Page 1

THE

THE PULSE MAGAZINE NOVEMBER 2020

FOR FRESHMAN ADJUSTMENT IN AMERICA

24

FALL ATHLETE

11

BLACK WOMEN

5

FALL 2020

16

DANCE VS SOCCER Dancers and soccer players switch their sports for an interesting experience


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THE

SWINGING B R I DG E VOLU M E 1 1 3

EDITION 19

LETTER FROM THE

STUDENT DIRECTOR

ASST. STUDENT DIRECTOR

AMY LINT

EMILIE RUSH

H

ow is it November already? I feel like it was just yesterday that I was coming to school, not knowing what to expect for the semester. There were so many times that I feared we would get sent home for outbreaks of COVID-19, but here we still are.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF BRIAN SHERMEYER MAGAZINE MANAGER CORINNE YOUNGBERG AUDIO & VISUAL MANAGER GENE BOONPIENPOL

COVER PHOTOGRAPHY ANDRE FREUEH & LIAM FITZSIMMONS

STUDENT LIFE EDITOR

CULTURE EDITOR

SPORTS EDITOR

KAITLIN MERLINO

JUDY KYEI-POKU

JULIA MARY REGISTER

BUSINESS MANAGER

BRAND MANAGER

WEB MANAGER

TAYLOR GIBSON

ANDRE FRUEH

WESLEY CHEAH

YEARBOOK MANAGER

DESIGN ASSISTANT

SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

CAROLINE HOLMES

SHANNON BILLINGTON

CASSIDY BARLOCK

RADIO MANAGER

AUDIO & VISUAL ASSISTANT

MUSIC MANAGER

NOLAN HOGENBOOM

EDITOR

O C T. 2 0 2 0

LIAM FITZSIMMONS

RAVI AHUJA

1 UNIVERSITY AVE SUITE 3058 MECHANICSBURG, PA 17055 (Downstairs South Wing of the Larsen Student Union) The Swinging Bridge Magazine is published through The Pulse: Messiah University Media Hub, run by students. The Pulse consists of Pulse Radio (90.7), The Clarion yearbook, and The Swinging Bridge Magazine. The Swinging Bridge staff strives to publish quality student writing, photography, and design.

THE HEARTBEAT OF MESSIAH UNIVERSITY

To learn about job and volunteer opportunities, email thepulse@messiah.edu.

For me, this pandemic has made me realize there is a lot that I have taken for granted and that I am thankful for. Wrestling and interacting with my friends, family and professors are just two of these many things that I do not want to take for granted any longer. While this semester is quickly coming to a close, the lives of some seniors will just be beginning. To those seniors, I would like to thank you for your readership in the past and I would also like to wish you luck in your future endeavors. Thank you for allowing me to be a part of your journey. For those of you coming back for the spring, stay safe over the break and stay positive. We can do this together. Soak it in,

Brian Shermyer Editor-In-Chief


TABLE

STUDENT LIFE 5

2 CAMPUS CLOSET NOVEMBER EDITION

4

OF

CONTENTS

SPORTS & HEALTH 11

CULTURE 24

9

23

NATE ROMBERGER'S SENIOR PROJECT

DIFFERENT CULTURES THANKSGIVING

APPLIED HEALTH SCIENCE SENIOR SPOTLIGHT

10

24

STRESS FREE SEMESTER

NUTRITION QUIZ

BLACK WOMEN IN AMERICA

HELPFUL TIPS TO STAY MOTIVATED

TIME TO TEST YOUR NUTRITION KNOWLEDGE

THE STRUGGLES OF WOMEN OF COLOR

5

11

27

FALL ATHLETES ADAPT TO CHANGES

STUDENTS AND FACULITY REACT TO CHANGES

FALL 2020 FOR FRESHMAN NEW YEAR, NEW EXPERIENCES

FALL ATHLETE ADJUSTMENT

7

16

HOW STUDENTS ARE GIVING THANKS DURING COVID-19

DANCERS TRY PLAYING SOCCER, SOCCER PLAYERS TRY DANCING

GIVING THANKS IN A PANDEMIC

DANCE VS SOCCER

8

20

RACHEL ROCHET & ELLEN DIEHL'S SENIOR PROJECT

ATHLETIC ADVICE FROM MESSIAH'S COACHES

THEATER SENIOR SPOTLIGHT

COACHES ADVICE COLUMN

22

RECIPE

EASY TACO SOUP

1

MULTICULTURAL THANKSGIVING MEALS

SEPTEMBER 2020

LONGER SPRING BREAK & NO JTERM


STUDENT LIFE

CAMPUS

CLOSET November Edition

BY HALEY MONG

W

ith the winter months drawing near, it seems like the natural next step to pull out your sweaters and flannels from the back of your closet, dust off your boots, and layer up for the looming cold weather. Just because the weather is freezing doesn’t mean fashion has to be put on freeze, too.

His classy winter style translates well to his friends' fashion needs as well. He says,

Daniel Curry, Sophomore,

they’ll often borrow

Communication Major

some of my clothes.”

J

ust about every morning, Daniel checks the weather and browses Pinterest for style inspiration before deciding on his attire for the day. He then shuffles over to his closet to pick out clothing with colors that coordinate with one another. With every outfit he wears, he strives to be himself, usually achieving a confident, but casual look: “I want to show a part of myself that is different from other people, but still with a casual look and vibe to it.” Despite his usual laidback look, Daniel saves his fancier options for the winter months when he can break out his boots, jeans, and flannels, which are featured in his outfit choice here.

“My friends like to use the ideas I have for certain outfits and

When they need a dressier accessory, they borrow from Daniel’s collection of bow ties. Overall, Daniel’s outfits choices heavily rely on the situation at hand or whatever he is doing that day. Whether he is just hanging out with friends in an athletic look, or dressing up for an event, he still lets his styles reflect himself.

THE SWINGING BRIDGE

2


STUDENT LIFE

Megan Hamilton, Senior, Biopsychology Major

N

ow in her senior year, Megan reflects on her college fashion progression towards her current, comfortably modern look. Featured Now in her senior year, Megan reflects on her college fashion progression towards her current, comfortably modern look. Featured here, her go-to winter look includes a collection of basic pieces, such as her black pants and jean jacket, elevated with some statement pieces to show some personality. Megan is wearing one of her favorite winter sweaters with her trusty pair of Doc Marten boots, giving a little edge to her outfit. Her favorite part of this outfit, however, are her earrings, which she bought at a little store in Estonia while studying abroad. Ultimately inspired by the European fashion Megan saw on her study abroad trip to Lithuania in 2019, this look speaks to Megan’s fashion evolution and desire for others to feel good about what they wear.

