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Issue 175 April 2019

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Pastoral Letter for Lent 2019

Our Journey towards Easter INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

Ash Wednesday penance

Our RCIA Journey


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Inspiring excellence personal and academic

Welcoming students from all areas of Liverpool & beyond Bellerive is a very popular choice for girls from across Liverpool. Contact us for a guided tour and ďŹ nd out why we are such a unique, ambitious school.

Bellerive FCJ Catholic College 1, Aigburth Drive, Sefton Park, Liverpool L17 3AA Tel: 0151 727 2064 www.bellerivefcj.org Specialisms in Sciences, Applied Learning and Maths & Computing


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contents Welcome

Issue 175 April 2019

As we begin the month of April, we continue our Lenten journey, in fact as the month continues, we have much to reflect on. We still have two weeks before Palm Sunday when we commemorate the triumphant entry of the Lord into Jerusalem, and then, Holy Week, the greatest and most dramatic week of our year.

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We reflect on the drama of the events in Jerusalem where every human emotion is laid bare. There is humble service and the gift of the Eucharist, intrigue and betrayal, vigil and prayer, suffering and death; followed by the bleak and empty day of Holy Saturday.

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At the end of Holy Week we keep vigil and celebrate the First Mass of Easter when all is transformed as we celebrate the resurrection, a joy which lasts until the Feast of Pentecost. As we begin the month Archbishop Malcolm’s Lenten Pastoral Letter continues to support us in this penitential season as we prepare for the weeks ahead. May we continue our journey together in prayer and have a happy and holy Easter.

     

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Main Feature ‘The light of Easter will chase away the dark clouds of crisis

For a city boy to spend Easter in the countryside was quite something. I was about twelve years of age when I went with a group from my school to Kintbury, the De La Salle Brothers Centre in Berkshire. We were blessed with much good weather and the sun shone on us. On reflection, I can see that what made this trip very special was that we celebrated all the Holy week and Easter services as well as taking long country walks and enjoying the company of each other. As a keen altar boy I had been used to the long ceremonies but it was the combination of liturgy and holiday that really hit home for me. It showed me that life, especially Easter life, was good and it could be fun.

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News From around the Archdiocese

We need glimpses of this good life to keep us going and give us hope. Real hope is based on the resurrection of Jesus, otherwise it is just optimism. The trouble with optimism is that it is just a desire for things to get better and is really only wishful thinking. Hope says that they will get better because Jesus has risen from the dead, and that hope is given to us too. So why not enjoy this season of Easter by looking for signs of new life and resurrection in the ordinary things you encounter every day. You will be surprised by what you see, your faith will be enriched, and it will be fun.

21 Animate An Easter meditation

May you and your families have a very happy Easter.

25 Cathedral Record A busy time ahead

Most Rev Malcolm McMahon OP Archbishop of Liverpool

26 Pic Extras Mums the word News from the KSC

From the Archbishop’s Desk

Editor Peter Heneghan

Copy deadline May 2019 Monday 15 April 2019

Editorial Catholic Pictorial Magazine Liverpool Archdiocesan Centre for Evangelisation, Croxteth Drive, Liverpool L17 1AA Tel: 0151 522 1007 Email: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk

Publisher CPMM Suite 4 Pacific Chambers, 11-13 Victoria Street, Liverpool L2 5QQ

Advertising Sales team 0151 709 7567 Pictures: Main Feature: James O’Hanlon Profile: Peter Heneghan

CPMM Ltd. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced copied or transmitted in any form or by any means or stored in any information storage or retrieval system without the publishers written permission. Although every effort is made to ensure the accuracy and reliability of material published, Catholic Pictorial Ltd. can accept no responsibility for the veracity of the claims made by advertisers.

16 What’s On Whats happening in the Archdiocese 19 Profile Helen Jones Team and community are fundamental

22 Sunday Reflections Liturgy and Life 23 Nugent News The Good Shepherd and the Good Samaritan

28 Pic Life Jealousy really does get you nowhere 30 Justice and Peace St Oscar Romero of the Americas, pray for us

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Pastoral Letter for Lent 2019 Archbishop Malcolm’s Pastoral Letter for Lent 2019 was read on the weekend of the First Sunday of Lent: 9/10 March 2019 My dear friends, This is going to be a difficult Lent for all of us. As I write this letter both our nation and the Church are in crisis. Every one of us is deeply disturbed by our country leaving the European Union. Whether we voted to leave or remain we did not expect the process to be this difficult, but whatever happens in the next few weeks it does look as though many ordinary men and women, and families may feel some detrimental economic effects of Brexit, at least in the short term. Therefore, it seems to me that this is a time for us to show our worth as Christians and not to be looking for a quick fix. As Christians we welcome strangers, we reach out to the hungry and we provide shelter for those who have none. In today’s reading from St Luke’s Gospel, Jesus is presented by the devil with a range of quick fixes. He could easily have fed himself by turning stones in to bread, but he chose not to do so because he didn’t need to prove himself. So, it should be with us, as Jesus’s brothers and sisters we should respond to the needs of others simply because it is our nature to do so. The work that goes on in the archdiocese feeding the hungry through foodbanks, providing homes for those in need, supporting asylum seekers, caring for those who are rough-sleeping, helping trafficked men and women as well as the work of Nugent, our own catholic social services agency, is simply phenomenal. I have only scratched the surface of all 4

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the good work that is done, and I applaud you for what you are doing. But if there is an economic recession then we will have to give even more of our time and resources not only during Lent but possibly for longer. This is not a time for us to only look after ourselves, but a time to be generous of spirit and attentive to the needs of our neighbours. The gospel today also speaks to us of the misuse of power. The devil offers Jesus power over all the kingdoms of the world, but he refuses as he reminds us, ‘You must worship the Lord your God, and serve him alone.’ The recent meeting of Presidents of Bishops’ Conferences with Pope Francis in Rome on Child Sexual Abuse highlighted how the evil misuse of power by clergy has left in its wake numerous victims whose lives have been damaged and who many years later are still suffering. We have not been spared this evil in our archdiocese and some of our priests have been convicted of offences against children. I believe that we have set up a thorough and rigorous system for safeguarding our young people so that our Church is now a safe place for them. But we can never be complacent, that is why I eagerly await the guidance from Pope Francis that we have been promised as a result of the Rome meeting. I would also urge any person who has been sexually abused by a person in authority in the Church to come forward. I promise you that you will be listened to and given the necessary support.

‘I know that we will see the light of Easter chasing away the dark clouds of crisis.’ The Child Sexual Abuse scandal has also undermined the moral authority of the church; that goes without saying. Who would listen to us now? So how do we recover from this desperate situation? I think there is ultimately only one way and that is to turn again to Christ and show the world that he is truly alive in our Church. Paradoxically the best way to go about this is to turn outwards to the world. Jesus came to bring the good news to the poor, to let the blind see, and make the lame walk, and that is what we should do too. There is a personal journey that we all have to take as we take this Lent seriously. Lent is an annual opportunity to put our own house in order by the traditional works of mercy, fasting and giving alms. There is also a journey we are making together towards Synod 2020. As you know the Synod will take place in October 2020 but as we walk together towards that moment, now is a time for listening to each other. Let us remember that listening to another person attentively is a real act of love where we show that we take that person seriously. Members of the Church at this time need more than ever to listen to each other. Your priest needs to listen to you, you need to listen to each other and that is why I want to hear what your ideas are for the Church of the future, as well as your concerns. Thank you to all who came to pray at the opening of the Synod and to all Members who came to the excellent first series of Members meetings. On our synod journey we are at the discerning and listening stage. Please look out for opportunities to gather in your parish or pastoral area for a Synod listening event. We hope to hear as many voices as possible because the Spirit of God will speak through you. If you have time, I would also like you to complete the on-line survey. Go to


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pastoral letter

Above: Archbishop Malcolm at the ecumenical distribution of ashes at Liverpool Parish Church with the Archbishop of York, the Most Reverend John Sentamu. Credit: James O’Hanlon the Synod website (Synod2020.co.uk) and click on the Synod Survey section. Lent is not going to be easy this year but by its end I know that we will see the light of Easter chasing away the dark clouds of

crisis. There are no quick fixes in this world but by patiently walking with the Lord we will once again be proud to call ourselves Christian. May God bless each and every one of you and your families

Holy Week and Easter at the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King Palm Sunday of the Passion of the Lord 14 April 8.30 am Mass (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) 10.00 am Family Mass (Crypt) 11.00 am Procession of Palms and Solemn Mass Celebrant: Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP 7.00 pm Mass (Crypt) 7.30 pm Tenebrae (Cathedral) Monday of Holy Week 15 April 7.45 am Morning Prayer (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) 8.00 am Mass (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) 12.15 pm Mass (Crypt) 5.15 pm Sung Mass (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) Tuesday of Holy Week 16 April 7.45 am Morning Prayer (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) 8.00 am Mass (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) 12.15 pm Mass (Crypt) 5.15 pm Sung Mass (Boy’s Voices – Blessed Sacrament Chapel) Wednesday of Holy Week 17 April 7.45 am Morning Prayer (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) 8.00 am Mass (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) 12.15 pm Mass (Crypt) 7.30 pm Mass of Chrism Celebrant: Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP

The Most Reverend Malcolm McMahon OP Archbishop of Liverpool

THE EASTER TRIDUUM Maundy Thursday of the Lord’s Supper 18 April 10.00 am Sung Office of Readings and Morning Prayer (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) 7.30 pm Mass of the Lord’s Supper Celebrant: Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP followed by Watching concluding with Night Prayer at 10.00 pm Good Friday of the Lord’s Passion 19 April 10.00 am Sung Office of Readings and Morning Prayer (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) 11.30 am Stations of the Cross led by Bishop Tom Williams (Cathedral) 3.00 pm Celebration of the Lord’s Passion Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP presides Holy Saturday 20 April 10.00 am Sung Office of Readings and Morning Prayer (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) 9.00 pm The Easter Vigil and First Mass of Easter Celebrant: Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP Easter Sunday of the Lord’s Resurrection 21 April 8.30 am Mass (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) 10.00 am Family Mass (Crypt) 11.00 am Solemn Mass of Easter Day 3.00 pm Solemn Baptismal Choral Evening Prayer 7.00 pm Mass (Crypt)

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News diary If you’ve got any news from your parish that you’d like featured e-mail us with the details at: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk

