Page 1

THE

THE PULSE MAGAZINE

for Halloween this year

TALES

in the midst of COVID-19

SPORTS & FAITH

17

CELEBRATING HALLOWEEN ON CAMPUS What students are doing

SPOOKY SEASON

15

13

CONNECTING

9

THE ROLE OF RA'S

OCTOBER 2020


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THE

SWINGING B R I DG E VOLU M E 1 1 3

EDITION 19

LETTER FROM THE

STUDENT DIRECTOR

ASST. STUDENT DIRECTOR

AMY LINT

EMILIE RUSH

I

t still blows my mind that I am in my last year here at Messiah. I really do love learning all of your stories. If you ever see me walking around campus, don’t be afraid to reach out and say hi. Or, if you have a story that you want to be told, shoot me an email and we can talk.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF BRIAN SHERMEYER MAGAZINE MANAGER CORINNE YOUNGBERG AUDIO & VISUAL MANAGER GENE BOONPIENPOL

COVER ART SHANNON BILLINGTON

STUDENT LIFE EDITOR

CULTURE EDITOR

SPORTS EDITOR

KAITLIN MERLINO

JUDY KYEI-POKU

JULIA MARY REGISTER

BUSINESS MANAGER

BRAND MANAGER

WEB MANAGER

TAYLOR GIBSON

ANDRE FRUEH

WESLEY CHEAH

YEARBOOK MANAGER

DESIGN ASSISTANT

SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

CAROLINE HOLMES

SHANNON BILLINGTON

CASSIDY BARLOCK

RADIO MANAGER

AUDIO & VISUAL ASSISTANT

MUSIC MANAGER

NOLAN HOGENBOOM

EDITOR

O C T. 2 0 2 0

LIAM FITZSIMMONS

RAVI AHUJA

1 UNIVERSITY AVE SUITE 3058 MECHANICSBURG, PA 17055 (Downstairs South Wing of the Larsen Student Union) The Swinging Bridge Magazine is published through The Pulse: Messiah University Media Hub, run by students. The Pulse consists of Pulse Radio (90.7), The Clarion yearbook, and The Swinging Bridge Magazine. The Swinging Bridge staff strives to publish quality student writing, photography, and design.

THE HEARTBEAT OF MESSIAH UNIVERSITY

To learn about job and volunteer opportunities, email thepulse@messiah.edu.

Normally, this edition would focus on the past and homecoming. However, like many things, homecoming has been cancelled. Because of this, we decided to focus on the things that we can have and do. I’m excited for you all to hear some of the Halloween customs of other countries, different experiences of students on campus and how faith impacts student athletes while they compete. There is a lot of joy in the past, but we cannot dwell on it. Let’s focus on what we can do and make the most of it.

Soak it in,

Brian Shermyer Editor-In-Chief


TABLE

CONTENTS

STUDENT LIFE 6

CULTURE 12

SPORTS & REC 21

2

11

17

NEW LIMITED SECTION OF SWINGING BRIDGE MAGAZINE

WORSHIP ON AND OFF THE FIELD

CAMPUS CLOSET OCTOBER EDITION

4

STRESS FREE SEMESTER COZY FALL VIBES WITH COZY FALL MOVIES

5

WORKING ON CAMPUS BALANCING SCHOOLWORK AND CAREER WORK

ONLINE FEATURE

13

CONNECTING SPORTS & FAITH

21

CELEBRATING HALLOWEEN ON CAMPUS

THE ATHLETICISM OF DANCE

CELEBRATING DURING COVID

REDEFINING WHAT IT MEANS TO BE AN ATHLETE

15

24

AS THE WEATHER GETS CHILLING, SO DO THE STORIES

HOW WELL DO YOU KNOW MESSIAH'S SPORTS?

SPOOKY SEASON TALES

SPORTS QUIZ

6

25

THE EXTRA STEPS TAKEN TO INCLUDE QUARANTINED STUDENTS

EASY DELICIOUS RECIPE

QUARANTINED ON CAMPUS

APPLE CRISP

9

26

CHANGING DUTIES DURING COVID-19

YOGA EDITION

THE ROLE OF RAS

1

OF

SEPTEMBER 2020

DAILY WORKOUT


STUDENT LIFE

CAMPUS CLOSET

BY KAITLIN MERLINO October is in full swing on Messiah’s campus. With leaves falling and temperatures dropping, students opt for warmer, more comfortable clothing. That does not mean that they sacrifice fashion in the name of comfort. Take a look at how a few of Messiah’s students draw inspiration from the fall weather and express themselves through their clothing choices. Emilie Rush “My hometown only has two seasons, winter and summer, so when I came to Messiah last year, I was excited to experience a temperate fall, and let me tell you it didn’t disappoint! My fashion sense really depends on my mood and how much effort I put in each morning. I’d describe my fall fashion sense as cozy, flowy and layered. I try to pair a bulkier sweater with something tighter on the bottom like pants or a skirt. I really like wearing semi-transparent tights under my dresses and skirts, I think it elevates the look and keeps me warm. Last year big, fur-

ry wool coats were really in style, and I got one for Christmas. I must say, it wouldn’t be something that I’d think would look stylish but it really surprised me with how versatile it ended up being. I found a way to put it into my outfits without it looking completely out of place. Fall fashion to me means layers. The temperature changes between the early morning and late afternoon can be dramatic, so you need to wear something that can change just quickly as the weather can. I think my clothes say a lot about me. When I’m wearing my lazy outfits it really appeals to how laid back I am and flexible. Also, the contrast between those lazy outfits and a nicer look just speaks to the fact that even though I don’t always dress up, I certainly can! Fashion to me is all about being comfortable and having a purpose. It helps me be comfortable in the skin I’m in and I’ll never take that for granted.”

cozy, flowy and layered

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STUDENT LIFE

Zach Busch “My style is a mix of hipster, casual, and a dash of prep — all-in-all pretty stylish. I take pride in the clothes that I wear and the outfits I create. You will rarely see me wearing sweatpants, especially in public. I try to always dress to impress, while also maintaining my own comfort. I think that if you

you warm and looking snazzy. Sweaters will always have a place in my heart because they look great and make you feel even better. It is just the perfect thing for an evening walk beneath the color-changing trees. I also like to wear a light sweater with a jean jacket over it and if that doesn’t say fall, I don’t know what does.”

