the island and discuss life as we know it—finding those friends who would be willing to dive into a deep philosophical dialogue.

If you could give all human beings one virtue which would you choose and why? I would give the virtue of justice to all humans. Justice means respecting the rights of all persons. Since we are persons ourselves, justice also includes self-respect, a proper regard for our own rights and dignity. Justice includes so many of the interpersonal virtues—civility, honesty, respect, responsibility and tolerance. When we lack this virtue as a person, we are in danger of corrupting our actions and those of others. What historical figure would you most like to meet or be mentored by? Eleanor Roosevelt. As a leader and a woman, I would love to have an opportunity to meet Mrs. Roosevelt and learn more about how she found the courage and confidence to chart a path for herself and other women at a time when women were not seen as capable or desirable to have such high profile positions.

When you were young what did you most dream of being when you grew up?

A CHILD’S FIRST TEACHERS ARE THE PARENTS AND ADULTS WHO INFLUENCE THEM IN THEIR EARLY FORMATIVE YEARS.… AS VITAL TO A COMMUNITY AS PROVIDING SHELTER, FOOD AND EMPLOYMENT.

~ LINDY HOYER

What life experience has strengthened you most? Losing my mother at an early age, before I became a mother myself and was prepared to navigate my life fully without her guidance. This experience strengthened me in ways I couldn’t have predicted and helped me focus on stabilizing and prioritizing other relationships in my life. It also taught me that no matter what I could press on and survive.

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OMAHA CHILDREN'S MUSEUM

As a young girl I always dreamt of being a teacher. My role play/fantasy play as a child always involved an imaginary classroom of eager learners, dutifully paying attention to their teacher (me). My father sold school supplies and was a former teacher, so I had a whole set up of chalkboards, text books and lesson plans to work with.

WWW.OCM.ORG • 402.930.2342

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homelessness, poverty, domestic violence, mental health crisis, substance abuse, social isolation, barriers to service access, and other traumas can affect more than just individuals and their immediate families; they eventually hurt the community, too. by addressing these challenging problems, heartland family service helps make the community better for everyone.

HOW DO YOU encapsulate an organization powered by 400 dedicated employees, 1,100 volunteers and a 200-member guild that helps 52,000 individuals annually? how do you summarize the details of more than 50 programs provided from 15 locations in eastern nebraska and southwest iowa and through approximately 100 collaborative relationships with other entities? “it’s hard to describe because it’s such a big agency with so many programs,” said Joann gould, president of the heartland family service friends guild. “i wish people knew all the different ways heartland family service touches peoples’ lives.” “heartland family service has over 50 programs that are focused in three areas: child and family development, counseling and prevention, and housing and financial stability,” melissa crawford, chair of the board of directors, said. “so if someone is in need of help, i really encourage them to reach out to heartland family service, because with the broad range of programs, there is probably a program that can help them.”

he said. other programs enrich the lives of residents through parent education, support for child care providers, a girls’ summer enrichment program and a senior center. eighty percent of the clients served have annual incomes of $20,000 or less, and many programs are provided on a sliding fee scale.

generational” approach are just some of the ways to help individuals and families see lasting change, he said. John levy, omaha community foundation’s director of donor philanthropy, said it’s sometimes hard for community members to see that quick fixes are hard to come by when addressing “what other people in the community are dealing with and that the issues they’re facing are extremely complex and challenging.”

the organization started out in 1875 as the christian workers association, a coalition of eight omaha churches who pooled their resources under the umbrella objective to more efficiently serve the needs of the impoverished “i wish everybody knew that somewhere, somehow, and infirm. as it evolved from an all-volunteer entity to a there is someone they know who has been touched by or more formal service provider, the organization took on is experiencing some sort of trauma, and that the work different names including omaha city mission, we do directly addresses that trauma and helps people associated charities, family welfare association & children’s bureau, and family service of omaha. in 2004, work through that,” dostal said. “the chances are high the current name heartland family service was adopted. that someone in their circle of influence has benefited from our services.”

programs also changed over time, a significant factor in the nonprofit’s staying power, dostal said. services like “we like to see easy wins, but it’s the long deal,” levy said. daycare and foster care support were phased out when “it might not be an immediate result but they’re making a meaningful difference long-term…heartland family other providers emerged, for instance. other programs were formed to address growing community needs, like service is addressing these issues in a thoughtful, the crisis response program developed in partnership strategic and meaningful way. the help that they’re with local law enforcement agencies or the kindergarten providing, you can be confident that it’s truly making a “we’re a health and human service organization that is based right here in the community; we’re home-grown,” readiness program for children of recent refugees. difference. it’s trauma-informed care, it’s best practices, chief development officer donna dostal said. “we’ve it’s evidence-based.” been here for 142 years doing basically the same thing “we’re very fortunate in that we’re home-grown. that’s really unique because we don’t have those national ties,” “they are a very results-focused organization. by focusing we did when we started in 1875: helping families be dostal explained. “we’re pretty agile and able to be the best they can be through education, supportive on results they make sure that their programs really do responsive to community needs as they arise. there has services and counseling.” have an impact. they truly are making a difference in been a tremendous evolution of services based on what people’s lives and they continue to monitor their the community needs, but the fact that we’re homegetting the name correct is a good place to start: it’s programs to make sure they do that,” crawford said. “i heartland family service, not services. “it reflects one grown and entirely local enabled us to do that.” really like the connectedness of their programs, because integrated effort,” president and ceo John Jeanetta oftentimes when someone needs support or assistance said. “heartland family service is a multi-service social Affecting lasting change in one area, they also need support or assistance in service agency.” heartland family service doesn’t just respond to the another area.” immediate emergency and assume resolution, Jeanetta Doing what others can’t said, because crisis “is often a symptom of a bigger Community collaborations heartland family service provides critical services to the problem.” one of his most recent areas of focus has been most vulnerable children and families in our community, upgrading technology and research capabilities to better heartland family service has established more than Jeanetta explained. every year, staff helps clients address evaluate how programs are working long-term. research 100 different collaborative relationships with other service providers that range from sharing information has already suggested that identifying underlying serious, urgent issues including child abuse, juvenile to transferring clients to coordinating services, problems and contributing factors, providing extended crime, family violence, mental illness, substance abuse and poverty, often “what others won’t or can’t address,” follow-up care, and treating the whole family in a “two- Jeanetta said.

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GENERATIONS CENTER CLIENT FLORA SHUKIS SHARES HER STORY DURING THE 2017 “CARNIVAL OF LOVE” GALA

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helping others omaha has even become a nationwide model for collaboration between service entities, dostal added, which is a testament to the nonprofits and service providers in the community as well as the people who live there. “you wouldn’t see this elsewhere. if (nonprofits) are competitive, it’s a red flag for redundancy or silos, or a right-hand/left-hand problem.” greg london, chief deputy with the sarpy county sheriff’s department, can attest to the effectiveness of interagency collaboration. through a program called asap (assessment, support and prevention) in his county, law enforcement officers from the sheriff’s department, bellevue police department, papillion police department or la vista police department can contact heartland family service to request an on-site, face-to-face risk assessment by a mental health therapist when individuals appear to be volatile. “you can talk to any officer or agency in the entire country and they will agree with my assessment that mental health is one of the biggest challenges in law enforcement…we often get calls where people are in distress. we’re not mental health practitioners; we do attend training but that doesn’t mean we’re experts in mental health. so in the past, we were perplexed on how to handle calls and what do with these people,” london said. “some calls are very easy to determine that a person should be ‘committed,’ the term is epc: emergency protective custody. other times we can rectify the problem by calling a family member—as long as the person is not a danger to themselves or others—we could have someone else intervene and help the situation out.” but there is a gray area, london said. that’s when the services of a mental health professional come in. “they know the resources that are available, they are better equipped to talk to people and de-escalate the situation. they are the experts, and that’s why we rely on them,” london said. “it has been a godsend, that program, for our agency.”

SCOTT AND SUSAN HARTMAN WITH HFS PRESIDENT & CEO JOHN JEANETTA

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unnecessary hospitalization, protective custody and incarcerations can be prevented through the program, london said. a second positive outcome is that community members may be more likely to call for help in a precarious situation if they know alternatives to

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best arrest and prosecution exist for the person whose behavior is causing concern, especially if the person in question is a friend or loved one. london estimates that his officers make approximately 10 asap calls per month. “now our deputies walk away with more confidence because the asap counselors are there and they trust them wholeheartedly,” he said. “they have been great to work with. from day one they told us they have a 30-minute response time and they’ve never wavered from that.” therapists also follow up with individuals to provide necessary referrals in hopes of preventing future crises. “we want to get away from the revolving door,” london said.

Service and loyalty dostal praised the therapists who participate in heartland family service’s crisis intervention programs for their willingness to be available around the clock, but she also said that any human services work requires a tremendous level of commitment. “we have 400 of probably the most dedicated employees. they really dedicate their lives to the service of the families in our community, whether it’s in our child and family programs, our housing and financial stability programs, or our therapeutic/counseling and prevention services,” she said. “it’s across the board, people who go above and beyond what it means to serve their community and be loyal to an employer. they transcend that because they’re here for the mission.” levy expressed similar sentiments about the people of heartland family service. “they have such a small infrastructure—great leadership, an engaged board and a talented staff,” he said. “you can be confident they really are operating the right way.”

So many ways to support community support for heartland family service is more important than ever. “while we do get some government funding, it definitely does not support the programs to the extent they need to be supported. that is going to continue to be a challenge as there are so many demands on state and

VOLUNTEERS AND BURLINGTON STORES, INC. EMPLOYEES HELPING K.I.D.S/FASHION DELIVERS UNLOAD ITEMS DONATED TO HEARTLAND FAMILY SERVICE heartland family service

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helping others

federal budgets,” crawford said. “to continue to provide the valuable services heartland family service provides, community and donor support is just critical.”

drink, games, auctions and entertainment in a festive atmosphere. in a record-breaking year, the 2017 event raised more than $315,000.

“to help further what we’re doing in the community, in recent years, guild members have also taken on more we’re always going to need (monetary) donations,” relatively small activities associated with specific dostal agreed. donations of goods and gift cards are also programs. welcome, she added, and there is a wide variety of items needed from gently used clothing for the “career closet” “there are a lot of people like me who like to be more to personal care supplies for adults and teens in shorthands-on, so we talked to program directors,” gould said. term housing facilities to educational toys and books for “that’s how we started getting more involved in some of after-school programs. updated wish lists for individual the programs, finding out what their needs are and programs are posted on the heartland family service helping them with the things they would love to do but website (heartlandfamilyservice.org). just don’t have the money for.” HEARTLAND FAMILY SERVICE VOLUNTEERS

community support can also mean giving the gift of time and talent. “unless there is some sort of special licensure required, we can bring in volunteers,” dostal said. volunteers can help with numerous tasks like assisting with child care in the family works program (a residential substance abuse and mental health treatment program for women with children), playing board games with seniors at the generations center, or helping sort and process donated materials. volunteer hours allow for staff time to be more strategically allocated, and “that equates to budget-relieving activity.” dostal emphasized that anyone who wants to volunteer can not only be useful, but also matched with work they enjoy.

BABYTALK PROGRAM

“we need to understand what it is they want to do and want to help with, and find a good fit. with over 50 programs, we can find something for everyone,” she said.

some of the gifts are tangible, like cleaning supply starter kits for residential program clients, or eyecatching t-shirts for youths going on group outings. some of the gifts are morale boosters, like hosting a brunch for a group of clients. “i enjoy the hands-on involvement with some of the programs we support, like ready in 5, which helps prepare refugee children under five to get ready for school; the prom for seniors, which we put on with the high-school members of our Junior friends program; hosting parties for the moms in the family works program; helping ninth-graders know what is going on in their own community and how they can help with our student league program; and of course, the gala, since that is how i first became involved with the guild,” gould said.

“friends” in “friends guild” refers to support for the organization, but for gould and other members, the guild is also a circle of friends. she was originally the heartland family service friends guild is another recruited by friends to help with a february gala, and important source of community support. she’s since brought in others. because guild members are “the agency’s time and their resources are already well volunteering their time, it’s important to match them to a commitment that suits them, she said, whether that’s taken-up with trying to run their programs as efficiently as possible; they don’t have the extra dollars overseeing an event, heading a committee, or just to do the things the guild can do for them,” gould said. helping out once a year for a few hours. “we help out some of the programs with things that “we want to get them doing whatever interests them the aren’t in the budget.” most. we want people to feel engaged, and that they have a purpose and that what they do is rewarding,” she guild activities can be a lot of fun, she said, especially the biggest fundraiser of the year. the “carnival of love” explained. “some people really just want to offer money. gala, held around valentine’s day, features fine food and other people want to become more involved.”

