Issuu on Google+

friday, Jan. 25, 2013

www.farm-news.com

farm news / The messenger, forT dodge, iowa

1C

Is the corn demand market ended? 2013 may be record volatile year By DARCY DOUGHERTY MAULSBY yettergirl@yahoo.com

OMAHA — The year ahead could be one of the most interesting, if not one of the most volatile, periods in recent history when it comes to the corn market, some analysts predict. “The big question for 2013 is whether the demand market for corn that started in 2005-2006 is coming to an end,” said Darin Newsom, a DTN senior analyst. Domestically, corn-ending stocks in early January totaled 647 million bushels, a significant decline from the last time stocks dipped this low, with 883 million bushels estimated at the end of 1996-1997. Even more important, Newsom said, is the ending stocks-to-use ratio, which is a percentage measure of reserves. “This ratio was 5.8 percent in December 2012, making it the second lowest on record, right behind the 5 percent ratio in 19951996,” Newsom said. “As a result, we’ll need to have near-record corn yields and production in 2013 to meet all the different areas of demand.” Global stocks tighten Analysts are projecting record acres of corn in the United States this year, with a general consensus of 98 million acres. Much of this additional acreage is expected to be planted in the Northern Plains and the Southeast, said Newsom,

-Messenger/­Farm­News­photo­by­Darcy­Dougherty­Maulsby

WHILE SOME MARKET analysts believe the demand market for corn may be coming to an end, they acknowledge that much will depend on the weather in 2013. who added that weather will be a key factor in 2013. “Perhaps the ground is so good in Iowa, Illinois, eastern Nebraska and western Nebraska that maybe we don’t have to have all the subsoil moisture in place by planting, but we need to see weather patterns change to bring more moisture to many areas of the United States.” Three years of belownormal corn yields nationwide contributed to a decline in corn demand in the past three years, simply because the production wasn’t

there, Newsom said. While Brazil has filled some of this demand, global demand for corn has dropped in the 2012-2013 marketing year — the first time a decline has happened in 19 years. Global ending stocks continue to tighten, Newsom added. “You have to go back to 1973-74 to see levels close to the ones that exist today. The current ending stocks-to-use rate is 13.6 percent, which isn’t a lot higher than the 11.7 percent rate of 1973-74.” Rebuilding global corn supplies will depend not on-

ly on the United States’ 2013 crop, but on the crop that will be harvested in South America this March. Brazil has experienced near-ideal growing conditions, Newsom said, but Argentina has experienced some weather challenges that may curtail yields. “Also keep an eye on the Ukraine, which wants to plant more corn than wheat,” Newsom said. While global corn production and demand could certainly rebound this year, the future for domestic demand remains unclear. The

United States is running well behind pace on corn exports, and demand continues to languish on the livestock side of the industry, due to herd liquidation in both cattle and hogs. If drought conditions persist into the 2013 growing season, a renewed push for a waiver of the Renewable Fuels Standard remains a possibility, Newsom said. Huge price swings? Newsom isn’t the only one who thinks volatility will continue to define the corn markets and the weath-

er in 2013. So do 350 agribusiness executives who attended a recent Rabobank Forum and shared their opinions on topics they believe will be significant for global and North American agribusiness in the coming year, including: ∫ Extreme weather. Notably, 68 percent of attendees named weather extremes and volatility as the single biggest factor affecting North American food and agribusiness in 2013. This concern far outweighed the next two closest factors — consumer demand, 13 percent, and policies and regulation, 10 percent. ∫ Risk management. Reflecting the concern over continued weather volatility, 59 percent of poll respondents said the 2012 drought has changed their views about risk management. These executives cited an increased focus on financial liquidity, 25 percent, increased investment in risk management and insurance, 21 percent, and greater diversification, 13 percent, as leading solutions to hedge against continued volatility in weather patterns and commodity markets. In any event, it’s clear that investors don’t like uncertainty and volatility, said Newsom, who noted that investors don’t want to take a chance on corn this year. While it’s not out of the realm of possibility for corn prices to drop to the low- to mid-$3 range in the months ahead, it remains to be seen whether the demand market is falling apart, Newsom said. “So much will be riding on the weather this year. “We could see some huge price swings with every weather-related news headline that comes out.”

A report card: Taking stock of the checkoff

Ethanol JOHNSTON (ICPB) — Many individuals and groups working together made ethanol a success, and the Iowa Corn Checkoff remains an essential contributor to that team effort. From its very first project to today, the checkoff has paid for ethanol promotions, ethanol education, and ethanol advertising to create today’s market. When California challenged the Clean Air Act regulations requiring the use of ethanol, it was Iowa Corn Promotion Board-

+

funded research confirming ethanol’s environmental benefits that helped the Environmental Protection Agency win the court battle. In the past decade, ICPB efforts advanced from simple ethanol promotion to support the development of Iowa’s farmer-owned ethanol industry and expand the fueling opportunities and resulting use of E85. Today, more than 75 percent of the fuel purchased in Iowa is ethanol blends, and the state has 175 E85

flex-fuel pumps. Iowa Corn continues to work to expand higher blends as E15 was approved by the EPA for use in 2001 and newer vehicles and the number of flex-fuel vehicles in Iowa is one in every 10. Ethanol promotion began paying off for growers as early as 1982. In years with excess grain stocks, ethanol demand helped reduce surpluses and cushion price declines. More recently, ethanol demand within Iowa has strengthened basis for growers, in-

creased corn prices, and grower ownership of new plants means farmers are sharing in the value-added profits from ethanol. Livestock, et al ICPB market development projects over the years have also helped build demand for new corn uses in sweeteners and plastics. In the livestock sector, the ICPB has contributed more than $5 million to develop pork and beef export markets through U.S. Meat Export Federation

programs. As Iowa ethanol production grew, the checkoff has also committed funds to distiller’s dried grains marketing and education — an initiative that benefits both to livestock producers and Iowa’s ethanol industry. Most people don’t know that one-third of every bushel processed in an ethanol plant comes back as a valuable livestock feed called DDGs. Through the Coalition to Support Iowa’s Farmers, the ICPB also supports growing Iowa livestock

Betty lived on the farm for 45 years and is now enjoying gardening at her Friendship Haven town home. “Meeting new friends, going for walks and the Wellness Center all make this the perfect place for me!”

production, one family at a time. Exports Export sales in the 20112012 marketing year set another new record, the result of a near-total rebuilding of export markets. The top U.S. markets of 1978 are gone: At that time, 60 percent of corn shipments went to the European Union, Soviet Union and Poland. As those markets disappeared, ICPB funding, See REPORT, Page 2C

Town o Homes Available! To join the neighborhood, call 573-6000!

Friendship Haven +


2C

Farm News / The messeNger, ForT DoDge, Iowa

www.farm-news.com

FrIDay, JaN. 25, 2013

2013 Corn Edition

Report much of it for U.S. Grains Council programs, built demand in other regions, tripling U.S. corn sales to Japan, Mexico, Taiwan, South Korea and Egypt and creating additional new markets in countries like Colombia, Morocco and

Continued from Page 1C Indonesia. Research Before the checkoff, groups like the Iowa Corn Association Growers lacked the funds to support even modest research projects.

Since then, ICPB research programs have grown in scope, in recent years qualifying for more than $5.4 million in matching funds that make the grower investment go farther. ICPB seed money has played a critical role in

Contact Your Local Agent Representing German Farmers Mutual for Local Coverage on Your Farm or Home. Serving Northwest Iowa for 120 Years -

We serve the following counties: • Sioux • Lyon

• Plymouth • O’Brien

• Osceola • Cherokee

To contact GFM for a farm policy review

116 N. Main Ave., Sioux Center, IA 51250 (712)722-2571 • (800)788-2571 • Fax(712)722-2574

the corn mapping genome. In 1998, a new law gave the checkoff legal rights to its research results, and today projects like isosorbide research are on track to bring dollars back to the ICPB when they are commer-

cialized, providing more funds that can be invested to benefit growers. Defend the industry The wave of corn and ethanol hate stories has been overwhelming, but the checkoff continues to

SStarting t a r t i n g aatt $1800 $1800

NEW! One-Touch Technology

www.germanfarmers.com

defend the corn industry and all uses of corn. “Proactively supporting the value of corn in food and fuel” has been and continues to be a top priority, driving how the checkoff allocates staff and spending.

- Patented Knuckle Pivot Technology Allows Axle to Climb Heaped Load and Keep Constant Tension on Tarp for Maximum Control in Wind ON-SITE INSTALLS! Conditions. Iowa’s #1 - 5 Year Motor Warranty Premier Tarp Deal - High Polished Chrome Plated Casting Where the Customer - Also New - Multi-Flex Rear Arm for Trailers with Tailgates. Please Call is #1. for more info! - We Also Carry a Full Line of Replacement Parts and Tarps, Even “S” brand. Our Tarps are 18-22 ox. Commercial Grade Vinyl. - Replacement Tarp Prices Starting at $375 for a 42” Trailer - Grain Cart Tarp Kits Starting at $750

When you need extra visibility on the farm or on the road, a camera system can give you the edge you need, A&I Products CabCAM™ can be the extra “eyes” required to fill that need at an affordable price. Shop us online or call for details.

Shop our online store at RiesenbergEnterprises.com

THE WARRANTY YOU WANT.

THE SERVICE YOU NEED. THE BRAND THAT DELIVERS BOTH. Carroll Implement Ltd. 1001 Kossuth Ave. LuVerne, IA 50560 515-882-3261

Linde Equipment Co. 108 S. Idaho Glidden, IA 51443 712-659-3725

Pocahontas Equipment Co. LLC 1400 W. Elm St. Pocahontas, IA 50574 712-335-4522

Robinson Implement 2002 St. F24 Irwin, IA 51446 712-782-3171

Central Iowa Farm Store, Inc. 203 Iowa Ave. Old Hwy. 30 W. Marshalltown, IA 50158 641-753-3996

Casady Brothers Implement 1705 W. 2nd St. Webster City, IA 50595 515-832-4447

Moss Brothers, Inc. 2476 240th St. Dallas Center, IA 50063 515-992-3858

Franken Implement & Service 2782 360th St. Rock Valley, IA 51247 712-722-3941

Ames, IA

800-779-7979

When you need farm tire service, give us a call. We are specially trained and equipped to handle all of your on-farm and in-field repair and replacement needs. Nothing kicks dirt like Firestone farm tires. Stop by and see for yourself!

Marshall, MO

800-889-6161

Case IH Application Equipment

Heartland Ag, sells and services a complete line of Case IH chemical and fertilizer application equipment. • Case IH self propelled sprayers are the leaders in the industry and feature: 150 hp to 290 hp 750 gallon up to 1200 gallon 75 to 120 foot booms • Case IH self propelled fertilizer applicators are state of the art with the Surveyor Cab for unmatched comfort and visibility, 340hp to 380 hp models in both three and four wheel models, 1800 to 2400 gallon spray systems with 85 foot booms, single and dual bin spinner applicators and Case IH Flex Air applicators. • Financing ans seasonal rentals available.

Heartland Ag, Inc. represents a complete line of Ag Systems anhydrous ammonia and liquid fertilizer applicators that are manufactured to exacting specifications and carry the best warranty in the industry including the following: Up to 40 foot liquid side dress applicators with 500 to 1300 gallons tanks. NH3 applicators up to 65 feet wide with seven year warranties. 1000 and 1450 gallon NH3 wagons A complete line of NH3 knives, shanks and sealers. Electronic controllers for all farm and dealer needs. Sprayer parts for all makes and models. Financing and seasonal rentals available.

HEARTLAND AG, INC.

Highway 30 West • Ames, IA 50014 • 800-779-7979 +

+


friday, Jan. 25, 2013

www.farm-news.com

farm news / THe messenger, forT dodge, iowa

3C

2013 Corn Edition

Nutrient management for modern farmers Have decreased soil erosion 67 percent from 1980 to 2011 JOHNSTON (ICGA) — The definition of nutrient management is a key set of practices that help promote and maintain healthy soil with good physical, biological and chemical properties. Nutrient management also grows healthier plants and can help stimulate proper root growth. Part of smart nutrient management is to use practices when they’re most needed and in such a way that plants and soil benefit, without nutrients leach-

+

ing into groundwater or otherwise washing away. Iowa’s farmers have some work to do, but they have been significantly and vigilantly improving practices. According to the Field to Market Report from the Keystone Alliance, from 1980 through 2011, trends in U.S. corn production show an increase in production and decreases in per bushel land use, irrigation, energy and greenhouse gas emissions. Soil erosion specifically had a

67 percent decrease over the same time period. During this same 21-year span, farmers nearly doubled production on only slightly fewer nutrients. According to data from the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service, farmers grew 6.64 billion bushels of corn using 3.9 pounds of nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium) for each bushel in 1980. In 2010, they grew 12.45 billion bushels using 1.6 pounds of nutrients per bushel produced.