Catholic Men’s Society of Great Britain Fr John Daley Chaplain to the Catholic Men’s Society (CMS) of Great Britain and John Smartt, Secretary to the Executive Council, were surprised to read in February’s edition of the ‘Catholic Pictorial’ that the CMS of Great Britain had folded in 1987. They are pictured reading the article while on pilgrimage in Malta: organising retreats,

pilgrimages, and days of recollection being one of the one of the promotions of the CMS. Whilst on the island they also took the opportunity to share this year’s CMS Plan study document for branches and parishes entitled ‘Young People - The Synod’ with potential new members on the pilgrimage. Each year members of the CMS Planning

Bill Huebsch returns to the Archdiocese We are delighted that Bill Huebsch, author, theologian, former director of religious education, and farmer, is returning to our diocese in May writes Veronica Murphy. Bill has led a number of day and week-long courses for lay people and for clergy over the last few years. He writes and teaches extensively on the catechetical mission of the church and was an important guide for us as we developed our own policies on Family Catechesis. Inspired by ‘The Joy of the Gospel’ and later writings from Pope Francis he will lead ‘An Introduction to the New Pastoral Theology emerging in the era of Pope Francis.’ There will be two opportunities to attend this one-day workshop which is open to all: Friday 10 May at St. Joseph’s Wrightington or Saturday 11 May at LACE. Both days will begin at 10.00 am and finish at 4.00 pm. Tea/coffee and lunch will be provided. Suggested donation is £10 per person. Further details are available on 0151 522 1040 or by e-mailing: formation@rcaol.co.uk 6

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committee meet to consider feedback from men in the branches in Birmingham, Nottingham, Hallam, Lancaster, Motherwell Leith, Edinburgh and Liverpool along with suggestions of topics from members of the Bishops Conference. In the last few years suggestions from Cardinal Vincent Nichols, Archbishop Bernard Longley, Archbishop Peter Smith, and several bishops have contributed to the compiling of the next year’s Plan. As well as providing a forum for men to discuss their faith and its application to everyday life by way of planned discussions in the parish, the Society also organises opportunities for developing men’s spirituality, by way of its promotions of the Mass, liturgy, retreats, pilgrimages and social formation encouraging men to get involved in their parish life. Dean O’Brien from Limerick, started the first branch in England at St Vincent’s in Sheffield in May 1854, a branch that still exists today. Branches followed in Liverpool and other cities. The aim of the Society is the same today as it was at its foundation: Christian Adult Formation for men, enabling them to know, love and serve the Lord and to provide experiences for developing men’s spirituality in the parish setting. So contrary to the February article the CMS is still alive and active, maybe fewer in numbers, but there are still groups of men who wish to continue the ethos and aims of the CMS and are active in setting up new branches. For further information or if you are interested in forming or reforming a branch to assist in your parish please contact: john.smartt45@gmail.com


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FEAST OF DIVINE MERCY

PART-TIME PERMANENT POST APPEALS ADMINISTRATOR SURVIVE-MIVA (Missionary Vehicle Association) UK Registered Charity No. 268745

Sunday 28th April 2019 Our Lord asked Saint Faustina to promote the Devotion to His mercy- saying: "The soul that will go to Confession (within the octave of the feast) and receive Holy Communion on the Feast day, shall obtain complete forgiveness of sins and punishment" St Faustina confirms Our Lord’s command to her: “If I cannot show mercy, by deeds or words, I can always do so, by prayer. My prayer reaches out even there, where I cannot reach out physically.” Holy Cross and St Helen 1.30pm Exposition, Rosary, Confession, Devotions, Mass 4 pm Corporation Street – St Helen’s town centre - train No 10 bus from Liverpool (Peter - Divine Mercy shop) St Clares, Arundel Avenue, Liverpool 3.00pm Devotions, Exposition, Confessions Our Lady of the Annunciation Bishop Eaton Liverpool 4.30 pm Blessing of Image, Rosary, Devotions Mass 6.00 pm St Francis of Assisi, Garston, Liverpool 2.30pm Confession Devotions, St Aloysius, Huyton, Liverpool 2.00pm Devotions, Confession Mass 5.00pm Holy Spirit, Ford 3.00pm Devotions, Confessions, Exposition St Edmund of Canterbury, Waterloo 2.00pm Confessions, Veneration of Image, Devotions and Mass St Mary’s, Broadfield Drive, Leyland 3.30pm Devotions, Confessions, Healing Service Mass 5.30pm Sacred Heart, Brooke Street, Chorley 3.00pm Exposition, Confessions Devotions Mass 4.00pm St Mary’s, Standishgate, Wigan 3.00pm Devotions, Confessions Mass at St John’s Church 4.30pm Holy Family, New Springs, Wigan 3.00pm Devotions Our Lady Star of the Sea, Ramsey, Isle of Man 2.30pm Confessions, Devotions

DIVINE MERCY SHOP for leaflets, Divine Mercy pictures, cards, prayer books and St Faustina’s book ‘Diary’£9.99’ containing her thoughts and the words of Our Lord to her’

Unit 2, 37 London Road, Liverpool

A person with strong communication and IT skills, including experience of using database software, is required to manage SURVIVE-MIVA’s church appeals process. The role involves contacting Catholic parishes by phone / e-mail / letter to book appeal dates, updating a database and generating reports from it, as well as liaising with the charity’s remote volunteers who make the church appeals. Full training on using SURVIVE-MIVA’s bespoke database will be provided. Salary: £9.50 - £11.50 an hour (full-time equivalent of £17,290 - £20,930 p.a.) depending on experience. Hours of work: 10 hours per week, work pattern negotiable. Closing Date for Applications: Monday 29th April 2019. For a job description and details on how to apply, please contact:

SURVIVE-MIVA 5 Park Vale Road, Liverpool L9 2DG Tel: 0151 523 3878 E-mail: info@survive-miva.org www.survive-miva.org

Don’t miss our Friday night Healing Service with Cor et Lumen Christi Community

Accommodation on a full board basis in single en-suite rooms on campus. Day visitors welcome.

“Love One Another...” John 15:12

(Four cabins behind a bus shelter - near to Lime Street) Open: Mon–Tues - 11.00 - 4.45 Wed - Closed Thurs–Fri - 11.00 - 4.45 Sat -Sun - closed

All welcome… Catholic Pictorial

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news diary

RCIA Celebration by Veronica Murphy A joyful celebration of The Rite of Election and Call to Continuing Conversion took place in the Cathedral on the First Sunday in Lent. This annual celebration marks an important step on the journey to full membership of the Roman Catholic Church for those, from across the Archdiocese, who have been learning about what it means to be a Catholic and feel ready to receive the Sacraments of Initiation during Eastertide. For those who have not been baptised, there is the declaration, by the Archbishop, of their election: recognition that they have indeed been chosen and called by God to be baptised, confirmed and share fully in the Eucharist as members of the Body of Christ, the Church. Those who are already baptised are called by the Archbishop to continuing conversion during the Lenten season in preparation for their full sharing in the Easter Mysteries. During the service Godparents and Sponsors testify to the readiness of those they are accompanying and all who are present promise to support them in prayer. The service was facilitated by members of the RCIA Diocesan Core Team who

generously give their time throughout the year to support the work of RCIA. The five new Pastoral Associates also supported this important diocesan event. This year 40 people seeking all three sacraments attended and signed their names in The Book of the Elect whilst a further 59

attended in response to the call to continuing conversion. For further information regarding training or resources for RCIA please call the Pastoral Formation Department on 0151 522 1040 or email: V.Murphy@rcaol.co.uk

Ash Wednesday at Liverpool’s Parish Church On Ash Wednesday the Archbishop of York, the Most Reverend John Sentamu, presided at a Eucharist at Liverpool Parish Church and an ecumenical distribution of ashes. Archbishop Sentamu was joined by Archbishop Malcolm McMahon and Bishop Tom Williams together with the Bishop of Liverpool, Right Reverend Paul Bayes, the Bishop of Warrington, Right Reverend Beverley Mason and the Chair of Liverpool’s Methodist district, Rev Dr Sheryl Anderson. The service marked the start of the Archbishop of York’s mission to the Anglican Diocese of Liverpool. A large congregation from across the City attended, before some of the clergy went on to the main streets of Liverpool to do ‘Ashes to Go’. Picture: Roy Bevan

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news diary

Faith in Action needs you! Two years ago the Archdiocese of Liverpool was one of the first in the country to launch a Faith in Action scheme. It is an initiative that could be called a ‘Catholic Duke of Edinburgh’ scheme in that young people are asked to put their faith into action and reflect on the work they have completed in the light of Church teaching and tradition. For that, they are awarded either a bronze, silver or gold award. Since the launch, the numbers taking part have grown tremendously. This year we have over 1,100 participants and it is fantastic that such large numbers are putting their faith into action across the diocese. However, this also presents a small logistical problem. At the end of the academic year, each young person must submit a final ‘piece’ bringing together all they have done through the year and demonstrating their growth in faith through their work and reflections. This is not an exam and nor is it an essay: it can be a poster or a video of themselves. Yet however the piece is presented, it must be moderated. Moderation is really affirming the young person in the work they have done and encouraging them to move on to the next stage of the scheme. To be an FIA moderator does not require any background in teaching or in studying theology. What is required are people willing to read through some final

Archbishop Malcolm with Michael and his wife Helen

pieces from young people in different schools and parishes and offer a few words on a feedback sheet. In a world where we are all so busy, I am aware that asking for more might be difficult but the commitment is only a few hours during the summer term and the moderation can be done at your home and in your own time. The role of the moderator is vital to the continuing success of the award and I hope some readers might be interested in helping out. If you would like more information, please call Father Simon Gore on 01744 740467/740460 or email s.gore@animateyouth.co.uk

Education Service Secretary The Education Service at the Metropolitan Cathedral welcomes over 4,500 children from all parts of the country each year. This is an important aspect of the cathedral combining education and evangelisation. We are looking for a secretary to coordinate the work of the cathedral education service. This involves taking bookings, checking the cathedral diary and liaising with our team of 12 teachers. This is a voluntary post and requires some moderate IT skills. If you or a friend is interested, please contact Sean Murphy email s.murphy@metcathedral.org.uk for further information.

