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New for 2019

Made

F ree

Food & Drink

Natural, nutritious & tasty

Arts & Crafts

Creativity on a personal scale

Home & Health

Surround yourself with well-being

A supplement to

THE METHOW VALLEY NEWS Sponsored by Methow Made, a program of Twispworks

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New for 2019

Made Made for you

Connecting you with the best of the Methow’s unique, diverse products is what this annual publication is all about. By connection, we mean one-to-one in many cases. A delightful part of the Methow Valley experience is discovering for yourself what inspires our local producers. They are small companies, in many cases single-proprietor operations. To survive and thrive in our rural economic base, they must offer things that are original, creative and especially representative of our community. You will enjoy getting to know them, and taking their products home with you. The Methow Made program was created by TwispWorks, the smallbusiness development campus in Twisp that is also home to many local artists. Methow Made, a marketing and branding program, was designed to help our producers develop and reach their markets, here and outside the valley (visit http:// methowmade.com for more details). You’ll also find their products at farmers markets, galleries, studios and retail outlets throughout the valley. Look for the Methow Made displays in many local stores. For a quick overview of local producers, please peruse our business directory. Don Nelson

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A decade of achievment

METHOW MADE Don Nelson, publisher/editor Darla Hussey, design LaShelle Easton, design Sheila Ward, advertising Tera Evans, office manager CONTRIBUTORS Ralph Schwartz Don Nelson Don Linnertz Ann McCreary Sandra Strieby A publication of the Methow Valley News P.O. Box 97, 502 S. Glover St., Twisp, WA 98856 (509) 997-7011 • fax (509) 997-3277 www.methowvalleynews.com On the cover: Photos by Mary Kiesau

TwispWorks accelerates its mission of supporting local economy

Creative, original, local Methow Made is more than a brand – it’s a way of life

Barreling along

Old Schoolhouse Brewery builds its beermaking business and community connections

Ovenly delights

The valley’s artisan bakeries offer excellent food and good company

Swept away

Bethany Ridenour’s brooms embody craft, spirituality and practicality

Find it at the farmers markets Local artists, local creations: where to find them Drink up

Beverages produced in the Methow and where to meet their makers

Methow Made business directory


A decade of achievement TWISPWORKS ACCELERATES ITS MISSION OF SUPPORTING LOCAL ECONOMY By Don Linnertz Executive Director, TwispWorks This year, TwispWorks is marking its 10th anniversary of delivering programs to support a healthy, diverse and sustainable local economy. The community has embraced the mission of TwispWorks and we’re seeing this labor of love bear fruit. From tackling the root causes of economic instability like access to affordable child care, to helping entrepreneurs start or grow their business, TwispWorks is focused on creating a local economy that works for everyone.

COMMUNIT Y HUB, EC O N O M I C E N G I N E A key focus for us is in modernizing and redeveloping the 17 buildings on our 6.4-acre campus. More than $2.5 million has been invested to renovate indoor spaces making them suitable for businesses to operate. We’ve planted gardens and greenspaces and installed works of art to make the

campus a welcoming place for the community to enjoy the natural environment, gather and celebrate. Funding for these projects has been secured in large part from foundations and private donations. Local contractors and labor are used to make improvements, reinvesting these dollars back into the local community. This year, we will celebrate the opening of the Old Schoolhouse Brewery’s new brewing facility, making it possible for the them to increase their manufacturing capacity and bring new jobs to our economy. We also are completing construction on the final four spaces on our campus to incubate new businesses. Whether you’re new to TwispWorks, or a regular visitor, TwispWorks offers a host of opportunities for you to tour artists’ studios, shop from local producers, enjoy the outdoor spaces including the Plaza@TwispWorks, grab a bite to eat, enjoy a locally crafted beer, take a class or visit with friends and neighbors. TwispWorks is a place for everyone!

COMMUNIT Y PA R T N E R S H I P S, CAMPUS O P E R AT I O N S Central to our organization is our partner community made up of local businesses, working artists and nonprofit organizations who make the TwispWorks campus their home. TwispWorks

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Photo by Don Nelson

has a two-way relationship with our partners whereby we provide equitable rental rates to help fledgling businesses incubate and establish a foothold in the economy and they support our mission by providing classes, demonstrations and youth internships. It is through our partners that we see the spark of a creative economy – where people and businesses collaborate and thrive and where the sum of our parts becomes something much bigger. Today, the TwispWorks campus is home to more than 35 partners spanning manufacturers, artists, producers, professional service providers, nonprofits and civic organizations. TwispWorks and our partners have nearly 100 new jobs and brought additional revenue to the town of Twisp. Come to the campus and check them out!

H E A LT H Y EC O N O M Y PROGR AMS TwispWorks delivers programs, services and educational

opportunities for individuals and businesses who live and operate in the Methow Valley as well as programs supporting youth and community engagement. TwispWorks’ Methow Made program provides sales, marketing and retail support to more than 40 local producers and artisans. You can find Methow Made products at retail locations throughout the Methow Valley – just look for the Methow Made logo. TwispWorks leads the conversation around what defines a healthy economy and how local government, businesses, industries and the community at-large can work together to build a sustainable and vibrant economy. This year, we’re leading the effort close the digital divide by bringing reliable high-speed internet to un-served or under-served communities. Today, TwispWorks serves as a model for what is possible when people, place and ideas come together.


Creative, original, local METHOW MADE IS MORE THAN A BRAND — IT’S A WAY OF LIFE By Don Linnertz Executive Director, TwispWorks From glacial-fed lakes to wildflower-covered meadows, the Methow Valley is a place whose natural splendor can take your breath away. With such staggering beauty all around us, it’s no surprise that the Methow has become home to hundreds of artists, small manufacturers, craftspeople, farmers and producers whose entrepreneurial spirit creates the backbone of our local, creative economy. In small communities like ours, the concept of shopping local takes on a special meaning. The hand-blown glass vases, upcycled bird, bat and bee houses, or one-of-a-kind notecards you purchase here in the Methow Valley were made just around the corner. The organic goat’s cheese, delectable chocolate truffles or freshfrom-the-oven breads enjoyed throughout the Methow Valley come from a few storefronts down. The heirloom tomatoes, heritage grains or clover honey you find in the grocery store aisle were harvested just over the next hill. When you buy locally made products here, it’s

“neighbor helping neighbor” at its finest. It’s an investment not just in a business, but also in a way of life.

ME THOW MADE

Seven years ago, TwispWorks created the Methow Made Program. Initially made possible by a grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Methow Made provides sales, marketing and retail support to local producers and artisans. To qualify, a member must make or grow their product here in the Methow Valley. TwispWorks continues manage and grow the Methow Made program both in the number of participants in the program and in the benefits available to members.

W H AT L O C A L L O O KS L I K E This Methow Made special publication is a partnership between TwispWorks and the Methow Valley News and is designed to showcase many of the local business who deserve your support. But buying Methow Made goes beyond supporting a single business or craftsperson. It has an additional, profound affect in that it creates a multiplier effect for your investment

METHOW INVESTMENT NETWORK: LOCALS HELPING LOCALS Accessing capital is a huge challenge for most small businesses. That’s why TwispWorks created the Methow Investment Network in 2017. The network connects businesses needing capital to grow with people looking to invest in the local economy. Since its creation in 2017, Methow Investment Network members have loaned more than $1.4 million to local businesses. Over 80% of the loans have been made to Methow Made members. Are you interested in investing in local businesses while receiving a good return on your investment? We encourage you to join the more than 40 investors in this fun, lowpressure Methow Valley network. There is no minimum or maximum amount you need to invest and everyone is welcome to participate. boosting the local economy. Your dollars support the retailer selling the product, the producer making the product and the community through tax revenue. It’s a win-win-win. Not to mention the quality, craftsmanship and value of Methow Made products are stellar. You can find

New business opportunities are circulated to members by email or at quarterly “pitch night” social events (think “Shark Tank!”) and members contact business owners directly to arrange loan terms. Mentors are available to help new investors and businesses alike. In March 2019, TwispWorks was awarded a grant from the Washington State Microenterprise Association to assist with the revision of application and training materials as well as to market the program to new members. Our new logo, modeled after the TwispWorks gear, reflects another flywheel in our economic vitality engine and is a model for rural economic development. You can find more about the program at twispworks.org/ min or email us at info@ twispworks.com. Methow Made products in retail locations throughout the Methow Valley. Just look for the Methow Made logo. Or you can visit the Methow Made Facebook page or web site. This is what local looks like – make the connection and buy Methow Made!

