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Jennifer Bernard, of Webster City, poses with some of her prize winning quilted jackets and a large patterned quilt. Bernard is getting ready for the upcoming Fort Dodge Quilt Show.

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Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012


Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012

The art Bernard competes at national level

of quilting

Story and photos by ANNE BLANKENSHIP

ndship aven

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Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012 WEBSTER CITY — For Jennifer Bernard, the art of quilting is just that — art. The seamstress and quilter has long competed in area quilting contests, but in recent years, has stepped up to the national level. And she’s bringing home top honors and prize money. Bernard said she has always enjoyed sewing and made many garments for her two daughters when they were small. She initially began competing at the Hamilton County Fair. “My daughter was in 4-H and I didn’t know too much about that,” she said. “But she competed at the fair and she got ribbons, and I discovered there was a quilt competition, too.” Bernard started entering some of the clothes she had made for her children. She said she was thrilled when she got her first blue ribbon at the fair. She began quilting and eventually she taught her dad how to quilt, too. He also began to compete in fairs, including the Iowa State Fair. “So, then I began competing at the Iowa State Fair with him,” she said, and also started competing with the Iowa Quilter’s Guild. “I started winning ribbons there, too,” she said. “I don’t know what it is about my family — they all like to compete.” In addition to her father, Bernard’s daughter, Danielle, competes in horse events, and her other daughter, Nora, trains dogs and competes in dog shows. While she still makes quilts for family members and friends, she’s moved on to explore creative garment designs. “I find I really enjoy the design and I’ve really gone on to being a quilt artist now,” she said. She keeps ribbons and records of the contests, notes and comments from judges. She

ABOVE: While she’s competing now on the national level, Jennifer Bernard still enjoys making garments and quilts for her granddaughter like the pink, green and yellow set in this picture. LEFT: Jennifer Bernard operates her long-arm quilting machine set up in her basement. She uses the machine on her own creations, but also quilts for customers on a limited basis. She wears one of the jackets she designed and quilted.

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Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012

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keeps her contest entries listed on spreadsheets along with the prizes awarded to each. Most contests have rules that items can only be entered once, so detailed records must be kept of which garment was entered in which show, Bernard said. “I don’t know what there is about wanting to win these competitions, except that its a goal that makes you get better. Because if you want to win at quilting, you have to evaluate your strengths and weaknesses, not just say ‘Oh that judge didn’t like me, they’re not fair,’” she said. “It takes skill and you have to improve.” When she retired from teaching in 2006, Bernard purchased a long-arm quilting machine and opened a quilting business, Heart’s Desire Quilting. It was then that she got involved with the Machine Quilters Showcase “I went to that show and I won the very first year I was there. I won for a jacket that I had worn to school for a year.” “That’s kind of the way my sewing has been. I made a little dress for my daughter and it won first prize at the county fair and the state fair. It was just kind of the normal sewing I do and I have a talent for. It makes me happy, so I just kind of developed it more and more,” she said. She’s been competing on the national level for about two years and at just about every show, she’s placed among the top prize winners. One of the garments she is most proud of is a brilliant red and black, heavily beaded and jeweled jacket she calls “Fierce

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Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012 Intentions.” She made jacket for her daughter Danielle to wear at national quarter horse competitions. Danielle took seventh place out of 120 competitors at the All-American Quarter Horse Congress in Columbus, Ohio. The jacket has won three first place honors and a second place at national quilt shows in 2012. And Bernard still has a couple more shows to enter yet this year. She’s also won three Best Machine Quilting honors from National Quilting Association-certified judges at the Iowa Quilters Guild, Omaha Quilters and Des Moines Area Quilters shows. So far in 2012, she’s won more than $2,100 in prize money. “There are many, many people who enter those shows and go home with no ribbons. If I get a first, second or third place, that’s something that I really, really appreciate. There are 200 people who walked away from that show with nothing,” she said. Bernard, who now teaches classes and is a regular speaker for various quilting organizations, urges beginning quilters to take some classes from good teachers. “You need to learn from good teachers and pay attention to