“I’m a big advocate for wearing something that makes you feel good and that makes you feel beautiful and confident,” said Megan. “For me sometimes that’s sweatpants or sweatshirts and leggings, but often it's wearing my Doc boots, a sweater, and my jean jacket.” Megan’s fashion inspiration is also shared among her friends: “Recently, we’ve created Pinterest boards for our friends and it has been fun to really see what makes them shine!” Encouraging others, she says, “What’s most important is feeling comfortable in your own skin and that reflects whatever style you have. If you are confident in yourself and if certain clothes make you feel more confident in yourself, then wear those.”

3

NOVEMBER 2020


STUDENT LIFE

Stress-Free Semester Helpful Tips to Stay Motivated BY KAITLIN MERLINO

A

s we trudge through the last leg of classes towards finals, it is important to prioritize mental health. With papers, tests and projects piling up, you may feel incredibly overwhelmed; all on top of the global crisis that pervades into campus. Remember, you are not alone in this.

campus where mental health can be discussed as a part of our complete wellness.”

According to Active Minds, a nonprofit that promotes mental health awareness in young adults,

“We host wellness events such as free yoga and pilates to promote healthy minds and bodies,” Durben said. “We also believe that your spiritual health is important and can influence your mental health.”

Over 89% of students polled said they were experiencing stress or anxiety due to the effects of COVID-19. That statistic looks bleak, but we are stronger together. Active Minds also reported that students are taking action to combat this newfound stress: two-thirds of students said that they were helping others with their mental health battles. Check in with your friends, reach out to others when you feel stressed and take advantage of Messiah’s mental health resources like the Engle Center. Practicing empathy involves both monitoring the mental well being of yourself and others. One of Messiah’s many clubs, Minds Matter, fuses these ideals together through its work on campus. Brittany Durben, the club president, said, “Minds Matter is an executive club that promotes a Christ-like environment on

Hosting various events throughout the year, this club seeks to demonstrate the importance of mental health awareness as it intersects various parts of our lives.

Recognizing common stressors before they occur can benefit your mental well-being and battle procrastination. In preparation for finals, start a project well ahead of the due date or create study guides that make it fun to study. Make to-do lists in order to keep track of when assignments are due.

life often throws us for a loop. With a broken marriage, two small kiddos and lovingly obnoxious parents, Miriam Maisel copes in the only way she knows how: taking the stage as one of the 1950’s few female comics. While the limelight sometimes proves more sour than sweet, pursuing her dreams is worth the pursed lip; more often than not, laughter escapes anyway.

Use these tips to motivate yourself into finishing the rest of the semester strong.

We’ve got this!

At the same time, try not to get too caught up in the mindset of just checking tasks off a list. If your experiences are anything like my own, this will lead to a surefire burnout. Instead, prioritize. Ask yourself what projects are the most important that you need to get them done first, second and so on and so forth. Taking a to-do list step by step and day by day can keep you from getting overwhelmed with the amount of unchecked boxes remaining. Congratulate yourself when you do accomplish one of those tasks and make sure to take time to take breaks. Burning the midnight oil will sometimes just get you burned. As the weather gets colder and we migrate indoors, cocoon under some blankets with a good TV show. Found on Amazon Prime, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” demonstrates that THE SWINGING BRIDGE

4


STUDENT LIFE

FALL 2020

FOR FRESHMAN

NEW YEAR, NEW EXPERIENCES BY AMY DEPRETIS

W

hile we all have memories from our first weeks of college life, the class of 2024 certainly has an experience to remember. COVID-19 disrupted quite a few Messiah traditions this semester, including Welcome Week. So although the ‘24 Falcons still received a warm, socially distanced welcome, there were many sacrifices and changes in their orientation experience. Freshman psychology major Alexa Burger regrets not having opportunities for extracurriculars, like attending soccer games. Also a member of the women’s softball team, Burger described a lot of challenges for athletes as well. Rather than traditional practices, the team is employing a phased model of practicing in small “pods.” Despite this slow start to the pre-season, Burger found reasons to remain positive, like bonding with her teammates that live on her floor. “We grew in relationships just because there wasn’t much to do, so we got closer that way,” she said. Team bonding may have looked quite a bit different this year, but Burger found a victory in her new friendships.

5

SEPTEMBER 2020

For Micah Clark, a mechanical engineering major, one of the biggest adjustments has been the lack of visitation privileges. Clark said that he looked forward to sharing Messiah’s beautiful campus with family and friends, as well as taking trips home on the weekends. Despite this, he called this social disconnect a “backhanded blessing,” as the lack of activities in his first weeks of college gave him plenty of time to get to know his floormates. Now, Clark and his new friends in Naugle choose to spend much of their leisure time together, building on the relationships that visitation restrictions jump-started. “I think it has made it harder, but not impossible,” Clark said. Both Burger and Clark elaborated on the many annoyances, both large and small, that COVID posed in their college experiences thus far. Even still, they both spoke highly of Messiah’s efforts to control the spread of the frightening virus and keep us all on campus. Burger appreciates the constant encouragement to follow campus health policies, as

well as the uplifting role of the University’s social media. Clark is willing to follow the guidelines in order to have his first year on campus. “All of us want to be here enough that we’re willing to wear masks, social distance as much as we can and give up some of the fun activities to stay on campus,” Clark said. Students are not the only ones feeling the impact of this frenzied first semester. As the director of Messiah’s Honors Program and an instructor of first year seminar (FYS), Professor James LaGrand noted that he also feels challenged by the restrictions COVID places on his classroom and his ability to know his students as well as he would like.


STUDENT LIFE

“It is still clearly a loss or a lack… when interaction really is intended to take place mostly within the classroom,” LaGrand said.

that our circumstances don’t dictate God’s goodness, that He is good no matter how hard life feels.”

Messiah professors care deeply about their students, and with so much to be offered through office hours or casual chats over coffee, LaGrand and his colleagues feel the strain.

Both LaGrand and Babyak voiced appreciation for the first-years’ resilience in a challenging semester. LaGrand noted that the small things students do are becoming much more important to their growth.

Another FYS instructor, Professor Lauren Babyak offers a unique perspective as the Director of First Year Courses. She finds that she must be more intentional than ever about attending to the specific needs of her students. Some of these needs are expected, as adjusting to college is often difficult. But increasingly technological teaching models create unique concerns for students this year, such as needing to take breaks from screens.

“Being engaged and plugged in: I think that’s resilience right now,” LaGrand said. “In class, I’ve seen them rise to the occasion and respond in a strong, self-disciplined and resilient way.”

