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THE

THE PULSE MAGAZINE

PERCUSSION CHALLENGE

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SAB FITNESS

A PASSION FOR

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THE PULSE VS

9

#STOPASIANHATE

APRIL 2021

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FALCON FANTASTIC Behind the Curtain


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LETTER

THE

SWINGING B R I DG E VOLU M E 1 1 7

EDITION 23

FROM THE

APRIL 2021

STUDENT DIRECTOR

ASST. STUDENT DIRECTOR

AMY LINT

EMILIE RUSH

W

EDITOR

ell, we made it. What a year it has been. From working around COVID to working around all of the hate in our country, we have finished the race.

CORINNE YOUNGBERG

While this is my last magazine and semester, I am confident that I am leaving you all in even better hands as Julia Mary will be taking over for me with a lot of exciting plans for the future.

COVER PHOTOGRAPHY LIAM FITZSIMMONS

I hope you enjoy the last issue of our magazine for the year. I thank you for all of the memories and wish you all luck in your future endeavors. Signing off one last time.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF BRIAN SHERMEYER MAGAZINE MANAGER

Soak it in, STUDENT LIFE EDITOR

CULTURE EDITOR

SPORTS EDITOR

KAITLIN MERLINO

JUDY KYEI-POKU

JULIA MARY REGISTER

BUSINESS MANAGER

BRAND MANAGER

WEB MANAGER

TAYLOR GIBSON

ANDRE FRUEH

WESLEY CHEAH

YEARBOOK MANAGER CAROLINE HOLMES

DESIGN ASSISTANT SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER CASSIDY BARLOCK SHANNON BILLINGTON AUDIO & VISUAL MANAGER

RADIO MANAGER

MUSIC PROGRAMMER

NOLAN HOGENBOOM

RAVI AHUJA

LIAM FITZSIMMONS

1 UNIVERSITY AVE SUITE 3058 MECHANICSBURG, PA 17055 (Downstairs South Wing of the Larsen Student Union) The Swinging Bridge Magazine is published through The Pulse: Messiah University Media Hub, run by students. The Pulse consists of Pulse Radio (90.7), The Clarion yearbook, and The Swinging Bridge Magazine. The Swinging Bridge staff strives to publish quality student writing, photography, and design.

Brian Shermeyer Editor-In-Chief

LETTER FROM THE

FUTURE EDITOR

D

id I ever think me, a dance major, would be editor-in-chief of a magazine? Nope, never. When I was a freshman, I probably would have laughed if you told me I was going to be editor-in-chief of The Swinging Bridge my senior year. It has been a journey learning how to be the Sports and Health editor this year, but I am thankful for the experience and for Brian helping me along the way. Next year, The Pulse staff is looking to expand the content of the magazine. I am all about exciting, funny or controversial topics that are impactful to you as students. Please reach out to me if you have any story ideas. Alright that’s it,

THE HEARTBEAT OF MESSIAH UNIVERSITY

To learn about job and volunteer opportunities, email thepulse@messiah.edu.

Julia Mary Register Future Editor-In-Chief


TABLE

OF

CONTENTS

STUDENT LIFE 11

CULTURE 17

SPORTS & HEALTH 23

2

11

19

STRESS FREE SEMESTER

3

CAMPUS CLOSET

WHY MEN WEAR SHORTS IN THE WINTER

5

INTERNING AT A NON-PROFIT

SERVICE DOGS

MORE THAN JUST PETS

13

SERVICE DOG QUIZ

TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE

14

FALCON FANTASTIC

GAINING CAREER EXPERIENCE THAT MAKES A DIFFERENCE

BEHIND THE CURTAIN

7

15

CREATING BOUNDARIES AT SCHOOL AVOIDING BURNOUT

9

A PASSION FOR PERCUSSION

UNDER-APPRECIATED BUT HIGHLY IMPORTANT

AUTISM AWARENESS MONTH BECOMING INFORMED

17

#STOPASIANHATE

HOW STUDENTS HAVE BEEN IMPACTED BY ASIAN HATE CRIMES

THE END OF SPRING SEMESTER THE FINAL PUSH

20

MUSIC THAT GOT YOU THROUGH THE SEMESTER

21

ATHLETIC GRADUATE ASSISTANTS

THE NEXT STEP IN ATHLETICS

23

THE PULSE VS SAB FITNESS CHALLENGE WHAT CLUB IS MORE PHYSICALLY FIT?

26

PASSING THE TORCH

ADVICE FROM SENIOR ATHLETES

27

ALL ABOUT INTUITIVE EATING PROPERLY FUEL YOUR BODY

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APRIL 2021


STUDENT LIFE

STRESS-FREE SEMESTER

BY KAITLIN MERLINO

W

ith finals week creeping up on us once again, now is the time to pull out all of the mental health stops you can. This month, I asked some students about what has been getting them through this semester, with the hopes that their suggestions can help you and I to navigate the end of classes. Sophomore social work major Jordan Zercher discovered that she needed to switch up her routines this spring. “After a few weeks in the spring term, I realized that what had worked for me last year was no longer cutting it,” Zercher said. “For me, that’s meant finding new study spaces, trying new ways of making to do lists, and allowing myself to break from what I normally do. I’m still figuring out what this will look like but it has been helpful in relieving stress and getting rid of the monotonous feeling of the semester.”

“Something that helps me relieve stress before it happens is to really evaluate any opportunity before I commit to it,” Phykitt said. “I ask myself: ‘Will it bring me joy more often than not?’ ‘How often will I complain about this thing?’ ‘Will it bring me closer to God?’ I’ve said no to so many wonderful opportunities, yet feel so much more at peace than I have in prior semesters.”

"It is important to prioritize what you find most important and most rewarding."

Maybe what has worked for you in the past is not helping you now. You are not alone in that. Like Zercher, shake up what you are doing to get out of that rut. If you feel stuck, there is always something you can do to change it, whether that is something small or redecorating your room.

It is important to prioritize what you find most important and most rewarding. With the sheer amount of opportunities during college, it is easy to become a “yes” person. However, taking the time to figure out what you actually want to do will prevent you from feeling trapped in your commitments.

Nearing the end of her Messiah career, senior musical theatre major Katie Phykitt has taken a strategic route when making plans.

While you are balancing your various activities, it is also important to take time to develop your sense of self and your relationships, as sophomore public relations major Amelia Crouse has done.

5 MINUTES

“This year has been pretty crazy and stressful, but I’ve found that setting aside time to be intentional about building and maintaining relationships has really helped,” Crouse said. “This can be just getting meals with friends and catching up about our days or being open to discuss what is the source of stress. I’ve found that simply having dialogue with someone is a stress reliever.” Like sophomore computer science major Abigail Garrido, you can also motivate yourself by making time for the things you enjoy. “I do the usual things to relieve stress, like listening to music or drawing, but I think my best tactic is having something to look forward to,” Garrido said. “For me it's moving out with my family and events in the apps I play. It motivates me to get through the week and not get so bogged down with the present and whatever is currently stressing me out.” As the spring semester comes to an end, try to implement some of these tips to take care of yourself and your mental health. Best of luck to everyone on their finals. THE SWINGING BRIDGE

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STUDENT LIFE

CAMPUS CLOSET why men wear shorts in the winter THE CALVES, THE COLD, THE CONFUSION BY JULIA MARY REGISTER It is 30 degrees outside, the wind is blowing and winter coats are bundled tight. And yet, numerous men are seen walking around campus wearing shorts. Wondering students and faculty see these men and think, how can they not be cold? Why do they wear shorts in the winter? To answer these questions, four men were asked on March 4 about their special fashion choices.