Hope Trenkler “Fall is my favorite time of year for fashion. The warm, earthy colors, the layers, the boots! They all come together to create such fun outfits. In fall, I find myself leaning towards a mixture of vintage cuts and timeless staples. On warmer days, a peasant blouse and a swing skirt paired with riding boots and a belt keep me feeling breezy; like I'm ready to traipse through a pumpkin patch. On chilly days, chunky sweaters and trousers with heeled boots or sneakers keeps me warm but chic. Fall weather is perfect to play around with layers so knee-high socks or button-ups under sweaters are totally my jam. And, at the end of the day, a good flannel never fails in the fashion department.”

hipster, casual and a dash of prep look good then you will feel good even if it is not your best day. One thing I have done over the years is to buy clothes that fit my aesthetic and go with many different things so I can look good no matter what I put on. Clothing is the best way I can freely show off who I am and be proud of it, because I feel confident that I am putting together some great outfits. I can mix and match shirts and pants, then throw on a jacket or cardigan and bam, a whole look made in under 5 minutes. My favorite thing about fall fashion is jackets, cardigans, and most important, sweaters. I absolutely love my jean jacket and it goes with almost every outfit. The same holds true with most cardigans. If it is warm out, but that fall breeze is still in the air, a cardigan is a great fall essential to keep

3

SEPTEMBER 2020

warm but chic


STUDENT LIFE

Stress Free

Semester WAYS TO RELAX AND REWIND ON CAMPUS

BY KAITLIN MERLINO

October always feels like we have finally started to break in the shoe that is the semester. Classes delve into their materials and each of us begins to establish a routine. Though we tend to revolve our worlds around school, there is also a need to take care of our social and mental health. Especially during these times, it is important to find a way to balance everything going on in our lives. Now that Halloween approaches, there are plenty of activities to celebrate and relieve the stress that is oftentimes scarier than movie monsters. For some reason, watching people get terrorized by ghosts can be a therapeutic experience. Halloween is a great time to indulge that horror movie drive. One of my greatest quarantine discoveries, Netflix’s series “The Haunting of Hill House” provides the perfect amount of horror and heart. Through bewitching performances and expert camera work, the cast and crew portray the story of five siblings whose childhood literally comes back to haunt them. Years after escaping a ghost-infested house, each must face the truth of what happened that night, uncovering the mystery of their mother’s death.

Those who want more should read Sally Jackson’s book of the same name, which served as the inspiration for the 10 episode series. Though the book and the movie differ widely in their content, I can vouch that it equally captured audiences both just tipping their toes into the horror genre and seasoned enthusiasts. With the overwhelming success of the series, a follow up show, “The Haunting of Bly Manor,” premiered October 9. Based on Henry James’ novella “The Turn of the Screw,” this season provides viewers with the same actors but different characters and storylines. With homework mounting and tests looming, many of us have cast off leisure time in the name of studying. During this time, it is especially important to keep sane by taking frequent breaks, whether to take a short walk or just focus on something that isn’t school-related. For those looking to take a step away from a screen or textbook, hobby books can be a great solution. Even if you do not have enough time to start a specific project, taking 10 minutes to read a chapter about a subject you're interested in can provide a break and some inspiration for later. One of my favorites has been Stephen King’s “On Writing.” Throughout the book, he blends autobiographical content with sound writing tips. It is handy for when I do not have time to actually sit down and write something

non-academic, but still want to be involved in something I love. In my case, reading about writing gives me new tools to use when I do find that illusive free time. Both those off and on campus may feel disconnected from their peers, especially in contrast to previous years. Social distancing and masking both support our physical health, but we also need to work harder on mental health because of those new, but necessary, rules. Most of us probably have some degree of Zoom fatigue at this point, but it can serve as a valuable tool to keep in touch with family members or friends when we are unable to physically see them. Even create a schedule, setting aside a specific time to talk each week. It may seem like overkill, but who can deny the power of routine? If you always are free when your friend or family member is not (and the other way around), try downloading an app like Marco Polo, which allows users to record their messages for an asynchronous video chat. Having any type of communication outlet can help alleviate feeling isolated, even if it isn’t the same as in-person contact. All-in-all, remember to stay safe, stress-free and connected as the fall continues in full swing.

THE SWINGING BRIDGE

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STUDENT LIFE

Working On Campus BY KAITLIN MERLINO Often characterized by mountains of homework and an overwhelming lack of sleep, the college years push students to the limits of their intellect. Papers and projects encourage in-depth learning into a variety of subjects, and experienced professors provide valuable insight into their chosen field. However, time spent in a classroom only accounts for some of the learning done at Messiah University. The school boasts a hands-on model, encouraging and requiring students to embark on experiences within career environments. Messiah even offers certain on-campus jobs that allow its students to grow as individuals, leaders and professionals. Two key jobs in mentorship positions are at the Writing Center and the Career and Professional Development Center. The Writing Center operates as an on-campus resource for all students. At any point in the writing process, students can bring tutors their paper, thesis statement or even a fragment of an idea. “We really want our clients to take ownership of their writing and the writing process, so instead of merely providing an editing service, we dialogue and collaborate with our clients,” the Writing Center’s head tutor Lydia Pebly said. English majors, like Pebly, can engage in a job that actively stretches their writing muscles and provides valuable experience for their future careers. “I’m planning on teaching English, so there will be lots of similarities and skills I’ve built during my time at the Writing Center that will be a huge help to me,” Pebly said.

5

SEPTEMBER 2020

At the same time, the tutoring position isn’t exclusive to writing-centered majors. Senior theatre major Ellen Diehl also finds the position extremely rewarding. “I feel like I have a knack for encouraging people and mentoring people,” Diehl said. “And I think I have that potential, but this position has allowed me to really blossom in that way.” Not only do these students act in mentorship positions, they form a communal bond with their fellow tutors. “In our staff meetings we frequently share our tutoring experiences, so we pick up tips and tricks from other tutors, and we also talk through the challenges of tutoring and how to problem-solve,” Pebly said. Balancing school and work can be challenging, but Diehl enjoys figuring out how to juggle it all. “I’m able to set my hours in chunks of time when I don’t have classes,” she said. “But I was more strategic this year in setting my hours, keeping in mind, ‘I have to sleep, I have to eat, I have to take time for homework.’” The Career and Professional Development Center (CPDC) has the unique position of giving student workers career skills by helping their fellow students with career-related issues. The position itself is fairly new, debuting in the fall of 2019 with the redesign of the CPDC offices. According to senior communications major Cosette Schulties, the student career coach

position involves aiding students who drop into the CPDC offices with questions, looking over resumes and helping navigate various networking platforms. Senior public relations major Lauren Patterson first heard about the job opportunity during an Into the City trip to Atlanta. “I was an eager sophomore looking to find new connections and the CPDC provided just that,” Patterson said. “I also got to know the CPDC team a lot more and they are just such a positive and talented group of people.” Listing “have fun” as a key value for their employees, the CPDC team creates a positive working environment for everyone involved. “They not only care so much about the work they are doing for Messiah, but care so much about their co-workers and working effectively as a team,” Patterson said. “I feel uplifted and confident in my skills every time I work.” Though teamwork and comradery are important, the student career coaches also gain experience in a leadership position when interacting with students. “My position is a student leader… honing in on that leadership ability to take charge of a situation,” Schulties, who is also the president of the La Alianza Latina club, said. “While most of what I advise students is really recommendations, I think those recommendations have a lot of power over how a student takes their next steps.” Schulties also sees the position as an opportunity to connect with fellow students, establishing mutual understanding, respect and empathy. “I walk away with more gratitude and appreciation for Messiah. I have more love for the student body as a whole because I’ve gotten to know different pockets within that community,” Schulties said. Messiah’s multiple career opportunities provide students with places to test out what the “real world” feels like before graduation. Those interested in these positions or any others on campus should take a chance and apply: you may just find your passion!