In total, this represents an 87.5 percent increase in production with 4 percent fewer nutrients. “We are able to focus on resource management more today because our seed technology has improved so much,” said Jay Lynch, a farmer leader from Humboldt. “It is not that our fathers and grandfathers didn’t care about conservation, it is more about where we have been and where we are going. “Just like anything today, we learn from what we did in the past and we work to make it better. I don’t use the same practices, seed, and equipment they used to

use, because I have more options and I am sure that my kids will farm very differently from how I farm.” Iowa’s farmers are leading the charge on conservation with the introduction of a non-point and point source plan to reduce nutrient loss to water. The Nutrient Reduction Strategy, created in cooperation with Gov. Terry Branstad, the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship and the Iowa Department for Natural Resources, outlines efforts to reduce See NUTRIENTS, Page 12C

CONTACT ONE OF THESE DEALERS TODAY! MICHAEL ANDEREGG ! " CLEAR LAKE, IA # $ $ 641-425-8384 " MICHAEL.ANDEREGG @PLANTPIONEER.COM

CHRIS BLOME ALDEN, IA 641-751-3936

TYLER SWART DUMONT, IA 641-373-0500

CHRIS.BLOME @PTPRECISIONAG.COM

TSWART @PTPRECISIONAG.COM

PRAIRIE CITY

MARSHALLTOWN

WEBSTER CITY

515-994-3200

641-753-3996

515-832-4447

PRAIRIE AG SUPPLY

CENTRAL IOWA FARM STORE

RENWICK

MASON CITY

515-824-3231

641-242-2702

BOONE VALLEY IMPLEMENT

MASON CITY RED POWER

CASADY BROS. IMPLEMENT

LAWTON S&S EQUIPMENT

712-944-5751

HARLAN

SORENSEN EQUIPMENT

712-755-2455

MANSON

MANSON RED POWER

712-469-2145

+


4C

Farm NewS / The meSSeNger, ForT DoDge, Iowa

www.farm-news.com

FrIDay, JaN. 25, 2013

2013 Corn Edition

The future of ethanol It’s important to Iowa, nation JOHNSTON (ICGA) — From local communities where the crops are grown and processed, to cities where drivers fill up with domestically produced fuels, American-made ethanol is an economic engine for Iowa and contributes to the future of the nation. American ethanol contributes to nearly 400,000 jobs added in agriculture, manufacturing and the service sector. It adds $42.4 billion to the gross domestic product and adds $29.9 billion in federal, state and local taxes and it helps the U.S. reduce its dependence on foreign oil. “Iowa is in a unique posi-Messenger/Farm News file photo CORN-BASED ethanol has created 74,000 Iowa jobs tion to have an abundant and added $11 billion to the state’s gross domestic corn supply and have stateproduct. Iowa still leads the U.S. in ethanol manufac- of-the-art ethanol production which equals economic turing.

success,” said Kevin Rempp, a farmer from Montezuma, who currently serves as chairman of the Iowa Corn Promotion Board. Iowa leads the nation in production by creating nearly 30 percent of all ethanol. This has resulted in 74,000 new jobs for Iowans and accounts for $11 billion of Iowa’s GDP. Increased ethanol production means an increased demand for corn — and Iowa corn growers are answering the call. Even in challenging years such as 2012, yields were maintained and corn supplies have been adequate. Today, U.S. corn farmers are working to increase yields. Currently farmers achieve an average of 169 bushels per acre, a 15 per-

“Iowa is in a unique position to have an abundant corn supply and have state-of-the-art ethanol production which equals economic success.”

—Kevin Rempp Montezuma-area corn grower Chairman of Iowa Corn Promotion Board

cent increase from the 146 bushels in 2001. This trend will only continue, as the average Iowa yield is expected to top the 200bushel mark by 2020. In addition, the value of each kernel has increased steadily since 2005-06. Traditionally, corn was harvested and exported from Iowa. Now, it’s processed into ethanol or fed to livestock right here in Iowa. Iowa’s traditional corn markets are consistent, and ethanol has served as a new market for increased yield

The First Bin Designed for the 21st Century

and production to add value to every kernel. “The fact that a high value-feed product also is produced in the ethanol process is often overlooked,” Rempp said. “The reality is that for every bushel of corn that goes into the ethanol plant, one-third of those bushels comes out of the plant as distiller’s dried grains that is fed to livestock.” Building the future The Renewable Fuels See ETHANOL, Page 5C

BIGGER Stronger faster

KITS COME IN 14-24FT SIZES AND FOR A LIMITED TIME HAVE FREE DELIVERY

• We custom build to your size up to 42’ hopper cocnes. • Custom built augers to your size • Self closing bin lids • Bin alerts • Many other options available

Winter Discount In Effect

The MK130Plus Auger The heavy-duty MK130Plus is built tough to take on the biggest of jobs. Constructed with heavier gauge tube and flighting than our other models, the MK130Plus offers more years of dependable, high-capacity performance.

CARPENTER CONST. INC

'

1261 125th ST • BOONE, IOWA 50036 515-432-1808 • CELL: 515-230-1808

%& "

)

$( ) #) " "" !

"

#) !! $)

1-866-467-7207

)

(

www.grainaugers.com

POWER LLC

515-964-6100

2402 S.E. Hulsizer • Ankeny, Iowa fax 515-964-6119 www.northstarpowerllc.com

•Diesel Engines •Power Generators

Carroll Implement Ltd. 1001 Kossuth Ave. LuVerne, IA 50560 515-882-3261 Franken Implement & Service 2782 360th St. Rock Valley, IA 51247 712-722-3941 Linde Equipment Co. 108 S. Idaho Glidden, IA 51443 712-659-3725 Casady Brothers Implement 1705 W. 2nd St. Webster City, IA 50595 515-832-4447

authorized distributor

•Drive Train Components

Central Iowa Farm Store, Inc. 203 Iowa Ave. Old Hwy. 30 W. Marshalltown, IA 50158 641-753-3996 Pocahontas Equipment Co. LLC 1400 W. Elm St. Pocahontas, IA 50574 712-335-4522 Robinson Implement 2002 St. F24 Irwin, IA 51446 712-782-3171

P.O. Box 1030 • Wahpeton, ND 58074 800-688-3300

www.wil-rich.com • sales@wil-rich.com

ANDERSON IMPLEMENT 3043 Madison Ave. RR1, Fort Dodge, IA 50501 515-547-2370

+

+


FRIDAy, JAn. 25, 2013

www.farm-news.com

Ethanol Standard, which came into effect in 2005 and was reauthorized and expanded with strong bipartisan support in 2007, promotes the production of home-grown renewable fuels, giving consumers an alternative to foreign petroleum. RFS has allowed for expansion of the American ethanol industry by creating market certainty. It requires that by 2022, the U.S fuel market blends 36 billion gallons of biofuels, with up to 15 billion gallons coming from corn-based ethanol. “The RFS is the only major policy in the United States that is reducing our dependence on foreign oil,” said Don Elsbernd of Postville, who serves on the Iowa Corn Growers Association. “It also provides consumers with lower energy costs and creates the necessary market conditions to encourage innovation in renewable energy. By requiring renewable fuel use, Congress has given investors the confidence that a market for biofuels will exist.” It is estimated that addi-

+

FARM nEWS / ThE MESSEngER, FORT DODgE, IOWA

5C

Continued from Page 4C

Ethanol quick facts

tional job creation from advanced biofuels production under the RFS could reach 807,000 by 2022. Flex fuel vehicles One way to increase ethanol consumption is by using more in flex fuel vehicles designed to run on a variety of fuels, including regular unleaded, super unleaded (10 percent ethanol) or any blend of ethanol up to 85 percent. There are nearly nine million FFVs on U.S. roadways and one in 10 vehicles in Iowa is an

TOM EISCHEN SALES INC.

FFV, the ICGA said. Iowa has more than 175 E85 pumps that number among 2,900 in the U.S. For more information on FFV models, visit www.iowacorn.org/ethanol. In addition, there are more ethanol blended fuel choices than ever. The key component for retailing these fuel options to consumers is the ethanol flexfuel pump — which blends gasoline and E85 to make a variety of midrange blends such as 15 percent, 20 percent, 30 percent, or 85 percent

ethanol. Nearly every gallon of gasoline sold in the United States is blended with 10 percent ethanol. Last year, the EPA approved a waiver for 15 percent ethanol blended fuel for vehicles 2001 and newer. E15 is a new, higher octane fuel that is approved for use in model year 2001 and newer cars, light-duty trucks, medium-duty passenger vehicles (SUVs), and all FFVs. The approved group of

BIN SALES & REPAIR SUPPLIES

∫ Iowa’s ethanol industry has the capacity to produce more than 3.7 billion gallons annually, using more than 1.3 billion bushels of corn. ∫ One bushel of corn can produce 2.8 gallons of ethanol, with one-third returning as distiller’s dried grain to feed livestock. ∫ Iowa leads the nation in production, creating nearly 30 percent of all U.S. ethanol. ∫ Each barrel of domestic ethanol displaces 1.2 barrels of imported petroleum. ∫ One out of every 10 vehicles in Iowa is a FFV. ∫ 60 cents of every dollar spent filling up FFVs remains in Iowa. ∫ An Iowa State University CARD study reported that thanks to ethanol, U.S. consumers saved $1.09 per gallon in 2011. ∫ Consumers in the Midwest benefited more, saving $1.69 per gallon. ∫ More than 95 percent of all fuel sold in the United States is blended with 10 percent ethanol. ∫ While the U.S. imports 65 percent of its petroleum needs, domestic ethanol now reduces oil imports by 128,000 barrels each day. ∫ Producing ethanol requires less water than gasoline by a 3-to-1 margin. ∫ The ethanol industry has resulted in 74,000 new jobs in Iowa and accounts for $11 billion of Iowa’s gross domestic product. vehicles includes more than 62 percent of the cars, trucks and SUVs on the road today. What is more important is the fuel consumed by

Introducing SMART-Touch Technology!

603 Hwy. 18, Algona, IA Phone: 515-295-3377 • Fax: 515-295-3493 Tom Cell: 515-320-3377 Tim Cell: 515-320-3431 tomesales@awcmail.com

Corn, soybean seed, farm chemicals, native grass seed, STIHL & TORO sales SUNDOWNER, H&H, DOOLITTLE, PJ TRAILERS

North Central Cooperative Feed • Fertilizer • Fuel • Grain Marketing Services • Poultry Litter Clarion • Holmes • Hutchins •Kanawha• Woden

www.nccoop.com

The SMART2™ from Shur-Co® is the most advanced remote of its kind on the market. It not only opens and closes your chosen applications – it lets you specify exact positioning!

Don’t trust your harvest to anything less. Call your local Conrad American dealer today!

LAKE CITY VETERINARY SERVICE, P.C. 1103 West Main Lake City, Iowa 51449 Lake City: 712-464-8911 Toll Free: 800-347-8911 Fax 712-464-8016 email: lcvetsma@iowatelecom.net Arthur H. Mally D.V.M. Home 712-464-3211 Paul J. Armbrecht D.V.M. Home 712-297-7916

these vehicles constitutes more than 80 percent of the unleaded fuel sold. For more details visit www.iowacorn.org/ethanol or www.byoethanol.com.

LIFETIME ARM WARRANTY!

Our patent-pending SMART2™ remote gives you two-way communication in a digital display, controlling over 100 programmed devices from more than 100 feet away. It relays real-time positioning of tarps and traps: Automatically set tarps to stop away from the tarp stops and save on wear and tear. Or open traps based on the capacity of elevator pits. And speaking of tarps and traps, our 4500 Series HD electric tarp offers a powerful American-made motor with a super-reliable magnetic brake and the strongest torsion arms on the market! The ProTrap® hopper door opener has all-metal gears and housing, a high-efficiency plantetary gear reduction and no hydraulics to fail.

SEE THE SMARTrailer™ LINE AT A FARM SHOW NEAR YOU! SHUR-CO® of IOWA 3839 Midway Blvd., Ft. Dodge, 866.356.0245

www.shurco.com

SOURCE CODE FN

800.474.8756

Increase Crop Yields • Maximize Water Usage Boost Spray Performance • Improve Weed and Disease Control Reduce the Impact of Soil Compaction.