For Nicolas Kane, a senior finance major, his shorts come out around 45 degrees. As a member of the Daisy Dukes, a rec dodgeball team, he is used to wearing shorts with his teammates all year round. “A lot of athletes tend to wear shorts, usually guys that have nice calves,” Kane said. “I’d say that’s a plus as well. Just trying to show off.” Sometimes Kane and others anticipate warm weather and bring out the shorts before their time. This leads to regret and cold calves during long walks across campus. “I’m a little chilly right now to be honest,” Kane said. “Yesterday was an unusually warm day and it gave me a little hope, so I wore them now only to be disappointed.”

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APRIL 2021


STUDENT LIFE Michael Mourelatos, a sophomore cybersecurity major, has an unique reason for justifying his choice of shorts in the winter. “My legs get less cold than my upper body,” Mourelatos said. “I’ve got kind of hairy legs, I think that might be a factor.” Mourelatos’ friends question him all the time about his clothing decisions. His girlfriend in particular does not understand why he does not wear long pants. “My friend’s twin brother calls us polar bears,” Mourelatos said. “Not sure what he means by that, but we can stay warm during colder temperatures I guess.” While at times Kane and Mourelatos have regretted wearing shorts on a cold day, Stevie Snodgrass and Ethan McKeehan have not. Both stand by their love for shorts. Snodgrass, a sophomore mechanical engineering major, prefers shorts for both comfort and fashion. “I got socks for Christmas and if I’m wearing pants then I can’t show them off,” Snodgrass said. “My legs don’t really get too cold, so it’s comfortable.” McKeehan, a freshman broadcasting and media production major, will put pants on if it is snowing or below freezing outside, but otherwise shorts are his preferred choice.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY LIAM FITZSIMMONS

His love for shorts all year round started in high school when he walked to his aunt’s house before driving to school. For McKeehan and others, a short cold walk in shorts is not worth wearing pants for the whole day. Shorts in the winter are a fashion statement and a way of life. No matter how many friends, parents or teachers question them, these men stick with shorts over warmth. “It’s my personal style, I just like wearing shorts,” McKeehan said. “Wearing long pants, it feels weird to me sometimes. I’m more comfortable in shorts.” There you have it, folks. Everyone has their own personal style and for these dudes, it is shorts in the winter.

THE SWINGING BRIDGE

4


STUDENT LIFE

GAINING CAREER EXPERIENCE THAT MAKES A DIFFERENCE BY CHRISTINE LAMOREUX

N

on-profit organizations focus on giving back to the community and operate to fulfil the needs of the public or a specific group. You can make your own contribution by interning at one during your college years. Internships are a vital part of the college experience and help students prepare for the workforce after graduation. Many Messiah students decide to intern at a non-profit, which can operate differently from the typical internship experience. Senior social work major Joy Hammond is currently interning at two non-profits this semester. The first, Families United Network (FUN), is an adoption and foster care agency in Mechanicsburg. In addition, she works at Partnership Planners LLC as part of their Foundry Makerspace branch which partners with a Harrisburg school, community agency or church to initiate, participate, research or advocate in some way for initiatives that impact the community.

“My professor is the field placement coordinator for our social work students,” Hammond said. “She took our interests into account and then connected us with an agency that may fit. Then the students had to take the initiative to reach out to the agency, send our resumes, collect our clearances and have an interview with the agency.” Hammond described her experience as an unpaid intern at a non-profit similarly to working a paid job. Interns have a set amount of hours they must fulfill and, if they are unable to be at work, they must call in 24 hours prior. This may differ between organizations, but it is best to treat your internship with professionalism and commitment. Because of the COVID regulations at FUN’s office, Hammond splits her hours between going into the office a few days a week and working remotely in her apartment on campus. “My typical workday would begin with waking up at 8:30 to get ready for my senior field placement with FUN,” Hammond said. “I would arrive at their office around 9 a.m. and I wouldn't return to the college until around 3

Hammond connected with FUN through the social work department.

5

APRIL 2021 PHOTO BY TIM MOSSHOLDER ON UNSPLASH


STUDENT LIFE

or 4 p.m. Then I would come home and begin my Foundry Makerspace projects around 4 p.m. until about 6:30 p.m.” The pandemic has affected how jobs and internships operate in general. “Normally, I would be going into schools or driving to community organizations but, because of the pandemic, all of my work is completed virtually on campus through reports, video meetings and research,” Hammond said. Hammond said her field experience has helped solidify the doubts about her career after graduation. Working with FUN has given her the real-world experience of social work and helped her prepare for what to expect. Another senior social work major, Alexis Gerald, is interning at Randi’s House of Angels (RHOA), which supports children and their families who have been exposed to domestic violence. Originally hired to work at another non-profit, COVID changed Gerald’s plans. Luckily, her supervisor connected Gerald with RHOA when that internship fell through. “My workday looks like meeting with my supervisor and discussing ongoing projects,” Gerald said. “I check emails and conduct research. I am currently researching trends in child abuse in the state of Pennsylvania and grant opportunities. It is a lot of computer work because my internship is fully remote.”

tern,” Gerald said. “I've enjoyed the additional meetings where I am learning new things and being mentored which is different than when I was working full time.” Joy Fea from the Career and Professional Development Center has some helpful tips when searching for an internship. “Most of these sites don’t advertise internship opportunities on their websites,” Fea said. “So a student should contact them and ask who would be the best person in the organization to talk to about internship opportunities.” She explained that a lot of the sites are looking for extra help and many are willing to assist and train students in the process. Upon contacting the organization students should prepare a resume and send it to the organization. Some of the most popular non-profits among Messiah students that Fea mentioned were Bethesda Mission, Hope International, Salvation Army and Hope Walks. If you are interested in working with any of these non-profits or others, the Career Center can help you get connected. Interning at a non-profit is a great way to gain experience in the field of your choice and get involved with the community. You can impact lives, and it looks great on a resume.

Gerald enjoys being given the opportunity to grow and learn from the other staff members. “I have worked for a non-profit full time and it is less intense to function as an unpaid in-

THE SWINGING BRIDGE PHOTO BY MOSES VEGA ON UNSPLASH

6


STUDENT LIFE

BY JOY HAMMOND

S

tudents have always had difficulty balancing their school and social lives. Now that a pandemic has students balancing online and in-person learning, the line between work and relaxation have been blurred even more. No one can predict how long the pandemic will last, but it has taken a toll on the mental and physical health of students around the world. “Self-care is very important, especially in a time like this,” junior international business major Hannah Hope said. “The negative effects from burn out can cause you to struggle with focus and motivation to do anything.” Students are more susceptible to burn out from increased usage of electronic devices for schoolwork, along with following the COVID-19 precautions of social distancing. This has caused students to feel isolated as academics take more precedent over family and friends. “Burn out is essentially a strong momentum of built-up negative habits, all concluding in extreme exhaustion at the expense of your physical, mental and spiritual well-being,” senior social work major Fatimah Jan said. “I’ve dealt with it before and it can be a horrible experience. I get anxious when thinking about

7

APRIL 2021

the amount of work I must do and then begin sleeping less, eating next to nothing, drinking less water, coming to work tired.” Betsey Miller, the certified nurse practitioner working at the Engle Center, equates the effects of burn out to those of a lit candle. “Imagine a candle: a lit wick can only burn for so long until it is burnt out,” she said. “It can no longer hold a flame and won’t function like it used to. In a sense, this is what happens to us as humans when we keep going and going with no reprieve.” One of the best solutions to avoid or minimize burn out is to set boundaries for self-care. Setting boundaries can be difficult, especially when working from home, but it is important for students to care for themselves. “I think setting boundaries for yourself in selfcare can start by making sure you get enough sleep every night,” Hope said. “Sleep is incredibly important and sometimes it can be the first thing that is overlooked.” Another way to set boundaries is by being intentional. Jan uses symbolic actions to signify when her work time has ended and when her break begins.