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Photo by Mary Kiesau

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Barreling along OLD SCHOOLHOUSE BREWERY BUILDS ITS BEERMAKING BUSINESS AND COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS By Ann McCreary

W

HEN he heard that Congress had passed a law that permanently protects the upper Methow Valley from mining, Jacob Young knew immediately what he needed to do. Make beer. Young is manager and a co-owner of Old Schoolhouse Brewery (OSB), which brews award-winning beer. But more than that, OSB creates beer to promote and honor important community causes, like the successful Methow Headwaters Campaign that lobbied to protect the upper Methow Valley from future mining. OSB’s response was “Never Mined IPA,” a beer created specifically last March to celebrate the preservation of the valley’s environment and natural beauty. The special occasion brew was a hit, and every drop was

consumed. “People embraced that beer for all it embodied,” Young said. Creating the special beer was in keeping with OSB’s mission: “Make the best beer. Provide an ideal gathering place. Use business to inspire and give back to the community, trails, and important environmental issues.” In addition to “Never Mined,” OSB has produced three versions of a beer called “Trailbreaker Pale Ale,” to support the Methow Chapter of the Evergreen Mountain Bike Alliance and Methow Trails. It also made a beer called “Canyon Street,” to recognize and support the Methow Housing Trust’s affordable housing initiative that has resulted in construction of new affordable homes on Canyon Street in Twisp. Five local businesses bought 13 kegs and pledged to donate $100 per keg to the Housing Trust.

C O M M U N I T YMINDED For Young, the ability to use OSB’s beer to give back to the Methow Valley community has been one of the most rewarding parts of his work. “Those are my favorite things. Working with local nonprofits and having a product you are excited about that can do some good for the community,” he said. OSB donates a portion of the sale of the specialty beers to the organizations it supports. And the beers help raise awareness of issues important to the Methow Valley. When a consumer asks why the beer is named “Canyon Street” for example, it provides an opportunity to talk about the pressing need for more affordable housing in the valley, Young said. The locally grown brewery has certainly raised awareness — on an international scale — of its high-quality beers. OSB won many awards at international beer competitions under its first owners, Laura and Casey Ruud and brewer Blaze Ruud. Its award-winning tradition has continued under

its current owners, Jacob and Nate Young, Troy Anderson, and head brewer Kyle Koger. The Winthrop Brewing Company opened in 1992 on Winthrop’s main street. The Ruuds purchased it in 2008, renamed it Old Schoolhouse Brewery and began making their own beers, which soon began winning awards. When the Ruuds sold the business three years ago, OSB was a popular community gathering place, and the small brewing facility couldn’t keep up with demand for its beer outside the valley. The Ruuds decided it was time to turn the business over to owners who were willing to take on the challenge of expanding the business. The new owners have taken on that challenge in a big way. Within a year, they opened the OSB Taproom on the TwispWorks campus, giving OSB a presence at both ends of the valley. Young said the Taproom got off to a slow start during its first year, but has been discovered as a low-key alternative to the Winthrop pub  — especially among locals — as a place to socialize and enjoy OSB beer. The Taproom, which had its second anniversary

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on May 25, is busy with live music, open mics, wedding receptions and special events.

N E W FA C I L I T Y

After opening the Taproom, OSB’s owners took on a much bigger challenge — planning and building a new production brewery at TwispWorks. The new brewing facility will increase OSB’s brewing capability five-fold, from 1,000 barrels produced annually at the Winthrop pub to 5,000 barrels annually when it reaches full capacity. Construction of the 4,000-square-foot brewery and an adjoining taproom began in 2018 and the project was nearing completion early this summer. The building itself is owned by TwispWorks and is leased to OSB. TwispWorks received a $480,000 grant from a Seattle foundation donor to design and construct the building. OSB received loans totaling nearly $500,000 for the new brewery project from the Methow Investment Network, a TwispWorks program that connects local investors with local businesses that need funds to start up or expand. OSB was one of the first projects to receive funding through the Methow Investment Network, and investors have been eager to support a business that exports a Methow made product outside of the valley. The facility was designed by

architect Ray Johnston, a parttime Methow Valley resident who has been involved in TwispWorks for many years. It was built by Blackcap Builders Collective, a locally owned construction company managed by James Salter. The new taproom is scheduled to be completed after the brewery is up and running, and will probably open in 2020, replacing the current taproom across the lawn at TwispWorks. In keeping with OSB’s mission of providing a gathering place, the taproom will have space for live music both inside and outside, like the Winthrop pub. The

new taproom has garage-style doors that can roll up and open the interior to the outdoors, and it will have outdoor seating with a view of the pavilion at TwispWorks where music and other events are held. By late spring, only a few essential pieces of equipment needed to be delivered and installed before brewing could begin. OSB plans to ramp up production gradually, beginning with about 1,200 barrels annually at its new facility. Production at OSB’s Winthrop brewpub will decrease from 1,000 to about 500-600 barrels annually, with

a focus on different beer styles and a barrel aging program, Young said. OSB handles its own beer distribution in the Methow Valley, Leavenworth and Wenatchee, and works with Orcas Distributing to deliver its product in the Seattle area. OSB beers are found in about 75 cities around Washington, but with its limited production capacity, it has struggled to meet demand. “In summer, we make it a priority to make sure we have beer in the valley,” said OSB co-owner Troy Anderson. “We’re not able to keep a consistent amount of

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beer going anywhere outside the valley. Whenever people see it in Seattle, they get excited.”

QUALIT Y FIRST

OSB has a line of awardwinning “core beers” that it has consistently produced over the years, Young said. “The Ruuds built the business and stood behind the quality of their beer for so long that beer drinkers look for our brand,” he said. Kyle Koger, OSB’s head brewer, trained under Blaze Ruud. Young said Koger asked Ruud to sample some of his home-brewed beer, and Ruud “immediately hired him.” Ruud is now in the business of selling hops and provides all the hops for OSB’s beers, Young said. OSB’s core beers aim to “satisfy both the discerning hop heads and those who prefer a lighter taste,” according to OSB’s website. The core beers include OSB’s “signature beer,” Ruud Awakening IPA, described as a “big, bold American IPA with plenty of piney, citrusy, and floral Pacific Northwest hops that completely overwhelm its medium malt body.” The core beers also include Hooligan Stout, Rendezvous Porter, Big Valley Brown, Epiphany Pale and Methow Blonde. OSB also produces a “reserve series” of beers, including Fresh Hop IPA, Barley Wine Style Ale, Imperial IPA and Imperial Stout. Koger has been developing new beers, including “one-off”

Photo by Mary Kiesau

beers like those produced for nonprofits and special events. “He’s winning awards. People are really excited about the product,” Young said. “We have a big following. The thirst in Seattle is insatiable for one-off beers. The younger crowd wants to be wowed by something they haven’t tried before.” Koger is pushing the “creative process … trying new recipes,” but is also “a purist,” Young said. “He’s not doing trend-of-the-moment beers … like glitter beer. You’ll never see us make glitter beer.” The opening of the OSB

Taproom in Twisp and the brewery expansion was welcomed by the town of Twisp and TwispWorks as a boost to the local economy. OSB has increased staff over the past three years — it now employs about 50 people in the summer — and will hire additional employees as production and distribution increases, Young said. “We were eager to switch from just being in Winthrop to expanding into Twisp,” he said. “Our brand is the Methow Valley. We’re so proud to be a Methow company that is all over Washington state.”

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Photo by Ralph Schwartz

Ovenly delights

THE VALLEY’S ARTISAN BAKERIES OFFER EXCELLENT FOOD AND GOOD COMPANY By Ralph Schwartz

G

O to any of the four artisan bakeries in the Methow Valley, and you’ll find more than a hearty and delicious loaf of bread, or an irresistible pastry. You’ll also find community. The owners of SweetRiver Bakery, Cinnamon Twisp Bakery, Rocking Horse Bakery and the Mazama Store (in the order you would encounter them, traveling up-valley) aren’t just devoted to their kitchens and their craft. They also take pride in the space they create for people — to meet, to unwind and to share news. In these places, “Methow Made” refers not just to fresh-baked goods 10

with local ingredients. It also means the relationships these bakeries create.