The greatest need, according to Babyak, is to seek God’s presence in the classroom like never before. “We pray before class,” she said. “We seek to remember

Babyak also sees tremendous growth in her students. “Their priorities are changing,” she said. “Their perspective on what really matters is changing. Instead of sulking in the ‘whatcould-have-been,’ they are focused on the ‘what-could-be.’” These professors exemplify what many faculty are doing: supporting first-years in any way possible. Whether it is asking students how they are at the start of class or simply lending a listening ear, Messiah faculty are committed to offering as much normalcy as possible to the class of 2024. While COVID-19 has stolen a lot from this year’s freshman class, it hasn’t stolen their fervor. In true Falcon spirit, they embrace the Messiah community we all know and love.

"THEIR PERSPECTIVE ON WHAT REALLY MATTERS IS CHANGING."

THE SWINGING BRIDGE

6


STUDENT LIFE

Giving Thanks By: Joy Hammond

D

espite the anticipation of Thanksgiving and holiday preparations, fears of the current pandemic still remain. With the world full of uncertainty this fall, it is difficult for people to find joy in life with all COVID-19 precautions. “This year has truly been crazy for everyone,” Hannah Hope, a junior international business major, said. “But I am reminded everyday by my wonderful family and friends of how God has blessed me throughout my life amidst the coronavirus.” During this pandemic, many people have been subjected to many changes because of COVID-19. At the same time, mental health issues have seen an increase from social isolation and the uncertainty of issues in the world. Students on Messiah’s campus have developed some ways to combat their doubts and fears.

“I stay positive by remembering all the things that God has already blessed me with in my life,” Hope said, “I also make sure to set aside time for myself to relax with friends or just by myself.” This semester, Messiah University has made every effort to keep students safe while holding to its close community atmosphere.

7

NOVEMBER 2020

in a Pandemic

The Student Activities Board (SAB) and many other extracurricular clubs on campus have held outside events for students to attend. There have also been more open discussions about diversity and conflict, especially as Hispanic Heritage Month is celebrated in October. Pa Moua, a junior public relations major, enjoys chatting with people and seeing different perspectives on life. “It helps remind me of the theme, unity,” she said.

“There’s comfort in knowing that you are not alone and that there are people you can reach out to.” Somebody who is always there is God. Our faith can impact our reactions during crises. “I know many people over quarantine who are not Christians,” Hope said, “and seeing them in such fear, truly saddened my heart. Without being able to trust God, I don’t know where I would be.” Both Hope and Moua confirmed that their faith kept them grounded during this uncertain time. With the pandemic causing many people to feel alone and helpless, it is important to know that you are not alone. By having a positive outlook on this pandemic, people can appreciate the special moments in life.

“It’s natural to get frustrated,” Moua said,

“but my faith helps me stay grounded and see the light in the circumstances that I can’t control." There are several ways in which someone can accomplish a positive outlook on the recent pandemic. This can include recognizing the importance of social interaction and reflection on one’s life. However, if you or someone you know is dealing with extreme sadness and isolation, it is important to remember the people who care. The Engle Center is also offering free counseling services during the entire academic year. To combat feelings of hopelessness and isolation, Hope had family movie nights and hikes with her family over the summer. Now that she is on Messiah’s campus, Hope has Zoom workout sessions with her friend Tariah. By taking Hope’s lead, students can also connect with their friends and family by streaming movies or playing online video games together. Students should remember to be thankful for the safety and joy that God has provided during this pandemic. If we seek out positivity, there’s a chance we’ll find it.


STUDENT LIFE

R E T A E H T T H G I L

T O P S R O I N SE

CT E J O R P R NIO E S S ' L H E N DI E L L E D ET AN H C O R L RACHE BY KAITLIN MERLINO

M

usical theatre major Rachel Rochet and theatre major Ellen Diehl have been preparing for their senior projects, which will be performed via livestream on Nov. 20 and 21 at 8 p.m.

Diehl seeks to shine a light onto musical theatre icon Julie Andrews, focusing on the relationship between her and her daughter Emma Walton Hamilton.

“I had the idea a year or two ago on the topic of the separation between the sciences and the arts,” Rochet said. “It’s evolved a little since then, but I noticed we kind of have this polarizing mentality of the arts and sciences.”

“The premise is that they are writing Julie’s memoir together and, through the writing process, it brings up memories,” Diehl said. “It brings them back to when Emma was a child and her memory of different experiences, and Julie sharing her side of it.”

The theatre department as a whole has been a great rock for these students to lean on, since creating an entire show can be an intimidating experience.

With a working title, “Where the Apple Falls: A Julie Andrew Story,” Diehl pieced together melodic tunes and upbeat dances that flow into the theme of daughters and mothers.

“It’s almost like a baby bird in the nest just being flung out to see if it flies,” Rochet said. “But I think our professors trust that we have the framework of knowledge; we just need that initiative to try it.”

Though both shows play on the same nights, each project proved unique to the creators and each student encountered different processes when creating her work.

Walking away from this experience, they both feel a boost of confidence in their abilities as actors and creators.

Rochet sees things differently. In her Cabaret-style show, she hopes to make connections between the arts and its cousin departments, from science to history, showing that painting and drawing aren’t the only creative outlets a person has access to. “All of the songs and monologues focus around the theme of ‘what defines art and who is an artist?” Rochet said. In the time of COVID-19, Rochet sees the need for this concept as a vital thread that connects us all. “With all the debates about which careers are essential and which are non-essential, there's a lot of tension, and a lot of people feel like their vocation is considered more or less important than others,” Rochet said.

“One thing that’s been challenging during this process is the planning end, having to put the whole thing together and figure out the timeline for myself,” Rochet said. After taking advantage of a quarantined summer to research, creating a document full of excerpts from interview transcripts and Andrew’s actual memoir, Diehl sought

to clean up her script during the school year. “I had a really long script with lots of stories, and it’s been stripping away what’s not necessary through the process of blocking,” Diehl said.

“So often someone has to give actors a role. This is a way for us to create something for ourselves and claim, ‘Yes, I can do this,’” said Diehl. “It’s ok to try things and put work out there,” Rochet said. “You can’t control how people will receive it, but all you can do is put out the work that you have created and that you believe in, knowing that that should be enough.”