STUDENT LIFE

n d in t e n "H e a lt h y a d a r ie s d o t io n a l b o u n r e la t io n not sever s h ip s , t h e y n n e c t io n " enhance co

“When I come home from my internship, I change out of my clothes immediately and freshen up, so it feels as if I am taking off all that I carried home with me,” Jan said. “And the act of closing my laptop after my senior seminar class is symbolic, so when I see my environment again, I immediately feel calm and the stress of work feels easier to tackle.” Self-care is an important technique in maintaining a healthy balance between work and school. There are many ways for a student to practice this whether that is taking fifteen minutes in meditation or journaling to process events. “Self-care doesn’t have to be social media worthy face masks and bubble baths or extravagant nights out. It more often is taking small, simple moments to step away,” Miller said. “Personally I’ve begun to practice self-care by learning to delegate tasks to my co-workers to dilute the overwhelming schedule. I text a friend periodically throughout the day to check in, and I even keep a folder of saved cute animal pictures to glance at when I just need a second of relief.” Learning to be assertive is another way for a student to advocate for his or her mental and physical health. This requires a person to actively listen to their being and body and act to fulfill their needs.

biggest hurdle was learning to centralize my needs in life. This meant saying ‘no’ or gently reminding someone of where I was at in certain situations, rather than spending much of my energy anxious about someone’s reactions to my needs.” Boundaries can serve as important tools for building and growing relationships. “Boundaries are not brick walls around us that keep people out, but rather fences that allow us to open ourselves to relationships and care from others when we need,” Miller said. “Healthy and intentional boundaries do not sever relationships, they enhance connection and deepen our ability to connect by keeping us mentally well.” Students should know they are not alone in these feelings. Confiding in friends or health professionals about struggles is important to keep students accountable. It is important to remember that worth is not measured by productivity, and that it is healthy to take a step back sometimes. If you or someone you know is struggling with burn-out, make sure to reach out and take a day to practice selfcare. The Engle Center, Falcon Care and Minds Matter are also available for students to use.

ill fects w Side-ef to person m o r f e: vary n includ e t f o t u b person h au st io n - M en ta l ex co n ce n tr at e - In ab il it y to o ti va ti o n - L o ss o f m w o rk e to en g ag in e lo n g er - T as k s ta k sc h ed ul ed en ts - R eg ul ar ly as si g n m d an s cl as se el m in g h rw fe el o ve st re ss le ve ls - In cr ea se d ea d ac h es - Fr eq ue n t h an ce s - G I d is tu rb

A d d it io n a l s e lf care metho ds:

- E at in g a ba la n ce d m ea l - W o rk in g th ir ra ti o n al fero ug h ar s - Af fi rm in g own p o te n ti al an d w o rt h - T h er ap y / C o un se li n g - Sp en d in g e m o rn p ra y er o r th Sc ri p tu rein g in - U ti li zi n g en to rs fo r su p p o m rt - L is te n in g to a p o d ca st - T ak in g a 15 -t o -2 0- m in n ap ut e - So ci al iz in g w it h fr ie nds - Ph y si ca l ac ti vi ty / ex er ci se

“A part of setting boundaries is learning to be honest with yourself and the areas of your life that you cannot compromise in order to be a healthy person and to be in healthy relationships with people,” Jan said. “For me, the

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION PLEASE VISIT WWW.MESSIAH.EDU/FALCONCARE

THE SWINGING BRIDGE

8


STUDENT LIFE

BY ARRINGTON REGISTER

W

hen most people think about an orchestra, the percussion section is not the first thing they envision. Sections of violins, cellos and wind instruments come to mind first. But in the back of the orchestra are the percussionists with their wide variety of instruments, from the snare drum to keyboard instruments like the marimba.

“We know percussionists are there, and if that’s missing, it’s like we haven’t arrived somewhere,” Marin said. “It’s a subconscious importance.”

The percussionists are important to the collective sound of the orchestra and, like any other musician, each member puts time and discipline into crafting their performances.

“A lot of times you may not think you’re important, but if you find the little ways you can contribute to the larger sound of the ensemble and the little colors and textures you can latch onto, you can really find joy in the tiny things like what cymbal to use,” Labossiere said.

“In an orchestral setting, our job as percussionists oftentimes is to provide textural and timbre differences to what the rest of the orchestra is doing,” Director of percussion studies at Messiah University Erik Forst said. “You would miss us if we weren’t there playing that cymbal crash at the end of that huge crescendo.”

For senior percussion major Will Labossiere, knowing his place in the orchestra comes from the portion of the sound he can control.

Though percussionists often have shorter parts within orchestra pieces, they practice just as much as any other musician, from violinists to French horn players. Percussionists also perform solo and in ensembles, where they hold more of the spotlight.

Senior percussion major Gabi Marin has a similar view of percussionists’ roles.

9

APRIL 2021 PHOTO BY BRENT NINABER ON UNSPLASH

PHOTO BY JUNIOR ON UNSPLASH


STUDENT LIFE

“We don’t have the same limitations that other musicians have,” Forst said. “As long as we’re practicing the right way, our hands don’t get tired. Typically, percussionists practice more than everybody else does.” Forst encourages his percussion performance students to practice five hours per day, but they often find they need more than that. “When I was counting hours, I would spend eight, ten, twelve hours in a day, especially on the weekends when I would just keep going,” Labossiere said. “I stopped counting last year because I found it more productive to think about what was accomplished.” All of this practice is necessary not only to learn to produce beautiful sounds, but also to help percussion majors find the types of percussion instruments they like best. “What I try to do is get my students to develop a practice routine where they hit as many things as they can possibly hit in a very detailed and nuanced way,” Forst said. Forst has his first-year students practicing on a variety of instruments each day, spending anywhere from twenty to sixty minutes on each.

For Marin, staying motivated is about putting her heart into playing any instrument she picks up. “I always go back to that feeling I get when I hear music and, whenever I’m tired or don’t understand what I’m working on, I like to go back to seeing everything holistically,” Marin said. “It’s all music and it’s all beautiful and, even though this concerto in marimba doesn’t sound like the music I personally like, it all comes from the same kind of roots.” As a long-time percussionist himself, Forst finds that playing a variety of instruments and pieces keeps him passionate about music. Currently working on an end-of-semester recital, even playing a new piece slowly is exciting. “I listen to it and I’m like ‘this piece is awesome!’ I got a little chill while I was playing it,” Forst said. His passion was evident as he spoke about why he loves percussion. “I keep doing this because I have those feelings about the music that I play, the sounds that the instruments make. I even like the way that these metal pipes sound when I play them. I think they’re gorgeous.” Forst said.

At its essence, percussion is all about making interesting sounds. “There’s this percussionist that teaches out in California who has a formula that says that every instrument should be able to make 10,000 sounds,” Forst said. “We, as percussionists, need 10,000 instruments to make all those different sounds. That’s kind of the world that percussionists inhabit. We’re always looking for ways of making sound artistic.” In the end, percussionists are every bit the artists that other musicians are, whether they are playing a melodic instrument or a bongo drum. “We’re more musical than people think. I think I’ll end it with that,” Marin said. “That kind of says it all.” So next time you find yourself listening to an orchestra, look for the percussion section and appreciate the unique sounds they add to the piece. Each cymbal crash and strike of the snare drum is the product of the passion and practice that they put into their craft.