Circle of friends

“SHARE THE LOVE” EVENT

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best BY FOCUSING ON results THEY MAKE SURE THAT THEIR PROGRAMS REALLY DO HAVE AN impact. THEY TRULY ARE MAKING A difference IN PEOPLE’S LIVES AND THEY CONTINUE TO monitor THEIR PROGRAMS TO make sure THEY DO THAT. ~ MELISSA CRAWFORD Chair, heartlaND family serViCe bOarD Of DireCtOrs

WELLNESS WORKS EMPLOYEE RESOURCE GROUP

Advocacy and empathy involvement can even begin at home, and heartland family service recognizes the influence families can have just by setting a good example. salute to families, dating back to 1982, honors four nebraska families for their strong family life and community service. in addition, a family advocate award is presented to an individual or group who has demonstrated direct action in services or issues that strengthen families. the community is asked to submit nominations each spring for a november awards presentation. community engagement can also mean engaging in direct advocacy or just fostering awareness and compassion in the community, even when one’s own family is not affected.

firsthand within his family,” london said. “i think the stigma is lessening and people are becoming more sympathetic and more educated that there are problems out there. it may not affect them or their family, but it is a concern for society.” society is affected because trauma that may appear to involve only specific individuals and families— homelessness, poverty, domestic violence, mental health crisis, substance abuse, social isolation, barriers to service access, and more—can ultimately have a ripple effect. fortunately, the good works of heartland family service also have a ripple effect.

MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS RESPONSE TEAMS

“i am continually amazed at how many people not only are aware of heartland family service but are affected by it in some way, shape or form,” gould said.

“most people never think twice about it, and they have no idea so many families are hurting and the struggles that come with it in trying to help them…i remember a “i think it’s important that people have a healthy family and support system at home in order to be successful in conversation with a community member where he told me ‘people don’t think about mental health problems in the community,” crawford said. “by helping to treat the community unless it affects their direct family.’ it did families who have some challenges and opportunities ahead of them, heartland family service enhances the affect his family, and that was the first time he ever thought about mental health issues because he saw it community as a whole.” heartland family service

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PROFESSIONAL AND COMMUNITY leader Melissa “privilege” of working on national accounts such as ConAgra, Mutual of Omaha Marvin credits her parents with instilling an early love of service and demonstrating an and the then-local First National Bank of Omaha account which introduced her admirable work ethic, but she’s made her own way through leadership roles with notable to the field of banking. That led to a director of marketing position for Norwest companies and community organizations as well as a string of honors reflecting her Bank Nebraska. commitment and contributions. That period was “an incredible training ground,” Marvin recalled. “I really took advantage of all the learning opportunities and leadership training.” At the young age of 14, Marvin was stocking sweaters and scarves at Zoob’s, an upscale women’s clothing boutique. Zoob’s is just a fond memory now, but Marvin’s vigorous work Her next role was at Commercial Federal Corporation, managing advertising and leading ethic endured. After earning a communications degree at the University of Kansas in 1985, the initiative to help build proactive sales and service processes to further embed Marvin couldn’t wait to launch her career. Because at 22, she was already poised to make leadership and sales best practices within the culture to maximize results. She next worked for Cohen Brown Management Group, a global financial services consulting her own way and a name for herself as a professional and community leader. firm headquartered out of California, where she stayed for almost 14 years as part of principal Dr. Martin Cohen’s leadership team. “It was a great experience working Over the next three decades, Marvin made her own way and then some. with financial institutions all over the world,” she said. Her resume includes notable companies and management roles from account executive to senior vice president. Over the years, she’s Marvin was then hired away to another global sales expressed her “love for Omaha and statewide initiatives” through management consulting firm, Vantage Point Performance. contributions to several dozen different charities and As part of the company’s leadership team, she expanded community organizations: serving on the board of her sales leadership processes expertise to all industries “I love people, governors for Joslyn Art Museum and boards of directors around the world. While working at Cohen Brown and for Girls Inc., Nebraska Arts Council, Nebraska Cultural I love helping people Vantage Point, Marvin spent three years part-time with Endowment, Humanities Nebraska, Nebraska Metropolitan Community College, working with the and I love to see Shakespeare and many more. She’s become known as a team—including President Randy Schmaizl—on key passionate fundraiser, chairing events for Joslyn Art people succeed.” initiatives to support services and learning for career Museum, Lauritzen Gardens Antique & Garden Show, and preparation such as the Fort Omaha Campus expansion Durham Museum, to name just a few. MELISSA MARVIN project. She has also served as senior vice president of F donor engagement for United Way of the Midlands and is In October, she was named Woman of the Year by the currently consulting for organizations using her sales Arthritis Foundation Heartland Region, the most recent in a leadership best practices to maximize results. string of accolades. She’s also been named WCA Woman of Distinction, an Omaha Junior Chamber of Commerce Outstanding Young Omahan, and an Outstanding Young Nebraskan finalist, among other Role models and advisers honors reflecting her love for, commitment to and contributions back into the “I feel like I’ve been in the relationship business personally and professionally,” she community. said. “And I always had mentors. I still have mentors.” Early love for service One mentor Marvin called out specially is business and community leader Mike Marvin credits her parents—Sharon and the late Sam Marvin—with instilling in Yanney, with whom she has worked with on several projects. the family an early love for service to others with activities such as delivering Christmas gifts to homebound individuals and volunteering as a family to be bell- “He’s incredibly supportive, like my father was,” she said. “I have the greatest respect ringers for the Salvation Army. Marvin said she’s been told she shares her father’s and admiration for him. I feel like it’s such a privilege to have such great leadership larger-than-life personality and the humility and grace of her mother, whom she in this community.” calls her best friend. With quite a few career years still ahead of her, this lifelong learner isn’t content to “A solid upbringing and a supportive foundation built on the importance of hard rest on her many accomplishments. work, faith and service to others made it possible to soar,” Marvin said. “Faith, family and friends are my three most important priorities. Over time, Marvin herself has become a role model and adviser, boosting others in their careers and community service efforts. “I love people, I love helping people “There is nothing more powerful than leading by example, something my parents and I love to see people succeed,” she said. She named counseling on how to did as well. To be the best you can be in your work and volunteer life, you have to negotiate, overcome objections, close deals, and navigate through tough work ask yourself daily, ‘What can I do more, better, different and/or less of to ensure I situations along with mentoring and motivating others in the workplace as some am putting my best foot forward to maximize results?’” of the ways she’s strived to have impact. Learning from leaders “That is the greatest gift when you can see how others are able to soar,” she said. Marvin said she was always willing to learn from more experienced professionals, “Others realizing their potential and helping them on how to achieve their goals is starting with the late Chuck Peebler at Bozell. Her position there provided the the ultimate success.” 24

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BARB ROESSNER’S job is “literally a matter of life and death.” As the cardiac transplant and clinical coordinator at Children’s Hospital & Medical Center, she works with little patients who need big surgery—a heart transplant.

at all hours, but when her small patients are critically ill and their families are in need, Roessner never says no.

As a medical professional, physician assistant Barb Roessner’s career is based in science. However, she can’t help but think that in 2011, serendipity was at play in pushing her to a new role as the cardiac transplant and VAD (ventricular assist device) clinical coordinator at Children’s Hospital & Medical Center. Roessner was actually in the final stages of accepting another position when she was offered an interview at Children’s.

“They look at me as an extension of their family and they know that I’m completely dedicated to them. When they need me, I’m here. I’m willing to sacrifice my own family for them because that is what they need for their child to get well,” she said. “My family sees it and they understand it, and they’re 100 percent supportive; it’s way more than 40 hours a week and they ‘get it.’ My family understands that when I’m not home it’s not because I don’t want to be. It’s because somebody needs me more.”

“I was literally on the phone with contract negotiations when another call came through,” she recalled. “(The position at Children’s) was really what I wanted to do. I clicked back over and declined the other job.”

Two of Roessner’s children are even interested in following her into the medical field. Her oldest son began medical school this fall, and her daughter (13) has also expressed an interest in medicine, although on the Without an offer in hand, Roessner continued to explore other veterinary side. However, “My 20-year-old wants nothing to opportunities over the next few months. And when do with medicine,” Roessner said with a laugh. “He’s another well-timed phone call came in, she was pulling majoring in chemical engineering.” Her high-schoolinto the parking lot for a promising interview at “My inspiration every day sweetheart husband Jason, who manages a car another medical facility. Roessner again decided to is my patients and their dealership, “has also been very gracious.” hold out.

“Shortly after that I started here at Children’s, and it really, truly seems like it was meant to be,” she said.

families. To see them succeed makes me want to do what I do even more.”

An easier journey Lindsey Schumann, whose daughter Zadey received a heart transplant at two months old, said Roessner’s dedication has made her family’s journey “a little easier.”

Quality care Roessner was instrumental in the development and BARB ROESSNER F success of the new pediatric heart transplant program at “I can’t even explain how much easier that has made things, Children’s, from helping drive the application process with the United Network for Organ Sharing to developing policies and and how much fear and worry that takes off of our shoulders, procedures, and from creating patient education information to meeting being able to go directly to Barb with our questions or concerns,” she said. with every department within the hospital that would be involved in transplant “Barb has always been very involved with every aspect of Zadey’s care, not just patients’ care. The first infant heart transplant took place in April of 2013. the heart and transplant area. She knows everything every step of the way and is able to be extremely informative and insightful to other doctors involved in “Barb has worked with passion in acquiring the knowledge, skill and attitude to provide quality care for all of our transplant patients and families,” said Dr. Robert Zadey’s care. Barb goes above and beyond for Zadey and always has. Because of Spicer, chief of Pediatric Cardiology at Children’s. “By providing emotional support Barb, I feel Zadey is in the best possible hands she could be in for her road through and thoughtful solutions to each and every problem, Barb is recognized as a valued life with a heart transplant.” resource and important partner—not only for transplant recipients and parents, but for everyone in the heart transplant program.” Families with critically ill infants or children “really ride an emotional roller coaster,” Roessner said, and finding out a child needs a heart transplant can be devastating Her work at Children’s has been Roessner’s first professional experience in pediatrics, to them. “But it’s an opportunity and there’s hope,” she said. “a different perspective and different atmosphere than working with adult patients.” “To see these parents go through this journey and open up and cry with me, laugh with me, to trust me…it’s moments where they let their guard down and trust you with their emotions, I just can’t put that into words. I feel honored,” she said. “My inspiration every day is my patients and their families. To see them succeed makes me want to do what I do even more. When they’re meeting all those little “Because somebody needs me more” And the fact is, working with transplant patients is not only unpredictable, but milestones, each little success they have makes it really easy to come to work and “literally a matter of life and death,” Roessner said. Vacations have been cut short put in those long hours. And then seeing a baby we transplanted as a neonate or postponed, she’s missed family events, and she’s been called in on days off and getting ready to go to kindergarten—that’s been a lot of fun and so rewarding.” “In ways it’s harder. You get attached to the kids,” she said. “It takes it to a whole different level of engagement…I cared about my adult patients, but I was not as invested.”

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award-winning marketing executive linda lovgren started her own company as a young mother in the 1970s when gender roles were still fairly rigid, but her farm upbringing had already taught her that she could work as hard as any male and grow the career she wanted from the ground up.

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LINDA LOVGREN lOVgreN MarketiNg grOup

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grounded RURAL roots LINDA LOVGREN HAS THE POLISHED APPEARANCE ONE WOULD EXPECT FROM AN EXPERIENCED ADVERTISING EXECUTIVE, BUT HER DEEPEST ROOTS ARE IN RURAL IOWA, WHERE SHE GREW UP ON A FARM NEAR THE SMALL COMMUNITY OF LAKOTA IN THE NORTHERNMOST PART OF THE STATE. “I had the opportunity to learn an awful lot before I even launched beyond my hometown,” she said. “Farm families are a business and the kids all work on the farm in some role or another. There is no gender segregation in terms of who does what work. If there’s a job to do, it doesn’t matter what it is, you do it.” So when a young Lovgren wanted to participate in the more outdoorsy, physically challenging boys’ 4-H activities in what was then a gender-segregated organization, her educator parents petitioned for their daughter to join the boys’ club. She was eventually allowed to have a dual membership.