STUDENT LIFE

THE EXTRA STEPS MESSIAH IS TAKING TO HELP QUARANTINED STUDENTS FEEL INCLUDED

A

s a Witmer RA this year, senior Kevin Cook knew that part of the job description involved upholding and enforcing campus COVID-19 rules. Given that leadership position, Cook felt responsible to set an example. “I was attempting to do everything to a tee,” he said. He still ended up quarantined, along with many other Messiah students. Across the country, everyone is talking about universities and how they are handling the se-

mester under the threat of COVID-19. Some schools, overwhelmed with the amount of cases on their campuses, shut their doors for the remainder of the fall. With a minimal number of cases, other universities choose to continue in-person learning. Messiah University has been dedicated to this cause, placing strict preventative measures in place to stem the spread among students. “Before I came to campus, I felt like the rules were really over-the-top,” sophomore nursing major Heather Schmidt said. “But as soon as I

BY KAITLIN MERLINO

got here, I realized how careful we need to be in order to stay open.” While abiding by the university rules, some students felt that there were inconsistencies as they applied to the whole of campus. Especially regarding the dining options, there were fewer restrictions and regulations at the beginning of the semester. The seating arrangements in Lottie and the other dining locations were not as spread out and students could spend more time eating and talking to friends -- all without wearing masks.

THE SWINGING BRIDGE

6


STUDENT LIFE “That’s how we all ended up here,” sophomore nursing major Natalie Zimmerman said, “because we ate a simple meal.” Schmidt said, “People can be completely abiding by the rules but still spreading it, and they just don’t realize that they’re not being safe.” At the same time, students noted that Messiah’s goal remains grounded in ensuring the safety of its students and staff. Taking the necessary precautions, like quarantining exposed students, has allowed Messiah to remain open. Many students’ experiences entering quarantine mirrored each other. Some received word that a close contact tested positive, then, grabbing a suitcase or bag, went to the Engle Center to begin quarantine. “I just threw together what I could,” Cook said. “I have maybe 30% of my belongings with me… It was a very stressful 45 mins to an hour. I think they tried to accommodate as much as they could, but it was very much ‘get this person quarantined ASAP.’” “I didn’t get the memo to pack a bag [before going to the Engle Center],” sophomore health and physical education major Sarah Ehrig said. “So someone had to go into my room and choose everything for me, and a bin showed up at my front door.”

Schmidt and other students began to have symptoms and reported them to the Engle Center. After a few days of self-quarantining, Schmidt said she “couldn’t smell nail polish remover.” That’s when she got tested and moved in to Smith Apartments to quarantine.

think anyone is to blame for any of this; it’s just a work in progress right now,” Schmidt said.

After seeing her roommate, Schmidt, go through the quarantine process, Zimmerman already knew what was coming once she tested positive. She notified the friends she had been in contact with, giving them extra time to pack and prepare for the move.

“Being online is hard enough; being in quarantine and being online is really tough for me,” senior health and physical education major Hunter Kent said.

Even with the stress of moving into quarantine, students praised the Engle Center nurses for their kindness and empathy. “They are really portraying God’s love right now and just ministering to all of the students,” Schmidt said. “Even with so much extra on their back, they aren’t missing a beat.” Nurses have also served as a contact with the rest of campus, providing a friendly face during daily check-ups and a contact for any questions or concerns students may have. At the same time, students have encountered some difficulties contacting specific campus departments for issues like finances. “You have to ask for everything and you can’t get through to anyone on the phone. I don’t

Navigating remote learning has also proved a challenge for those in quarantine.

The majority of the teaching staff show their dedication to their students, extending grace and respect during these times. Other professors demonstrate a stricter code, holding quarantined students accountable to the same standards as their other students. In these cases, students have had to practice self-advocacy, talking to professors about their situation. “I think people expect you to be sitting around doing nothing all day [in quarantine] ,” Ehrig said. “So, it shouldn’t be a problem to finish your schoolwork or be on top of things.” This expectation falls short of the reality these students are facing. Instead, they remain confined to an apartment, unable to even go outside for a short time. Students in quarantine report that their energy is low and, combined with the added anxiety, they find it difficult to concentrate in their classes.

STUDENT NATHAN ROWE gets his tempterature taken by an Engle Center nurse after being in quaratine for over two weeks.

7

SEPTEMBER 2020


STUDENT LIFE IN QURANTINE students are provided for with daily meals brought to them by the Lottie Nelson staff.

FRIENDS & FAMILY are allowed to stop by a quarantined student's window to say hi and check in on them.

"Every student, whether they are

on campus, remote or quarantined, has the capacity to engage with peers, professors and faith.

"

“The main thing for me is that I’m not getting stimulated in the same way I am in the classroom,” Ehrig said. Even through those hardships and sacrifices, some bright spots remain. “Every day, my friends will come knock on my window,” sophomore chemistry major Kevin Clarke said. “I’m very grateful for that because I get to stand at my window and have a conversation with my friends. I look forward to that every day.” A group of quarantined students Zoom together daily, ensuring a bit of normalcy and virtual interaction into their routines. “It’s good to have people there to ask you how you’re doing and to keep you accountable to doing your work,” sophomore mechanical en-

gineering major Matt Eells remarked. “I don’t know if we would all have the mindset and the attitude that we have if we didn’t have the times we got together.”

“In spite of being back in our ‘normal’ lives, I never want to be the person who just walks away. That’s not what we’re here for,” Eells said.

“It’s really tough because everything comes in waves when you really don’t expect it to. We’ve created this really great community and it’s been super helpful because every second of the day, you have someone who will likely be able to Zoom with you,” sophomore theatre and social work major Jordan Zercher said.

It’s amazing to see how Messiah’s sense of community expands past the heart of campus and into quarantine housing. Every student, whether they are on campus, remote or quarantined, has the capacity to engage with peers, professors and faith. These students in quarantine show that with reliance and tenacity, community isn’t just the people you live with; it’s those that you share your life with, even if that happens over Zoom.

All of the students expressed the desire to get others connected, since some are all alone in their quarantine experience. In addition, they are dedicated to continuing to provide support to those still in quarantine even once they have exited.