THE SWINGING BRIDGE

8


SPORTS & HEALTH

applied health science senior Spotlight BY LEANNE TAN As an institution that prizes experiential learning, Messiah University presents students a multitude of ways to expand their knowledge beyond general coursework. From completing internships to conducting research studies, many students have seized various opportunities to explore their interests more deeply and to prepare for life after Messiah. Senior applied health science major, Nate Romberger, is one such student. As a cross-country athlete, Romberger integrated his interest in cardiovascular exercise into his senior honors project. Under the mentorship of health and exercise physiology professor, Scott Kieffer, he is looking into the effects of high intensity exercise on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a protein found in the brain and spinal cord that enhances memory and learning ability. Romberger said that the inspiration for the research came from a literature review he had compiled two years ago about the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on the brain. “We found that HIIT was associated with memory, learning and other cognitive functions,” he said. “And then we looked at

some of the mechanisms behind that. One was just generally blood flow. Another group was the neurotrophic factors like BDNF, so that’s kind of how the interest started.”

“A lot of the behind-the-scenes stuff was learning how to pipette out the serum from the blood,” Romberger said. “Learning that and also how to measure and analyze BDNF.”

To conduct the study, 14 students were recruited to partake in four different experimental sessions. Over the course of a few weeks, participants completed an assessment of their oxygen consumption during exercise (i.e. VO2max testing), a resting session and two different exercise protocols: HIIT and MICT (moderate-intensity continuous training).

The study, however, is not without its challenges. Romberger and his team have had to reschedule a few experimental sessions because of COVID-19.

Throughout the sessions, Romberger, with the help of two other applied health science majors, sophomore Sam Zercher and first-year Grant Myers, collected blood samples from the participants.

“We’re taking eight blood samples over the course of the study,” Romberger said. “A lot of people aren’t comfortable with needles, so they don’t really want to do that.”

The samples were then centrifuged to obtain blood serum, which was then used to measure participants’ BDNF levels before and after engaging in exercises of varying intensities, as well as during recovery. “We’re expecting that the high intensity protocol would make a greater increase in BDNF concentrations,” Romberger said. “But you never really know, it could be the same. We’re just trying to build on the current literature.” While the data collection process only began this semester, preparations for the study started as early as last winter

9

SEPTEMBER 2020

Another difficulty was the recruitment of participants, which, according to Romberger, was one of the hardest parts of the project.

Despite the challenges, Romberger finds enjoyment in carrying out the study. As he plans to pursue a career in exercise physiology, he said that the project has helped him develop research skills that will be useful at graduate school. Romberger is excited for the opportunity to discover the effects of exercise on brain health in greater detail. “A lot of times, most people think of exercise as impacting your heart and muscles,” Romberger said. “But we don’t really think about how it might impact the brain, so I think that’s an exciting area of research.”


Nutrition Quiz

SPORTS & HEALTH

Time to test your knowledge of nutrition facts! Amanda Rempel, a 2018 alum from Messiah, provided seven questions to help students understand the basics of what it means to eat healthy. Rempel is currently a registered dietitian at UPMC Pinnacle hospitals and is using her knowledge to help others learn about healthy and whole eating.

Scoring

0-3 points

Which of the following is a good source of Omega-3 fatty acids and are known for being “heart healthy”?

Time to make some changes! Hmm…If you only scored 0-3 points on the quiz, it’s time to second guess some of your nutrition habits. Take note of the new facts you learned so you can apply them to your life!

a. Banana b. Coconut oil c. Salmon d. Quinoa What are the 5 main food groups according to USDA MyPlate? a. Meat, bread, milk, fruit, sweets/ desserts b. Dairy, plant foods, protein foods, fats, sugars c. Fruit, vegetables, grains, protein foods, dairy d. Vegetables, meat, sweets/ desserts, fruit, cheese

3.

What is the recommendation for daily sodium intake? a. Less than 1,700 m per day (the amount in 1 can of chicken noodle soup b. Less than 2,300 mg per day approximately 1 tea spoon of table salt c. Less than 4,800 mg per day (the amount in 1 whole cheese pizza from the Union Cafe) d. Less than 7,000 mg per day (approximately 1 tablespoon of table salt)

4.

Which are the 3 macronutrients? a. Glucose, lipid, fiber b. Sodium, sugar, fat c. Protein, vegetables, whole grains d. Carbohydrate, protein, fat

5.

Which of the following contains gluten? a. Barley b. Popcorn c. Potatoes d. Yogurt

6.

What percent of an adult’s intake of grain foods should be whole grains? a. 10% b. 50% c. 75% d. 100%

7.

4-5 points Not bad!

A great start! 4-5 points on this nutrition quiz is a strong number. Keep growing so you can make more healthy choices!

6-7 points Amazing job!

You obviously know your stuff! If you scored 6-7 points on the quiz, then you have a good understanding of the basics of nutrition and what it means to make healthy eating decisions.

What is the daily recommended intake of vegetables for a 2,000 calorie diet? a. 2 servings (1 cup) b. 5 servings (2.5 cups) c. 7 servings (3.5 cups) d. 1 serving at every meal

Answer Key 5. A 6. B 7. B

2.

1. C 2. C 3. B 4. D

1.

THE SWINGING BRIDGE

10


SPORTS & HEALTH

FALL ATHLETE

ADJUSTMENT FALL ATHLETES ADAPT TO CHANGES BY BRENDAN LABRA Fall athletics certainly look different this year at Messiah University. On July 24, the Middle Atlantic Conference (MAC), suspended all competitions for the remainder of 2020 because of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, this has not stopped Messiah’s athletic teams from practicing and competing. Messiah’s fall sports teams, volleyball, cross country, soccer and field hockey, have all found unique ways to come together as teams and keep the ball rolling, despite the lack of competition. To share in greater detail how they have stayed engaged during this suspended season, four representatives from each fall team gave their perspective regarding their “new normal” as athletes.

11

SEPTEMBER 2020

PHOTO CREDIT MATTHEW FENTON


SPORTS & HEALTH

PHOTO CREDIT MATTHEW FENTON

The Messiah field hockey team was looking to add to their impressive trophy cabinet this fall. Coming off the heels of their 12th straight MAC Commonwealth championship, expectations were sky high. As with all fall sports, the season was put to an abrupt halt. Senior defender, Claire Myers, offered an unique insight into the ways that the team is still staying together during these difficult times. While all the players are disappointed that the season was cut short, Myers said that their team spirit is still high. “After having been apart for almost six months, our team was overjoyed to be reunited on campus and begin practicing,” she said. “Our coaches have done an awesome job at putting things in perspective for us, reminding us of the gift and privilege that we have to be practicing with one another on campus, as many other schools were not given that opportunity.” With the season being cancelled, Myers said that the team is still finding

unique ways to stay game-ready for next year. “Our team has the privilege of practicing three days per week up on our field. In addition, we have been participating in strength & conditioning workouts on the days we do not practice,” Myers said. “We have enjoyed engaging in new workouts such as pilates and high intensity interval training (HIIT), and appreciate the attention that has been placed on our mental, emotional and spiritual health in addition to our physical fitness level.” On top of this, Myers acclaims the team’s high spirits to their combined devotion to Christ. Online Zoom meetings have allowed for small groups of the team to have devotional time, which has led to closer relationships. “I think we’ve learned the need of being intentional with one another, as the time to bond and get to know one another doesn’t come as naturally as it does under normal circumstances,” Myers said.