Creating her own role Years later, in 1978, gender roles were still fairly rigid. Only about half of American women were employed outside the home and the vast majority of small businesses were owned by men. Women with young children were usually expected to either leave the workforce until their children entered school or abandon their careers altogether. Lovgren, however, was as undaunted by anyone’s expectations as she was in her 4-H days. As a young wife with a 1-year-old toddler and a baby on the way, she decided to transition her advertising and marketing career. At the urging of some business friends she launched her own business. “I had always known I wanted to have my own company, but I didn’t know the timing would be quite what that was,” she said. “My husband knows I’m a very competitive person and I can’t leave things alone. And he said, ‘If you don’t try this, you’ll always wonder what could have happened.’” Lovgren Marketing Group not only happened, it continues to thrive today as a firm of professionals offering a wide array of creative, media and strategic services. “I really have a heart for business. I’m determined, persistent and competitive,” Lovgren said of her success. “I don’t think it ever occurred to me that it wouldn’t work. I honestly think that’s a philosophy I gained growing up.”

With her company’s 40th anniversary on the horizon, Lovgren continues to serve as president and chief executive officer. “At first we were a pretty traditional marketing/ advertising relations firm with public relations as a part of the whole marketing strategies,” Lovgren said. “Over the years we have focused more on strategic marketing. In the last eight to ten years, our expertise has really grown in the field of public relations called ‘public involvement,’ and in crisis management, but we still have some of our full-service traditional clients as well.” Lovgren’s client list grew to include current clients like the Omaha Storm Chasers, Metro‘s ORBT rapid bus transit project, MAPA‘s “Little Steps. Big Impact” campaign, Lexus of Omaha, the city‘s Clean Solutions for Omaha effort, among others. Lovgren Marketing‘s list has included notables such as ECI Investment Advisors, Inc.’s development project for Mutual of Omaha, Gallup University, the Omaha Convention Center and Arena, Pinnacle Bank and Guarantee Mutual Insurance (now Lincoln Financial).

Getting more involved Lovgren emphasized community engagement from the beginning. “When I started my company, I went to the Chamber and said, ‘I’m starting this company and I know I’m pretty expert at what I do but there are also things I don’t know how to do as well. Can you help me with resources and help me understand how the business community works and how to get more involved?’ she recalled. “Bob Bell was the Chamber president at the time and throughout this process we became friends. He helped guide me through the various Resources the Chamber offered for small and large businesses. I became very involved with the Chamber and have been an advocate ever since.” In fact, Lovgren was the first female chairman of the Chamber board (2003-2004) and was inducted into its Omaha Business Hall of Fame in 2012. Looking back, Lovgren credits her parents with instilling in her both early confidence and a conscientious work ethic. “They were always behind me 100 percent. My dad, even back in the ‘50s and ‘60s, said ‘You do what you want to do and that’s what you’ll be good at.”

30

She started college intending to follow her parents into teaching, but her second semester at Iowa State University introduced a new possibility. “I ended up taking a creative writing class. At the time, communications was under the English department: journalism, advertising and public relations all rolled into one degree,” she said. Lovgren enjoyed writing in high school, and the program’s classes from television production to radio to journalistic writing all seemed appealing. “So I changed my major to communications.”

Learning every side of the business She followed her college sweetheart from Iowa State University to Indiana University and relocated with him in 1971 to his hometown of Omaha where the newlyweds kicked off their careers, Robert’s with Mutual of Omaha and Linda’s with a small radio station across the river. “I took a job with KRCB radio (KQKQ’s predecessor) in Council Bluffs as a copywriter and did some news reporting. It was a very small station but I got a few months of a lot of experience there, meeting people and getting to know the community and having multiple jobs and a lot of responsibilities,” she said. “Then I was hired by small ad agency and worked for them for seven years.” She began as the creative director, which including copywriting and producing, and eventually moved to account management. “Because it was a smaller firm— it became a firm of six people when I was working there—it gave me the opportunity to see every side of the business.” Lovgren, who became an Accredited Public Relations (APR) counselor, knew early on she was in her element. “I really enjoyed the client interaction, but I really enjoyed the fact that because I worked with the client and I worked with the creative and I worked with the media, I could see the whole picture of how marketing helped an organization. Obviously it was much easier back then because it was radio and television, direct mail and print. And the market was a lot different,” she said. “There have been lots of significant changes since even I started my company.”

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• mquarterly

LINDA LOVGREN IN OMAHA THERE ARE MORE THINGS THAT connect US THAN DIVIDE US, AND THE THINGS THAT DO DIVIDE US inspire THE COMMUNITY TO BREAK DOWN THOSE barriers. ~ LINDA LOVGREN

This special feature is sponsored by planitomaha. planitomaha is dedicated to honoring women whose influence not only impacts the boardroom but the community.

“Welcome to

Doing more She’s always been hands-on, Lovgren said. “Because we are a small business, my role is still with client relationships. My primary focus is client strategies and client-focused work and consulting,” she explained. As a result, the company is regionally recognized and has received many honors including five awards at the 2016 PRSA Nebraska Paper Anvil Awards Gala (two Awards of Merit and three Awards of Excellence) with Lovgren herself receiving the 2016 PRSA Professional of the Year Award. “In terms of my overall career, some highlights have been the participation that I’ve had over the years in the communications or launching of projects that have made a difference in Omaha economically or in terms of job growth,” she said. “There are so many of those businesses and efforts that come along and being part of those is really exciting.” Lovgren has made a difference in the community personally as well, serving—often in board positions or leadership roles—numerous organizations like Nebraska Methodist College, Nebraska Methodist Foundation, PRESENTS

Partnership, 4 Kids, the Nebraska 4-H Foundation, Omaha Federation of Advertising, Nebraska Public Relations Society, International Association of Public Participation, Omaha Ethics Alliance and the Nebraska State Fair Board, to name just a few. Seven years ago she founded Casting for Recovery in Nebraska, a fly fishing retreat experience for breast cancer survivors. “Most of the participants have never tried fly fishing. I’m the one who loves fly fishing and that’s why I wanted to start this program in Nebraska,” Lovgren, a breast cancer survivor herself, explained. “It’s been a real passion for me and I’m so excited to have found other women who are so loyal and so supportive and so helpful to the women who’ve shared their breast cancer journey through our program.” Despite her amazing career and community involvement, Lovgren still looks forward to doing more. “I will stay involved in the community as long as there is a spot for me to do that,” she said. “While some people may think the career is the pinnacle of a lifetime, I think the lifetime is the pinnacle.”

game changers

LINDA LOVGREN

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Matt Darling is Vice President of Donor Services at the Omaha Community Foundation

omaha giving

• Omaha COmmunity FOundatiOn

A giving season WITH

more purpose

It’s not a secret that the holiday season can feel like the most hectic time of year, with no shortage of activities vying for our time, attention and energy. For philanthropy, these last two months represent the busiest months of the calendar, too. According to the Center on Philanthropy, the average individual makes 24% of their annual donations between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day; other estimates put that number as high as 34%, with nearly half of those charitable gifts coming in December alone. Many of us donate to the same causes year after year, but this fall, what if you could do more? To make the most of your philanthropy this holiday season, there are several questions to consider that can help you ensure your gifts generate the greatest impact. 1. Prioritize and Personalize Deciding which organizations you care about or what causes you feel most passionate about is an essential first step. To start, think about a place you have volunteered for or an organization that has impacted your life. Personal experiences can often drive philanthropic intent. What organizations might align with your interests? Are you interested in nonprofits addressing the root causes of an issue, like eradicating hunger, or would you rather give to an organization tackling the crisis at hand, like a food pantry? Asking and answering these questions can help you narrow how and where, you might want to give. Ultimately it comes down to what will mean the most to you. 2. Ensure Your Gift Matches a Need Once you’ve chosen a cause, understanding the specific challenges within a community can help you find an organization that not only warrants your support, but is addressing an identified need. For instance, if you want to give within education, there are a variety of different ways you could support the field—from helping an organization focused on early childhood education to making a gift to a college scholarship program. TheLandscapeOmaha.org is a tool that anyone can access to learn more about the Omaha-

Council Bluffs region’s most pressing issues, while also connecting with the people and organizations working within these areas. We encourage you to use this—or other resources—as you consider our community’s greatest needs and the organizations working in those areas. 3. Do Your homework! matt darling If you’ve identified a potential nonprofit, it’s time to conduct your own due diligence on the organization. Websites like GuideStar.org can offer upto-date data on nonprofits to help inform your giving decisions. Another good start is to pay a visit to their website and do your own research. Some key questions to consider as you’re browsing: How does the nonprofit talk about their mission? How do they talk about their success? What do their financials look like? Consider whether these answers align with your own values and how you hope to impact in the community. It can also be helpful to read newsletters, annual reports and marketing materials to gain even more insight into organizational impact and effectiveness. Take your time to do the research; understand their programming and how they address community need. Or, if you have an account at the Omaha Community Foundation, ask us to do some digging on your behalf. 4. Follow Up and Give Again Your gift can be the start of a strong, lasting relationship with a nonprofit. Keep in touch, or seek out a volunteer opportunity. A deeper funder-nonprofit relationship has the potential to create even greater lasting impact. By keeping these steps in mind this giving season, your philanthropy can generate even more good for our community. To learn more about how about how the Omaha Community Foundation can help you make the most of your charitable giving this holiday season, call us at (402)342-3458 or email giving@omahafoundation.org.

Give todayy,, and we’ll sweeten the gift. Open a new charitable giving account by Decembe er 29, and we’ll match 10 % of your inittial contribution.* You want to make a differenc You e e in the ence community. And right now your generosity can go even further thankks k to a matching grant from the William and Ruth Scott Family Foundation. t To learn more, call us at 40 To 0 02-342-3458 or visit omahafoundation..or . g/ incentive * While funds last. $1,000 match maximum. m

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maRy E. VandEnaCK Mary Vandenack, while a lawyer by profession, has studied extensively in mind/body areas of fitness and wellness. She is Yoga Alliance RYT-200, Power Pilates certified and ACE certified.

filling our life WITH

healing friends AND SAFE PEOPLE “FRIENDSHIP IS THAT SHELTERING TREE WHICH COVERS YOU WITH WARMTH WHEN YOU ARE COLD WITH SORROW, BALMS YOUR SOUL WHEN YOU ARE HURT IN HEART AND BANDAGES WITH LOVE WHEN YOU BLEED INSIDE.” ~ Ritu Ghatourey Have you ever been “thrown under the bus” by someone you trusted and believed in? Have you ever had something come back to you that you shared with one trusted person as a confidence? Have you ever shared your pain with someone in hopes of that person helping you to heal, only to be hurt with your own pain? While all of us will fail to be “safe” now and then, it is important to know whether we are filling our “friend” space more often than not with people who are actually not safe. It is also important to know the qualities of safe people and consciously surround ourselves with those who have qualities to help us heal and be safe. While it’s unavoidable that our lives—in places over which we have no control—result in having un-safe people in our circle, developing the skills to recognize and cope with un-safe people will prevent avoidable hurt. When we go through a life crisis or are simply in a moment of vulnerability, we realize how important having safe and healing friends is. To fill your life with safe and healing friends, there are a couple of simple things you can do. The first is to become what you want to have in your life. Be a friend with whom others can feel safe and develop the qualities of healing friendship. When considering who to keep close to you, watch for consistency in the qualities that are important to you.

Safe people engage in conscious communication. They take the time to understand how you communicate and consider that in how they engage in the relationship.

Safe people accept others as they are. This doesn’t mean that we don’t have healthy boundaries and identify and communicate expectations. It does mean we accept the fundamental nature of others. To truly offer acceptance, we must be willing to see who others really are rather than who we would like them to be.

Healing friends support our path and recognize that we will grow in the time and manner that we need to rather than based on what others would like from us. The healing friend affirms us, notices our uniqueness, points out our strengths and offers love and humor. That friend encourages us to live our dreams.

Safe people support us in creating love and good works. A safe person wants us to love and be loved and helps us find our loving nature.

A healing friend listens. They listen to all that we have to say, even when we wander, repeat ourselves and can’t put together a cohesive sentence.

Safe people are empathic and act on that empathy. An empathic person has a sincere interest in our lives and exhibits genuine concern for our wellbeing.

The healing friend tries to help us find humor, song, magic and dance in our life challenges. Such a friend might teach us to play Poohsticks in hopes of making life seem simple again.

ENVISION YOUR FUTURE: PREVENT DISEASE DISCOVER HEALTH! YOU DESERVE A BEAUTIFUL, HEALTHY SMILE!