THE SWINGING BRIDGE

8


STUDENT LIFE BY LEANNE TAN

THE THE ROLE ROLE OF OF

RA'S

I

 n any normal semester, you can find senior social work major and third-time resident assistant (RA) Leah Olson and her residents crowded together in her room on a Monday night catching an episode of “The Bachelor.” But, as most of us have figured out by now, this semester is far from normal, and in person meetings have become a rarity. “I’m trying to be creative in finding things that we can do to encourage each other,” Olson, RA of Kelly Apartments section C and senior RA of Hess and Kelly halls, said. “I see my role of building community as writing notes, checking in on people individually, baking cookies or doing something to make people feel like they’re loved and cherished even when times are really hard.” The COVID-19 pandemic has caused numerous changes to campus this school year. From social distancing to modified visitation policies, we have had to make adjustments in social interactions. For a community-based institution like Messiah, this can make connecting with others particularly difficult – and no one understands this challenge better than the residence life team, whose day-to-day responsibilities revolve heavily around fostering and enhancing community involvement. “So many interactions happen candidly on floors, in the halls and at events where we’re all gathered together … and that’s not able to happen this year,” Caleb Miller, the residence director of Witmer Residence, said. “So, it does take a little bit more effort to interact with students.” Similarly, sophomore biology major and co-RA of Grantham Residence second floor, Savannah Navas finds the physical boundary between her and her residents to be the biggest obstacle that emerged in their interactions.

9

SEPTEMBER 2020


“Last year, if I’d see someone and they’d be having a bad day, I’d be like ‘come here, I’ll give you a hug,’ and that’s just a way I try to relate to people or comfort people,” Navas said. “And when I pray for someone, I like to put my hand on them or hold their hands, so not being able to do that has just been really difficult.” The mission statement of the Office of Residence Life is to “foster safe, hospitable and holistic living-learning environments.” For the physical well-being of the campus community, the safety aspect of the mission is emphasized more than before. Hence, a major component of the RA job description this year is ensuring that students comply with the university’s social distancing guidelines. “RAs are kind of seen as the COVID police right now,” Olson said. “This new responsibility is honestly hard to adjust to. No one gets into being an RA because they love enforcing rules. We want to talk with and get to know people, but now it’s different where I can’t invite people over to my apartment or host events.”

therapist therapist therapist therapist

STUDENT LIFE

Though not what she expected when she applied to be an RA, Navas now sees the added duty as a chance to care for and build relationships with her residents. “It allows us to hold our residents accountable … from a place of love,” she said. “Like, reminding them, ‘Oh, I notice your mask is down. Could you please pull it up? I don’t want you to get sick.’” For Miller, connecting with students has required a fair bit of intentionality on his part. This semester, he has made a conscious effort to get to know students he sees in the lobby of Witmer, learning their names and recognizing their faces even though it may not be as easy with their masks on. In addition to the efforts of the Residence Life team, the Division of Student Success and Engagement is playing an active role in cultivating community involvement across campus, specifically among first years. As a part of the “Becoming U” initiative, first year students meet as a floor each week during the time slots for chapel, engaging with various co-curricular educators to experience a variety of topics — all while following community safety guidelines.

“I think that’s a really great thing that didn’t exist before, where floors are able to have deep conversations together and to share some experience that will hopefully be able to tie back into conversation and interaction on the floor,” Miller said. “It’s a really exciting initiative that has come out of necessity, because we lost the ability to do some of the other ones.” While this semester has affected community living in more ways than one, it has also helped stimulate new ideas of connecting with others that were never considered before. Perhaps, all it takes is a little bit of effort, adaptability and innovation to make things work in this unusual season.

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Dr. Van Dyke and the rest of the Marriage and Family Therapy faculty develop Dr. Van Dyke restpossibilities of the Marriage and Family Therapy faculty the whole person to and fosterthenew for personal, professional, and develop the whole foster new possibilities personal,and professional, relational growth.person In the to classroom and in our newforMarriage Family and Dr.Therapy Van relational Dyke andtrain the with rest In of the classroom Marriage Therapy faculty develop growth. the and inand our pursue new Marriage and Family Clinic, visionaries in theand fieldFamily one of the fastest the whole person tothrough foster possibilities for personal, professional, Therapy Clinic, trainnew with visionaries in the field and pursue oneand of the fastest growing careers the M.A. In Marriage & Family Therapy. relational growth.careers In the classroom in our Marriage and Family growing through theand M.A. In new Marriage & Family Therapy. Therapy Clinic, trainTherapy with program visionaries in the fieldis and pursue of theonfastest The Marriage and Family at Wheaton College accredited by theone Commission Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy (COAMFTE), 112 South Alfred Alexandria, Virginia 22314, Dr. Van Dyke and Education restprogram of In theatMarriage Marriage and Family Therapy faculty develop growing careers through the M.A. &is Street, Family The Marriage and Family Therapy Wheaton College accredited byTherapy. the Commission on Accreditation 703.838.9808, coa@aamft.org for Marriage and Familyto Therapy Education (COAMFTE), 112 for Southpersonal, Alfred Street,professional, Alexandria, Virginia 22314, the whole person foster new possibilities and 703.838.9808, coa@aamft.org The Marriage and Familygrowth. Therapy program Wheaton College is accredited by theMarriage Commission onand Accreditation relational In theatclassroom and in our new Family for Marriage and Family Therapy Education (COAMFTE), 112 South Alfred Street, Alexandria, Virginia 22314, Therapy Clinic, train with visionaries in the field and pursue one of the fastest wheaton.edu/MA-FamilyTherapy 703.838.9808, coa@aamft.org growing careers through the M.A. In Marriage & Family Therapy. Dr. David Van Dyke wheaton.edu/MA-FamilyTherapy

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wheaton.edu/MA-FamilyTherapy

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THE SWINGING BRIDGE

10


ONLINE FEATURE

Published online October 1, 2020

Odd October Holidays F

BY ALEXIS SHEELY

Bring Your Bible to School Day

all has arrived here at Messiah University. While October is known for the spooky season of Halloween, many other odd holidays exist throughout the month, providing us with easy and fun ways to celebrate.

Starting off the month, Oct. 1 serves as Bring Your Bible to School Day. Because Messiah strives to integrate faith and learning, this holiday is fitting for our campus and easy for students to celebrate. Focus on the Family, a global Christian ministry group, sponsors this holiday, uplifting students to express their beliefs and share with others the truth of God’s Word. “As a professor of Hebrew Bible, I am deeply invested in Scripture, how we read and understand it, and how we respond to what we find in its pages,” the Department Chair of Biblical and Religious Studies and Associate Professor of Hebrew Bible Brian Smith said. “I am also interested by the role that the Bible plays in society.” Last year in the U.S., about 670,000 students from kindergarten to college and their families participated in the movement. Being involved encourages other Christians and helps celebrate religious freedoms in the United States. “The event is evangelistic, but also intentionally connected to the ‘religious freedom’ conversation taking place in our society,” Smith said. “I imagine that students studying sociology, political science, U.S. history, etc., would want to consider the event in light of the church/state separation that we enjoy here.” Smith also brings up a great point about the presence of a variety of religious practices within the U.S.

