Page 1

18 20

Methow Valley

Summer Calendar

of summer eVents & AttrActions

Activities

for eVery interest & All Ages

Information for An enjoyAble methow VAlley Visit

A supplement of the methow VAlley news


WinthropWashington.com


A summer frame of mind

We start production

of the “Methow Valley Summer” publication in February, when

skiing, skating snowmobiling, snowshoeing and fat biking are the valley’s stellar attractions. Summer seems a long ways off and writing about it feels a bit odd. But the sunny season gets here pretty

quickly once the snow fades away, and

suddenly it makes perfect sense to think about it.

Photo by Steve Mitchell

There is so much to think about. Our scenery not only provides a stunning backdrop, it also beckons us to venture out and enjoy it. Imagine the ways: hiking, backpacking, mountain biking, camping or horse riding and packing. The rivers invite kayakers, canoeists, tube floaters. Our lakes promise great experiences for anglers, swimmers, boaters, water skiers and picnickers. Several rock-climbing areas challenge beginners and experts alike. At Bear Creek Golf Course, you may find yourself spending too much time

admiring the views instead of your lie. You can get almost anywhere on a road bike. Closer to town, roller-skating and pickleball share the summer surface at the Winthrop Rink. Winthrop’s boardwalks are ideal for casual strolling, unpressured shopping, and a variety of food and drink options. Twisp counters with the weekly Methow Valley Farmers Market, The Merc Playhouse and Confluence Gallery. Look for “Methow Made” products at all those places. Check out our events calendar, and the article on the summer’s major events, to help plan your stay. At the end of the day, tilt your head back and marvel at our “dark skies” array of stars, planets and other objects populating the heavens. “Methow Valley Summer 2018” is intended to help you engage in whatever suits your fancy. It also includes practical visitors’ advice, a guide to fees required at local trailheads and recreation areas, and helpful maps. And please support our advertisers. They help make this place special and make this publication possible. 

31

st annual

RhythM & Bl u

es

presented by Winthrop Music Association

WINTHROPBLUESFESTIVAL.ORG Methow Valley News

SAMANTHA FISH SAMANTHA FISH

 3


Methow Valley Summer On the cover:

Photo By Steve Mitchell

6

An eventful summer

You don’t have to look hard to find activities for everyone, of any age

8

Take the plunge The valley’s rivers and lakes entice swimmers, waterskiers, boaters, rafters, tubers, floaters and more

down in 10 Wheels the Methow Multiple mountain and trail biking options offer something for everybody

 4

Trail Mix up for a 18 12 Saddle backcountry

Whether hiking or backpacking, the valley's options accommodate every kind of experience

adventure

The Mountains are calling and you should go

your lot 15 Cast in our lakes and streams

24

SUMMER VISITOR MAP

Where to find what you want to do in the Methow Valley

16 Upward mobility 2 6 Pitch it or park it From bouldering to worldclass routes, Methow Valley rock climbing will leave you vertically challenged

From tenting to RVing, the Methow Valley offers plenty of camping options

Summer 2018


Contributors Don Nelson

Ashley Lodato

is publisher and editor of the Methow Valley News.

is a Methow Valley News columnist.

Marcy Stamper is a Methow Valley News reporter.

Ann McCreary

David Ward

is a Methow Valley News reporter.

is a Methow Valley News columnist.

A publication of the Methow Valley News P.O. Box 97, 502 S. Glover St., Twisp, WA 98856 509.997.7011 • fax 509.997.3277 www.methowvalleynews.com • editor@methowvalleynews.com

3 0 3 2

An off-planet experience

3 4 What’s more ...

leave 41 Don’t without us

Warm up to winter

you hit 3 8 Before the trail ...

Clear nighttime skies make stargazing in the Methow Valley a celestial experience

Come back when the snow falls for an amazing array of Methow Valley activities

Don Nelson |  publisher/editor

Darla Hussey | design Methow Valley News

Beyond the recreational stuff, the valley is chock full of other attractions

A guide to recreational passes, fees, permits and licenses

Susan Finn| office manager

‘Methow Made’ products will provide a lasting impression of your visit

44 Visitor Info 46 Calendar 50 Directory of Advertisers 42 Restaurants

Sheila Ward | advertising consultant

Dana Sphar | ad design/production

 5


Full schedule

The Methow Valley calendar offers a tantalizing array of events There are so many things to

do on your time in the Methow Valley. But don’t

forget the scheduled events

that start in May and go through

September. Here are some major

offerings to build a day or a vacation around.

Winthrop ’49er Days

Commemorate and celebrate the old west at ’49er Days, May 11–13 in downtown Winthrop and at Mack Lloyd Park. Activities include a parade, demonstrations and displays, games and more. The events are free except for Saturday’s barn dance and some of the meals served at the park. See info@winthropwashington.com for more information. New Old Time Chautauqua

An addition to this year’s lineup is the New Old Time Chautauqua (NOTC), a traveling vaudeville

troupe that will make a stop in the Methow Valley on June 22–23. Continuing a 30-year tradition of sharing entertainment and ideas, Port Townsend-based NOTC is embarking on a tour of the north central Washington, focusing on connecting communities in conjunction with local state parks. Festivities include a potluck at Pearrygin Lake State Park on Friday, and a fun-filled parade and workshop series in Twisp on Saturday. The event will culminate with a show at the Methow Valley Community Center in Twisp on June 23, starting at 7 p.m. Expect jugglers, magicians, folk singers, trapeze artists, tap dancers, hulahoopists and a 30-piece band at the stage show. For more information, visit www.chautauqua.org. Rendezvous Festival

Also new to the schedule is the Rendezvous Festival on May 11 – 13, the same weekend as Winthrop’s ’49er Days. The festival, to

be staged at Sun Mountain, will celebrate recreation and the arts in the Methow Valley. Entertainment will include 14 bands, plus opportunities for world-class trail running, mountain biking, hiking, paddling, rock climbing and more with easy access from the festival site. A weekend pass is $120; Friday pass $60; and Saturday pass $70. Camping is available nearby. The festival is presented by Outdoor Arts & Recreation (outdoorartsandrec. org for information and tickets), a nonprofit based in Winthrop.

be seen to be understood). The Methow Valley Rodeo is a member of the Western States Ranch Rodeo Association and has hosted some of the region’s best ropers and riders for over 45 years. The rodeo arena is located about halfway between Twisp and Winthrop on Twin Lakes Road. Events begin at 1 p.m. on May 26 – 27, and on Sept. 1 – 2. Tickets are $10 for adults; $5 for kids 7 to 12; kids under 6 get in free. For more information go to www.methowvalleyrodeo.com.

Methow Valley Rodeo

Methow Music & Art Festival

Nothing delivers more bucks for your bucks than the Methow Valley Rodeo — and twice a year. The rodeo is scheduled over the Memorial Day and Labor Day weekends, bracketing the summer with broncs and more. Most of the competitors are from around the region, and there are activities for the kids too (mutton bustin’ has to

After the annual Fourth of July parade down Glover Street in Twisp, walk a couple of blocks to Twisp Town Park for the annual Methow Music & Art Festival, an afternoon of musical performances, participatory art, contests, aerial artists, great local food, and fun for all ages. Root for your favorite contestant in the pie-eating and hula-hoop contests, then visit the dozen-or-so hands-on art booths: tie-dye T-shirts, letterpress printing, face painting, copper arts, the ever-popular wooden boat station, and more. Headline musicians will perform on the bandshell stage throughout the afternoon. This year’s theme is “Bicycles and Art,” featuring bikeinspired projects. The festival takes place from 11:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Cost is $5 for kids age 5 and older, and $10 for adults. Go to www.methowarts.org or call (509) 997‑4004 for more information. Winthrop Rhythm and Blues Festival

Photo by Don Nelson

 6

The Winthrop Rhythm and Blues Festival celebrates its 31st year in the Methow Valley with the usual stellar lineup of worldclass performers, playing day and night July 20 – 22, at the Blues Summer 2018


in the festival — will perform for and sit in with students at the Pipestone Summer Music Camp. The Chamber Music Festival begins on July 26 and runs through Aug. 4. Tickets and schedule information are available at www. methowmusicfestival.org, or call (509) 997‑5000.

Methow Valley Chamber Music Festival

Methow Valley Home Tour

World-class chamber music comes to the valley for 10 days each summer and finds a home at Signal Hill Ranch between Twisp and Winthrop. Now in its 23rd season, the Chamber Music Festival offers an intimate setting, creative programming and dazzling performances. In addition to the five centerstage concerts at Signal Hill, performances at various other locations around the valley will be offered for free (check the weekly Methow Valley News “What’s Happening” page for details). Rehearsals are free and open to the public on concert days. And the Fellowship Quartet — four college-age musicians selected to participate

Each summer, Confluence Gallery & Art Center hosts the Methow Valley Home Tour, an exclusive peek inside some of the valley’s most beautiful homes, and an opportunity to learn about design, architecture and innovative construction. The 2018 Home Tour theme is “Building in the Land of Sun and Snow,” featuring valley homes and cabins that balance practical and environmental demands with designs that mirror the unique beauty of the Methow Valley. The 17th annual Methow Valley Home Tour is on Aug. 4, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tickets are $25 per person, or $20 per person for carpools of four, and go on

Food & Lodging in downtown winthrop

509-996-2408

sale Aug. 1 at Confluence Gallery, 104 Glover St. in Twisp, or may be purchased by phone at (509) 997‑2787. Drama at The Merc Playhouse

Twisp’s outstanding community theater has two productions scheduled this summer: • April 25-May 6 –“Rikki Tikki Tavi” will be presented by the Tom Zbyszewski Children’s Theater. Cost is $5-$18. • July 13 – 22, “Bike America” by Michael Lew, a wildly theatrical picturesque journey that crams an entire continent into one production. Cost is $5-$18. Visit www.mercplayhouse. org or call 997‑7529 for more information about any of the performances. Winthrop Vintage Wheels Show

Cap off the summer by taking in a stunning array of vintage automobiles, motorcycles, tractors, travel trailers and bicycles in and around downtown Winthrop on Sept. 8. And it’s all free. 

* Breakfast, Lunch & dinner * Burgers, Salads, pasta * Fish, Steaks * Fresh Food * Beer, wine & Cocktails open Every Day 7am - 9pm call for winter hours 248 Riverside Ave, winthrop

STAY COOL

Ranch on Highway 20 just west of Winthrop. Tickets are $110 in advance, or $120 at the gate. On-site camping is available for $45. Friday night’s show benefits The Cove food bank in Twisp, and entrance is $10 or free with the festival pass. Visit www.winthropbluesfestival.com for details.

HANDCRAFTED COFFEE FOR COFFEE LOVERS

Always Good! Experience mountain lodge comfort on the Methow River. Just a short walk over the Spring Creek Suspension bridge to downtown Winthrop. Methow Valley News

509-996-4348 110 White Ave (Twin Lakes Rd) Winthrop WA

www.methowriverlodge.com

BLUESTARCOFFEEROASTERS.COM

 7


Take the plunge

The valley’s rivers and lakes entice swimmers, waterskiers, boaters, rafters, tubers, floaters and more Photo above by Steve Mitchell. Photo right by Mary Kiesau

By Marcy Stamper

On those long

days of summer, there’s nothing like some time

in — or on — the water to cool off. The Methow offers water activi-

ties for all interests and abilities, from a kiddie pool in Twisp to

serene freshwater lakes to thrilling whitewater rapids.

Because the Methow River is free-flowing, conditions change with the season. In early summer, consider a raft trip with experienced guides to safely navigate the whitewater while you take in the scenery. Later in the season, as the river level gets lower — and the water gets warmer — people switch to tubing, where they can enjoy a relaxed float downstream in gentler conditions. Have your own boat or personal watercraft? Try sailing or jet-skiing on Pearrygin Lake or Alta Lake, where there are state park facilities.

 8

Or take a canoe to explore Blackpine Lake, a quiet, high-altitude lake with shimmering blue-green water. Prefer to dispense with the hassle of bringing a boat? You can rent rowboats, canoes, kayaks and stand-up paddleboards at the Patterson Lake office near Sun Mountain Lodge. Swimmers and waders will want to check out Pearrygin Lake or Patterson Lake for a refreshing dip or languid float on a raft. For a truly invigorating experience, try one of the many swimming holes on the Methow’s rivers. The Wagner Memorial Pool in Twisp is great for lessons or a lap swim, and for letting toddlers play in a wading pool.

by mountain scenery. Access from East Chewuch Road and Bear Creek Road east of Winthrop. Blackpine Lake: Swim in a crystal-clear, high-mountain lake. Access from Buttermilk Creek Road (11 miles west of Twisp on Twisp River Road) or Libby Creek Road off Highway 153, 1 mile south

of Carlton. Confluence of Methow River and Twisp River (Twisp Town Park): Splash and wade through river rocks where two of the Methow’s finest rivers converge. Lots of options for sunbathing. Carlton swimming hole: A favorite with locals, with a deep pool,

Swimming

Patterson Lake, near Sun Mountain Lodge: Swim in a cool freshwater lake surrounded by hills. Numerous informal areas along the shore. Access from Patterson Lake Road. Pearrygin Lake: Swim in a large, roped-off area or explore other areas of this spring-fed lake, ringed

Photo by Mary Kiesau Summer 2018


sandy beach and some shade. Access across from the Carlton Store on Highway 153. Gold Creek swimming hole: Sandy swimming hole with a rocky beach, large boulders for jumping

into the water, and shallow side streams. At the south end of Gold Creek Loop Road on Highway 153, 15 miles south of Twisp. Chewuch Campground swimming hole: A generous pool for splashing and dunking. Access through Chewuch campground, 15 miles north of Winthrop on the West Chewuch Road toward Thirtymile. Wagner Memorial Pool, Twisp Town Park: Zerodepth wading area, lap and open swim, lessons, aerobics, shaded seating, bathhouse and lifeguard. Open mid-June to late August. Boating

Pearrygin Lake State Park: Bring your own rowboat, kayak, canoe or motorboat and explore this lake’s many inlets. Waterskiing and personalwatercraft use also allowed. Two boat ramps, 60 feet of dock. Access from East Chewuch Road and Bear Creek Road east of Winthrop.

Alta Lake State Park: Bring your own rowboat, canoe, sailboard or windsurfing gear. Also popular for motorboats or personal watercraft. Limited waterskiing on small lake. Two boat ramps, 60 feet of dock. Access 2 miles north of Pateros on Highway 153. Patterson Lake: Rent canoes, paddle boats, kayaks, sailboats and paddleboards by the hour; and rowboats by the hour or day at the Patterson Lake office near the Patterson Lake cabins at Sun Mountain Lodge. There is an 8-mph speed limit for motorized boats. More info at 1-800-572-0493 or 996-2211. Access from Patterson Lake Road. Blackpine Lake: Row or paddle on a crystal-clear high-mountain lake. Non-motorized boats only. Gravel boat ramp; two floating docks. Access from Buttermilk Creek Road (11 miles west of Twisp on Twisp River Road) or Libby Creek Road, 1 mile south of Carlton. River rafting and tubing

Methow River Raft + Kayak leads organized trips on the Methow River from their Winthrop

location. Choose from a scenic raft tour gentle enough for the whole family, or exciting whitewater trips on a raft or inflatable kayak for beginning through intermediate paddlers. They’ll also launch you on a tube trip for a languid float down the river (and pick you up when you’re done). Methow River Raft + Kayak also offers intermediate-level trips on a stand-up paddleboard on a quiet stretch of river near Mazama. More info at (509) 341-4661 or info@ methowrafting.com. Lazy River Tubing at the Abbycreek Inn rents tubes and lifejackets for a gentle, beginner-level float down the river. Rent tubes at the inn south of Winthrop, get dropped off at the Winthrop Red Barn, and float back to the inn — a trip of 25 to 45 minutes, depending on the season. People can also organize their own trips using the inn’s tubes. Season is mid-July to mid-September, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Reserve at 996-3100 or www. WinthropTubing.com. Check out the map at the center of the magazine for help finding the locations mentioned. 

Ballooning... the peaceful thrill .

Morning Glory 509-997-1700

WHERE PEOPLE, PLACE AND IDEAS COME TOGETHER. EXPLORE • CREATE • SHOP • GATHER

BALLOON TOURS THE METHOW VALLEY, WASHINGTON

www.balloonwinthrop.com

Methow Valley News

TWISPWORKS.ORG

SPONSOR OF

502 S. GLOVER STREET – TWISP, WA 98856 509-997-3300

THIS AD FunDeD In pArT by THe OkAnOgAn COunTy HOTel/MOTel lODgIng TAx FunD

 9


Wheels down in the Methow

Multiple mountain and trail biking options offer something for everybody Technical,

high-alpine singletrack rides with

breathtaking views? Check.

Mellow, family-friendly rides

on wide trails along sparkling

rivers? Check. Miles of empty roads through stunning scenery? Check.

Whether seeking a challenge or relaxation on wheels, cycling around the Methow Valley offers rides for every ability and inclination. Mountain bikers choose from a wide selection of trails and the valley’s sunny, dry

weather offers great riding conditions. As winter snow melts, a progression of trails open up at higher elevations, offering a destination to escape from summer heat. In fact, the Methow Valley boasts the highest-elevation mountain bike trail in the state. Road bikers enjoy a variety of quiet roads through forests and farmlands without ever getting in their car. The valley has several shops to meet biking needs, and après ride options from bakeries to brew pubs. The free “Winthrop Washington” mobile app has information on mountain bike and road rides. 

Where to gear up • Winthrop Mountain Sports, 257 Riverside Ave., Winthrop, 996-2886 • Methow Cycle & Sport, 29 State Route 20, Winthrop, 996-3645 • Goat’s Beard Mountain Supplies, 50 Lost River Road, Mazama, 996-2515

• North Cascades Cycle Werks, 2 Country Road, Mazama, 996-2225 • Jack’s Hut at Freestone Inn, 31 Early Winters Drive, Mazama, 996-3212 • The Outdoorsman, 170 Riverside Ave., Winthrop, 996-2649

Photo by Steve Mitchell

Methow Valley Ciderhouse refreshing your Methow adVentures sinCe 2010 liVe MusiC Outside Fridays & saturdays 12 taps With rOtating Ciders, BreWs & Wine lunCh & dinner With BBq, hOuse smOked meats & artisan Brats salads, sandWiChes, & desserts Vegan & gluten Free OptiOns

FULL SERVICE SKI SHOP Sales • Service • Retail DAILY & SEASON RENTALS Downhill, Snowboard, Cross Country, Snowshoe & Custom Boot Fittings

kid & pet Friendly | OutdOOr games | lOts OF parking Summer HourS - open Daily

louploupskishop.com 509-846-5076 • Twisp, WA

 10

28 Hwy 20, wintHrop

|

metHowcider.com

|

509.341.4354

|

at

noon

metHowcider@gmail.com Summer 2018


Eventful biking The Methow Valley will host several fun events for cyclists to join or observe. Coming up this season: • May 12–13: Trek Dirt Series mountain bike camp, a weekend-long instructional mountain bike skills camp for men and women, hosted by Methow Cycle & Sport in Winthrop. For information visit www.dirtseries. com. Cost: $395. • May 19 and June 9: Kids Bike Rodeos at TwispWorks (May 19) and Pearrygin Lake State Park (June 9), 10 a.m.-noon. Kids ages 5-10 learn skills to ride safely, and volunteers will conduct bike helmet fittings and bike safety inspections. Bike helmets will be available for a $5 donation. Sponsored by Methow Cycle & Sport,

Pearrygin Lake State Park, TwispWorks, Aero Methow Rescue Service, Winthrop Kiwanis, Okanogan County Fire District 6 and Twisp Police. • June 23–24: Singletrack Celebration and Brewfest. A mountain bike skills camp for women, sponsored by Methow Evergreen MTB. More details available at methowevergreenmtb. org and oldschoolhousebrewery. com. • Sept. 15: Gran Fondo Winthrop takes riders over 90 miles of paved and gravel roads deep into the North Cascades with 10,000-plus feet of climbing. This ride is hard and is intended for experienced cyclists. Leaves the Barn in Winthrop at 8 a.m. Cost: $70. More information at rideviciouscycle.com/events/ gran-fondo-winthrop.

CALL

911

Serving the Methow Valley with Advanced Life Support since 1968

For emergencies

Aero Methow RESCUE SERVICE

BUSINESS OFFICE (509) 997-4013 aeromethow.org

Favorite rides

How do you pick the best of the best? It’s not easy, but here are a few ride suggestions offered by Joe Brown at Methow Cycle & Sport in Winthrop. Maps of the routes are available on the store website at www.methowcyclesport.com.