Dr. Stephanie Vondrak • Dr. Ashley Rainbolt Vondrak Dental (402) 289-2313 info@drvondrak.com

THE CHOICE IS YOURS! 35

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planning matters

• with Vw law

estate plan asset coordination

ENSURING YOUR TESTAMENTARY INTENTION A common misunderstanding about the estate planning process is that all assets will pass in accordance with one’s trust or will. That isn’t the case. Different types of assets pass in different ways and contractual designations can trump one’s trust or will. Thus, it is important to coordinate all of your assets as part of your estate planning process. In the event that you specifically want something to pass differently than as provided by the trust or will, you should create clear documentation of any differences. Asset coordination can prevent trust and estate disputes after death. Clear documentation of testamentary intentions can help your beneficiaries establish what you intended to do in the event that someone took advantage of you during a final illness or incapacity. Assets transfer in various ways at death. Assets can pass through a probate process. Probate requires a filing with a court, presenting your will and asking the court to direct that assets be distributed in accordance with your will. Assets can pass by operation of law.

For example, if you title an asset in joint tenancy, upon your death, the asset will pass to the joint tenant by operation of law. Assets can also pass by contractual designation. Creation of a trust and titling assets in trust results in contractual transfers. When you name a mary e. vandenack beneficiary of a life insurance policy, annuity, or IRA, the asset passes contractually. As part of preparing an estate plan, you should compile a detailed list of all of your assets, including the current titling and beneficiary designations. When compiling this list, consider all real estate, investment accounts, your home, life insurance, annuities, stock in a closely held company, executive compensation plans, benefits payable under an employment agreement and unique assets. Assets that typically pass outside of your trust or will include IRAs, retirement accounts, life insurance, business ownership agreements and annuities. In many states real estate can be passed pursuant to a transfer-on-death deed and investment accounts can be passed via a transfer-on-death designation. For those assets that can pass by contractual designation, it is important to consider whether that is desirable. The correct answer depends on a variety of factors. The most important factor is the best way to achieve your estate planning objectives. Additional considerations may include probate avoidance, estate tax issues and income tax issues. For any estate that consists of a variety of assets that pass by beneficiary designation, consideration should be given to whether some of the assets should be directed to the trust and distributed through that vehicle. One advantage of a trust in this regard is that the trust can cover all of the distribution issues in one convenient place. For example, the trust can specify who receives assets in the event a beneficiary predeceases you. This cannot always be accomplished in beneficiary designations but even if it can, you must remember to update and change all beneficiary designations when changes to your testamentary plans occur. Detailed asset coordination is crucial to a good estate plan. Coordinating various estate planning advisors so that everyone is on the same page is extremely beneficial.

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• • • • • •

T I T T T T


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• swaRtzbaugh-FaRbER & assOCiatEs, inC.

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HOW YOUR dentist ENVISION YOUR CAN extend scaredy cat! YOUR AND LIFE !

stephanie vondrak d.d.s.

AS AMERICANS

DR. CHARLES MAYO

we tend to want the very best of everything and for as little personal physical or financial output as possible. Our desires surrounding healthcare are no different. We want the best healthcare as defined by cost, providers and benefits received. Unfortunately, the financial stability of the insurance company providing the benefit is sometimes a distant fourth or forgotten consideration. These three primary factors are interdependent. That is, it is not always possible to find the ultimate state – the best providers at the lowest cost with the best benefit plan.

has said, “Preventative dentistry can add five years to the human life.” Learn how to increase your longevity with these five tips!

Prior to the year 2000, insurance companies tended to be friendlier to their insureds, with simpler patient experiences brought on by wide PPO networks and generous benefit plans. Today, with annual health insurance costs reaching an all-time high, averaging over $10,000 per employee, we need some relief from escalating costs! There is an option in metro Omaha to get one step closer to the ultimate state: “Skinny” PPO networks. “Skinny networks” limit the facilities or number of physicians and hospitals within a preferred network and provide patients richer benefits when those physicians or hospitals are utilized. Ultimately, by driving more patients to a smaller number of doctors/hospitals, insurance companies can negotiate lower costs and drive better health outcomes. There is a difference in costs between any chosen medical providers. If you don’t know where to look, those differences are difficult to identify. An MRI in Omaha, for example, can vary in cost between a low of $330 to a high of more than $900. If we can steer patients to the most costeffective options- or at least provide the tools to help patients understand the differences – the consumer saves dollars on their procedures and in the long run, we all reap the benefits of more affordable health insurance. There are electronic tools to help members find the most efficient providers (the lowest cost AND favorable health outcomes). Many insurance companies even provide this information on their member portals. Alternatively, patients can learn the cost of a medical procedure simply by asking the facility or doctor. Skinny networks are not just about cost, they also contain an element of measuring health outcomes to ensure the quality of care is not diminished. Many of the local major insurance companies have varied skinny PPO networks that provide lower-cost premiums by steering patients to lower-cost physicians, specialists and hospitals, yet requiring certain patient health measures be maintained to ensure the patient is receiving superior care. For example, one national company has as much as a 13% premium difference between their full PPO network and a skinny network that only includes about half of Omaha’s available healthcare providers. With premium rates increasing 10% to 20%, a 13% reduction in premiums through skinny networks is a welcome option.

TIP ONE: Look in the mirror when you brush your teeth! Brushing effectively requires your toothbrush bristles contact all tooth surfaces. Try holding your toothbrush at an angle and moving the bristles in a circular motion, you will gently remove the plaque and massage your gums at the same time. Think of brushing as a skill, focus on your technique and practice, practice, practice! TIP TWO: Always brush before bed! Bed-time brushing is essential to establish excellent dental health! Remember, your teeth should be spotless when your head hits the pillow. It only takes twelve hours to form cavity...if you sleep with dirty teeth, you are well on your way to creating new decay. TIP THREE: Only floss the teeth you wish to keep. Mouthwash, Water Pics and excuses won't shoo your plaque bugs away. To effectively remove plaque from in between your teeth, flossing is the only way! TIP FOUR: Beware of popping and clicking in your jaw joints! In the mission to keep your teeth, let’s not forget the importance of healthy jaw joints. Popping and clicking in the jaws means unnecessary movement of the cartilage within the temporomandibular joints. This movement can trigger symptoms such as facial muscle pain, headaches, broken teeth, ear pain, and more. If these signs and symptoms sound familiar, seek answers from a knowledgeable dentist on how to protect your TMJ joints for long-term dental health. TIP FIVE: Straight teeth are teeth! From creating confident smiles to eliminating plaque traps, you are simply more likely to brush, floss, and maintain your straight, beautiful smile than your crowded one. I encourage adults of all ages to consider Invisalign or traditional orthodontic treatment for a straighter, healthier smile! So, take the initiative and be proactive, follow these five tips for better dental health and you may enjoy better overall health that can actually lead to a longer, healthier life.

With a little research, education and thought, we have the potential to improve the outcomes we desire.

For more information, please contact your trusted advisor at Swartzbaugh-Farber – ‘Client Centered – Client Advocates™’. This material is intended for informational purposes only and should not be construed as legal or tax advice and is not intended to replace the advice of a qualified attorney, tax advisor or plan provider. Securities Offered through M Holdings Securities, Inc., a Registered Broker Dealer, Member FINRA/SIPC. Swartzbaugh-Farber & Associates, Inc. is independently owned and operated.

Dr. Stephanie Vondrak is board certified by the American Academy of Craniofacial Dental Sleep Medicine to treat patients suffering from sleep apnea with sleep apnea appliances. 37

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community CONNECTIONS

2017 HOSPITALITY HALL OF FAME inductees

2017 Hospitality Hall of Fame Honorees The Omaha Hospitality Hall of Fame celebrated its 25th Anniversary at the Induction Dinner on October 15th. Five hospitality industry leaders were inducted this year, bringing the total to 128. The purpose of the event each year is to recognize achievement in the restaurant/food service industry among past and present restaurant owners, managers, chefs, event planners, culinarians, educators, purveyors and others who have significantly contributed to the industry. The annual dinner is a fundraiser for culinary and hospitality students. The Hall of Fame is presented by the Omaha Restaurant Association and is hosted by Metropolitan Community College Institute for the Culinary Arts, Fort Omaha Campus.

2017 HALL OF FAME HONOREES

The menu creation and food preparation was provided by the students, faculty and staff at the institute. Entertainment was provided by Gooch and the Guys. Visit the event website at www.omahahospitalityhalloffame.com for more information.

Jan and Les Schneiderman Les started his career in high school in 1951, working as a “soda jerk” in his uncles’ business, KB Ice Cream. Les spent two years in the Army before returning to Omaha to work at KB (Kesselman Brothers) Foods as a sales representative. In 1959, Les married Jan Ricks, who later worked in the business with him along their son Scott. KB Foods was a company that believed providing outstanding in customer service. After working his way up to president, Les ran the company until his retirement in 1998.

JAN AND LES SCHNEIDERMAN

Haukur “Jim” Olafsson Jim Olafsson started an importing food business in Iceland in the 1980s. Bringing that business to Omaha in 1996, Jim saw a void in quality ingredients available in the area. He made items such as caviar, smoked salmon, mushrooms, truffles and chocolates available in the Omaha market. Jim became the “go to” person sought out by Omaha’s finest chefs. Twenty years later, H. Olafsson International Specialty Foods has grown significantly and is still run by Jim and his wife Bjorg. They continue to work closely with Omaha’s best chefs and top restaurants, introducing them to new and exciting culinary trends.

HAUKUR “JIM” OLAFSSON

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OMAHA RESTAURANT ASSOCIATION | the iNstitute Of CuliNary arts at MCC

hospitality honors Hap Abraham Chef Hap Abraham is a catering giant in Omaha. After attending the Culinary Institute of America from 1966 to1968, he returned to Nebraska and established Abraham Catering Services, Inc., where he’s been ever since. His company caters 500 weddings per year plus many other events. Hap is known for catering high profile grand openings; Buffet Cancer Center, Lexus of Omaha, Henry Doorly Zoo, and the Berkshire Hathaway Annual Meeting. Abraham Catering Services, Inc. services six venues and has exclusive rights to cater at several additional venues.

HAP ABRAHAM

Chef Claude Hampton, Jr. After paying his dues working nights and holidays at the original Café di Coppia and Oak Hills Country Club, an energy-charged Claude Hampton, Jr. started with Absolutely Fresh Seafood Company. Claude is not only the executive chef but he is also the sales manager at Absolutely Fresh. In his spare time, he teaches cooking classes and sets up amazing lobster bakes. Claude has been involved in the American Culinary Federation and served as a past membership chairman.

CHEF CLAUDE HAMPTON, JR.

Gary Rohwer Gary Rohwer started in the restaurant industry in 1981, developing and expanding the Chartroose Caboose through franchising. Gary also developed a unique method of slicing and portioning steak meat, which he patented. He started Heartland Beef Processing Co. in 1989, where he sold his product “Steak-Eze” throughout the U.S. and three other countries. Gary then sold Heartland Beef to Advance Pierre Foods and retired in 1998. After two short years, Gary came out of retirement and created PepperJax Grill in 2000. Gary started Glenn Valley Foods in 2008 to process an improved version of Steak-Eze called Gary’s Quick Steak. Gary sold his PepperJax franchise operations in 2016.

GARY ROHWER

2017 hospitality

HALL OF FAME HONOREES

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event galleries

look for the LEARN MORE ABOUT THESE ORGANIZATIONS IN THE EVENT BOOK 2017!

QLI QLI GOLF CHALLENGE

ANGELS AMONG US MISSION POSSIBLE

METRO AREA YOUTH FOUNDATION SUMMER BASH FOR CHILDHOOD CANCER

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY OF OMAHA BREW HAHA

AUTISM ACTION PARTNERSHIP VINTAGE AFFAIRE GALA

LUTHERAN FAMILY SERVICES OF NEBRASKA ® CELEBRATING 125 YEARS OF FAITH IN ACTION

REJUVENATING WOMEN BEAUTIFULLY BROKEN BANQUET

OMAHA ZOO FOUNDATION ZOOFARI 2017 - NIGHT OF THE TIGER

• VIEW & PURCHASE ADDITIONAL PHOTOS OF THESE EVENTS now! AT Spiritofomaha.com

Purchase photos from these events online or from your smartphone, and metroMAGAZINE will donate 10% back to that organization. Join us in giving back! Enter the code “GIVE10” on the checkout page of your shopping cart. • please remember to trade with our advertisers, whose support helps make our promotion of these important events possible

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featured eVeNt

spotlight

omaha zoo foundation

ZOOFARI 2017 - NIGHT OF THE TIGER

Photos courtesy of OMAHA ZOO FOUNDATION

roaring evening

ESSENTIALS: When: April 5 and April 6th

When: September 15

Where: Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium

Why: Zoofari 2017 raised funds to support the new Asian Highlands exhibit at Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium

Honorary Chairs: John P. and Anne Nelson and John H. and Susie Nelson

JOHN P. NELSON, TINA CHERICA AND JOHN H. NELSON

Caterer: Abraham Catering

Attendance: 1,100

Amount Raised: $2.4 million

Mission: The Omaha Zoo Foundation is a nonprofit organization that was founded in 1984 to support the mission of Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium, which is dedicated to the education of the public and the preservation of earth's priceless biodiversity. Our work includes raising the funds needed to ensure the zoo's continued growth and vibrancy and supporting its education, conservation and research initiatives.