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“I also wonder whether Jewish and/or Muslim students would be interested in similar ‘Take your Torah’ or ‘Carry your Koran’ events,” Smith said. “What a great opportunity for interfaith dialogue!” Participating in Bring Your Bible to School Day is simple, but can entail a little bit more than just bringing your Bible to class.

their favorite Bible verses or meeting outside, socially distancing with their Bibles and talking about all things Christ. Spread the word about God’s love and spend some time with the Bible to celebrate today.

Focus on the Family makes some suggestions as to how students can celebrate, such as providing an extra Bible to give away to someone or writing down and passing out some favorite Bible verses. “Obviously, one of the best ways to celebrate Bring Your Bible to School Day is to do just that—bring your Bible to School, even if you’re not taking a class in Biblical Studies or Theology right now,” Smith said. “Or better yet, add a minor or double-major in Biblical and Religious Studies!” In the wake of COVID-19 and Messiah’s efforts to keep our campus safe, students can safely create faith-based conversations by setting up a Zoom call with friends to discuss

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Published online October 4, 2020

MESSIAH’S THEATRE DEPARTMENT BEGAN ITS FALL 2020 SEASON WITH A LIVESTREAMED PRODUCTION OF

Antigone BY KAITLIN MERLINO

S

enior musical theatre major Katie Phykitt and theatre professor Dan Inouye direct this classic Greek tragedy. Though originally written by Sophocles in 441 B.C., the cast and crew manage to breathe a modern relevance into the aged words.

Throughout the play, themes about the law and justice abound. When does anarchy begin: when the people break the law, or when the law breaks the people? Family loyalty, feminism and the place of faith also add to the conversation.

Opening to a chorus of “no justice, no peace,” the stage, bordered by a pilared office, stands still against the chaotic background of sound, empty except for two bodies outlined in chalk on the ground.

All of these themes find immediate relevance in today’s society.

Enter Antigone and Ismene, sisters played by Gabrielle Johnson and Jordan Zercher, respectively, arguing about the newest law by King Creon, portrayed by Joshua Murray. They have been forbidden to offer a proper burial for their brother, who was considered a disgrace, under threat of death. A faithful follower of the divine laws, Antigone defies this order, burying her brother and incurring the wrath of Creon. Believing in the power of law and order, Creon demands retribution for Antigone’s rebellion – and those connected with what he views as anarchy. Will law prevail over justice? Is it possible to make corrections after taking wrongful actions? In the end, how many bodies will join the outlines on the floor? For answers, you’ll have to watch the show.

REPARE FOR MINISTRY N THE WAY OF JESUS

t Pittsburgh Seminary prepare for ministry in the us. Together we welcome neighbors. We share Theatre usually finds its use as an escape from erences, and experiences. We expand our minds. the woes of the world, but this play allows aue challenged and enriched as we explore diences the to enter another world that mirrors ge of beliefs we bring to the table.their Join own. us!

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ONLINE FEATURE

With the murders of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor this summer, along with the upcoming election, now is the time and the place to talk about these issues. The cast finds the perfect way to blend modern issues and classical storyline together in the theatrical format “Antigone” offers. Johnson deftly portrays an unwavering princess, one unafraid of standing up against injustice, no matter the cost. Playing the role of King Creon as a modern politician, Murray stands at the opposite end; similarly stubborn, but blind to the effects of his actions. The Greek chorus behind them mingles with the voices of protestors around the country. Throughout the performance, audiences can feel the passion and enthusiasm the actors exude – even through a screen. Messiah is privileged to have the ability to still perform theatre productions during this time; taking necessary safety measures has become an art form of its own. The crew utilized masks and the live streaming capabilities, creating a socially distanced theatre that still engages audiences.

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CULTURE

CE LEBR ATIN G HALL OWE E N ON CA M P US BY JUDITH KYEI-POKU

T

his year a lot of events are looking different from usual. COVID-19 has put restrictions on many aspects of life. It is becoming a challenge trying to find different activities and events to do while following regulations.

For fall she wants to try to drop gifts off at her residents’ apartments. She wants to do activities that follow the fall theme while being safe. It gives her a good way to check by each apartment and see how her residents’ semesters are going.

October was a month that, as returning students might remember, students normally walk around in costumes, decorate their dorms and go trick-or-treating in their dorm buildings.

“With the new COVID restrictions and being in an apartment, it’s really hard for me to interact with people, but that’s not stopping me from finding ways to do so,” Arke said. “Even simple things like dropping off toilet paper, I’ll use to say hi and catch up with them.”

“As an RA of an apartment section it is difficult to think of creative ways to interact with my residents because, so far, with no visitation, it is hard to plan events,” Catherine Arke, a senior marketing major and a resident assistant in Fry, said. “But that doesn’t mean it’s not doable.”

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SEPTEMBER 2020

This gives her the ability to still show them that she is there for them if they need her and to continue building a bond with them.

The decorating part of the season, however, is going to be more difficult because of the interactive aspect. Despite this, Keanan Wolf, a senior education major is still in the mood to decorate. “As a typical college guy, I do not really decorate that much. But my roommates and I still want to make our apartment presentable,” he said. “One of my roommates wants to put pumpkins outside our patio.” In order to have events, you must abide by the regulations of disinfecting and staying six feet apart. Arke, like the rest of us, must find different ways to go about it. “I am sure people will still dress up in costumes. I want to hold creative competi-


CULTURE

tions, like a costume contest or even pumpkin carving, but in a way that people can still socially distance and enjoy themselves,” she said. “However, we will not be seeing trick-or-treating”. “COVID has made it stressful with coming up with ideas on what different events to hold. Before we did not have to think about how intentional we must be with planning,” Clara Haubold, a senior Human Development and Family Science major and member of S.A.B. (Student Activities Board), said. “We need people to follow the rules for the events to work. Whether it is a simple task like sanitizing a pen or abiding by the social distancing rule we need people to listen. However, events are still doable”. One of the events S.A.B. is hosting is “Screen on the Green.” The event uses a blow up projector, allowing students to come with chairs and friends to watch movies. They have hosted it on Friday and Saturday nights. “On Halloween itself we are also trying to have a fall fest. People will be carving pumpkins while socially distancing,” Haubold said. “People are also welcomed to come dressed up in costumes.” S.A.B. is working on other events to hold for the student body. A lot of bigger events, according to Haubold, will be held outside with social distancing and mask precau-

tious. S.A.B. plans to decorate the campus. They want to put lights around to give a more comforting feeling during these times. “I know what we are doing, even if stressful, is worth it. I hope that students appreciate our hard work and show up for the different events we have planned,” Haubold said. “This is all for them.”

This year is new to everyone but is not stopping students from adjusting to the new challenges that they are all facing. Even with COVID-19 some students are still choosing to remain festive.