With these rigorous practice routines, percussion majors have to find ways to stay passionate and face the music when it gets tough. “Sometimes it’s really challenging to be in the practice room and not hear any improvement, until one day it will just click - the ‘practice room discoveries,’ we call it,” Labossiere said. “There’s no greater feeling than getting something that you’re working on for months. I love the process of seeing the growth that you can get in music.”

PHOTO BY ŁUKASZ RAWA ON UNSPLASH

THE SWINGING BRIDGE

10


STUDENT LIFE

SERVICE D GS THEY ARE MORE THAN JUST PETS

BY MORGAN BATHGATE

S

ervice dogs come in different shapes and sizes and can complete different tasks every single day. These dogs may know up to 50-60 commands on average and their jobs can span across the spectrum. Speranza volunteer Stacy Witalec has seen the expertise of service dogs firsthand. Speranza is a volunteer shelter for dogs, cats and even farm animals. They collect donations and spend time walking dogs that are waiting for a forever home. Witalec has worked with Speranza since 2004 and currently owns Rex, a therapy dog who works in a hospital.

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APRIL 2021

“Service dogs play a critical role for people and for so many organizations and the type of service they provide varies,” Witalec said. “From emotional support, to insulin detecting, the list goes on and on. These dogs go to work because they want to help people.” Mobility assistance and guide dogs are the most common types of service dogs. Labrador retrievers and poodles are often trained to assist individuals who are wheelchair bound or blind. Diabetic, seizure alert and seizure response dogs are also common. Golden retrievers are commonly bred in order to help epileptic and

diabetic people, and can sense when their owner is low on insulin or has a seizure. Other dogs can help with psychiatric and autism support. In fact, the highest percent of Americans with a service dog belong to individuals with autism. These dogs act as a social icebreaker for young kids while growing up. Havanese, doberman pinschers and standard poodles tend to be trained for these kinds of situations. Unlike service dogs, emotional support animals are typically not allowed to enter most places without a license. Emotional support animals are often only allowed in limited lo-


STUDENT LIFE cations, while service dogs can go anywhere. The Americans with Disability Act (ADA) does not recognize emotional support animals in public, as they are trained to help a specific owner versus being trained to aid someone with a disability. Service dogs are more than pets. According to the ADA, they are considered to be workers. Petting one is generally not considered a good idea while they are working. Attempting to feed, touch or even talk to a service animal can be distracting and can cause endangerment to the owner. Likewise, it is important to treat the owner with respect. People with disabilities may feel self conscious or offended when their animal receives more attention than them. Though it sounds nice to get to take a furry friend with you everywhere you go, it can be embarrassing for people with disabilities. You can show the most respect by adhering to their needs. For students on campus, we may encounter a situation where another student owns a service dog. If you notice someone who does have a service dog, Witalec encourages students on campus to treat them all the same.

IF

YOU

NOTICE

SOMEONE

WHO DOES HAVE A SERVICE DOG, WITALEC ENCOURAGES STUDENTS ON CAMPUS TO TREAT THEM ALL THE SAME. “It's natural for people to see an animal in a public place and want to pet them, but what they don't understand is that each therapy team puts in hours and hours of work to get to the point of certification,” Witalec said. “I could see other students having the same conflict, especially in their own buildings with their floormates. It can be hard not to socialize with a dog on the floor.”

Witalec pointed out a problem a service dog could have on campus would be trying to feed a service dog treats. If possible, refrain from doing so as this could take away from their ability to focus on the care of the owner. There is a stereotype that service dogs are only allowed for certain people, and a select few at that. Witalec thinks that this idea should change. “Studies have shown the overwhelming positive effect an animal can have on someone, who will in turn, make a positive impact through their work,” Witalec said. “It's a win-win for everyone. Unfortunately, there aren't enough organizations educating themselves about the benefits of having therapy animals on staff or even having a therapy animal organization make regular visits for a staff break.” At our own campus, we’re fortunate enough to work with Adi, our own service dog. Adi works as an on call golden retriever, according to the Engle Center.

Though she is not on campus presently because of COVID-19, she is often a regular visitor in the counseling offices of the Engle Center. We eagerly await her return, and you can still follow up on how Adi is doing following her Instagram page, @adithegolden. To conclude, Witalec wanted to leave us with one more piece of information:

“WHEN YOU MEET A DOG WITH A HEART THE SIZE OF A MOUNTAIN WHO WANTS NOTHING MORE THAN TO GIVE AND GET NOTHING IN RETURN, YOU REALIZE HE'S THE IDEAL ONE TO PUT A SMILE ON THE FACE OF SOMEONE IN NEED,” SHE SAID. “I THINK IT'S HARD FOR PEOPLE TO UNDERSTAND UNTIL THEY'VE SEEN IT HAPPEN BUT ONCE YOU DO, YOU'RE FOREVER CHANGED.”

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STUDENT LIFE

SERVICE D GS QUIZ

!

BY MORGAN BATHGATE

Let us test your knowledge about service dogs by taking the quiz below.

1. Which of the following is NOT required

in order to register a canine as a service dog?

a. Prove that you have a clinical disability

in order to qualify for the Americans With Disabilities Act to own one.

b. Have had the service animal trained

to do a specific task, whether it’s through personal training at home or registering through the Canine Good Citizen program.

feel judged, and openly denying the presence of a service animal can make someone feel uncomfortable. The best thing you can do is ask questions as long as it fits the situation, and respect their distance. Service dogs are “workers,” and not pets. You should usually try to avoid petting them, but if you ask permission and they say yes, you can.

3.

TRUE or FALSE: It is against the law in the state of Pennsylvania to fake having a disability in order to have a service dog.

registered service animal.

The answer is true. It is against the law and considered a misdemeanor. Furthermore, claiming to have a disability to possess said dog is considered a crime that can lead up to a $1,000 fine and a year in jail.

d. Provide documentation as a form of

4.

c. Provide a license as a proof of owning a

proof for managing a service animal.

The answer is d. You do not need to provide any kind of documents to prove you have a therapy dog. In fact, being asked is against the law, and you do NOT have to give any sort of documents to prove this.

2.

Which of the following is considered impolite and unethical to do in the presence of a service dog?

Which group of the population relies the most on service dogs?

a. Occupational therapists

d. Amputees

3-4 points

Spectrum

b. Ignore the service dog.

5.

c. Ask questions in order to accommodate

TRUE or FALSE: As of 2020, approximately 500,000 service dogs are helping people in the United States.

d. Respect a service dog’s boundaries.

The answer is true. These numbers continue to grow every year.

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Much to learn

c. Low-functioning people on the Autism

b. Veterans

a. Touch the dog with permission.

The answer is b. Service dogs are essentially a part of the person who owns them. While it is rude to pet a dog without permission, it can be just as offensive to ignore a service dog completely. People with disabilities often

0-2 points

You may not know a lot about service dogs, but there are plenty of opportunities to learn more. Take a look at some of the resources mentioned in the article to get started.

The answer is c. Veterans come in at an extremely close second.

the person with a disability.

Scoring:

Room to improve Great work. You know a lot about service dogs and their work, but there is always more to learn. Keep working towards this knowledge.

5 points

Expert on all things dogs Wow! You have got this down pat. Share your knowledge with others and be sure to continue learning about the amazing capabilities of service dogs.