For more Information: www.omahazoofoundation.org

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mquarterly

| zoofari 2017

WARREN BUFFETT, DR. LEE SIMMONS AND WALTER SCOTT JR

CALVIN AND RHONDA SISSON

JESS AND DENNIS PATE

MARY AND HAL DAUB

BOB AND JUDY BATES WITH DR. JOHN MARSHALL

KATE NELSON WITH JOHN H. AND SUSIE NELSON

DR. AMY HADDAD AND STEVE MARTIN

JEANNIE ALDREDGE AND MARCIA HOFFMAN

JOHN P. AND ANNE NELSON

MARIE AND DR. LEE SIMMONS

JOHN AND LYNNE BOYER WITH VIC AND TAMI MONSON

SENATOR BEN AND DIANE NELSON


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event galleries

photos courtesy of metro area youth foundation

BOLD Bash

Metro Area Youth Foundation Summer Bash for Childhood Cancer When: August 12 Where: Embassy Suites Conference Center – La Vista Why: Funds raised to provide financial assistance to families who have children undergoing cancer treatment Honorary Chairs: Ron Spencer and David Dries Attendance: 400 Amount Raised: $170,000 Mission: To allow families to focus on the children, not the money they owe. About: Metro Area Youth Foundation is comprised of Optimist Clubs and their members from Western Nebraska and Eastern Iowa, The Foundation is operated by Optimist Club members who donate their time and effort to this worthy cause. MAYF has assisted over 400 families in the past 10 years thanks to the public’s generous donations. For more Information: 402.740.5158 | summerbashforccc.org

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photos courtesy of qli

DOWN THE

Middle QLI

QLI Golf Challenge When: August 14

KAREN THOMPSON, DIAN PICKEREL, ANNA ECKHOFF AND CHRIS WENDLANDT

CARL MEYERS, SCOTT MEYERS, JOSH MARRON AND ANTHONY MEYERS

Where: The Players Club at Deer Creek, Omaha Why: The QLI Golf Challenge is an annual fundraiser which provides support to QLI’s innovative Life Path Services program. Life Path Services reconnects individuals and families affected by traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury to their passions and purpose following injury. Attendance: 148 golfers Amount Raised: over $70,000

TERESA WAGEMAN, SAM WAGEMAN, COREY PAULSEN AND TRAVIS MASON

KEN WENTZ, CHRIS PRESTON, CHRISTOPHER HOYME AND CHAD RICHTER

Mission: Deliver life-changing rehabilitation and care. Protect dignity, instill purpose, and create hope. Commit to excellence. About: QLI provides life-changing rehabilitation and care for individuals who have suffered traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury. The only program of its kind, QLI draws families from all across the nation to Omaha for their unique and effective services.

ROY PATTERSON, CHRIS JOHNSTONE, PHIL MCDONNELL AND CHRIS THELEN

MEGAN MAHONEY, TAYLOR KERSCHKE, JEN PIKE AND KIELY MADHAVAN

TOM KEALY, MACKENZIE FARR, KYLE JANSSEN AND TYLER JOHNSON

For more Information: 402.573.3700 | www.teamQLI.com

SHAWN WILLS, ERIC FITCH, PAUL MORIZZO, TED JEFFRIES AND QLI

JUSTIN HORN

CAPTIONS

CAP45

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event galleries

photos courtesy of angels among us

NOTHING IS

Impossible Angels Among Us Mission Possible When: August 26

JOANNE KAMPPINEN, JOHN HOULIHAN, VITA COFFEY AND MIKE COFFEY

SUSIE NELSON AND SHARI HOLL

Where: Hilton Hotel Downtown Omaha Why: Mission Possible was a fundraising event to help support families battling pediatric cancer. Special Guests: Jeff Packer, MC from WOWT; cancer families from across our area Event Planner: planitomaha Multi Media: Macre Productions

MYLLA GRUBE

JEREMY AND RENEE VOKT WITH TRACI AND BILL PREISTER

Attendance: 400 Amount Raised: $150,000 Mission: Angels Among Us provides financial and emotional resources to families battling pediatric cancer living in or being treated in Nebraska.

BRENT AND ERIN O’MARA

ANDREA OLSON AND COLLEEN BARSTOW

About: Currently we are assisting 40 families from across Nebraska and Iowa with $320,000 in support. Angels Among Us announced as part of the evening a rebranded logo which was done in collaboration with OBI Creative. Not only that, the organization announced that it will increase the number of families supported from 25 to 40 and they would increase the amount of support for each family from 12 months to 18 months each. For more Information: 302.934.0999 | www.myangelsamongus.org

MYLLA, SEAN AND KIERA GRUBE

TED AND AMEE ZETZMAN WITH JEFF KAVICH AND DONNA KUSH

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photos courtesy of habitat for humanity of omaha

RECORD

Crowd

Habitat for Humanity of Omaha 2018 Brew Haha When: September 7 Where: Stinson Park, Omaha

AMANDA BREWER AND KATHY JEDLICKA

LISA AND DENNIS RITTER Why: Brew Haha raises funds to support Habitat Omaha’s important work of building strength, stability and self-reliance through homeownership. All Habitat homeowners help build their home alongside volunteers and pay an affordable mortgage. A decent place to live and an affordable mortgage help homeowners save more, invest in education, pursue opportunity and gain financial stability. Attendees had the opportunity to enjoy delicious tastings from 67 of the area’s best breweries and restaurants and listen to live music by Shenanigans. Herbe Sainte, Kros Strain Brewing and Stirnella sponsored the Patron Party. Honorary Chairs: Lisa and Dennis Ritter with Billie and Mike Mancuso Event Chairs: Erin and Joe Pogge Event Sponsors: CSG International, Assurant, Paxton & Vierling Steel Co., American National Bank, Lisa & Dennis Ritter ReMax, BuilderTrend, JE Dunn, McGrath North, HDR, Inc., NorthMarq Capital, Warren Distribution, First State Bank, Aimee & Trent Demuling, Olympic Transportation, First National Bank, Bland Cares Foundation, Shamrock Development, Streck, Inc., Mackintosh Charitable Trust, Regan & Mike Mackintosh, Ashley & Clark Horgan, Baird Holm LLP, Berkshire Hathaway Homeservices, CoBank, Fraser Stryker, Great Western Bank, Greenslate, Holland Basham Architects, Jim Hawk Group, Home Instead, Kiewit Corporation, Kutak Rock, LLP, Lutz and Company, PC, Midwest Housing Equity Group, Nebraska Title Company, OrthoNebraska, Olsson and Associates, Quickserve Solutions, Security National Bank, TD Ameritrade, TSA Manufacturing, Waitt Corp, Woods & Aiken Attendance: 1900 Amount Raised: $210,000 Mission: Habitat for Humanity builds strength, stability and self-reliance through shelter. About: Habitat Omaha works to eliminate substandard housing with a focus on blighted areas of North and South Omaha. The organization also works in the areas of Blair, Waterloo, and Burt County. Habitat Omaha’s core programs include new and rehab builds, critical home repairs on owner-occupied homes and the demolition of condemned houses. Together, Habitat Omaha’s programs strive to provide families in need with opportunities to successfully achieve and maintain homeownership while improving the safety, appearance and value of neighborhoods. For more Information: 402.457.5657 | www.habitatomaha.org

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event galleries

photos courtesy of autism action partnership

CLASSIC

Jubilee

Autism Action Partnership Vintage Affaire Gala When: September 9 Where: Embassy Suites Conference Center – La Vista, NE

DRS. MIKE AND LISA KELLY VANCE

DR. JOHN BERTONI AND CAROL KONTOR Why: The annual Vintage Affaire Gala raises money to support the Autism Action Partnership’s mission to provide support for people and their families in Nebraska that are dealing with autism. Special Guests: C.L. and Rachel Werner, Scott and Gail Werner-Robertson

KATE WEITZ AND GRANT GARCIA

DR. RICH AND GERALYN AZIZKHAN

Sponsors: C.L. and Rachel Werner, My Place Hotels, SEI, Pinnacle Bank, Midlands Carrier Transicold, Truck Center Companies, Roger & Kate Weitz, Wicks Trucking, Valmont, Moglia Family Foundation, Gary & Becky Werner, Creighton University, First National Bank, Fraser Stryker, Seim Johnson, Pat & Connie Jung, UNO/UNMC, Werner Trucking, Travel and Transport, Gerald & Lynn Timmerman and the Simmonds Family Foundation Attendance: 230 Amount Raised: $462,000 Mission: To improve the quality of life of persons on the Autism Spectrum and their families through education, advocacy and support, thereby enabling them to be an integral part of the community.

GAIL WERNER-ROBERTSON WITH MIKE AND ELIZABETH CASSLING AND MARY AND HAL DAUB

About: The Autism Action Partnership provides social skills programs in 229 Nebraska schools. We also provide employment support programs for adults on the spectrum who seek meaningful employment. For more Information: 402.763.8830 | www.autismaction.org

MEGAN AND JOSH KOZIOL

KRISTA REED, NICOLE LEATHERS AND RACHEL WERNER

SCOTT AND JILL ERWIN

KAREN AND DOUG KEELER WITH JIM AND TANA STADJUHAR AND ROSE OPBROEK 48

VINO MAS

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photos courtesy of heart ministry center

DIGNITY

For All Heart Ministry Center Holy Smokes When: August 31 Where: Anthony’s Steakhouse Why: A benefit event for the Heart Ministry Center. The Heart Ministry Center is extremely grateful to our generous financial supporters who help make what we do possible. The Heart Ministry Center is diligent in ensuring that money donated to our Center is spent thoughtfully and used in the best interest of the people we serve. Please consider donating to our programs, so we can continue to provide services to those in need. Honorary Chairs: Drs. Shirley and James Huerter Volunteer-of-the-Year: Ann Laughlin Heart of Gold Sponsors: Nebraska Medicine, Mike and MaryJo Dahir, Arkfeld Wealth Strategies Giant Heart Sponsors: Drs. Shirley and Jim Huerter, Sue and Mike Lebens, Pella, Security National Bank Big Heart Sponsors: C & A Industries, JetLinx, First National Bank, Levy Family, Baird Holm Attendance: 500+ Amount Raised: Over $140,000 Mission: Providing food, clothing, healthcare and a way forward to people severely affected by poverty in the Omaha area. About: The Heart Ministry Center offers clients a choice food pantry, a clothing closet, medical clinic, dental clinic and social work & case management services. For more Information: 402.451.2321 | www.heartministrycenter.org

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event galleries

photos courtesy of rejuvenating Women

RESTORING

Power

Rejuvenating Women Beautifully Broken, Road to Freedom Banquet When: September 19 Where: Embassy Suites Hotel & Conference Center, La Vista Why: Raising funds to provide hope and restoration to victims and survivors of human trafficking and exploitation Sponsors: Restored & Redeemed Sponsors: American National Bank, Thrasher. Wings of Hope Sponsors: TransCanada, Simmonds Family Foundation, Dave & Susan Williams, Christ Community Church, Scott & Cindy Heider. Freedom Sponsors: Pinnacle Bank, Jerry & Kari Peters, Kevin & Lisa Larson. Faithful Sponsors: Kelley Engineering, Color 9 Creative, Senator Jim & Kristi Scheer, UP Railroad Company, Village Pointe Aesthetic/Dreams MedSpa, Echo Systems. Inspiration Sponsors: Doug & Loretta Patterson, Salem Media Group, The Hills Montessori, Lifegate Church, Keller Williams Realty-Rachel Tiller, Jeff & Kelly Roberts, Becker Chiropractic & Acupuncture, Intellegen, Kiewit Corporation, Regent Financial/Nebraska Realty. Gracious Sponsors: Wealth Partners, Michael Morris & Brenda Christensen. Committed Sponsors: Diamond Chiropractic, Lueder Construction, Edge Magazine, Sandy Epstein, Jill Bydalek, Dave & Ann Hickey, Senator Robert & Julie Hilkemann, Bruce & Stacy Simon Event Planner: Meredith Klein Attendance: 512 Amount Raised: $152,000 Mission: “Providing hope and restoration to victims and survivors of human trafficking and exploitation” About: Rejuvenating Women’s Vision: Empowerment of all survivors of human trafficking and exploitation to lead healthy, independent lives. For more Information: www.rejuvenatingwomen.com | 800.402.0601

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photos courtesy of lutheran family Services

CONVICTION

in Motion

Lutheran Family Services of Nebraska Celebrating 125 Years of Faith in Action® When: September 23

GREG AND NANCY THRASHER

COYNER SMITH, LEEMAH NASRATI AND DONNA SMITH

Where: Embassy Suites Conference Center – La Vista Why: In its 125th year of service, LFS Nebraska’s “Faith in Action®” event recognized those whose generosity and leadership help Lutheran Family Services provide quality human care programs in the areas of Behavioral Health, Children Services and Community Services.