FIELD HOCKEY THE SWINGING BRIDGE

12


SPORTS & HEALTH

MEN'S SOCCER There is typically a buzz around Shoemaker Field during the fall at Messiah. Both the men’s and women’s soccer teams are known for their NCAA National Championship title appearances and victories year in and year out. Junior forward, Darryl Daniels, believes the men’s team has adjusted to the changing circumstances during COVID-19. Daniels said the team was disappointed that they would not be able to compete this fall. However, they have included ways to keep their spirits up throughout that let down. “What helped was the fact that most sports teams in the country are going through the same thing and the fact that we do not play for success or acknowledgement,” Daniels said. “Every guy on the team plays soccer to glorify God and to be the best we can be for Him.” While the men’s soccer team has not been able to compete against other schools, Daniels emphasized how they are able to compete in scrimmages with each other and still have three practices and strength training during the week. Daniels also stated that the lack of competition will only increase the desire to win next season. “When we all left before quarantine, the group consensus was to train harder than any other soccer team in the country,” he said. “We want the next time we step on the field to show that working for God is better than working towards temporary success.”

PHOTO CREDIT MATTHEW FENTON

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SEPTEMBER 2020


SPORTS & HEALTH

Because of the nature of cross country, Messiah’s team has competitive opportunities that look different from other fall sports. While teams across the country are still not permitted to play in the same area, the cross country team started participating in virtual races.

and experience the joy of competing. I think our team has enjoyed the opportunity to race in a really fun, low stress environment.”

Senior captain Nate Romberger emphasized how this has provided the team with an unique opportunity.

“Our team has done different team building activities with the Loft including the high ropes course in addition to regular practices, team devos and strength and conditioning sessions with AROMA,” he said. “These have been great opportunities for our team to get to know each other.”

“Our team has been able to train like we would if there was a ‘normal’ competitive season and even compete against other schools in virtual competitions,” Romberger said. “We have been able to race a variety of distances

Romberger also stated how the lack of travel has given them more time for team building opportunities.

PHOTO CREDIT MATTHEW FENTON

CROSS COUNTRY THE SWINGING BRIDGE

14


SPORTS & HEALTH

WOMAN'S VOLLEYBALL For Messiah’s women’s volleyball team their season was postponed until the spring, unlike many other fall sports, who instead saw their season cancelled all together. Senior Kristen Seibert said her team still holds onto hope, as they are staying in shape for the upcoming season. “We have practices three times a week and lifting through AROMA once a week,” Seibert said. “Even though we are not working towards competing against other teams right now, we have been working hard as a team to improve in our own positions for whenever our next season is.” Practices obviously look a little different right now because of the protocols Messiah put in place for COVID-19. “Getting back into normal, intense practices took a while because we had to stay socially distant. It has been a

PHOTO CREDIT MATTHEW FENTON

15

SEPTEMBER 2020

lot harder to create a game-like practice due to social distancing,” Seibert said. “As a setter, we haven't been able to work on setter-hitter connections as often, so we have to make the most of the drills we are able to participate in.” Despite this, Seibert noted that morale has been high because of fun activities that the coaches have put together. “One Saturday, we had a team activity scavenger hunt on campus where we split into four teams and ran around campus completing different challenges,” she said, “such as getting in the breeches, rolling down Cemetery Hill or eating a ketchup packet from the Union.” Activities like these have allowed the team to bond despite the limitations the team has endured this semester.


SPORTS & HEALTH

DANCERS TRY PLAYING SOCCER AND SOCCER PLAYERS TRY DANCING

BY JULIA MARY REGISTER

D

ance and soccer are two very different worlds, especially on Messiah’s campus. As a dance major and sports editor for the magazine, I’ve been wondering how I could connect the two worlds. How could dance benefit soccer players and soccer be helpful to dancers? In order to answer these questions, I held an experiment. Eight dancers participated in a soccer practice and six men’s soccer players took a ballet class.

The practice was challenging, to say the least. Many dancers struggled with the constant cardio and coordinating their movements with the ball. “I don’t think anything during the practice was easy,” Kirsten Harte, a senior dancer, said. “They were very technical. It was obviously a hard technique that they’ve been perfecting for so many years of their lives.”

The results of this experiment were informative and eye opening.

Dancers have strong body awareness and control but are not used to having to control a ball while moving quickly. It was almost like adding a prop into a complicated dance.

To begin, my fellow dancers and I joined a soccer practice led by junior Darryl Daniels. He led us in a series of warm-ups and drills that were common exercises for the soccer players.

However, our dance background helped us succeed and learn the skills quickly. We were able to transfer over many things we learned in dance classes to the soccer field.

“I think soccer is one of the more similar sports to dance,” junior dance major Rachel Switzer said. “They have a lot of the same skills and aptitudes. I could use my dance skills to be quick on my feet or succeed in the drills.” A big part of both soccer and dance is the strong mentality needed and the desire to do well. “Dance sets you up for the idea that you won’t get it right away. I’m going to try and keep trying and eventually I’ll get it. We never say it’s too hard and we’re always trying to push ourselves,” Mikayla Broome, a junior dancer, said. All of the dancers could see ways that participating in soccer more often could benefit them in their athletic art form. Soccer could help

THE SWINGING BRIDGE

16


SPORTS & HEALTH SPORTS & REC

dancers be more agile, have faster footwork, increase cardio and long-term endurance and jump higher.

“We have core values that our coach gives to us and one of them is always choosing to be positive,” Daniels said. “At practice we’re constantly encouraging each other as we strive to be excellent and be positive.”

“If I can have the same amount of stamina as they have, then I could last through a whole concert no problem,” senior dance major Ryan Wong said.

At the end of the practice, the dancers were proud that they were able to prove that dancers can play soccer.

While the focus of this experiment was on the physical benefits of soccer and dance, a surprising thing dancers noticed was the welcoming atmosphere the soccer players fostered.

“As a dancer, we’re taught that sports aren’t for us but I think we can use our bodies for sports,” Switzer said. “We don’t have to be the clueless, can’t-play-sports kind of people.”