Mountain bike

• Buck Mountain: A longtime locals’ favorite that is accessible to most abilities and interest levels. Great spring ride with amazing views and wildflowers. The 13-mile loop trail is a nice mix of fast and flowing singletrack. • Angel’s Staircase: One of the best alpine singletrack loops you will find anywhere. Great terrain and a mix of challenging climbs and fast descents on a 25-mile route. Tops out at 8,200 feet with breathtaking views. • Sun Mountain: Easily accessible from Winthrop, Sun Mountain is a system of trails and a great choice for groups that contain a variety of experience and technical ability. Choose from beginner through advanced level trails. Follow with a Methow Valley News

swim in Lake Patterson or a frosty beverage at Sun Mountain Lodge.

Road rides

• Tour de Okanogan: A classic century featuring mountain passes, fun descents and good county roads. The 105-mile loop takes riders from the Methow to the Okanogan Valley and back again. There is an option for food and coffee at SweetRiver Bakery in Pateros before heading up the Methow Valley. • Andrews Creek: A really good option for hot days. Follows the Chewuch River 30 miles out and back from Winthrop. Offers nice grades, paved single-lane road, beautiful scenery and options for dipping in the river and great scenery. • Winthrop Valley Loop (gravel): Great mix of pavement and mostly gravel surfaces. Climbs into the Rendezvous via Gunn Ranch, then drops down to connect with Wolf Creek Road. Lots of climbing but plenty of rewards with sweeping views of Mt. Gardner and fun descents.

www.EvergreenMTB.org/chapters/Methow

An Eclectic Shopping Adventure...

sto clos re ing

RetiRement Sale Summer Blowout! • Women’s Fashions • Market Baskets

• Sun Hats • Vintage

• Collectibles and More!

Open Monday - Saturday 117 West 2nd Ave • Twisp • 509.997.0416

 11


Saddle up for a backcountry adventure Photo by Mary Kiesau

The mountains are calling and you should go The Methow

Valley’s packers and outfitters take people into the mountains where it maybe too far or too difficult for many people to reach on foot.

Pack trips give people a chance to spend their time in midst of spectacular mountain scenery, rather than taking two or three days just to get there. Then, from the high

Denise Heatley, LMP

Mount Gardner

camp, people can meander through open meadows and ridges and look for bear, moose and mountain goats, or spend the day relaxing at an alpine lake. A group can request a certain destination, although outfitters have permits for specific places and there are limits on the number of people and livestock they can take on the trail. Because outfitters have seasoned horses that know the terrain and are used to different riders, people don’t need experience to join a pack trip. The trips also appeal to people with a lot of experience in the saddle. A unique appeal of pack trips is that they make it possible to share

the mountains with people who would never otherwise get to see the high country. On deluxe trips, people are treated to surprisingly gourmet meals, with hearty stews and luscious desserts cooked out in the open. After the day’s ride, hike or fishing, guests relax with cocktails and hors d’oeuvres while the camp cook makes dinner. In addition to deluxe trips where the outfitters handle everything, most companies also offer a drop camp, where clients ride or hike into the mountains and the outfitters leave all your gear and food at a prearranged spot — and then come and get it at the end of the trip. People who’d prefer a day ride

(or who want to get some experience before a multi-day trip to the mountains) can take a trip with JD Outfitters at Sun Mountain Lodge on their trail system. Early Winters Outfitting and Sawtooth Outfitters also offer day rides, both on valley trails and even into the mountains. Trail rides are also available at Chewack River Guest Ranch north of Winthrop. More information about opportunities to get into the country by horseback is available from the Methow Valley Backcountry Horsemen at www.mvbch.com. Washington Outfitters and Guides Association has information about local outfitters at 997-1080, (877) ASK-WOGA or www.woga.org. 

NORTH CASCADES FLY FISHING 509-996-3731 • fishandfloat.com

MASSAGE (509)341-4228

202 White Avenue Winthrop Fitness Building License # MA00011919

 12

Longest Standing Guide Service in the Methow Valley Summer 2018


Packers, outfitters, trail rides Cascade Wilderness Outfitters Steve Darwood (509) 322-3809 www.cascadewildernessoutfitters. com pack trips, drop camps, hunting trips Early Winters Outfitting Aaron and Judy Burkhart 996-2659 www.earlywintersoutfitting.com pack trips, drop camps, day rides, riding lessons Highland Stage Company Donald and Lorah Super (509) 923-1944 pack trips, drop camps, horsedrawn stagecoach camping trips JD Outfitters (Sun Mountain Lodge) John and Debbie “Red” Schrock day rides of varying durations, dinner rides 996-4735 www.sunmountainlodge.com

North Cascade Outfitters Steve and Jess Darwood (509) 322-3809 pack trips, drop camps, hunting trips Sawtooth Outfitters Brian Varrelman (509) 923-2548 www.altalake.com/ sawtoothoutfitters.html pack trips, drop camps, hunting trips, day rides

Come Ride With Us at the

Chewack River Guest Ranch Lodging & Riding Stables

Bring your horse or ride one of ours. Guided trail rides through the spectacular scenery at the Chewack River Ranch.

Chewack River Guest Ranch Don and Chris Lundgren 588 E. Chewuch Road, Winthrop 996-2497 chewackranch.com Trail rides, cattle drives, public stables North Cascades Safari Aaron and Judy Burkhart 996-2659 pack trips, drop camps, hunting trips

H ORSEBACK R IDING

Drop-Ins Welcome! One mile river frontage Fly Fishing!

Don & Chris Lundgren. 588 E. Chewack Rd. Winthrop, WA 98862 (509) 996-2497 (6 miles N. of Winthrop on East Chewack Rd.)

Check out our website at www.chewackranch.com

Got Shade? Riparian areas include the banks and floodplains that border rivers and creeks. Plants and trees that grow in the riparian zone are crucial to a healthy stream and are used by a variety of wildlife.

Healthy riparian areas benefit streams in many ways:

ENJOY the

Rid e

• Trees provide shade, keeping water temperatures cool • Plants bind the soil together with their roots, reducing erosion • Trees fall into the stream, providing food and shelter for aquatic life

Respect The River Sponsored by

Methow Salmon Recovery Foundation Funding provided by

Washington State Department of Ecology and

Bonneville Environmental Foundation

THE VALLEY’S ONE-STOP SHOP FOR CYCLING, SUP’ S , TRAIL INFO, NUTRITION AND MORE SALES RENTALS SERVICE GEAR 7 DAYS / WK • 509.996.3645 29 HWY 20 • WINTHROP, WA

METHOWCYCLESPORT.COM Methow Valley News

 13


Lake & Stream

TO THIRTY MILE

S ED

WA TER S

Methow Valley

regulations and information

CLO TO WASHINGTON PASS

TO HARTS PASS

EIGHT MILE

BUCK LAKE

•MAZAMA CL

HW

Y

20

ED

METHOW NATURAL HISTORY

CHEWUCK RIVER

OS

The beautiful Methow Valley in Okanogan “Country” North Central Washington State, is a place rich in geologic history and natural fish habitat. Surrounded by magnificent 7,000-8,000 foot glaciated peaks, frigid waters tumble 4,000 feet to the upper Valley floor, racing toward the Columbia River, passing the hamlet of Mazama at 2,150 feet, slowing through Winthrop at 1,765 feet, then Twisp at 1,619 feet, twisting its way in frothing rapids to Pateros at 775 feet, at the Columbia River.

8 mi. to mouth

May 27 - Aug 15

W AT E

RS

Boulder Creek

METHOW RIVER

Weeman B. to Foghorn D.

WEEMAN BRIDGE

May 27 - Aug 15

HW

Y

CONSERVE METHOW VALLEY TROUT THROUGH SAFE CATCH & RELEASE

20

Wolf Creek

• Use only artificial lure/fly with single barbless hook. • DO NOT play fish to exhaustion. • Use rubberized or knot-less landing net. • Grasp fish by its back and head, gently but firmly, turn fish belly up while removing hook. • If fish swallows hook, cut leader.

PEARRYGIN COUGAR

•WINTHROP

FOGHORN DAM

near Winthrop

Winthrop National Fish Hatchery Tours: Call 509-996-2424 for information.

CAMPBELL DAVIS

PATTERSON BIG TWIN LITTLE TWIN

METHOW RIVER

COLOR KEY: CLOSED WATERS

May 27 - Sept 30

May 27 - Sept 30

Foghorn D. to Lower Burma B.

CL

OS

ED

May 27 - Aug 15

W AT E

Beaver Creek

WAR CREEK

•TWISP

TWISP RIVER

RS

War Creek to mouth

er

tt

Bu

May 27 - Aug 15 Cr

k

HWY 20 to OKANOGAN/OMAK

m or

k

ee

Lakes: Rainbow Trout, West Slope Cutthroat, Kokanee, Eastern Brook Trout (higher lakes). Some private lakes hold Brown Trout and Tiger Trout. Rivers: Rainbow Trout, West Slope Cutthroat, Bull Trout, Eastern Brook Trout, Whitefish, Steelhead, Chinook, Coho & Sockeye Salmon.

an

Cr

FISH OF THE METHOW VALLEY

ilk

Lakes: damsel and dragonfly nymphs and mature adults; chironomid and mayfly nymphs and adults; leaches, scuds, shrimp, snails, small fish and other microorganisms. Rivers: caddis, stone fly and small mayfly nymphs and adults, grasshoppers, ants, beetles and other terrestrials.

LAKES

ee

m

WHAT METHOW VALLEY FISH EAT

May 27 - Sept 15

Po

BLACK PINE

FISHING WITH BAIT

When fishing with bait, trout are counted as part of the daily limit, whether kept or released. Statewide rules apply for lakes no minimum size, five fish limit. Season: Libby Alta, Pearrygin Lakes: Apr 22 - Sept 30 Creek Patterson Lake: Open year around Black Pine Lake: Open year around Winter Lakes: Bait limit 5 fish. Cougar, Campbell, Davis: Sept 1 - Mar 31

CATCH & RELEASE, SELECTIVE GEAR RULES, APPLY ON ALL METHOW RIVERS & STREAMS •CARLTON

HWY 153

Winter Lakes Summer Regulations:

CATCH & RELEASE ONLY

Cougar, Campbell, Davis: Apr 22 - Aug 31 Selective gear rules apply.

SELECTIVE GEAR RULES

Gold Creek

METHOW STEELHEAD REGULATIONS: Opening and closure determined by WDFW During open season: 2 adipose fin clipped Steelhead can be taken per day. ALL WILD MUST BE RELEASED. Gold Creek to Lower Burma Bridge: May 27 - Sept 15 (unless opened by WSFW special regulations)

Gold Creek

Only unscented, artificial flies/lures with single barbless hooks are allowed. METHOW • No motorized boats, except under special rules for individual waters LOWER Electric motors allowed. BURMA BRIDGE Big Twin and Little Twin: Selective gear rules, trout limit, 1. Open Apr 22 - Oct 31 Black: Upper Chewuck, year round selective gear rules. H W Y See WDFW Fishing regs. for definition of terms, 15 additional closures, and whitefish seasons 3

All threatened or endangered species—Summer Steelhead, Spring Chinook Salmon, Bull Trout—must be released unharmed year-round, unless retention is allowed under special state rules. Report violations to WDFW Enforcement 509-322-4356 Questions contact Methow Fishing Adventures 509-429-7298 Content reviewed by WDFW.

 14

CLOSED WATERS

(unless opened by WDFW special regulations)

•PATEROS HWY 97

Fishing license vendors • Pardners Mini Market, Winthrop • Valley Do it Center, Twisp • Ace Hardware, Winthrop

Local fishing guides • North Cascades Fly Fishing: Kevin VanBueren, 996-3731, www.fishandfloat.com • Methow Fishing Adventures: Leaf Seaburg and Sarah Lane, (509) 429-7298, www.flyfisherproshop.com/blog, methowfishingadventures@gmail.com • Griff’s Fly Fishing Adventures: Rodney and Clint Griffith, (509) 929-3813, (509) 341-4994, www.griffsv fishing. com • Heavy Hitter Guide Service: Caine Brand, (509) 421-1235, www.facebook.com/HeavyHitterGuideService, cs_brand@ hotmail.com

Fishing updates and information • The Outdoorsman, 170 Riverside Ave., Winthrop, 996-2649, www.theoutdoorsmanstore. net, lance@theoutdoorsmanstore.net • Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, wdfw. wa.gov/fishing; wdfw.wa.gov/ fishing/washington/County/ Okanogan; wdfw.wa.gov/ weekender/region_two.html

ALTA LAKE

Summer 2018


Cast your lot in our lakes and streams Summer fishing

opportunities are abundant and varied in the

Methow Valley. From floating the

lower reaches of the river by drift boat and casting a fly or throw-

ing a line in from a lake shore, to hiking into remote a high mountain lake where the trout are so

hungry they almost jump on your hook, once you land your first

“big one” it’s easy to get hooked.

Before you head out it’s important to check local regulations and restrictions and make sure your fishing license is current. Licenses expire every year on March 31 and new ones can be purchased online (fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov) or at registered vendors (on page 14).

Temporary licenses for one to three days area also available. Children under 15 fish for free in Washington. Upon purchase of your license, you receive a Vehicle Access Pass to display at required fishing access sites managed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The annual Kids Fishing Day (Saturday, June 9) is hosted by the Winthrop National Fish Hatchery. This annual event is co-sponsored by a myriad of government, tribal, nonprofit and community groups. Volunteer anglers help kids learn to set worms on hooks, cast, and reel in hatcheryraised rainbow trout. Kids learn how to clean and fillet fish as well participate in boating safety games, arts and crafts,

beaver viewing, and watershed education. Unlike catch ’n’ release on the river, families can feast that evening on their catch. The Methow Valley Lake and Stream map (left) includes just about all the basic information you need to get started. 

Horseback riding (1 mile past alta Lake state Park)

The ‘Varrelman’ Family Since 1944 GPS address: sawtooth outfitters 490-499 alta Lake road Pateros, Wa 98846 1 hour triP ~ $35 each rider 2 hour triP ~ $45 each rider 4 hour triP ~ $75 each rider all day triP ~ $125 each rider all day off ranch triP ~ $200 each rider Prices subject to Wa State Sales tax PriceS baSed on minimum of 4 riderS We recommend booking your trip 2 days in advance

Visa and Mastercard accePted

to book your trip call 509-923-2548 Photo courtesy of Paul Budrow

Playground Year Round! MAZAMA COUNTRY INN

p

Swimming Pool AC Free Wi-Fi Cabins

p

p Hot Tub & Sauna p Rooms for Every Budget

800-843-7951 for room, cabin or restaurant reservations mazamacountryinn.com Methow Valley News

 15


Upward mobility From bouldering to world-class routes, Methow Valley rock climbing will leave you vertically challenged

By Ashley Lodato

Although rock

climbing is not a sport for everyone, those who climb understand the appeal.

Photo by Donni Reddington

The airy feeling of being off the ground, feet perched on a sliver of granite, fingers crimping a rocky nub. Dancing up a rough face, light steps, friction making possible your upward progress. Forearms pumping at the top of a sustained vertical slab, hands gritty with chalk and sweat. The thrill of finally mastering a sequence after repeated attempts. The Methow Valley is a launching pad for anyone who wants to wander in the backcountry, finding peaks and figuring out how to stand on top of them. If this sounds like your ideal summer and you have the experience and time to make that dream a reality, then start poring over the Beckey guidebooks (Volumes 2 and 3 of the Cascade Alpine Guide series by the late and iconic climber and mountaineer, Fred Beckey). You can find these at Mazama’s Goat’s Beard Mountain Supplies shop (see

Methow Valley Farmers Market

information below). We highly suggest you cap your North Cascades backcountry climbing experience with a viewing of “Dirtbag: The Legend of Fred Beckey,” a 2017 documentary about the storied climber’s life. Beckey was notoriously irreverent, but in his pragmatic way he articulates why people climb: “I don’t know what inspires me; I can’t explain it. It’s hard to put into words. Why does anyone do anything? I like to do it; it’s fun.” Ready for some climbing fun but don’t have enough time to get into the backcountry? In addition to being a gateway into a wonderland of backcountry ascents, the Methow Valley can also answer your daytrip climbing needs. Always practice accepted climbing etiquette and take fundamental safety precautions (see www.rockandice.com/how-to-climb/best-rockclimbing-ethics-and-practice). Or in the words of the world’s original dirtbag climber, Fred Beckey: “Keep on belay. There are too many screw-ups and mistakes from people not paying attention.” Where to go

Liberty Bell and Early Winters Spires: The climbs in The

the Liberty Bell/Early Winters Spires area are some of the best in Washington state, with solid rough-granite and climbs ranging from moderate to difficult. This area is popular for good reason, but decades of popularity have resulted in considerable impact to the surrounding area, including human waste disposal issues, erosion, and trail proliferation. The result of a collaborative effort with the U.S. Forest Service, the Access Fund, the National Forest Foundation, and other organizations, the presence of a seasonal climbing ranger with outreach and education information will be a step toward mitigating human impact on the Liberty Bell/Early Winters Spires area. Fun Rock: The Fun Rock crags along Lost River Road are easily accessed from a climber’s parking area, about 1.4 miles northwest of the Mazama Store. With more than 50 routes ranging 5.6-5.12d, there is something for everyone (which is why this area gets crowded, particularly on weekends). You can get the Fun Rock guidebook at Goat’s Beard. The Matrix: Located 1.6 miles south of Mazama and accessible from the Goat Creek Sno-Park, the

Winthrop Inn on the Methow River

Fresh Fruit & Veggies, local arts, crafts & more! Saturdays 9am - noon at the Methow Valley Community Center 201 Hwy 20 S., Twisp

 16

smoke-free ~ pool & spa picnic area ~ micros & fridges free Wi-Fi ~ morning coffee bar

509.996.2217

www.winthropinn.com Summer 2018


about this area. Washington Pass Crags: Beat the summer heat at the crags just above the hairpin turn at Washington Pass. As with The Matrix area, these are mostly single-pitch bolted routes. This newly developed area gives you the feeling of climbing in the mountains yet is reachable by just a 5-minute walk from the road. Get some guidance

If you don’t have the gear or experience to tackle climbing on your own, or if you want to take your climbing to the next level, it’s wise to take a class or enlist a guide: North Cascades Mountain Guides offers low-ratio climbing trips with world-class, certified guides. Want a family day at the crags? Or maybe you’re interested in experiencing multi-pitch climbing. NCMG has you covered. www. ncmountainguides.com; (509) 9963194; 48 Lost River Road, Mazama. Northwest Outward Bound School in Mazama has climbing programs as well. www.nwobs.org; (503) 946-3404; 226 Lost River Road, Mazama.

t he e! o t t x e N a Stor Mazam

Need gear? Climbing equipment and outdoor gear are a brisk business in the Methow Valley and are available at several local retailers: Goat’s Beard Mountain Supplies, located behind the Mazama Store, has the widest selection of climbing gear in the valley, including the climbing guidebook you’ll need if you’re going without a professional or a local: Bryan Burdo’s Mazama Rock, a Vertical Paradise. (This book is, however, notoriously hard to get from the publisher, and is frequently out of stock.) Goat’s Beard also sells miniguides for other local crags, as well as the Beckey guidebooks. www. goatsbeardmountainsupplies.com; (509) 996-2515; 50 Lost River Road, Mazama. Other local retailers offer outdoor gear and apparel: Winthrop Mountain Sports, 257 Riverside Ave. in Winthrop, www.winthropmountainsports.com, (509) 9962886; Cascades Outdoor Store, 222 Riverside Ave. in Winthrop, www.cascadesoutdoorstore.com, (509) 996-3480. 

ON TWISP BA M A

RY KE

Get Out There

Gear is near

CINN

60-plus routes at The Matrix take some of the pressure off Fun Rock. They’re mostly sport routes, but there are a few trad lines as well. You’ll need the Matrix & Europa guidebook, since these climbs are not included in any other climbing guide. Goat Wall: Goat Wall is 3 miles northwest of the Mazama Store on Lost River Road; you can’t miss this massive rhinostone wall that spans several miles, towering 1,000 feet above the river. Routes abound. Get the climbing guide at Goat’s Beard. Europa: Europa is a crag on Goat Wall with new and previously undocumented routes ranging from 5.6-5.12. Sun and great views make this a nice place to climb in the shoulder seasons or early on summer mornings. Goat’s Beard carries the Matrix & Europa guidebook. West Chewuch/Falls Creek: Another new site can be found out the West Chewuch, above Falls Creek. Little is written about this new site; experienced climbers just head to the crags and get on the climbs. Eventually, www.mountainproject. com may have some information

Pastries & Breads

  Iced Organic Espresso, Smoothies & Shakes  organic flours & grains

Breakfast & Lunch Sandwiches & Bagels

Sit in or Take out!

Open Every Day 6am - 3pm

509.996.2515 Methow Valley News

Downtown Twisp 116 N. Glover Street 509.997.5030 Free Wifi Follow us on Facebook

 17


Photo by Ashley Lodato

The OuTdOOrsman Lowest prices around!

• CaMping • FiShing • lake & rIVEr toyS

Fly Shop • CUSToM • KNIVES RaFTeRS • FootwEar dOwnTOwn winThrOp

996-2649

www.theoutdoorsmanstore.net

 18

Open 7 Days a Week!