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the details of quilting — from choosing fabrics to making sure the points are precise. There are some good teachers around here and some good quilt clubs,” she said. Bernard recommended that local quilters attend the upcoming Webster City Quilt Show on Sept. 16. The show, sponsored by The Gingerbread House and the Webster City Medical Clinic, is held at the medical clinic from noon to 4 p.m. Bernard said the show was an opportunity for local residents to see some wonderful quilts and quilted items. She also mentioned the Fort Dodge Area Quilters 21st Biennial Show on Sept. 29 and 30 at Iowa Central Community College. Bernard will have items entered in that contest. She admits that the shows are also great places to get ideas for future projects. “Going to a quilt show, you look at everybody’s work,” she said. “Everybody uses stuff in creative and different ways. Sometimes, I keep a sketchbook and jot down ideas.” “Everybody’s work has value,” she said. “My work has no more value than anybody else’s just because it’s won ribbons. Because that little kid will always love the quilt that Grandma made.”

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September

Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012

September Thursday — 13 500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center. n

Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. n

Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n

Blood pressure check, 11 a.m. to noon, RSVP, Webster City. n

Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n

SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center. n

Hamilton County PHS foot clinic. Friday — 14 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n

Community Bingo, 2 p.m., Fort Dodge Rehabilitation and Health Care (formerly Careage of Fort Dodge). n

Birthday party, 2 p.m., Eagle Grove Senior Center. n

Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. n

Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center.

Saturday — 15 Boone River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m. to noon, RSVP building, Webster City.

Bridge, 1 p.m., Webster City Senior Center.

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Wednesday — 19 RSVP Workday, 9 a.m. Senior Center, Webster City.

Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. Sunday — 16

n

Golden K Kiwanis, 9:30 a.m., Citizens Central. n

Monday — 17 Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments.

Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134

Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center.

500 cards, 1 p.m., Algona Senior Center.

Penny bingo, 1 p.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments.

Senior Citizens 500, 1 p.m., Webster City.

Bingo, Eagle Grove Senior Citizen Center, 6:30 p.m.

Thursday — 20 500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center.

n n n

Tuesday — 18 Webster City Diamond K Kiwanis, 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 9 a.m. meet. n

River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m., Citizens Central. n

Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n

Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central.

Locally Owned Since 1979

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JCAHO Accredited page

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Senior Bowl, 1 p.m., Webster City Bowl.

n n

SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center. n

Hamilton County PHS foot clinic. Friday — 21 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n

Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. n

Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center. Saturday — 22 Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. n

Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. Sunday — 23

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Monday — 24 Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments.

n

Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center.

Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

n

Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134

500, 1 p.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments.

Blood pressure check, 11 a.m. to noon, RSVP, Webster City.

Bingo, Eagle Grove Senior Citizen Center, 6:30 p.m.

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Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n

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Tuesday — 25 Webster City Diamond K Kiwanis, 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 9

Calendar Thursday — 27 500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center.

a.m. meet. n

River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m., Citizens Central.

n

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Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134

Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. n

Saturday — 29 Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Senior Bowl, 1 p.m., Webster City Bowl.

Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N.

Bridge, 1 p.m., Webster City Senior Center.

Sunday — 30

Wednesday — 3 RSVP Workday, 9 a.m. Senior Center, Webster City.

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October

Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134

Monday — 1 Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments.

Senior Bowl, 1 p.m., Webster City Bowl.

Blood pressure check, 11 a.m. to noon, RSVP, Webster City.

Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center.

Bridge, 1 p.m., Webster City Senior Center.

Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central.

Penny bingo, 1 p.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments.

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Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n n

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Wednesday — 26 RSVP Workday, 9 a.m. Senior Center, Webster City.

SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center.

Bingo, Eagle Grove Senior Citizen Center, 6:30 p.m.