Bene Merenti for Michael Langan During his visitation to St Francis de Sales, Walton, Archbishop Malcolm McMahon celebrated Mass with Parish Priest, Father Ged Callacher and Father Pat Sexton. At the end of Mass, he presented Michael Langan, owner of Pilgrimage Company Leisure Time Travel, with the Papal Award, Bene Merenti. Michael had absolutely no idea that he was about to receive the award and Father Pat commented. ‘It was the first time Michael has ever been lost for words’. Leisure Time Travel encourage as many people as possible, irrespective of their financial status, to visit Lourdes and other shrines including Fatima and the Holy Land. ‘Lourdes’ said Michael, ‘is very special to me and my first visit was with my Aunt Mary when I was only seven years old. Little did I know then that I would start taking pilgrims to Lourdes thirtytwo years later. It is summed up by the mural in the Rosary Basilica ‘par Marie et Jesu’. (‘Through Mary to Jesus.’)

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news diary A celebration of Marriage and Family Life Justin, Sherly, Lesley and Joshua received a Family bible from Archbishop Malcolm at the Annual Mass in celebration of Marriage and Family life which the Archbishop celebrated in the Metropolitan Cathedral in February. Here, they reflect on the Mass: ‘It was a liturgical and social celebration of family life, ensuring that the graces and blessings of family are formally celebrated. The Mass brought us together, spiritually strengthening us to share God’s healing and salvation to the world. The Cathedral Choir sang beautifully, raising the serenity of the occasion. ‘There was exchange of Family Bibles. The Bibles were entrusted to three families last year and was passed on to three new families this year. We were fortunate to receive a Bible as we are celebrating our 25th wedding anniversary this year. The Archbishop invited married couples to renew their marriage vows which they made to each other on their wedding day. He continued by thanking God for long and happy marriages and asking God’s continued blessings on their marriages with gifts of joy and peace. All families present were blessed with the abundance of God’s love to grow in compassion, love

Justin and Sherly with Lesley and Joshua

and forgiveness; thereby to become a sign of God’s presence in the world. Family is a holy place, it raises awareness of God’s presence in ordinary events of daily lives, whether we are children, siblings, parents, spouses, relatives, friends or neighbours. As Pope Francis says, “there is no perfect marriage or ideal

Annual Civic Mass Archbishop Malcolm welcomed civic leaders from across the region to the Metropolitan Cathedral for the Annual Civic Mass at the beginning of March. Among the dignitaries attending were Lord Mayor of Liverpool Councillor Christine Banks, and Cathedral parishioner, High Sheriff of Merseyside, Peter Woods. In addition to the civic guests there were representatives from public and voluntary organisations and from Catholic societies and organisations in the archdiocese, together with ecumenical guests from the Churches on Merseyside. Each year the Mass offers an opportunity to ask God’s blessing and to pray for local communities and for all who hold important office in the region. 10

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family; but a challenging mosaic made up of many different realities with all their joys, hopes and problems”. Consequently, it is the responsibility of the domestic Church to pass on their faith in families. “As the family goes, so goes the nation and so goes the whole world in which we live”’ (Pope St John Paul II).


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news diary

Family following by Neil Sayer, Archdiocesan Archivist Canon Tony O’Brien was pleased to welcome Sophie Gibberd during her recent visit to the Cathedral designed by her father, Sir Frederick Gibberd. The Dean showed her some of the

archives relating to Sir Frederick, including his winning entry for the Cathedral design competition in 1960. Sophie also looked at the original invitation to Sir Frederick and his family to the Cathedral’s opening and consecration on 14 May 1967, and was delighted to see a photograph of herself as a young girl holding her

parents’ hands on leaving the ceremony. She vividly recalled the colour of the day’s pageantry, though that isn’t shown in our black and white photos of the event, and she also shared her memories of visiting her father’s architectural modelling shop and offices, where the competition entry was actually typed up.

Above: Canon O’Brien with Sophie Gibberd in the Archdiocesan Archives at the Cathedral Left: The Gibberd family at the opening in 1967

Our Dominican Visitors The annual student retreat weekend organised by the Chaplaincy to the University of Liverpool and John Moores University took place in February at Sandymount House of Prayer, Blundellsands. This year the chaplaincy invited two members of the Dominican Sisters of Saint Cecilia, from Nashville, Tennessee, to lead the retreat. Sister Mary Gianna Klein

OP and Sister Angela Marie Russell OP are currently based at the congregation’s house in Elgin, in the Diocese of Aberdeen. University chaplain Father Neil Ritchie said, ‘I visited the sisters at their house in Elgin last year, and thought that it would be wonderful to invite them to visit our Archdiocese and get them to work with our young people’. The Sisters combine a

Sister Mary Gianna OP, Sister Juanita Cruz MC, Father Neil Ritchie, Sister Angela Marie OP, Archbishop McMahon OP

monastic communal lifestyle of contemplation in the Dominican tradition with an active apostolate in Catholic education and work among young people. ‘They immediately engaged with the young people and were a huge hit with them’ Father Neil said. ‘They based their retreat input on Pope Francis’ letter on the call to holiness: ‘Gaudete et Exsultate’ (‘Rejoice and be glad’), and the students enjoyed it immensely. The Sisters also joined us for walks on the beach, board games after Holy Hour, and an impromptu ‘ceilidh’ when one of the students got his violin out.’ Archbishop Malcolm celebrated Mass at St Philip Neri church on the Sunday evening which was attended by Sister Juanita Cruz of the Missionaries of Charity who had a special reason for being there: her own sister is a member of the Nashville Dominican Sisters. The following day, the sisters joined the Missionaries of Charity community at Seel Street for Mass and breakfast. Before returning to Elgin, the sisters were able to see something of Liverpool: ‘their visit to Liverpool really wouldn’t have been complete without a trip on the Mersey Ferry’ said Father Neil.

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school news

Our Synod and Schools by Father Philip Inch and Father Matthew Nunes Synod Moderators At three gatherings that took place in March for secondary heads, primary heads and faith leaders, and secondary school chaplains, a phrase was continually brought to the fore: the Catholic School is, for many children and families, their main experience of what it means to be Church. If this is true, and it would be hard to argue that it is not the case, then what we do in school to be the Church that God is calling us to be has a central place to play in our Synod deliberations. A group has been meeting since the Autumn to look at ways in which we can hear the voices of all the people in our school communities. They prepared the Synod Day for Primary Heads and Faith Leaders (to be repeated on Friday 10 May at St Joseph’s in Chorley) and have got together a resource for schools to use with both pupils and with families. This resource can be found on the Synod Web site, under ‘resources’. All the gatherings have been reminded of Pope Francis’ vision of a Synodal Church and using some of his inspirational writing in ‘Evangelii Gaudium’ have been invited to catch something of his vision for a Church, on fire with the call to be missionary disciples. And this is lived out in the context of our parishes and schools. At all three events there has been a real enthusiasm for taking hold of this God given moment in the story of our Archdiocese to be, in the words of Pope Francis, bold and creative in our search for the new tools for evangelisation that our times and situations demand. There was a passion shown for sharing the faith, for encouraging children and families to take an active part in the life, mission and worship of the Catholic Church and a realisation of the demands that that will make. People acknowledged the time pressures (and economic pressures) in family life and the difficult decisions that have to be made because of that. There was a hope that the Synod will not just be a talking-shop but be a real ‘kairos moment’ when new action will be set in place. It was felt that Synod cannot be passive but must be active in its deliberations and in its outcomes. 12

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It is true to say that those who came went away knowing more about the Synod and fired up to make sure that the voices of all in our school communities are heard.

Please go to a listening event in your parish or school and/or complete the on-line Synod Survey at www.Synod2020.co.uk

SFX helps to provide clean water in Africa St Francis Xavier’s College (SFX) in Woolton has been able to provide an African village with clean water after donating money towards the construction of a much needed well. By installing AquAid water coolers within the school, a proportion of the annual hire fee has gone towards supplying fresh water to a community in Africa. This water well, known as an Elephant Pump, it is a modified version of a water pump based on an age-old Chinese rope pulley system. The pump is built by an experienced member of the Africa Trust in collaboration with local people from the community who are then taught how it works and how to repair it using local materials and parts. One pump supplies potable water for upwards of 300 people and due to the pumps design and construction will continue to supply the community it serves for decades. Patrick Ferguson, executive head at SFX, said: “We’re thrilled to be able to contribute towards the supply of clean, fresh water for communities that don’t have access to this essential resource. “Many of us take for granted the running water that comes from our taps and so this is a great initiative for the school to be part of as it gets people thinking about others who are less fortunate.


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school news Henry crowned English athletics champion A Liverpool student has won two under 17 titles at the 2019 England Athletics Championships. Henry Nwoke, a Year 11 student at The Academy of St Nicholas won the 200m title emphatically in a truly special time of 21.85 seconds. This gives Henry the 12th fastest ever time for the under 17 UK age group and 8th in the world. His 60m title win, in a new personal best (PB) of 6.91s, was the 15th fastest ever time in the UK for his age group. Held at the Sheffield English Institute of Sport and organised by England Athletics, the event brought together some of the country’s top track and field talent across a range of age groups. In the 60m final, Henry’s start wasn’t the best. Halfway down the 60m straight he had a narrow lead which he fought with every meter to keep as he crossed the finish line in first place. On the second day of the Championships, the 200m heats and semi-finals took place with Henry running 22.74s and 22.32s. He drew lane 5 in the final with the second fastest runner in the country on the outside of him in lane 6. Down the back straight it was neck and neck between the two runners, but

coming up and around the top bend Henry started to show his class, keeping his form and taking a lead which he wouldn’t let up. Liverpool student Henry Nwoke crowned English athletics champion Reflecting on his wins, Henry Nwoke said: “I was really nervous going into the championships, as it was my first ever indoor nationals, but I knew I had trained really well and the times I had ran in previous races gave me confidence. “The weekend itself was a challenge

mentally and physically, but one I really enjoyed. Winning these national championships has shown me that hard work really does pay off. I can’t thank Mr Sweeney enough, I have learned so much in the 9 months I have been training, we make a great team.” Having only started training for athletics in June 2018, 16 year old Henry has made rapid progress in every sense of the word. His maths teacher at The Academy of St Nicholas, Michael Sweeney, who is also a coach at Liverpool Harriers, saw his potential and started to train him. Coach Michael Sweeney said: “In such a short time Henry has improved so much. In training we have changed his running style completely, mastered the art of block starts and he’s put in the hard yards of winter training, always with a smile on his face. “He asks me every session about his running style, ever the perfectionist. He goes home and puts in the research in to top level sprinting and brings me videos and questions regularly, he is a coach’s dream! “Having competed at an international level myself, and coached athletes to this standard previously, he makes the role so much easier. Henry’s future is very bright.”