“I really appreciated how they were unafraid to be encouraging and show their Christian character,” Switzer said. “They started out in prayer and it unified everybody. It was a great environment and you could tell they had a lot of integrity.” Throughout the entire practice, all of the soccer players cheered us on through our struggles. They gave us helpful tips on how to get better and let us know when we did something well. In dance, oftentimes the focus is on individual success and there is not always the emphasis on team building. “The biggest takeaway for me is experiencing the team mindset and finding a way to bring that into dance,” Broome said.

17

SEPTEMBER 2020

Junior soccer player Luke Brautigam attributed their successful team atmosphere to the Christian environment at Messiah. “A lot of us have experience with past teams that don’t have the same mentality,” Brautigam said. “I’ve never been on a team that is so positive and pushed to be encouraging like that and I think it’s definitely very unique here.” Daniels sees their coach, Brad McCarty, as a big part of their positive nature.


SPORTS & HEALTH

“We are athletes ourselves, we have stamina, we have muscle strength, and we have athleticism,” Ellianna Morrison, a junior dancer, said. After the dancers proved their agility in soccer, it was time for the soccer players to test their coordination in ballet class. Just like you would during a normal ballet class, the athletes progressed through barre exercises to center combinations. The farther along they went, the harder the steps became. From the beginning, the players were preparing themselves for a difficult time but the class may have proved to be more challenging than they realized. “I thought I was going to struggle with flexibility and balance, which I did, but I wasn’t expecting some of the other stuff. Ballet takes more strength than I thought,” Josh Bratager, a first-year soccer player, said. Ballet can often look deceivingly easy to those who are not used to training in that way. A big difference between soccer and dance is how the players are allowed to show their exhaustion on the field, but on stage, dancers must make each step look easy. “They make it look effortless, so you think it’s effortless,” Luke Groothoff, a junior soccer player, said. “It’s so much harder than that.”

The graceful nature of ballet did not necessarily come easily to the soccer players during the class. “It’s hard to make it look graceful because it takes a lot of stability,” Brautigam said. “I felt like I was shaking the whole time and not able to keep good posture. That was the hardest thing for me.” One of the more challenging aspects of ballet is the coordination required and the mental focus needed in order to perform every step. “The mental aspect definitely surprised me,” sophomore Grant Johnson said. “All the movements and putting them together, I just couldn’t wrap my head around how to do them all simultaneously.” Another difficult component of dance for the soccer players was the required flexibility. It was also an area they would like to see improvement in, which could benefit them on the soccer field. “If you combine their flexibility with our sport, I feel like you’d be able to kick the ball so much harder and get your leg back farther, which would be really helpful,” Johnson said.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY LIAM FITZSIMMONS

SEE THEM IN ACTION by scanning the QR code below and watching a video of the athletes

“Also, for injury prevention,” first-year Isaac Owen added. “The more flexible you are the less likely you are to pull something. You have a bigger range of motion to catch yourself.”

THE SWINGING BRIDGE

18


SPORTS & HEALTH

While dance proved to be a struggle for the soccer players, they certainly used their soccer background to succeed in many ways. Their strength, agility, balance, jumps and mental fortitude all helped them find commonalities between soccer and dance.

them, which led to the joining of two separate Messiah communities. Hopefully, the dance vs. soccer experiment will lead to further opportunities for collaboration down the road. Who’s ready?

By taking a ballet class, the soccer players were introduced to the dedication required to be a dancer and witnessed first hand the benefits it can have for other athletes. “It was pretty crazy,” Johnson said. “It definitely makes me have more respect for the people on ‘So You Think You Can Dance’ and dancers around the world.” Ultimately, this experiment proved to be a success. Both groups involved learned a lot about the athleticism and intellectual components required for both activities. The dancers and the soccer players both said they would try soccer or ballet again. The experience was a fun learning opportunity for

Reverend

time traveler professor

19

SEPTEMBER 2020

Dr. Jennifer McNutt American Society of Church History Awardee Royal Historical Society Fellow Author of Calvin Meets Voltaire

Understanding Christian history is vital to our present faith. As a historian, Dr. Jennifer McNutt brings the past to the present, guiding students to understand and apply Christian history and theology to their work today. wheaton.edu/MA-History


SPORTS & HEALTH

BY BRIAN SHERMEYER Q UESTION

What is your advice to stu-

Q U EST IO N

What is your advice to stu-

dents/athletes who are trying to stay con-

dents/athletes who are struggling with

nected with their friends/teammates but

mental health during these times?

are having difficulties with all of the restrictions?

A N SW E R

I think this has been my biggest

concern for all of our Messiah students This is probably the most diffi-

during this time. Mental health struggles are

cult time of students' lives to stay connect-

a real thing, and uncertainty, loss, isolation

ed. Thankfully we have tons of technology

and disappointment that comes with ev-

these days that can help. I've thought sever-

erything going on certainly will have and al-

al times about how much harder it would be

ready have had a negative impact on many

to go through a global pandemic a hundred

people’s mental health. To anyone strug-

years ago. I know it's not easy to stay con-

gling with mental health, I say talk to some-

nected, but take advantage of the technol-

one about it; be vulnerable. Don’t try to do

ogy you have. Zoom, FaceTime, at the very

it alone or tough it out. I also say don’t be

least text your friends. It's easy to feel alone

ashamed about mental health struggles. I

these days. It takes effort to stay connected.

have struggled with anxiety and depression

But the effort is worth it.

my whole life. There are genetic factors, bi-

ANSWER

- Justin Beachy, Head Coach, Men’s Volleyball

ological factors and sometimes spiritual factors that contribute to mental health struggles. I also would say to those that may not

Q UESTION

How do you deal with all of

these constant changes? ANSWER

This question is easy for me. I

struggle as much to be compassionate and reach out to your friends. - Bryan Brunk, Head Coach, Men’s Wrestling

have a personal motto. We (meaning Messiah women’s basketball), will do difficult better than our competitors. Whether it be injuries, facility conflicts, weather and now COVID-19, we will win the difficult. We will not be a victim of circumstances, we will get better because of them. - Mike Miller, Head Coach, Women’s Basketball THE SWINGING BRIDGE

20


SPORTS & HEALTH

"

"

I’M TRYING TO ENCOURAGE MY ATHLETES TO THINK ABOUT THESE FOUNDATIONAL QUESTIONS AND POINT TO CHRIST’S RESURRECTION TO FRAME THEIR ANSWERS.