FALCON FANTASTIC BEHIND THE CURTAIN BY EMILIE RUSH

A

  fter enduring an entire semester with lim   ited campus events or ways for students to connect and socialize with each other, Messiah put a lot of time and money into making Staycation a four day long extravaganza. JP Edmunds, the coordinator of Student Involvement and Leadership Programs (SILP), saw Staycation as a way to launch something big, something unlike the school had ever seen before: The Falcon Fantastic. The game stems from the hit British reality game show, “Taskmaster,” which follows contestants as they have to use their creative and logical brains to work through a list of challenges. The Falcon Fantastic team wanted to mold the show so that it was enjoyable for students participating and could also be re-created in future semesters. This meant embracing certain game show restrictions. No task could take too long and they could not be too hard or expensive. Edmunds gathered Cody Ford from SGA and Emilie Rush from The Pulse to curate his idea and bring it to life. Ford admits that in the beginning, he was not sure the event had the potential to take off. “I wasn’t sure about the general participation that we would get for this kind of event,” Ford said. “I thought way more students would have left campus compared to the amount that I assumed left.” Drumming up participants and excitement for the event proved to be a problem at the beginning.

The first draft of The Falcon Fantastic could easily be called a failure. Students were asked to submit a one minute homemade trick shot video, and the best videos would then be chosen to move onto the next round. However, only two students submitted a video. When the first major promotion was sent out to the student body via mass email, the prizes had not been solidified and would not be for another two days. This caused some students to delay applying. “I saw the email, and I skimmed it because it sounded fun, but when I saw how much of a time commitment it was and didn’t see a prize, it wasn’t worth it,” Jenna Humcke, a sophomore, said.

Even when the grand prize was announced, a new Macbook Air, the team still did not see signups skyrocket. The planning team pushed back the original video deadline and eliminated the second round altogether, allowing contestants to head straight to the live show for a chance to win the grand prize. This still did not increase student participation.

FALCONLIFE FUN STUDENT

And it did! The Falcon Fantastic was a success. A few dozen toilet paper snakes and hand painted portraits later, Sam Blevins was crowned the first Falcon Fantastic winner and walked away with the grand prize. Blevins was not one of the original contestants to apply, but he did go into the final event planning to give it his all. “I have always enjoyed game shows and stuff like that so I knew I had a shot,” he said. “I signed up because it looked fun, and my favorite part was getting to know the other contestants. I would most certainly play again.” The two students who submitted videos to the first round were also given a prize, as the planning team knew they had to recognize those who had been on the journey from the very beginning. Getting The Falcon Fantastic up and running was indeed a journey, but after changing and reworking the original plan so many times, it would be a mistake to call the show a disaster. “I think that we’ve opened the door for new kinds of events for the student body,” Ford said. “I’m hopeful that we are able to put on more events like this in the future to engage students.” Thanks to the hardwork and dedication of The Falcon Fantastic team, the vision of Edmunds and the high spirits of the students that played to win, the show went on. Do not be surprised if this is only the beginning, the Falcon Fantastic will be back bigger and better than ever.

Disappointed and scrambling, Edmunds, Ford and Rush put their heads together to design a one day event, reorganizing sign ups so that now all students could enter regardless of their participation in the original first round. On the day of the show, the Falcon Fantastic team was struck with yet another setback: the original host was nowhere in sight. Gathering all the courage she could, Rush took the mic and prayed that the show would indeed go on.

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Autism

Awareness Month BECOMING INFORMED

BY TINA LAMOREUX What is so special about April? “April 2nd is Autism Acceptance Day! My hope for this day is that we start to move forward from just being ‘aware’ of autism and move into acceptance,” Rachel Feiler Marshall, a 2015 Messiah College alum and current special educator, said. “I teach eight of the most wonderful kids ever. I love that I get the honor of seeing every lightbulb moment. I love that no two of my students are the same.”

of special education at Messiah University, said. “Friends provided brief respite or partnered with us in hard decisions. I am especially thankful for the many community servants who love our son well even when his behaviors are difficult or awkward.”

During the month of April, the world has an opportunity to reach out, get educated and minimize stigma against this marginalized group. Awareness is a great way to circulate acceptance and support for individuals who are on the Autism Spectrum.

This month is not only about spreading awareness, but also celebrating neurodiversity. Neurotypical is commonly used as a term for people who do not have a developmental disability, it is short for neurologically typical. Atypical is a term used for those who have developmental differences or are on the Autism Spectrum.

Of course, support during one month of the year can only go so far. It is important to provide empathy and understanding all year round. Change happens with community reinforcement and advocating for yourself and others.

While we have been telling you to learn more and become aware of Autism, we have not actually informed you about any of it. Luckily, Burchard was able to spell it out for us.

“As a mother of a child with severe Autism, I am so thankful for the community who supported our parenting, especially when we felt isolated from church or community participation,” Melinda Burchard, professor

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APRIL 2021

“Autism Spectrum Disorder, ASD, is a fairly common developmental disability. Individuals with ASD may experience a range of challenges with communication, social skills or behaviors. Because Autism is a spectrum disorder, some with this disorder may need special education and may even struggle to live independently,” she said. “Others on this spectrum learn and work


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successfully with accommodations and understanding. In fact, here at Messiah University, we have successful members of our academic community who have ASD.” While motor impairments are fairly common, not all folks with Autism have them. It is a common misconception that everyone with Autism or other intellectual disabilities has low motor skills, but this is not true for everyone on the Autism spectrum. Low motor skills can be part of someone’s symptoms of Autism or related to another disability. If you have a friend on the Spectrum, Burchard recommends to celebrate both similarities and differences with them. “When you engage with a friend with ASD, enjoy your shared interests just as you would with any other friend, appreciate your similarities and celebrate your differences. Appreciate how different perspectives expand our world,” she said. Autism Awareness Month is often celebrated by fundraisers, conferences, art shows, presentations and other events that spread awareness and celebrate neurodiversity. Because of the current pandemic, there are not many of these in-person events being held during Autism Awareness month, but there are still ways you can contribute. ASERT (Autism Services, Education, Resources and

Training) hosts online events all year round, such as social events, training, panels, workshops and discussions around Autism and other developmental disabilities. Aaron’s Acres, located in Lancaster PA, offers a safe space for adults and kids to have fun and strengthen their social skills. They offer a summer camp where high school students can volunteer to be a buddy for one child, similar to the buddy system at the Special Olympics hosted annually by Messiah. Donating to local organizations that provide programs for the community is always a great way to help out. Educating yourself and sharing information on social media or within your circle is a good way to minimize myths and misinformation about the Autism community. If you have a friend or a family member on the Spectrum it is important to learn of their different strengths and where they need patience or extra care from others. Having those conversations with them or their caretakers is important to have an active role in your friend’s or loved one’s life. Having an open mind, open ears and an open heart to understand those who are different from you is the key to making a positive impact.

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HOW STUDENTS HAVE BEEN IMPACTED BY ASIAN HATE CRIMES

#STOPASIANHATE BY JUDITH KYEI-POKU WITH BRIAN SHERMEYER

T

 hese last two years have been filled with numerous issues coming at us left and right. There has been the fight against COVID-19, the surge in police brutality and now we are battling the rise of Asian hate crimes. Prejudice and racism are not new to this country, and as the year continues, COVID-19 has not only changed how our society functions, but has invoked the rooted racism and the way the world treats the Asian community. Strong words used by former President Trump, such as “the Chinese Virus,” do not help to calm down the hate, rather it amplifies the covert hatred to be overt. “With last year’s presidency, the overt racism in this country has become more acceptable,” junior nursing major Irene Lee said. “I am hurt, scared, devastated, numb, desensitized and I hate that I am desensitized because this has become a norm. Every marginalized community in this world feels and knows this pain.”

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APRIL 2021

Bawi Cung, Douglas Kim, Ms. Yaun, Xiaojie Tan, Daoyou Feng and Xiao Zhen Xie are just a few names of those who have either been assaulted or killed because of the ongoing display of Asian hate. What has been happening to the Asian community in this country requires considerable time for all of us to listen, reflect and learn.

diversity. Until now, I have never felt so Asian in my life,” Kara Jung, a freshman athletic training major said.