MEXICAN GRILL & TEQUILA BAR DOWNTOWN WINTHROP

OPEN EVERY DAY AT 11AM (509) 996-2245 I carlos1800.com Also visit us in Leavenworth!

Gluten-free menu available Over 200 Varieties of Tequila!

ailable Gift Cards av

Gift Card

Summer 2018


Whether hiking or backpacking, the valley's options accommodate every kind of experience By Ashley Lodato

If you’re like me, one of the reasons you

love the Methow Valley is its proximity to some of the most beautiful hikes on the planet.

The mountains call, you answer, and the next thing you know your boots are pounding out that familiar tempo on a dusty trail, or across a talus slope, or along a

needle-strewn path. You’re happiest out here, with the rugged peaks, the lush meadows, the marmot’s whistle, the wildflowers blooming in the spring and summer, the larch glowing in the fall. Nicole Ringgold says that she “takes bigger breaths” when she walks long distances, and that “scents are more vibrant, and the scenery seems much more vivid.” For Leslie Hall, a hike or long mountain run checks off several boxes she thinks are essential to her well-being: physical activity, sustained periods of time to catch up with friends on the trail, and exploring new areas in the Methow Valley. “Connecting with friends beyond the basic ‘how are you?’ in a beautiful area while out exercising,” says Hall of her three-prong approach. Keri Miles agrees with the physical benefit as a tool for emotional well-being. “It’s just me and the mountain, or me and a friend and the mountain, but always there’s a physical focus on just taking the next step up that pulls you outside of yourself, and helps you let go of anything except taking that next

step,” she says. Getting out into the mountains is both hard and easy — hard because you test your muscles (and sometimes your patience), easy because life is reduced to a limited series of questions: Which way shall I go? Where should I stop for lunch? Do I have time to take a side trip up that peak? “It’s about unburdening yourself from the day-to-day stuff,” says Midge Cross. There is an elemental simplicity to hiking that is found in few other places. Even when difficulties present themselves, solutions can usually be found. Bridge washed out? Hike along the stream until you find a safe place to cross. Raining? Get out your rain jacket. Critters? Hang your food. Trail junction? Consult your map. As Sam Lucy says, “Backpacking simplifies things, brings you back to the basics: food, water, shelter. You become self-reliant.” The things you carry

Even simplified, however, there are going to be items you need to take out on a day hike or backpacking adventure, so at some point

you are making decisions about the things you’ll carry. Rita Kenny, co-owner of Winthrop Mountain Sports, addresses the evolution of gear and the philosophies that drive it. “First gear was all old-school,” she says, “which was uniformly heavy.” Next, Kenny says, came the lightweight gear movement, driven by a small subset of long-distance hikers. “In some ways they were outsiders, on the fringe,” says Kenny. “But then suddenly all the gear companies jumped on board for the lightweight movement and everyone was making light gear.” Following the lightweight movement was a steady march toward ultra-light, and then super-ultralight, where every item in a backpack — not to mention the backpack itself, which would weigh less than 2 pounds — was pared down to bare bones weights. “Some of these long-distance hikers on the Pacific Crest Trail [PCT] or Appalachian Trail [AT] these days are carrying only 15-20 pounds — including food! — for multi-day stretches,” says Kenny. “The packs that used to be

blue sky real estate A refreshing approach to real estate services

www.MethowBlueSky.com (509) 996-8084 Anne Eckmann & Heather Marrone, Owners Kathy Goldberg, Valerie Kardonsky, Sherry Malotte, Michael Notaro Methow Valley News

 19


considered ultra-light (empty pack weight of 2-3 pounds) are now being loaded to 35 pounds for multiday trips, and the original lightweight packs which at 4 pounds were once revolutionary are seen as traditional, used only by people who like to load up with a lot of creature comforts.” Kenny cautions backpackers to select packs not based on weight, but based on planned use. “It doesn’t make sense to use a 2-pound pack if you’re loading it up with a 3-pound stove and 15 pounds of food,” she says, “or if you’re planning to go off-trail. These super-ultra-light packs are really designed for a specific use: on-trail, long distance, minimally loaded.” Kenny also notes that the very lightest packs on the market most likely do not offer the comfort features that mainstream backpackers consider essential: comfortable shoulder straps, a molded waist belt, back support. As categories of user groups increase, says Kenny, gear companies respond, creating specialized equipment designed for specific uses: from car-camping families to long-distance through-hikers. In the Methow Valley, Kenny says, she sees a wide range of hikers, from those resupplying along the PCT to avid day hikers to backpacking families taking the kids out. “People are really getting out and exploring our public lands,” says Kenny. “It’s such a political issue right now. It helps raise awareness to get people out into those places, explore them, and appreciate them.” More gadgets

Another thing gear companies are focusing on is what Kenny refers to as “cool accessories,” such

as utensils and headlamps. “You wouldn’t believe how light these things are these days,” she says. Kenny mentions a new gadget from JetBoil: a gauge that measures how much fuel is left in canisters. “If you’re using a canister stove you should have one of these,” says Kenny. “You wouldn’t carry it on the trail; you would use it at home to test your canister to see if it’s empty and ready for recycling or if there’s still some fuel in it.” Before considering bigger items like packs and tents, Kenny urges hikers and backpackers to focus on the piece of equipment that will make or break a walking experience: footwear. “The distance hikers are all wearing running shoes built for hiking these days,” she says, “but the average hiker is going to want a sturdier hiking shoe, especially if they’re planning any off-trail travel.” One of the things Kenny is most excited about this year is a new boot option: the Technica Forge boot — the world’s first custommoldable hiking boot, which recently earned Backpacker Magazine’s editor’s choice award. “There’s moldable foam in the heel, instep, and ankle,” says Kenny. “I tried some of these boots out and they were probably the most comfortable boots I’ve every worn. The fit was pretty impressive.” Retailers customize the Forge to the wearer’s foot using special equipment and have the ability to re-mold the boot over time. Kenny points to the heel and ankle in particular. “The ability to mold the heel and ankle and eliminate so many of those pressure points, it just solves so many problems,” she says, referring in particular to blisters. In general, hikers in lightweight

Photo by Mary Kiesau

and breathable boots are far less likely to get blisters than those in heavy leather boots. “Blisters are caused by friction, heat and moisture,” says Cascades Outdoor Store co-owner Amy Sweet, who speaks with the empathy of one who has suffered. “When your sweaty feet are trapped in your waterproof boots, you’re creating the perfect conditions for blister formation.” Sweet recommends the athlete’s lubricant Glide, combined with lightweight breathable boots and two-layer socks as blister prevention. Cross’ blister prevention program is more basic: lightweight shoes and a minimalist pack. “I never get blisters in running shoes,” she says, “and they’re kinder to the trail than big clunky boots.” Despite the promising nature of custom-molded boots like the Forge, one boot does not fit all. Winthrop Mountain Sports’ other coowner, Diane Childs, has in the past offered this sage advice: “What’s the best boot for backpacking? The one that fits your foot best.”

nectar SKIN BAR & BOUTIQUE

FACIALS l MASSAGE l WAXING l BOUTIQUE

Childs suggests that hikers consider stiffness (particularly in uneven terrain), breathability (you probably don’t need waterproof boots if most of your hiking is in the eastern Cascades), and boot height (low for level trails, higher for off-trail — although Cross unflinchingly maintains that strong ankles eliminate the need for boots with ankle support). Childs also provided this information: boots made on European lasts are better for narrow feet, while those made on American lasts accommodate wide feet better. This kind of specialized knowledge about gear is why consumers should spend time with retailers who fully understand the features of the products they’re selling. The fit and function of items like your pack and your boots are literally going to make the difference between success and failure on your trip, so let your retailer educate you about products’ qualities. Personal choices

The weight-reduction strides that

bronwen handcrafted jewelry

Intertwined Designs Earth Friendly Handmade Clothing 509-996-3113

www.winthropchalets.com info@winthropchalets.com

 20

509.996.2417 l 134 Riverside Ave, Winthrop, WA

www.nectarskinbarwinthrop.com

Summer 2018


have been made in backpacks have also been seen in the newer tents, sleeping pads, stoves and sleeping bags, says Kenny, referencing items like a Big Agnes 3-inch inflatable pad that weighs 10 ounces, or hammock sleep systems that eliminate the need for a tent. “Gear companies are really pushing the boundaries of how light you can go,” she says. Still, Kenny confesses that in her backpacking days there are luxuries she wouldn’t forego, despite the added weight. “I like to eat real food,” she says, “so that means carrying the food and a stove that’s good for cooking [as opposed to stoves like the JetBoil that are designed just to boil water].” Kenny also likes to put on a puffy down jacket and camp shoes like Crocs upon reaching camp and then take an insulated mug of tea and drink it in her camp chair — all items that would not be seen in a super-ultralightweight backpacker’s pack. Both Cross and Hall say that they have moved away from backpacking altogether rather than endure their beloved hikes under the weight of a pack. “My backpack always ends up being too heavy and it makes me cranky,” says Hall. “It makes me grumpy,” echoes Cross. The former backpackers both acknowledge, however, that giving up backpacking limits their access to places that are farther out, although both tend to push the limits of day hikes and knock out some pretty impressive daily mileage. Cross offers a compromise for those who like to sleep in the backcountry but who loathe heavy packs: horsepacking. “We have excellent outfitters in the Methow,” she says. “The horse takes my stuff and I frolic in with a small pack.”

THE

Ready to frolic into the great outdoors? Make sure you have proper permits, passes, and parking information for your desired destination (see page 38). DAY HIKES (one-way miles from shortest to longest)

• Slate Peak: The ¼-mile hike to Slate Peak gets you up to 7,400 feet elevation and provides a glimpse into the rich mining history of the area around the turn of the 20th century. Drive to the end of the Harts Pass road (which can often be quite rough) and hike from the gate. • Falls Creek: Another short hike to a stunning view is the ¼-mile walk to Falls Creek Falls, out the West Chewuch Road. Park at Falls Creek Trailhead. • Twisp Ponds: A 1-mile loop winds through restored riparian areas, native vegetation, interpretive signage and several significant public art pieces. Park at the Twisp Ponds site just outside Twisp on Twisp River Road. • Rainy Lake: Hiking doesn’t get any easier than the 1-mile walk on a paved, level path with interpretive signs and resting benches, ending at a sparkling alpine lake. Park at the Rainy Pass Trailhead. • Tawlks-Foster Suspension Bridge: The flat 1-mile trail to the Suspension Bridge brings you to a picnic shelter and some interpretive signs by the river. Park at the Suspension Bridge Trailhead along Goat Creek Road in Mazama. • Patterson Mountain: The 3-mile loop around Patterson Mountain is one of the first snowfree hikes in the valley and is lush with wildflowers in the late spring. Park at the state boat access on Patterson Lake Road. • Lone Fir Loop: Kids love the

Ulrich’s Pharmacy Your local store for gifts, apparel, housewares, cards, and more! Prescriptions • Over-the-counter Medications Store Hours: 9-6 M-Sat. • Pharmacy Hours: 9-6 M-F • 9-1 Sat. 423 E. Methow Hwy. • Twisp 509-997-2191

VIRGINIAN RESORT

HOME OF THE BLUES Featuring Cabins & Rooms on the River starting at $69 per night

Free Continental • Military Discounts Group Rates • Free WiFi • Satellite TV • Pet Friendly Call to make your reservation!

toll free 866-996-2535 or 509-996-2535 808 Hwy 20 • 1/2 mile from Downtown Winthrop Methow Valley News

 21


2-mile loop around Early Winters Creek at Lone Fir Campground. With its shady glades and fun bridges, the trail is interesting and surprising. Park at Lone Fir Campground. • Lake Ann: Lake Ann is just 1.9 miles from the parking area, but it gets you into what feels like the heart of the mountains — a sparkling lake in a granite cirque. Park at the Rainy Pass Trailhead. • Lookout Mountain: Lookout Mountain in Twisp loses its snow early, making it a favorite spring hike. Panoramic views and a historic wildfire lookout make this 2-mile hike a worthwhile one. From Twisp River Road, turn left on Road 1605 and connect with Forest Service Rd 4400-200 to the parking area at the end. • Cutthroat Lake: Another alpine lake worth visiting is Cutthroat Lake, although it is marshier than Blue Lake or Lake Ann. The 2-mile trail into the lake is easy; moms have even been seen pushing baby joggers along it. Park at the Cutthroat Lake Trailhead. • Blue Lake: The 2.2-mile hike into Blue Lake has some elevation gain but rewards the hiker with the opportunity to dip in its turquoise waters. Park at the Blue Lake Trailhead. • Goat Peak: Goat Peak is popular for its panoramic views of the North Cascades but also for its staffed fire tower (one of only two remaining in the Methow Valley Ranger District) on the summit. The 2.5-mile hike is strenuous and is dry in the late summer. From Goat Creek Road, take Forest Road 52, then 5225, and then to the end of 5225-200 to the parking area. • Maple Pass: The 7-mile Maple Pass loop is probably the most New Old Time

ChauTauqua 2018 Washington State Parks Tour

COme CelebraTe

our State Parks with some of the best vaudeville performers on the planet Fri. June 22 4pm Potluck Pearrygin State Park SaT. June 23 12pm Twisp Parade, Farmers Market 1pm WorkShoPS-TwispWorks 7pm VaudeVille ShoW-MV Community Center More info: chautauquatwisp.com

 22

popular day hike in the area, and for good reason. The hike passes through old-growth forests and subalpine hillsides before emerging into alpine meadows and a 360-degree view of the North Cascades from the summit ridge. Park at the Rainy Pass Trailhead. • Easy Pass: The 3.5-mile hike up Easy Pass is anything but, as you climb up 3,000 feet fairly relentlessly. Emerge into the talus above treeline and the views are breathtaking, as the trail criss-crosses an avalanche fan under the soaring peaks of Ragged Ridge before entering the larch-covered lush Easy Pass saddle. Park at the Easy Pass Trailhead. OVERNIGHT TRIPS (one-way miles from shortest to longest)

• Tiffany Lake: The 1-mile trail into Tiffany Lake brings you to a level campsite with swimming and exploration opportunities, with wildflower-carpeted Tiffany Mountain looming above. From the campsite you can travel more lightly on side trips to the saddle above the lake or to Tiffany’s summit. Park at the Tiffany Lake Trailhead. Directions are complicated; get a Forest Service map. • Windy Pass: The 3.5-mile hike along the Pacific Crest Trail to Windy Pass lacks significant elevation gain or loss, so you can travel through meadows and larch stands at a brisk clip before reaching your camping destination at the pass. Drive the Harts Pass Road almost to the end, parking in the small area that gives access to the PCT. • Black Lake: Hiking into Black Lake with a backpack is appealing due to its limited elevation gain and loss. In August, the 4.5-mile trail is

Photo by Ashley Lodato

lined with raspberries and blueberries as well. There are campsites on both ends of the lake. From the West Chewuch Road, take Road 51, then 5160-100 to the road end and trail 500. • Scatter Lake: Set in a spectacular bowl, Scatter Lake is hardearned (almost 4,000 feet elevation gain in 4.5 miles) but worth the journey. Abernathy Peak looms above the lake, visible from the pleasant and abundant campsites. Drive up Twisp River Road to the Scatter Creek Trailhead. • Stehekin: Huh? Yes, that’s right, you can hike from the Methow Valley to this tiny boat-and-planeaccess-only community at the end of Lake Chelan. The hike starts at Bridge Creek and drops you gradually into the confluence with the Stehekin River 18 miles later. From there you can take a National Park Service shuttle into Stehekin and

FRESH GREENS

either boat out to Chelan the next day if you’ve arranged a pickup, or turn around and hike back to your car at Bridge Creek via McAlester Pass. Two campsites along the PCT provide the opportunity to break the 18-miles up into two days. Park at the Bridge Creek Trailhead. TEN ESSENTIALS

Developed in the 1930s by The Mountaineers as a checklist for backcountry emergency preparedness, the Ten Essentials were 10 individual items that few experienced wilderness travelers would consider leaving out of their backpacks. The jury is still out on the Ten Essentials regarding day hikes, especially those on familiar or well-marked trails in good weather. While most hikers agree that sunscreen is worth the weight, those trotting around Maple Pass in three hours would probably consider it

Jason Rumohr, LMP CHP Hellerwork Structural Integration 105 Norfolk Rd, Winthrop

Must Be 21 or Older to Even Read This

..................... cannabis retail ..................... 509-996-2025 freshgreenswinthrop.com ...............................................................................

Free your body. Enjoy your life.

Open every day 10am-6pm • Daily Specials Lot 29, Horizon Flat Rd, Winthrop

This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

509-341-4050

jasonrumohr.com #MA17981

Summer 2018


overkill to carry a space blanket and a water filter. You’ll need to make the decision for yourself, but consider the basic premise behind the Ten Essentials: you probably won’t use most of this stuff, but as soon as you need it, you’ll be glad you brought it. • Navigation: Learn how to read a topographic map before you hit the trail. Seriously. Ditto for your compass. Plus, a lot of compasses have mirrors in the lids, which you can use to admire your grubby face. • Sun protection: Sunscreen, sunglasses, sun hat — wear them every day. • Insulation: Bring more warm clothes than you think you’ll need; it’s colder in the mountains. Even on a sunny day hike it’s often nice to have a hat and puffy jacket for lunch on the summit. • Illumination: Even in the summer with 16 hours of daylight, you never know when you might have to hike out in the dark. Pack a headlamp or flashlight and make sure your batteries are new. • First aid kit: Outdoor stores sell well-stocked commercial kits, or

FARMSTAND OPEN DAILY MAY-OCTOBER Organic berries Homemade ice cream Espresso Wholesome snacks

VISIT US: HWY 20, MP 101

Methow Valley News

visit REI’s website for an inventory list that will guide you through assembling your own. • Firestarter and matches: If for some reason you are spiraling toward hypothermia, and there are no other options for getting warm, you’ll have to light a fire. This should only be a last resort if there are no established fire rings. Heed all fire bans! • Repair kit and tools: Sometimes the ability to fix your stove or your pack makes the difference between comfort and misery. • Water and purification system: In John Muir’s day you could drink water straight from the stream. Not anymore — treat your water. • Extra food: Bring something high-calorie, non-perishable and unappealing, like stale energy bars in an unpopular flavor. You’ll have them if you need them, but you won’t be tempted to break them out for dessert one night. • Emergency shelter: If all goes well and you’re lucky, you won’t need your rain gear or space blanket, but better safe than sorry. 

Handmade Chocolates Homemade Ice Cream Homemade Waffle Cones 40+ flavors of ice cream & 30+ flavors of yogurt

ESPRESSO

Plus 18-Hole Mini Golf!

BREAKFAST SANDWICHES CINNAMON ROLLS HOT DOGS FRESH-MADE SANDWICHES ON ARTISAN BREAD & 100+ VARIETIES OF BULK CANDY

Fun for the Whole Family! Main Corner in Winthrop

509-996-3834

509-689-2517

Antiques and collectibles.

Vintage home and garden décor.

A variety of recycled, repurposed and locally made items.

501 Hwy 20 Winthrop, WA

996-8297

 23


FS 1 00

 24

Summer 2018


Visitor Center

North Suspension Footbridge

MILEAGES

Methow Valley Sport Trails Association 509-996-3287

zzly Gri

l Hil

Twisp to Winthrop Twisp Information Center 9 509-997-2926 Winthrop to: Sun Mountain Trails U.S. Forest Service 10 509-996-4000 Pearrygin Lake State Park 4 Mazama 14 Winthrop Chamber of Commerce Washington Pass 34 509-996-2125 WinthropWashington.com Rainy Pass 40 Hart's Pass 33 Goat Peak Trail 18 Sweetgrass Butte 19 Copper Glance Lake Trail 22 Tiffany Lake Trail 28

Spring Creek Footbridge

Ice Rink

Fish Hatchery

Twisp to: End of Twisp River Road W A S H I N G T26O N SouthTheCreek Horse Camp 23 Winthrop Chamber of Commerce is honored to have you visit our Loup old Loup Pass western town. In addition to our wooden 13 boardwalks, Winthrop, Blackpine Lakeis best know for its highly acclaimed 20 year-round Washington pursuits, its strong agricultural ties Foggyrecreational Dew Campground 20and its vibrant arts community. visiting we hope you will have Winthrop via While Elbow Coulee 15 the opportunity to stay and enjoy the Methow Valley's many coffee roasters, brew pubs, Columbia River 32 art galleries, specialty shops, eateries and accommodations. Okanogan 30

To Smokejumper Base, Golf Course & Twisp

Gro ce ry

Winthrop Washington 1-888-4Methow | WinthropWashington.com Winthrop Washington on Facebook

Saturday Farmers Market

The Methow Valley Sport Trails Association (MVSTA) is the nation's largest cross-country ski resort with over 120 miles of perfectly groomed trails. In partnership with the US Forest Service, other government agencies and private landowners, MVSTA is dedicated to developing and promoting non-motorized, trail-based recreation in the Methow Valley. The Methow Valley Sport Trails system is recognized as one of the finest trail systems in North America for hiking, biking, trail running and cross-country skiing. Come ski with us this winter! Methow Valley Sport Trails Association 509-996-3287 | mvsta.com | SkiTheMethow.com Methow Valley Sport Trails Association on Facebook

Visitor Center

North Suspension Footbridge

Methow Va

Twis

U

This map is not intended for backcountry navigation. Detailed Okanogan National Forest and Methow Valley area maps are available for purchase at ranger stations, visitor centers and many local businesses.