Q UESTION

- Katie McComb

How do you stay thankful

during these difficult times? ANSWER

To be honest, I don’t always. I of-

ten need some of those people that I talk

Q U EST IO N

How do you find the motivation

to prepare without having a guaranteed season? A N SW E R

My team has found so many pos-

with to hold me accountable and snap me

itives about this situation. They are taking it

back to gratitude. Philosophically or theo-

as an opportunity to focus on parts of their

logically, I know that I should rejoice in the

swimming they normally do not get to focus

Lord always. When I am reminded about my

on when we have a traditional season.

responsibility to be thankful, I start to focus on where my treasure is. I am a child of God and He is working all things together for my good. So I know that I can even be thankful for the challenges and the disappointments.

In addition, this time has forced us to ask questions of ourselves such as: Why am I

swimming? Who am I doing this for? I’m trying to encourage my athletes to think about these foundational questions and point to

I am also incredibly thankful for the relation-

Christ’s resurrection to frame their answers.

ships I have with my guys. This team is full of

The Gospel changes everything. Because

so many special young men, many of whom

we know there is a new heaven and new

have allowed me to be a close mentor and

earth on the horizon, does it really matter

friend. We get to practice in some capaci-

if we have the season we thought we were

ty already and we have this time together.

going to have?

There really is a lot to be thankful for. - Bryan Brunk, Head Coach, Men’s Wrestling

While mourning that desire is certainly worthwhile, I’m challenging both myself and my athletes to think about how this season can shape us each to become more like Christ and develop deep, lasting relationships with one another. Our motivation is growing in understanding of the Gospel, regardless of whether or not we have a season. - Katie McComb, Head Coach, Men’s and Women’s Swimming

21

SEPTEMBER 2020


Recipe

SPORTS & HEALTH

A hearty soup that can make meal

prep simple and quick. Make a pot on the weekend and warm-up a serving for dinner each night.

-fi xme

Soup

al

Taco

-to y s a e , A warm

Ingredients: 1 lb. ground beef 1 package or 4 tablespoons taco seasoning 1 (16 oz.) can kidney beans, undrained 1 (16 oz.) can pinto beans, undrained 1 (16 oz.) can corn 1 (16 oz.) can diced tomatoes 1 can Ro-Tel tomatoes and chilies

Directions: Brown the beef in a large pot Drain excess grease from the beef Mix taco seasoning into the beef Then without draining, mix in all other ingredients Simmer for 1 hour on low heat Serve with a spoon full of sour cream and tortilla chips Store in the fridge for up to a week, also freezes well

THE SWINGING BRIDGE

22


CULTURE

MULTICULTURAL

THANKSGIVING MEALS HOW DIFFERENT CULTURES CELEBRATE THANKSGIVING BY JUDITH KYEI-POKU When it comes to holidays, there are some that are celebrated universally and others that are specifically connected to other cultures and locations. In the United States, Thanksgiving is widely celebrated and popular. Those who celebrate it spend time with their families and enjoy a variety of foods, games or even just cherish the valuable time spent with those they love. Culture plays a huge influence in the way people celebrate. Depending on your cultural background, your family might integrate foods or traditions from your culture into the celebration of Thanksgiving. Téa Parris, a first year sustainability studies major, is Puerto Rican and black and her family mixes their culture while celebrating Thanksgiving. “Thanksgiving in my family is a very fun and hectic time. My family always cooks a lot of food and does a lot of dancing. We always cook the classic Thanksgiving foods, and we have a cook off,” Parris said. “My aunt and uncle have a cook off to see who makes the best turkey. My cousins and I are the judges and we always rig the vote for my aunt to win.” Parris found Thanksgiving as one of the greatest times to see all her family together just laughing and enjoying one another. She talked highly of the traditional food her family makes on top of the turkey. “My abuela makes the rice and empanadas. I help my mom make pasteles, mofongo and pernil. My other aunt makes pollo guisado and arroz con gandules. We start feasting at around 2 p.m. and we go all day.”

23

SEPTEMBER 2020

After eating, Parris and her family find different activities to do to pass the rest of the day. “My aunts and uncles will watch Spanish movies and talk about the 90’s. We all come together to eat dinner at like 9 o’clock,” she said. “We will all say what we are thankful for. Later in the night we dance. Then we finish the day off by going Black Friday shopping together as a family”. Niyah Brown, a freshman biopsychology major, speaks proudly about her family and how they go about celebrating the holiday. “Usually we eat the basic foods like turkey, stuffing, cranberry sauce and collard greens. My grandmother is ‘famous’ for her cakes so she always brings like five whenever she arrives at our house,” Brown said. “My aunt is ‘famous’ for her pies so she is always experimenting with different flavors and brings a bunch of different varieties every year”. After eating, her family likes to unwind by talking or participating in various sports outdoors. “After eating dinner, the adults then gather and talk about whatever is going on in their lives and catch up. My cousins and I always gather together outside and play either a big game of soccer, football or even tag,” Brown said. “It gets even better because sometimes the adults come and join so it's

an even bigger game. When it's getting late and starting to get dark outside, everyone comes inside and gathers in the living room and starts to converse there, then we eat our dessert there.” Alanah Inniss, a sophomore cyber security major, is an international student from The Bahamas. In The Bahamas, the people still celebrate Thanksgiving, just not to the extent that we do in the United States. “Unlike the U.S., Thanksgiving is not a holiday back home,” said Inniss. “Normally this is just the time for families to come together to eat food, especially different kinds of Bahamian food. Yes we do eat the basic ham, turkey and stuffing, but also Caribbean dishes like crab and rice, conch fritters, conch salad and baked macaroni.” Because it is not acknowledged as a holiday, people in The Bahamas have to adjust their schedules in order to be able to celebrate with their families. “In the Bahamas typically we do not get the day off. We still have to go to school and work, but we mainly tend to get together either in the afternoon or, if we do not have enough time, the weekend of Thanksgiving,” Inniss said. Many individuals take the time to remember their blessings and be around those who make life special for them during Thanksgiving. Blending traditions with different holidays allows it to be more special to individuals who want to preserve their identity. Not everyone celebrates the same way but, in the end, it is built on the same foundation of spending time together and enjoying delicious meals.


CULTURE

HOW AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMAN ARE OVERLOOKED IN TODAY'S SOCIETY BY JUDITH KYEI-POKU

F

rom the day black women are born, they are devalued no matter the socio-economic conditions they inhabit. The systems implemented to uphold justice continue to disregard and discount their experiences. This is further highlighted by the Breonna Taylor case.

women being made to feel invisible.

Breonna Taylor was a 26-year-old unarmed African American woman who was fatally shot in her Louisville, Kentucky apartment by officers Jonathan Mattingly, Brett Hankison and Myles Cosgrove.

Junior sports management major Nuria Lane was disappointed to see the outcome of the Taylor case.