Satisfaction Guaranteed • More Yield in Your Field

Mark Good

Owner & Sales Consultant

515-570-4106 North Central Iowa crabapple2145@yahoo.com www.amway.com/goodstore

YOUR COMPLETE HYDRAULIC REPAIR SHOP • Hose Repair • Cylinder Repair • Motor Repair • Pump & Valve Repair • Truck Repair • Install Wet Kits • Large selection of hose fittings • Snow Plow & Sander Equipment (seasonal) • New Clylinders and Motors • We also make DOT approved air brake hoses

Come see Earl for all your hydraulic needs! 800-262-8735 8 0 0 - 2 6 2 - 8 7 3 5 or o r 712-792-0311 712-792-0311 919-E. 9 1 9 - E . Hwy. H w y . 30 3 0 • Carroll, C a r r o l l , IA IA IF IT’S HYDRAULIC... WE FIX IT!!

+


6C

Farm News / The messeNger, ForT DoDge, Iowa

www.farm-news.com

FrIDay, JaN. 25, 2013

2013 Corn Edition

ICGA in third year developing young leaders sac County student wants to get ag on offensive side of food issues By LARRY KERSHNER kersh@farm-news.com

SAC CITY — Where college is expected to give a young person a leg up in one’s chosen career field, a team of agriculture students, including Brent Drey, of rural Sac City, are looking for an additional boost to their future through a program called CAT. The Iowa Collegiate Advisory Team, now in its third year, is giving Drey and 18 other select students from a variety of Iowa colleges and universities, in-

sights into the corn industry. Drey said this is his second year with the program, and he’s excited about returning to the program, this time as president of the Iowa State University Corn Growers Association, which organized last fall. Drey, a sophomore majoring in ag studies, said the ISUCGA has been formed by students to increase involvement by their peers in the state’s corn industry. Students have the opportunity to meet regularly and

which provides an added challenge to young farmers. “But the prospects are high for renting ground,� he said. He’s also encouraged because “beginning farmers have a lot of resources available to them� to get a successful start in agriculture. “In order to become industry leaders we need to have the proper training and networking to conquer the challenges we will face during our careers,� Drey said.

“In order to become industry leaders we need to have the proper training and networking to conquer the challenges we will face during our careers.� —Brent Drey Member of ICGA’s Iowa Collegiate Advisory Team

become immersed in the real-world issues that they will face when they graduate from college. Drey’s family farms corn, soybeans and popcorn on 1,800 acres around the

Sac City area. His hopes after graduation is to return to take a place in the family’s operation, eventually returning cattle and hogs to the family operation, and then enter

local and possibly state politics. Although recent land sales have been making headlines, Drey said he senses that many landowners are still not ready to sell

See DREY, Page 11C

6OMPDLZPVSQPUFOUJBMXJUI,FZ$PPQFSBUJWF ZPVSQBSUOFSGPSTVDDFTT 70

8&"3&,&: 0HU L GL DQ RI I HU V W KH O DU JHVW  VHO HFW L RQ RI  VHHG W HQGHU V L Q W KH VHHG KDQGO L QJ L QGXVW U \ DQG FDQ DFFRPPRGDW H DQ\ I DU PL QJ RSHU DW L RQ  :H W DNH W KH ZRU N RXW  RI  O RDGL QJ VHHG L QW R \RXU SO DQW HU  RU  GU L O O  GHFU HDVL QJ W KH GRZQ W L PH L Q W KH Ä&#x;HO G L Q RU GHU W R NHHS \RXU  W U DFW RU  DQG SO DQW HU  PRYL QJ 9L VL W  XV W RGD\ W R O HDU Q PRU H

#&(

#*

&)" +

&" & & " %) $! "(

"( & # )( #"'

# #&

* & " &' )$$ +

!' ' "

XXXLFZDPPQDPN "HSPOPNZ&OFSHZ'FFE(SBJO-VNCFS$POTUSVDUJPO/"1"4FSWJDF$FOUFS $FOUSPM1SFDJTJPO"H3PMBOE5SBOTQPSU35*-PHJTUJDT

Ĺ•  0HU L GL DQ 0DQXI DFW XU L QJ  , QF  5HJL VW HU HG 7 U DGHPDU NV 8VHG 8QGHU  /L FHQVH

ANDERSON IMPLEMENT

3043 Madison Ave. RR1, Fort Dodge, IA 50501 515-547-2370

Make the Most of Your Farmland Investment '+!%

&

&%) (

)

&+ +, '( ##)&+%

*

#

#$ )

& "

## , -

)

)

Combining local, personal attention with proven farm management techniques, real estate strategies, and succession planning, Hertz helps you realize your r goals.

! () ' !),

%

) 1101 13th St. N. Humboldt, IA 50548 515.332.1406

2800 4th St. SW Ste. 7 Mason City, IA 50401 641.423.9531

www.hfmgt.com www .hfmgt.com +

+


friday, Jan. 25, 2013

www.farm-news.com

farm neWs / THe messenGer, forT dodGe, ioWa

7C

2013 Corn Edition

Rotation still best tool against rootworms By CLAYTON RYE crye@wctatel.net

MASON CITY — Every crop year a farmer has to compete with weeds, diseases and insects to grow a crop. This struggle between man and those accompanying challenges make those fields comparable to a battlefield as farmers go against forces both above and below the ground, the outcome of which determines final yield. Western corn rootworm is one of those foes and its adaptability is requiring better strategies in managing this pest, said Erin Hodgson, an Iowa State University Extension entomologist, during a Jan. 10 Crop Advantage Series meeting. Until 1929, she said, WCR was found along the common borders of Kansas, Nebraska and Colorado. By 1963, it was in the western

+

Western corn rootworm eggs. third of Iowa, the middle third in 1964, and the eastern third in 1966. It has spread to much of the U.S. cropland, including the state of Maine, by 2005. Hodgson outlined for her audience the increasing problems keeping western corn rootworm populations under control. “The increasing number of fields growing continuous corn makes it harder,� she said, “to control WCR populations under an economic treatment threshold.� In 2003, seed corn con-

Western corn rootworm larvae.

“The increasing number of fields growing continuous corn makes is harder to control WCR.� —Erin Hodgson ISU Extension entomologist

taining transgenic Bt rootworm control was made available, reducing or eliminating the need for soil-applied insecticides to control larvae. Fields growing continuous

corn since then are showing resistant populations to this control method, Hodgson said. In 2009 there were reports of severe rootworm injury in Bt planted fields. ISU’s

Gassman Lab started collecting data and comparing to fields where there were no problems. The results were published in 2011, showing the problem fields were continuous corn fields with the same Bt trait for at least three years. This was the first time documenting a beetle has developed Bt resistance, she said. While resistance was expected to occur sometime in the future, it was a surprise that it only happened in six years after commercial re-

Complete Truck, Trailer, Car & Pickup Repair Service

HOBBY

See WCR, Page 8C

Custom Sizes - Economical - Versatile

Humboldt, Iowa (3 Blocks West of Dodgen Industries) 515-332-3093 • 332-3303 • 515-332-2806 after hours EQUESTRIAN

lease. The resistance has been found in Bt trait Cry3Bb1. The resistance was found initially in northeastern Iowa and has since spread across the northern third of Iowa. It has also been confirmed in Illinois and is suspected in Nebraska, Minnesota and North Dakota. The best way to control western corn rootworm, Hodgson aid, is to avoid any continuous-corn practice as it is an adaptable pest.

Fabra Dome Structures

• Certified mechanics for repair • New Tires for any size vehicle

FA R M

Western corn rootworm moths.

Western corn rootworm damage.

The Grain Dryer Experts

COMMERCIAL

Your options are endless. Let’s nail the plan.

t%BJSZ#BSOT t$BMWJOH#BSOT t4XJOF'JOJTIJOH t4PX(FTUBUJPO t4IFFQ#BSOT t(SBJO4UPSBHF

t)BZ4UPSBHF t4IPQ"SFBT t8BSFIPVTFT    t(SFFOIPVTFT t.BDIJOFSZ4UPSBHF t)PSTF3JEJOH"SFOBT

Fabra Dome Structures are very low in cost, heavy duty and are able to fit all types of applications

•20+ Years Experience in Vacuum-Cool Tower Drying

CZCVJMEFST for fastest and simplest structure to install.

•Towers & Low Profile (Horizontal) models with capacities up to 4,800 bph • Known for Quality Construction • Standard Manual Mode Backup

! *+!) $+/ '&*+), +$'& &

Lester Buildings offers unlimited choices for how your structure will function and look. Together, we’ll create your custom plan.

')+#.'' ")$ %!* 0 % " ,((%/

,+#-!& ) $& & %$&" '%,+$'&*

Custom fit replacement covers available for all brands of hoop buildings Dealer Inquiries Welcome

877-257-4311 "VEVCPO *" 4BMFT!GBCSBEPNFDPN XXXGBCSBEPNFDPN

Other Iowa locations, call Jeff Cruzen, Regional Sales Manager at (515)577-7563

MathewsCompany.com

 

Specialty Contracts & Diversified Marketing Programs





  



  







 

  

























 





POET Biorefining – Coon Rapids offers a variety of specialty contracts including cash, basis fixed, futures fixed and minimum price contracts. Our specialty contracts give you the ability to manage your price risk, while our competitive prices and DTN Portal allow you to efficiently sell your corn in a profitable manner. biorefining

'PSJOGPSNBUJPOSFHBSEJOH pricing, sale and delivery of corn, please call  poet.com/coon rapids

Grain delivery benefits: t/PTISJOLDPNQFUJUJWFEJTDPVOUT t4QFDJBMUZDPOUSBDUT t$PNQFUJUJWFQSJDF t'BTUQBZNFOU tISPOMJOFNBSLFUJOHUPPMTQPXFSFE by DTN Portal Together with you, POET is proud to produce an environmentally friendly, renewable fuel to help NFFUUIFFWFSJODSFBTJOHFOFSHZOFFETPG"NFSJDB

309-629-9000 30 3 09-629-90000 www.calmercornheads.com www.calmercornheads.com w.ca w. ..ca almer almerrrcor c corrrnheads.com n nheads.com m

Trash T ra ash Reduction Re educttion n aandd D Decomposition Decompo osition Rolls Ro olls s For JD 40, 90, 6000, CASE-IH 2200 series, and NH 96c, 98c, and 996 corn heads

“Confetti Like�

Faster Residue Breakdown!

Ten Blades Chop, Cut, and Shred!

Patented Revolving Open Windows Allow the Stalk to Feed Easily!

BT CHOPPER REPLACEMENT STALK ROLLS

ÂŽ

is no Residueproblem!

longer a

BT Chopper Kit Available for JD 40 and 90 series 309-629-9000

Linde Equipment Co. 108 S. Idaho Glidden, IA 51443 712-659-3725

Swartzrock Implement 2192 Old Hwy. Rd. S. Charles City, IA 50616 641-228-5714

Pocahontas Equipment Co. LLC 1400 W. Elm St. Pocahontas, IA 50574 712-335-4522

Casady Brothers Implement 1705 W. 2nd St. Webster City, IA 50595 515-832-4447

Moss Brothers, Inc. 2476 240th St. Dallas Center, IA 50063 515-992-3858

Robinson Implement 2002 St. F24 Irwin, IA 51446 712-782-3171 +


8C

Farm News / The messeNger, ForT DoDge, Iowa

www.farm-news.com

FrIDay, JaN. 25, 2013

2013 Corn Edition

WCR

Buying Equipment?

Continued from Page 7C

In ISU publication number 290-12, Hodgson wrote that the single most effective tool in Iowa is to rotate corn to soybeans or another crop. Even if the cycle of continuous corn is broken only once in every four to six years, this will reduce corn rootworm numbers. Hodgson wrote that after rotating back to corn, a farmer can expect nearly zero

root injury in first-year corn. If crop rotation is not a choice, there are other strategies that can be used. Pyramided corn transgenic traits, such as SmartStax containing Cry3Bb1 and Cry34/35Ab1 traits or AgriSure 3122 that has Cry34/35Ab1 and mCry3A traits can be used. Hodgson cautions users that if the rootworm popula-

tion has developed resis- only a small area of roots tance to one of the traits it while a transgenic provides will be the other trait that protection throughout the will be doing the actual con- root system. trol leading to resistance to  Another option is to rotate  single Bt corn rootworm that trait. Rotating pyramided traits traits either annually or at every two to three years least every two years.  from would help keep this Hodgson said scouting of   a non-roothappening. With both larvae and adults is es    worm Bt corn, sential to any strategy used  a soil insecti cide can be used. However, to control western corn rootan insecticide will protect worm.

 

   

     

 

         

           

         

 

 

 

 

   

Find it on   

    farm-news.com 

 

 

&5<67$/$9(   $5&$',$,2:$  

3+ 

ZZZDUFDGLDOLPHVWRQHFRP

Our eighth year!