Wolf is still optimistic about Halloween celebrations. He said, “I still think it could be fun. A lot of it in the past has just been people dressing up and walking around campus. We can still dress up this year and be festive. We can make this October enjoyable while socially distancing and wearing masks.” However, there are some things that are not possible. “We definitely cannot do trick-ortreating though. I remember last year we had candy bowls in the lounge and little snacks,” Wolf said. “I feel like in a season where people are down and not happy about a lot of stuff even if Messiah does something, like dress up for the day, it will boost people’s moods.”

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Spooky Season AS THE WEATHER GETS CHILLING, SO DO THE STORIES BY JOY HAMMOND

Tales

H

alloween is a special day in October where people can snack on free candy and tell scary stories. Originally a Celtic holiday, Halloween is a time where people dress up and go door to door to yell the phrase, “trick or treat.” This festive occasion is a national delight in the United States, however there are many countries who do not celebrate it. Some countries celebrate other holidays like Dia de los Muertos and Eid il-Burbara. At Messiah University, there is a diverse student body from a variety of cultural backgrounds. Messiah students share scary stories from different countries around the globe. Zoe Leininger is a senior film and media arts major. She is part Lebanese on her mother’s side with a story to tell about a special holiday that is celebrated in that country. Eid il-Burbara, also known as St. Barbara day, is like the Halloween celebration in America with a few differences. While children dress up in costumes and come to people’s doors at night, they don’t receive candy or chant “trick or treat.” Instead the children go around dancing and singing the story of St. Barbara and receive food or money for the feast. This food would consist of burbara, a bowl of boiled wheat grains, pomegranate seeds, raisins, anise and sugar or dough that is filled with walnuts or cheese. There are many versions of St. Barbara, but the storyline stays consistent. Barbara was a very beautiful daughter who lived in a pagan society. When it was found that she had converted to Christianity, she was chased by people who sought to kill her. She wore numerous disguises as she fled. She was miraculously saved each time she was about to be executed or captured.

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One version has Barbara locked away in a tower by her father. When he found out that she became a Christian, she was brought to the Roman prefect where she would be tortured until she denied Christ. This went on several days until the prefect ordered her beheading. Her father, as executioner, was struck down by lightning and the prefect died from fright.


CULTURE

With a chill down her neck, Ifunanya began to run. “Running, running. Why are you running?”

Mikayla Fenn is a senior HDFS (Human Development and Family Sciences) major at Messiah University. Having spent most of her life in Honduras, Fenn has heard one scary tale that continues to be told each year at her previous school. The story of La Llorena. This story is a Hispanic tale commonly known by those in Central and South America. Though there are different versions of this tale one aspect remains the same, the crying woman and her dead children. The tale begins with Maria, who marries a rich man with whom she had two children with. Her husband neglected Maria, causing her to drown her children in a river in a fit of rage. Immediately, she felt guilt and remorse for what she did and began to search the river for them. When she couldn’t find them, she drowned herself as well. To this day, she still searches that river in search for her lost children, calling out, “Dónde están mis hijos?” (Where are my children?). There are different endings to this tale, but one fact remains consistent. People describe her as a beautiful figure dressed all in white or black and crying. She was called La Llorena (The Weeping Woman). Many parents tell their children this tale to keep them from wandering out after dark.

It is said that if you hear her cries it may already be too late. She kidnaps lost and misbehaving children and they are never seen or heard from again. Kammy Undieh is a senior biology major. She is known as an avid storyteller with many spooky tales from her home country, Nigeria. This story is about a girl named Ifunanya and a voice that began to haunt her at midnight. Although it’s not a common story, Ifunanya is surely one that shouldn’t be read at night.

BY ROSEMARY JONES

“Washing, washing. Why are you washing?” the voice said. The girl threw the bucket under the sink and blasted the shirt with water. “Rinsing, rinsing. Why are you rinsing?”

The tale begins with Ifunanya watching the clock strike midnight. She had been studying alone in the classroom. Noticing that it was late, Ifunanya packed her things and put them in her locker.

Heart pounding, Ifunanya threw her shirt on the drying line and sprinted towards her dormitory.

That’s when a voice whispered, “Rushing, rushing. Why are you rushing?”

Crying, Ifunanya finally reached her room. She threw herself on her bed and closed her eyes. She could hear her heartbeat, the gentle whirring of the ceiling fans, and the snores of her dorm members.

She looked around and saw no one. Ifunanya slammed her locker door shut and began to walk towards her dormitory when the voice whispered again. “Walking, walking. Why are you walking?”

I WE ARE NOT ALONE

As she passed the laundry area, Ifunanya realized that she didn’t have any clean uniforms left. She dashed into the laundry area, took off her shirt and began to hand wash it with the detergent that had been left there by another careless student.

am sure that we all know what it feels like to feel confident, or at least relatively comfortable. Similarly, in the story of Peter walking on Water in Matthew 14, Peter was safe and dry inside the boat; he felt so confident that he called out to Jesus and said, “Tell me to come to you on the water.” But once he got out of the boat and into the water and the winds, Peter began to doubt. Thoughts were likely racing through his mind: I am only human. I can’t do this. It’s impossible. And with these thoughts, Peter began to sink.

“Running, running. Why are you running?”

Then, the voice came again, "Lying, lying. Why are you lying? And now you are lying on me."

In one of the most terrifying moments of his life, Peter called out to Jesus: “Lord, save me!" And as the Bible says, Jesus immediately reached out His hand and caught Peter. And just like with Peter, Jesus will always reach out and catch us whenever we feel like we are falling. We are not alone, even on our worst days. If you are sinking right now and it seems that there is no one to save you, call out to Jesus. He loves you. And, in times of strife, He will always pull you from the waves and into His arms.

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SPORTS & HEALTH

CONNECTING SPORTS & FAITH BY JOY HAMMOND

Messiah University strives to foster close community, service and faith on and off campus. These are some of the key factors that prospective students take into consideration when they visit for the first time. This is apparent in the university’s official statement on the unity of faith, learning and life in the student handbook. “All of our gifts, talents and interests are to be nurtured as acts of praise towards God while serving humanity and all creation.” Messiah has made efforts to ensure that faith is in every aspect of life on campus, from Agape Center service trips to the academic curriculum. “Christ Preeminent,” Messiah’s community motto, affirms their commitment to service for Christ and others. This commitment applies to Messiah sports too. The university offers 22 official sports, as well as club and recreational sports for any student to participate in. While the college prides itself on their athletic accomplishments, one aspect remains the same: their respect and praise to God in every play. Galen Fitzkee, a senior peace and conflicts studies major, has been playing tennis and

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cross-country throughout his entire high school and college careers. “Team prayers are a must before any athletic competition,” Fitzkee said. “Our faith keeps us motivated and focused on competing to bring glory to God by what we accomplish and how we act on the course or court.” When participating in athletics, he relies on God for peace and strength. “I personally find that I am closest to God when I am running or competing,” Fitzkee said. “I can tune out the distractions of ordinary life and focus on my sport.” Tyler McNair is another cross-country runner at Messiah, who has participated in the sport for the past three years. “We are used to talking about faith from the spiritual aspect, but everything you do is an outpouring of worship and God’s love,” McNair said. One aspect that McNair is thankful for is the physical ability God has given him. As a senior Christian ministry major, McNair has challenged himself to think more critically about competition and his faith.