SWEE TRIVER BAK ERY Pateros is one of those historic cities along the Columbia River that’s conspicuously missing a downtown. Old Main Street was submerged in 1966 after Wells Dam was built. Despite this, the city still has a lively center of commerce and culture — SweetRiver Bakery (203 Pateros Mall), tucked between Highway 97 and a riverfront park.

Centrally located in the region, at the foot of the Methow Valley, and between Omak and Wenatchee, SweetRiver has been a pit stop for travelers and a gathering place for locals since the late Al Hymer opened the shop in 2002. Al wanted to move his breadmaking operation out of his home kitchen, so he purchased a commercial bakery — everything from the brick oven to the garbage cans — in Buffalo, New York for $70,000. Al U-Hauled the contents of the old bakery, named “Flour Power,” across the country and set it up in its current location, a former dentist’s office. The side of the old brick oven still sports

a “Flour Power” sticker. Al started simply, offering only breads, pastries and coffee at first. He brought his son Alex into the kitchen in 2006, when he was 23. Alex now owns the bakery himself, with the support of general manager Chris Webb. Today, SweetRiver offers pizza, beer and wine, and live music on weekends in front of a lawn that seats 300. At night on a summer weekend, SweetRiver is the place to be in Pateros. Despite the kegs of beer and the rock-and-blues music, Alex has stayed true to his roots. He’s proud of the breads his father taught him how to bake on the


stone in the old brick oven from Buffalo. He’s most proud of SweetRiver’s sourdough, made from a yeasty “mother” that has been fed diligently for the past 12 years. Lunch, featuring sandwiches with scratch-baked bread, is growing in popularity. New this summer is ice cream in homemade cones — something cool to pair with a cup of locally roasted Blue Star coffee. While business does slow down in the winter, SweetRiver remains open seven days a week, from 6 a.m. till 8 p.m. “There are just enough people who need that cup of coffee in the morning,” regardless of season, Alex said. The bakery stays open later Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays from Memorial Day weekend to

Labor Day weekend. Weekends feature live music, and Thursday is karaoke night. Learn more at sweetriverbakery.com.

CINNAMON T WISP BAK ERY When the name of your bakery and your signature pastry are one and the same, it better be good. The cinnamon twisps at Cinnamon Twisp Bakery (116 N. Glover St.) aren’t just good, they’re “to die for,” as more than one Facebook reviewer put it. Twisted, then curled to look a little like a cinnamon roll, and then drizzled with hazelnuts, the bakery’s namesake item can sell out fast on a busy weekend. But there’s plenty more for locals and visitors looking for a

Photo by Ralph Schwartz

sweet treat. “People also rave about our chocolate eclairs and our fruit delight,” said Katie Bristol, who has owned the bakery since its inception 25 years ago. (The bakery celebrated its silver anniversary on May 4.) Bristol was one of five owners when the bakery opened in 1994 to fill a major void. Before Cinnamon Twisp, the Methow Valley didn’t have an artisan bakery. Cinnamon Twisp touts its patronage of Bluebird Grain Farms and other local farms that supply ingredients. The farms Bristol selects aren’t local just for the sake of being local, either. “It’s about quality. It’s about organic. It’s about local,” she said. The raspberries, strawberries, nectarines, apricots and apples in the pastries are grown nearby. Local tomatoes, cucumbers and onions go into the sandwiches. The bakery’s gourmet pizza as another signature item. Featuring artichoke hearts, feta cheese and onions, the pizza’s recipe has stayed the same since the bakery started. If you walk into Cinnamon Twisp around noon, prepare to

Photo by Ralph Schwartz

stand in line. The bakery is a popular lunch stop among locals. The grilled CTB with avocado is Cinnamon Twisp’s most popular sandwich. The CTB — cheddar, tomato and bacon, smeared with garlic aioli — is also a play on the bakery’s initials. Cinnamon Twisp upgraded two years ago to a La Marzocco espresso machine, making the locally roasted Lariat coffee taste even better. The bakery is expanding its gluten-free options, with an eye to offering items and looks to broaden its salad menu. Cinnamon Twisp stays open

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ROCK ING HORSE BAK ERY Winthrop’s population waxes and wanes with the seasons. The town throngs

Photo by Steve Mitchell

and maintaining the equipment. Much of Rocking Horse’s menu reflects Teresa’s particular tastes and skills. The bakery’s signature carrot cake is her recipe, and the whoopie pies — cream filling sandwiched inside two chocolate cakes — are a staple in New England, where the Teresa and Steve came from. The bakery’s décor, likewise, is a blend of Methow Valley artifacts, many on loan from the nearby Shafer Museum, and New England antiques such as Steve’s pewter coffee urns. The menu also reflects Teresa’s fascination with Indian food. She blends the spices that go into the wintertime soups and summer salads such as the Methow biryani, made of emmer wheat from Bluebird Grain Farms, Teresa’s masala curry, dried fruit and almonds. “The valley has fairly cultivated taste buds, which is great for me because that’s my primary passion,” Teresa said. Rocking Horse bakes muffins,

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scones, coffee cakes and sweetbreads daily, which can be paired with fresh Lariat coffee. In fact, customers can pass from the Rocking Horse straight into Lariat’s retail shop next door. For Teresa, Rocking Horse is about relationships in addition to good food. She said the former teacher in her is fulfilled when she hires local high school students for their first job, to teach them how to work in a fast-paced environment. Teresa and Steve also hire valley newcomers with barista experience. This gives new employees a chance to make connections in the Methow. “It’s one of the ways Steve and I met people when we moved here,” Teresa said. More of the Rocking Horse story (and menu) can be found at rockinghorsebakery.com.

RY KE

with thousands of ice cream eaters and festival goers in the summer, bustles with red-faced skiers in winter, and goes semidormant in the early spring. Rocking Horse Bakery (265 Riverside Ave.) remains as a beacon of consistency in this tourist-driven ebb and flow by catering to the locals. “We were really intentional about building our menu and the ethos of the business around our local customers,” co-owner Teresa Mitchell said. “They are, pardon the pun, our bread and butter.” Locals can count on the Rocking Horse to be open seven days a week most of the year, from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. The bakery is closed on Tuesday during the shoulder season, between the skiers and the warmweather crowd. Teresa runs the kitchen, while her husband, Steve, manages the front of the house, instilling in new employees Rocking Horse’s friendly customer service

CINN

seven days a week, from 6 a.m. to 3 p.m., including winters. The bakery closes its doors on Sundays during March and April, after the skiers start to clear out and before the pass opens. The bakery features live music in conjunction with Twisp’s art walks and other special occasions.Check out Cinnamon Twisp at facebook.com/ CinnamonTwispBakery.

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PULL OUT THIS HANDY GUIDE AND TAKE IT WITH YOU WHEN YOU SHOP

Methow Made makes it easy for people who love the Methow Valley to experience local products and flavors and to support our local economy. This 2019 Methow Made Guide connects you to the manufacturers, farmers, artisan food and beverage producers, artists and craftspeople who make their products with ingredients and/or labor from right here in the Methow Valley. For more information, visit MethowMade.com or call us at (509) 997-3300.

A program of TwispWorks Learn more at TwispWorks.org

MethowMade.com LOOK FOR DISPLAYS OF METHOW MADE PRODUCTS AT VARIOUS RETAILERS THROUGHOUT THE VALLEY


ARTISAN GOODS

FOXTAIL POTTERY

MARCIA IVES

Foxtail Pottery’s distinctive dark-colored stoneware clay body contrasts with lush glaze colors to highlight Mandy Shoger’s bold pattern designs. Her work is primarily functional and designed for everyday use.

Marcia encourag and be merry wit handmade potte work can be foun and she takes cu

TwispWorks campus (Twisp) www.foxtailpottery.com

MarciaRaeIves@ (206) 719-2389

CHARTS & LIGHT

GARDNER GARDENS

MCCOY’S TR

Working with humble switchplate covers, Stormy Fuller, turns the mundane into the magnificent! Using retired aviation charts Stormy crafts custom switchplate covers! The perfect gift for pilots and for those of us who like to keep our feet on the ground!