Winthro

Spring Creek Footbridge

Ice Rink

Win

Fish Hatchery

To Smokejumper Base, Golf Course & Twisp

ry

ce

Gro

The Winthrop Chamber old western town. In add Washington is best know recreational pursuits, its community. While visiting stay and enjoy the Metho art galleries, specialty sh

Ski Area

W 1-888-4Met Winthr

Saturday Farmers Market

The Methow Valley Spor largest cross-country ski groomed trails. In partn government agencies an developing and promoti the Methow Valley. The recognized as one of the hiking, biking, trail runn

Co

Methow V 509-996-328 Methow Valley

Methow Valley News

ďƒ• 25


PHOTO BY DARLA HUSSEY

Pitch it or park it From tenting to RVing, the Methow Valley offers plenty of camping options

One of the many great

joys of the Methow Valley is the opportunity to sleep under the starry skies, the sound of wind in the pines or a

burbling stream lulling you to sleep. Depending on the day and the location, camping in

the Methow Valley can be a tranquil, solitary

experience, or it can be a bustling social time of activity. The good news is that you have

plenty of options to pitch a tent, park a camper, or string up a hammock and surrender to the simpler life that camping affords.

Up-valley (Cascades to Winthrop)

The campgrounds in this section of the accompanying chart are all located right off Highway

 26

20 in the mountains between Winthrop and Washington Pass. Ballard, Road’s End, Meadows, and Harts Pass campgrounds are situated on Lost River Road and in the Harts Pass area. For a complete listing of U.S. Forest Service campgrounds in this area, visit www.fs.usda.gov/ recarea/okawen/recreation/camping-cabins/ recarea/?recid=59073&actid=29. Mid-valley (Winthrop to Twisp)

The campgrounds in this section of the chart are all located on or near Highway 20 between Winthrop and Twisp. There are no U.S. Forest Service campgrounds located immediately off Highway 20 in the Winthrop-to-Twisp area; however, numerous Forest Service campgrounds like 8-Mile, Falls Creek and Chewuch, are just a few miles outside Winthrop along the Chewuch River, while others like South Creek, War Creek,

and Roads End are easily accessible up Twisp River Road. For a complete listing of U.S. Forest Service campgrounds in the mid-valley area, visit www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/okawen/recreation/ camping-cabins/recarea/?recid=59073&actid=29 Down-valley (Twisp to Pateros)

The campgrounds in this section of the chart are all located on or near Highway 20 and Highway 153 between Twisp and Pateros. There are no U.S. Forest Service campgrounds located immediately off Highway 153 in the Twisp-toPateros area; however, numerous Forest Service campgrounds like Black Pine Lake can be found just a few miles from the highways. For a complete listing of US Forest Service campgrounds in the down-valley area, visit: www.fs.usda.gov/ recarea/okawen/recreation/camping-cabins/ recarea/?recid=59073&actid=29.  Summer 2018


Campgrounds at a glance

PHOTO BY DARLA HUSSEY

  Up Valley (Cascades to Mazama)   Name

Location

Lone Fir Campground, USFS

27 miles NW of Winthrop on Hwy 20

First Come First Served

Klipchuck Campground, USFS

19 miles NW of Winthrop on Hwy 20

Early Winters Campground, USFS

Fees

 Down Valley (Twisp to Pateros)

Amenities

Other

$12/site; $5 add’l vehicle

potable water pump, no sewer or electric hook up

beautiful kid-friendly 2-mile hiking loop along stream

509-996-4000, www.fs.usda. gov

First Come First Served

$12/site; $5 add’l vehicle

potable water pump, no sewer or electric hook up

trailhead to Driveway Butte hike located at entrance

509-996-4000, www.fs.usda. gov

15 miles NW of Winthrop on Hwy 20

First Come First Served

$8/site; $5 add’l vehicle

potable water pump, no sewer or electric hook up

near town of Mazama, running trails, views of Goat Wall

509-996-4000, www.fs.usda. gov

Pine Near RV Park and Campground

2 blocks from downtown Winthrop

yes

$20-$50; more for cabins

full hookups, EV charging station, laundry, wifi, showers; mining shacks, tipis, cabins

walking distance to downtown Winthrop, across street from historic Shafer Museum

509-341-4062, www. pinenearpark.com/

Winthrop KOA

1/2 mile east of Winthrop

yes

$35+/site

full hookups, laundry, TV reception, showers

riverside, pool, cabins, playground, bicycle rentals

509-996-2258, koa.com/ campgrounds/winthrop/

Methow Valley News

Reservations

  Mid Valley (Mazama to Twisp)  

Contact

 27


Campgrounds, Continued Name

Location

Pearrygin Lake State Park

Reservations

2 miles from Winthrop

Fees

Amenities

Other

Contact

yes

$30+/site

full hookups, showers, wifi; cabins

lakeside, swimming, boating, hiking trails, fishing

509-996-2370, parks.state.wa.us/563/ Pearrygin-Lake

Big Twin Lake Camp- 3 miles south of ground Winthrop

yes

$25+/site

full hookups, toilets, showers

boating, fishing, close to trails & rodeo grounds

509-996-2650, www.methownet.com/bigtwin

Silverline Resort

1.5 miles from Winthrop

yes

$23+/site

full hookups, toilets, showers, convenience store, wifi, breakfast kitchen

lakeside, swimming, boating, hiking trails, fishing, mini-golf

509-996-2448, silverlineresort.com

Riverbend RV Park

2 miles east of Twisp

yes

$25+/site

full hookups, toilets, showers, dog park, wifi, convenience store, laundry

riverside, boating, fishing, horseshoes, basketball

509-997-3500, www.riverbendrv.com

Carlton RV Park

Carlton

yes

$15+/site

full hookups, showers, convenience store, restaurant

swimming, beach

509-997-0833, www.carltonrvpark.com

Loup Loup Campground, USFS

12 miles east of Twisp First Come First Served

$12/site; $5 add’l vehicle

potable water pump, no sewer or electric

mountain biking, hiking, Western Larch

509-996-4000, www.fs.usda.gov

Lightning Pine RV Park

just north of Methow

yes

$8-$25+/site

full hookups, fire pits, showers, laundry

dog-friendly, horse boarding, horseshoe pits, volleyball court, hiking, swimming, tubing

509-923-2572, www.lightningpine.com

Alta Lake State Park

2 miles southwest of Pateros

yes

$30+/site

full hookups, showers, wifi

boating, hiking, birding, golf

888-226-7688, parks.state. wa.us/239/Alta-Lake

• Full hook-up RV sites • Clean restrooms & showers • Laundromat • Rec hall for group events

BIG RIG FRIENDLY! WE ALSO SELL

JULY 26 - AUGUST 4

www.methowmusicfestival.org

Breathtaking Setting

Propane Supplies RV parts Cold sodas Ice cream

(509) 997-3500 1-800-686-4498 www.riverbendrv.com reservations@riverbendrv.com

19961 Hwy 20, Twisp

 28

Unique Concerts

Thrilling Artists Summer 2018


LARIAT COFFEE roASTERS

The Methow Valley is a Beautiful Place, But Don’t Take It Home on Your Car!

CAR WASH

COFFEE ACCESSORIES ~ Kalita - Freiling - Chemex AeroPress - Baratza - Bonavita J Scale & more!

“NOW OPEN”

DOWNTOWN WINTHROP LARIAT RETAIL STORE

BLACK COLT Cold Brew

Handcrafted goods~gifts

Stoneware Mugs Glass Travel Cups T~Shirts & Hats

• Touchless Automatic with Undercarriage Wash • Dryers on Top Two Washes • Self-Service Bay (RV Friendly) • Two Vacuums with Carpet Cleaners Clean the Boat Before You Go!

KING’S PACIFIC PRIDE & CARWASH

Home accessories & more!

Precision Exhaust & Custom Tire

265 Riverside Ave, Suite B; Winthrop, WA / 509.996.4240

South of Twisp on Hwy 20 Use cash or Pride Card

Winthrop KOA Campground ON THE METHOW RIVER

Tents RVs Cabins Playground & Heated Pool

• Large, grassy pull-through sites • Store • Showers • Laundromat • Free WiFi Courtesy Shuttle Service to Downtown Winthrop 509-996-2258 • 1-800-KOA-2158 www.koa.com Methow Valley News

 29


An off-planet experience Clear nighttime skies make stargazing in the Methow Valley a celestial experience By David Ward

What could be better than lying back on your lounge chair on a balmy summer evening gazing up at a star-studded sky? If you are visiting from Seattle or some other large city, be sure to take advantage of our dark clear skies. The wonders of the universe are on display here in the Methow Valley every clear night. This summer there are some special treats waiting for you in the night sky above, and even if you just spend a few minutes gazing upwards, you are sure to see something amazing. The planets are going to put on quite a show this summer. Every two years and 50 days, the orbits of Mars and the Earth coincide, bringing Mars very close to us. Happening at the end of July, Mars will be brighter than it has for 15 years. It will be twice as bright as Jupiter, an unmistakable red ruby blazing away in the nighttime sky. The best time to see Mars will be late July and early August. Look for it low in the southeast, rising near sunset. Depending on obstructions to your view of the sky, it might be a little later before it is visible at your location. A small telescope will probably show you one of the polar ice caps and possibly dark features on the otherwise orange planet. Jupiter is a sky-watcher’s favorite with its cloud bands and four bright moons perpetually dancing around the largest planet in our solar system. Even without a telescope, it is always an impressive bright-yellowish steady light shining in the south. It will be

 30

visible all summer long, one of the brightest objects in the sky. Saturn and Venus

Saturn is not as bright as Jupiter and no wonder, since it is almost a billion miles from us. Its glorious rings make up for its lack of luster, however. A small telescope will give you a fine view of the rings and its largest moon Titan nearby. Look for Saturn to the lower left of Jupiter in the south. If you have trouble finding the ringed planet, a full moon will point the way on the night of June 27-28. Saturn will be not far below, a dimmer yellowish object, not twinkling like the stars. Also all summer long, Venus will dazzle us as the evening star in the western twilight. By late summer a telescope will reveal it to be a beautiful little crescent. Venus, because it travels between us and the sun, goes through phases just like our moon. If you like watching shooting stars, you are in for a treat this summer. The annual Perseid meteor shower, which I like to call the “Old Faithful” of meteor showers, will not be washed out by moonlight like it was last year. Shooting stars, of course, are not actually stars, which are huge. Our sun, a small star, is much larger than the earth. If stars were falling on us it would be catastrophic to say the least. The Perseid meteors are leftover debris from a comet which goes by us every now and then. Comet Swift-Tuttle is the largest object that regularly passes us, and its next scheduled appearance is in the year 2126. It is a messy comet leaving a trail of debris in its wake, which we run into every August. Most of the Summer 2018


meteors you see flashing across the sky are the size of a grain of sand. Traveling far faster than a bullet, they immediately heat up when they hit our atmosphere, ionizing a column of air for a few seconds. That ionized air is what we see. Most evenings in August will have more meteors than normal. The best nights will be around Aug. 12 and Aug. 13. Later at night is better. After midnight, we are looking up into the sky in the direction the earth is traveling and so we are running into more of that debris. The Perseids are famous for larger slow-moving shooting stars, big fireballs with long glowing tails called bolides. If you are lucky, you may see a few of them. Our place in the cosmos

Some native cultures called it the “backbone of the night.” The ancient Greeks thought it was breast milk from a goddess. Other people saw it as a giant celestial river flowing across the sky. Today we know it as a vast structure of hundreds of billions of stars and our home in the infinite cosmos. We call it the Milky Way galaxy, from the old

Greek myth involving spilled breast milk from Hera, queen of the gods. An August evening when that faint glow stretches from north to south passing directly overhead is the best time to fully appreciate this wonder of the universe. Imagine a huge pinwheel with two spiral arms wrapping around a central bulge. Right overhead is one of those arms, and at its closest it is so far away it has taken its light 6,000 years to reach us. Low in the south near the planet Saturn, we can see the center of our galaxy and a look through binoculars will reveal star clusters and clouds of gas. This view of the Milky Way is one of the grandest sights nature has to offer, and a reminder of how tiny and insignificant the earth is in the vastness of the cosmos around us. A great time to see the Milky Way will be the nights of the meteor shower in August, but any moonless summer night will do. I will be up at Sun Mountain Lodge this summer to show you all the sights up above. Check with the lodge for my schedule and I hope to see you there! 

Wine, Spirits & Beer

Affordable Quality Wines

A large array of quality

WinES, BEERS, & SpiRitS at affordable prices. Special orders, quantity discounts, kegs, wine tastings. Open Every Day 11am - 6pm

Downtown Winthrop 130 Riverside Ave.

Twisp Valley Grange Available for Weddings & Parties Beautiful Dance Floor Full Kitchen/Dining Area Very Affordable Rates For info and Reservations call Kim 509.997.8050 or Judy 509.997.0775

PIC

Luxury Boutique Lodge 300 Acre Private Ranch Breathtaking Valley Views Accommodations for Groups from 2 to 30 Weddings and Events for groups from 2 to 250 twispterrace.com Methow Valley News

boutique clothing • gifts • baby home decor vintage Mon-Sat 10:00am-5:30pm 509.863.3681 Twisp, WA 98856 In the heart of the Methow Valley

 31


Warm up to winter Come back when the snow falls for an amazing array of Methow Valley activities Submitted By Methow Trails

The Methow Valley is acclaimed for dry snow

and sunny winter days, hosting nearly every type of winter

recreation opportunity you could ever ask for. Enjoy some of the

nation’s most extraordinary winter

wonderland experiences November through March.

Here are a few of the popular wintertime experiences the Methow has to offer. Photo by Donni Reddington

NORDIC SKIING

With over 120 miles of perfectly

groomed trails, the Methow Valley is home to the nation’s largest crosscountry ski area and a number of current, former and future Nordic ski Olympians. The ski trails are groomed daily by Methow Trails from November to March. The average length of our ski season is historically over 110 days per year. Unique experiences on the crosscountry ski trail system include: • Kids 17 and under ski free every day in the Methow. In addition, kidfriendly ski trails offer young skiers interactive play stops along the way. • Canadians ski for at-par currency exchange. • Ski over a magnificent suspension bridge, ski town-to-town or even ski from bakery-to-bakery. Gear rentals and lessons are

methownet.com

INTERNET SERVICE FOR OUR COMMUNITY

 32

Summer 2018


available at several places in the valley. FAT BIKING

This activity is a must-do winter adventure and a great way to break up your ski day with something new. Selected, groomed trails are open to both Nordic skiers and fat bikers. Floating over the snow by bicycle is a unique feeling that will have you grinning from ear to ear. Rentals are available at several places in the valley.

stars and in the shadow of Mt. Gardner. Enjoy open skate sessions, pick-up hockey, and Friday theme nights — there’s something for everyone. More information on the award-winning Winthrop Rink, including special events like the annual “Apple Puck” hockey tournament featuring the University of Washington club hockey team and a worth challenger, can be found at winthropicerink.com. SNOWMOBILING

Try a free, guided snowshoe tour with a local natural history expert. Tours run Saturdays in January and February. More information on the crosscountry, snowshoe, and fat bike trail system can be found at methowtrails.org and via their free mobile ski report app.

If you like exploring the scenery near and far, then snowmobiling might be the best way to cover large patches of the Methow Valley’s expansive snow-covered terrain. Over 300 miles of groomed snowmobile trails and endless backcountry opportunities exist. View information on snowmobile locations and rentals at winthropwashington.com.

WINTHROP ICE RINK

ALPINE SKIING

SNOWSHOEING

Winthrop is home to a gorgeous, uncovered, refrigerated, NHL regulation-size, outdoor ice rink that allows skaters to experience the thrill of ice skating under the

There are a dozen ski resorts in Washington state, but we challenge you to find one as cool as Loup Loup Ski Bowl. The Loup’s best assets might be what it doesn’t have.

The Loup doesn’t have lift lines, an attitude or exorbitant pass prices. What is does have is big mountain views, close proximity to Winthrop and Twisp, and days where all the powder may not even get skied. The Loup even has a snow-cat assisted luge run and tubing hill. Learn more about this gem at skitheloup. com. HELICOPTER AND BACK COUNTRY SKIING

The Methow Valley lies at the base of the “American Alps” of the North Cascades. North Cascades Heli-ski can provide the experience of a lifetime as they fly skiers up the mountains for the best turns. Also popular in the Methow is skitouring and backcountry skiing, accessing run after run by your own initiative. Find out more at heli-ski. com and ncmountainguides.com. SLEDDING

Families with kids young and old will take delight in the thrill of sledding down a fresh snow slope, coming up for air, laughing and doing it all over again. Sledding might be one of the most popular winter

activities in the Methow. Pick a hill, any hill and just try and get the kids to come back inside! RIVER AND LAKE ICE FISHING

Avid anglers rejoice! Ice fishing in winter on Methow Valley frozen lakes is one of those experiences you can’t find everywhere. In addition to the lakes, the Methow Valley rivers provide a steelhead fishing challenge to those not afraid of a little cold weather. Winter in the Methow is also full of other activities that include a world-class fireworks show, a hot air balloon festival, ski racing events snowshoe softball, hockey tournaments and snowmobile tours. Check the calendar in the weekly Methow Valley News, pick up a copy of the Methow Valley Winter magazine, or peruse the winthropwashington.com website for information. Whether you cross-country ski, fat bike, alpine ski, snowboard, sled, snowshoe, ice skate or snowmobile — or just relax by a fire and enjoy the views — gliding in a Methow Valley winter will be an experience that you will not forget.  Curtis Edwards

NATURA L GROWN LY FRU & PROD IT UCE

STOP BY OUR FRUIT STAND IN OKANOGAN Cherries, Apricots, Peaches, Nectarines, Pears & Apples Open Daily, 7:30am-6:00pm

• BBQ Favorites • Slow Smoked Brisket • Pulled Pork • Homemade Sides • Real Food = Real Good! Plus ESPRESSO & Free Wi-Fi! ee our Come sICK U-P H IN PATC PUMPK fall! this

Serving Breakfast & Lunch Daily on the Deck

Breakfast 7:30 - 11:00am Lunch 11:00am - 3:30pm Find our Fruit & Produce at our Winthrop Fruit Stand & the Methow Valley Farmer’s Market on Saturdays

(509) 422-2444 • 23090 HWY. 20

1.8 MILES BEFORE DOWNTOWN OKANOGAN, ON THE RIGHT

www.smallwoodfarms.net

meeting your outdoor recreation needs since 1984 sportswear • outdoor gear • trail info • footwear open 7 days a week in downtown Winthrop 509.996.2886 www.winthropmountainsports.com meeting your outdoor recreation needs

since 1984

Methow Valley News

 33

sportswear outdoor gear trail info footwear •


What’s more ...

Beyond the recreational stuff, the valley is chock full of other attractions By Ashley Lodato

You came to the

Methow Valley to hike. Or you came here to climb. Or

to backpack, raft the river, water ski, mountain bike, swim, com-

pete in an athletic event, read in a hammock, fish, float downstream or attend a music festival. You

may be focused on “boardwalk-

ing” in westernized Winthrop. Or you came to spend time alone,

or spend time with your family,

or your dog. Your days are full of

activity, or full of a whole lot of

nothing, and that’s exactly how you want it to be.

But at some point you might find yourself with a free hour, or a free afternoon, and you think, “What now?” And the answer is, “All of the rest of things to do in the Methow Valley, that’s what.”

Bird watching

The diversity of habitat and elevation in the Methow Valley lends itself to a booming bird population, with more than 250 species represented in the valley. Hang out by a river and you’ll see bald eagles and Great Blue Heron. Look up at a cliff and you’re sure to see ravens riding wind currents, or possibly even a peregrine falcon. The beaver pond near Chickadee Trailhead on the Patterson Lake Road is an excellent spot for birding, as are the Twisp Ponds (www. methowsalmon.org). Riser Lake is home to western meadowlarks, and canyon wrens live in Pipestone Canyon (www.justgetout.net/Okanogan/ post/Methow-Valley-Birding). Classes

You want to learn how to do something? There’s probably someone in the Methow Valley who can teach you. Think of it as summer school. Try www.methowarts.org/category/ classes, or twispworks.org/events. Galleries

If you’re a gallery hound you’ve

Photo by Marcy Stamper

come to the right place. Although the Methow Valley’s art galleries are small, they represent a wide, highquality range of artists, mediums and styles. Confluence Gallery & Art Center in Twisp hosts regular exhibits that feature the work of local, regional and national artists. The gift shop offers a tantalizing array of jewelry, ceramics, textiles and other handcrafted items (confluencegallery.com). Donna Keyser’s D*SIGNS Gallery in Twisp offers unique handcrafted home furnishings for Methow Valley living (keyserstudios.com). TwispWorks’ artist spaces are working studios and galleries, featuring silversmiths, painters, ceramicists, woodworkers, iron workers and other artists (twispworks.org/who-is-here/ twispworks-partners). The spaces are typically open to the public on Saturdays.