Liverpool students shine at the Cavern! Talented students from the Academy of St Francis of Assisi (ASFA) recently performed at Liverpool’s most iconic music venue, The Cavern Club. The students followed in the famous footsteps of The Beatles, Oasis, Arctic Monkeys, The Who, Adele and The Rolling Stones, who have all performed on the iconic stage. Organised by head of music Mr Jay Bradley, ‘Live at the Cavern’ was an evening of great music featuring bands and acts from the academy. Over 75 students took part in the show across all year groups from Years 7 to 11, showcasing the academy’s diverse, vibrant community. The set list included a show-stopping opener by 20-piece drumming group Orquestra De Ritmo, a stunning piano interlude by Ryan Morris, a pop medley of hits (Price Tag and Flashlight) by Year 8 students and a dynamic drum solo by Charlie Hornby. Student Olivia Williams brought the crowd to their feet with her stunning rendition of Labrinth’s Jealous. While a Year 10 GCSE

group got the crowd in the party mood with a set list of Boogie Shoes, Know No Better and an original song called Better Days. A group of Year 7 students, accompanied by Mr Bradley put on a brilliant performance playing the African djembe drums. The night ended on a high when Year 11 band MODE played their last ever gig, with songs including No Diggity, Want You Back, Crazy in Love, Changes and Mo Money Mo Problems. Headteacher Tracey Greenough, said: “Live at the Cavern was a truly unique opportunity to bring our community together and grow and develop talent at every level. We have received such positive feedback from students who took part and staff and families who attended. “Watching students perform on the stage and grow in

confidence every year is amazing to see. The night was a real celebration of the academy’s special togetherness and remarkable talent.” The academy has a varied music curriculum with creativity and performances as a key focus. Students have the opportunity to try projects such as body percussion, beat boxing, film music, samba band and a range of school choirs.

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sunday reflections On a liturgical note Are we nearly there yet? It is a familiar cry, heard on family outings the world over, but as we pass from March to April we might be feeling the same about our Easter celebrations. It does seem to have been a particularly long Lent but, of course, it hasn’t been – it’s just that it is such a late Easter Day this year. It begs another question too: namely, where is ‘there’? When asked from the back seat of the car, this can be a question about the arrival at a physical place, the end of this particular stage of the journey. Understood in this sense, the place of arrival could be the end of our Lenten privations and a return to the things we have ‘given up’ for Lent; the Easter Day and Eastertide celebrations themselves; or the beginning of an Easter break from school or work. And yet there must be something greater than this, or else it can just be seen as doing the same things year in, year out; just a cycle, albeit a virtuous one. I expect the bigger and most fundamental question is not ‘Are we there yet?’ but ‘Why do we do all of this?’ – which is basically the same question the youngest member of a

Sunday thoughts John Humphreys is to retire from Radio Four’s Today programme. Let off the lead by spin doctors, politicians are fair game. Innocentsounding questions are used to flush out privately held and welldisguised opinions. Are they racist or sexist? Do they want to abolish the NHS or the nuclear deterrent? One slip of the tongue or hesitation by a politician on Today provides headlines for the rest of the day. To go on record with inappropriate views is the death knell for anyone with aspirations to high office. A politician with a ‘safe pair of hands’ is one who is sure-footed under pressure. Having earned their stripes, they are wheeled out in times of crisis to clean up the mess left by hapless colleagues who have let their guard down: ‘What the Northern Ireland Secretary really meant to say was…..’

Canon Philip Gillespie

Jewish family asks at the beginning of the Seder, or Passover meal: ‘What is different? Why do we do all of this?’ The liturgy of the Easter Vigil – which I hope many of you will make the effort to celebrate, be it in your parishes or at the Cathedral itself – answers this question for us most poetically in the great Exultet: ‘This is the night that even now, throughout the world, sets Christian believers apart from worldly vices and from the gloom of sin, leading them to grace and joining them to his holy ones.’ All the preparations of the Lenten season, the careful attention to prayer, fasting and almsgiving, the spring cleaning not only of our houses but, more importantly, of our inner selves to get rid of the clutter and the noise which stops us hearing and responding to the voice of the Lord … all of us this done for a good purpose, to lead us to grace and join us with the Holy Ones, the Saints, who experience fully and perfectly the love of the Blessed Trinity. E Così sia! May it be so …

Mgr John Devine OBE

Jesus would have been a natural on the Today programme. ‘Is it lawful for a man to divorce his wife?’ ‘Why do your disciples pick corn on the Sabbath?’ ‘Is it right to pay taxes to Caesar?’ ‘Moses has ordered us to condemn women like this to stoning. What have you to say?’ These are questions asked by Pharisees. None of them are inspired by concern for the hungry or by compassion for those betrayed by the infidelity of their partner. Jesus adroitly deflects them all. Nor are such questions intended to provide definitive guidance to those of us hearing them 2,000 years later. Yet these very same questions appeal to modern-day Pharisees equally motivated by the desire to score points. Their purpose is to discredit and to incriminate.

Weekly Reflections are on the Archdiocesan website at www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk/reflection 14

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The quality of mercy A few weeks ago I was invited to go and speak in a Category A prison near York and I was asked to talk about God’s mercy. I have been invited into several prisons but this was the first time I had been asked into such a tough place. I knew I would be facing men who had committed the most heinous of crimes and I was going to have the temerity to speak of mercy. My fears eventually dissolved and I had a great time with the men there but one of them said to me: ‘Have you any idea how hard it is to listen to you speak of God’s mercy when I know what I’ve done?’ I have reflected on that over the last weeks and have realised that mercy is probably the hardest of God’s attributes for any of us to accept. For some reason we would rather deal in terms of retribution than mercy. We would rather God paid us back for our sinfulness. Yet without mercy we have no Gospel. Without the truth of unconditional love that does not depend on any meritocracy, we have nothing to share with the world. If there is no forgiveness, there is no need for Christ. Mercy, as Pope Francis is always telling us, is central to the Gospel. Lent is a great time for thinking about the mercy of God. The truth is that we all need mercy; yet probably the hardest truth of all is that it is there for the taking. I think we need a theology which teaches us that when we do make mistakes, we can trust mercy and, as Ronald Rolheiser says, ‘take our place among the broken, among those whose lives are not perfect, the loved sinners, those for whom Christ came.’ We need to know that God loves us with all our faults and failings and to know that that the task of Christianity is to enable us to get up each morning and to live again because of the truth of God’s wonderful and unconditional mercy. Father Chris Thomas


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The Good Shepherd and the Good Samaritan Our founder, Father James Nugent initiated The Good Shepherd appeal in 1902 to help the most vulnerable children and adults in the North West, and it continues to do so every year with schools across the Archdiocese taking part in fundraising activities to support the work we do. The theme for this year’s Good Shepherd Appeal is ‘The Good Samaritan: Join the journey-walk in faith’, linking in with Synod 2020 and regarding everyone as your neighbour and therefore your neighbour being anyone who is in need of our help. The Good Samaritan gave the gift of himself, his time, his money, his care and love for the poor man in need of his help and Jesus challenges us to ‘go and do

the same’. Schools across the archdiocese have been applying the theme to their fundraising activities, with some fun and creative activities taking place, including: a Bunny Hop, Good Shepherd Market and a Pyjama and Teddy Party, discos and bingo, sponsored walks and a Spring fair, a black and white themed non-uniform day and Easter raffles, to name a few. Our team have also been out visiting schools and finding out what they are doing and supporting them with information and fundraising packs. There are a lot of Schools who have been supporting our Good Shepherd appeal for many years, and in the last 5 years alone have helped raise over £272,000.

It is humbling to see the number of children, young people and their families giving their time to help the people we support across the archdiocese and we are very grateful for their continued commitment to helping those less fortunate. Join the journey-walk in faith Come and join in the celebration of the Good Shepherd Masses. Wednesday 12 June 1:00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King, Liverpool Tuesday 18 June 10:45am at Leyland St Mary’s church.

Pupils from St Peter and St Paul, Halton enjoy a day at Nugent finding out about the Good Shepherd Appeal

Normandie Wragg Chief Executive Nugent

New Year’s Honours List 2019: Ann Connor OBE According to Gov.co.uk, a ‘total of 86 people have been recognised for their outstanding contributions to education, children’s services, and improving social mobility in the New Year’s Honours List 2019.’ Ann Connor, retired Education Advisor at the Department for Education, was one of the 86 individuals that received this prestigious award for services to education.

Ann has clearly made an impact in her career and as a result, Education Secretary, Damian Hinds congratulated all who were recognised and thanked each for ‘…helping young people reach their potential. Your incredible work has enhanced countless lives across the country’. Bishop Eton parish, also recognised Ann’s great work, sharing, ‘Ann has led our Core Team for the past few years and was the inspiration for and has overseen the Resettlement Programme. We are blessed that she and so many others use their gifts in building up this community of faith’. This award is the cumulative recognition of a career’s worth of dedication and achievement that has benefited the young people of our communities.

It is through the work of the Resettlement Programme that I was first inspired by Ann. Ann is a dedicated individual with keen intellect, emotional intelligence, and compassion for those she works with. Ann is also keenly passionate for the work she does with the Resettlement Programme. I have had the fortunate opportunity to get to know Ann a little bit, and each time I spend time with her, I walk away having learned something different. Ann may have passed the baton in her career with the DfE, but here in the Archdiocese of Liverpool, we continue to benefit from her wisdom and leadership. We are very fortunate to have her guidance. Congratulations, Ann.