SPORTS & HEALTH

“It’s not what it’s [sports] all about,” McNair said. “No matter what, win or lose, always give glory to God.” Faith plays a critical role in sports, bringing athletes closer to God and each other. One way in which Messiah university encourages the use of sports and faith is their sports ministry on campus. AROMA, also known as A Revolution of Missional Athletes, strives “to empower Messiah University students to participate in God’s Kingdom through sports.” The ministry has three core values: empowered by identity, participating in the Kingdom, and revolution of sports. AROMA combines athletic ability with acts of service. The ministry partners with a variety of organizations and churches to teach their athletes how to “pursue athletic excellence and develop Christian character.” Aaron Faro, the AROMA Sports Ministry Director and Assistant men’s soccer coach, listed many ways he has seen faith incorporated into sports. “I believe my identity in Christ is the most core part of who I am,” Faro said. “Within AROMA, we talk all the time about aligning our purpose in sport with our purpose in life. If our purpose in life is to glorify God, then that is also our purpose in sports.” Faro has been coaching for 20 years, although this is his 12-year coaching at Messiah. Inspired by his father-a former coach, Faro believes that this position gives him the chance to witness to others and show God’s love. “Billions of people around the world love sports and so it is an amazing common ground to build a relationship,” Faro said. “Relationships are how God chooses to

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WE ARE USED TO TALKING ABOUT FAITH FROM THE SPIRITUAL ASPECT, BUT EVERYTHING YOU DO IS AN OUTPOURING OF WORSHIP AND GOD’S LOVE

shine His light and love. We can leverage the powerful gift to build God glorifying relationships, which is how we can change the world,” Messiah University also offers club sports, which are part of the athletics department. Club sports maintain the same level of competitive spirit, however they do not play for the college like varsity sports do. Messiah offers five club sports: men and women’s club soccer, men and women’s ultimate frisbee, and club field hockey. Each one requires practices two to three times a week with games on the weekend. Some differences between intramural/rec and club sports are experience and commitment. However, both club and intramural sports strive to build relationships and strengthen Christian character.

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Emma Workman, a senior Engineering major, has been playing on the women’s club soccer team since freshman year. She is the team’s captain and has seen faith incorporated into sports through community. “God calls us to be in communion with one another,” Workman said. “I see it in the times teams come around and pray before games and build each other up when they face challenges.” Workman attributes her teammates as being the ones to push her to become a better follower of Christ. She uses her faith and love of soccer to glorify God. “I believe that God gave me the ability to play soccer and I want to use that gift for him,” Workman said.


SPORTS & HEALTH

There are many ways to worship and glorify God on campus. Worship isn’t just about prayer or singing. Glorifying God can come through acts of service, words of encouragement or competing in a sport. At Messiah University, everyone looks for different ways to integrate faith into the world. Some see God’s glory through the winning and losing of games. Some see God’s glory through community. The most important decision to make is this: “Whatever you do, whether in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through Him,” (Colossians 3:17).

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SPORTS & HEALTH SPORTS & REC

BY JULIA MARY REGISTER

REDFEFINING WHAT IT MEANS TO BE AN ATHLETE

W

hen the average person thinks of an athlete, they picture someone who plays a common sport, such as football, soccer or tennis. Often, dancers are overlooked and not recognized for the athleticism required for their art form. In reality, dancers possess the same strong, athletic physiques and abilities needed by athletes in traditional sports. Merriam-Webster dictionary defines an athlete as “a person who is trained or skilled in exercises, sports or games requiring physical strength, agility or stamina.” Gregg Hurley, associate professor of dance, certainly believes dancers fit the definition of an athlete.

“Dancing requires flexibility, strength and cardiovascular endurance,” Hurley said. “Professional athletes often step into a dance class and they’re amazed at how dancing requires the whole body to be engaged.” Leah DePra Emo recently graduated with a Bachelor’s in dance and an exercise science minor. She has experienced firsthand the athleticism required to dance in higher education. “I consider dancers athletes because I think that an athlete is one who trains their body to do specific things and reach specific goals,” Emo said. “Dancers are training their bodies to execute

choreography well and push our bodies to go higher, spin faster and be cleaner.” While dancers may have different goals compared to athletes who play traditional sports, they train in similar ways. Ryan Wong, a senior dance major, can attest to the physicality dancers possess. “We use the same amount of energy that most athletes do. We have to be physically fit and keep up in the gym to maintain the muscle mass that keeps our bodies going,” Wong said. “We condition ourselves just like other athletes and take a lot of principles from yoga and pilates.” Dancers often face an extra challenge in their athletic art form that athletes who play football or soccer do not.

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SPORTS SPORTS& &HEALTH REC “Something that makes dancing that much more difficult is where the athlete can grunt and make any kind of face her or she wants to, a dancer, for aesthetic reasons, is asked to create a great deal of effortlessness while performing flexibility, strength and endurance,” Hurley said. Many people choose to watch dance for the artistry and narrative, while not realizing the effort a dancer is putting into each movement. Dancers are not allowed to show the audience how exhausting dance really is. Ballet is well-known for the extreme strength and athleticism required in order to perform it, adding to the challenge of making it look effortless. “Ballet is double the core strength training than some of the other styles,” Wong said. “My legs and calves are stronger from ballet. Taking ballet classes have made me a better hip hop dancer.” Hurley emphasized the challenges of ballet. “Because of the poise and control needed to make performing strenuous activities look easy, ballet is one of the more athletic styles of dance. The physical athleticism is so deceptive in nature for ballet,” he said.

“Throughout high school, taekwondo alongside dance helped me cross train,” Emo said. “Taekwondo focuses a lot on strength and cardiovascular movement. Dance typically focused on technique, choreography and flexibility, so that was a nice pairing” Wong also experienced the benefits of dancing and playing sports simultaneously. “I relate most to tennis because with tennis you have to be flexible and quick on your feet. Being a dancer helps a lot with being light on your feet,” Wong said. “In tennis you have to move to the ball and anticipate it and with dance you have to do the same thing. You have to anticipate the next beat, the next movement, or you’ll be behind.” Ultimately, dancing is beneficial to athletes of any sport, and vice versa. “I was a better athlete growing up because I danced and because I had a better understanding of what my body could do,” Hurley said. “Both sports and dance use the physics of the body, so one could inform the other. It wouldn’t hurt a dancer to experience momentum in sports and it certainly wouldn’t hurt sports players to step into a classroom and find their muscles in a dance class.”