STEVE PEMBERTON AND AMANDA REINERT

LINDA MCCLAIN, RUTH HENRICHS AND TERRY MCCLAIN

Special Guests: Steve Pemberton: Keynote Speaker Walgreens’ Chief Diversity Officer and author of “A Chance in the World”. Amanda Reinert, reigning Mrs. Universal. Greg and Nancy Thrasher: Trinity Award. Terry and Linda McClain: Immanuel Award. Coyner and Donna Smith: 2017 Douglas E. Parrott Faith in Action® Honorees. Rev. Richard Snow – President, Nebraska District, LCMS. Rev. Brian Maas – Bishop, Nebraska Synod, ELCA. LFS Nebraska President & CEO Ruth Henrichs Sponsors: Dr. Thomas & Jane Tonniges Family, Immanuel, Thrasher, Inc. Valmont Industries, First National Bank Attendance: 850

TODD ANDREWS

REV. DR. DENNIS ANDERSON WITH ROLAND AND HIROKO TEMME AND BARBARA ANDERSON

Amount Raised: $135,000 Mission: Lutheran Family Services expresses God’s love for all people by providing quality human care services that build and strengthen individual, family and community life. About: Lutheran Family Services’ vision is to address Safety, Hope and Well-Being for all people, embracing the values of Faith, Family, Diversity, Excellence, Integrity and Collaboration. For more Information: 402.342.7038 | www.LFSneb.org

BISHOP BRIAN MAAS AND PRESIDENT RICHARD SNOW

GREG AND NANCY THRASHER WITH THEIR FAMILY

COYNER AND DONNA SMITH SURROUNDED BY THEIR FRIENDS

TERRY AND LINDA MCCLAIN WITH THEIR FAMILY 51

JAN AND LARRY NOVICKI WITH BOB DORR AND ROSE HILL

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event galleries

photos courtesy of Grief’s journey

HEALING

Odyssey Grief’s Journey Grief’s Journey Remembrance Walk On Saturday, August 12, over 300 people gathered at Miller’s Landing to celebrate the lives of loved ones no longer here at the 19th Annual Grief’s Journey Remembrance Walk.

TIONS NSEN

The weather was beautiful, the walk over the Bob Kerrey Pedestrian Bridge was invigorating, the live music was highly entertaining and everyone enjoyed the snacks, activities and camaraderie. The Remembrance Walk is an annual event that supports our community’s grievers, provides community awareness of the available free services, and is also a fundraiser that helps Grief’s Journey continue the work of providing free grief support.

NDER For more Information: www.griefsjourney.org

COCO

TIONS WISE, STON

S or the Savo the expe perience

NNEY

V oted Best of Omahaa eight Years in a Row

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photos courtesy of youth emergency Services

TOE

Tappers Youth Emergency Services Dance for a Chance When: August 4 Where: Omaha Design Center Why: To raise awareness and funds for homeless youth in our community. Youth Emergency Services (YES) has been providing critically-needed programs and resources to homeless and at-risk youth in Omaha for more than 40 years. Attendance: 450 guests Amount Raised: $90,000 Mission: To serve homeless and at-risk youth by providing critically-needed resources which empower them to become self-sufficient. For more Information: www.yesomaha.org

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event galleries

Photos courtesy of First responders Foundation

HONORING

the Brave First Responders Foundation 9/11 Memorial Benefit When: September 8 Where: Omaha Design Center Why: Annual fundraiser for first responders Attendance: 500 Mission: Our mission is to enhance public safety and build community appreciation and respect for our first responders. About: The First Responders Foundation has grown into Omaha’s premier nonprofit in supporting first responders. We focus efforts on fundraising, programming, and events that support our mission to enhance public safety and build community appreciation and respect for our first responders. For more Information: firstrespondersomaha.org

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Photos courtesy of ronald Mcdonald House charities

SOARING

High

Ronald McDonald House Charities in Omaha Wings and Wheels When: September 8 Where: Signature Flight Support Omaha Why: A benefit for the families staying at the Ronald McDonald House Attendance: 385 Amount Raised: $129,000 About: At Ronald McDonald House Charities in Omaha, we’re for the fighters. The caregivers. The ones who have packed up their families and sick kiddos, traveled hundreds of miles to an unfamiliar city, skipped meals, lost sleep, cried silently, fought ferociously and hoped for the best even when faced with the worst. For more Information: 402.346.9377 | rmhcomaha.org

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event galleries

Photos courtesy of justice For our neighbors

COMMUNITY

Strength

Justice For Our Neighbors-NE enVISION 2017: Food Truck World Tour When: September 14 Where: Okada Sculpture and Ceramics Facility of the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha Why: Our third annual fundraiser brings community members together to learn about the work JFON-NE provides for low-income immigrants. This event benefits the clients of Justice For Our Neighbors – Nebraska. Attendance: 350 Amount Raised: $183,000 Mission: Justice For Our Neighbors – Nebraska is a nonprofit organization welcoming immigrants into our communities by providing free, high-quality immigration legal services, education, and advocacy. For more Information: 402.898.1349 | jfon-ne.org

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Photos courtesy of lauritzen Gardens

DESIGN AND

Culture

Lauritzen Gardens Antique & Garden Show When: September 14 through 17 Where: Lauritzen Gardens

BRUCE FRASIER AND RICHARD NIELSEN

Why: A four-day celebration of design and culture to benefit the beauty of Lauritzen Gardens.

BRUCE AND GERRY LAURITZEN

Attendance: More than 2,500 Amount Raised: Net funds = more than $600,000 About: A living museum of unique four-season plant displays, Lauritzen Gardens is maintained to the highest environmental and horticultural standards with the goal to provide memorable educational and aesthetic experiences for all. More than twenty themed gardens and the new Marjorie K. Daugherty Conservatory immerse guests in the beauty of the Nebraska landscape and in a lush environment where plants burst with life year-round.

POLINA SCHLOTT, SHEILA FITZGERALD AND SHANE CONNOLLY

MOGENS AND CINDY BAY WITH STACY AND BRUCE SIMON

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For more Information: 402.346.4002 | www.omahaantiqueshow.org

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Photos courtesy of KaneKo

LIBATIONS &

Liberation KANEKO

Open Space Soirée When: September 22 Where: KANEKO 1111 Jones St, Omaha, NE Why: KANEKO’s annual fundraiser supports future community programming reaching visitors from Omaha and beyond. Attendance: 490 Amount Raised: $115,000 Mission: Creativity begins with an idea — seeing things differently. Our purpose is exploring the creative process — how a new idea is born into the arts, sciences, and philosophy. There is no restriction for creative activity. Imagination has complete freedom. Supporting and promoting freedom in creativity is KANEKO’s mission. For more Information: 403.341.3800 | www.thekaneko.org

A

N

BR

Scot ts Bluff National Monument Center Pivot Irrigation

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A

SESQUI U CENTENNIAL

E

K

NET SALUTES THE NEBR A SKA


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Photos courtesy of alzheimer’s association

A WINNING

Walk

Alzheimer’s Association Nebraska Chapter Walk to End Alzheimer’s Residents of Omaha and surrounding areas joined the Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s in the fight to end Alzheimer’s disease on September 24, 2017 at Midtown Crossing in Omaha. Nearly 1,800 participants raised more than $183,000 to fund Alzheimer’s care, support and research programs. The event was filled with poignant personal stories and energy to continue the fight to end this disease, said Erinn Drouin. The Alzheimer’s Association is the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s research, care and support. Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer’s. For more Information: alz.org | 800.272.3900

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event galleries

Photos courtesy of open door Mission

IN THIS

Together Open Door Mission Love Your Neighbor Auction & Dinner When: September 28 Why: A night of good food, fun, and celebration to recognize God’s continued works of love in the lives of those Open Door Mission serves who are experiencing homelessness and poverty. Attendance: 1,050 Amount Raised: $152,000+ About: Open Door Mission is a Gospel Rescue Mission founded in 1954 committed to breaking the cycle of homelessness and poverty. Each day, Open Door Mission’s campus offers 816 safe, shelter beds to homeless men, women, and children, serves over 2,300 hot, nutritious meals and provides preventive measures to more than 275 people living in poverty. For more Information: 402.422.1111 | www.opendoormission.org

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Photos courtesy of omaha Home for Boys

BRIGHT

Futures

Omaha Home for Boys Imagine Our Youth When: September 29 Where: Embassy Suites Conference Center - La Vista

ICE-T WITH TAMMY AND DARREN CARLSON

ICE-T WITH AILEEN AND TOM WARREN

Why: The funds raised at Imagine Our Youth will help change and save the lives of at-risk youth who seek the guidance and support of Omaha Home for Boys. The Home serves more than 300 young men and women annually, empowering them with the skills needed to become independent, productive adults. Featured Keynote Speaker: Ice-T Attendance: 550 Amount Raised: $175,000 Mission: The mission of Omaha Home for Boys is to support and strengthen youth, young adults and families through services that inspire and equip them to lead independent and productive lives.

ONS

BACK ROW - JEREMY WARREN AND DARREN CARLSON FRONT ROW - JEFF DEWISPELARE, TOM EYMAN, JEFF MORAN, AILEEN WARREN, ICE-T, GARY UNGER, JEFFREY COLEMAN, ALLEN STRAUB AND MICAH EVANS

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For more Information: OmahaHomeForBoys.org | 402.457.7000

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event galleries

Photography by deb Kaplan

DARKNESS

Begone

Collective for Youth Lights On Afterschool Celebration When: September 30 Where: University of Omaha- Sapp Fieldhouse Why: The Lights On Afterschool event is a chance to highlight the need for more high quality afterschool programs while celebrating the programs that are already doing great work.

LIGHTS ON AFTERSCHOOL AWARD WINNERS

ONS

Attendance: 1,500 About: Collective for Youth support our partners through financial resources, professional development, and quality standards. We come to work every day so that young people in our community can participate in great educational, recreational, cultural, social, and personal enrichment programs. We believe that our youth – our city’s future – deserve the best.

REP. DON BACON AND MEGAN ADDISON

JOHN WITZEL, MEGAN ADDISON, BOB WHITEHOUSE AND JONATHAN BENJAMIN- ALVARADO

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For more Information: www.collectiveforyouth.org

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Photos courtesy of completely KIdS

DATE

Night Completely KIDS Night in the Neighborhood The Completely KIDS Guild-sponsored Night in the Neighborhood, a new fundraiser supporting Omaha nonprofit Completely KIDS, raised more than $165,000 to support the agency’s mission of educating and empowering kids and families to create a safe, healthy, successful and connected community.