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what’s on Monday 1 April Lenten Holy Hour 12.00 noon at St Bartholomew’s, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NY. Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament 2.00 pm at St Marie’s, Almond Brook Road, Standish, WN6 0TB. ‘The Mystery of Everything.’ A lent course based on the film ‘The Theory of Everything’. 4.30 pm – 5.30 pm at the FCJ House, 53a Cranbourne Road, Wavertree, L15 2HY. Details: Email: lynnefcj@hotmail.com or Tel: 0151 733 5475. Lenten Reflection and Discussion 7.30 pm at St Marie’s Hall, Almond Brook Road, Standish, WN6 0TB. Tuesday 2 April Morning Prayer followed by Adoration, concluding with Mass At 12.00 noon. 9.30 am at St Mary’s, Mount Pleasant, Chorley, PR7 2SR. Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament 10.00 am to 10.00 pm at Holy Family, Hall Lane, Cronton, Widnes, WA8 5DP. ‘Walking in the footsteps of the Saints.’ Reflections on practical ways to deepen our spiritual life. ‘St Ignatius of Loyola.’ Speaker: Father Denis Blackledge SJ. 6.00 pm Exposition in the Blessed Sacrament Chapel of the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Talk begins at 7.00 pm in the Gibberd Room. Lenten Holy Hour 7.00 pm at St Mary, Queen of Apostles, Maryvale, Skelmersdale, WN8 6DY. ‘Broken’ Reflection on our community in light of the television drama 7.00 pm at Our Lady’s, Portico Lane, Portico, Prescot, L34 2 QT. Stations of the Cross 7.30 pm in St Alban’s, Bewsey Street, Warrington, WA2 7JQ. Lenten Book Club Discussion and reflection on ‘Reconciliation’ by Muthuraj Swamy. 7:30 pm at St Margaret Mary, Pilch Lane, Liverpool, L14 0JG. Wednesday 3 April Lenten Early Morning Mass 7.00 am at St Bartholomew’s, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NY. ‘Songs we Remember.’ Singing and enjoyment for anyone who likes to sing but particularly geared towards those living with dementia and their carers. 2.00 pm to 3.30 pm at St Thomas of Canterbury Parish Hall, Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details: Irenaeus Tel: 0151 949 1199. Email: m.knight@rcaol.co.uk From now on: a Lent course on Hope and Redemption in the film ‘The Greatest Showman’ 6.30 pm at the FCJ House, 53a Cranbourne Road, Wavertree, L15 2HY. Details: Email: lynnefcj@hotmail.com or Tel: 0151 733 5475. Churches Together in Crosby Lenten Reflection 7.00 pm at St Helen's church, Alexandra Road, Crosby, L23 7TQ.

Stations of the Cross 7.30 pm at St Bartholomew’s, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NY. ‘Caring for our Common Home.’ Lenten discussion. 7.30 pm at St Joseph’s, Meeting Lane, Penketh, WA5 2BB. Thursday 4 April Early Morning Lenten Mass 6.30 am in St Alban’s, Bewsey Street, Warrington, WA2 7JQ. Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament 7.00 am to 10.00 pm at St Leo, Lickers Lane, Whiston, L35 3PN. Mass followed by Stations of the Cross 9.15 am at St Bernadette’s, Wigan Road, Shevington, WN6 8AP. Stations of the Cross 9.50 am at St Patrick’s, Marshside Road, Southport, PR9 9TJ. Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament. 2.00 pm at St Bernadette’s, Wigan Road, Shevington, WN6 8AP. Stations of the Cross 6.30 pm at St Marie’s, Almond Brook Road, Standish, WN6 0TB. Stations of the Cross led by parish groups 7:00 pm at St Margaret Mary, Pilch Lane, Liverpool, L14 0JG. Stations of the Cross 7.00 pm at St Catherine Laboure, Stanifield Lane, Farington, Leyland, PR25 4QG. Scripture Study Group ‘The Great Adventure’ by Jeff Cavins. 7.30 pm at St Leo, Lickers Lane, Whiston, L35 3PN. Stations of the Cross 7.30 pm at St Oswald’s, Padgate Lane, Warrington, WA1 3LB. Friday 5 April to Sunday 7 April ‘Bread Blessed and Broken.’ Silent Lenten Retreat led by Sister Moira Meeghan at lrenaeus, 32 Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details Tel: 0151 949 1199. Email: jenny@irenaeus.co.uk Website: www.irenaeus.co.uk Friday 5 April Early Morning Lenten Mass 7.00 am at St Mary’s, Church Road, Woolton, Liverpool, L25 5JF. Stations of the Cross 9.30 am at St Joseph’s, Saxon Road, Birkdale, PR8 2AY. Morning Prayer followed by Adoration, concluding with Mass 12.00 noon. 9.30 am at St Mary’s, Mount Pleasant, Chorley, PR7 2SR. Stations of the Cross 11.45 am at St Benedict’s, Rhodes Street, Warrington, WA2 7QE. ‘Caring for our Common Home.’ Lenten discussion following the 12.15 pm Mass at St Benedict’s, Rhodes Street, Warrington, WA2 7QE. Ecumenical Lenten Poverty Lunch 12.30 pm at St Bartholomew’s, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NY.

Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament and Benediction 6.00 pm at St Mary’s, Church Road, Woolton, Liverpool, L25 5JF, concluding with Night Prayer at 8.30 pm. Stations of the Cross 7.00 pm at Holy Family, Hall Lane, Cronton, Widnes, WA8 5DP. Stations of the Cross 7.00 pm before Evening Mass at Sacred Heart, Brooke Street, Chorley, PR6 0NG. Stations of the Cross 7.00 pm at St Anthony of Padua, Queens Drive, Mossley Hill, L18 8AY. Family Stations of the Cross 7.00 pm at St Bede, Preston Road, Claytonle-Woods, Chorley, PR6 0NG. Stations of the Cross 7.00 pm at St Leo, Lickers Lane, Whiston, L35 3PN. Stations of the Cross 7.00 pm at St Mary, Queen of Apostles, Maryvale, Skelmersdale, WN8 6DY. Mass with Stations of the Cross 7.00 pm at St Luke the Evangelist, Shaw Lane, Whiston, L35 5AT. Evening Prayer followed by Stations of the Cross 7.00 pm at St Mary’s, Mount Pleasant, Chorley, PR7 2SR. Stations of the Cross 7.00 pm at St Oswald and St Edmund Arrowsmith, Liverpool Road, Ashton-inMakerfield, WN4 9NP. Saturday 6 April Journey to Holy Week and Easter, organised by Pax Christi 10.00-4.00 pm at the Cenacle Retreat House, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool, L15 6TW. Discussion and reflection following a showing of the awardwinning film: ‘Of Gods and Men.’ Suggested Offering £10 (subsidies available). Please bring food for a shared lunch. Bookings: Jan Harper Tel: 0774 6919915 Email: janharper1@yahoo.co.uk Stations of the Cross 12.35 pm at St Marie on the Sands, Seabank Road, Southport, PR9 0EJ. Sunday 7 April Fifth Sunday of Lent Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King Masses 8.30 am (Blessed Sacrament Chapel), 10.00 am (Family Mass – Crypt), 11.00 am (Solemn Mass – Cathedral), 7.00 pm (Crypt). 3.00 pm Choral Evening Prayer Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament 2.00 pm – 4.00 pm at St Joseph’s, Bury Lane, Withnell, Chorley, PR6 8SD. Evening Prayer and Benediction 3.30 pm at St Joseph’s, Saxon Road, Birkdale, PR8 2AY. Holy Hour and Stations of the Cross 4.00 pm at Holy Family, Lily Lane, Platt Bridge, Wigan, WN2 5LL.

Details of Holy Week and Easter Services can be found at www.liverpo 16

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april Stations of the Cross 4.00 pm at St Mary’s, Church Road, Woolton, L25 5JF. Evening Prayer followed by Benediction 4.30 pm at St Mary’s, Mount Pleasant, Chorley, PR7 2SR. Holy Hour 7.00 pm to 8.00 pm at Holy Family, Hall Lane, Cronton, Widnes, WA8 5DP. Monday 8 April Lenten Holy Hour 12.00 noon at St Bartholomew’s, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NY. Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament 2.00 pm at St Marie’s, Almond Brook Road, Standish, WN6 0TB. ‘The Mystery of Everything.’ A lent course based on the film ‘The Theory of Everything’. 4.30 pm – 5.30 pm at the FCJ House, 53a Cranbourne Road, Wavertree, L15 2HY. Details: Email: lynnefcj@hotmail.com or Tel: 0151 733 5475. Lenten Reflection and Discussion 7.30 pm at St Marie’s Hall, Almond Brook Road, Standish, WN6 0TB. Tuesday 9 April Morning Prayer followed by Adoration, concluding with Mass 12.00 noon. 9.30 am at St Mary’s, Mount Pleasant, Chorley, PR7 2SR. Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament 10.00 am to 10.00 pm at Holy Family, Hall Lane, Cronton, Widnes, WA8 5DP. Raising Awareness of Human Trafficking and Combating Modern Slavery in the UK today Come and learn more and ask what we can do together in practical ways to help strengthen the fight against human trafficking and slavery. 10.30 am to 3.30 pm at St Joseph’s Prayer Centre, Blundell Avenue, Freshfield, Formby, L37 1PH. Speakers : Brother Francis, Chair of the Medaille Trust; Sister Isabel Kelly FMSJ and Anthony Brown. Bookings: Tel: 01704 875850 or 07712 178670. Email: theprayercentre.stj@psmgs.org.uk Website: www.stjosephsprayercentre.com ‘Walking in the footsteps of the Saints.’ Reflections on practical ways to deepen our spiritual life. ‘St Augustine. The Confessions.’ Speaker: Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP. 6.00 pm Exposition in the Blessed Sacrament Chapel of the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Talk begins at 7.00 pm in the Gibberd Room. Lenten Retreat in Daily Life 6.30 pm at the FCJ House, 53a Cranbourne Road, Wavertree, L15 2HY. Details: Email: lynnefcj@hotmail.com or Tel: 0151 733 5475. Lenten Holy Hour 7.00 pm at St Mary, Queen of Apostles, Maryvale, Skelmersdale, WN8 6DY. Stations of the Cross 7.30 pm in St Alban’s, Bewsey Street, Warrington, WA2 7JQ. ‘Broken’ Reflection on our community in light of the television drama 7.00 pm at Our Lady’s, Portico Lane, Portico, Prescot, L34 2 QT.

Lenten Book Club Discussion and reflection on ‘Reconciliation’ by Muthuraj Swamy. 7:30 pm at St Margaret Mary, Pilch Lane, Liverpool, L14 0JG. Wednesday 10 April Lenten Early Morning Mass 7.00 am at St Bartholomew’s, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NY. From now on: a Lent course on Hope and Redemption in the film ‘The Greatest Showman’ 6.30 pm at the FCJ House, 53a Cranbourne Road, Wavertree, L15 2HY. Details: Email: lynnefcj@hotmail.com or Tel: 0151 733 5475. Churches Together in Crosby Lenten Reflection 7.00 pm at St Helen's church, Alexandra Road, Crosby, L23 7TQ. Stations of the Cross 7.30 pm at St Bartholomew’s, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NY. ‘Caring for our Common Home.’ Lenten discussion 7.30 pm at St Joseph’s, Meeting Lane, Penketh, WA5 2BB. Thursday 11 April Early Morning Lenten Mass 6.30 am in St Alban’s, Bewsey Street, Warrington, WA2 7JQ. Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament 7.00 am to 10.00 pm at St Leo, Lickers Lane, Whiston, L35 3PN. Mass followed by Stations of the Cross 9.15 am at St Bernadette’s, Wigan Road, Shevington, WN6 8AP. Stations of the Cross 9.50 am at St Patrick’s, Marshside Road, Southport, PR9 9TJ. Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament 2.00 pm at St Bernadette’s, Wigan Road, Shevington, WN6 8AP. Stations of the Cross 6.30 pm at St Marie’s, Almond Brook Road, Standish, WN6 0TB. Stations of the Cross led by parish groups 7:00 pm at St Margaret Mary, Pilch Lane, Liverpool, L14 0JG. Stations of the Cross 7.00 pm at St Catherine Laboure, Stanifield Lane, Farington, Leyland, PR25 4QG. Scripture Study Group ‘The Great Adventure’ by Jeff Cavins. 7.30 pm at St Leo, Lickers Lane, Whiston, L35 3PN. Stations of the Cross 7.30 pm at St Oswald’s, Padgate Lane, Warrington, WA1 3LB. Friday 12 April Early Morning Lenten Mass 7.00 am at St Mary’s, Church Road, Woolton, Liverpool, L25 5JF. Stations of the Cross 9.30 am at St Joseph’s, Saxon Road, Birkdale, PR8 2AY.