H YB Y B R I DS DS B BUI U I LT LT T TO O P PE ERF FOR ORM W WH HERE Y YOU OU F FA ARM Frankly, we have a lot to choose fr from. om. Her Here e ar are e four we highly rrecommend. ecommend. D84-06RL D 84 - 06 R L

Y54-04RL Y54 - 0 4R L

s/U T S T ANDINGY IELDPO TEN T IAL s/UTSTANDINGYIELDPOTENTIAL s$     2 ,'ENUI T Y ®3MART3TAX s$ 2,'ENUITY 3MAR T 3 T AX ®2)"BRINGSTHEMOST 2)"BRINGST HEMOS T ADVANCEDALL IN ONECORNTRAITPACKAGETOYOURFARM A DVANCEDALL IN ONECORNT RAI TPACKAGETOYOURFAR M s2EAL SINGLE BAG REF UGE IN A BAGSIMPLI lESAND s2EAL SINGLE BAG REFUGE IN A BAGSIMPLIlESAND SSPEEDSUPPLANTING PEEDSUPPLAN T ING 7ELL ADAP TEDTOCORN ON CORN ss7ELL ADAPTEDTOCORN ON CORN ss%XCELLENTTOLERANCETO'OSS7ILT % XCELLEN TTOLERANCETO'OSS7 IL T ssNDPLACE &)2344RIAL )OWA&ALLS )!BUACRE  NDPLACE  &)2 344RIAL )OWA&ALLS ) !     BU  ACRE

C C94-00R 94 - 0 0 R G Genuity e nu it y ® V VT3 T3 P Pro ro

#ONSIS TEN T IMPRESSIVEY IELDPO TEN T IAL ss#ONSISTENT IMPRESSIVEYIELDPOTENTIAL 4 HISIST HEQUAD S T ACKVER SIONOF' 4    W HICHWESELLOU TOFEVER YYEAR ss4HISISTHEQUAD STACKVERSIONOF'4WHICHWESELLOUTOFEVERYYEAR 6ER YGOODEMERGENCEANDEARL Y SEASONGROW T H WELL ADAP TEDTOHIGH ss6ERYGOODEMERGENCEANDEARLY SEASONGROWTH WELL ADAPTEDTOHIGH RRESIDUEENVIRONMENTS ESIDUEENVIRONMEN T S 'OODDROUGH TS T RESSTOLERANCE ss'OODDROUGHTSTRESSTOLERANCE !GRISURE ®'4PROVIDESFULL SEASONCONTROLOFCORNBORERANDROOTWORM ss!GRISURE     ' 4PROVIDESF ULL SEASONCON T ROLOFCORNBORERANDROO T WOR M s#ANBESPRAYEDW I T HANYBRANDOFGL YPHOSATE INCLUDING2OUNDUP ® OR s#ANBESPRAYEDWITHANYBRANDOFGLYPHOSATEINCLUDING2OUNDUP OR )GNITE )GNI TE ®,IBERTY  , IBER T Y ®

In 2012 the Farmers National Company real estate team completed over 175 successful land auctions in Iowa. :HDVV :HDVVLVWHGZLWKWKHVDOH :H DVVLVWHG VWHGZLWK Z W WWKH HVD VDOH H RIRYHUDFUHVRI,RZD RI RYHUDFUHVRI,RZD IDUPODQGLQZLWKDZRUWK IDUPODQG ZLWKDZRUWK LQ RIRYHUPLOOLRQ RI RYHUPLOOLRQ

60-01N 6 0-01N

s $AY#2s  $AY#2 s/U T S T ANDINGY IELDPER FOR MANCE s/UTSTANDINGYIELDPERFORMANCE s3 T RONGAGRONOMICPACKAGEFORCON T INUOUSCORNAND s3TRONGAGRONOMICPACKAGEFORCONTINUOUSCORNAND S T RESSEDAREAS STRESSEDAREAS s% XCELLEN TROO TS T RENG T H VER YGOODFALLS T ALKS T RENG T H s%XCELLENTROOTSTRENGTH VERYGOODFALLSTALKSTRENGTH s'ENUI T Y6 44RIPLE0ROPROVIDESDUALMODESOFACT ION s'ENUITY644RIPLE0ROPROVIDESDUALMODESOFACTION A GAINS TABOVE GROUNDINSECT S AGAINSTABOVE GROUNDINSECTS

s $AY#2s $AY#2 % XCI T INGGENE T ICSW I T HUNMATCHEDY IELDPOWERINCONVEN T IONAL ss%XCITINGGENETICSWITHUNMATCHEDYIELDPOWERINCONVENTIONAL CORN COMPETINGWELLWITHSTACKEDHYBRIDS C ORN COMPE T INGWELLW I T HS T ACKEDHYBRIDS s'OODSTALKANDROOTSTRENGTH s'OODS T ALKANDROO TS T RENG T H 6ER YGOODOVERALLPLAN THEAL T HANDFALLIN T ACT NESSFORA ss6ERYGOODOVERALLPLANTHEALTHANDFALLINTACTNESSFORA CONVENTIONALHYBRID C ONVEN T IONALHYBRID /URBES T SELLINGHYBRID I TSOLDOU TEARL YIN      AND  ss/URBEST SELLINGHYBRID ITSOLDOUTEARLYIN  AND

t  507.373.3161 WWW.ALSEED.COM W W W.A L S EED.CO M t 8 0 0.352.5247 5 07.373.3161 t 800.352.5247

VIKING NG C O R N

&

S O Y B E A N S

If you are thinking of buying or selling land, we would like to work for you. Call us today!



 

 











Visit our w website ebsite for information on all of our lando landowner wner ser services! vicess!

www www.FarmersNational.com .FarmersNational.com

5 5HDO(VWDWH6DOHVÂ&#x2021;$XFWLRQVÂ&#x2021;)DUPDQG5DQFK0DQDJHPHQW HDO(VWDWH6DOHVÂ&#x2021;$XFWLRQVÂ&#x2021;)DUPDQG5DQFK0DQDJHPHQW $ $SSUDLVDOÂ&#x2021;,QVXUDQFHÂ&#x2021;&RQVXOWDWLRQÂ&#x2021;2LODQG*DV0DQDJHPHQW SSUDLVDOÂ&#x2021;,QVXUDQFHÂ&#x2021;&RQVXOWDWLRQÂ&#x2021;2LODQG*DV0DQDJHPHQW //DNH0DQDJHPHQWÂ&#x2021;1DWLRQDO+XQWLQJ/HDVHV DNH0DQDJHPHQWÂ&#x2021;1DWLRQDO+XQWLQJ/HDVHV

Curry really works well for me. I had several fields go over 197 bushels this year - Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never had yields like that on this kind of dirt. All I can say about my Curry corn is WOW...WOW!

Customer C ustomer FFocused ocused Regional Products Regional Products 401 West 20th Street Storm Lake, IA 50588

Grand Junction Neese, Inc. 515-738-2744

+

Zearing Nessa, Inc. 641-487-7608

www.harvestauger.com West Bend Everly Emmetsburg J.B. Mertz & Sons, Inc. Corn Belt Equipment Woodford Equipment 515-887-4511 712-834-2661 712-852-3003

+


Friday, Jan. 25, 2013

www.farm-news.com

Farm news / The messenger, ForT dodge, iowa

9C

2013 Corn Edition

Here comes CSR2 Formula will alter long-time inherent soil productivity ratings By KAREN SCHWALLER

kschwaller@evertek.net

OKOBOJI â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The new CSR2 rating system is something that is turning the heads of producers and making them wonder how that will affect their taxation. Dr. C. Lee Burras, a professor in Iowa State Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department of Agronomy, addressed this issue with producers at a Jan. 10 conference in Okoboji. Iowaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Corn Suitability Rating provides a basis for producers to gauge the productivity of soils in various fields. Quantitative models looking at the innate soil

productivity was developed in the 1970s, and today most nations â&#x20AC;&#x201D; along with several U.S. states â&#x20AC;&#x201D; have some kind of mechanism to measure soilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s production capacity. Though CSR is used to determine soil productivity, the underlining factor for the CSR is fair and equitable taxation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have the best CSR developed in history,â&#x20AC;? Burras said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We should be proud of it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a production rating that is fair for the innate soil productivity system.â&#x20AC;? Burras said CSRs vary across landscapes and across Iowa. A perfect soil would have a rating of 100,

We Have Aglime

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Soil maps are not pure. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not 100 percent. CSR2 helps us to be consistent across the state, but it can be a challenge.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Dr. C. Lee Burras ISU agronomy professor

he said. That rating is based on different variables, including steepness of slope, erosion classification and soil texture. CSR calculations as they are today have been working, so why change it? Burras said the change is based on three goals, which are:

â&#x2C6;Ť Getting values proportional to CSR, but with greater transparency, consistency and ease. â&#x2C6;Ť Having CSR2 consistent with modern soil mapping, classification and government programs. â&#x2C6;Ť Being able to extend CSR2 across boundaries including state lines and

Points are assigned to each of these variables, with total possible points being 100. The December 2012 formula includes the above variables, with the exception that the water-holding capacity limit has been softened, the soil depth and erosion factor is updated, and the climate variable is deleted altogether from the equation. Burras said officials are still working out some details with unusual textures of soils. Burras said the CSR and CSR2 end up being within a few points of each other for most soils in eastern Iowa. Western Iowa will see CSR2 often being greater See CSR2, Page 10C

FINE TWINE C OMPANY â&#x20AC;&#x153;We Tie Up Your Businessâ&#x20AC;?

The

Authorized Dealer www.meridianmfg.com

TRUCK REPAIR â&#x20AC;˘ AGLIME ROAD STONE â&#x20AC;˘ CATWORK

around the world. CSR2, he said, is calculated similarly to the original CSR. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We correct each soil mapping unit using seven parameters that still result in the best soils being worth 100 points,â&#x20AC;? Burras said. The CSR2 formula has changed a couple of times in the process, said Burras, who was part of the recalculating effort. The formula in September 2012 included the summation of variables including the taxonomic subgroup class of the soil; the family particle size class; field conditions of a particular soil mapping unit, water-holding capacity, soil depth and tolerable rate of erosion; climate and an expert judgment correction.

JOHNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S AG SERVICE Hwy. 3 East â&#x20AC;˘ Humboldt 515-332-1883

Your Full Service Co-op That Is Customer Driven.

FROM SEED TO FEED WE HAVE ALL YOUR HAY NEEDS

O u r f r i e n d l y , p r o f e s s i o n a l s t a ff w i l l h e l p y o u d e v e l o p a comprehensive crop production program.

â&#x20AC;˘ Grid Soil Sampling â&#x20AC;˘ U.R.T. Spreading â&#x20AC;˘ Custom Application â&#x20AC;˘ Crop Mapping

Highview Stratford

â&#x20AC;˘ Americas Alfalfa â&#x20AC;˘ Millborn Grass Seeds â&#x20AC;˘ Baler Twine â&#x20AC;˘ Net Wrap â&#x20AC;˘ Hay Preservatives

Kamrar Stonega

www.unitedcoop.com

Contact Tony or Rick

Hamburg, IA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Pomeroy, IA

WEBSTER CITY 1-800-909-6373 or 515-832-6373

You Want It!

+

We Got It!

877-468-2022

866-999-1006 712-756-4388 Alton, Iowa

               8QXVXDOZHDWKHUSDWWHUQVDQGĂ XFWDWLQJPDUNHWSULFHVFKDQJHWKHULVN                IDFWRUVIRUFRUQSURGXFHUVDOPRVWGDLO\,WÂ&#x203A;VPRUHLPSRUWDQWWKDQ                    HYHUWRSXWWKHSURSHUFURSLQVXUDQFHFRYHUDJHLQSODFHIRUWKH                    XSFRPLQJFURS\HDU*LYHXVDFDOORUVWRSLQWRUHYLHZDOO RIWKHQHZFKDQJHVDQGXSGDWHVIRU            

Hopkins Insurance, Inc.

     &523+$,/Â&#x2021;3523(57<&$68$/7<Â&#x2021;/,)(+($/7+Â&#x2021;/21*7(50&$5(3527(&7,21

        +Z\(DVW3RFDKRQWDVÂ&#x2021; hopkinsinsurance.com       712-335-9915Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;)$;712-335-9918

Lori Lori Brian Brian ShawnShawn Lisa Lisa Katie Stacy Stacy Hopkins Johnson Behrendsen Beschorner Hopkins ZemanZeman Johnson Behrendsen Rosenboom Beschorner

7+( /21*(67 5811, 1* %5$1' 2) 6((' 7(1'(56

0HU L GL DQ &O HDW HG %HO W

View our full online inventory today!