ANGELA ROCK WITH LYNNE AND JOHN BOYER, PENNY PARKER, HOLLY AND MIKE BOYER, CHRISTINE SCHULTE AND KATE BROWNRIGG

“Though Completely KIDS has existed in Omaha for nearly 100 years, we positioned ourselves 10 years ago in the Park East Neighborhood at the heart of the communities we serve,” Executive Director Penny Parker said. “Night in the Neighborhood highlighted this vibrant area of our city while drawing support from others to advocate for the kids and families, many of whom struggle in poverty, who reside here.” For more Information: completelykids.org | 402.397.5809

LYNNE BOYER AND PENNY PARKER

STEVE LINDSAY, JODY CARSTENS, AMY DEARDORFF AND DAWN DINSDALE

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event galleries

Photos courtesy of nuFemme rejuvenation clinic

NEW

Beginnings NuFemme Rejuvenation Clinic NuFemme Rejuvenation Open House When: August 29 Where: NuFemme Rejuvenation Clinic Why: Celebration of grand opening of NuFemme Rejuvenation Special Guests: Antonio Sabato Jr. Caterer: J. Cocos Attendance: 250 Mission: At NuFemme, patient wellness is the priority About: This state-of-the-art medical center is designed to help women of all ages reach their full wellness potential. The specialty trained medical staff offers the latest treatments to rejuvenate inner and outer wellness. Features specialists in Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy, Sexual Health, and Anti-Aging Medicine. The evidence-based medical treatments are tailored to each patient’s individual needs and enable them to harness their full potential. The goal is healthier, younger, beautiful vitality. For more Information: www.nufemme.com | 855.855.9965

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The information in this section appears as supplied to us by the organizations presented. ALH Publications, Inc. accepts no responsibility for the accuracy or integrity of any of the information provided. Please double-check for updated details with event organizers.

• mquarterly community CALENDAR

save the date

Learn more details about any of these events by searching our extensive Community Calendar at mQUARTERLY’s website: http://www.SpiritofOmaha.com/Metro-Magazine/Community/Calendar/

featured

VENTS

CONNECT with over 100 nonprofits and learn more about their mission and how you can help! Order your copy of The Giving Guide & Event Book 2017 today at mQUARTERLY’s SpiritofOmaha.com.

November 9 • 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Complete information for the following events is available at metroMAGAZINE’s SpiritofOmaha.com CALENDAR PAGE or each organization’s website.

MERRYMAKERS TOAST TO HAL DAUB Merrymakers Association

November 1 • 8:00 AM – 4:30 PM

Omaha Design Center | 1502 Cuming St. | Suite 200 | Omaha $200/ticket or $75 for under age 40 | 402.697.0205 | www.merrymakers.org

NONPROFIT SUMMIT OF THE MIDLANDS Nonprofit Association of the Midlands and D.A. Davidson

November 10 – 12

Embassy Suites Conference Center – La Vista NAM Members $150 ~ Not-yet-members - $225 ~ Lunch keynote and awards only - $75 402.557.5800 | www.nonprofitam.org/events/EventDetails.aspx?id=907099&group=

JOSLYN CASTLE HISTORIC HOME TOUR & BOUTIQUE Joslyn Castle 3902 Davenport Street | Omaha $20 - $75 | 402.595.2199 | www.joslyncastle.com/events

November 2 • 10:00 AM – 8:00 PM CHRISTMAS CARAVAN 2017 Assistance League® of Omaha

November 10 • 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM TREE OF LIGHTS KICKOFF The Salvation Army

Various homes in Omaha $16 in advance, $20 at the door | 402.210.5571 | www.alomaha.org

American National Bank | 7921 W Dodge Rd | Omaha Free | 402.898.5909 | http://salarmyomaha.org

November 2 5:30 PM – 9:30 PM

November 10 • 8:00 AM – 4:30 PM

ONEWORLD MILAGRO DINNER OneWorld Community Health Centers

2017 AUTISM ACTION PARTNERSHIP SUMMIT Autism Action Partnership

Hilton Omaha | 1001 Cass St. | Omaha Learn more about the Milagro Dinner: http://bit.ly/2v9XoYG Purchase tickets: http://bit.ly/2njSAXY $125 | 402.502.8940 | www.oneworldomaha.org/get-involved/milagro-2017/

Scott Conference Center | 6450 Pine Street | Omaha Tickets: $75.00, Student/ Family Discounts: $50, Individuals with Autism: Free 402.763.8830 | http://https://autismaction.z2systems.com/eventReg.jsp?event=2&

November 3 • 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM

November 11 • 6:00 PM – 10:00 PM

LUTHERAN FAMILY SERVICES RALLY FOR KIDS Lutheran Family Services

CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL & MEDICAL CENTER GALA Friends Board of Children's Hospital & Medical Center

Hilton Omaha | 1001 Cass Street | Omaha $100 | 402.201.9588 | www.lfsneb.org/events/rally-for-kids/

CenturyLink Center Omaha | 455 N 10th Street | Omaha $185+ | 402.955.6851 | http://childrensomaha.org/gala

November 3

November 17 • 6:00 PM

AMERICAN RED CROSS, CELEBRATING A CENTURY OF VOLUNTEERS American Red Cross

SENTIMENTAL JOURNEY The Durham Museum

American Red Cross will celebrating a century of volunteers. Free | 402.343.7714 | www.redcross.org/neia

801 S. 10th Street | Omaha $175 and up | 402.444.5071 | www.durhammuseum.org

November 3 • 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM

November 23 • 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM

BREAKING THE CYCLE LUNCHEON Youth Emergency Services

JOSLYN CASTLE TURKEY TROT Joslyn Castle

TBD | Omaha $65 | 402.345.5187 | www.yesomaha.org/luncheon

Turner Park at Midtown Crossing | 33rd and Dodge | Omaha $30 - $40 | 402.595.2199 | www.joslyncastle.com/events

November 5 • 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

November 24 – January 3 • 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

HONEY SUNDAY Ollie Webb Center, Inc.

HOLIDAY POINSETTIA SHOW Lauritzen Gardens

Throughout Omaha $6 per bottle | 402.346.5220 | http://olliewebbinc.org

100 Bancroft Street | Omaha $5-10, free for garden members and children under 6 402.346.4002 | www.lauritzengardens.org

November 9 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM

December 2 • 6:00 PM

LUNCH FOR THE GIRLS FEATURING NICHOLAS KRISTOF & SHERYL WUDUNN Girls Inc. of Omaha

CHRISTMAS ENCHANTMENT Children's Square U.S.A.

CenturyLink Center | 455 N. 10th Street | Omaha $100 Regular Seats; $200 Patron Seats; Tables of 10 also available. 402.457.4676 | http://girlsincomaha.org/events/lunch-for-the-girls/

TBD Free (but we hope you will purchase some items) 712-322-3700 | www.childrenssquare.org 67

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The information in this section appears as supplied to us by the organizations presented. ALH Publications, Inc. accepts no responsibility for the accuracy or integrity of any of the information provided. Please double-check for updated details with event organizers.

community CALENDAR

Learn more details about any of these events by searching our extensive Community Calendar at mQUARTERLY’s website: http://www.SpiritofOmaha.com/Metro-Magazine/Community/Calendar/

December 2 – 3 • 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM PHYSICIANS MUTUAL & WOWT HOLIDAY MARKET Aksarben Village, 67th & Center Streets 67th & Center Streets | Omaha Free Admission

December 9 • 10:00 AM – 11:00 AM BOYS TOWN PEDIATRICS PRESENTS PARENT TALK: FOOD ALLERGIES IN KIDS Boys Town National Research Hospirtal

save the date CONNECT with over 100 nonprofits and learn more about their mission and how you can help! Order your copy of The Giving Guide & Event Book 2017 today at mQUARTERLY’s SpiritofOmaha.com.

DON’T MISS these

Complete information for the following events is available at metroMAGAZINE’s SpiritofOmaha.com CALENDAR PAGE or each organization’s website.

November 2 • 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM MEMORY EVENT: JOSLYN ART MUSEUM Josyln Art Museum 2200 Dodge Street | Omaha Free for Families with individuals on the spectrum 402.763.8830 | www.autismaction.z2systems.com/eventReg.jsp?event=19&

14000 Boys Town Hospital Rd. (on Boys Town Campus) | Omaha Free | 402.498.6729 www.boystownpediatrics.org/aboutus/Calendar/Pages/Food-Allergies-in-Kids.aspx

November 3 • 6:00 PM – 8:30 PM

December 9 • 5:00 PM – 5:00 PM

University Nebraska Medical Center's Sorrell Center 649 S 42nd St | Omaha $40-$10,000 | 402.213.9646 | www.bigmuddyurbanfarm.org

JOSLYN CASTLE UNLOCKED Joslyn Castle 3902 Davenport Street | Omaha $65 | 402.595.2199 | www.joslyncastle.com/events

December 27 • 6:00 PM – 11:00 PM OMAHA SYMPHONY DEBUTANTE BALL Debutante Ball Committee Embassy Suites | 12520 West Port Pkwy | LaVista 402.850.0428

January 20 • 6:00 PM – 11:00 PM 36TH REFLECTION BALL Midlands Community Foundation Embassy Suites Conference Center – La Vista $125 per person; sponsorships available | 402.991.8027 | www.midlandscommunity.org

January 27 • 6:00 PM – 11:00 PM ROSIE ROCKS A NIGHT IN MONTE CARLO The Rose Theater Omaha Marriott Downtown at the Capital District 222 N 10th St | Omaha $150 per ticket | www.rosetheater.org

February 17 • 4:30 PM – 10:00 PM MERCY: THE GOLD STANDARD, FIESTA 2018 Mercy High School Embassy Suites Conference Center – La Vista $125 per guest; $75 for alumna 402.553.9424 | http://Mercyhigh.org

February 24 • 7:00 PM – 11:00 PM PERFECT POUR Friends of Nebraska Children and Families Foundation The Slowdown | 729 N. 14th St. | Omaha General admission: $75 VIP package $150 http://perfectpour.org

LET'S GROW HERE GALA Big Muddy Urban Farm

November 5 • 2:00 PM – 5:00 PM OMAHA PUBLIC SCHOOLS FUNDRAISER OPSF Executive Board Regency Parkway Art Gallery | 440 Regency Parkway Suite 137 | Omaha $50 | 531.299.9600 | www.omahaschoolsfoundation.org www.eventbrite.com/e/opsf-fundraiser-tickets-37349377995?aff=es2

November 11 • 7:00 PM – 11:30 PM 9TH ANNUAL ROCK TO RAISE John Atkinson Foundation St. Nicholas Community Center 50th & Harrison Street | Omaha $60/person | www.johnatkinsonfoundation.org

November 18 • 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM ARTITUDES HOLIDAY ART SHOW & SALE Westside Community Center 84th & Grover Street | Omaha Free | 402.943.9221 | Facebook.com/ARTitudesNebraska

November 18 • 6:00 PM – 10:00 PM CUMC & BERGAN GALA CHI Health Foundation Century Link Center | 455 N 10th Street | Omaha $125 | 402.343.4438 | www.MyCHIHealth.com/Foundation

December 9 • 7:30 AM – 12:00 PM 2017 NEBRASKA JINGLE BELL RUN Arthritis Foundation Nebraska Strategic Air and Space Museum | Ashland $30 to $45 | 402.201.2864 | www.jbr.org/nebraska

December 30 • 10:00 AM – 2:00 PM NOON YEAR’S EVE The Durham Museum 801 S 10th Street | Omaha $11 Adults, $8 Seniors, $7 Children (3-12) | 402.444.5071 68

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Learn more details about any of these events by searching our extensive Community Calendar  at mQUARTERLY’s website:   http://www.SpiritofOmaha.com/Metro-Magazine/Community/Calendar/

CONNECT with over 100 nonprofits and learn more about their mission and how you can help! Order your copy of The Giving Guide & Event Book 2017 today at mQUARTERLY’s SpiritofOmaha.com.

• mquarterly LEARN MORE ABOUT THESE ORGANIZATIONS IN THE GIVING GUIDE 2017!

January 12  •  6:00 PM – 9:00 PM CELEBRATION Of LIfE dINNER fUNdRAISER Nebraskans United for Life DC Centre | 11830 Stonegate Drive | Omaha $45 | 402.399.0299 | http://nufl.org

January 16  •  4:00 PM – 5:30 PM GREATER OMAHA CHAMBER'S 2018 ANNUAL MEETING  CenturyLink Center Omaha | 455 N. 10th St. | Omaha Single Ticket: $120 (Members) / $145 (Non-Members) 402.346.5000 | www.OmahaChamber.org/Events

bravo!

SUPPORTING THE ARTS Complete information for the following events is available at metroMAGAZINE’s SpiritofOmaha.com CALENDAR PAGE or each organization’s website.

Through January 7   ZOOM INTO NANO The Durham Museum 801 S 10th Street | Omaha $11 Adults, $8 Seniors, $7 Children (3-12) 402.444.5071 | http://durhammuseum.org/

November 11   vETERAN'S dAY PROGRAM & LUNCH Strategic Air Command & Aerospace Museum 28210 West Park Highway | Ashland $12/adult, $6/child, free to veterans | 402.944.3100 | http://sacmuseum.org/

Through November 12   Thurs. - Sat. 7:30 p.m. & Sun. 2:00 p.m.