Morning Prayer followed by Adoration, concluding with Mass 12.00 noon. 9.30 am at St Mary’s, Mount Pleasant, Chorley, PR7 2SR. Stations of the Cross 11.45 am at St Benedict’s, Rhodes Street, Warrington, WA2 7QE. ‘Caring for our Common Home.’ Lenten discussion following the 12.15 pm Mass at St Benedict’s, Rhodes Street, Warrington, WA2 7QE. Ecumenical Lenten Poverty Lunch 12.30 pm at St Bartholomew’s, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NY. Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament and Benediction 6.00 pm at St Mary’s, Church Road, Woolton, Liverpool, L25 5JF, concluding with Night Prayer at 8.30 pm. Stations of the Cross 7.00 pm at St Anthony of Padua, Queens Drive, Mossley Hill, L18 8AY. Family Stations of the Cross 7.00 pm at St Bede, Preston Road, Claytonle-Woods, Chorley, PR6 0NG. Stations of the Cross 7.00 pm at St Leo, Lickers Lane, Whiston, L35 3PN. Stations of the Cross 7.00 pm at St Mary, Queen of Apostles, Maryvale, Skelmersdale, WN8 6DY. Mass with Stations of the Cross 7.00 pm at St Luke the Evangelist, Shaw Lane, Whiston, L35 5AT. Stations of the Cross 7.00 pm at St Oswald and St Edmund Arrowsmith, Liverpool Road, Ashton-inMakerfield, WN4 9NP. Saturday 13 April Stations of the Cross 12.35 pm at St Marie on the Sands, Seabank Road, Southport, PR9 0EJ. Carrying of the Cross with the Missionaries of Charity Carrying the Cross through Church Street, Lord Street and Bold Street concluding with a Service at St Luke’s (bombed out church. Meet at 1.45 pm on Church Street. If you would like to marshall the procession contact Jim Ross. Email: jimmy.ross7@gmail.com Tel: 07766 706766. Wednesday 17 April ‘Songs we Remember.’ Singing and enjoyment for anyone who likes to sing but particularly geared towards those living with dementia and their carers. 2.00 pm to 3.30 pm at St Thomas of Canterbury Parish Hall, Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details: Irenaeus Tel: 0151 949 1199. Email: m.knight@rcaol.co.uk Friday 26 April A concert with Italian singer and musician Roberto Tardito, as part of a Europe-wide tour 7.00 pm at St Albert the Great, Stockbridge Village. Tickets £10 each, from St Albert’s Tel: 0151 228 7308, Email: stalberts@rcaolp.co.uk Refreshments will be served in the Church Hall after the concert.

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Love to sing? A Waterloo choir have celebrated reaching a fresh fundraising milestone by making a special date – to sing at the Metropolitan Cathedral. St Edmund’s Choir have now raised more than ÂŁ4,000 to support ongoing restoration works to the church – including the organ – through a series of concerts and events, and can now look forward to performing in the Cathedral’s Crypt Concert Room in June. The concert, ‘Musicals and More’, will take place on Friday 7 June, starting at 7.30 pm. The choir, formed in 1997 with just four people, now has more than 60 members aged between 16 and 82 who travel from as far as Kirkby and Manchester to rehearse. Charlie Corkin, director of music, said the inclusive nature of the choir was key to their success: ‘There are no auditions, no expectation that anyone has been in a choir before, and it’s completely free – we pride ourselves on being a choir for everyone. ‘The vast majority of the choir can’t read music and have never had any music lessons. The choir enables people to come together because they love to sing, love to socialise and to support important causes. In a time when arts funding is so tight, we’re so lucky to be able to offer a free community choir for anyone to get involved in and perform a wide variety of music from Abba to Zadok the Priest. We’re so much more than a Church choir – we have something for everyone!’ St Edmund’s choir welcomes anyone with a love of singing to their rehearsals each Sunday evening at 7.00 pm in the Lisbonian Room, next to St Edmund’s Church, Oxford Road, Waterloo, L22 8QF. For more information, email lovetosing@stedmundschoir.com or call 07730 413 024. Tickets for ‘Musicals and More’ cost ÂŁ10 and can be bought online via www.stedmundschoir.com

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profile

Helen Jones ‘Team and community are fundamental’ By Simon Hart Helen Jones can draw from a deep well of experience as she settles into her role as Archdiocesan pastoral associate for South Liverpool. Take, for example, the lessons of three years working on the southern Japanese island of Kyushu in the early 1990s. ‘You really see how group dynamics work in a very different way from the West,’ she says. ‘You have that square-peg-in-round hole syndrome but also the whole community pulling together. That, to me, was a real eye-opener.’ Be it in Kyushu or Our Lady of Mount Carmel church, her base today, groups matter – and she wishes to play an active part. She had been working previously as diocesan mission secretary for the Diocese of Shrewsbury but believes ‘sitting behind a desk was not really what I felt I was called to be doing’. She continues: ‘I very much wanted to be out in a parish with people. Sometimes when you reflect on your life you can see the path is very clear and it was a natural progression for me to be out in the community and living my faith alongside them and supporting them where I could.’ Hence her eagerness to accept the role

of pastoral associate working across six South Liverpool parishes: Our Lady of Mount Carmel and St Patrick, St Anne’s and St Bernard’s, St Anthony of Padua, St Charles and St Thomas More, St Clare’s and St Hugh’s, and St Wilfrid’s. It is a role, she says, that involves ‘sharing resources, looking at joint catechesis, supporting faith formation programmes, developing or strengthening school and parish links or ecumenical activity, and of course supporting Synod 2020.’ In Helen’s mind, a central challenge for her and the Archdiocese’s other pastoral associates, is ‘the acceptance of lay ministers in a pastoral role’, and encouraging communities to embrace them. ‘It is relationships that are key,’ she adds. ‘It’s being able to forge relationships with clergy and with parishioners that enables me or any pastoral associate to become effective.’ Helen, who lives on the Wirral, has prior experience of working in a parish from four years as a volunteer at St Winefride’s in Neston. ‘That was a full-on introduction to the rhythm of parish ministry and to community-building although I was very much in a supportive role,’ she explains.

For the mother of two, her inaugural involvement in the life of a parish actually came as a teenager when she played in the music group at the parish where she grew up, Our Lady Help of Christians in West Byfleet, Surrey. A spiritual curiosity followed her to university where alongside her BA in German at King’s College, London she also studied ethics, philosophy and theology. ‘I was always wanting to find out more,’ she notes. After three years teaching English in Japan, she eventually arrived in the northwest when moving to Chester in 1998 with a freshly acquired MSc in Advanced IT from Southbank University. ‘I came up with the idea of doing something with IT,’ she says, ‘but I prefer working with people. That’s where I realised I needed to be in a team. Team and community are fundamental to who I am.’ And building relationships is a vital part of that – even, it turns out, with the occasional animal. After all, Father Joe Kendall, her line manager, has a dog who picks his friends very carefully. ‘I’ve been very lucky,’ she laughs. ‘I made sure I made friends with the dog very quickly!’

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LACE Conference Centre or 18 years we have enjoyed an enviable reputation for our fabulous food and a superb setting on the edge of Sefton Park.

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If you would like to know more, please ring a member of the team on

0151 522 1002

To continue to help support over 6,000 vulnerable children and adults across the North West, Nugent’s charity shop is in urgent need of donations. You can donate any items at our shop at:

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youth ministry

An Easter meditation Animate Youth Ministries team coordinator Tom looks ahead to four special Sundays in April. Sunday 7 April – John 8:1-11 Today’s gospel reading is perhaps one of the most famous stories from Jesus’ ministry. ‘Let any one of you who is without sin be the first to cast a stone at her.’ With these words, Jesus exposes the hypocrisy of the scribes and pharisees, and thwarts their attempt to entrap him. Some people interpret this passage to mean that, since we are all sinners, we have no right to judge others for their sins. Surely however, as brothers and sisters in Christ, we have a duty to watch out for each other. If we see someone sin, we should rebuke them and hope that they would do the same for us. Through this, we can build each other up and help each other remain faithful to Jesus’ final command to the woman: ‘Go now and leave your life of sin.’ Dates for the Diary

Palm Sunday, 14 April – Luke 19:28-40; Luke 22:14-23:56 Today we hear the account of Jesus’ triumphant entry into Jerusalem and also his Passion and death. The contrast between the two stories is astounding. The very people who celebrated him as the Messiah are calling for his death just a few days later. The enthusiasm the crowds had for Jesus’ arrival vanished as soon as it had come. What changed? People are fickle, which was as true 2,000 years ago as it is today. How often do we find ourselves caught up in the excitement of some new fad, only for our interest to dissipate as suddenly as it appeared? Maybe we may sometimes act the same way with regards to our faith; swept up by the

fervour of the Easter or Christmas season, only to quickly forget once it passes. As we enter Holy Week, we must remind ourselves that our faith isn’t something to be pushed aside whenever we feel like it, but something to engage in and encounter through every aspect of our lives. We must welcome Christ each day with the same joy as the cheering crowds. Easter Sunday, 21 April – John 20:19 What sums this day up better than the Sequence from today’s Mass? Christians, to the Paschal Victim offer sacrifice and praise. The sheep are ransomed by the Lamb; and Christ, the undefiled, hath sinners to his Father reconciled. Death with life contended: combat strangely ended! Life's own Champion, slain, yet lives to reign. Tell us, Mary: say what thou didst see upon the way. The tomb the Living did enclose; I saw Christ's glory as He rose! The angels there attesting; shroud with grave-clothes resting. Christ, my hope, has risen: He goes before you into Galilee. That Christ is truly risen from the dead we know. Victorious King, Thy mercy show! Amen. Alleluia. 2nd Sunday of Easter, 28 April – John 20:19-31 ‘Doubting Thomas’ is a phrase that, in my own personal experience, is often used disparagingly (thanks, Mum). People often criticise Thomas for his refusal to believe in Jesus’ resurrection without seeing the evidence first. But surely this is a very human reaction to something so momentous. Did not the other disciples react the same way? They refused to believe Mary Magdalene until they had seen the risen Christ in the flesh. Thomas only wanted to experience what the other 10 had already done. But they were only human: they were afraid; they were anxious; they doubted, even after Jesus revealed himself to them for the first time. Are we not the same today? A week after the celebrations and ‘alleluias’ of Easter Sunday, do the old fears and doubts begin to creep back in? We must remember that Jesus’ presence is a constant in our lives. He is revealed to us in every Mass, through the sacraments, and through the good words and deeds of our neighbours.