9DU L DEO H 6SHHG 5HPRW H &RQW U RO  ZL W K 'L VSO D\

$/ / ( 1 $1  ( ' 562 1   : // , , $06  , $ 

  

www.farm-news.com

Ĺ&#x2022;  0HU L GL DQ 0DQXI DFW XU L QJ  , QF  5HJL VW HU HG 7 U DGHPDU NV 8VHG 8QGHU  /L FHQVH

+


10C

FaRm NewS / The meSSeNgeR, FoRT DoDge, Iowa

www.farm-news.com

FRIDay, JaN. 25, 2013

2013 Corn Edition

CSR2

You You Want Want It! It!

Continued from Page 10C

CSR. Taxation than changes would follow. “Soil maps are not pure. They’re not 100 percent,” he said. “CSR2 helps us to be consistent across the state, but it can be a challenge.” Soil productivity ratings across the state are updated consistently, he said. Burras said CSR and CSR2 are productivity “inherent rankings.” “That doesn’t mean yield,” he said. The formulas are based on pedologic principles, properties and nomenclature. “CSR2 is generally consistent with CSR, but alignment varies because of the updates in databases and evolving terminology, and the changed climate variable,” he said. Attempts to link crop productivity, soils and rainfall go back 4,000 years in the countries of China and India, he said. Iowa boasts more than 500 different soil types. Of those soil types, there are 10 to 15 soils that are rated at 100. County assessors are not required to use CSR2, he said, but many do want to

We We Got Got It! It! -Messenger/Farm News file photo

ALTHOUGH IOWA’S AG land will not change in its ability to produce row crops and forage, the new corn suitability rating formula will likely change most CSRs up and down, which potentially could affect land values and taxable values. use it. Burras said water management continues to be an important part of soil management in Iowa’s croplands. “Iowa has over a million

miles of tile line in the soil” he said. “We have better plumbing in our fields than we do in our houses.” He said yields can vary tremendously from year to year, saying they increase

about one percent per year on average. He attributed this to variables such as genetics, weather, better management of crops and soils and fertility.

Producers can find information about soil types, maps and soil information by typing “Web Soil Survey” into their Internet search engines.

View View our our full full online online inventory inventory today! today! www.farm-news.com

Labre Crop

Consulting Is

Your Leading Independent Precision Ag

VB5 B55660 TTW WIN TTW WISTTER W

Company!

We Offer • Excellent soil sampling and fertility program

WE A ARRE THE BESTT! VB4440 T IN TWISTER TW

• Carry a large variety of today’s best precision ag equipment • Currently developing a complete data management program

If you don’t know how to get started, are a precision ag pro, or anywhere in between, Labre Crop Consulting’s staff is ready to help serve your needs for your farm’s successful future.

Call 712-469-7512 • www.gpssoilsampling.com

En tries due by by Entries Mar ch 1, 2013 March

VB750 TTWIN TWIS STER

www. ww ww w emcsprreaders.com

Eggs!

Prroudly Manufactured Man in the USA in Dorchester terr,, W Wisconsin isconsin

Phone 715.654.5200 15.654.520 Fax 715.654.5558

Win fabulous prizes! www.iowaegg.org

CORPORATE FARMER, INC. CORPORATE FARMER

Growing Your Family Farm

s i n c e

1 9 7 5

Growing Your Family Farm

Teaching Corporate Planning To Farmers

Our concern your We will add dollars your bottom Our c o n c e r n iis sy o u r ffamily a m i l y ffarm. arm. W ew ill a dd d o l l a r s tto oy our b o t t o m lline ine tthrough hrough p proper r o p e r ttax ax p planning, lanning, p protecting rotecting y your our o operation p e r a t i o n ffrom rom h holes o l e s iin n iits ts security s e c u r i t y blanket, b l a n k e t , and a n d preparing p r e p a r i n g for f o r the t h e next n e x t generation. generation.

ADVISORS TO THE FAMILY FARM •Income tax planning

•Corporate tax management •Separation of liability

CORPORATE FARMER

Growing Your Family Farm

+

1307 6th St. SW Mason City, IA 50401

(800) 472-6931

www.corporatefarmer.com

•Financial planning for profit •Tax bookkeeping

•Tax preparation, W2 & 1099s •IRS correspondence •Monthly newsletter

+


friday, Jan. 25, 2013

www.farm-news.com

farm news / The messenger, forT dodge, iowa

11C

2013 Corn Edition

Drey

Continued from Page 6C

“We have meetings once a month and are having speakers at each meeting who are linked to the agriculture industry and will speak about current issues affecting agriculture.” Drey said his past 4-H public speaking and communication skills has prepared him to be an outspoken advocate of agriculture. “I speak to all sorts of people and to all groups about defending ag,” Drey said. “Ag is on the defensive, but I want to help ag be on the offensive.” The CAT is sponsored by the Iowa Corn Growers Association and the Iowa Corn Promotion Board. The team assists the ICGA and the ICPB in developing programs that target and enhance Iowa Corn’s relationship with students who are pursuing careers in agricultural production and agriculture business and industries. “We’re a young version

of the ICPB,” Drey said. Team members glean a wide variety of information at corn board meetings. “But we don’t set policy,” he said. He said he’s learned that the ICGA “is really concerned that all producers and livestock customers are benefited.” He said CAT members are actively trying to recruit other young students into the program and to encourage other ICGA chapter at college campuses. He said Iowa Central Community College, for instance, is considering forming a chapter in Fort Dodge. “The newly named Iowa Corn Collegiate Advisory Team is made up of excellent students from across Iowa who are passionate about the future of agriculture in our state,” said Bob Hemesath, a farmer from northeast Iowa and an ICGA director and chair of the committee overseeing CAT.

TEBBEN LAND ROLLER

Models Available Include: 7’, 17’, 31’, 33’, 41’, 42’, 45’, 52’

CULTI-ROLLER

Advantages Of The Culti-roller

• The Tebben Land Roller Levels Fields By Pushing Rocks, Root Balls And Residue Evenly Across The Surface For Better Harvesting Efficiency/Higher Yields, Seed To Soil Contact And Less Downtime. • 42” Diameter Tubes • Rear Wheel Hydraulic Steering Standard. • Heavy Duty Four Bolt Flange Bearings With 2-7/16” Replaceable Shafts. • Optional Hydraulic Hitch Package Available.

+

Participants of the newly selected team include students from ISU, Graceland University, Dordt College and Northwest Missouri State University, as well as Iowa Lakes Community College, Indian Hills Community College, Southeastern Community College, North Iowa Area Community College, Kirkwood Community College, Iowa Central Community College, Iowa Western Community College, Des Moines Area Community College, Muscatine ComCollege and munity Ellsworth Community College. “CAT is a great opportunity for me to learn more about the agricultural industry and also provides an opportunity for eager students to be Iowa corn advocates,” said Cale Juergensen, who attends Iowa Lakes Community College. More student members are joining Iowa Corn regularly and the interest in

• Helps eliminate problems with root balls, rocks and stalks • A new use for the cultivator stored in the back shed • Along with using trash cleaners on the planter, the Culti-Roller will have the same results as a land roller, for a fraction of the cost • Rolling later helps eliminate and erosion problem from high winds & heavy rains • More time to pick rocks before rolling • Seals in moisture in the dryness of the summer • Keeps soil open longer to absorb spring rains

more student chapters of ICGA is increasing as well. “As a member of ICGA, I hope to learn more about Iowa Corn and also have

the opportunity to network with industry professionals as I share my passion for agriculture,” said Lisa Nelson, who attends Iowa

State University. For more information on ICGA student chapters or CAT, contact ICGA at (515) 225-9242.

LIVING GREEN GREEN FACT Farm News & The Messenger Recycled

5,457

Pounds Of Cardboard In 2011

A Messenger Publication Serving Farmers in Northwest and North Central Iowa

TREE & STUMP SAW • 3 Pt. Cat. I, II, III or skid loader mounted.

• 75HP Gearbox/Rated for 30-120 HP tractor.

• 3/4” thick x 40” Dia. blade w/12 replaceable carbide tips.

NEW ZONE TILL SHANK

• Adjustable Point Pressure Up To 2,400 Pounds • Automatic Reset Assembly • Heavy 5” x 7” Tube Frame • Category II or III 3 Point

• Heavy Duty push bar and grapple arm directs falling trees, and can also be used to pick up and stack trees.

• Manual Guage Wheels Including Tires

• 15” Cutting Depth

• Replaceable Wear Bar and Shovels

• Cat. 5 Driveline w/slip clutch.

• 3 to 8 Shank Models Available on 22”, 24” or 30” Spacing

• Weight 1200lbs

• 36” Underframe Clearance

• Optional Heavy or Light Duty Disc Assembly

TEBBEN ENTERPRISES • 10009 Hwy 7 S.E. • CLARA CITY, MN 56222 WWW.TEBBEN.US • Tel: (320) 847-2200

Jeff Arends Webster City, IA 515-832-3255

Scott Sebby Clarion, IA 515-532-2121 515-689-0630 (cell)

Southern Calhoun Ag Lohrville, IA 712-465-2008 712-830-9038 (cell)

Thilges Sales Britt, IA 641-843-4422 641-860-0355 Pat Thilges 641-860-1242 Andrew Eekhof

Jeff Yeager Kamrar, IA 515-835-1161 (cell) 515-539-2609

John Wells Fonda, IA 712-288-6586 712-730-3780 (cell)

Gary & Matt Klaassen Pomeroy, IA 712-468-2645 712-830-2772 (cell)

Johnson Seeds Newell, IA 712-662-7498 712-660-1125 (cell)

Matt Schreiber Eagle Grove, IA 641-425-9211 (cell)

Minnehan Ag Churdan, IA & Paton, IA 515-203-0620

Dean Carden Duncombe, IA 515-543-5463

Jeffrey Joyce Emmetsburg, IA 515-890-0391

Brian Freed Cherokee, IA 712-437-2223

Patrick Merron Bancroft, IA 515-885-2066 515-320-1029 (cell)

CPS/Pioneer Thad Diersen Odeboldt, IA 712-668-2266

AD Madden, LLC Ringsted, IA 712-866-8400 712-260-2569 (cell) Chad Anderson, Inc Emmetsburg, IA 712-260-7144 +


12C

Farm News / The messeNger, ForT DoDge, Iowa

www.farm-news.com

FrIDay, JaN. 25, 2013

2013 Corn Edition

Nutrients entific, reasonable, and cost-effective practices. The strategy was the result of a 2008 Gulf Hypoxia Action Plan calling for Mississippi River border states to reduce total nitrogen and phosphorus loadings by 45 percent. The Iowa Corn Growers Association and other groups are lobbying for sound science and voluntary adoption. “Conservation, nutrient

Continued from Page 3C

management, and soil health are not a one-size fits all equation,” said Ben Gleason, Iowa Corn Sustainability Programs manager. “It is a farmer by farmer, field by field decision. “That is why voluntary conservation practices are more reasonable. Mandating farming practices could potentially reverse the positive movement we have made. “We aren’t at perfection,

but we are moving in the right direction right now.” Farmers have adopted practices to make their farms more sustainable, but Iowa farmers, as a whole, having been blazing the conservation trail for years. This includes: ∫ According to the Iowa Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program, 72 wetlands are currently restored or under development. These 72 wetlands

alone will remove 76,700 tons of nitrogen over their lifetime and protect 91,500 watershed acres. ∫ Iowa farmers have more than 620,000 acres enrolled in the continuous, targeted Conservation Reserve Program, more than any other state. This number increases every month. It’s also almost 13 percent of the U.S. continuous CRP signup total. ∫ Iowa farmers have re-

stored more than 250,000 acres of wetlands, putting Iowa farmers eighth in the nation in terms of voluntarily restoring cropland to wetlands. ∫ Since 2004, practices installed through voluntary watershed projects now collectively reduce sediment reaching Iowa’s waters by 130,947 tons per year and phosphorus loading by 202,312 pounds per year. In a recent press release

from the governor’s office, Brandstad said, “Iowans have a culture of conservation due to our close connection to the land and a long history of recognizing the importance of being environmental stewards. “Agriculture has been a key driver of the state’s economy and farmers understand better than anyone that we need to protect our natural resources for future generations.”