Golden K Kiwanis, 9 a.m., meet at Bob Heun Shelter House John F. Kennedy Memorial Park. Brunch andofficer/board installation.

Friday — 28 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center.

Tuesday — 2 Webster City Diamond K Kiwanis, 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 9 a.m. meet.

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Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n

500 cards, 1 p.m., Algona Senior Center. n

Senior Citizens 500, 1 p.m., Webster City.

118 South 25th Street, Fort Dodge, IA (across from the mall) Mon.-Fri. 9-5:30 • Sat. 9-1 515-955-8500 800-383-8500

n

Community Bingo, 2 p.m., Fort Dodge Rehabilitation and Health Care (formerly Careage of Fort Dodge). n

Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. n

Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center.

n

n

Golden K Kiwanis, 9:30 a.m., Citizens Central. n

Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n

500 cards, 1 p.m., Algona Senior Center. n

Senior Citizens 500, 1 p.m., Webster City. Thursday — 4 500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center.

Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n

SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center. Friday — 5 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n

Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. n

Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center. Saturday — 6 Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. n

Senior potluck, noon, Webster City Senior Center n

Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N.

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Sunday — 7

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Monday — 8 Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments.

n

Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

n

Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134

Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center.

Blood pressure check, 11 a.m. to noon, RSVP, Webster City.

500, 1 p.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments.

River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m., Citizens Central. Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n

Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central.

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n

• • • • • • •

n n

n

Wound Care Supplies Enteral Feeding Supplies Commodes Bath Benches Hospital Beds Seat Lift Chairs Bath Aids

Bingo, Eagle Grove Senior Citizen Center, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday — 9 Webster City Diamond K Kiwanis, 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 9 a.m. meet. n

River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m., Citizens Central. n

Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n

Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n

Senior Bowl, 1 p.m., Webster City Bowl. n

Bridge, 1 p.m., Webster City Senior Center. Wednesday — 10 RSVP Workday, 9 a.m. Senior Center, Webster City. n

Golden K Kiwanis, 9:30 a.m., Citizens Central. n

Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n

n

500 cards, 1 p.m., Algona Senior Center.

n

Senior Citizens 500, 1 p.m., Webster City.

• • • • • • •

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Oxygen Therapy Crutches Canes Wheelchairs Walkers Incontinent Supplies Uniforms page

9


September

Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012

September Thursday — 13 500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center. n

Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. n

Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n

Blood pressure check, 11 a.m. to noon, RSVP, Webster City. n

Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n

SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center. n

Hamilton County PHS foot clinic. Friday — 14 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n

Community Bingo, 2 p.m., Fort Dodge Rehabilitation and Health Care (formerly Careage of Fort Dodge). n

Birthday party, 2 p.m., Eagle Grove Senior Center. n

Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. n

Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center.

Saturday — 15 Boone River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m. to noon, RSVP building, Webster City.

Bridge, 1 p.m., Webster City Senior Center.

n

Wednesday — 19 RSVP Workday, 9 a.m. Senior Center, Webster City.

Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. Sunday — 16

n

Golden K Kiwanis, 9:30 a.m., Citizens Central. n

Monday — 17 Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments.

Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134

Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center.

500 cards, 1 p.m., Algona Senior Center.

Penny bingo, 1 p.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments.

Senior Citizens 500, 1 p.m., Webster City.

Bingo, Eagle Grove Senior Citizen Center, 6:30 p.m.

Thursday — 20 500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center.

n n n

Tuesday — 18 Webster City Diamond K Kiwanis, 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 9 a.m. meet. n

River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m., Citizens Central. n

Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n

Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central.

Locally Owned Since 1979

8

n

n

JCAHO Accredited page

n

Senior Bowl, 1 p.m., Webster City Bowl.

n n

SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center. n

Hamilton County PHS foot clinic. Friday — 21 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n

Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. n

Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center. Saturday — 22 Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. n

Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. Sunday — 23

n

Monday — 24 Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments.

n

Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center.

Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

n

Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134

500, 1 p.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments.

Blood pressure check, 11 a.m. to noon, RSVP, Webster City.

Bingo, Eagle Grove Senior Citizen Center, 6:30 p.m.

n n

Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n

n n

Tuesday — 25 Webster City Diamond K Kiwanis, 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 9

Calendar Thursday — 27 500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center.

a.m. meet. n

River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m., Citizens Central.

n

n

Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134

Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. n

Saturday — 29 Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Senior Bowl, 1 p.m., Webster City Bowl.

Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N.

Bridge, 1 p.m., Webster City Senior Center.

Sunday — 30

Wednesday — 3 RSVP Workday, 9 a.m. Senior Center, Webster City.

n

October

Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134

Monday — 1 Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments.

Senior Bowl, 1 p.m., Webster City Bowl.

Blood pressure check, 11 a.m. to noon, RSVP, Webster City.

Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center.

Bridge, 1 p.m., Webster City Senior Center.

Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central.

Penny bingo, 1 p.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments.

n

Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n n

n n n

n n n

Wednesday — 26 RSVP Workday, 9 a.m. Senior Center, Webster City.

SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center.

Bingo, Eagle Grove Senior Citizen Center, 6:30 p.m.

Golden K Kiwanis, 9 a.m., meet at Bob Heun Shelter House John F. Kennedy Memorial Park. Brunch andofficer/board installation.

Friday — 28 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center.

Tuesday — 2 Webster City Diamond K Kiwanis, 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 9 a.m. meet.

n

n

Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n

500 cards, 1 p.m., Algona Senior Center. n

Senior Citizens 500, 1 p.m., Webster City.

118 South 25th Street, Fort Dodge, IA (across from the mall) Mon.-Fri. 9-5:30 • Sat. 9-1 515-955-8500 800-383-8500

n

Community Bingo, 2 p.m., Fort Dodge Rehabilitation and Health Care (formerly Careage of Fort Dodge). n

Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. n

Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center.

n

n

Golden K Kiwanis, 9:30 a.m., Citizens Central. n

Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n

500 cards, 1 p.m., Algona Senior Center. n

Senior Citizens 500, 1 p.m., Webster City. Thursday — 4 500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center.

Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n

SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center. Friday — 5 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n

Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. n

Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center. Saturday — 6 Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. n

Senior potluck, noon, Webster City Senior Center n

Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N.

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Sunday — 7

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Monday — 8 Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments.

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Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134

Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center.

Blood pressure check, 11 a.m. to noon, RSVP, Webster City.

500, 1 p.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments.

River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m., Citizens Central. Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n

Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central.

• Respiratory Equipment • Sleep Disorder Therapeutics • Mastectomy Supplies • Ostomy Supplies • Urological Supplies • Diabetic Supplies

n

• • • • • • •

n n

n

Wound Care Supplies Enteral Feeding Supplies Commodes Bath Benches Hospital Beds Seat Lift Chairs Bath Aids

Bingo, Eagle Grove Senior Citizen Center, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday — 9 Webster City Diamond K Kiwanis, 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 9 a.m. meet. n

River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m., Citizens Central. n

Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n

Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n

Senior Bowl, 1 p.m., Webster City Bowl. n

Bridge, 1 p.m., Webster City Senior Center. Wednesday — 10 RSVP Workday, 9 a.m. Senior Center, Webster City. n

Golden K Kiwanis, 9:30 a.m., Citizens Central. n

Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n

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500 cards, 1 p.m., Algona Senior Center.

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Senior Citizens 500, 1 p.m., Webster City.