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Primary education in the Archdiocese Roman Catholic primaries in the Archdiocese of Liverpool offer all children a nurturing, spiritual environment to begin their educational career, rooted in the principles of the church. Collective worship is also central to a Catholic school’s ethos and is crucial to its spiritual life, and to the pupils’ personal development. In addition, regular time spent at Mass helps to instil a discipline within each child, and also a calmness that can aid their academic performance. The Archdiocese’s vision is that as many children, young people and staff as possible are able to access and benefit from a collaborative, self-improving approach regarding school to school support and that it successfully meets the needs of our Catholic school communities. For parents who want their child to have a solid religious grounding at school, the benefits of a Catholic primary are obvious. A good Catholic school will be a place where the teachings of Christ are made as relevant to each child’s experience as possible. With strong links to their parish church, Catholic schools often have a community feel. Many children will go on to sing in the choir or serve during Mass as well. The Archdiocese also follow the Bishops of England and Wales recommendations that 10% of the total curriculum time is allocated to RE. This valuable teaching will enhance your child’s knowledge and understanding of the Catholic faith and his/her ability to engage in reflection upon religious belief and practice. As parents we all want the best education and support for our children and with the Archdiocese providing peer to peer support, where an appropriately skilled professional (e.g. national or local leader of education, lead practitioner, etc.) gives direct support to another school and/or fellow professional we know that our children will be in safe hands. Primary school allocation results will be released on Tuesday 16 April 2019.

Blessed Sacrament Catholic Primary School Cedar Road, Aintree, Liverpool L9 9AF T: 0151 525 9600 F: 0151 525 2998 Places available for Reception start date September 2019

We offer: • 2 year old provision • 30 hour offer • Extended Services including Holiday Club • Fantastic EYFS provision

If you wish to visit the school or have any further enquiries please contact the school office on 0151 525 9600 From our RE Inspection: “The extent to which the Religious Education Curriculum meets pupils’ needs is outstanding.”

‘Aim High - Live Life to the full’ (John 10:10)

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McCallum & Tritton & Sons Independent Family Funeral Directors

0151 931 2002

www.mccallumandtritton.co.uk 24

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cathedral A busy time ahead It is often said that tragic moments bring out the best in composers. On Mothering Sunday, the 4th Sunday of Lent, our girl choristers continue their annual tradition of singing Pergolesi’s Stabat Mater dolorosa. This beautiful text was believed to have been written in the 13th century and describes Mary’s anguish as she wept at the foot of the cross while Jesus died. Whilst the text has been set by many famous composers over the last 800 years, the setting by the Italian composer Giovanni Battista Pergolesi is perhaps the most beautiful of all. Set for two voices, violins and chamber organ the music exemplifies the tension Mary must have felt, watching her Son, but also captures the sense of hope, hope that Jesus died to save all of our sins. The performance takes place as part of Evening Prayer on Sunday 31st March. One of the special features of Holy Week here at the Metropolitan Cathedral is the singing of the passion narrative on Palm Sunday and Good Friday. People who attend the liturgies on these days often comment on what a powerful experience it is being part of such a performance. The musical settings we use were written by former Master of the Music, Philip Duffy. For years the choir has sung these from handwritten manuscripts. Over the last year Philip has very kindly been typesetting his passions, so that this year we will be singing both the Luke and John passions from newly typeset copies. Philip’s setting of the passion are but a small element of the large corpus of liturgical music that he composed during his 30 years at

by Dr Christopher McElroy Director of Music, Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral

Cathedral Record Canon Anthony O’Brien – Cathedral Dean

the Cathedral, much of which is still in regular use. Looking ahead to the Summer term, there are several important (and we hope) exciting events on the horizon. Saturday 11th May sees our annual Two Cathedral’s Messiah which will, this year, take place at the Metropolitan Cathedral. The sight and sounds of both Cathedral choirs joined together is certainly a magical experience, and something not to be missed. In June we are once again joining the Anglican Cathedral Choir (this time down the road at the Anglican Cathedral) to do a concert of music by Henry Purcell and Roxanna Panufnik, in the presence of the latter composer. (Purcell sends his apologies having been dead for some 300 years!) On June 13th we welcome the Friends of Cathedral Music ‘Choristers of Great Britain’ Choir to Liverpool - a choir which features choristers from nearly every cathedral in the UK. A busy term will end with a special choir and orchestra concert featuring the Metropolitan Cathedral Choir and Crosby Symphony Orchestra on July 13th in the Metropolitan Cathedral.

We journey through the final days of Lent and on to Holy Week and the celebration of Easter throughout the course of the month ahead and the solemn liturgies celebrated in the Cathedral really emphasise the meaning and great importance of this time for us all. The final two talks on our Lenten series ‘Walking in the footsteps of the Saints’ take place on the first two Tuesdays in April at 7.00 pm in the Gibberd Room. On 2 April Fr Denis Blackledge SJ will be talking on St Ignatius of Loyola and ‘the spiritual exercises’. The following Tuesday it will be the turn of Archbishop Malcolm who will be talking on St Augustine of Hippo and ‘The Confessions’. We begin Holy Week gathering in the Cathedral garden for the blessing of Palms at 11.00 am on 14 April, weather permitting. This is one of the two days in the year when the passion narrative is sung (the other being Good Friday) which heightens the drama and meaning of the narrative. On Palm Sunday evening at 7.30 pm there is a special Holy Week Tenebrae Service. On Wednesday evening we gather as a Diocesan family to take part in the Mass of Chrism at 7.30 pm. At this service the priests renew their commitment and the oils that are used in parishes across the Diocese for the celebration of the Sacraments are blessed. The three days of Maundy Thursday, Good Friday and Holy Saturday all begin with a Choral Office of Readings and Morning Prayer at 10.00 am. They help to define a structure of prayer throughout these days focussing on the suffering, death and resurrection of the Lord. The Evening celebration of the Lord’s Supper is both a thanksgiving for the gift of the Eucharist and a renewal of dedication to follow Christ through lives of service and this concludes with watching until 10.00 pm. On Good Friday Bishop Williams will lead a service of Stations of the Cross after the sung office and Archbishop Malcolm will preside in the afternoon at the Commemoration of the Lord’s Passion at 3.00 pm. All are welcome to join us in an ecumenical Walk of Witness through Liverpool City Centre on Holy Saturday beginning at 2.00 pm. Later that evening at 9.00 pm our Easter Vigil begins outside the main entrance of the Cathedral with the blessing of the Easter Fire and procession to celebrate, in Vigil and Eucharist, the Resurrection of the Lord. Our Easter Sunday Mass times are as a normal Sunday and we have a special Easter Choral Evening Prayer at 3.00 pm for Easter Day. I wish you all a very happy Easter.

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Pic extras

Mums the Word ‘Come, Everything is Ready.’ This was the theme for the 2019 World Day of Prayer, formally known as the Women's World Day of Prayer, and prepared this year by the Christian women of Slovenia. It is a women-led movement and a day celebrated in over 120 countries, and each year we admire the strength of the communities who participate, finding empathy in their concerns and encouragement in their faith. The line above is taken from Luke 14: 15-24, the Parable of the Great Banquet. At the heart of this year’s service was an invitation for all to come to God’s table, inviting us all to His banquet. The table was laid with a basket of bread, salt, water, rosemary, a jug of wine produced in Slovenia, and a vase of red carnations, one of their national flowers. The opening prayer read: ‘God of Love and Justice, you created us in your image, and long for us to share your hospitality. Give us the grace to accept your invitation and the wisdom and generosity to share it with others.’ We then heard the experiences of five Slovenian women – Marjeta, Mojca, Marija, Ema and Natasha – who had suffered for their religious beliefs, being treated as second-class citizens because of it. We heard of violent abuse by alcoholic parents, of homes with no running water or electricity. People in Slovenia have known what it means to be refugees or immigrants, with many leaving to find work abroad. Yet they have overcome many difficulties throughout their history and still stand together in strength. • Cath Lydon and I attended the Annual Civic Mass at the Metropolitan Cathedral on Sunday 3 March. Archbishop Malcolm McMahon celebrated the Mass, which was also attended by the Rt Rev Paul Bayes, Bishop of Liverpool, and Rev Dr Crispin Pailing, Rector of Liverpool. It is 25 years since the Church of England ordained its first women priests and also present was the very Rev Dr Sue Jones, Dean of Liverpool Cathedral, as well as Councillor Christine Banks, Lord Mayor of Liverpool. • Our AGM will take place on Saturday 27 April at 1.00 pm at the Gibberd Room in the Cathedral, followed by Mass. A buffet lunch will be served from 12 noon. Prayers will have been said for you all at Belmont Abbey. I wish you and your families a happy and joyful Easter. Maria Bruns, Archdiocesan president 26

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A century of service News from the Liverpool Province of the Knights of St Columba

Province holds centenary celebration dinner

The first major event of the KSC’s centenary year was a celebration dinner held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Liverpool on Friday 15 February. It was attended by members, wives, family and friends from all parts of the province. Among the distinguished guests was our ecclesiastical adviser Malcolm McMahon, the Archbishop of Liverpool, who is pictured here together with the order’s supreme knight, Bertie Grogan; provincial chaplain Dunston Harrington, who is parish priest at St Mary’s Little Crosby/St William of York; Ray Pealing, our provincial grand knight, and his wife Mary; Harry Welsh, the supreme director for action and social, and his wife Tricia; and John Church, the provincial social secretary, and his wife Pat. During his speech following the dinner, Archbishop Malcolm took the opportunity to thank the knights for the assistance provided at the