Reminder Classified Deadline is NOON on Friday before publication (Published every Friday) Fax: 515-574-4448 • Phone: 800-622-6613 ext. 451

Roach Ag. Marketing, Ltd. Futures & Options Since 1978

Pat Moore - Commodity Broker 1-877-363-6169 2260 220th Street, Jolley, IA 50551

Our bakery meal & cereal fines are dry, energy-dense food ingredients for all types of livestock as alternatives to grains, proteins & supplemental fats.

email: pmoore@roachag.com

785-743-2820

www.roachag.com

Premium Seed Corn

Proud To Be Farmer Owned & Operated

“Buy Direct” FOR SAVINGS ON SEED CORN COSTS • Helped thousands of farmers regain profits • Operated by farmers for farmers

• FM 2-way Radios & Pagers for business and public safety • FCC License Advice & Assistance • Reconditioned & Rental Radios • Repeater Towers • Narrow Band and Digital Radios

Randy Roeber, Owner Algona & Iowa Falls

800-747-6652

rcommwireless.com VERTEX STANDARD is registered in the US Patent & Trademark Office. All other product or service names are the property of their respective owners © Vertex Standard Co. Ltd. 2011.

Linde Equipment Co. 108 S. Idaho Glidden, IA 51443 712-659-3725 Pocahontas Equipment Co. LLC 1400 W. Elm St. Pocahontas, IA 50574 712-335-4522

1-800345-7798

Grain Drying & Storage Feed, Fertilizer & Petroleum

1120 1st Ave. Slater, IA 50244

Premium Seed, Inc. Hybrid Seed Corn

800-779-3571

Robinson Implement 2002 St. F24 Irwin, IA 51446 712-782-3171 Casady Brothers Implement 1705 W. 2nd St. Webster City, IA 50595 515-832-4447

Central Iowa Farm Store, Inc. 203 Iowa Ave. Old Hwy. 30 W. Marshalltown, IA 50158 641-753-3996

CALL NOW AND START SAVING!

1028 130th St., P.O. Box 218 • Berwick, IL 61417 309-462-2396 • Fax 309-462-3044

26th ANNUAL

FEBRUARY 26th, 27th, 28th 2013 • ISU EXTENSION SEMINARS CHECK WEBSITE FOR DETAILS • OVER 700 LINES ON DISPLAY • ALL THE NEWEST IN AGRICULTURE

FREE Coffee and Rolls 8:30 - 10AM Daily Sponsored by:

STOP-FYRE The World’s Best Fire Extinguisher

Register 9AM - Noon Drawing at noon Must be present to win

MIDWEST SHOWS, INC. (507) 437-7969

www.farmshowsusa.com +

+


friday, JaN. 25, 2013

www.farm-news.com

farm NewS / The meSSeNger, forT dodge, iowa

1d

Farming dry Taking 2012’s lessons into 2013’s growing season By CLAYTON RYE crye@wctatel.net

MASON CITY — In preparing for the 2013 corn crop in what could be another year with less than ideal conditions, Roger Elmore, an Iowa State University corn specialist, advised farmers to consider being conservative in planting population and plant adaptive hybrids for dry conditions. Elmore was one of several presenters on Jan. 10 in Mason City at one of 13 Iowa locations for ISU’s Crop Advantage Series. In a booklet containing information on the areas of coverage that was handed out to attendees, Elmore wrote the drought of 2012 had its beginnings as early as August 2011. Elmore described as “amoeba like,” the spreading of extreme dry conditions across Iowa and the corn belt starting during fall of 2011. Those dry conditions allowed for an early planting in what many thought was a perfect seed bed, Elmore said, but sidewall compaction along with other early season problems created problems with emergence and early season growth. The 2012 growing season continued ahead of schedule with warm temperatures and especially warm nights accelerating the crop through its growth stages. “Dry conditions aggravated the situation, “ Elmore said. Heat and dry weather created the perfect storm as concerning the corn crop. An early silking and reproductive period with a rapid seed fill led to an early harvest resulting in an advantage of lower drying costs. At mid-July less than 20 percent of the Iowa corn crop ranked in the good-to-excellent category. Yield forecasts by U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service during the fall of 2012 put the national and Iowa state corn crop at 22 percent below trend line yield. For comparison, the last major drought in 1988 resulted in a yield of 29 percent below trend line. In planning for 2013, Elmore said, “It is back to the basics” in understanding what creates the yield

-Messenger/Farm News photos by Clayton Rye

ROGER ELMORE used this chart to show the difference between corn and soybean rotation and continuous corn on the research farms in Kanawha and Nashua. The Kanawha farm had a 22 percent penalty with continuous corn and the Nashua farm showed a 13 yield penalty under continuous corn during the last five years. in corn. A sequence of events happens that determines final corn yield, he said. These elements include plant population, ear numbers per plant, kernel rows per ear, kernels per row, and kernel weight. Timing of the events and stresses that occur will impact the final yield. Growth stages as the crop progresses contribute to the final outcome. At growth stage V6, the primary ear begins. Stage V7 determines kernel rows and begins kernel numbers per row through V15 to V16. Another factor determining yield is leaf area index, which is measurement of total leaf area. A high LAI increases light interception which increases photosynthesis. Improved photosynthesis results in increased biomass and grain production. Elmore said that using 30-inch rows with a population of 30,000 seeds

ROGER ELMORE used a large pad of paper and an easel in his presentation on lessons learned from the 2012 crop year to ask those in attendance about what factors determinerow crops’ final yield. there is 95 percent light creased by taller plants, leaves, and earlier plantiinterception. more leaves, narrower ng dates. The LAI can be in- rows, leaf angle, wider As a corn plant moves

from the vegetative V stages to the reproductive R stages, there is a range of days between pollen shed and silking, or R1, called the anthesis silking interval or ASI. Stresses during this time strongly affect grain yield. A high ASI from water stress reduces the number of kernels per ear and ears per plant. Other stresses during this time include weeds and feeding by root worm beetles impacting final kernel numbers and/or kernel weights. In preparing for the 2013 corn crop in what could be another year with less than ideal conditions, Elmore recommended farmers consider being conservative in planting population and plant adaptive hybrids for dry conditions. Additional information on farming during drought conditions can be obtained on any ISU Extension office website. Click on the links under Dealing with Drought.

ICGA seeks fuel tax increase to maintain roads Says farm-to-market roads, rural bridges need costly upgrades

JOHNSTON (ICGA) — Iowa’s bridges and roads are essential to corn production, as rural roads make up nearly 90,000 miles of Iowa’s 114,000 mile road system. The agricultural sector is a vital part of Iowa’s economy, yet Iowa’s farm-to-market roads and rural bridges are in great disrepair. The Iowa Corn Growers Association policy supports a fuel tax increase to fund transportation improvements to existing infrastructure in the state. A fuel tax increase was the ICGA’s top priority in 2012

+

and will continue to be an issue in the 2013 legislative session. An increased fuel tax would act as a user fee as it is the way to collect funding from out-of-state drivers who use and also contribute to the deterioration of Iowa’s roads. The Iowa Department of Transportation has estimated to be 15 percent of passenger travel. Funding to support Iowa’s roads and bridges is currently not sufficient to meet the maintenance demands of Iowa’s road system.

Iowa’s fuel tax has not been increased since 1989; while repair and construction costs have continuously increased for more than 20 years. Although, no one wants to pay higher taxes, Iowa must make this investment as infrastructure repair costs will only become greater in the future. The ICGA is urging the legislature to support a fuel tax increase to improve Iowa’s road infrastructure. It asks Iowans to support a fuel tax increase. For more information visit: https://governor.iowa.gov/wpcontent/uploads/2012/01/Road-Use-Tax-Fund-EfficiencyReport-FINAL1.pdf

Wagner Truck & Auto Sales Dennis W Dennis Wagner agner

404 Broad Street • Rolfe, Iowa 50581 712-848-3443 • Cell 515-368-3443 Toll Free 1-888-254-4595 Eves 712-848-3540 Fax: 712-848-3193

Bob W Bob Wagner agner

712-848-3203• Cell 712-358-1312

wagnertruckandauto.com truckpaper.com

‘04 Freightliner Century S/T, 370 hp, 10 spd, 400k miles $23,500

‘07 Timpte 40’ Ag Hoppers S/R $24,900 ‘04 Freightliner Columbia Day Cab, 380 HP, 10 Spd $23,900 ‘99 Volvo Day Cab, Cummins Just In ‘80 Hobbs 42’ Hopper $6,900

‘00 Freightliner FL-80 Allison Auto 146K w/’07 Maurer 28’ Hopper $31,500 ‘88 Westrum Built 26’, Single Hopper, Tandem Axle $8,950 ‘05 Volvo Day Cab, 395 HP, 10 Spd $17,900 ‘92 Timpte 42’ Split Tubs $12,500

‘13 Jet 38’ Ag Hoppers Alums $26,900

‘96 Jet 30’ Hopper $11,000 ‘05 Maurer 38’ Ag Hoppers Call ‘00 Timpte 42’ Regular Hoppers S/R $18,500 ‘82 Timpte 40’ Hopper Just In ‘92 Dakota 30’ Hopper $10,900

‘13 Mauerer 28’ Alums Single Hopper Electric Tarp $24,500

‘96 Timpte 40’ Spring Ride Alums $16,900 ‘03 Timpte 40’ Regular Hoppers A/R $20,500 ‘00 Jet 34’ Ag Hoppers Just In ‘09 Timpte 40’ Ag Hoppers A/R Excellent $26,400

‘06/’07 Freightliners Columbia Detroit 515 HP 10 Spd Ultra Shift $34,900 ‘05 Volvo Day Cab, 435 HP, 10 Spd Auto Shift, Just In ‘07 Volvo Day Cab, 465 HP, 10 Spd, Auto Shift, Just In

+


2D

Farm News / THe messeNger, ForT DoDge, Iowa

www.farm-news.com

FrIDay, JaN. 25, 2013

2013 Corn Edition

Nanotech to improve corn nutrition? lege of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re bringing agriculture into the arena.â&#x20AC;? Instead of a mini-submarine sailing through a human vein, Kokini describes how nanoparticles carry nutrients through the roots of a corn plant.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Corn growers will be able to encapsulate nutrients in nanoparticles,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The particles can be tagged with molecules that attach to the root system and receive signals from the plant to release nitrogen as it is needed in the plantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life span.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;So, instead of applying nitrogen and phosphorus in a brute-force sort of way, in using nanotechnology more of the nitrogen added to the soil is released when the plant needs it, avoiding over-fertilizing and reducing the cost of the applica-

Huge scientific discoveries start with tiny technology

URBANA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jozef Kokiniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s description of the ways nanotechnology can be utilized in food science and agriculture is reminiscent of the 1966 science fiction film Fantastic Voyage in which a specially designed nuclear submarine and a team of researchers are miniaturized and injected into a patientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bloodstream. But Kokini is talking about real science, not fiction. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nanotechnology has already found applications in pharmaceutical delivery systems and building better IT chips,â&#x20AC;? said Kokini, University of Illinois associate dean of research in the Col-

tions while increasing the effectiveness of the nutrients.â&#x20AC;? Kokini served as one of the USDAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s advisors on nanotechnology. He is particularly excited about the recently created research center at the University of Illinois in partnership with the National Science Foundation called the Center for Agricultural, Biomedical, and Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology. The center is actually an industry-university cooperative research center grant. At least 12 companies commit to a $25,000 annual membership fee, and the National Science Foundation adds an additional $125,000. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Normally, you need a minimum of two universities to establish a center, but Illinois managed to get commitments from 14 companies on its own,â&#x20AC;? Kokini

Hydraulic 3rd Link

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The particles can be tagged with molecules that attach to the root system and receive signals from the plant to release nitrogen as it is needed in the plantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life span.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Jozef Kokini University of Illinois associate dean of research in the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve also been working in the area of understanding      the environmental impact of nanotechnology, which will   be important in determining judicious use in the future. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As we continue   to un derstand living systems at the scale of the biological    molecule, it makes sense that any desire to manipulate these tiny systems would require tools that are correspondingly small.      beâ&#x20AC;&#x153;This  intersection tween nanoscale devices

said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So the University of Illinois is the only university to have a center on its own.â&#x20AC;? Kaustubh Bhalerao, an assistant professor in ACESâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Department of Agri   cultural and Biological Engineering, is anticipating potential research projects in CABPN.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have current projects using nanotechnology to develop the next generation of agricultural chemi        cals,â&#x20AC;? Bhalerao said. 