The Winthrop Gallery shows the work of local and regional artists in a cooperative gallery format (winthropgallery.com). You’ll also find local art on display at other locations in the valley including Rocking Horse Bakery in Winthrop and Cinnamon Twisp Bakery in Twisp. Golf

Bear Creek Golf Course near Winthrop offers a moderately priced, well-maintained venue with nine holes in two circuits in a stunning setting, as well as a driving range, foot golf (using a soccer ball), disc golf (using a flying disc), and fling golf (using a lacrosse stick). There’s a clubhouse, cafe, meeting space, outdoor tables with a good vista of the course, and wonderful views of the Sawtooth mountain range and lofty Mt. Gardner, especially from the sixth tee

METHOWHOUSEWATCH.COM

security visits, property maintenance, cleaning

䴀伀唀一吀䄀䤀一 䄀䐀嘀䔀一吀唀刀䔀匀 䤀一 吀䠀䔀 䠀䔀䄀刀吀 伀䘀 吀䠀䔀 䌀䄀匀䌀䄀䐀䔀匀 刀伀䌀䬀 䌀䰀䤀䴀䈀䤀一䜀 䤀一 䴀䄀娀䄀䴀䄀  圀䄀匀䠀䤀一䜀吀伀一 倀䄀匀匀 一伀刀吀䠀 䌀䄀匀䌀䄀䐀䔀匀 一䄀吀䤀伀一䄀䰀 倀䄀刀䬀

䴀吀⸀ 䈀䄀䬀䔀刀

509.996.3332 METHOHW847DT

 34

䤀渀昀漀䀀渀挀洀漀甀渀琀愀椀渀最甀椀搀攀猀⸀挀漀洀  簀  㔀 㤀ⴀ㤀㤀㘀ⴀ㌀㄀㤀㐀 眀眀眀⸀渀挀洀漀甀渀琀愀椀渀最甀椀搀攀猀⸀挀漀洀 Summer 2018


(www.bearcreekgolfcourse.com). Alta Lake Golf Course is just 2 miles southwest of Pateros off Highway 153 and offers a scenic and challenging 18-hole course (www.altalakegolf.com). Adjacent to the state park of that name, it has recovered from the firestorms of a few years ago. The brushy areas some remember from the old days that separated fairways are gone, notably on the back nine. Fees are about the same as at Bear Creek. The buildings are new since the fires, including the hotel and pro shop. Gamble Sands Golf Course just north of Brewster, the newest course in the region, is home to 18 holes on a sandy ridge overlooking the Columbia River (www.gamblesands.com). Gamble Sands is already worldrenowned and was voted “Best New Course in the Nation for 2016” by both Golf and Golf Digest magazines. A new clubhouse and a retail facility have been added. It is a friendly walking course. Also within driving distance: Bear Mountain Ranch (bearmtgolf.com); Desert Canyon Resort (desertcanyonresort.com); and Lake Chelan Golf Course (cityofchelan.us/golf-course).

Good books

The Winthrop and Twisp libraries are well-stocked little gems and cool oases on hot summer afternoons. Check out books, attend story time, use Wi-Fi or computers, and meet the friendliest librarians in the west (www.ncrl.org/locations). Trail’s End Bookstore in Winthrop offers a wide selection of books, games, gifts and art supplies, as well as lively readings, family-friendly events, a kids’ corner and espresso (www.trailsendbookstore.com). The valley’s free little libraries do a robust free book exchange, one in Mazama between the Mazama Store and Goat’s Beard Mountain Supplies and the other outside the Twisp Post Office. Take a book and/or leave a book (www.methowarts.org/ little-art-libraries-in-twisp).

509-996-2000

mtgardnerinn.com

Interpretive trails

The Twisp Ponds site is a complex of streams, rearing ponds, meandering trails, public art and interpretive stations (methowsalmon. org). The Sa-Teekh-Wa interpretive trail is easily accessible from downtown Winthrop across the pedestrian

UniqUe golfing experience in the beautiful Methow Valley

event venUe

weddings, reunions, parties, etc..

SerioUS coffee drinkS experience our new LaMarzocco espresso machine Proudly Serving

509-996-2284 • 19 Bear Creek Golf Course Rd • Winthrop www.bearcreekgolfcourse.com

offering an eclectic selection of wines from washington and around the world

•over 20 wines on our tasting menu •delectable small plates •gift bags and wine accessories •“frequent flighter” card - buy 5 flights and receive one free Wed, Thurs & sun noon-8pm • Fri & saT noon-9pm • 509-996-3229 229 riverside ave. space h • Winthrop, Wa • brixwinthrop.com Methow Valley News

 35


bridge with the same name, and winds 2 miles through pine stands along the Chewuch River (www.wta.org/go-hiking/hikes/ sa-teekh-wa-trail). Not all interpretive trails focus on the natural world. A selfguided walking tour of the public art in Twisp will give you many chances to observe, reflect, and interpret (www.methowarts.org/ public-art-map). Volunteering

Winthrop screens both current hit movies and popular “indies” in its ultra-comfortable theater. Order tickets online and enjoy a beverage before the show (thebarnyardcinema.com). The Merc Playhouse in Twisp is community theater at its best, with seasonal productions featuring local actors, directors and stage crews. This summer, “Bike America” runs July 13–22 (www. mercplayhouse.org).

One of the very best ways to become a part of a community is to plug into the organizations that define it. The Methow Valley is home to dozens — some say nearly 100 — nonprofit organizations with missions ranging from conservation to arts education to social services. The Volunteer Methow website will tell you all about volunteer opportunities in the valley. Filling a need might just be one of the most meaningful things you’ll do all summer (www. VolunteerMethow.org). Indoor watching

The Barnyard Cinema in

Methow River Poems

In 1992 the poet William Stafford wrote a commissioned series of poems reflecting the landscape and spirit of the North Cascades. The poems in this collection — the Methow River Poems — are engraved on steel plaques placed at various locations between Washington Pass and Pateros (www. methowarts.org/staffordpoems). Mini-golf

Ice cream and miniature golf go hand-in-hand (well, cone in one hand, club in the other) in downtown Winthrop at Sheri’s Sweet Shoppe (www. sherissweetshoppe.com).

On the eastern edge of Winthrop, the Abbycreek Inn runs an 18-hole mini golf course (www.abbycreekinn.com). After a round or two of mini golf at the Silverline Resort, you can take a dip in nearby Pearrygin Lake (silverlineresort.com). Pickleball

Incredibly, the Methow Valley has its own pickleball association (www.facebook.com/ Methow-Valley-PickleBall). Six pickleball courts are available at the Winthrop Rink (winthroprink. org/pickleball). The Methow Valley Community Center in Twisp hosts twice-weekly pickleball sessions seasonally (methowcommunity. org/facility-hours). Roller-skating

The Winthrop Rink offers rollerskating and roller hockey throughout the summer (winthroprink.org). One of the best deals in the valley is renting the Methow Valley Community Center in Twisp for a 3-hour roller skating party — complete with skates (methowcommunity. org/gym-rental).

Get historical

The Shafer Historical Museum on Castle Street in Winthrop (also reachable by stairs from Riverside Avenue) offers a remarkable and informative collection of buildings, belongings, documents and artifacts from Methow Valley history. The centerpiece is “The Castle,” the original home of Winthrop’s legendary entrepreneur Guy Waring. It’s well worth a casual stroll (www. shafermuseum.com). The museum also offers a self-guided tour of Winthrop pamphlet for $2. It is also available at the visitors center on Riverside Avenue. The Methow Valley Interpretive Center on the TwispWorks campus explores the native and natural history of the Methow Valley with indoor and outdoor exhibits including the Methow Valley Native Plants Garden and native pithouse. The center also hosts events such as talks and workshops (www. methowvalleyinterpretivecenter. com). Lofty perspectives

Morning Glory Balloon Tours in Winthrop offers hot air balloon trips,

Farmer owned & grown Seasonal Apples, Peaches, Cherries & Asparagus, Jams, Honey & Spices, Northwest Wines, MicroBrews, Local Gifts, Espresso, Ice Cream, Deli Menu, Baked Goods & Homemade Pie

We are 5 miles North of Desert Canyon 23041 Hwy 97, Orondo, WA 98843 • mile post 230/231

Open 7am-7pm 7 days a week

www.lonepinefruit.com OPEN EARLY EVERY DAY!

ENATCHEE WOR LD EW TH

265 Riverside Ave. Winthrop

2018

www.rockinghorsebakery.com

 36

Picked at the Peak of Perfection

Stop by and taste why we were voted World’s Best Fruit Stand! Summer 2018


a quiet, above-it-all experience for unique views of the valley (www.balloonwinthrop.com). Fish stories

The National Fish Hatchery in Winthrop, which raises spring Chinook, coho salmon and steelhead, offers exhibits and interpretive information. On June 9, kids fish free, and there are also activities and displays (fws.gov/winthropnfh). Smokejumping, ground zero

The smokejumping approach to fighting wildfires started at the North Cascades Smokejumpers base in 1939. Learn all about it in a tour at the base, on Twisp-Winthrop Eastside Road (www.northcascadessmokejumperbase.com). Just drive

Photo by Steve Mitchell

The valley’s back roads take you to scenic places where fewer folks venture. Be sure to get a good U.S. Forest Service map and check for road conditions before venturing out, and

be prepared for primitive road conditions. Some roads are suitable only for four-wheel drive and sports utility vehicles. Get Loupy

The Loup Loup Ski Bowl, a few minutes east of Twisp on Highway 20, is always expanding its summertime activities on Little Buck Mountain. Check it out at skitheloup.com. Mani-pedi and more

Get a massage, facial manicure, pedicure or other personal pampering. Try the Nectar Skin Bar and Boutique in Winthrop, or head on up to Sun Mountain Lodge for special treatment in the spa. Looking for indoor exercise? Get a day pass at Winthrop Physical Therapy & Fitness and take advantage of a wide range of modern workout equipment in a pleasant environment. This is a good place to meet local folks. Take a vow

Get married. The Methow Valley is a spectacular setting

for nuptials. Check out the Methow Valley News “Valley Vows” publication for complete information on how to make it happen. Look for copies around town for find the digital version on our website, www. methowvalleynews.com. Localize

It’s easy to feel local. We have our hangouts. If you really want to see what we look like, try places like the Hank’s Harvest Foods deli, Mazama Store, Rocking Horse Bakery, Carlton Store, Kind Grinds and Cinnamon Twisp Bakery. There are a lot of other places where we tend to quietly blend in. You can easily do the same. Support real news

Keep up with local goingson with a subscription to the Methow Valley News, delivered to you once a week with fresh stories and tons of useful information. Call 997-7011, email frontdesk@methowvalleynews. com or visit our website, www. methowvalleynews.com. 

BE AMAZED

Inspiring, Memorable, Beautiful A MUST SEE (509) 662-5785 ohmegardens.com 3327 Ohme Rd. Wenatchee, WA season: April 15 - Oct 15

Methow Valley News

 37


Before you hit the trail ...

A guide to recreational passes, fees, permits and licenses Want to get out on

the trail or launch your boat? Although there are many free

trailheads, for many hiking trails, you’ll

need a pass to park. Boat launches also

require a pass. And that means you’ll need a guide to the land agencies behind the scenes so that you get the right pass.

If you hike a lot, it’s worth investing in a Northwest Forest Pass for trails in the National Forest, and a Discover Pass, which provides access to all state parks and wildlife areas. They’ll save you money and you’ll always be ready for that spontaneous outing. While the system is a bit confusing, the passes support trails maintenance and recreational facilities as state and federal budgets are cut. Fortunately, some popular areas are still free (see list below). And, if you arrive on foot, bicycle or horse, you generally don’t need a pass. 

Free trails Photos by Marcy Stamper

 38

Big Valley, between Winthrop and Mazama Goat Peak, Mazama West Fork Methow, Lost River Copper Glance, Chewuch Harts Pass area Summer 2018


Winthrop Barn

Where to buy FEDERAL Annual Northwest Forest Pass is $30; National Forest Recreation Day Pass is $5 Northwest Forest Pass (annual and day passes) In person: Methow Valley Ranger District, 24 W. Chewuch Road, Winthrop, 996-4003 Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Local vendors (annual pass only): Goat’s Beard Mountain Supplies, Mazama, 996-2515 Methow Cycle & Sport, Winthrop, 996-3645 Valley Hardware Do it Center, Twisp, 997-3355 Winthrop Mountain Sports, Winthrop, 996-2886 National Forest Recreation Day Pass (day) In person: at trailheads; requires exact cash or check Local vendors: Mazama Country Inn, Mazama, 996-2681 The Outdoorsman, Winthrop, 996-2649 Online or by phone (annual and day passes): U.S. Forest Service: www.fs.usda. gov/main/r6/passes-permits/ recreation Discover Your Northwest, www. discovernw.org/store or (877) 874-6775 U.S. Geological Survey store at http://store.usgs.gov, (888) 2758747 (plus $10 processing fee) Interagency 4th Grade Pass (annual pass, free) www.everykidinapark.gov STATE Annual Discover Pass is $30; Day Pass is $10 Discover Pass (annual and day passes) Methow Valley News

In person: - Pearrygin Lake State Park, Winthrop - Alta Lake State Park, Pateros (no transaction fees) Local vendors (annual and day passes): Pardners Mini Market, Winthrop, 996-2005 Valley Hardware Do it Center, Twisp, 997-3355 Winthrop Ace Hardware, Winthrop, 996-2150 Yancey’s Pateros Hardware, Pateros, (509) 923-2622 (transaction fees: $5, annual; $1.50, day) Online or by phone: discoverpass.wa.gov or (866) 320-9933 (transaction fees: $5, annual; $1.50, day) When renewing vehicle license tabs (annual pass only): In person at the Washington Department of Licensing By mail with tab-renewal form Online at www.dol.wa.gov (no transaction fees) Pass information and online purchases General info: Washington Trails Association: www.wta.org/go-outside/passes/ passes-and-permit-info Outdoor Recreation Information Center: www.discovernw.org/ ranger-station-rei-seattle.htm, (800) 270-7504 Discover Your Northwest: www. discovernw.org (under “Store,” and then “Recreation Passes”) Federal: U.S. Forest Service: www.fs.usda. gov/okawen/ (follow the link to “Passes & Permits” and then “Recreation Passes & Permits”) State: Discover Pass: discoverpass. wa.gov; frequently asked questions, exemptions, etc.

Auditorium

The Barn, perfect for gatherings big or small Weddings • Parties • Fundraisers • Reunions Performances • Meetings WIFI, Music System & Fully Equipped Professional Kitchen

In Town by Park & River • 509-996-2117 www.winthropbarn.com • info@winthropbarn.com The Merc Playhouse PRESENTS

Bike America By Mike Lew directed by Missi Smith

July 13th - 22nd Thur - Sat 7:00 PM Sun 2:00 PM Tickets $16 - $18 Thurs, July 19th is Pay What You Can Night Bike America is presented by special arrangement with SAMUEL FRENCH, INC.

mercplayhouse.org • 509.997.7529 Show contains adult language and themes

LaFonda Lopez Restaurant

Authentic Mexican Menu

s plu pastas, curries, hamburgers, steaks, salads & desserts

Open for Lunch & Dinner Beer • Wine • Margaritas

11:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. every day • Daily Specials Dine In or Take Out • Patio Seating Available

997-0247 • www.lafondalopez.com 102 Methow Valley Hwy (Across from North Cascades

Bank)

 39


A basic guide to passes: FEDERAL

For U.S. Forest Service land (Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest/Methow Valley Ranger District)

Needed at: • Most trails along the North Cascades Highway, including Blue Lake, Cutthroat Lake/Pass, and Lake Ann/Maple Pass • Lookout Mountain • Twisp River trails • Falls Creek Falls, Chewuch area • Also good at national forests in Oregon Pass options: • Northwest Forest Pass, $30, annual • National Forest Recreation Day Pass, $5, day • National Forest Recreation ePass, $5, day; can be printed at home and validated for the day you’re going to use it.

STATE

The Vehicle Access Pass is free to people who buy hunting and fishing licenses. It provides access to WDFW lands (such as the Methow Wildlife Area), but not other state lands.

Needed at: • Carlton Swimming Hole • Lewis Butte • Patterson Mountain/Patterson Lake • Pearrygin Lake State Park (unless you’re camping there) • Alta Lake State Park (unless you’re camping there) • Leader Lake (Loup Loup Highway) Parking on state land requires a Discover Pass (unless you can park safely on a state or county road). The campsite fee at a state park covers your daytime activities there, but camping on other state lands generally requires a Discover Pass.

Picking the right pass

Washington State Parks, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW Methow Wildlife Area), Department of Natural Resources areas

Pass options: Discover Pass, $30, annual plus $5 service fee if purchased online or at a local vendor. Day Pass, $10, day plus $1.50 service fee if purchased online or at a local vendor

In addition to the main passes — day or annual versions of the Northwest Forest Pass and the Discover Pass — a variety of other passes are available, depending on your interests, age, and how much you use public lands. America the Beautiful 2018: National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Annual Pass, $80. Good at national parks and other federal lands. Interagency Senior Pass: If you’re over 62, you can get a lifetime pass for $80 or an annual pass for $20. Both the America the Beautiful pass and the Senior pass are good at national parks, U.S. Forest Service lands (most trails along the North Cascades Highway), and other natural areas run by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Bureau

of Reclamation, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. They also provide free entrance for your traveling companions and a discount on camping, boat launching and guided tours. A pass providing lifetime entry to all federal lands (the Interagency Access Pass) is available for free to those with a disability and their traveling companions, and to certain volunteers. The Interagency Annual Military Pass is free for active-duty military and traveling companions. The Every Kid in a Park program provides a free pass to all fourth-graders (or those who start fourth grade this fall) and their families. Check out www.everykidinapark.gov. There’s detailed information about the different types of passes, where you need them — and what the agencies use the fees for — on the Washington Trails Association website at www.wta.org/ go-outside/passes, plus a handy guide called “Which Pass Do I Need Q&A.”

W eddings R eunions M eetings B irthdays •

2 Spacious Dining Areas • Large Kitchen • Plenty of Parking • Private Dressing Rooms • Large Doors to Exterior • All Inclusive with Tables, Chairs & Place Settings

M ETHOW V ALLEY ’ S P IPESTONE C ANYON R ANCH (509) 997-9394 facebook.com/Pipestone-Canyon-Ranch pipestonecanyonranch@gmail.com

 40

Summer 2018


TWISP TAM Don’t leave without us CREATIONS

FURNITURE

REPAIR • REFINISH BUILD NEW Artistic, Methow Made recycled wood tables

‘Methow Made’ products will provide a lasting impression of your visit The Methow

Valley is more than a beautiful place to visit and recreate. It’s a working community, full of creative,

energetic people who make their livelihoods growing, creating or

Reasonable pricing

Tamra Jennings 509-997-7799 twisptam@gmail.com

producing things that are entirely portable, enjoyable and durable.

Make your Methow Valley memories tangible by taking home, or ordering online, something from

the attractive array of locally made, manufactured, grown or created goods — including beer, wine, coffee, cider, spring water, grains, meats, fruits and vegetables, jams and jellies, hot sauce, honey, baked goods, cheese, soaps, lotions, arts, crafts, plants, jewelry, knives and more. More than 40 Methow Valley businesses are represented in the Methow Made program sponsored by TwispWorks. For a complete list, visit www.methowmade.com. Many local retailers carry selections of Methow-made products. Don’t miss either the Farmers Market at the Methow Valley Community Center in Twisp, on Saturdays from 9 a.m. – noon; or the Winthrop Market at Mack Lloyd Park (near the Winthrop Barn) from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. on Sundays. For lots of useful information, you may be able to find copies of the 2017 “Made in the Methow”

publication produced by the Methow Valley News. To see a digital version, go to www. methowvalleynews.com, scroll to the bottom of the home page and click on the “Made in the Methow” cover. The 2018 version, which will be called Methow Made, will be available in June at locations throughout the valley. For more information, call TwispWorks at 997-3300.