Adoremus National Eucharistic Congress last September. It was also a special occasion for John Hamilton, a former provincial grand knight, and Steven Owen, former grand knight of council 9, who were presented with long-service awards by Bro Bertie. As part of his trip to our province, Bro Bertie made a visit to the Isle of Man council, accompanied by provincial grand knight Ray Pealing – an occasion which was greatly appreciated by the officers and brothers of the council on the island. • A further pulpit appeal for new members was made at all Masses at St Oswald’s, Old Swan on the weekend of 23/24 February. We thank Father Mark Beattie, the parish priest, for allowing us to make the appeal and for the warm welcome received. If further information is required please contact Bro Aiden Carney on 0151 427 7126. Websites: www.ksc.org.uk and www.kscprov02.weebly.com Email: dpokeane@aol.com


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Issue 175 April Issue2019 163 April 2018

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PIC Life Jealousy really does get you nowhere By Moira Billinge ary was a wonderful friend. I could tell her anything and even the most mundane, innocuous conversations would be treated by her with total confidentiality. She loved her faith, had a finely tuned sense of humour and was always ready to help anyone who needed it. Sadly, there was an individual who, because of the work in which they were both involved, came into almost daily contact with her and proved a constant thorn in her side. If Mary’s name was mentioned in her presence – or if it appeared in newsletters, circulars, etc – it was sufficient to stir the green-eyed monster. Mary’s many achievements had to be understated or, by her own request, not acknowledged or recognised publicly because of her fear of the inevitable repercussions that any accolade would trigger. Jealousy and envy are very negative emotions and are highly

M

destructive. Proverbs 27:4 says: ‘Anger is cruel and fury overwhelming, but who can stand before jealousy?’ A jealous or envious heart is never at peace and is always driven to undermine rather than praise or encourage. While we may struggle with jealousy at times, once we recognise it for the invasive, pernicious emotion that it is, most of us will try to rise above it. If we allow it to take a hold, it corrupts our spirit and destroys not only our own equilibrium but also impacts on those around us. Jealousy never recognises the achievements of others, nor takes pleasure in their joys and successes. Instead, it feels insecure and views everyone as a threat or as being in competition with them. Jealousy begrudges others their possessions, appearance, intelligence, career and relationships. It latches greedily on to gossip and likes to perpetrate it. In order to pacify a jealous person, the people on the receiving end will continually attempt to appease, and

Easter Cards from Carmel Only three weeks now to Easter Sunday - It’s time to select lovely cards for your family and friends. Look into this shop at Maryton Carmel Allerton and you will find delightful easter cards as well as cards for all occasions on sale. Contact the Sisters at Maryton Grange, Allerton Road, L18 3NU. Telephone the card office on 0151 724 7102 or Email the Sisters at marytoncards@outlook.com

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modify their own responses and behaviour to avoid triggering the inevitable reaction. This makes jealousy a bully. It is difficult enough to deal with a jealous person who actually has insight into their own behaviour, for they can at least attempt to rationalise it, put it into perspective and try to overcome this failing. However, a jealous person who lacks such insight is infinitely harder to cope with. Jealousy often arises from a sense of entitlement and they consider their actions to be entirely justified. We do not have to cope on our own if this sort of behaviour is impacting negatively on our lives, regardless of where it is happening – and especially not in school or in the workplace. We must not be afraid to seek the help and protection to which we are entitled, which, sadly, was not available in time to help my friend. No-one should put up with a toxic environment and, exposing such behaviour can often diffuse the ‘power’ of the perpetrator. If we cannot avoid being in jealous company we should still try to be compassionate but it is vital that we continue to focus on what we want to achieve and not allow our dreams to be derailed or our progress stunted because of fear of unpleasantness. Difficult as it is, we should try to pray that they will cease to wade in what must be the sheer misery of their envy, and hope instead that they will discover – and thank God for – the blessings that are to be found in their own lives rather than continually focusing on those of others. A thankful, generous heart is rarely a jealous one.


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Catholic PICretreats and away days 2019 Catholic Pic Away Days 2019

Catholic Pic Retreat Days Summer 2019 Retreat Days will be led by Father Peter Morgan - we will visit:

During the summer of 2019 we have planned away days to: • • • • •

Lancaster Wednesday 10 April Llangollen Wednesday 8 May Conwy Wednesday 19 June Lytham St Anne’s Wednesday 31 July Arnside/Grange over Sands Wednesday 7 August

If you would like to join us on one or more of our away days please ring 0151 733 5492 for your booking forms

The Shrine of Our Lady at Ladyewell Wednesday 5 June and Wednesday 3 July Pantasaph Monastery The Pontcysyllte Aqueduct is a navigable aqueduct that carries the Llangollen Canal across the River Dee

To book please ring 0151 733 5492

Worth a visit - Llangollen This month, explore the picturesque town of Llangollen, writes Lucy Oliver. This quaint Welsh town on the River Dee is famous for the canal navigating the English border (the busiest in Britain) and since Georgian times, visitors have enjoyed the sights of this inland resort. For visitors to Llangollen Wharf, there is the opportunity of a canal-boat trip across the Pontcysyllte Aqueduct. Looking down on the Dee Valley, the Grade I-listed stone and cast-iron structure is the longest and highest aqueduct in the UK. Back in town, a more modest spot is the Holy Cross Catholic Church on Oak Street – a parish which has taken the name from the local Cistercian abbey,

founded around 700 years before, Valle Crucis. The church was established on its present site in 1958, and built through the volunteering efforts and donations of Catholics from ‘Liverpool to Llangollen’. If you’re feeling adventurous, a walk up to the ruins of the medieval Castell Dinas Bran rewards you with views overlooking the town. Below, the heritage railway is also well worth

visiting for the sights and sounds of the steam trains. And don’t leave without stopping off for refreshments; treat yourself to afternoon tea at the Carriage Tearooms.

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Letter from Wonersh By Peter Murphy few weeks ago the Seminary welcomed the local Churches Together group for evening prayer. We are fortunate here to be blessed with a group of Christians, led by their clergy and pastors, who are very keen on working together as much as possible – especially when it comes to acts of prayer and worship, as well as working to eradicate injustices in the local area. (Work that is hardly foreign to our own Archdiocese.)

A

One of my favourite events for which we join the Churches Together group is the Good Friday Walk of Witness and Service of Prayer. A few years ago at this service, the rather charismatic Baptist minister kept repeating a line while preaching which is often recalled in the seminary community: ‘It’s Friday, but Sunday is coming!’ The message behind this line, I believe, can be helpful at this halfway point in our Lenten journey. Even though you still have every good intention and a fervent desire to succeed in the Lenten work of prayer, fasting, and almsgiving, you are starting to get fed up of all this Lent stuff. Well, you will if you are anything like me! These days of Lent in which we unite ourselves in a special way to the Lord’s Passion on the Cross can be difficult. However, even in this season, we continue to be the people of the Resurrection; we know that by the end of this month we will have celebrated the Glorious Resurrection of the Lord. We trust that the preparation of this penitential season will be worth it, and hope that we are able to grow closer in our relationship with the Resurrected Lord through this preparation and the grace which we make ourselves ready to receive. The seminary formation for the Priesthood is in some ways similar. It is certainly an opportunity for preparation; and like a good Lenten practice, it requires the engagement of the whole person. Like Lent, it can be difficult – as with all authentic Christian formation, it requires taking up the burden of the Cross. Both involve hope too. For most of your time as a Seminarian you can only hope to be ordained. Yet because we know that the Lord is good, we can expect that we will grow into a deeper intimacy with Him by His grace. Be assured of my prayers for a blessed Lent, and a glorious Eastertide.

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justice & peace

‘St Oscar Romero of the Americas, pray for us’ By Steve Atherton, Justice and Peace fieldworker Our diocese is justly proud to be a Romero hot-spot and on 24 March we celebrated once again the annual Romero Mass – the first since his canonisation, but 39th overall. It was a double celebration – taking place at St John’s, Wigan as part of their 200th anniversary celebrations – and this extract from The Romero Trust newsletter for January 2019 is a reminder of why we give thanks each year for this life – and ultimate sacrifice. Born on 15 August 1917, Oscar Arnulfo Romero y Galdamez was sent to study for the priesthood in Rome and was ordained in 1942. He embraced a simple lifestyle; he was a popular preacher who responded with real compassion to the plight of the poor. He was ordained Auxiliary Bishop of San Salvador in 1970. Seemingly unsympathetic to the new social justice thrust of the Latin American Church, he was suspicious of the clergy and the Base Christian Communities of the archdiocese working alongside the exploited rural poor, promoting social organisations and land reform. A brief spell back in the countryside opened Romero’s eyes as he reconnected to the misery and hardship of the ‘campesinos’ and witnessed the murderous repression being suffered at the hands of the security forces. In February 1977 he was the surprising choice to be the new Archbishop of San Salvador. Over the next three years, the social and political conflict intensified with electoral fraud blocking change, and peaceful protest being met with massacres and death-squad killings. From his pulpit Archbishop Romero became the voice of the voiceless poor. There he spoke the truth of what was happening: he denounced the killings, the torture and the disappearances of community leaders; he demanded justice and recompense for the atrocities committed by the army and police; and he set up legal-aid projects and pastoral programmes to support the victims of the violence. Romero, rejecting the violence perpetrated by the left as well as the right, strained every nerve to promote peaceful solutions to his nation’s crisis. He was vilified in the press, harassed by the security forces and publicly opposed by several episcopal colleagues. The death threats multiplied; Romero realised he was going to be killed. And he came to accept it. At 6.26pm on 24 March 1980, with a single marksman’s bullet, he fell at the foot of a huge crucifix while celebrating Mass. Thirty-five years later, he was declared a martyr of the Church. Killed out of hatred of the faith, he was beatified on 23 May 2015 and canonised on 14 October 2018. At the end of the 2nd Romero Mass, Julian Filochowski concluded his homily with the words ‘Saint Oscar Romero of the Americas, pray for us’. Archbishop Derek Worlock was heard to mutter, ‘Steady on.’ We’ve always known that Julian’s assessment was right. Romero is a contemporary Christian martyr-witness, who shows us that the preferential option for the poor is not just possible and do-able. It is essential to our life as a Church.


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Keep up to date with all the news from around the Archdiocese online at: www.catholicpic.co.uk You can now follow us on twitter at:

@PicCatholic

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