Great on Quick Tach Equipment

Tired of adjusting your tractorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 3rd link? Now you can do it from the seat of your tractor with the GNUSE POWERLINK



 Adjust equipment on the go  Heavy-Duty. Years of field-proven service  Affordable price













   



   







(402) 478-4433 â&#x20AC;˘ www.gnusemfg.com







          









- JD 6600,7700 Combine...................$184 - JD 6620-8820 Combine Lwr.............$96 - MP 540-860 Combine Kit. . . . . .$211-$508 - NH TR75-95 Combine Kit..............$190 - NH 1100-1118 Swather Kit.............$206 - Steiger ST/PT Kit............................$252 - Versatile Srs 3 Kit............................$425 - White Srs 3 Lower Kit.....................$385 Pre-formed Acoustical Parts: - AC 8000 Srs. Headliner..................$257 - CIH 7110-8950 Headliner..............$195 - CIH 7110-8950 Post Kit.................$175 - Ford Srs 1 Headliner.......................$267 - JD 30-60 Srs. Headliner..................$228 - JD 30-60 Srs. Cowl Unit.................$139 - JD 7000 Srs. Headliner...................$212

View our Website or Call for a complete product list www.fehrcab.com â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Made in the USA

- JD 8000 Srs. Lower Kit..................$458 - JD 8000 Srs. Headliner..................$227 - JD 9400-9650 Combine Headliner. $502 - JD 6620-8820 Headliner.................$209 - Versatile Srs. 4 Headliner................$285 Pre-Cut Floor Mats: - AC 7000 Srs....................................$101 - CIH Maxum....................................$190 - CIH Magnum Front Mat...................$96 - Ford Series I......................................$96 - Gleaner Combine............................$102 - IH 1420-1480....................................$67 - IH 86/88 2wd....................................$72 - JD 30 Srs. 2wd..................................$82 - Versatile Srs. 3................................$137 Quality Guaranteed! 10116 N. 1900 Road, Fairbury, IL 61739 Call for a complete Listing: (815)692-3355



 





 





















 













 



















 

 









 rear ramp   Front &  doors,   ¹ZPKLKVVY3,+SPNO[Z      front & rear loading   screwless     sides,  lights,    OLSTL[NHYTL[YHJR    HS\T^OLLSZ

$

(]HPSHISL^NVVKJYLKP[

5,195

$

Terryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Auto Body & Trailer Sales Currently 6 month Interest free! PJ & American Hauler  



   

 

 







   













Hwy 9 East â&#x20AC;˘ Riceville, IA 50466 641-985-2536 New Hampton Auto Body New Hampton â&#x20AC;˘ 641-394-3014 





   





          













 



 

























 









 







  



 





 







 





 



 



 

          







 



Âť6]LYHSS

Âť;PS[^ÂťZ[H[PVUHY` 2QHJRWS`9HKPHSZ

8,895

*Zero Down Financing



+



American Hauler    All Aluminum 7â&#x20AC;&#x2122; x 29â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  :UV^TVIPSL;YHPSLY   

- Quiets Cab/More Comfortable Cab Environment - Restores Original Insulation Qualities â&#x20AC;˘ Increases Resale Value 700+ Models Available

Precision Cut Interior Kits: -AC 7000 Srs. Black Belly.................$255 - Ac 8000 Srs. Lower Kit...................$215 - Gleaner Combine Kit.......................$166 - Ford Srs 1 Lower Kit.......................$225 - IH 86-88 Srs. Lower Kit..................$136 - IH 86/88 Headliner Kit....................$135 - IH 1420 Combine Kit......................$162 - CIH 1620 Combine Kit....................$228 - CIH 7110-8950 Lower Kit...............$255 - CIH 9110-9390 Kit (no posts).........$267 - Case 70 Srs 2 wd.............................$240 - Case 90/94 Srs 2wd.........................$245 - JD 30 Srs 2wd Lower Kit................$144 - JD 40,50,55,60 2wd Lower.............$175 - JD 4400 Combine Kit......................$171





 

Box 189 â&#x20AC;˘ Arlington, NE 68002

NEW CAB INTERIORS







          







   

and living systems will be foundational to revolutions in bio-based technologies.â&#x20AC;? Kokini described examples of how nanotechnology can be utilized in animal digestion for livestock and how nanosensors might be used in a corn or soybean field. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Microfluidic devices are already being used to locate a single cancer cell in humans,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With a lab on a chip, you can take the DNA and RNA out of that cell and diagnose cancer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In agricultural research, we want to be able to isolate the RNA and DNA from a cell of a leaf. Using a grid of micro-fluidity devices in a field, famers will be able to monitor the health of the plants and make corrections during the plantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; development. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The key will be to make it producible and affordable.â&#x20AC;?

  

   

+


friday, Jan. 25, 2013

www.farm-news.com

farm news / The messenger, forT dodge, iowa

3d

2013 Corn Edition

Agronomist offers insight on silage inoculants BROOKINGS, S.D. — When it comes to selecting a corn silage inoculant, growers may be a bit overwhelmed. Ron Dodds, a South Dakota State University Extension agronomist, offered clarity to the topic by explaining the various types of corn inoculants and which to use depending on the situation. Microbial Silage fermentation can be made more efficient by using microbial inoculants, reduce dry matter lost to unwanted or prolonged microbial respiration and preserve nutrients. Sometimes inoculants use improves palatability to the point that dry matter intake and improve animal performance increase. A large portion of in-silo/in-bunker dry matter loss occurs due to aerobic fermentation, which converts the carbon and hydrogen from the sugars into carbon dioxide and water vapor. Some silage inoculants contain microbes designed to promote both rapid fermentation, and to extend both storage/shelf life as well as limiting in feed

+

bunk spoilage. Enzymes Many silage inoculants also contain enzymes to help with the rapid liberation of sugars for use by the fermentation bacteria. The goal of both types of these products is to rapidly lower the pH silage so that it's low enough that neither mold producing fungi nor bacteria can survive. Ideally corn silage should reach a pH of 3.8 to 4.2 within 21 days of being harvested. In emergency situations, fermentation can be slightly accelerated by the addition of regular (not protein enhanced) molasses or sugar to the corn silage, but doing so is laborious and expensive. Forage Forage inoculations work best if they are applied in liquid form thoroughly mixed into the silage. For this reason chopper mounted inoculants application equipment, with application nozzles mounted either just prior to the intake roller(s) or spraying into the discharge throat, is preferred. Inoculants application is not as precise as herbicide

fermentation. Most quality silage inoculants contain a combination of bacteria, and some contain enzymes, which help convert more complex carbohydrates into simple sugars, which the bacteria can more easily convert into lactic, acetic or propionic acid.  Generally, most good quality silage inoculants are sufficient to properly ferment corn silage that is at the proper moisture. However, like legume inoculants, silage inoculants must be stored in a very cool and dry environment. Concentrated inoculants are particularly heat sensitive and should be protected -Messenger/Farm News file photo There are numerous types of inoculants farm- from heat sources and direct sunlight on the packaging ers can use for efficient fermentation of silage. until mixing, which should be no more than several spraying, but it doesn't need not needed. to be. Make sure that there But, conditions don't have hours prior to application. is always enough for the to be very far from ideal to Application heavy yielding corn and cut make silage inoculation Application rates for back a little when yields are pay. Ideal silage harvest, below full machine capaci- storage and feed bunk con- silage inoculants vary according to the formulation, ty. ditions are uncommon. Excessively high over ap- There is almost always so it is very important to plications can be rather ex- something to be gained by read and follow the manupensive and should be using a quality silage inocu- facturer's directions carefully. avoided whenever possible. lants. Powered concentrates apWhen conditions for ferplied as liquids typically go mentation are ideal, silage Bacteria use inoculation may be merely There are several different on the silage at rates around cheap insurance that was bacteria used for corn silage a few quarts of solution per

ton. Regardless of the type of inoculants used, the goal is to get as many colony forming units of bacteria per gram of silage as possible applied quickly and evenly. Liquid inoculants, made from powdered concentrate are easier to apply in a more uniform manner, but do require some prep time and the support of a clean, low chlorine water supply. Apply as recommended Silage inoculants are generally cheap enough that applying below the recommend rate to save money is rarely worth the effort; partly because poor quality silage can be on the same load as low quality silage and there is no reliable way to adjust application rates based on a load of pre-fermentation corn silage before it is unloaded and stored. Silage inoculants will not cure poor harvest timing, storage management, bad weather or long down time periods. They can only help preserve the potential of the forage that was present at harvest; they can't fix poor management or bad luck.

Quad Train Spreader

Let us help you with all of your farmland real estate needs. Listing - Buying -Tax Free Exchange - Lease Backs- Auctions Please give me a call.

Leland L. Metzger

NEESE INC.

Sales-Service-Rentals Hwy. 30 E. • Grand Junction, IA 50107

220 East State St. • P.O. Box 519 Algona, IA 50511 866-295-2401 or 515-295-2401 • Cell: 515-341-5402 www.farmhomeservices.com

515-738-2744

%

#

/ ,# 2,"1(-, 8 //-** 8 *)' /1 8 +$0 8 ! /# 1 2+!-*#1

(/ 3$ *$ /9

)$

-*$#'-+$ ,$4"$,12/6%0 "-+

# 46

! $ 1' 3$ $

!$ $01 1

(11

7 444 . /)% /+0"-+.21$/ "-+

1' 1

#

+$0

61 & # /0' **1-4, ! *01-, 3$

444 "(%0"!( "-+

,0-,

$

444 &.00-(*0 +.*(,& "-+ "

,# 1 $!01$/ (16 444 "(%0"!( "-+

1' 1 54$**

+


4D

Farm News / The messeNger, ForT DoDge, Iowa

www.farm-news.com

FrIDay, JaN. 25, 2013

2013 Corn Edition

Stover: Another cash crop? Pioneer studies how much to leave on the field By LARRY KERSHNER kersh@farm-news.com

JOHNSTON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; As POET nears completion of its Project LIBERTY plant in Emmetsburg later this year, and DuPont has initiated construction of a cellulosic ethanol plant in Nevada in late 2012, research is underway to determine the proper way to price corn stover as well as the right amount to Andrew remove Heggenfrom fields. staller Andrew Heggenstaller, a Pioneer agronomic research manager, based in Johnston, has taken a leading role for his company in conducting research with Iowa State University. The real questions to ask, Heggenstaller said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;is how much (residue) is there and how much should be left behind?â&#x20AC;? Unlike POET, which contracts with producers to bale and haul stover for delivery to the plant site, DuPont is contracting with

-Contributed photo

DUPONT IS STUDYING the ideal amount of stover that can sustainably removed from corn fields, while it is building a cellulosic ethanol plant in Nevada. The plant will annually need roughly 20 percent of the stover that can be found on 800,000 acres of corn in a 30-mile radius from Nevada. producers for access to harvested fields, and hiring custom balers to harvest stover. Heggenstaller said this approach allows farmers to try the program without an additional chore between grain harvest and fall tillage, and without purchasing or renting the needed baling equipment. The price for stover will be based on nutrient content

of the stover, Heggenstaller said, to compensate producers for the nutrients that are being removed from fields. However, he said, the company has developed a â&#x20AC;&#x153;rule of thumbâ&#x20AC;? of roughly 2 tons of stover per acre. â&#x20AC;&#x153;On average, there is 5 tons of stover per acre on fields,â&#x20AC;? Heggenstaller said. And thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of it out there. He said annually there is 800,000 acres of corn fields in a 30-mile radius around Nevada and the new plant will need the

stover from just 20 percent of those acres annually. Therefore, he said, not all fields will always be harvested. DuPont is developing a policy to not harvest stover from low-yielding fields, preferring to take stover from fields with historic yields of 175 to 180 bushels per acre or more. In addition, DuPont plans to harvest stover from qualifying continuous corn fields three out of four years, and from two of four

years from fields with cornsoybean rotations,. The difference, Heggenstaller said, is that although soybeans are credited with improving soil nutrients and tilth, bean stubble adds little organic matter back into soil, compared to stover. Harvest a benefit Heggenstaller said his research shows a benefit to some fields where stover is harvested including less disease pressure, earlier plant emergence and requiring

(FOUMFIBOEMJOH  PGCVMLTPZCFBOT

strength and stability than wood

BWBJMBCMFJOw w w w GMJHIUJOHEJBNFUFSGPS w w w wBVHFST

Woden Lumber Co. â&#x20AC;&#x153;your friendly lumberyardâ&#x20AC;?