Beekeeper Dave Sabold harvests beeswax from his ten backyard colonies to create Gardner Gardens Beeswax Skin Cream, using all-natural coconut and almond oils and vitamin E. Available at Methow Valley retailers.

McCoy’s Tradition all-natural and ne render small batc tallow, blending i coconut and oth lasting soaps tha

(Carlton) 541-740-8607 chartsandlight@gmail.com.

(509) 996-2522 www.gardnergardens.com

Available at Meth www.mccoystrad

CULLER STUDIO

HOTSPOT FIRE PITS

Textile/surface design Artist Sara Ashford uses solely natural dyes for her one-of-akind wearable & fine art pieces. Visit Sara’s studio and dye garden at TwispWorks and learn about her many classes.

MCFARLAND C

Tim Odell’s fire pits are locally made by craftspeople and skilled metalworkers dedicated to quality and longevity, with many of the fire pits made from recycled scrap steel.

TwispWorks (Twisp) (509) 341-4042 Follow her on Facebook!

1211 Cascade Dr. (Twisp) (509) 997-4766 www.hotspotfirepits.com

Bill Tackman and flock of sheep in They sell sustaina customers, and t products can be and their online s

(509) 923-1916 www.thelambran

DOG PAW KNIVES

INTERTWINED DESIGNS

MCIVOR WO

Career–bureacrat turned knife-maker, Phil Millam handcrafts custom hunting and kitchen knives for clients, using a range of materials and designs.

We produce high-quality, eco-friendly clothing at our Mazama home-based studio. Find us at the MV Farmer’s Market, Nectar Skin Bar, or make an appointment to shop our studio. Visit us online to learn how we create sustainably-made clothing.

Sustainably harv wood made into panels and shav woodturner Don Winthrop Gallery Gallery.

(360) 319-0342 www.intertwineddesigns.com

(509) 997-9456 www.mcivorwoo

Visit Dog Paw Knives on Facebook!

EMILY POST POTTERY

KIKENDALL’S WOOD TURNING

METHOW PH

Emily’s distinctive “sgraffito” carved mugs, plates, large mixing bowls, tumblers, vases and other handmade vessels are a reflection of her love of nature, cooking and the Methow Valley.

Utilizing wood salvaged from dead trees around his home in Carlton, Washington, Duane Kikendall works on the lathe as a hobby, turning items from bottle stoppers to peppermills, all from the local woods that surround his home.

Sherry Malotte h all her life specia art photography eye and skill for r You can visit She TwispWorks cam online.

(509) 997-2251 www.squareup.com/market/ emilypostpottery

Available at Methow Valley retailers.

www.sherrymalo

EQPD

LUCID GL ASSWORKS

MOUNTAIN K

Using the principles of industrial design, we create local manufacturing jobs building durable, practical, universal goods. LastBags, TaperTops, DuffleBoxes and more.

Custom, handmade blown glass by Samantha Carlin in her studio outside of Carlton. Available at farmers markets, Methow Valley retailers and on her website.

Visit us on the TwispWorks Campus Open Monday – Saturday, 10 – 4 www.eqpdgear.com

(509) 341-9102 www.lucidglassworks.com

Mary Kiesau is a and educator off classes and custo photography in t and a calendar (o is also available fo

(509) 996-8242 www.mountaink

FIREWEED PRINT SHOP

LUCINDA’S BOTANICAL SALVES

MOLLY’S SO

Artist Laura Gunnip helps students of all ages engage in the radical act of creative self-knowledge through letterpress and printmaking classes. Fireweed Print Shop is a community printing resource as well as a retail space of Laura’s hand printed items.

Healing salves, balms and oils created from predominately local plants including perfumes from downed pine branches, moisturizing antiseptics from cottonwood and more. Available at retailers throughout the Methow Valley.

Keeping the Met Molly’s Soap mak lasting soaps. Tim homegrown herb nothin’ nasty. De to retailers valley

Find us on the TwispWorks Campus (509) 449-1789 lauragunnip@gmail.com

(509) 996-3566 www.reflexologyandsalves.com

info@mollysoap

www.mollysoap


S POTTERY

ges you to eat, drink th a piece of beautiful ery in your hands! Her nd throughout the valley ustom orders.

@gmail.com

ADITIONAL SOAPS

nal soaps are gentle, ever scented. We handches of locally-sourced it with high quality olive, her oils to produce long– at really work.

how Valley retailers and at ditional.com

NICE NESTS Nice Nests are species-specific nest boxes crafted from salvaged scrap wood and funky found hardware. Patrick’s studio can be found on the TwispWorks campus. 502 S. Glover St. (Twisp) (509) 699-0349 www.nicenests.com

PINETOOTH PRESS We make awesome clothing. Every Saturday from July through August we’ll be doing it live! Drop in to shop and maybe even print your own shirt! Glover and 2nd Ave. (Twisp) Insta: @pinetooth www.pinetoothpress.com (541) 337-5107

CREEK LAMB RANCH

PRINTMADE APPAREL

d Katie Haven raise a small the lower Methow Valley. ably raised meat direct to their naturally dyed fiber found at local retailers store.

We help businesses create energy around their brand through thoughtfully designed apparel. Reach us below or stop by the shop and say hi!

nch.com

OODWORKS

vested and locally-sourced o beautiful petroglyph ing accoutrements by n McIvor. Available at the y and at the Confluence

odworks.com

Glover and 2nd Ave. (Twisp) Insta: @printmade.co www.printmadeapparel.com (541) 337-5107

SAWTOOTH RIDGE WOODWORKS Noelle and Jeff Kastring create beautifully crafted, fundtional home décor from their workshop just outside of Carlton. Known for their contemporary mantels and rustic floating shelves, Sawtooth Ridge also handles custom orders. www.sawtoothridgewoodworks.com.

HOTO ARTS

SMILING WOODS YURTS

has been a photographer alizing in abstract and fine y. Sherry also has a great real estate photography. erry’s studio on the mpus or see her work

Smiling Woods is a family-and-friendowned business in Winthrop, offering solutions for people seeking to live in the round. Their yurts are durable and aesthetically appealing, using high quality, environmentally friendly materials.

otte.com

www.smilingwoodsyurts.com (509) 997-2181

KIND PHOTOGRAPHY

TRUE NORTH LETTERPRESS

naturalist, photographer fering natural history om services, plus nature the form of cards, wall art online and at retailers). She or freelance photography.

Greeting cards and custom letterpress services that showcase the sumptuous, tactile qualities of letterpress. Original art, books, prints, and cards at the studio shop next to the Farmers Market in Twisp.

kindphotography.com

AP

thow clean since 1982. kes gentle, versatile, longme-tested recipes use rbs, natural ingredients and elivered fresh from the farm y-wide.

p.com • (360) 420-8132

p.com

117-B W 2nd Ave (Twisp) (509) 449-1081 www.truenorthletterpress.com

DRINKS BLUE STAR COFFEE ROASTERS Artfully roasted coffees, including the awardwinning Espresso Blend, available at their coffee bar and roasting plant just off Hwy 20. 3 Twisp Airport Rd. (Twisp) (509) 997-BLUE (2583) www.bluestarcoffeeroasters.com

L ARIAT COFFEE ROASTERS Award-winning coffees roasted in Winthrop. Try our fan favorites: Cowboy Mud, Barrel-Aged Limited Reserve or Black Colt Cold Brew. Visit our Winthrop store or order online and we’ll ship to your door. 265 Riverside Ave (Winthrop) (509) 996-4240 www.lariatcoffee.com

LOST RIVER WINERY Lost River Winery produces high-quality wines at excellent prices. Visit their tasting rooms in Winthrop or in Seattle near Pike Place Market. 26 Highway 20 (Winthrop) (509) 996-2888 www.lostriverwinery.com

OLD SCHOOLHOUSE BREWERY Award winning beers, created with the choicest hops, perfectly malted grains, and the Methow’s famously delicious unfiltered, North Cascades water. 155 Riverside Ave. (Winthrop) TwispWorks (Twisp) (509) 996-3183 www.oldschoolhousebrewery.com

SINCL AIR ORCHARDS & CIDERHOUSE Old-fashioned and organic hard ciders, farm crafted with delicious Honey Crisp apples in the Methow Valley using solar power. Available at retailers throughout the Methow, Washington state, and at their taphouse in Winthrop. 231 Riverside Ave. (Winthrop) www.sixknotcider.com

WATERSTONE WOODWORKS

WILD ROOTS DESIGNS

Nils Knudsen creates custom furniture and cabinetry showcasing the natural beauty of locally-sourced wood. Waterstone’s pieces are made to order, working with clients to create designs to fit their needs. Find Nils in Winthrop and on Facebook!