Shafer Historical Museum & Village A Window into the Past... “THE CASTLE”, a log home standing on its original site, was built in 1896 for Winthrop Founder Guy Waring. • Open air museum with 17 buildings, including authentic homestead structures furnished with period pieces. • World class mining exhibit featuring equipment used in historic local mines, including a Stamp Mill replica. • 1914 Model T and 1924 Rickenbacker Coupe

...where our patio becomes your patio for the summer… 509-996-3906 | Freestoneinn.com 31 Early Winters Drive Mazama, WA Methow Valley News

• Interpretive signs and 4,000 historic photos

Shafer Historical Museum & Village

Beginning Mid-May, open Saturday & Sunday – 10am to 5pm June through September, open 7 days a week – 10am to 5pm 285 Castle Avenue • Winthrop WA

www.shafermuseum.com

 41


Restaurants Bakery Cinnamon T wisp Bakery. 116 N. Glover St., Twisp 997-5030. facebook.com/ CinnamonTwispBakery Mazama Store . 50 Lost River Rd., Mazama. 996-2855. themazamastore.com Oliver ’s Artisan K itchen. 100 Bridge St., Winthrop. 996-2020. oliversartisankitchen.com Rocking Horse Bakery. 265 Riverside Ave., Winthrop. 996-4241. rockinghorsebakery.com

Methow Valley Ciderhouse . 28 Hwy 20, Winthrop. 341-4354. methowvalleyciderhouse.com Mick & Miki ’s Red Cedar Bar. 110 S Glover St., Twisp. 997-6425. facebook.com/ Mick-Mikis-Red-Cedar-Bar Old Schoolhouse B rewery. 155 Riverside Ave., Winthrop. 996-3183. oldschoolhousebrewery.com OSB Taproom. 502 S. Glover St., Twisp. 997-0902. Sixknot Taphouse . 231 Riverside Ave., Winthrop. 996-3862. sixknotcider.com

Bar/Cocktails

Sun Mountain Lodge . 604 Patterson Lake Rd., Winthrop. 9962211. sunmountainlodge.com

BJ’s B randing Iron. 123 N. Glover St., Twisp. 997-0040. facebook.com/TwispBrandingIron

Three Fingered Jack’s. 176 Riverside Ave., Winthrop. 996-2411. 3fingeredjacks.com

B rix Wine Bar. 229 Riverside Ave., Winthrop. 996-3229. Carlos1800. 149 Riverside Ave., Winthrop. 996-2245. facebook.com/ CARLOS1800 Copper Glance . 134A Riverside Ave., Winthrop. copperglancewinthrop.com Duck B rand. 248 Riverside Ave., Winthrop. 996-2408. facebook.com/ DuckBrand Freestone Inn. 31 Early Winters Drive., Mazama. 996-3906. freestoneinn.com

Coffee Shop 3 B ears Café & Quilts. 414 Riverside Ave., Winthrop. 996-8013. 3bearscafe.com B lue Star Coffee Roasters. 3 Twisp Airport Rd., Twisp. 997-2583. bluestarcoffeeroasters.com K ind Grinds. 94 Bridge Street., Winthrop. 996-4563. facebook. com/kindgrinds

Convenience Store Carlton General Store . 2256 Hwy 153, Carlton. 997-9022. facebook.com/ Carlton-General-Store

T wisp Chevron. 126 Methow Valley Hwy, Twisp. 997-3181. Winthrop Store . 228 Riverside Ave., Winthrop. 996-2277.

T wisp Chevron. 126 Methow Valley Hwy, Twisp. 997-3181. Mazama Store . 50 Lost River Rd., Mazama. 996-2855. themazamastore.com Pardner ’s Mini Market. 900 Hwy 20, Winthrop. 996-2005. Winthrop Store . 228 Riverside Ave., Winthrop. 996-2277.

Family Friendly Carlos1800. 149 Riverside Ave., Winthrop. 996-2245. facebook.com/ CARLOS1800 Duck B rand. 248 Riverside Ave., Winthrop. 996-2408. facebook.com/ DuckBrand El Sabor NorteÑo. 108 N. Glover St., Twisp. 997-0760. facebook.com/ elsabornorteno.twisp

Deli

El Valle . 123 N. Glover St., Twisp. 997-1068.

Cinnamon T wisp Bakery. 116 N. Glover St., Twisp. 997-5030. facebook.com/ CinnamonTwispBakery Glover Street Market. 124 N. Glover St., Twisp. 997-1320. gloverstreetmarket.com

East 20 Pizza . 720 Hwy 20, Winthrop. 996-3996. east20pizza.com

Hank’s Harvest Foods. 412 E. Methow Valley Hwy, Twisp. 9977711. hanksharvestfoods.com K ind Grinds. 94 Bridge St., Winthrop. 996-4563. facebook. com/kindgrinds Mazama Store . 50 Lost River Rd., Mazama. 996-2855. themazamastore.com Rocking Horse Bakery. 265 Riverside Ave., Winthrop. 996-4241. rockinghorsebakery.com

Cascadia Music

RV Park & Campground

“On the shoreline of Pearrygin Lake”

• Clean & Remodeled Facilities • Boat Launch & Fishing Docks • Free WiFi & Pet Friendly • Groups Welcome & Discounts • Family Atmosphere with Shade & Grass

509-996-2448 677 Bear Creek Road — Winthrop, WA — www.SilverlineResort.com

 42

Coming Events

Pipestone Music Days May 18, 7:00PM

Methow Valley Community Center featuring the Pipestone Orchestra with soloists Rachael Nesvig Jessica Jasper and Michael Brady

Jazz in the Methow May 25,26,27 The Merc Playhouse with George Schneider , the Methow JazzStars and The Westerlies

Pipestone Summer Music Camp July 30-August 3 www.cascadiamusic.org 509-997-0222 Summer 2018


Hometown Pizza . 202 Methow Valley Hwy, Twisp. 997-2100. Hometownpizza.com Jack’s Hut at Freestone Inn. 31 Early Winters Drive, Mazama. 9963212. freestoneinn.com L aFonda Lopez . 102 Methow Valley Hwy, Twisp. 997-0247. lafondalopez.com Local B lend. 1017 E. Methow Valley Hwy, Twisp. 997-1048. facebook.com/valleygrub1017 Mazama Country Inn. 15 Country Rd., Mazama. 996-2681. mazamacountryinn.com Methow Valley Ciderhouse . 28 Hwy 20, Winthrop. 341-4354. methowvalleyciderhouse.com Old Schoolhouse B rewery. 155 Riverside Ave., Winthrop. 996-3183. oldschoolhousebrewery.com Oliver ’s Artisan K itchen. 100 Bridge St., Winthrop. 996-2020. oliversartisankitchen.com R iverside Grill . 162 Riverside Ave., Winthrop. 996-2444. Sheri ’s Sweet Shoppe . 207 Riverside Ave., Winthrop. 996-3834. sherissweetshoppe. com

Sun Mountain Lodge . 604 Patterson Lake Rd., Winthrop. 9962211. sunmountainlodge.com Tappi. 201 S. Glover St., Twisp. 9973345. tappitwisp.com Three Fingered Jack’s. 176 Riverside Ave., Winthrop. 996-2411. 3fingeredjacks.com

Bring sunshine to your table this summer with Bluebird’s ancient grain salad recipes!

Woodstone Pizzeria at Rolling Huts. 18381 Hwy 20, Winthrop. 996-9804. woodstoneatwesola.com

Fine Dining

For recipes and info: bluebirdgrainfarms.com

Arrowleaf B istro. 207 White Ave., Winthrop. 996-3919. arrowleafbistro.com Freestone Inn. 31 Early Winters Drive, Mazama. 996-3906. freestoneinn.com Sun Mountain Lodge . 604 Patterson Lake Rd., Winthrop. 9962211. sunmountainlodge.com

Food truck Fork at T wispWorks. 502 S. Glover St. 449-2089. facebook.com/ forktwisp/

small plates B rix Wine Bar. 229 Riverside Ave., Winthrop. 996-3229. Copper Glance . 134A Riverside Ave., Winthrop. copperglancewinthrop.com

SHARE

A LITTLE BIT OF EVERYTHING GOOD.

Sixknot Taphouse . 231 Riverside Ave., Winthrop. 996-3862. sixknotcider.com

Methow Grown A directory of farm-grown products from the Methow Valley

www.methowgrown.org Methow Valley News

A project of the Methow Conservancy’s Agricultural Program

Methow Conservancy

50 LOST RIVER ROAD • OPEN DAILY 7AM–6PM • 509.996.2855

THEMAZAMASTORE.COM

 43


Visitor Info NEED Lodging?

Central Reservations: 996‑2148 or (800) 422‑3048; www. centralreservations.net; info@ centralreservations.net

INFO CENTERS

T wisp: 997‑2926; 201 Methow Valley Highway (Methow Valley Community Center) Winthrop: 996‑2125 or (888) 463‑8469; 202 Riverside Ave.

CAR WASH

Cascade K ing’s: 1421 Methow Valley Hwy S. Twisp; 997‑2513; www. kingstire.biz

NEED A TOW?

Classic Towing, T wisp: 997‑2333 Winthrop Motors: 996‑2277

NEED TO CHARGE AN ELECTRIC VEHICLE?

Pine Near RV Park: 316 Castle Ave., Winthrop; (509) 341‑4062, www.pinenearpark.com Mazama Country Inn: 15 Country Road, Mazama; 996‑2681; www.mazamacountryinn.com Sun Mountain Lodge , Winthrop: 996‑2211; www. sunmountainlodge.com T wispworks: 502 S. Glover St., Twisp; 997-3300; twispworks.org

CAB AND SHUTTLE

Classic Mountain Cabby: 996‑2894; classicmountaincabby@ gmail.com

Methow Valley State Airport: Twisp-Winthrop Eastside Road; (360) 618‑2477

PET PROBLEMS?

OPEN LATE

Hank’s Mini Market: 410 E. Methow Valley Highway, Twisp; 997‑4332; until 10 p.m. every day; 24-hour fueling Mazama Store: 50 Lost River Road, Mazama; 996‑2855; 24-hour fueling Pardners Mini Market: 900 Highway 20, Winthrop; 996‑2005; until midnight every day; 24-hour fueling T wisp Chevron: 126 N. Methow Valley Highway; 997‑3181; until 10 p.m. weekdays and Sunday, 11 p.m. on Friday and Saturday; 24-hour fueling

POLICE/EMERGENCY

Emergency: 911 T wisp Police Department: 997‑6112; 118 S. Glover St.; townoftwisp.com/index.php/ departments/police-department/ Winthrop Marshal’s Office: 996‑2160; 206 Riverside Ave.; www. winthropmarshals.com Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Office: (509) 422‑7232; www. okanogansheriff.org Washington State Patrol: (509) 422‑3800 Okanogan County Fire District 6: 997‑2981 Aero Methow Rescue Service: 997‑4013; www.aeromethow.org

AIRPORTS

T wisp Municipal Airport: 40 Wagner Road, Twisp; 997‑2311.

Methow Valley Veterinary Hospital: 910 Highway 20, Winthrop; 996‑3231 NATURAL ANIMAL WELLNESS: 214 S. Glover St., Twisp; 997-9000 Valley Veterinary Clinic: 20335 Highway 20, Twisp; 997‑8452 Winthrop Veterinary Services: 19100 Highway 20; 996‑2793

HIGHWAY INFO

Washington State Department of Transportation: Dial 511 for pass and road information; www. wsdot.wa.gov

CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE

T wisp: 997‑2020; www.twispinfo. com Winthrop: 996‑2125; www. winthropwashington.com Omak: (509) 826‑1880 or (800) 225‑6625; www.omakchamber.com Okanogan: (509) 422‑4034; www. okanogachamber.com B rewster: (509) 689‑3464; www. brewsterchamber.org Pateros: (509) 923‑9636; www. pateros.com

BANKS

Farmers State Bank: 159 Riverside Ave., Winthrop; 996‑2244; www.farmersstatebankwa.com North Cascades Bank: 101 Methow Valley Highway N., Twisp; 997‑2411; www.northcascadesbank. com

NEED TO CLEAN UP?

L aundromat, showers and free Wi -Fi at Washworks: 325 E. Highway 20, Twisp; 997‑0336; www. hwy20washworks.com

RECREATION INFO

U.S. Forest Service: 996‑4000; 24 West Chewuch Rd., Winthrop Methow Trails: 996‑2387; 309 Riverside Ave., Winthrop; www.methowtrails.com; info@ methowtrails.com Winthrop R ink: 996‑4199, www. winthropicerink.com Wagner Memorial Pool , T wisp: 997‑5441 Pearrygin L ake State Park , Winthrop: 996‑2370; www.parks. wa.gov/563/Pearrygin-Lake Cascade Loop Scenic Highway: www.cascadeloop.com North Cascades National Park: Newhalem visitor center, (206) 386‑4495 ext.11; www.nps. gov/noca/index.htm Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife: (360) 902‑2200; www.wdfw.wa.gov

POST OFFICES

Carlton: 997‑6091; 2274 Highway 153 Methow: (509) 923‑2759; 34 Main St. T wisp: 997‑3777; 205 Glover St. Winthrop: 996‑2282; 1110 Highway 20

LIBRARIES

T wisp: 997‑4681; 201 Methow Valley Highway (Methow Valley Community Center); wireless hot spot

HOMETOWN PIZZA

The Valley’s Choice for Affordable Family Dining

Dine in • Take OuT Take’n Bake

• Stone Baked Pizzas Made From Scratch • Gluten-Free Crusts Available • Banquet Room

• • • •

Calzones Sub Sandwiches Fresh Salads Beer & Wine

509-997-2100

202 N. Methow Valley Hwy, Twisp, WA

 44

Since 1992

aspengrovehome.com | 156 Riverside Ave. | (509) 996-2009 Summer 2018


Winthrop: 996‑2685; 49 Highway 20; wireless hot spot

RECYCLING

Methow Recycles: 997‑0520; 12 Twisp Airport Road; www. methowrecycles.org

GOVERNMENT

City of Pateros: (509) 923‑2571; www.pateros.com Town of T wisp: 997‑4081; 118 S. Glover St.; www.townoftwisp.com Town of Winthrop: 996‑2320, 206 Riverside Ave., www. townofwinthrop.com

HEALTH CARE

Three R ivers Hospital , B rewster: (509) 689‑2086; www. threerivershospital.net Mid -Valley Hospital , Omak: (509) 826‑1760; www.mvhealth.org Confluence Health Methow Valley Clinic, Winthrop: 996‑8180

Family Health Centers Medical Clinic, T wisp: 997‑2011 B rewster Clinic: (509) 826‑1800 Steven C. Harrop DDS, Winthrop: 996‑2164 Sawtooth Dental Care , T wisp: 997‑7533 Family Health Centers Dental Clinic, T wisp: 997‑0922 Ulrich’s Pharmacy, T wisp: 997‑2191

Local MEDIA

Methow Valley News: 997‑7011; 502 S. Glover St., Twisp; www. methowvalleynews.com; frontdesk@ methowvalleynews.com www.methownet.com www.methow.com KTRT, 97.5 FM KCSY, 106.3FM KOZI, 93.5FM KTWP (public radio), 91.1FM KOMW, 95.1 All 996 and 997 prefixes are in the 509 area code.

Rolling Huts & Methow Tents The Ultimate Camping Experience Whether you’re a hiker, mountain biker or cross-country skier, the Rolling Huts, located in Washington’s Methow Valley, are the perfect accommodation. Designed as a modern alternative to camping by Tom Kundig of Olson Kundig Architects.

Comfortable Safari-Style Canvas Tents

Only 300 feet from the pristine Methow River, and at the edge of the forest, a group of safari-style canvas tents are waiting for you and your friends. Explore the surrounding wilderness and enjoy the myriad of options, outdoor www.rollinghuts.com and indoor, that this unique www.methowtents.com valley has to offer.

Book Now!

or Call (509) 996-4442 Methow Valley News

MAZAMA RANCH HOUSE

  

ExpEriEncE MazaMa in thE suMMEr EXPERIENCE MAZAMA

Beautiful Mountain Setting

IN THE Peace and Quiet Biking, Hiking and Horseback Trails

Rooms with kitchenettes Cabins with full kitchens Bright Stars at Night Beautiful Wedding Venue

SUMMER   

Rooms with Beautiful Mountain 509.996.2040 Setting w w w . m a z a m a r a n c kitchenettes hhouse.com Peace and Quiet Biking, Hiking and Horseback Trails

Cabins with full kitchens Bright Stars at Night

509.996.2040

Rolling Huts

18381 Hwy 20 Winthrop, WA 98862 ALL YOU CAN 509.996.9804 Open - Monday w w w . m a z a m a r a n c h hThursday ouse .com 8AM - 9:30PM

EAT EAT

MONDAY 5PM - 7PM

WOODSTONEATWESOLA.COM

 45


Calendar

MUSIC: Check the weekly What’s Happening calendar in the Methow Valley News for entertainment listings at: • Old Schoolhouse Brewery, Winthrop, and Old Schoolhouse Brewery Taproom, Twisp, 996-3183 • Twisp River Suites, Twisp, 997-0100 • Sixknot Taphouse, Winthrop, 996-3862 • Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop, 342-4354

MAY

1  NATURE WALK/BIRDS: Join Mary Kiesau of the Methow Conservancy for a casual tour of the Methow Valley’s natural world, at locations to be announced. Free; space is limited. Registration required at 996-2870 or mary@methowconservancy.org. 8-10am

1  PURPLE MARTINS: Methow Conservancy “First Tuesday” program on purple martins with Julie Hovis, at Winthrop Barn. Free. 996-2870. 7pm

3—6  THEATER: Tom Zbyszewski Children’s Theater presents “The Adventures of Rikki Tikki Tavi” at The Merc Playhouse, Twisp. $5-$18; pay what you can on Thursday. 9977529. 7pm Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 2pm Sunday 3  FIX YOUR GEAR NIGHT: Get your

outdoor gear repaired for free at eqpd on the TwispWorks campus. 997-2010. 4-7pm

4  NATURE DRAWING/SPRING

FLOWERS: Perri Howard of Velocity Made Good Studios and Mary Kiesau of the Methow Conservancy host nature drawing series at TwispWorks. $65. mary@ methowconservancy.org to register. 12:30-5pm

5  MEDICINAL AND EDIBLE PLANTS

TOUR: With Rosalee and Xavier de la Foret at Methow Valley Interpretive Center, TwispWorks. By donation. 557-3660 or rosalee@herbalremediesadvice.org to register. 11am-noon

7  PICKLEBALL: Try pickleball for free at

Winthrop Rink, ages 10 and older. 996-4199. 5-7pm

9  NATURE WALK/BIRDS: Join Mary Kiesau of the Methow Conservancy for a casual tour of the Methow Valley’s natural world, at locations to be announced. Free; space is limited. Registration required at 996-2870 or mary@methowconservancy.org. 8-10am

11—13  WINTHROP ’49ER DAYS: Parade, demonstrations and displays, games and more, in downtown Winthrop and Mack Lloyd Park. Free. info@winthropwashington.com 11–13  RENDEZVOUS FESTIVAL: Celebrate recreation and the arts in the Methow Valley, with 14 bands and more, at Sun Mountain. $60-$120. therendezvousfest.com

19  MUSIC: Singer/songwriter Rylei Franks at Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 341-4354. 7pm

24  NATURE WALK/FLOWERS: Join Mary

Kiesau of the Methow Conservancy for a casual tour of the Methow Valley’s natural world, at locations to be announced. Free; space is limited. Registration required at 996-2870 or mary@methowconservancy.org. 5-7pm

25—27  JAZZ WEEKEND: Presented by

Cascadia Music, with George Schneider’s Methow JazzStars on Friday, 7pm, The Merc Playhouse, Twisp; improv workshops with the Westerlies at MV Community Center, Twisp on Saturday, 3pm; Westerlies in concert Sunday at The Merc Playhouse, Twisp, 3pm. $5-$15 for concerts. cascadiamusic4u@ gmail.com; cascadiamusic.org

26—27  METHOW VALLEY RODEO:

Adventures in Wonderland, presented by the Aerie Circus School at MV Community Center, Twisp. $10. 6pm

12  METHOW VALLEY FARMERS MARKET: At Methow Valley Community Center, Twisp. Free. www.methowvalleyfarmersmarket.com. 9am-noon

Memorial Day weekend at the rodeo grounds on Twin Lakes Road. $10. info@ winthropwashington.com. 1pm each day

26  METHOW VALLEY FARMERS

MARKET: At Methow Valley Community Center, Twisp. Free. www. methowvalleyfarmersmarket.com. 9am-noon

12  ART AT TWISPWORKS: Open studios

26  ART AT TWISPWORKS: Open studios

12  COUNTRY ROCK: Dakota Poorman at

26  BIG SHAABANG: Celebrate the kickoff

and classes. Free. 997-3300. 11am-3pm

4  MUSIC: DJ Jeremiah with Bullfrog at

12  BARN DANCE: Dance to The Last

Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 341-4354. 9pm

Outlaws at Winthrop ’49er Days second night, at Winthrop Barn. $7. 996-2117. 830pm