Phone: 641-926-5215 or 641-926-5724 106 Main, Woden, Iowa 50484



UPMMGSFF 8.BSLFU4Ut0EFCPMU *"tXXXMVOEFMMDPSQDPN



See STOVER, Page 5D

ALL-STEEL construction for more

."%

t4FFE5FOEFST t(SBWJUZCPYBVHFST t5SVDLNPVOUUBJMHBUFBVHFST t#JOVOMPBEBVHFST t5SBOTQPSUBVHFST

less fall or spring tillage. DuPont conducted multiyear research at eight sites around the Nevada region, testing the yield advantage, if any, on continuous corn fields with partial stover removal, compared to no stover harvest. The test plots were near Ames, Colo, Hubbard, Nevada, Kamrar, McCallsburg, Maxwell and Stanhope. He said field characteristics such as greater than a 4 percent slope, combined with a lower historic yield would be less preferable for stover baling. The vast majority of the ground in the Nevada plantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s target area for sourcing stover is fairly level ground, Heggenstaller said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We also look at the (field) management practices,â&#x20AC;? Heggenstaller said, preferring fields with conservation or reduced tillage. In fact, he said, taking stover off can allow the producer to employ less aggressive tillage because there will be fewer stalks, leaves and cobs to break down. New cellulosic ethanol markets, rising feed costs and increasing residue management challenges are driving interest in corn stover harvest. According to Heggenstallerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s research: â&#x2C6;Ť While some stover needs to be retained in the

GERMAN MUTUAL INSURANCE ASSN. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Home Owners and Farm Propertyâ&#x20AC;? Highway 4 & 7 â&#x20AC;˘ Pomeroy, IA 50575 Phone: 712-468-2215 â&#x20AC;˘ 1-800-257-5037

Auto Parts Wholesale Inc.

SCI SCI Grain Inspection

www.sandeconstruction.com

Officially O f f i c i a l l y designated d e s i g n a t e d full full service s e r v i c e grain g r a i n inspection i n s p e c t i o n lab lab

HAL TUCKER CPAg, CCA TRENT SIEBRECHT CCA

We offer full inspections on quality factors in grain, Mycotoxins, sampling, and onsite inspections.

Business Business H Hours ours a are re 7 7:00AM : 0 0 A M tto o4 4:00PM :00PM M Monday o n d a y tthru h r u FFriday. riday. We We a are re a available v a i l a b l e tto om meet e e t yyour our n needs eeds 2 24/7. 4/7. LLet et u uss p provide r o v i d e you you w with ith p profesional, r o f e s i o n a l , accurate, accurate, a and n d ffriendly r i e n d l y sservice! ervice!

FARMERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CO-OP ELEVATOR

115 W. 6th St. â&#x20AC;˘ Storm Lake, Iowa 50588 Phone: (712)732-3030 Cell Phone: (712)299-3333

For all your feed, fertilizer, propane, and refined fuel needs!

Hampton â&#x20AC;˘ 621 4th St SE

(641) 456-2594 â&#x20AC;˘ (800) 770-2594

515-332-2021

Manure Management Plans NRCS Nutrient Plans Crop Scouting & Consulting GIS, Soil Testing

Designated by USDA/GIPSA to operate in NW Iowa, NE Nebraska, SE South Dakota, and Minnesota

Sioux C Sioux City, ity, IIA A - 712-255-8073 712-255-8073 â&#x20AC;˘ F Ft. t. D Dodge, odge, IIAA- 515-955-7012 515-955-7012 507-832-8078 W Windom, indom, M MN NL Lab ab - 507-832-8078

Humboldt

Howie Equipment & Tire Quality Ag Equipment â&#x20AC;˘ Jay Howie

641-456-5651 â&#x20AC;˘ 800-747-0029

Ottosen O t t o s e n ((515) 5 1 5 ) 3379-1065 79-1065 Algona A l g o n a ((515) 5 1 5 ) 2295-7243 95-7243

Fax: 641-456-2314

C o n t a c t your y o u r local l o c a l Co-op C o - o p today! today! Contact

1273 Mallard, Hampton, IA 50441

Also A l s o handling h a n d l i n g many m a n y seed s e e d varieties varieties aall o n g with w i t h soybean s o y b e a n seed s e e d treatments. treatments. along

For All Your Feed, Grain, Agronomy, & Energy Needs... Go With The Pro! â&#x20AC;˘ Bradgate.......................515-375-6523 â&#x20AC;˘ Gilmore City.................515-373-6174 â&#x20AC;˘ Graettinger...................712-859-3204 â&#x20AC;˘ Havelock......................712-776-2232 â&#x20AC;˘ Laurens........................712-841-4748 â&#x20AC;˘ Manson........................712-469-3388 â&#x20AC;˘ Milford..........................712-338-2223 â&#x20AC;˘ Pioneer.........................515-373-6513 â&#x20AC;˘ Plover...........................712-857-3423 â&#x20AC;˘ Pocahontas..................712-335-3575 â&#x20AC;˘ Rolfe.............................712-848-3801 â&#x20AC;˘ Ruthven........................712-837-5231 â&#x20AC;˘ Rutland.........................515-332-1491 â&#x20AC;˘ Terril.............................712-853-6131 â&#x20AC;˘ Wallingford....................712-867-4115

WWW.PROCOOP.COOP

â&#x20AC;˘ DFS is a Full Service Grain End User. For all your Grain Marketing needs, call 1-866-833-9886. A full line of contracts and programs available. â&#x20AC;˘ For all of your Grain and Livestock Marketing Newell, IA 712-272-3396 â&#x20AC;˘1-800-373-6514 needs, contact Market 1 Inc. at 1-800-859-3039. Nutra Mix Feeds â&#x20AC;˘ Swine Nutrition Products â&#x20AC;˘ Pig Sourcing A DFS owned company â&#x20AC;˘ Livestock Facility Sited Contracts

NO

NORTHWOOD LUMBER Ag & Lawn Sprayer Sales & Service

512 West Central, Northwood, IA

Kohlhaas Ag Aviation and Grain Vac Services

COLFAX TRACTOR PARTS

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Send us your aerial farm map for fields to be sprayedâ&#x20AC;?

Jerome R. Kohlhaas

PH: 515-824-3769 1704 Texas Ave. â&#x20AC;˘ Hardy, IA 50545 Call: 515-341-0704 â&#x20AC;˘ Fax: 515-824-3475

641-324-1215

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

Buy, Sell, & Trade Farm Equipment New & Used Parts National Locator Service Parting Late Model Tractors & Combines

Colfax, IA, North Side of Interstate 80 at Colfax exit. 1-800-284-3001 â&#x20AC;˘ colfaxtractorparts.com

MARKET ADVISORY

RTH IOWA

NI

Thornton (641) 998-2711 United LP Mason City (641) 423-4011

+

CO

O P E R AT I V E

Portland (641) 423-5311 Plymouth (641) 696-3382

www.nicoop.com

Clear Lake (641) 357-5274 Swaledale (641) 995-2213

207 Main â&#x20AC;˘ Royal, IA

â&#x20AC;˘ Internet and DTN/FarmDayta Market Advisory Service â&#x20AC;˘ Full Service Brokerage â&#x20AC;˘ Producer of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The CommStock Reportâ&#x20AC;?

www.commstock.com

1-800-242-5014

3330 Moville BT â&#x20AC;˘ Hornick, IA 51026-0106

712-874-3211

Our Vision:

To Continually Meet The Needs Of Our Customers Today And Tomorrow

Our Mission:

Reaching New Horizons With Our Satisfied Customers.

â&#x20AC;˘ Blencoe â&#x20AC;˘ Correctionville â&#x20AC;˘ Mapleton â&#x20AC;˘ Moville â&#x20AC;˘ Onawa â&#x20AC;˘ Pierson â&#x20AC;˘ Sloan â&#x20AC;˘ Turin â&#x20AC;˘ Washta â&#x20AC;˘ Whiting

+


fRIDaY, Jan. 25, 2013

www.farm-news.com

5D

2013 Corn Edition

Stover

Continued from Page 4D

field to protect soil from erosion and sustain soil organic matter, removing excess material has the potential to benefit a subsequent crop. â&#x2C6;Ť A subsequent corn crop may benefit from improved stand establishment and early growth, reduced nitrogen immobilization and lower disease pressure when excess stover is removed. â&#x2C6;Ť Partial stover harvest removes additional nutrients, which must be accounted for in fertility management. â&#x2C6;Ť The objective of this research was to assess the agronomic value of partial stover harvest for continuous corn, including the potential for crop production and yield benefits, as well as additional fertility requirements. Heggenstaller said the amount of stover to be left behind must be greater than what is needed to protect soil against erosion. The primary advantage in reducing surface residue is preventing its interference with planting and stand establishment of the subsequent crop. According to a report Heggenstaller co-penned in late-2012, â&#x20AC;&#x153;In many high-yielding areas of the U.S. corn belt, residue accumulation has become an increasing problem. To counter this problem, many growers are chopping stalks during or after harvest and/or incorporating stalks into the soil through more aggressive tillage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Both practices increase microbial degradation of stalks with resulting loss of carbon through CO2 release. From a carbon sequestration standpoint, managing excess residue by removing a portion for ethanol production is not

+

faRm nEwS / ThE mESSEngER, fORT DODgE, IOwa

At a glance

-Messenger/Farm News file photo

POET IS IN its third year of its own stover study by learning to handle, store and process the thousands of bales, both square and round, that producers around Emmetsburg will deliver to POET when Project LIBERTY goes on line later this year. substantially different than tilling the soil to increase decomposition.â&#x20AC;? In cases where management of excess residue is a driving factor in management decisions, partial stover harvest could potentially expand rotation and management options, Heggenstaller siad. For example, a reduction in excess residue could allow for increased production of corn following corn, particularly in the northern corn belt where residue decomposition tends to be slower. Tillage or other field operations

currently done specifically to manage residue could potentially be eliminated, providing substantial production cost savings. Partial stover harvest could have secondary benefits as well, he said, including reduction in inoculum levels for corn pathogens that overwinter in corn residue, such as anthracnose, gray leaf spot, Gossâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; wilt and northern leaf blight, as well as reduced nitrogen immobilization. Lignan is co-product Unlike corn-based ethanol, with

a co-product that retails as a prime livestock feed, cellulosic ethanol leaves behind lignan. Heggenstaller said there are no long-term definitive plans for how Pioneer will market the lignan, but the immediate plan is to form it into cakes and burn it. Lignan cake has a similar British thermal unit content as coal, he said. Some of it will be used to power the Nevada plan, and other out-sources maybe the nearby corn-based ethanol plant, or Ames which has a coal-burning municipal utility.

â&#x2C6;Ť Corn stover is the most plentiful source of lignocellulosic biomass in the U.S. Sustainable utilization of corn stover as a feedstock for ethanol and other biofuels could help meet energy needs while delivering agronomic benefits. â&#x2C6;Ť In fields where excess residue interferes with planting, impedes stand establishment, and ties up nitrogen, partial stover harvest can increase corn yields and potentially reduce production costs. â&#x2C6;Ť Sustainable corn stover harvest requires that only a portion is removed from the field, leaving a sufficient amount behind to meet other critical needs, including mitigation of soil erosion, maintenance of soil organic matter and sustained soil fertility. â&#x2C6;Ť The amount of stover that can be sustainably harvested is generally most limited by the amount that must be left in the field to maintain soil organic matter levels. â&#x2C6;Ť Crop nutrients, most notably potassium, are removed from the field when stover is harvested. Specific removal rates will vary according to soil nutrient levels, growing conditions, hybrid, and the time and method of harvest. â&#x2C6;Ť DuPont expects to initially create 75 gallons of ethanol per ton of stover, but will fine-tune the process to eventually distill 80 gallons of ethanol per ton of stover.

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Services Leadership PioneerÂŽ brand varieties deliver more of what you are looking for in your soybean seed. Powered by our exclusive Accelerated Yield Technology (AYTâ&#x201E;˘) system, we incorporate key defensive and agronomic traits into our elite genetics for consistent, top-end performance. Along with Pioneer Premium Seed Treatment, Pioneer FITÂŽ Mapping, customized package and delivery, as well as trusted knowledge and services from your local sales professional, DuPont Pioneer offers the right products and services to help achieve total soybean performance. pioneer.com/soybeans

Pioneer Premium Seed Treatment for soybeans is applied at a Pioneer production facility or by an independent sales UHSUHVHQWDWLYHRI3LRQHHU1RWDOOVDOHVUHSUHVHQWDWLYHVRĹ?HUWUHDWPHQWVHUYLFHVDQGFRVWVDQGRWKHUFKDUJHVPD\YDU\ See your Pioneer sales representative for details. 7KH'X3RQW2YDO/RJRLVDUHJLVWHUHGWUDGHPDUNRI'X3RQW ÂŽ TM SM   7UDGHPDUNVDQGVHUYLFHPDUNVRI3LRQHHU $OOSXUFKDVHVDUHVXEMHFWWRWKHWHUPVRIODEHOLQJDQGSXUFKDVHGRFXPHQWVŠ 2012 PHII.

+


6D

Farm News / The messeNger, ForT DoDge, Iowa

www.farm-news.com

FrIDay, JaN. 25, 2013

Search thousands of pieces of farm equipment to find the right one for you.

Start your search at

Farm-News.com +

+


Corn Edition 2012