Cindy Ruprecht, the creative force behind Wild Roots Designs, is an artist, poet, and teacher. Cindy works in numerous medias including painting, beadwork, basketry, pottery and leather work. Her iconic notecards can be found at local retailers throughout the Valley and online at her website.

6 Horizon Flat Rd. #2 (Winthrop) (509) 683-2009

www.sacredarts.net


FOOD & GROCERY

BLUEBIRD GRAIN FARMS

ROCKING HORSE BAKERY

Bluebird’s distinctive 100% organic grains, including their signature Emmer Farro and Einkorn Farro, are sold as whole grains, freshmilled flour, and handmade blends for hot cereal, pancakes and pilafs. Available at local retailers and bakeries in the Valley, and at www.bluebirdgrainfarms.com.

Delectable handmade pastries, beautiful, smooth espresso drinks, signature breads, made-from-scratch sandwiches, soups and salads featuring flavors from around the world … these are the ingredients that are the Rocking Horse Bakery. 265 Riverside Avenue (Winthrop) www.rockinghorsebakery.com

(509) 996-3526

CINNAMON T WISP BAKERY

SUNNY PINE FARM

Celebrating 25 years! Traditional pastries, vegan delights and savory sandwiches all made with local, organic and wholesome ingredients. Espresso, smoothies & shakes too!

Sunny Pine’s organic goat’s milk chevre, feta, and yogurt is produced on the upper Twisp River, and includes both traditional and unique flavor profiles. Find them throughout the Methow and at Seattle-area retailers.

116 N. Glover Street (Twisp) (509) 997-5030 www.cinnamontwisp.com

(509) 997-4811 www.sunnypinefarm.com

CROWN S RANCH

SWEET RIVER BAKERY

Crown S Ranch combines traditional farming with innovative technology to raise sustainable beef, pork, sheep, chicken, turkeys, rabbits and eggs.

A sweet spot at the confluence of the Columbia and Methow rivers — Sweet River Bakery. Using fresh local and regional ingredients, we make all our bread, pastries, sandwiches & pizza from scratch! Espresso too!

7 Twin Lakes Rd. (near Winthrop) (509) 341-4144 www.crown-s-ranch.com

203 Pateros Mall (Pateros) (509) 923-2151

DOUBLETREE FARM

TEX AS CREEK PRODUCTS

Doubletree Farm employs dairy methods that have beneficial environmental impacts and humane animal husbandry at the root of its actions. Their vat pasteurized, nonhomogenized whole milk is available at stores throughout the Methow Valley and Okanogan.

Texas Creek’s award-winning hot sauces are produced from locally grown peppers and tomatoes. Their Pure Evil Capsaicin Drops add heat to any food without changing the flavor. (800) 231-2607 pureevilproducts.com

(509) 997-7494

HIGHWAY 20 HONEY

THOMSON’S CUSTOM MEATS

Each of the queens is known by name at this small family-run apiary in Mazama, where the kids help to harvest beautiful, golden honey made from pristine wildflower nectar. Found at Methow Valley retailers.

Smoked meats, handcrafted sausages, pork, lamb, chicken, beef, bacon, jerky and more. All natural and locally-grown with no antibiotics. Inside Methow Valley Thriftway, 920 Highway 20, (Winthrop) (509) 996-2525 www.thomsonscustommeats.com

METHOW GOLD HONEY

T WISP RIVER ORGANIC APPLES

Blane has been producing his Methow Gold Honey for forty years. From his apiary on the banks of the Methow River, Blane’s bees are free to enjoy the wide variety of wildflowers that are native to the Methow. Visit Blane at the Methow Valley Farmers Market or get his honey at local retailers.

We grow 30 varieties of organic apples. They are selected for full-flavored, treeripened qualities. Our fruit is available at the Methow Valley Farmers Market in Twisp or by calling (509) 997-2819. Find us on Facebook.

METHOW MASALA Locally handcrafted culinary creations, gourmet picnic provisions and small-batch Indian spice blends that celebrate the character and spirit of the Methow Valley. Located in Winthrop’s Rocking Horse Bakery. 265 Riverside Avenue (509) 996-4241 www.rockinghorsebakery.com

RETAIL PARTNERS UPPER VALLEY

Sun Mountain Gift Shop Twisp Daily Business

Mazama Store

The Winthrop Store

Aspen Grove

Glover Street Market

Methow Cycle & Sport

Hank’s Harvest Foods

Methow Valley Thriftway Rocking Horse Bakery

MID & LOWER VALLEY Sweet River Bakery


revived the store’s bakery with the can-do attitude that typifies the Methow Valley. While Missy had worked at the store prior to owning it, she didn’t bring a wealth of baking experience to her new role. “We did trial and error, and sort of figured it all out” — with the help of interested employees who had done some baking at home, Missy said. “It all sort of evolved.” As it turned out, Rick and Missy’s four children all had a knack for baking. Claire, their oldest, said she wanted to try her hand at it and turned out to be an excellent baker, according to her mom. Marc became the store’s bread master. Marielle and Sylvie have proven themselves in the store’s kitchen as well. Not only have the LeDucs shown resourcefulness in being self-taught, they also have created the valley’s most popular baguettes without a proper bread oven. A traditional Parisian boulanger might turn up his nose at the store’s sel de mer baguettes, but anyone in the valley who wants one had better get to the store early. “Water, flour, yeast, salt and a

little sugar,” said Marielle, listing the baguette’s ingredients. “It’s a super-basic recipe that works in our oven. Brush with olive oil, and put salt on top. Somehow, they’re incredibly popular.” Here’s hoping that whatever magic the LeDucs have found with their Blodgett convection ovens isn’t broken when they fire up a true bread oven. The centerpiece of a kitchen remodel starting in June is a new deck oven — a stone oven with steam injection to create the proper crispy crust. The store had been baking bread loaves in cast-iron pans with lids, “to simulate a steaminjected oven,” Marielle said. The new oven will allow the baking team to forego the unwieldy iron pans. Each level of the deck oven can have its own temperature setting — cooler for croissants, warmer for loaves. The new oven should make everything more consistent and more efficient — “more product with less effort,” as Marielle put it. If customers still like the old baguettes, those Blodgetts aren’t going anywhere. The Mazama Store is online at themazamastore.com.

Handblown glass

by Laura Aspenwall Showing at the

Winthrop Gallery

509-996-3316 www.ouzelglass.com

METHOW GROWN A director y of Methow Valley farms & ranches www.methowgrown.org A project of the

Methow Conservancy

Beautifully crafted, functional home décor

www.SawtoothRidgeWoodworks.com

Vintage home and garden décor

Locally crafted furniture, yard art, artwork, jewelry and more. Recycling and repurposing local treasures!

501 Hwy 20 Winthrop, W A

996-8297

Photo by Ralph Schwartz

13


t p e w S y a aw Photo courtesy of Bethany Ridenour

BETHANY RIDENOUR’S BROOMS EMBODY CRAFT, SPIRITUALITY AND PRACTICALITY By Sandra Strieby

B

ETHANY Ridenour makes brooms and teaches broommaking, finding deep meaning in a craft that blends elements of the prosaic and the profound. As a young girl living on the streets, Ridenour never dreamed that brooms would one day be her livelihood. But her craft and her business, Bristle and Stick Handcrafted Brooms, are firmly anchored in that challenging past. Her story is one of cleaning and healing, story-telling and craft and root-finding.