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Oxygen Therapy Crutches Canes Wheelchairs Walkers Incontinent Supplies Uniforms page

9


Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012

Veteran Affairs offices offer services Webster and Hamilton County Veteran Affairs offer assistance for veterans, service members and their families. This includes federal and state benefits as well as temporary county benefits to qualifying indigent veterans and their families. County benefits include rent, utilities, transportation for medical care, medictions and burial expenses. Eligibility for county benefits: ∫ The individiual must be a legal resident of the county in which they apply ∫ Have been discharged from the US

S UPPLIES & S ERVICES • 24 hour oxygen delivery • Oxygen concentrators and accessories • Lift chairs • Wheelchairs • Ostomy supplies • Hospital beds, rails and accessories • Nebulizers • Bathroom safety aids • Ambulatory aids

Armed Forces under “Honorable Conditions” ∫ Served during a “War Time Period” Application must be made in person. Webster County: 723 First Avenue South, Fort Dodge Hours: Monday and Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Tuesday and Thursday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Friday 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hamilton County: 500 Fairmeadow Drive, Webster City Hours: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday; 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Wednesday.

• Urinary incontinence management supplies • Compression hosiery • Breast pumps and supplies • Urologicals • Daily living aids • Orthotics and braces • CPAP/BiPAP machines and supplies

2350 Hospital Drive | Webster City, IA 50595 | 5 1 5 - 8 3 2 - 7 7 8 5

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NEWS FLASH... Willy Says Utilities Are Included At The Wahkonsa Apartments!

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Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012

Ask Dr. Marion

I’m still a little ways from retirement age, but I’m starting to grow concerned about my finances. I thought I’d been saving enough (or close to enough) but now I’m not so sure. Can you offer me any tips? Candace, Phoenix, AZ

you will have to pay taxes on it. Remember to take the required minimal withdrawals to avoid a tax penalty. - Roth accounts: These have the benefit of tax-free withdrawals, because you already paid taxes on the contributions. - Home equity: If your home is paid off, you may be able to use a loan or reverse mortgage, should you need to. - Insurance: Make sure you sign up for Medicare on time, to avoid a rise in premiums. Look into purchasing Long Term Care insurance to avoid having to dip heavily into your savings for unforeseeable health needs.

Ways to save: -Downsize your home: If it makes sense There has been a lot of discussion about for you, consider moving into a smaller the crisis many of us will face as we reach place, like an apartment or condo, and retirement age. How will we continue to use the extra money to pad your savings fund our lifestyle, without an income? account. Even for people who think they have - Sell your car: Now that you don’t have planned adequately, there may be surprise to drive to work everyday, do you still expenses around the corner. Here are need a car? Especially if you are in a 2-car some ways to fund retirement, as well as household, consider selling one car, and some ways to cut expenses. taking advantage of public transportation whenever possible. Funding: - Use senior discounts: While some busi- Social Security: You should be eligible nesses advertise their senior discounts to receive monthly payments, once (movie theaters, hotels, restaurants), othyou’ve reached the age of 62. Remember ers do not. Don’t be afraid to ask! though that if you sign up right away, - Travel during the off-season: Without you won’t receive your full benefits. If the constraints of work, you can travel possible, delay signing up until you’ve during non-peak times for a tremendous reached the “full retirement age” (varies savings. depending on the year you were born). - Cook at home: After a long day of - Retirement accounts: If you saved durwork, coming home and cooking a meal ing your working years, through 401(k)s can be tiring. But now, you can devote or IRAs, you can use the money now, but

more time to grocery shopping and cooking. This is a great way to save money. - Seek out free (or cheap) entertainment: Chances are, you will be faced with more leisure time than ever before. Look for free concerts, free museum days, and any other options your city has to offer. If you feel the need to buy a new book or movie, shop used stores or neighborhood yard sales instead.

Curious About Cremation?

Get The Facts... Seminar Designed To Answer All Your Questions

Saturday, October 6, 2012 • 11:30 a.m. Short informational seminar and tour of Gunderson’s on-site crematory facility.