“Stop Asian Hate” was formed around March of last year to address and bring awareness to the discrimination that the Asian community has been facing since the pandemic began. The social activist group has been working hard to collect data on the hate and harassment incidents that have been increasing.

“Any kind of racism makes me mad. Racism towards Asians has always been around. Personally, I’ve experienced it in the form of microaggression. I feel like during COVID-19, it gave people a ‘valid’ reason to be racist towards the Asian population,” Jung said. “In Germany, these kids were talking about Coronavirus. As they walked past me, they looked directly at me and said ‘Coronavirus’ and that is when I realized they were talking about me.”

Because of the pandemic, Asian people have recently been singled out and made very aware that they are of Asian descent, whether they were born in Asia or not. “I was born in America but I grew up in Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan and Germany. When I moved to PA., I noticed the lack of ethnic

Discriminatory comments are not something that is new to Jung. Being Asian, she can recount different times where hate has been directed at her because of her appearance.

Jung’s experiences have not all just been in regards to international racism, but also in this area of Pennsylvania.


CULTURE “I was at the Capital City Mall with my family, and I noticed we were the only Asians there. A group of young girls walked past my sister and I saying racial slurs directed at us. They were people of color just like us, so it caught me off guard,” Jung said. “I have experienced stuff like that from my time in Germany, but my sister had not. After that I felt unsafe and wanted to leave the mall. When I expressed my frustration to my parents, they told me, ‘This is normal, we grew up with this,’ but this should not be normal.” One outlet that people could turn to for support and love, especially at Messiah, has not been as vocal or supportive as some would like.

“The church has been too silent about the injustices that occur in our society. Why is it that we are taught to be like Jesus on Sundays, but we fail to act like him throughout the rest of the week?” Lee said. Jung is also very frustrated about how all Asians are grouped together as one and people do not understand or respect the different nationalities within the Asian community. “People have been grouping all Asians together which is also frustrating. I get mad for Chinese people because it’s unacceptable for people to be referring to the Coronavirus as something like the Kung Flu,” she said. “It seemed as though everyone was mocking the Asian population, including those in influential positions.”

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROBINSON GREIG FROM UNSPLASH

This has also scared and frustrated Lee throughout the attacks because of her ties to those who were injured and killed.

“Three of the women killed in the attack at the massage parlor were Korean and I’m Korean. I can see my mothers and aunts as the victims,” she said. “I have been seeing a lot of things on social media about how the name of the shooter was more publicized than those who were harmed. Why aren’t the names of the victims more important? Why does the killer always get the press?”

BY NATE CASTILLITTO

P

raise be to God. As we enter the last month of this semester, let us reflect on the faithful work of our Father during all times. Like most years, we might now find ourselves hobbling toward the finish line under the weight of classwork and extracurricular commitments. In such a tumultuous time as the one we have faced, many of us have borne their share of loss and heartbreak over the past year, too. It is in our stress and affliction, however, that we are reminded of the powerful deliverance of our Father. The prophet Isaiah told the imperiled Judeans,

“Fear not, for I am with you; be not dismayed, for I am your God; I will strengthen you, I will help you, I will uphold you with my righteous right

Even through all of the frustration and pain, Lee still sees hope for the future.

hand,” (ISAIAH 41:10).

“Anti-Asian hate is not new, people consume Asian culture but have not been standing up for us in these times. However, I do know many pastors and even athletes who have been speaking up and bringing awareness,” Lee said. “We have an immense amount of work to do in achieving Christ-like righteousness and justice for BIPOC (black, indiginous, people of color) in our respective America. I am a strong believer that Christ also shares the pain within the injustices we endure.”

Whether we have just grown weary or have found our backs against the wall, it is God’s righteous hand that upholds us. And while our direction can look bleak, there is comfort in the knowledge that the Lord of all things will deliver us when the dust finally settles. May we see His hand in all that we do.

Right now, the Asian community needs us to listen and hear their voices. We, as a community, cannot be silent about what is happening across the world to our Asian brothers and sisters, and it is our responsibility to condemn any type of hate and work together to create lasting, effective change. Together we can help stop Asian hate. THE SWINGING BRIDGE

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The End of Spring Semester THE FINAL PUSH BY NATE CASTELLITTO The sun has come out and the trees have regrown their leaves. It is April, and finals are quickly approaching. Summer is just around the corner. As we find ourselves near the end of the spring semester, let us reflect on the joys and challenges of these past few months. Sophomore Kaitlyn Farah is very thankful for this semester. “This semester has been very joyful. While there has been a lot of hard work, the Lord has instilled a confident peace in me,” she said. “I have also been continuously blessed with the most amazing friends.” From freshmen to seniors, students often find their semesters go by in a breeze. Without J-Term and with finals week taking place online, this semester may seem even shorter than normal. For many students in their last semester, the end is bittersweet. Senior Bryanna Pye, in her last term at Messiah, cannot believe how quickly it has all gone. “This semester has been a whirlwind. I’m convinced that each semester goes by faster and faster, because we only have a few weeks left,” she said. “I’ve gotten to be involved in so many projects and events, but also made sure to take time and invest in my relationships with those around me.”

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Like this past fall, students weathered the storm of studying and fellowshipping within COVID-19 restrictions. However, they were creative in planning fun, safe activities and modifying past campus favorites each week. “Some of the sweetest memories I’ve had on campus [this semester] have been night tennis, random picnics, late nights in Jordan and Kline and spontaneously jumping in the breeches,” Farah said. Sophomore Matt Eells is also thankful for relationships he has made. “I’ve been really motivated and encouraged by a bible study that a few of my friends run. In the midst of a difficult situation, I’ve been refreshed by good conversation that stems from digging into the word together,” he said. The pleasant weather of late has opened up even more possibilities for students to build relationships. In addition to other outdoor activities, many students have started taking their meals and school work outside to various spaces around campus. Sophomore Eli Whitehead-Zimmers is one of those people.

“I love walking to dinner and seeing people scattered all across the grass and in adirondack chairs. I feel like when everyone's outside I'm constantly bumping into people I know and having great conversations,” Whitehead-Zimmers said. “Outdoor dinners are one thing from the pandemic that I definitely hope sticks even after COVID is a thing of the past.” With another semester almost under their belts, students can be proud of the work they have done this spring. On top of the usual rigor of the academic year, COVID-19 brought on its own set of obstacles and challenges. Whether in-person or remote, students embraced adversity with diligence and determination. With this in mind, Messiah University students have reason to celebrate this spring.

AS WE FIND OURSELVES NEAR THE END OF THE SPRING SEMESTER, LET US REFLECT ON THE JOYS AND CHALLENGES OF THESE PAST FEW MONTHS.


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Music

THAT GOT YOU THROUGH THE

Semester BY JUDITH KYEI-POKU With the end of the semester rapidly approaching and more deadlines for quizzes, projects and exams, one tool that helps students get through it all is music. Music can be a constant and grounding way for students to unplug, help study and get motivated to do work.

Felix Zarate, a cybersecurity major, really likes “Corazón Sin Cara” by Prince Royce. This song has helped him to stay on track and push through the semester. This song allows Zarate to feel closer to home, connect him with his culture and reminds him of who he is through his tough times.

Here at Messiah, students listen to a variety of genres across many continents including worship, country, rap, rock, R&B, Latin and K-pop.