GENESIS

“As a young person I had a pretty traumatic life experience,” says Ridenour. From the chaos engendered by that experience, two threads emerged — threads that would become lifelines for Ridenour and lead, eventually, to her current calling. First, she became “sort of a neat freak,” unconsciously striving for order in life that was out of order. Most especially, Ridenour embraced sweeping. “When I was somewhere where I could use a broom, I would pick it up,” she says. “I look at it like I was literally trying to heal my own trauma.” Second, Ridenour found shelter and connection in wild places. As a girl on the run, “the places that I found that I could hide, where no one would find me or look for me, were green spaces, so I tend to think, as I say, I was raised by trees. When other people might have had a safe home or somewhere like that where they felt safe … that 14

was my home, those were the relatives that took care of me.” From that intimate relating with the more-than-human world, Ridenour began learning and teaching ancestral skills — the routine processes that have been part of landbased people’s way of life for millennia: “making fire by friction, building shelters, making baskets, making clothing, tanning hides, things like that,” she says. Hide tanning became a specialty; Ridenour also found herself drawn to hand crafts. As she taught skills, Ridenour quickly realized that the benefits her instruction conferred were multi-layered. Beyond the crafting skill itself lies another way of relating to everyday objects and other people. “Some people have never made something that they use,” she says. “Not that long ago our ancestors made every single thing that they would use on a daily basis. And I think people are really craving that sort of re-connection.” With the process of reconnecting come freedom and empowerment — and the type of healing Ridenour herself experienced through her own connection with the natural world. “I started … noticing how … sitting in the circle with people, doing crafts, making things — just watching how much healing happened,” she says. “I think a lot about how our ancestors did that — they would sit together, they would sing, they would pray, they would put prayers into the stuff they were making.” Imbued in that way, stuff becomes more than stuff, and the makers are changed, as well. A handful of years ago, in Ridenour’s words, sweeping and crafting came together in her


mind. “I thought I should learn to make brooms, and I started searching out a teacher.” She found her way to the CedarRoot Folk School on Marrowstone Island in Puget Sound, where over the course of several days she learned the craft of broom making. She took to it at once, and began making and giving away brooms. Initially Ridenour balked at suggestions that she sell her brooms, but after conferring with her teacher, she agreed. “So I started just teaching it and selling brooms and it’s been full on and surprisingly lovely that everybody loves it,” she says.

CR AF TING

The brooms themselves are meticulously crafted for performance and longevity. Beauty is built in, a function of the natural materials themselves and creative and conscientious crafting. Ridenour points out, though, that there’s more to sweeping than moving dust and debris. Using a broom shifts energy, as well, moving out the old and making room for what’s next. Says Ridenour, “Energy and matter aren’t separate. And energy clings to matter … we think we’re just cleaning out this physical matter but we’re cleaning out a ton of energy. I can’t think of another tool that you can use in your house that can completely change the energy as fast as a broom.” Ridenour works in an airy

studio at TwispWorks, in a building that housed tools and equipment for fire suppression when the campus was a ranger station. She also uses the building’s basement to cure poles for handles and to dry brooms before sewing the bristles flat. The process starts outdoors, though, where Ridenour seeks out the branches that will one day become broom handles. Having been nourished and supported by wild places, she naturally collects with respectful intention. “I try to communicate with the trees — ‘Do you want to be a broom handle?’” Once harvested, the poles cure for a year in a cool dark room — “Making sure they don’t get bark beetles or anything like that, and that they’re totally dry … if you made [a broom] on a wet one it might shrink, and then the head could fall off.” Each pole inspires a unique broom. “It’s tricky with the twisted poles,” says Ridenour. “I’m learning more as I go — like if I don’t put the head on the right direction, they can not work quite as well … I look at each particular one and I try to envision it having a broom on it — I kind of dance around sweeping with the handle to try to see what it would be like.” Then comes a long process — preparing the poles; sorting, soaking, and attaching broomcorn; weaving the hurl (where bristles meet stick); hanging the brooms to dry; sewing to give them shape; and finally

Photo courtesy of Bethany Ridenour

cutting the broomcorn to create an even end for sweeping. It’s all done by hand, although Ridenour uses a few tools — a foot bobbin she made herself (“They’re not something you can buy”); a custom-made woodworking bench for making handles; an antique broom cutter; and for sewing, long needles made from deer antlers. “There’s higher-grade tools I could use and it would take less time but I’m sort of against doing that, so I do it the oldest way

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For recipes visit squareup.com/store/emilypostpottery emilyapost@gmail.com 509-341-4710

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15


that takes the most work,” says Ridenour. “I like teaching all the skills that I teach that way because I feel like when we make something really from scratch, we develop a deeper respect for the energy that it took to make all the things, and it’s sort of a gem in this disposable culture.” Unique fine art with a photographic element Image licensing • Commissions • Location photography TwispWorks Bldg #10 • Saturdays 10-3

Reflexology Promote well being, alleviate stress, physical pain, anxiety and fatigue. Help your mind, body and spirit work together.

Lucinda Tear

SHARING

Broom-making takes about half of Ridenour’s time; the other half is spent teaching. “I travel up and down the coast two or three times a year,” she says — tours she finds both exhausting and fulfilling. As with her earlier skills-teaching, Ridenour finds people respond on more than one level. She quotes a friend who told her, “One of the gifts that you give is embodiment, because we are in a culture that ’s really disembodied,”

206-550-3666

www.reflexologyandsalves.com

Photo courtesy of Bethany Ridenour

WA RF 60423740 • ARCB B01296 • BBB

then goes on to say, “When you’re working — you kind of have to be embodied to make something and use your hands.” And Ridenour tells her own story to her students. “I’m modeling that it’s OK to talk about the hard stuff … we cry with each other, and I just feel like that’s such a potent medicine. We’re really taught, I think, in this culture, to not show our feelings or share our feelings. I’ve always had a hard time with that.” Whether or not you craft your own handmade broom, “It’s a beautiful thing and it’s going to make you happy when you use it,” Ridenour says. “And they sweep better than any other broom.” You can find Ridenour’s brooms, and the maker herself, at the Fireweed Print Shop in the Bernard Hosey Founders Building at TwispWorks. Her website is bristleandstick.com.

A Methow VAlley trAdition USDA Certified | All Natural | No Antibiotics

Some of our SpecialtieS: 15 plus varieties of handcrafted pork & chicken sausage 100 year-old applewood smoker, producing signature jerky, ham & bacon

maSter butcher

THOMSON’S Custom Meats

Smokehouse

Sausage Kitchen

& SmokehouSe artiSan chriS thomSon

has been sourcing the finest meats in the valley for over two decades.

THRIFTWAY CoMe in And experienCe the thoMson CustoM MeAts differenCe.

(509) 996-2525 | o pen D aily 7 am -9 pm | 920 Wa-20, W inthrop , Wa 98862 16


Winth ro p M ark e t EvEry Sunday 10aM-2pM Memorial day Weekend through Labor day Weekend

Local produce, art, crafts and more! In the shady Winthrop Town park Sponsored by the Winthrop Chamber of Commerce

Photo courtesy of Bethany Ridenour

The Methow Investment Network has made it possible for me to expand my business, hire more employees and reach new customers. - Jacob Young, co-owner Old Schoolhouse Brewery

TwispWorks Wants YOU…

FUN! LOCALLY MADE

A taste-full time in the Methow needs custom balloon candy favors

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Learn more online at twispworks.org or email us at info@twispworks.org

FACE PAINT BALLOONS GLITTER TATTOOS

ABRACADOODLES.COM darla.hussey@gmail.com

17


Find it at the farmers markets Farmers markets offer local produce, art and handicraft items at several locations in and around the Methow Valley and beyond. Here’s how to find them:

M E T H O W VA L L E Y FA R M E R S M A R K E T

T O N A S K E T FA R M E R S M A R K E T

Saturday, 9 a.m.-noon Methow Valley Community Center, Highway 20, Twisp April-October

WINTHROP MARK E T

Sunday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Mack Lloyd Park, Highway 20, Winthrop Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day weekend

B R E W S T E R FA R M E R S M A R K E T

Saturday, 8 a.m.-noon 600 W. Main St. June-October

PAT E R O S FA R M E R S M A R K E T

Friday, 3-7 p.m. Downtown Pateros June-October

Retail outlets in the Methow Valley that carry local or regional produce include the Mazama Store, Glover Street Market, Hank ’s Harvest Foods, Methow Valley Thriftway, Lone Pine Espresso and YardFood.