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Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012

Actions speak louder than words

Actions speak louder than words. The men and women who serve as Foster Grandparents know that serving as positive role models for the children they work with is an important responsibility; and they take the responsibility seriously. Our Grandparents know that even when they are silent, the children they work with are watching them. Those children learn how to listen to their teacher when Grandma or Grandpa is also a good listener. They learn how to wait their turn when their Grandparent reminds them to be patient. They become better students as they work one to one on reading or math skills with Grandma or Grandpa. They learn what it is like to receive praise or a gentle reminder when accomplishing tasks. A hug or high five from a foster grandparent is an action that most every child looks forward to. Our office was pleased to hear of a story this month of students who took time to let their actions speak louder than words in helping one of our page 12

Grandparents. Monsignor Kevin McCoy at St. Edmond recently shared that one of the Grandmas at their school had a flat tire while serving her shift. He was pleased to note that two high school students offered to change her tire for her. Both of these young men deserve a high five from Grandma for sharing this act of kindness! This fall there are 45 people either serving in our program or training for placement as a new foster grandparent. Our new trainees benefit from the experience of our veteran grandparents who serve as mentors. These mentors allow the trainees to job shadow them in their assignment at school. The mentors also take the time to help the “newbies” get acquainted and feel comfortable joining our program because they realize that it’s never easy to be the new kid, no matter what your age. In addition to schools in Fort Dodge, we have Grandparents in Dayton and Barnum; and we will soon be placing a new grandparent at Prairie Valley. We are excited to help our volunteers make a difference to

children in all of these school districts! As we work to place the current group of trainees, we are also accepting applications for our next class which will take place in January. While that seems like a long way down the road, we know that it will be here before we know it, and the children of our community will still need help even when winter is upon us. The actions of our foster grandparents wouldn’t be possible without the help of many people who help in our program. We appreciate the DART drivers who transport many of our Grandparents each day. Webster County Public Health helps to ensure that our Grandparents are healthy enough to serve a schedule of at least fifteen hours every week; and the teachers we work with do a great job of completing all of the necessary paperwork needed for the pro-

Jeanine Nemitz, Coordinator Fort Dodge 55+ Volunteer Initiatives

The Foster Grandparent Program 617 Central Ave. Fort Dodge, IA 576-5401

gram reports. We are also grateful that we have the support of local funding partners including the Community Foundation and United Way as well as Target. The actions of Foster Grandparents speak loud and clear and those actions are saying that it is never too late to make a difference in the community. Accepting a position as a Foster Grandparent after retiring from the regular workforce is a great way to stay involved in the community, earn a little extra money (taxfree), and make a huge difference for the children of our area. For an application to become a Foster Grandparent, please contact our office at 576-5401.


Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012

The ‘three Ds’ of memory loss

Have you ever been in an environment with so much noise, movement, visual stimulation, people and conversations going on that you felt disoriented and confused? One of two examples are University of Iowa Football Saturdays at Kinnick Stadium. After driving across a good portion of Iowa on Interstate 80 bumper to bumper at breakneck speed, finding an elusive parking spot and walking a

mile up hill, the real stimulation b e g i n s . Hoards of football fans packed into a very small geographical area walking toward you, around you, across your path and some people stopped and standing in a group for some unknown reason. Everyone is way to close for comfort. Add bright colored clothing, yelling, cheering, conversations going on all around you, the PA announcer, the band, the music and announcements during pregame outside the stadium, and the smells of tail-gaters culinary adventures, popcorn, hotdogs being sold by vendors. It starts out as exhilarating but soon can become sen-