Politics and international relations major Kennesha Kelly-Davis said, “There is an album more specifically than a song that has helped me get through this semester which is RM’s ‘Mono.’ This album allows me to just focus on my schoolwork and feels like a warm blanket on my mind almost. It’s very introspective and just overall calming that whenever I know I need to really get work done it’s the first thing I put on.”

These songs resonate with Jeffers and others because of the themes and content within them. “Both of them are really vulnerable songs that speak about mental health issues as well as how each artists’ faith plays into that,” Jeffers said, “with the respective songs touching on being honest with God about his feelings and thinking you’re not worthy of the mercy God gives”.

From these students alone you can see the variety of music not only listened to, but that has helped students get through this challenging semester. Although this semester looks a lot different than years past, one thing that has remained a constant in students’ lives is music.

THIS ALBUM ALLOWS ME TO JUST FOCUS ON MY SCHOOLWORK AND FEELS LIKE A WARM BLANKET ON MY MIND ALMOST

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One of Messiah’s nursing students, Jadyn Jeffers, said, “I’ve really enjoyed ‘New Mercies’ by Taylor Janzen and ‘Honesty’ by Jason Gray.”

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SPORTS & HEALTH

ATHLETIC GRADUATE

ASSISTANTS THE NEXT STEP IN ATHLETICS

BY BRENDAN LABRA

A

s graduation approaches for senior athletes, they consider what the next big step will be as they start their professional careers. It can be difficult for athletes to say goodbye to the college lifestyle and also step away from their sport, possibly for good.

There are, however, options open for student-athletes who have a passion and goal to continue in their sport. Many of these athletes transition into becoming graduate assistants.

PHOTO BY OLEKSII S ON UNSPLASH

While some may be familiar with the term, often student-athletes are unaware of this career path that is available to them that not only keeps them involved in their sport but also furthers their academic career.

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Several of Messiah’s current athletic graduate assistants planned to continue to a graduate program while also staying involved in athletics after graduation. Emily Farwell, the current volleyball assistant expressed that she thought her time in volleyball had come to an end after graduation, but when the opportunity arose to be a graduate assistant, she simply could not pass it up.

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“I felt that my time with college volleyball was probably done,” Farwell said. “After college, I decided to pursue a career in social work, but I realized how much I missed being involved with the sport and started coaching for a local club in the area.” Farwell began to seek additional education opportunities after her time in social work and Messiah seemed like a perfect fit. “Through my experience coaching the local team, I began to wonder if there was more of a career within athletics that could be a good fit for me,” Farwell said. “My college coach had talked to me about graduate assistant positions and eventually connected me with Messiah.” Beyond providing students with an opportunity to earn their masters and stay involved in the sport they love, graduate assistant programs allow students to have an increased role in coaching or team management. Messiah’s baseball graduate assistant, Gage Bley, has various duties when the spring season rolls around.


SPORTS & HEALTH

“Some of my duties consist of practice planning, working specifically with infielders or hitters,” Bley said. “I also help with the recruiting, providing athletic facility tours and travel logistics for away games.”

Bley believed the graduate assistant program has shaped him into becoming “a successful coach and spiritual mentor as well.” While coaching is a popular option, it is important to realize that not everyone necessarily has to be called to coaching in order to pursue this opportunity. Liam Dole, the current graduate assistant for athletic communications at Messiah, always saw his ideal career in the communications world. “I was a senior at my undergraduate institution and I knew that I wanted to begin my career working in athletic communications,” he said. For Dole, the day-to-day operations in athletic communications look a bit different than Farwell and Bley’s days in coaching. “My role as an athletic communications professional is to enhance the student-athlete experience,” Dole said. “Messiah has 22 varsity athletic programs, and we

focus on covering those programs. Our responsibilities include setting up live streams, recording live stats and writing about our teams.” At Messiah, having a successful athletics program is important but not as important as pursuing engaging relationships with other staff and the Lord. Farwell, Bley and Dole take pride in their craft as they serve the Lord through different aspects of athletics. “Yes, we care about winning, but even more so, we care about our players’ growth off the field spiritually,” Bley said. “I have already learned so much about getting the most out of our boys not only on the field but off the field, in the classroom and in the Messiah community.”

If you are a graduating athlete this year, consider looking into graduate programs to keep growing in your athletic, relational and spiritual pursuits.

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SPORTS & HEALTH SPORTS & REC

BY JULIA MARY REGISTER

O

n March 26, the Pulse staff and SAB staff went head-to-head in a fitness challenge to see which club was the strongest and fastest. Led by Kevin Ogden, director of campus wellness and recreation, the teams completed a fitness test similar to one students often take in middle or high school. The test was adapted from Mark Barroso’s six tests to gauge overall fitness. The test included a broad jump, pushups, sit-ups, 300-yard shuttle, burpees and a mile run. All exercises were timed to see how many reps or how fast participants could complete each task.

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This specific test is great for assessing overall fitness to find strengths and weaknesses in multiple areas of exercise. “When we’re trying to get a base fitness level of an individual, we’re looking at everything,” Ogden said. “It’s a really well-rounded group of tests because it’s not leaving off one area or over emphasizing another. It has all of our aspects of fitness.” The fitness challenge was not easy for any staff members from the Pulse or SAB. Each person found different exercises most challenging. The broad jump was the first section of the fitness challenge. Participants began behind a tape measure and jumped out as far as they possibly could.

“The broad jump is a lower body power test,” Ogden said. “It’s a combination of both speed and strength that tests both how strong you are and how quickly you can produce that strength.” This was one of the easier exercises for the staff to do and was a good way to ease into the test. As the test progressed, so did the difficulty of the exercises. The second and third exercise tested how many pushups and sit-ups each person could complete in two minutes. The pushups tested the endurance of the upper body muscles and the sit-ups tested core strength.


SPORTS SPORTS& &HEALTH REC “I found the pushups and sit-ups to be the most difficult exercises,” Faith Kerlen, vice president and student talent executive of SAB, said. “I know they're super basic exercises, but they challenged me because I don't tend to incorporate them into everyday fitness.” The third exercise was the 300-yard shuttle. Participants started at one end of the field and sprinted to the other side and back as fast as possible. “The 300-yard shuttle tests the anaerobic system,” Ogden said. “It’s a shorter test that shows how well your body produces and uses energy without the presence of oxygen.”

A burpee is considered a functional movement, involving a jump and push up in one continuous motion. “It’s a little bit of conditioning, aerobic strength, and functional movement all in one,” Ogden said. “It’s a pretty good catch all because if you’re weak in one of those areas, you’re not going to do as well in that test.” Some people had a goal of one burpee, others around 20. Three minutes started to feel excruciating long when doing constant burpees and having just sprinted 300-yards.

“I have been going for walks daily and this was the first time I could truly feel that my stamina has improved because of it,” Youngberg said. “I beat my goals and even got the best mile time of my life. Even though I am not athletic this was a good feeling.” After having completed the five other exercises, the mile run pushed participants' endurance and discipline to finish. It was rewarding to finish the mile run knowing you successfully completed all six stages. SAB ultimately won the fitness challenge! Their team scored higher in five out of the six exercises on the test.

For Morgan Zimmerman, SAB president, the 300-yard shuttle was the easiest exercise during the test.

“The hardest exercise for me was probably the burpees,” Andre Frueh, brand manager of the Pulse, said. “just because they take out so much energy from you and you really have to push yourself to keep going during them.”

“I ran track in high school, so it was something that felt comfortable for me and also is just something I enjoy,” Zimmerman said. “It also felt kind of nostalgic to my days of competing.”

The fitness test concluded with the hardest exercise of all: the mile run. Participants ran from the recreational field by cemetery hill, to the High Center, and back. Their finish times ranged from six minutes to 14 minutes.