Thursday, 3-7 p.m. Triangle Park, Highway 97, Tonasket June-October

O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y FA R M E R S M A R K E T

Saturday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. American Legion Park, Second and Harley streets, Okanogan May-October

O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y FA R M E R S M A R K E T

Tuesday, 3:30-6:30 p.m. Civic League Park, Central and Ash streets, Omak June-October

File photo

Proud supporter of Methow Made & everything LOCAL!

Intertwined Designs

Earth Friendly Handmade Clothing

Eco-Friendly Clothing Handmade in Mazama, Wa.

Naturally dyed yarns, sustainably raised meat. (509) 997-7711 Hwy 20, Twisp Open Mon - Sat, 7am - 9pm Sunday, 8am - 8pm 18

M c F arland c reek l aMb r anch www.thelambranch.com • 509-923-1916


Drink up Photo courtesy TwispWorks

Local artists, local creations: where to find them Local arts and crafts are on exhibit — and for sale — at several locations in the Methow Valley. A few are listed below. Local products can also be found at retail outlets including the Mazama Store, the Winthrop Store, Hank’s Harvest Foods in Twisp, Methow Valley Thriftway in Winthrop, both Rocking Horse and Cinnamon Twisp bakeries, the Sun Mountain Lodge gift shop, Freestone Inn, YardFood in Twisp and Glover Street Market in Twisp.

CONFLUENCE GALLERY & ART CENTER

T W I S P W O R KS

Gallery featuring local artists 109 B N. Glover St., Twisp (509) 997-0255 keyserstudios.com

Several artists’ studios and workshops on the campus, including Anna Dooley Studio, Foxtail Pottery, Door No. 3 Print Studio, Culler Studios, Kelleigh McMillan Jewelry, Methow Photo Arts, Nice Nests, Perri Howard, Shivelight Studio, Studio B, Terry Hunt Studios, Trails Workshop, eqpd, Glitter & Grit Silversmith, Lucid Glassworks, Methow Metalworks, and Ward Studio 502 S. Glover St., Twisp (509) 997-3300 www.twispworks.org

The Methow Valley is home to a variety of beverage producers who make their imbibables right here, and offer them on site or in retail outlets, restaurants and bakeries. Here’s a roundup:

B L U E S TA R C O F F E E ROASTERS

Local and regional artists 104 Glover St., Twisp (509) 997-2787 www.confluencegallery.com

3 Twisp Airport Road, Twisp (509) 997-2583 www.bluestarcoffeeroasters. com

WINTHROP GALLERY

L A R I AT C O F F E E ROASTERS

Local artists’ cooperative 237 Riverside Ave., Winthrop (509) 996-3925 www.winthropgallery.com

D *S I G N S

WE AGANT GALLERY

Featuring the works of Rod Weagant and others 109 A N. Glover St., Twisp (509) 997-0139 rodweagant@hotmail.com rodweagantstudio.com

Salves and Potions 206.550.3666

Winthrop, WA 98862 www.reflexologyandsalves.com

Barry B. Stromberger 996-9894

www.theslagworks.com

155 Riverside Ave., Winthrop (509) 996-3183 502 S. Glover St., Twisp (TwispWorks campus) (509) 997-0902 www.oldschoolhousebrewery.com

SINCL AIR ORCHARDS AND CIDERHOUSE; S I X K N O T TA P H O U S E

PO Box 906 Twisp, WA 98856 (509) 997-0202 231 Riverside Ave., Winthrop (509) 996-3862 www.sixknotcider.com

6 Horizon Flats Road, No. 4, Winthrop (509) 996-3371 265 Riverside Ave., Winthrop (in Rocking Horse Bakery building) www.lariatcoffee.com

LOST RIVER WINERY

26 Highway 20,Winthrop (509) 996-2888 www.lostriverwinery.com

M E T H O W VA L L E Y CIDERHOUSE

28 Highway 20, Winthrop (509) 341-4354 www.methowvalleyciderhouse.com

THE SLAG WORKS Residential Iron … and more Lucinda’s Botanical

OLD SCHOOLHOUSE BRE WERY

Photo by Mary Kiesau

Cust Iron Wom ork

seafood Wild Sockeye Salmon

www.mistyfjord seafood.com 206.409.1885

19


Made brucemorrison.com

(509) 429-7726 ovalpeak@gmail.com 402 Bridge St, Twisp confluencegallery.com

(509) 997-2787 info@confluencegallery.com 104 Glover St, Twisp squareup.com/store/emilypostpottery

(509) 341-4710

Artists & Artisans

emilyapost@gmail.com foxtailpottery.com

(206) 304-0696 foxtailpottery@gmail.com 502 S. Glover St., Twisp, WA PonderosaStudio-GingerReddington.com

(509) 997-2721 (509) 995-2471 LucidGlassworks.com

(509) 341-9102 PO Box 1061, Twisp

DIRECTORY

BRUCE MORRISON Handcarving & rustic furniture SEE AD, PG. 2

CONFLUENCE GALLERY For 30 years, Confluence has brought artists, students and viewers together to enrich the lives of all. Featuring artists of Okanogan County & beyond. SEE AD, PG. 9

EMILY POST POTTERY Handcrafted ceramic wares inspired by nature. For yourself, and for your home. SEE AD, PG. 15

FOXTAIL POTTERY Wheel-thrown pottery. Eye-catching, but functional and suitable for everyday use. Showroom at TwispWorks. Dinnerware sets available. SEE AD, PG. 8

GINGER REDDINGTON Working out of her home studio in Twisp, Ginger's paintings have a depth, movement, and jewel-like quality to the color that make them truly unique. On display at Twisp River Suites. SEE AD, PG. 8

LUCID GLASSWORKS Hand blown glass studio offering functional glassware featuring “Dot” Tumblers. Studio hours by appointment only. SEE AD, PG. 7

METHOW PHOTO ARTS Sherry Malotte’s Methow Photo Arts offers unique fine art with a photographic element. Image licensing, commissions, (360) 303-2076 TwispWorks Bldg #10, 502 S. Glover St, Twisp location photography. Saturdays 10-3, by chance or appt. SherryMalotte.com

SEE AD, PG. 16

ouzelglass.com

(509) 996-3316 227 Wolf Creek Rd, Winthrop 20

foxtail pottery

OUZEL GLASSWORKS Handblown glass by Laura Aspenwall. Studio visits welcome. Selling at the Twisp Farmer's Market on Saturdays during the summer. SEE AD, PG. 13

STUDIO & SHOWROOM

GingerTwispWorks Reddington 502 S. Glover St, Twisp

Art T hat Kicks Butt foxtailpottery.com


theslagworks.com

(509) 996-9894

winthropgallery.com

(509) 996-3925 info@winthropgallery.com 237 Riverside Ave, Winthrop winthropmarket.com winthropmarket@gmail.com 51 N. Hwy 20, Winthrop

SEE AD, PG. 19

Artists & Artisans

theslagworks@gmail.com Winthrop, WA

THE SLAG WORKS Custom iron work featuring functionally decorative and architectural applications.

WINTHROP GALLERY Representing many professional artists of the region as a cooperative gallery. Staffed and managed entirely by its artist members and volunteers. SEE AD, PG. 12

WINTHROP MARKET Local produce, art, crafts, and vintage collectibles. In the shady Winthrop Town Park. Every Sunday 10am - 2pm, Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day weekend.

WI N THROP MARK E T

SEE AD, PG. 17

(509) 997-2583 3 Twisp Airport Rd, Twisp lariatcoffee.com

(509) 996-4240 info@lariatcoffee.com 265 Riverside Ave, Ste B, Winthrop

(509) 997-5030 116 North Glover Street, Twisp

BLUE STAR COFFEE Wholesale providers of world class, hand crafted coffee. Visit our roasting plant & coffee bar in Twisp. Open Monday Saturday, 7:30am - 4:30pm. SEE AD, PG. 11

LARIAT COFFEE Stop by our downtown Winthrop store for coffee, accessories, handcrafted goods, gifts, home accessories and more. Also available throughout the Methow or visit our online store.