After the verdict, which said that the police officers would not face charges directly related to the killing of Taylor, many people took to social media to express their feelings on the outcome. Among those people were black women, who expressed how they felt in this country. These feelings go back to a long history of black

When talking about events like the fight for African American freedom we hear of men like Martin Luther King and Malcolm X. But you probably have not heard of women freedom fighters.

“I found the verdict unjust and inhumane. I think that we often forget that a policeman's job is to help people, killing someone should never be the first option, especially someone who was sleeping in their own residence who did not pose any kind of threat,” Lane said. “Even though being a police officer is an extremely challenging vocation, killing people is always something that should not be the first instinct, but you also can’t blame people who have six months of training.”

Lane has also been very disappointed in the way women of color have been treated throughout generations and still to this day. “Women of color have been treated horribly in this country for generations. Currently, women of color are still experiencing discrimination in many forms,” she said. “It is easy to recognize discriminatory actions when they are physical and verbal; like calling someone a racial slur or assault. What is not so easy to see is subtle discrimination.” As a black woman it’s hard to not constantly think about your race. However, laws have been put in place for protection from segregation and discrimination. “In the 20th century, many laws have been put in place to protect black women specifically, from traumatic experiences over simple pleasure their white counterparts have taken for granted. For example, the Crown Act (Creat

THE SWINGING BRIDGE

24


CULTURE

"

"

THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS PEACE UNTIL THE WORLD SEES THEM FOR WHO THEY ARE.

ing a Respectful and Open World for Natural Hair) protects black women from experiencing discrimination of the basis of hair texture and hairstyle,” Lane said. “With these things in mind, we have evidence that black women and women of color in this country are mistreated. To conclude, Breanna Taylor’s case was not just at all. She was a beautiful, smart woman who was studying to save lives, and her black life matters.” Nadine Mfum-Mensah, a junior communication major, believes that the Breonna Taylor case shows that women of color are taken lightly. "Specifically, with media coverage, we did not see the same amount of ‘screen time’ that the other cases had, which did not sit well with me. Especially with a case that was so outrageous, I expected more anger,” Mfum-Mensah said, “but It felt like nobody cared unless looting was involved.”

25

SEPTEMBER 2020

Mfum-Mensah, along with other black women, found that when it came to their issues it wasn’t emphasized as being important like others. “I always remember a quote by Malcolm X that states, ‘The most disrespected person in America is the Black women. The most unprotected person in America is the black woman. The most neglected person in America is the black woman,’” she said. Mfum-Mensah sees the overwhelming amount of pressure on women of color in a cultural context. “I think so many people tend to forget that not only are black women fighting for civil rights,” Mfum-Mensah said, “but they are also fighting for women’s rights, and having to juggle both places at the very bottom of society.”

Black women have struggled to be given respect and care in this society. There have been many times where black women have felt devalued, but the Breonna Taylor case served as another instance that silenced the cries of black women. It is time that their humanity is shown and they are no longer treated as if they are invisible. It is time we, as a community, fight for and demand proper justice. Black women in this country have to yell at the top of their lungs to be heard, yell louder to be acknowledged and even louder to be listened to and understood. Every day is a battle. As a black woman there is no such thing as peace until the world sees them for who they are. Until that day comes black women will never be free.


CULTURE

& No J Term Longer Spring Break

BY-JUDITH KYEI-POKU This year, students have been thrown many surprises that have changed their life as well as their learning experiences. Some students might be facing delays to their graduation, loss of a job or not being able to finish their internships. Some are struggling with their academic performance because of trying to deal with the worries of the pandemic as well as education. But one thing Messiah students are going to face in 2021 is the loss of J-term. J-term helped to alleviate some of the stress of the spring semester. Next year, that option will no longer be available.

Kyah Bailey, a sophomore nursing major, was counting on J-term to catch up on courses that she was lacking after transferring to Messiah last year. “I am already a sophomore this fall and a junior in the spring,” Bailey said, “however that is only as far as credits go. I will not be able to start my nursing courses until next fall”. Sophomore September Nguyen, as well as many other students, utilized J-term last year in order to make her spring semester seem lighter. “Instead of taking 18 credits in the spring semester, I was able to take 15 which allowed me to feel less stressed,” Nguyen said. Bailey not only saw the effects of J-term on the students but she witnessed how it was also causing stress for the professors.

THE SWINGING BRIDGE

26


CULTURE

Praying Encouragement and Endurance BY JUDITH KYEI-POKU

T

his year continues to be filled with many surprises. I know students are getting more stressed out with schoolwork and the effects of the pandemic. All of these new events can be stressful for many and can cause immense worry. But, amid the chaos of this year, we need to continue trusting in the fact that God is sovereign over the fear and suffering we are experiencing. The times where we feel helpless and pained, we should remember the verse:

“I think this year has to be hard on the professors. They have to deal with just as much new things as we do,” Bailey said. “I think they’re doing a really good job and working really hard to make this semester as normal as possible and to keep us on campus.” Malcolm Gold, the department chair of sociology and professor of sociology, is proud of how the faculty and administration is going about handling these changes. “My sense is that administration and faculty have worked hard to try to ensure as smooth a transition as possible. We are all very aware of the difficulties we have faced trying to navigate the precarious season we are living through with COVID 19,” Gold said. “Making necessary changes can be hard but I am encouraged by our commitment to community and the ways we have all ‘stepped up’ to keep the campus safe.”

“For I know the plans I have for you, declares the LORD, plans for welfare and not for evil, to give you a future and hope.” (JEREMIAH 29:11).

We do not know what the future will hold this year but what we do know God is with us every step of the way. He has plans for every individual and though times seem tough right now the future holds a new chapter. God is here to provide us with peace during this season of uncertainty and as we continue with this year. No matter what we must remember that our hope is found in the Lord and to put our trust in Him.

27

SEPTEMBER 2020

There's going to be a new adjustment with the loss of J-term. Those who were intending to utilize it will now have to revise their schedules. “J-term has been a significant fixture of the academic calendar at Messiah for a long time and any changes to this will, inevitably, necessitate the need for adjustment,” Gold said. “Some departments will be impacted by having no J-term more than others.” It is the hope of students, faculty and staff that the loss of J-term will change without a hitch. While it may take a small adjustment period, students, faculty and staff will have to adapt quickly and move on to the spring semester.


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Swinging Bridge Magazine: November 2020  

Read about soccer players and dancers switching sports to experience something new; what this fall has been like through the eyes of our fre...

Swinging Bridge Magazine: November 2020  

Read about soccer players and dancers switching sports to experience something new; what this fall has been like through the eyes of our fre...

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