5  METHOW VALLEY FARMERS MARKET: At Methow Valley Community Center, Twisp. Free. www.methowvalleyfarmersmarket.com. 9am-noon

14  NATURE WALK/FLOWERS: Join Mary

Kiesau of the Methow Conservancy for a casual tour of the Methow Valley’s natural world, at locations to be announced. Free; space is limited. Registration required at 996-2870 or mary@methowconservancy.org. 5-7pm

5  SUNFLOWER MARATHON, HALFMARATHON, RELAY: Choose your race starting from Mazama. $85. 996-3287. 8am

18—20  PIPESTONE MUSIC DAYS: Pipestone Orchestra presents the Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 2 with local pianist Michael Brady, and Mozart’s Sinfonie Concertante with Rachel Nesvig, violin, and Jessica Jasper, viola, on Friday at MV Community Center, Twisp; plus various performances by Pipestone Music students around the valley on Saturday and Sunday. $15; students free. 997-0222. 7pm

5  MUSIC: Celebrate Cinco de Mayo at Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 341-4354. 7pm

19—20  PICKLEBALL TOURNAMENT: “Dink at the Rink” pickleball tournament at Winthrop Rink. $30. 996-4199. 8am each day

46

and classes. Free. 997-3300. 11am-3pm

11  AERIE CIRCUS SCHOOL: Alice’s Aerial

Inn, Mazama. Free. 996-3906. 6:30pm

19  ART AT TWISPWORKS: Open studios

Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 3414354. 7pm

11  OPEN MIC: With Ken Bevis at Methow

Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 341-4354. 7pm

5  TRASHION SHOW: Confluence Gallery’s eighth annual Trashion Show features haute couture from recycled materials, at Methow Valley Community Center, Twisp. $20-$45. 997‑2787; mail@confluencegallery. com; www.brownpapertickets.com/ event/332‑3219. 7-10pm

At Methow Valley Community Center, Twisp. Free. www.methowvalleyfarmersmarket.com. 9am-noon

25  NATURE DRAWING/SONG BIRDS: Perri Howard of Velocity Made Good Studios and Mary Kiesau of the Methow Conservancy host nature drawing series at TwispWorks. $65. mary@ methowconservancy.org to register. 12:30-5pm

4  JAZZ: Westendorf Jazz Trio at Freestone

5  ART AT TWISPWORKS: Open studios and classes. Free. 997-3300. 11am-3pm

19  METHOW VALLEY FARMERS MARKET:

and classes. Free. 997-3300. 11am-3pm

of summer with music, art, food and drink at TwispWorks campus. Free. 997-3300. Noon-3pm

29  NATURE WALK/BIRDS: Join Mary

Kiesau of the Methow Conservancy for a casual tour of the Methow Valley’s natural world, at locations to be announced. Free; space is limited. Register at 996-2870 or mary@methowconservancy.org. 7-9am

31– June 3  NATURALISTS’ RETREAT: Methow Conservancy spring naturalists’ retreat with Libby Mills and Dana Visalli. $200. 996-2870 or mary@ methowconservancy.org

June

1  FOLK ROCK: Danbert Nobacon and

the Axis of Dissent at Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 341-4354. 7pm

2  METHOW VALLEY FARMERS MARKET:

At Methow Valley Community Center, Twisp. Free. www.methowvalleyfarmersmarket.com. 9am-noon

2  ART AT TWISPWORKS: Open studios and classes. Free. 997-3300. 11am-3pm 2  KNIFE SHARPENING: Methow Skills knife sharpening class with Bob Kramer at Education Station, TwispWorks. $100. 9973300 to register. 1-5pm 2  DANCE ROCK: Jim Basnight Band at Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 341-4354. 7pm 3  WINTHROP MARKET: Local arts and

crafts, food, vintage items and more at Mack Lloyd Park, Winthrop. Free. 10am-2pm

5  NORTH CASCADES NATIONAL PARK:

Methow Conservancy’s “First Tuesday” program on North Cascades National Park with speaker Lauren Danner at Winthrop Barn. Free. 996-2870. 7pm

5  PICKLEBALL: Try pickleball for free at Winthrop Rink, ages 10 and older. 996-4199. 5-7pm 7  FIX YOUR GEAR NIGHT: Get your

outdoor gear repaired for free at eqpd on the TwispWorks campus. 997-2010. 4-7pm

9  METHOW VALLEY FARMERS MARKET:

26  CLASSIC ROCK: Gregg Hardy at

At Methow Valley Community Center, Twisp. Free. www.methowvalleyfarmersmarket.com. 9am-noon

26—June 30  EXHIBIT: “Snk’lip Nc’aps:

9  ART AT TWISPWORKS: Open studios and classes. Free. 997-3300. 11am-3pm

Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 341-4354. 7pm

Coyote Winked,” native art from the indigenous plateau at Confluence Gallery, Twisp, curated by Roberta Haines of the Colville Confederated Tribes. Free. 997-2787. Opening night reception, 4-8pm

26—June 30  EXHIBIT: “Inflorescence” exhibit by Kalindi Kunis at Confluence Gallery, Twisp. Free. 997-2787. Opening night reception, 4-8pm 27  ORIGINAL ROCK: Whiskey Fever at Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 341-4354. 7pm 27  ABOUT BEES: Learn about bees at Methow Valley Interpretive Center’s “Last Sunday” program on TwispWorks campus. By donation. 997-0620. 5-7pm

9  EXHIBIT OPENING: Winthrop Gallery opening reception for “Home & Garden,” a show of artwork from cooperative gallery members; show runs through July 23. Free. 996-3925. 11am-3pm. 10  WINTHROP MARKET: Local arts and

crafts, food, vintage items and more at Mack Lloyd Park, Winthrop. Free. 10am-2pm

15—16  BUTTERFLIES AND MOTHS: Butterflies and moths of the Methow Valley presented by Methow Conservancy. $5 for Friday evening session; $25 for Saturday field class. 996-2870 or mary@ methowconservancy.org to register. 6-8pm Friday, 9am-4pm Saturday 15  MUSIC: Local rock at Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 341-4354. 7pm Summer 2018


15  ART PRESENTATION: “Indigenous Columbia Plateau Art: Historical and Contemporary Contexts,” with Dr. Laurie Arnold of Gonzaga University, at Confluence Gallery, Twisp. Free. 997-2787. 7pm

22  KNIGHTS OF VERITAS: Authentic

knights in full armor demonstrate medieval weaponry and combat at Winthrop library. Free. 996-2685. 3:30pm

28  STREAM EXPLORATION: With the Okanogan Conservation District, using a hands-on stream simulation table, at Winthrop library. Free. 996-2585. 2pm

16  METHOW VALLEY FARMERS MARKET: At Methow Valley Community Center, Twisp. Free. www.methowvalleyfarmersmarket.com. 9am-noon

23  METHOW VALLEY FARMERS

MARKET: At Methow Valley Community Center, Twisp. Free. www. methowvalleyfarmersmarket.com. 9am-noon

29  DANCE ROCK: Union River Band at

23  ART AT TWISPWORKS: Open studios

30  METHOW VALLEY FARMERS MARKET: At Methow Valley Community Center, Twisp. Free. www. methowvalleyfarmersmarket.com. 9am-noon

13  MUSIC: Singer/songwriter Erika Lundahl at Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 341-4354. 7pm

30  ART AT TWISPWORKS: Open studios and classes. Free. 997-3300. 11am-3pm

14—15  WILDLIFE TRACKING: Wildlife

16  ART AT TWISPWORKS: Open studios and classes. Free. 997-3300. 11am-3pm

17  WINTHROP MARKET: Local arts and

crafts, food, vintage items and more at Mack Lloyd Park, Winthrop. Free. 10am-2pm

18  BUSHWICK NORTHWEST VARIETY

SHOW: Enjoy songs based on the stories and characters from your favorite books at Winthrop library. Free. 996-2685. 3pm

and classes. Free. 997-3300. 11am-3pm

23  FOLK ROCK: Rivertown Ramblers at Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 341-4354. 7pm 24  WINTHROP MARKET: Local arts and

crafts, food, vintage items and more at Mack Lloyd Park, Winthrop. Free. 10am-2pm

cultural Stories with Deb McVay, a mix of Spanish, English and sign language, at Twisp library. Free. 997-4681. 1pm

24  METHOW ARTIFACTS: Presentation of “Ancient Artifacts Tell the Story of the People,” with Rich Davis and Aaron Nauman at MV Interpretive Center, TwispWorks. By donation. 997-0620. 5-7pm.

22—23  NEW OLD TIME CHAUTAQUA:

25—29  CHIILDREN’S CAMP: “Listening to

21  MULTICULTURAL STORIES: Multi-

A traveling troupe visits for performances and workshops: Friday potluck at Pearrygin Lake State Park; parade in Twisp on Saturday at noon; workshops at TwispWorks on Saturday from 1-4pm; main stage show at MV Community Center, Twisp, on Saturday at 7pm. Free except for stage show. chautauquatwisp.com.

22  JAZZ: Westendorf Jazz Trio at Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 3414354. 7pm

Nature” children’s camp for ages 5-8 at MV Interpretive Center, Twisp. By donation. 9974904. 9am-noon daily

27  FREE ROLLER SKATING: Kids 17 and

younger skate free day at Winthrop Rink. 996-4199. 4-8pm

28  BOOK IT THEATER: Watch a favorite

kid’s book acted out: “Inside Out and Back Again” by Thanhha Lai, at Twisp library. Free. 997-4681. 4pm

Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 341-4354. 7pm

30  GYPSY ROCK: Gin Gypsy at Methow

Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 3414354. 7pm

July

14  ROCK: Bosco Brothers at Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 341-4354. 7pm

Winthrop Rink, ages 10 and older. 996-4199. 6-8pm

4  METHOW ARTS FESTIVAL: Music, bikeinspired art projects, food, games, contests and more at Twisp Town Park, after the Fourth of July parade on Glover Street. Free$10. 997-4004. 11:30am-3:30pm

14  SKATE-A-PALOOZA: Roller skating party for ages 13-18 at Winthrop Rink. $5. 996-4199. 9-11pm 15  WINTHROP MARKET: Local arts and

crafts, food, vintage items and more at Mack Lloyd Park, Winthrop. Free. 10am-2pm

4  ROCK: Danville Band at Methow Valley

17  PUPPET SHOW: Puppet show at Twisp library. Free. 997-4681. 11am

5  FIX YOUR GEAR NIGHT: Get your

17  PUPPET SHOW: Puppet show at Winthrop library. Free. 996-2685. 2pm

Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 341-4354. 7pm

6  PUPPET SHOW: Puppet show at Winthrop library. Free. 996-2685. 2pm 7—Aug. 11  EXHIBIT: “Birds and Bees” at

Confluence Gallery, Twisp. Free. 997-2787. Opening night reception, 4-8pm

7—Aug. 11  EXHIBIT: “Shrivelight,” solo

exhibit by Mary Apffel, at Confluence gallery, Twisp. Free. 997-2787. Opening night reception, 4-8pm

7  METHOW VALLEY FARMERS MARKET:

At Methow Valley Community Center, Twisp. Free. www.methowvalleyfarmersmarket.com. 9am-noon

7  ART AT TWISPWORKS: Open studios and classes. Free. 997-3300. 11am-3pm

7  FOLK ROCK: Sarah St. John and Friends at Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 341-4354. 7pm

8  WINTHROP MARKET: Local arts and

crafts, food, vintage items and more at Mack Lloyd Park, Winthrop. Free. 10am-2pm

Methow Valley News

14  METHOW VALLEY FARMERS MARKET: At Methow Valley Community Center, Twisp. Free. www.methowvalleyfarmersmarket.com. 9am-noon

2  PICKLEBALL: Try pickleball for free at

science of sound at Twisp library. Free. 9974681. 2pm

509-996-3212 | Freestone Inn.com 31 Early Winters Drive, Mazama,WA

track and sign certification class with David Moskowitz. $200. 996-2870 or mary@ methowconservancy.org. 8am-4pm

14  ART AT TWISPWORKS: Open studios and classes. Free. 997-3300. 11am-3pm

crafts, food, vintage items and more at Mack Lloyd Park, Winthrop. Free. 10am-2pm

6  SCIENCE OF SOUND: Explore the

Pizza & Brews

13—22  THEATER: “Bike America,” by Michael Lew, at The Merc Playhouse, Twisp. $16-$18. 997-7529; www.mercplayhouse.org. Thursday through Saturday, 7pm, Sunday 2pm

1  WINTHROP MARKET: Local arts and

outdoor gear repaired for free at eqpd on the TwispWorks campus. 997-2010. 4-7pm

Jack’s Hut

10  SCIENCE SHOW: Science show with Super Science Bob from the Chelan County PUD, at Twisp library. Free. 997-4681. 11am

10  ELECTRIC EXPERIMENTS: Hands-on

activities with electricity wizard Bob Bauer from the Chelan County PUD, at Winthrop library. Free. 996-2685. 2pm

19  SOULFUL BLUES: Lady A at Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 3414354. 7pm

19  TEEN KARAOKE PARTY: Rock out at Winthrop library. Free. 996-2685. 4pm 20  FOLK ROCK: Rivertown Ramblers at

Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 341-4354. 7pm

20—22  WINTHROP RHYTHM AND BLUES

FESTIVAL: Three days of great music by nationally and internationally renowned artists at The Blue Ranch, Winthrop. $110$120. www.winthropbluesfestival.org.

21  METHOW VALLEY FARMERS MARKET: At Methow Valley Community Center, Twisp. Free. www.methowvalleyfarmersmarket.com. 9am-noon

21  ART AT TWISPWORKS: Open studios and classes. Free. 997-3300. 11am-3pm 21  FOLK: The Winterlings at Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 341-4354. 7pm

22  WINTHROP MARKET: Local arts and

crafts, food, vintage items and more at Mack Lloyd Park, Winthrop. Free. 10am-2pm

25  FREE ROLLER SKATING: Kids 17 and younger skate free day at Winthrop Rink. 996-4199. 4-8pm

25  SNAKES AT THE LIBRARY:

“Rattlesnakes and a Rubber Boa” with U.S. Forest Service expert John Rohrer at Winthrop library. Free. 996-2685. 2pm

 47


25  PUPPET SHOW: Puppet show at Twisp library. Free. 997-4681. 11am 26—Aug. 4  METHOW VALLEY CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL: Chamber music concerts at Signal Hill Ranch, Highway 20 between Twisp and Winthrop. $30. www. methowmusicfestival.org for schedule and tickets. 6pm 27  ROADHOUSE ROCK: Jawknee Lawhore

and the Outhouse Gang at Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 341-4354. 7pm

27  MUSIC AND MORE: Eric Ode,

children’s author, poet and award-winning songwriter, presents “Any Way You Rock It” at Winthrop library. Free. 996-2685. 4pm

28—29  WOODBLOCK PRINTING

WORKSHOP: Learn wood carving techniques with Janet Fagan at VMG studios, Twisp. $150. 997-2787.

28  METHOW VALLEY FARMERS

MARKET: At Methow Valley Community Center, Twisp. Free. www. methowvalleyfarmersmarket.com. 9am-noon

28  ART AT TWISPWORKS: Open studios and classes. Free. 997-3300. 11am-3pm

28  HARD ROCK: Elephant Gun Riot at Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 341-4354. 7pm 28  EXHIBIT OPENING: Winthrop Gallery

opening reception for “Sustenance,” a show of artwork from cooperative gallery members; show runs through Sept. 17. Free. 996-3925. 11am-3pm

29  WINTHROP MARKET: Local arts and

crafts, food, vintage items and more at Mack Lloyd Park, Winthrop. Free. 10am-2pm

29  FIRST PEOPLES’ SKILLS

DEMONSTRATIONS: Learn about First Peoples’ skills at MV Interpretive Center, Twisp. By donation. 997-0620. 5-7pm

30—AUG. 3  PIPESTONE MUSIC CAMP: Intensive music camp for string, guitar and piano, ages 8 to adult, at MV Community Center, Twisp; free concert on Friday at 4 p.m. $250 partial day; $350 full day. 997-0222 or cascadiamusic4u@gmail.com. 9:30am-5pm

AUGUST

1  STORYMAKERS: Storytelling workshop

3  MUSIC: Local rock at Methow Valley

4  METHOW VALLEY FARMERS MARKET:

7  DRAGONFLIES AND DAMSELFLIES: Methow Conservancy’s “First Tuesday” program on dragonflies and damselflies with speaker Jim Walker, at location to be announced. Free. 996-2870; mary@ methowconservancy.org. 7pm

4  ART AT TWISPWORKS: Open studios

9  SCIENCE OF SOUND: See sound as well as hear it, at Winthrop library. Free. 9962685. 3pm

Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 341-4354. 7pm At Methow Valley Community Center, Twisp. Free. www.methowvalleyfarmersmarket.com. 9am-noon

and classes. Free. 997-3300. 11am-3pm

4  MUSIC: Larry Murante at Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 341-4354. 7pm 4  METHOW VALLEY HOME TOUR:

“Building in the Land of Sun and Snow” is the theme of this year’s home tour, sponsored by Confluence Gallery, Twisp, featuring a variety of homes around the valley. $25. 997-2787; www. brownpapertickets.com/event/3323228. 10am-4pm

focused on creating you own story, with author Dan Gemeinhart at Twisp library. Free. 997-4681. Noon

5  WINTHROP MARKET: Local arts and

1  BILINGUAL AT THE LIBRARY: Ainer

6—11  SUMMER MUSICAL THEATER CAMP

Spicer, bilingual librarian, presents “Rocker Birds,” a hands-on program in English and Spanish at Winthrop library. Free. 996-2685. 2pm

2  FIX YOUR GEAR NIGHT: Get your

outdoor gear repaired for free at eqpd on the TwispWorks campus. 997-2010. 4-7pm

2  BURKE MUSEUM AT TWISP: Seattle’s Burke Museum brings us a “mini-museum” of natural history and culture to Twisp library. Free. 997-4681. 4:30-6pm

Fresh & Organic Ingredients

crafts, food, vintage items and more at Mack Lloyd Park, Winthrop. Free. 10am-2pm FOR KIDS: “The Lion King” at The Merc Playhouse, Twisp, for ages 8 and up. $200$250. 997-7529; www.mercplayhouse.org. 9am-4pm; free public performances Aug. 10 and Aug. 11

6  PICKLEBALL: Try pickleball for free at

Winthrop Rink, ages 10 and older. 996-4199. 6-8pm

10  EXPLORING STREAMS: Explore and

learn about streams with the Okanogan Conservation District at Twisp library. Free. 997-4681. 11am

11  METHOW VALLEY FARMERS MARKET:

At Methow Valley Community Center, Twisp. Free. www.methowvalleyfarmersmarket.com. 9am-noon

11  ART AT TWISPWORKS: Open studios and classes. Free. 997-3300. 11am-3pm

11  ROCK: Michelle and the Love Dealers at Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 341-4354. 7pm

12  WINTHROP MARKET: Local arts and

crafts, food, vintage items and more at Mack Lloyd Park, Winthrop. Free. 10am-2pm

15  PUPPET SHOW: Puppet show at Winthrop library. Free. 996-2685. 2pm 15  PUPPET SHOW: Puppet show at Twisp library. Free. 997-4681. 11am 17  JAZZ: Westendorf Jazz Trio at Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 3414354. 7pm

ON tHe sunnY side of the North CAscAdes...