Other physically challenging styles of dance are modern, tap and hip hop. Breakdancing will also be added to the next Olympic games, officially making it a sport. Oftentimes, professional athletes take dance classes in order to cross train for their sport. This helps them fine tune their movements and engage their whole body when competing.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANDRE FRUEH

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SPORTS & HEALTH SPORTS & REC

"Any

dancer you talk

to will emphasize the hard work they put into maintaining the athletic training required for dance.

"

Any dancer you talk to will emphasize the hard work they put into maintaining the athletic training required for dance. “I take a lot of pride in being a dancer. Back when I was twelve, I laughed at other kids doing ballet, but I truly respect the sport now,” Wong said. Emo will always be an advocate for dance and what it can offer. “I think dance is a fun workout that is a great way to express yourself and experience athleticism,” she said. “It’s cool how diverse the genre of dance is in providing exercise in a fun way.” Try taking a dance class to test the limits of your athletic ability and even improve them.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY LIAM FITZSIMMONS


SPORTS & HEALTH

QUIZ!

MESSIAH

SPORTS How well do you know Messiah University's fall sports? Test your knowledge of athletics on campus by answering the following questions. Questions and answers provided by Holly Motheral, Scott Frey, Brooke Good, Jon Arosell and Dale Fogelsanger.

a)

Sara Yunez

b)

Autumn Reilly

c)

Maggie Futato

2.

What former Messiah women’s volleyball player was named MAC Commonwealth Rookie of the Year and MAC Commonwealth Player of the Year back-to-back years? a)

Mary Underman

b)

Brooke Gallagher

c)

Jane Underman

3. An 8k race in cross country is around a)

4 mi

a)

73

b)

92

c)

54

6.

In what year did the women's tennis team win their first ever conference title? a)

2012

b)

2016

c)

2019

7.

Which team wins in a cross country

meet? b)

5 mi

c)

6 mi

4.

a)

Add all the runners times together and the team with the lowest cumulative time wins.

b)

Add the place of f inish together for the entire team and the highest score wins.

c)

Add the place of f inish of the top 5 team f inishers, the next 2 team finishers can displace other team finishers, and the lowest team score wins.

In what year did Messiah field hockey win its first-ever NCAA Division III National Championship? a)

1999

b)

2001

c)

2016

ANSWER KEY

1. B 2. A 3. B 4. C

Two Messiah goalkeepers are currently number one and number two on the NCAA Division III Women’s Soccer list for career shutouts. Audra Larson is number one with 68. Who is number two with 54?

Messiah Women’s Soccer holds the NCAA DIII Record for consecutive games without a loss. This means there are some draws (ties) in that stretch of games. How many games did they go with a loss?

5. A 6. B 7. C

1.

5.

0-3 points

4-5 points

6-7 points

Time to get more involved in sports!

A great start!

Wow, you’re an expert!

If you got less than 3 right, that means you still have lots to learn! Try watching a game, attending a sporting event or befriending an athlete to begin your new love for sports.

4-5 points is a respectable number of points for this challenging quiz on Messiah sports. Keep learning and soon you’ll be a pro!

Go team! If you got 7-8 points correct, you know a crazy amount of facts about Messiah athletics. Share your love of sports with friends so everyone can be experts like you. THE SWINGING BRIDGE

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SPORTS & HEALTH

 Easy Apple    Crisp BY JULIA MARY REGISTER

Take advantage of the fall season and make a delicious apple crisp to celebrate the cool weather. Baking this recipe can serve as a study break that results in a tasty treat. Modifications can be made for allergies, such as gluten free flour or coconut oil instead of butter.

Ingredients:

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Directions: Grease an 8”x8” pan with butter or shortening Fill greased pan with the sliced apples

q 

4 cups apples, peeled and sliced

q 

2/3 cups sugar

Cut the butter into the flour and mix in the sugar, rolled oats, cinnamon and brown sugar

q 

1/2 cup flour

Spread the topping over the apples

q 

1 tablespoon brown sugar

q 

1/2 cup rolled oats

Bake in the oven at 350 degrees for 30 to 35 minutes.

q 

3/4 teaspoon cinnamon

Serve with ice cream

q 

1/3 cups butter


SPORTS & HEALTH

DAILY WORKOUT BY HALEY MONG Whether you find yourself outside visiting your friends or cooped up in quarantine, yoga provides an easy method to wake up and de-stress. Wellness professor, Veronica Yerger, provided a quick yoga routine that can be done 3-4 times daily: the sun salutation. While still an engaging exercise, sun salutations also enable you to think. “It is a great way to think about your prayers in your head and focus on God, yourself and on whatever it is you’re needing that day,” Yerger said. Yoga is designed to loosen muscles, but can be used for various other reasons as well. “It not only warms your body up and gets yourself moving, but it’s also a way to worship God and to be grateful for the sun and all of his creation,” Yerger said. Yoga also helps to center your intentions for the day. With variations on each pose, anybody can customize yoga according to their needs and abilities.

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SPORTS & HEALTH Involved with various forms of fitness throughout her life, Yerger first discovered yoga as a new addition to her exercise routine. At the beginning of quarantine she was approached to apply for a yoga professor position at Messiah. Feeling lucky to accept a job during quarantine, she dove right into learning yoga for the purpose of teaching it to students. As yoga helped her through the mundaneness and hardships of quarantine, she hopes students can also find solace in a yoga routine.

Pose

5: INHALE and shift your weight forward in your plank position

Pose 12:

EXHALE

forward fold

Here, Yerger walks us through a basic variation of the

sun salutation:

Pose

6: EXHALE slowly lower to chaturanga (elbows hugging your sides keeping your body straight) Pose 13: INHALE reverse swan dive up, stretch your arms up overhead

Pose 7: INHALE slide your chest forward to upward dog (or cobra)

Pose 1: Begin in Mountain Pose INHALE and stretch your arms out wide, open your chest and sweep your arms up overhead.

Pose 8: EXHALE curl your toes, firmly press through your hands, lift your hips up towards the sky, pressing your chest back towards your legs into Downward Dog. TAKE 3-5 breaths here.

Pose 9:

INHALE and step your right foot between your hands and bringing your other leg up to meet it

Pose 2: EXHALE and swan dive your arms out leading with your chest into a forward fold.

Pose 14:

EXHALE and bring your hands to heart, center or down at your sides for mountain pose

Pose 10:

EXHALE forward fold

Pose 3: INHALE up to flat back Pose 4:

EXHALE forward fold, plant your palms next to your feet and step or jump back into a plank position.

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SEPTEMBER 2020

Pose 11: INHALE to flat back

Yerger encourages all students to remain patient with themselves on their yoga journey. Rather than comparing yourself to others, recognize the uniqueness in how God created each of our bodies. We can all do different things and have different strengths. It is okay to start slow and modify each pose as you go.


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