Depending on their fitness level, participants were able to exercise in ways during the test they were not used to or push themselves to work harder to reach goals.

For others, running was difficult and triggered asthma symptoms. Depending on your preferences and health, a sprint can be more difficult than muscle endurance tests.

“The mile test looks at aerobic capacity or endurance,” Ogden said. “It largely comes down to energy systems in the body. If I want to know how cardiovascular fit you are, that would be the mile.”

“I think it was surprisingly helpful,” Shannon Billington, design assistant for the Pulse, said. “I recognized what I can push my body to do, whether it's those last few sit-ups or finishing out strong with a few more burpees”

For Corinne Youngberg, magazine manager at the Pulse, the mile run was a good way to gauge her recent aerobic fitness improvement.

Billington and others felt the work they did in their arms, core, and legs days after the test.

The fourth exercise proved to be one of the most difficult. Each person pushed themselves to see how many burpees they could complete within three minutes.

PHOTOS BY LIAM FITZSIMMONS

Andre Frueh, from the Pulse team, was clearly the top scorer for the test. He ran an amazing mile in just over six minutes and jumped over six feet.

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“I wasn't expecting to be so sore after the fitness test,” Billington said. “It just goes to show that by doing just a little bit of exercise and pushing yourself, it can actually really help to build up strength in your body.” Many Pulse and SAB staff members discovered ways they would like to improve their fitness after completing the test. “I would like to improve more in endurance,” Frueh said. “I was pretty exhausted by the end of the mile, although I didn’t take any of the exercises lightly. But I would like to be able to do more intense exercises and feel less tired afterwards.” Some had specific goals in mind when considering fitness improvement. “I would like to improve my cardiovascular fitness and flexibility,” Emilie Rush, assistant student director of the Pulse, said. “I've always wanted to be able to do a split.” Exercising regularly can help improve sleep, improve heart and lung health, increase energy and focus, and reduce anxiety. The American College of Sports Medicine recommends 150 minutes of exercise per week, which is roughly 30 minutes per day. Most Americans and college students do not meet that recommended goal. Ogden encourages students to get involved in holistic ways to exercise on campus. Students can visit the fitness center, join group exercise

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classes or learn virtually. “There’s a few different resources we have for individuals who want it,” Ogden said. “Our Instagram account, YouTube channel and website have a bunch of different workouts for upper body, lower body, functional training, core and body weight.” On the website, students can also book sessions with the fitness center’s student leaders to learn more about getting started or specific exercises. Feel free to contact Kevin Ogden at kogden@messiah. edu with any further fitness questions. If you are looking to gauge your individual fitness level or figure out what areas you can improve in, this test is a good place to start. Now is the time to ask yourself, how fit are you?


SPORTS & HEALTH

Passing the

Torch

Advice from Senior Athletes BY GRACE WELLMON The end of the spring semester means saying goodbye to the senior athletes as they close the chapter on their college career and begin an exciting new life post-graduation. Two senior athletes, Jayneisha Davis and Maelyn Elder, want to end this chapter by passing on wisdom and advice they have learned to the first-year student athletes.

Name: Maelyn Elder Major: Math with Teaching Certification Sport & Position: Women’s Swimming, Fly/Back/IM

Name: Jayneisha Davis Remember whom you are representing! Major: M.A. in Strategic Leadership Sport & Position: Women’s Basketball, Guard Take it one day at a time and savor every moment! “I would advise all first-year student athletes to tackle each day one day at a time. Coming into college as a 17 or 18 year old can be nerve-racking because it is a new place with endless options to choose from and adding extra-curricular activities such as athletics on top of everything is a lot. Being organized is a critical part of a successful college career, so be sure to find a system that will help you balance this new adventure of being a collegiate student-athlete. Be sure to cherish every moment with your teammates and coaching staff because these four years of college will go by fast. College athletics may feel new and different to you, but remember it is a great growing and learning experience that you want to take part in. So, buckle up and enjoy the ride but remember to take it one day at a time.”

PHOTO BY IGOR LEPILIN ON UNSPLASH

“As athletes at Messiah University, we have the unique experience of literally wearing the name of our Savior across our chest every time we compete. Messiah means anointed one of God, to be God's kings or servants, and wherever we go we are the image-bearers of Him. One of the most impactful moments of my athletic career at Messiah was being announced during my first MAC championship final as a freshman as ‘Maelyn Elder representing Messiah.’ At that moment, I was struck by the fact that whether I am competing or simply wearing my Messiah athletics gear to the grocery store, I have the opportunity to show others Christ and glorify Him with all that I say and do. This by no means requires me to be perfect, and I have messed up so many times. However, I would encourage first-years who have many seasons left to compete to think about what representing Messiah means to you and how that will impact the way you live both on and off the field, court, mat or pool.”

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ALL ABOUT

INTUITIVE EATING PROPERLY FUEL YOUR BODY BY LANEY KUCZMYNDA With the arrival of spring and warmer temperatures, many people start to think about body image. While some people respond to swimsuit weather with going back to the gym or starting a new diet, intuitive eating is a healthier alternative. Intuitive eating is the philosophy of listening to what your body needs and wants as opposed to restrictive eating. Heather Mayo, a senior nutrition major, is passionate about educating others on how to incorporate intuitive eating into their lives. Through her blog, Honest Health Heather, she works to teach people self-love and mindfulness, as well as stopping the destructive effects of diet culture. Mayo offers three tips for anyone wanting to implement intuitive eating in daily life: 1. Use a hunger/fullness scale--this helps you learn to listen to your body and figure out where you are on the hunger spectrum – do you just need a snack or a meal? This can help prevent eating too much when you do not need it, but also make sure you are getting enough fuel for your body. 2. Listen to your cravings--limiting yourself leads to unsatisfied cravings, which could lead to overeating. If you substitute a craving for a healthier option, that craving is likely to not go away. However, if you give into that craving, you are more likely to feel immediate satisfaction.

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3. Avoid distracted eating--eating while doing other things such as watching TV or walking to class can inhibit having a real sense of how your body is feeling. One strategy to avoid this is to completely plate your meals and take time to enjoy them so you can have a grasp on how your body is responding. There is a misconception that practicing intuitive eating means you can just eat whatever you want. Mayo believes it is essential to acknowledge the balance between what your body needs and wants, and what is healthy and will fuel your body. “It is important to pay attention to what you do like, but also what nutrients your body actually needs,” she said. “Make sure you have all different food groups and that you aren’t neglecting anything.” Intuitive eating provides you with the tools to better your relationship with

For more tips on intuitive eating and mind and body wellness, you can follow Heather @honesthealthheather on Instagram, or check out her blog, honesthealthheather.weebly.com.

food and your body, and these skills can translate into other areas of life as well, including exercising. “Life should be approached in a way of being intuitive, balanced and of being mindful around these kinds of things,” Mayo said. “Once you lose that intuitive side of listening to what your body needs, disordered eating or overexercising can come into play.” When first practicing intuitive eating, it can feel unnatural or difficult to be mindful, but the more you practice, the easier these strategies will become. Our bodies are constantly changing, and practicing intuitive eating is a journey. “There’s no such thing as a perfect diet, and it is important to give yourself grace around that,” Mayo said. “However, intuitive eating allows the freedom to mix it up and be able to enjoy different things that are good for your mind and also your body.”


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Profile for Messiah Pulse

Swinging Bridge Magazine: April 2021  

Read about the behind the scenes process of Falcon Fantastic and the event's outcome; Messiah students passion for percussion; and how Pulse...

Swinging Bridge Magazine: April 2021  

Read about the behind the scenes process of Falcon Fantastic and the event's outcome; Messiah students passion for percussion; and how Pulse...

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