Cold Brew • Salads Pastries • Sandwiches Wraps • Iced Coffee Smoothies (509) 996-4563 • kindgrindscoffee.com • 94 Bridge St. Winthrop, WA

Methow Valley’s only heated yoga studio

Offering a variety of yoga classes, dance and workshops.

music

Camping

Trail running mountain biking Paddling rock climbing hiking Located - 115 S Hwy 20 TWISP Full schedule at Agniyogastudio.com

 48

may 11, 12 & 13 2018

www.therendezvousfest.com Summer 2018


18—SEPT. 22  EXHIBIT: “Reflections on Water” at Confluence Gallery, Twisp. Free. 997-2787. Opening night reception, 4-8pm

25  CUTTHROAT CLASSIC TRAIL RUN: 10.6-mile trail run at altitude over Cutthroat Pass. $75. 996-3287

2  WINTHROP MARKET: Local arts and

10  PICKLEBALL: Try pickleball for free at

18—SEPT. 22  EXHIBIT: Paintings and drawings by Michael Caldwell at Confluence Gallery, Twisp. Free. 997-2787. Opening night reception, 4-8pm

26  WINTHROP MARKET: Local arts and

2  DINNER AT TWISPWORKS: Dinner at the TwispWorks campus. $50. 997-3300. 5-8pm

18  METHOW VALLEY FARMERS MARKET:

29  FREE ROLLER SKATING: Kids 17 and younger skate free day at Winthrop Rink. 996-4199. 4-8pm

2  DANCE ROCK: Full Upload at Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 3414354. 7pm

15  METHOW VALLEY FARMERS MARKET: At Methow Valley Community Center, Twisp. Free. www.methowvalleyfarmersmarket.com. 9am-noon

29  SUMMER READING PROGRAM

6  FIX YOUR GEAR NIGHT: Get your

18  ART AT TWISPWORKS: Open studios and classes. Free. 997-3300. 11am-3pm

PARTY: Twisp Library’s summer reading program final party with crafts, games, ice cream and prizes. Free. 997-4681. 11am

15  MUSIC: Singer/songwriters The Lark and The Loon at Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 341-4354. 7pm

18  SKATE-A-PALOOZA: Roller skating

31  FOLK ROCK: Rivertown Ramblers at

8—9  PICKLEBALL TOURNAMENT: Pickleball tournament at Winthrop Rink. $30. 996-4199. 8am

22  METHOW VALLEY FARMERS

At Methow Valley Community Center, Twisp. Free. www.methowvalleyfarmersmarket.com. 9am-noon

party for agesd 13-18 at Winthrop Rink. $5. 996-4199. 9-11pm

crafts, food, vintage items and more at Mack Lloyd Park, Winthrop. Free. 10am-2pm

Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 341-4354. 7pm

19  WINTHROP MARKET: Local arts and

crafts, food, vintage items and more at Mack Lloyd Park, Winthrop. Free. 10am-2pm

24  DANCE ROCK: Alki Jones at Methow

SEPTEMBER

1—2  METHOW VALLEY RODEO: Labor

Day weekend at the rodeo grounds on Twin Lakes Road. $10. info@winthropwashington. com. 1pm each day

Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 3414354. 7pm

25  METHOW VALLEY FARMERS

MARKET: At Methow Valley Community Center, Twisp. Free. www. methowvalleyfarmersmarket.com. 9am-noon

25  ART AT TWISPWORKS: Open studios

1  METHOW VALLEY FARMERS MARKET:

At Methow Valley Community Center, Twisp. Free. www.methowvalleyfarmersmarket.com. 9am-noon

1  ART AT TWISPWORKS: Open studios

and classes. Free. 997-3300. 11am-3pm

and classes. Free. 997-3300. 11am-3pm

25  JAZZ: Wayne and Breathe at Methow

1  CLASSIC ROCK: Honey and the Killer

Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 3414354. 7pm

crafts, food, vintage items and more at Mack Lloyd Park, Winthrop. Free. 10am-2pm

15  ART AT TWISPWORKS: Open studios and classes. Free. 997-3300. 11am-3pm

outdoor gear repaired for free at eqpd on the TwispWorks campus. 997-2010. 4-7pm

8  METHOW VALLEY FARMERS MARKET:

At Methow Valley Community Center, Twisp. Free. www.methowvalleyfarmersmarket.com. 9am-noon

8  ART AT TWISPWORKS: Open studios

and classes. Free. 997-3300. 11am-3pm

8  ROCK: Sky Kyss at Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 341-4354. 7pm 8  VINTAGE WHEELS SHOW: 43rd

annual Winthrop Vintage Wheels Show, showcasing automobiles, motorcycles, tractors, travel trailers and bicycles in and around downtown Winthrop. Free. info@ winthropwashington.com. 10am

Winthrop Rink, ages 10 and older. 996-4199. 6-8pm

MARKET: At Methow Valley Community Center, Twisp. Free. www. methowvalleyfarmersmarket.com. 9am-noon

22  ART AT TWISPWORKS: Open studios and classes. Free. 997-3300. 11am-3pm

29  METHOW VALLEY FARMERS

MARKET: At Methow Valley Community Center, Twisp. Free. www. methowvalleyfarmersmarket.com. 9am-noon

29  ART AT TWISPWORKS: Open studios and classes. Free. 997-3300. 11am-3pm

30  TULE MAT WEAVING: Learn about tule mat weaving at MV Interpretive Center, TwispWorks. By donation. 997-0620. 5-7pm

Beez at Methow Valley Ciderhouse, Winthrop. Free. 341-4354. 7pm

to the

Methow Valley News

a resort for all seasons

In county $33/year Out of county $44/year Out of state $55/year

(509) 997-7011

www.methowvalleynews.com Back on the field

Another ‘first day’

Mountain Lions drop home opener to Brewster

MV Community School classes start this week

Methow Valley News

SPORTS Page B1

STORY Page B4

PUBLISHED WEEKLY SINCE 1903

TWISP, WASHINGTON

VOL. 114 NO. 18

WWW.METHOWVALLEYNEWS.COM

SEPTEMBER 7, 2016

Tell our advertisers you saw them here!

$1

MV Citizens Council celebrates 40 years of activism Fight against ski resort launched broader agenda By Ann McCreary

For many Methow Valley residents, the battle fought over a downhill ski resort in Mazama is a distant memory, or was over before they moved here.

But lessons learned during that conflict still guide the Methow Valley Citizens Council (MVCC), created four decades ago to lead the fight against the proposed Early Winters ski area. “Forty years is a long time,” said Maggie Coon, who helped found MVCC in 1976, and has been involved in the organization for 15 of its 40 years, including her current position as chairman of the MVCC board of directors. “MVCC has had significant influ-

ence on the way the Methow Valley has grown and developed over the last 40 years. We’ve helped … instill a culture of advocacy, which is very much alive and well in the Methow Valley today,” Coon said. One of those early environmental advocates was Isabelle Spohn, who learned about plans for a destination ski hill at Sandy Butte soon after moving to Mazama in 1978. Spohn became involved in the new grassroots

group fighting the resort, and remained actively involved for 35 years. “It seemed to me that many people [in the valley] hadn’t seen that kind of [development] happen before, and didn’t understand how quickly something like that could happen,” Spohn said. “It had the possibility of having an enormous impact on the valley. It was so out of scale for the valley,” she said. Even before MVCC was officially incorporated in 1976, some local citi-

zens were raising alarms about rumors that Aspen Ski Corp. was making plans for a destination ski resort called Early Winters that could accommodate as many as 10,000 skiers a day — at a time when the entire population of the valley was only about 3,500 year-round residents. Bev and Jeff Zwar had recently moved to McFarland Creek when they

Washington’s Premier Destination Resort Enjoy stunning panoramic views of the Methow Valley, amazing food and wine, beautiful rooms, fabulous service, soothing spa treatments, and activities for everyone. Plus, experience AAA Four Diamond award-winning fine dining featuring fresh, local, and regional ingredients, and a fabulous wine cellar. Call today for reservations and specials: 800-572-0493

or 509-996-2211

See MVCC, A1

THESE BIG PIGS WENT TO M ARKET Bear Fight scientist discovers evidence of water on Ceres Vital information transmitted by Dawn mission spacecraft By Ann McCreary

Photo by Marcy Stamper

Emily Paul put her pig, Darwin, on a diet to be sure it qualifies for the market auction. A high school junior, Paul said raising pigs for the fair has made a big difference in her college fund. In addition to the pig, she plans to exhibit homemade caramels.

Local 4-H swine raisers look forward to county fair, auction By Marcy Stamper

Cody Wottlin wrapped his shoelaces in duct tape because his pig Schnizel finds them so irresistible. But nibbling on the shoelaces is just for entertainment, said Wottlin, since Schnizel (formally known as Frederick Esquire III) is hardly lacking for nourishment. In fact, this year several of the pigs being raised by the Methow Valley Cascaders 4-H Club are on diets because they’re already nearing the maximum weight to be auctioned at the Okanogan County Fair. (Pigs need to be between 230 and 290 pounds to qualify for the market auction at the fair.) McKenna Ott is dealing with the opposite problem — she’s raising a pig from a late litter and it may not weigh enough for the auction. “You never know till you show up — as soon as you cross the scales,

there’s no turning back,” said Erin White, the 4-H swine leader. Every year there are a few pigs that don’t qualify for the weight class. “Kids are devastated, but the parents are a lot more devastated,” said White. “It’s hard to watch the kid put in all that work.” If a pig is over or underweight, the child can still compete in fitting and showing, but will have to sell the animal privately, which rarely brings as much money as the auction at the fair. “It was a cake-walk with these pigs — you could go right up to them from two months,” said Wottlin, an eighth-grader who speculated that the pigs he and his brother raised this year were so calm because they’d been handled from birth. “They’re pretty goodlooking, too,” he said.

pig at auction for $4 or $5 per pound, and some have scored as much as $7 per pound, earning more than $1,000 to put toward a college fund or a car. The fair guarantees a price of 60 cents per pound, but that doesn’t come close to covering the typical $500 investment in the pig, food and supplies. Emily and Bodie Paul like pigs for their generally equable disposition and the ability to earn money for college. Their older brother raised steers, but steers demand a longer commitment and a bigger investment. They also tend to have less predictable personalities, said Emily, a junior in high school. She remembered one steer that was so gentle that her brother could read a book while lying on its back, but other steers would attack everything in sight, including the fence. 4-H exposes kids to a lot more than raising an animal. “It’s part of life — they learn that even if they feed the animals every day and do everything they’re supposed to do,” sometimes it just doesn’t work out, said

A scientist at the Bear Fight Institute near Winthrop has described the first and only confirmed detection of water-rich material at the surface of Ceres, a dwarf planet in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. Jean-Philippe Combe authored a research article published Friday (Sept. 2) in the journal Science, detailing the discovery of water ice on Ceres. Information leading to Combe’s discovery was transmitted by NASA’s Dawn spacecraft, which is orbiting Ceres. The detection of water ice on Ceres is inherently intriguing, Combe said in an interview last week. “Anything that involves water is very interesting and exciting. Water is an essential substance in the general evolution of any planet, and also for the creation of life, the type of life that we know anyway,” Combe said. “Water in our solar system is potentially related to creation of life. You have to start with detection of H20 to go further,” he said.

That’s not to imply that Ceres provides any indication of supporting life, Combe said. Of interest, though, is the presence of the water ice on the surface of Ceres, Combe said. Planetary scientists have long suspected that the interior of Ceres is composed of large amounts of water or ice, Combe said. “We knew that from the measurements of density of Ceres there has to be some ice in the bulk of Ceres. It is not dense enough to be made entirely of rocks. The obvious component was ice,” he said.

A surprise

Finding the water ice on the surface was surprising, Combe said. The water ice was detected using a Visible and InfraRed Mapping Spectrometer (VIR) carried aboard the Dawn spacecraft, which began orbiting Ceres in March 2015. The VIR measures the sunlight scattered on the surface of Ceres in a range of wavelengths from the near ultraviolet to the near infrared. Data obtained through VIR reveals mineral and molecular composition, and in this case revealed the presence of water. The water ice was observed in a 10-kilometer-wide crater named Oxo. See CERES, A3

 49

Methow Valley News

Friday night light

Learning experience

Methow Valley kids expect to bring some 6,000 pounds of pork to the county fair this year — 22 kids have spent the past six months raising pigs. “Kids tell their friends how fun it was, so lots join,” said White. It is not uncommon for kids to sell a

See FAIR, A3

Photo courtesy of Bear Fight Institute Jean-Philippe Combe of the Bear Fight Institute near Winthrop has identified the presence of water ice on the dwarf planet, Ceres.

At 100, Enid Shaw reflects on a Methow Valley life well-lived By Marcy Stamper

“I don’t know if people are making a fuss, although I have seen more people than in a long time,” said Enid Shaw, just over a week shy of her 100th birthday. “It’s a lot of attention — that’s all I can tell you.” Enid Pauline Gobat was born in Pateros on Sept. 16, 1916, and grew up there,

604 Patterson Lake Road, Winthrop WA 98862 | sunmountainlodge.com

when she was in her early 20s, after studying typing and commercial subjects in Spokane. She married Roy Richard Shaw (known as “Dick”) in 1937. They raised their five children in a rudimentary two-room cottage that had once served as a teacher’s residence at the old Beaver Creek schoolhouse. They used to carry water up from the creek in 10-gallon cream cans. “It was a hill to


Directory of Advertisers Antiques/Collectibles

Poppie Jo Galleria . . . . . . . . 11 Robins Egg Bleu . . . . . . . . . 23 Automotive/Fuel

King’s Pacific Pride & Car Wash 29 Mazama Store . . . . . . . . . 43 Bicycle Dealers/Repair

Methow Cycle & Sport . . . . . . 13 Cafés/Dining/Espresso

Blue Star Coffee Roasters . . . . . 7 Brix Wine Bar . . . . . . . . . . 35 Carlos1800 Mexican Grill & Tequila Bar . . . . . . . . . 18 Cascadian Farm . . . . . . . . 23 Cinnamon Twisp Bakery . . . . 17 Duck Brand Hotel & Cantina . . . 7 Freestone Inn . . . . . . . . . . 41 Hometown Pizza . . . . . . . . 44 Jack’s Hut at Freestone Inn . . . 47 Kind Grinds Espresso Bar & Cafe . . . . . . . . . . 48 LaFonda Lopez Restaurant . . . 39 Lariat Coffee Roasters . . . . . 29 Lone Pine Fruit & Espresso . . . 36 Mazama Country Inn . . . . . . 15 Mazama Store . . . . . . . . . 43 Methow Valley Ciderhouse . . . 10 Rocking Horse Bakery . . . . . 36 Sheri’s Sweet Shoppe . . . . . . 23 Sixknot Taphouse . . . . . . . . 35 Smallwood Farms . . . . . . . 33 Sun Mountain Lodge . . . . . . 49 Woodstone Pizzeria . . . . . . 45

Events/Festivals

Cascadia Music . . . . . . . . . 42 City of Pateros . . . . . . . . . . 51 Merc Playhouse Theater . . . . 39 Methow Valley Chamber Music Festival . . . . . . . . 28 New Old Time Chautauqua . . . 22 Omak Stampede . . . . . . . . 29 The Rendezvous . . . . . . . . 48 Winthrop Rhythm & Blues Festival . . . . . . . . 3 Galleries

Confluence Gallery & Art Center . . . . . . . . . 27 Groceries

Mazama Store . . . . . . . . . 43 Methow Valley Thriftway . . . . 37 Health/Medical

Confluence Health . . . . . . . 51 Jason Rumohr, Hellerwork . . . 22 Three Rivers Hospital . . . . . 23 Ulrich’s Valley Pharmacy . . . . 21 Internet Service Providers

Methownet.com . . . . . . . . . 32 Local Goods & Produce

King’s Pacific Pride & Car Wash . . . . . . . . . 29

Blue Star Coffee Roasters . . . . 7 Bluebird Grain Farms . . . . . 42 Cascadian Farm . . . . . . . . 23 Confluence Gallery & Art Center . . . . . . . . . 27 Lariat Coffee Roasters . . . . . 29 Lone Pine Fruit & Espresso . . . 36 Mazama Store . . . . . . . . . 43 Methow Valley Ciderhouse . . . 10 Methow Valley Farmers Market . . . . . . . . 16 Robins Egg Bleu . . . . . . . . . 23 Sixknot Taphouse . . . . . . . . 35 Smallwood Farms . . . . . . . 33 Twisp Tam Creations . . . . . . 41

Designers/Contractors

Lodging

Campgrounds/RV Parks

Pine Near RV Park . . . . . . 27, Riverbend RV Park . . . . . . . Silverline Resort . . . . . . . . Winthrop KOA . . . . . . . . .

32 28 42 29

Car Wash

GP Designs . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Emergency Services

Aero Methow Rescue . . . . . . 11 Event Facilities

Bear Creek Golf Course . . . . 35 Merc Playhouse Theater . . . . 39 Pipestone Canyon Ranch . . . . 40 Sun Mountain Lodge . . . . . . 49 Twisp Terrace Lodge . . . . . . 31 Twisp Valley Grange . . . . . . 31 Winthrop Barn Auditorium . . 39

 50

Central Reservations . . . . . . 52 Chewack River Guest Ranch . . . 13 Duck Brand Hotel & Cantina . . . 7 Freestone Inn . . . . . . . . . . 41 Mazama Country Inn . . . . . . 15 Mazama Ranch House . . . . . 45 Methow River Lodge & Cabins . . 7 Mt Gardner Inn . . . . . . . . . 35 River Run Inn . . . . . . . . . 40 Rolling Huts & Methow Tents . . 45 Silverline Resort . . . . . . . . 42 Sun Mountain Lodge . . . . . . 49 Twisp River Suites . . . . . . . . 51

Lodging, CONT.

Twisp Terrace Lodge . . . . . . 31 Virginian Resort . . . . . . . . . 21 Winthrop Inn . . . . . . . . . . 16 Winthrop KOA . . . . . . . . . 29 Winthrop Mountain View Chalets . . . . . . . . . 20 Massage Practitioners/ Spa Services

Mount Gardner Massage . . . . 12 Nectar Skin Bar & Boutique . . . 20 Sun Mountain Lodge . . . . . . 49 Museums

Shafer Historical Museum . . . . 41 Organizations

Cascade Farmlands. . . . . . . . 19 Cascadia Music . . . . . . . . . 42 City of Pateros . . . . . . . . . . 51 Evergreen Mountain Bike Alliance . . . . . . . . . 11 Merc Playhouse Theater . . . . 39 Methow Conservancy . . . . . 43 Methow Salmon Recovery Foundation . . . . . . . . . . 13 Methow Trails . . . . . . . . . . 17 Methow Valley Chamber Music Assoc. . . . 28 Shafer Historical Museum . . . . 41 TwispWorks . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Winthrop Marketing . . . . . . . 2 Pharmacies

Ulrich’s Pharmacy . . . . . . . . 21 Property Management

Methow House Watch . . . . . 34 Radio

KTRT 97.5 FM . . . . . . . . . . 21

Recreation/ Activities, CONT.

Sawtooth Outfitters . . . . . . . 15 Shafer Historical Museum . . . . 41 Sun Mountain Lodge . . . . . . 49 Winthrop Mountain Sports . . . 33 Retail

Aspen Grove . . . . . . . . . . 44 Confluence Gallery & Art Center . . . . . . . . . 27 Fresh Greens . . . . . . . . . . 22 Goat’s Beard Mountain Supplies . . . . . . 17 Lariat Coffee Roasters . . . . . 29 Lone Pine Fruit & Espresso . . . 36 Loup Loup Ski Rental Shop . . . 10 Mazama Store . . . . . . . . . . 43 Methow Cycle & Sport . . . . . . 13 Nectar Skin Bar & Boutique . . . 20 Outdoorsman . . . . . . . . . . 18 PIC Boutique . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Poppie Jo Galleria . . . . . . . . 11 Robins Egg Bleu . . . . . . . . . 23 Sun Mountain Lodge . . . . . . 49 TwispWorks . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Ulrich’s Valley Pharmacy . . . . 21 Wine Shed . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Winthrop Mountain Sports . . . 33 Sporting Goods

Goat’s Beard Mountain Supplies . . . . . . 17 Methow Cycle & Sport . . . . . . 13 Outdoorsman . . . . . . . . . . 18 Sun Mountain Lodge . . . . . . 49 Winthrop Mountain Sports . . . 33 Theaters/Cinema

Barnyard Cinema . . . . . . . . 15 Merc Playhouse Theater . . . . 39

Real Estate

Blue Sky Real Estate . . . . . . . 19 Coldwell Banker Winthrop Realty . . . . . . . 51 Recreation/Activities

Bear Creek Golf Course . . . . 35 Chewack River Guest Ranch . . . 13 Goat’s Beard Mountain Supplies . . . . . . 17 Loup Loup Ski Rental Shop . . . 10 Methow Cycle & Sport . . . . . . 13 Methow Trails . . . . . . . . . . 17 Morning Glory Balloon Tours . . 9 North Cascades Fly Fishing . . . 12 North Cascades Mountain Guides . . . . . . . 34 Ohme Gardens . . . . . . . . . . 37 Summer 2018


Pateros

Methow Valley Clinic 1116 WA-20 | Winthrop, WA

At the confluence of the Methow & Columbia Rivers

City Of Pateros www.pateros.com

Accepting New Patients Mon. - Fri. 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

June 14-17, 2018 Spring City Wide Yard Sales

509.923.2571

June 23-24, 2018 Motorcycle Rally & Concert in the Park

Pediatrician

Jesse Charles MD

Phoebe Hershenow ARNP

Leesa Linck MD

July 20-22, 2018 71st Annual Apple Pie Jamboree August 18-19, 2018 Pateros Hydroplane Races

509.996.8180 confluencehealth.org

Danielle Micheletti PA-C

Michael Tuggy MD

December 2018 Christmas in the City

Pateros Museum Open year-round Mon.- Fri. 8am to 4:30pm, same entrance as City Hall at 113 Lakeshore Drive, Pateros, WA

(Check website for dates)

Expert Brokers, ready to help YOU!

Dave Thomsen

Kathy Curtiss

Frank Kline

Emily Gibson

The Methow Valley’s BEST Real Estate Team 509-996-2121

CBWinthrop.com


Profile for Methow Valley News

2018 Methow Valley Summer  

What to do — and where to go to do it — in the Methow Valley this summer.

2018 Methow Valley Summer  

What to do — and where to go to do it — in the Methow Valley this summer.