Coffee Roasters

bluestarcoffeeroasters.com

SEE AD, PG. 24

CINNAMON TWISP Handcrafted breads, bagels & pastries baked daily with local organic ingredients. Breakfast, lunch, cookies, bars & dessert! Espresso, smoothies & shakes. Delightful service in Twisp. SEE AD, PG. 12

rockinghorsebakery.com

(509) 996-4241

sixknotcider.net

(509) 996-3862 231 Riverside Ave, Winthrop sunmountainlodge.com

(800) 572-0493 sunmtn@sunmountainlodge.com 604 Patterson Lake Rd, Winthrop

(509) 996-3526 PO Box 1082, Winthrop

SIXKNOT CIDER Certified organic hard cider, no added sulfites or preservatives. Sold locally and regionally. Visit our Taphouse in downtown Winthrop. SEE AD, PG. 24

SUN MOUNTAIN LODGE Sun Mountain Lodge has 112 guest rooms, two restaurants, lakefront cabins, two pools, spa services, gear rentals, shopping, and 60 kilometers of trails. Call for reservations. SEE AD, PG. 7

BLUEBIRD GRAIN FARMS Your source for the finest 100% organic grains, fresh-milled flour and whole-grain blends, including mixes for great-tasting and nutritious cereals, pancakes, pilafs and more.

Goods

bluebirdgrainfarms.com

SEE AD, PG. 11

Eateries

rockinghorsebakery@gmail.com 265 Riverside Ave, Downtown Winthrop

ROCKING HORSE BAKERY Delectable pastries and savory breakfast delights, organic Espresso, salads, sandwiches and soups featuring local ingredients handcrafted in Winthrop’s favorite gathering spot.

SEE AD, PG. 15

21


eqpdgear.com

(509) 997-2010 open M–F 10–4 Sat 10–2 Visit us on the TwispWorks Campus hanksharvestfoods.com

(509) 997-7711 info@hanksharvestfoods.com 412 Hwy 20, Twisp hotspotfirepits.com

(509) 997-4766 (888) 295-4765 intertwineddesigns.com

(360) 319-0342

EQPD Using the principles of industrial design we create local manufacturing jobs building durable, practical, universal goods. LastBags, TaperTops, WideTotes, DuffleBoxes & more. SEE AD, PG. 9

HANK'S HARVEST FOODS Proud supporter of Methow Made & everything LOCAL! SEE AD, PG. 18

HOTSPOT FIREPITS Made in the Methow Valley by craftspeople and skilled metalworkers who are dedicated to quality and longevity. Multiple sizes and a variety of accessories available. SEE AD, PG. 24

INTERTWINED DESIGNS Intertwined Designs produces organic, eco-friendly clothing that is handmade in Mazama. Celebrating 19 years of making clothing in the North Cascades. Visit our website.

Goods

SEE AD, PG. 18

reflexologyandsalves.com/herbalsalves.html LUCINDA TEAR/BOTANICALS Hand-made salves of native and garden-grown plants, olive oil, (206) 550-3666 and local beeswax. The smell and energy of the Methow. lucinda@lucindatear.com SEE AD, PG. 19 themazamastore.com

(509) 996-2855 50 Lost River Rd, Mazama

thelambranch.com

(509) 923-1916

MAZAMA STORE A little bit of everything good… SEE AD, PG. 2

MCFARLAND CREEK LAMB RANCH McFarland Creek Lamb Ranch is a small sheep farm near the town of Methow. Our products include yarn (hand dyed, natural), roving, fleece, and meat. SEE AD, PG. 18

(509) 996-2525 Open Daily 7am-9pm 920 Hwy 20, Winthrop

mistyfjordseafood.com

(206) 409-1885 mistyfjord@methownet.com

mollyssoap.com

(360) 420-8132

METHOW VALLEY THRIFTWAY Experience the Thomson Custom Meats difference. All Natural. No Antibiotics. 15+ varieties of handcrafted pork & chicken sausage, and smoked jerky, ham & bacon. SEE AD, PG. 16

MISTY FJORD SEAFOOD Wild salmon direct from the fisherman to you. SEE AD, PG. 19

MOLLY'S SOAP Handmade in the Methow since 1982. Gentle, versatile, and long lasting. Time-tested recipes driven by homegrown herbs and natural ingredients. SEE AD, PG. 13

22

THRIFTWAY


pinetoothpress.com

(541) 337-5107 info@pinetoothpress.com 204 E 2nd Ave, Twisp

(509) 996-8297 501 Hwy 20, Winthrop

PINETOOTH PRESS Visit our print shop in Twisp or email Bryan about your custom project. Made Right. Made Right Here. SEE AD, PG. 24

ROBINS EGG BLEU Antiques, collectibles, vintage, home and garden. Repurposed, recycled, and locally crafted décor and furniture. Whimsical and needful things. Patina and rust!! SEE AD, PG. 13

smallwoodfarms.net

(509) 422-2444 23090 Hwy 20, Okanogan sunnypinefarm.com

(509) 997-4812 sunnypinedairy@gmail.com 932A Twisp River Rd, Twisp wildheartsnursery.com

(509) 341-4819 809 T/W Eastside Rd, Winthrop methowconservancy.org info@methowconservancy.org 315 Riverside Ave, Winthrop twispworks.org

(509) 997-3300 info@twispworks.org 502 S. Glover St, Twisp

97.5 FM

(206) 550-3666 lucinda@lucindatear.com

SEE AD, PG. 2

SUNNY PINE FARM Certified organic goat dairy. Methow made chèvre, feta & yogurt, honoring the earth, the goat & your taste buds. SEE AD, PG. 17

Sunny Pine

FA R M

WILD HEARTS NURSERY Open Friday, Saturday & Sunday 10–5, April-October. We offer for sale a variety of trees, shrubs, perennials, vines, and evergreens, all grown right here in the Methow Valley. SEE AD, PG. 12

METHOW CONSERVANCY The Methow Conservancy is a nonprofit organization dedicated to inspiring people to care for and conserve the land of the Methow Valley. SEE AD, PG. 13

TWISPWORKS Visit TwispWorks! Shop local artist studios, stroll public gardens, grab lunch from Fork! Or a delicious drink from the OSB Taproom. Partner hours vary. SEE AD, PG. 17

KTRT The Methow Valley's own independent radio station, featuring an eclectic mix of music and programming. SEE AD, PG. 2

LUCINDA TEAR/REFLEXOLOGY Awaken your senses and integrate your body. SEE AD, PG. 16

Reflexology

reflexologyandsalves.com

SMALLWOOD FARMS We strive to grow high quality fruit and produce. Breakfast and lunch served daily on the deck. Friday night dinners also available. OPEN YEAR ROUND!

Radio

(509) 997-ROOT

SEE AD, PG. 13

Organizations

(509) 996-2870

SAWTOOTH RIDGE WOODWORKS (JEFF + NOELLE) Locally made modern rustic and contemporary wood home décor. Featuring mantels, floating shelves, open kitchen shelving, vanity mirrors, custom tables, bed frames and more.

Goods

sawtoothridgewoodworks.com Facebook/Instagram: @sawtoothridgewoodworks info@sawtoothridgewoodworks.com Made in Twisp

23


n Sixk

ot Taphous

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Local & regional craft ciders, beer, wine, kombucha, craft sodas & sparkling ciders.

42 TAPS IN ALL LOCAVORE LUNCH AND DINNER MENU Mon–Thurs 11am–8pm • Fri & Sat 11am–9pm Sun 11am–8pm Kid Friendly • Riverfront Deck 231 Riverside Ave, Winthrop 996-3862

SIXKNOTCIDER.NET

LARIAT COFFEE roASTERS BREWING EQUIPMENT ~ Kalita - Freiling AeroPress - Baratza - Bonavita

Award-winning coffees ~ Okanogan county’s oldest roaster!

LARIAT RETAIL STORE DOWNTOWN WINTHROP

Handcrafted Artisan Gifts Goods Pendleton Blankets & more! 24

265 Riverside Ave, Suite B; Winthrop, WA / 509.996.4240

Profile for Methow Valley News

Methow Made 2019  

What you can find — and where to find it — for all things Made in the Methow.

Methow Made 2019  

What you can find — and where to find it — for all things Made in the Methow.