STUPId f@#%ING BIRd Omaha Community Playhouse 6915 Cass St | Omaha Starting at $24 | 402.553.0800 | www.omahaplayhouse.com

November 15 – 19   A TALE Of TWO dICKENS Douglas County Historical Society 5730 N. 30th St. 11b | Omaha $15-$75 | 402.455.9990 | www.DouglasCoHistory.org

November 17  •  5:30 PM – 9:00 PM fACE ON THE BARROOM fLOOR Omaha Press Club 1620 Dodge St. | 22nd floor | Omaha $50 for members and $60 for non-members. 402.650.7063 | http://omahapressclub.com

November 17 – december 23   Wed. 7:00 p.m., Thurs. - Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sun. 2:00 p.m. & 6:30 p.m.

A CHRISTMAS CAROL Omaha Community Playhouse 6915 Cass St | Omaha Starting at $38 | 402.553.0800 | www.omahaplayhouse.com 69

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The information in this section appears as supplied to us by the organizations presented. ALH Publications, Inc. accepts no responsibility for the accuracy or integrity of any of the information provided.  Please double-check for updated details with event organizers.

community CALENDAR

save the date November 19  •  3:00 PM – 5:30 PM HANdEL'S  MESSIAH  Voices of Omaha Holland Performing Arts Center | 1200 Douglas Street | Omaha FREE - no ticket required 402.874.0649 | www.voicesofomaha.org/

November 24 – december 31   Thurs. - Sat. 7:30 p.m. & Sun. 6:30 p.m. Nov. 24 - Dec. 31, 2017 Special Matinee Performance - Sun., Nov. 26, 2:00 p.m. Special New Year's Eve Performances - Sun., Dec. 31, 7:00 & 10:00 p.m.

YESTERdAY ANd TOdAY  OMAHA COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE 6915 Cass St | Omaha Starting at $40 | 402.553.0800 | www.omahaplayhouse.com

November 24 – January 1   CHRISTMAS AT UNION STATION The Durham Museum 801 S. 10th Street | Omaha Adults: $11 Seniors (62+): $8 Children (ages 3 - 12): $7 Children 2 | 402.444.5071 | www.durhammuseum.org

November 24 – January 7   ETHNIC HOLIdAY TREES ExHIBIT  The Durham Museum 801 S 10th Street | Omaha $11 Adults, $8 Seniors, $7 Children (3-12) | 402.444.5071

November 24  •  4:00 PM – 8:00 PM TREE LIGHTING CEREMONY The Durham Museum 801 S 10th Street | Omaha $11 Adults, $8 Seniors, $7 Children (3-12) | 402.444.5071

November 24   9:00 AM – 4:00 PM

HOLIdAY BREAK ART dAY CAMP Adventure in Art Adventure in Art | 6001 Maple St. | Omaha $40 - $70 | 402.556.4278 | http://adventureinart.net

November 25 – december 23 •  7:00 PM – 8:00 PM HOLIdAY LIGHTS fESTIvAL - SOUNdS Of THE SEASON Holiday Lights Festival Gene Leahy Mall and the Old Market | Omaha FREE | 402.345.5401 | www.holidaylightsfestival.org

december 1  •  5:00 PM – 9:00 PM ETHNIC HOLIdAY fESTIvAL The Durham Museum 801 S 10th Street | Omaha $11 Adults, $8 Seniors, $7 Children (3-12) | 402.444.5071

december 1  •  10:00 AM – 2:00 PM SANTA GOES TO SPACE Strategic Air Command & Aerospace Museum 28210 West Park Highway | Ashland $12/adult, $6/child | 402.944.3100 | http://sacmuseum.org/ 70

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Learn more details about any of these events by searching our extensive Community Calendar  at mQUARTERLY’s website:   http://www.SpiritofOmaha.com/Metro-Magazine/Community/Calendar/

CONNECT with over 100 nonprofits and learn more about their mission and how you can help! Order your copy of The Giving Guide & Event Book 2017 today at mQUARTERLY’s SpiritofOmaha.com.

• mquarterly LEARN MORE ABOUT THESE ORGANIZATIONS IN THE GIVING GUIDE 2017!

december 2 – 19  •  HOLIdAY CONCERT SERIES The Durham Museum 801 S 10th Street | Omaha $11 Adults, $8 Seniors, $7 Children (3-12) | 402.444.5071

december 2 – 19  •  5:00 PM – 8:00 PM fAMILY NIGHTS WITH SANTA  The Durham Museum 801 S 10th Street | Omaha $11 Adults, $8 Seniors, $7 Children (3-12) | 402.444.5071

december 31 •  7:00 PM – 8:00 PM HOLIdAY LIGHTS fESTIvAL - NEW YEAR’S EvE fIREWORKS SPECTACULAR Holiday Lights Festival Downtown Omaha – Gene Leahy Mall FREE | 402.345.5401 | www.holidaylightsfestival.org

January 19 – february 11  •  RIPCORd OMAHA COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE 6915 Cass St | Omaha Starting at $24 | 402.553.0800 | www. omahaplayhouse.com

february 9 – March 11  •  Thurs. - Sat. 7:30 p.m. & Sun. 2:00 p.m

PARAdE Omaha Community Playhouse 6915 Cass St | Omaha Starting at $42 | 402.553.0800 | www.omahaplayhouse.com

february 10  •  6:00 PM – 10:00 PM

SWING UNdER THE WINGS Strategic Air Command & Aerospace Museum 28210 West Park Highway | Ashland $75 | 402.944.3100 | http://sacmuseum.org/

february 18  •  8:00 AM – 3:30 PM NE ROBOTICS ExPO Strategic Air Command & Aerospace Museum 28210 West Park Highway | Ashland $12/adult, $6/child | 402.944.3100 | http://sacmuseum.org/ 28210 West Park Highway | Ashland $12/adult, $6/child | 402.944.3100 | http://sacmuseum.org/

let us help you PROMOTE YOUR EVENTS! REGISTER ALL Of YOUR EvENTS fOR fREE: SpiritofOmaha.com/Metro-Magazine/Community/Calendar LET US PREPARE A COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT PACKAGE fOR YOU THAT CONNECTS YOU TO YOUR SUPPORT! Email us: CONNECT@SpiritofOmaha.com 71

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waking WORDS

mquarterly • letter from the eDitor

rob Killmer

spreadsheet Would you be willing to consider using a very left-brained, logical, logistical, detailmanagement tool like a spreadsheet to breathe new life and inspiration into your relationships and your own internal landscape? I’m here to suggest that you can!

2) Color-code Your Personal Preferences Once your list is added into your spreadsheet, both you and your partner can color-code the traits you find most desirable and most avoidable. It’s pretty simple to do: each of you selects a different color for your cell background and you both highlight the cells that matter to each of you with that color.

We normally associate spreadsheets with very non-intuitive, calculated, data-based, objective, unemotional tasks and thought processes, but if you (or someone close to you, like your partner or a close friend) have even a basic understanding of how to work with spreadsheets, you could use this very technical, dispassionate resource to provide very genuine and practical—yet also very insightful and inspirational—discernment into your more important and intimate relationships.

For example: You highlight your cells in light blue and your partner in light yellow. robert P. Killmer If you’re working with a combined list of editor@Spiritofomaha.com both desirable and undesirable traits rather than from separate lists for each, then you may wish to color all the undesirable traits with bold italic red fonts so they are easily distinguishable from the desirable ones.

Indeed, so much observation and understanding is available through utilization of this approach, I would dare to suggest that it could be extremely helpful in providing a very beneficial and enjoyable way to clarify and achieve your self-improvement goals. I also believe that this approach is useful enough that it can be beneficial in helping partners resolve some of their relationship challenges and conflicts…no kidding! Not buying? Try it!Take a shot at it with someone close to you: your significant other, or a business partner, or any relationship that could benefit from gaining additional insights into one another’s preferences and personalities (and what relationship can’t?). It’s cheaper than relationship counseling or (G.O.D. forbid!) divorce; and while I’m not suggesting this exercise is a replacement for professional help, it’s a great measure to try before you get to that stage, and I actually am suggesting that—for some of us—it has the potential to bring enough clarity and understanding that—for some of us—it may actually spare us the trip to a therapist’s, or priest’s or lawyer’s office.

3) Highlight Your” Overlaps” Now go back and notice which traits you both selected, the ones where you “overlap.” These are needs, desires and priorities you already share when it comes to personality traits you either wish to see in your partner or in yourself. (It’s important to acknowledge and embrace that if we desire traits in another, we should be willing to develop them ourselves.) You will want to highlight these in another cell color, perhaps light green. Even if you overlap about negative traits, you’ll see that you’re both aligned there as well as in the positives listed! Imagine the kinds of insights, inspiration, and even enjoyment and realization that could emerge in “seeing” where you’re aligned (and importantly) non-aligned.

I’m also suggesting that this approach is useful if you are not facing challenges with important relationships other than your relationship with you. This can be a great process for getting clearer about the traits you wish to focus on amplifying or diminishing as you examine and execute your own self-improvement goals.

4) Prioritize Your Selections Next, create a column to the left of your list column and call it “Priorities. “ Now, you can both examine your selections and prioritize them from, say, 0-9... 0 being the least important traits and 9 being the most important ones. You can use the data-sort mechanism in your You don’t have to be a technical wiz to use minimal spreadsheet skills to benefit your spreadsheet to select both columns and then sort by the left column so that all of your “9s, 8s, relationship with yourself or your significant others through the following process: 7s” show up at the top of your sheet and lesser priority items sort lower. This is an easy and amazingly clear way to place the traits that matter most to both of you at the “top” of your 1) Browse and Collect Your Personality Trait Preferences consciousness and mindfulness. It’s a great way to “see” the areas you need to focus Do a search in your web browser for “Personality Traits, Profiles,” etc. Your search will pull up on first, in moving your relationship in a positive direction. (There are multiple ways dozens of sites offering lists of desirable and undesirable character and personality traits to sort, and multiple plug-ins you can download free that permit you to add more “juice” to and qualities. (Be careful to avoid the ads that show up at the top of these search results, this “seeing” process, and I can assure you that there is more insight, inspiration, and even because many of these are actually scam sites phishing for personal information and ways more fun to be had as you both* discover—not only the information embedded in the to perpetrate identity theft. Search engines like Google are growing increasingly irresponsible sheet—but new ways to sift through that information together, working to enhance both about vetting these scammers and hackers, placing all of our secure information at risk, so aligned and non-aligned areas. (*Even if you’re using this process only for your own search carefully and avoid spurious or questionable sites!) illumination and personal development, you’re still engaging in an exercise of discovery between the you that you currently see yourself as and the you that you long to become!) Many legitimate sites will offer free lists or images of lists cataloging hundreds of traits to 5) Begin Applying the Genius Hidden Within Your Shared Discovery! select from, while others will offer less, like fifty or sixty. Some sites offer comprehensive lists of positive and negative traits, while others break the lists down separately. There is a This will most certainly appeal to whatever “geek” exists in you, but even if you’re not geeky benefit to separating out desirable and undesirable qualities, so either copy lists that do so at all, and you’re massively right-brained, you’ll be able to appreciate how this approach for you, or be prepared to do so yourself later (we’ll talk about simple ways to do this in adds value to the most non-technical, non-logical aspects of your life and relationships. what follows.) Many of us go through our entire life-journey or our most treasured and cherished I suggest finding a site or a list that offers you at least one or two hundred traits to begin relationship life-cycles without ever definitively or clearly knowing the characteristics and with; you can always go back and add more once you’ve got this little “system” down. personality traits that our partners, or we ourselves, value and aspire to! Businesses spend Once you’ve found a list that you and your partner feel is comprehensive enough, simply millions yearly to obtain this kind of data! This exercise gives that kind of insight freely, and copy the list data directly into a blank spreadsheet column. (If you’re selecting from an can actually stimulate previously unspoken dialog, and even shared inspiration, enthusiasm, image and you’d rather not type up the list yourself, there are applications such as Adobe and enjoyment in our personal journey and the relationships we share along the way! Acrobat Pro and others that can import the image and do text recognition on it to spare you having to type it all into your sheet, but it’s worth getting the data placed either way! Who knew that my empirical spreadsheet was yet another Mystical, Magic Wand! 72

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metroMAGAZINE’s mQUARTERLY WINTER (NOV/DEC/JAN 2017/18) Issue  

metroMAGAZINE’s mQUARTERLY WINTER (NOV/DEC/JAN 2017/18) Issue metroMAGAZINE/mQUARTERLY presents metroMAGAZINE’s mQUARTERLY WINTER (NOV/DEC...