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sory overload. A close second is Christmas shopping at a metro area mall with too many people too much colorful stuff, noise, commotion, happy people, angry people, little kids crying, the eternal holiday music, aching feet, arms hurting from carrying packages, you often become mentally and physically exhausted. If you’ve experienced overstimulation or mental and physical exhaustion you’ve had some moments of what people with the “three D’s” of confusion and memory loss experience. Imagine having dementia where experiences like these occur throughout your day every day with little or fleeting relief multiplied by the loss of insight and reasoning of dementia diagnoses. The first “D” is for dementia, a large group of diagnoses including Alzheimer ’s disease, Vascular Dementia and Lewy Body Dementia and as many as 70 other forms. Because of the number of forms the progression can be quite varied. Alzheimer’s disease is the most prevalent form and its progression is usually slow and insidious, sometimes people can skillfully hide or compensate for their losses for an extended

Diane Rollins, a social worker, dementia care practitioner, and Nursing Home Administrator at Stratford Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. She can be reached at 955-8919. period of time. Alzheimer’s does not happen quickly, and if memory loss and confusion happen quickly it is important to see your medical provider to rule out an infection, drug interaction or another physical cause of rapid onset. The second “D,” delirium, is defined as a temporary,sudden state of severe confusion and rapid changes in brain function. Delirium can be due to a number of conditions, including infection, drug toxicity or withdrawal, seizures, brain tumor, poisoning, head injury, and metabolic disturbances. Delirium is an acute disorder of attention and cognition (memory and perception) and is treatable. The diagnosis is missed in more than 50 percent of cases. Elders with dementia are at increased risk of delirium and may have both. Prevention of delirium for persons with dementia includes avoiding See ROLLINS, Page 15

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Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012

220 acres and a Farmall It was harvest time, 2011. I rode along with my daughter to bring lunch to those working in the field. It was a nice day and we had a couple of the young grandkids with us. It has been awhile since I have watched harvesting this close up and was surprised at the size of the machinery. The scope and speed of the harvesting process was amazing. This giant combine filled with the already shelled corn pulling up to unload the crop into a huge semi that would deliver the grain to the elevator. These trucks are so different from the tractors that used to pull one or two farm wagons to town. The amount of grain on the semis has to be measured carefully in order to adhere to the law re weight for vehicles using the roads. Amazing contrast to my days on the farm. I noticed the lack of fences, gone now in order to accommodate the size of the machinery. I found myself thinking back to how it was on our farm back in the ‘50s and ‘60s. I wonder what Grandpa Feldman would think if he were here today. He was a man set in his ways of doing things and was not one to accept new ideas easily. I bet he is turning over in his grave. page

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SixTy & Then Some mary Feldman

is a freelance writer living in emmetsburg We had three tractors, all Farmalls. The “H”, the “M” and the 450. Like the three bears, The H was the smallest. The M the middle sized and the 450 was the papa. My son recalls coming home on the school bus and seeing the 450 Farmall there in the yard: big, bright red and brand new. “It was around Spencer fair time.” he said, “I’d guess this was in the 1960s. I was pretty little, in kindergarten or maybe first grade at the time. “As we got older, it was on the ‘H’ that my brothers and I learned to drive the tractors and it was the ‘H’ that I started cultivating on with a two-row front mount cultivator. Eventually we moved up to the 450 with a 3 bottom plow. “The ‘M’ could pull a two-bottom whereas the 450 could pull

the three-bottom plow. Our corn picker had only two heads and was mounted on the ‘M.’ It took ear corn only and the corn was shelled later, a little at a time as needed. Our combine was a Minneapolis Moline and was pulled behind the M or the 450. “We had a flat board, called a stone boat with the iron skids on the bottom, almost like a sled. It was handy and used for hauling water and food to distant hog lots. When fixing fence. we road on it behind the tractor with the tools we needed

for the job. Our lane was not exceptionally long, but often after rains or winter weather, it developed deep ruts and would get pretty muddy. We used the stone boat to smooth out the lane and the yard, around the out buildings and going to the various fields and pastures.” I know many retired farmers. I know their sons and daughters who still work the family farm. The younger generations tell me it is very different from what it was back when they were children. Some tell me that it is hard to start up a farming oper-


Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012 ation these days. The expense of it all, from the land to the machinery to the cost of seed and harvesting. Everything is against success. I remember Grandpa saying if you were going to be a farmer, you better know business. That is even more true today. What a difference . Today my son-in-law farms many times the 220 acres we worked. He has three John Deere tractors, a 9520 T. 8410 T. and an 8400. Also a 4 wheel drive 9520 with wheels, A 24 row corn planter with a 40 foot drill for planting beans . A9760 Deere combine with a 30 foot bean platform and an 8 row corn head. I am not familiar with their capabilities but I see their size compared to the H and the M and the 450 that I remember. Check rowing was a method of planting where each hill of

Rollins

two to four seeds was exactly the same distance from each adjoining hill. That made it possible to cultivate the rows in several directions, making it easier to keep the weeds down. Then came the chemicals in the ‘40s and ‘50s for weed control and the check row method of planting became less popular. It was time consuming and took a lot of work to set up and with the weeds chemically controlled, it was no longer necessary. I remember that, for a long time, Grandpa Feldman refused to give it up and it was quite awhile before he finally gave in to trying another way. He was sitting on the porch with his son looking at the first year crop of corn planted the “modern” way. “Hmph,” he snorted. “You’ve got the corn planted so thick that a jack rabbit has to run to

the end rows to find his way out.” My children looked forward to shelling corn and bailing hay as the neighbors would come to help and the lunches were always good. The women spent most of the day in the kitchen. There was morning break to fix, then a big noon meal. Afternoon sandwiches and sometimes a light evening meal if the men were still working. Though it was a lot of work and the weather often very hot, it did have a festive feel about it as there was a lot of social interaction as well. “We didn’t like bean walking and picking up rock, though,” says son number two. My kids all made summer money walking beans for the neighbors. They always did a good job and I never heard any complaints about their work.

However, I have memories of when we walked our own fields. The whole family went out together and mostly I kept busy refereeing, as the kids did a lot of fussing and throwing dirt clods at each other. Still, we got the job done, pulling thistles and sunflowers and rogue corn from the bean fields. Bean walking is pretty much a thing of the past as the seed today is RoundUp ready. I suspect that picking up rock continues to be an on going farm chore. The farming life today is good, just as it was to us who lived on the 220 acres those years ago. True, it is different, but it is also the same in many ways, here in the breadbasket of the world. Happy Harvest! God Bless America and God Bless You!

Continued from Page 13

psychoactive drugs, a quiet environment, change in appetite, change in sleeping and daytime activity, dark and quiet at patterns, difficulty sleeping or sleeping night, use of visual and hearing assistive too much. devices. Diagnosis of delirium is based on Depression can resemble dementia clinical observations which include: Acute because depressed people have trouble onset (hours/days) and a fluctuating concentrating, and sometimes suffer course, inattention or distraction, disor- memory lapses and may speak slowly. ganized thinking or an altered level of The 3 D’s of confusion and memory loss consciousness show the importance of contacting health The third “D” is depression, a mental care professionals over concerns about health issue that affects mind and body. It memory loss and confusion for yourself or can involve feelings of sadness, irritability, members of your family. A great local decreased pleasure in formerly enjoyable resource for information in Fort Dodge is activities, feelings of hopelessness and the Greater Iowa Chapter of The guilt. They may have loss of energy and Alzheimer’s Association. A wonderful

speaker and nationally known Alzheimer’s Care Specialist, Teepa Snow, will be speaking in Fort Dodge on Oct. 16 at 8:30 a.m. at Iowa Central Community College. Contact Iowa Central Community College or the Fort Dodge Branch Office of The Alzheimer’s Association at (515) 576-4884 for details. The Walk to End Alzheimer’s will be held at Iowa Central Community College on Oct. 6 at 10 a.m., with registration at 9 a.m. Please consider attending and supporting these two events in Fort Dodge this fall for an important cause.

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September Active Living  

Fort Dodge Seniors Section

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