Page 1

2013 Annual Report Merriam PD welcomes some new neighbors in 2013


TABLE OF CONTENTS Page

2

Message from the Chief

1

Department Photographs

2-5

Organizational Chart

6

Administration

7-8

Budget Report

9

Forfeiture Report

10

Criminal Activity

11

Reported Crime

12

Crime Statistics

13

Use of Force

14

Police Training

15

Patrol Division

16 - 18

Traffic Enforcement Unit

19

Motor Vehicle Crashes

20 - 21

Investigations

22

Community Service Officers

23

Support Services

24 - 25

Officers at Work

26 - 28

Community Service

29

Citizen Volunteers

30 - 31

Citizen’s Police Academy

32 - 33

Citizen Feedback

34

Retirements / New Officers

35

Employee History

36


MESSAGE FROM THE CHIEF

Dear Mayor, Council Members, and Merriam citizens, Our annual report document has been produced for over twenty years. During the past few years the reports have contained much more than just information related to our department’s activity and calls for service. We have included our department’s commitment to the community through volunteerism, Citizen’s Police Academy training, and a sampling of letters provided by citizens to our officers for excellent service. We highlight the diversity of our calls for service during the year in the “Officers at Work” section. We encourage you to read these pages to better understand the difficult situations our officers face on a daily basis. We should never underestimate the dangers associated with this profession. As you read this report, 2013 was another active year for the police department and the city. During the year six new officers completed the police academy and our twelve week training program. Thanks to our great training officers for providing valuable knowledge and insight to the new Merriam Police Officers. Also new to Merriam are three new car dealerships on West Frontage Road, near I-35 and 67th Street. These state of the art facilities dramatically changed the landscape to this part of our city and increased our calls for service to this area. While on the topic of cars, three Ford Crown Victoria patrol cars were replaced with the new Ford Utility vehicles during the year. The new patrol units are all wheel drive and proved invaluable during the two big snowstorms that occurred in February. The first storm on Thursday, February 21, created a colossal mess throughout the metro area. For several hours I-35 was a parking lot. The department used the new patrol cars, our four wheel drive CSO truck, and another four wheel drive truck (obtained through drug seizure) to rescue numerous stranded motorists, including a flatbed tow truck driver near I-35 and Antioch (see page 20). The tow truck, with a car on the flatbed, had partially slipped off the exit ramp blocking the road. We were able to pull the truck back onto the road and clear the ramp. The timing of the storm created traffic challenges that we have not seen for over a decade. Our calls for service were slightly up, continuing a trend for the past two years. All reported crimes, including part one crime (page 13), were in line with five year averages. Our officers maintained a high level of self initiated activity which again shows the professionalism of our officers. 2013 also saw the full implementation of electronic ticketing; DigiTicket. The two main benefits of this program are improved accuracy of the data and a reduction in data entry for the court. Our officers maintain quality standards while providing excellent service to our citizen’s and the community we serve. Merriam continues to be a great place to live and work because of citizen involvement, great city government and city staff. We look forward to 2014 with high expectations for our department and the city’s continued growth, including the opening of the IKEA store. Sincerely,

Tim Burnett Chief Tim Burnett

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DEPARTMENT STAFF

Chief Tim Burnett Serving Since 1982

Sergeant Todd Allen Serving Since 1996

Corporal James Browning Serving Since 2006 2

Captain Michael Daniels Serving Since 1987

Sergeant Troy Duvanel Serving Since 1995

Corporal Jeremiah Waters Serving Since 2003

Lieutenant Darren McLaughlin Serving Since 1989

Sergeant John Walton Serving Since 1998

Corporal Chris Brokaw Serving Since 2001

Sergeant Jason Reynolds Serving Since 2000

Corporal Phil Lewis Serving Since 2002


DEPARTMENT STAFF

Detective Wes Waller Serving Since 2005

Detective Steven Wechsler Serving Since 2006

Detective Nick Weiler Serving Since 2005

Master Police Officer Todd Sparks Serving Since 1990

Master Police Officer Gerry Eickhoff Serving Since 1991

Master Police Officer Seth Mullis Serving Since 2010

Master Police Officer Corey Herron Serving Since 2009

Master Police Officer Jeff Magee Serving Since 1987

Police Officer Tim Filson Serving Since 2006 3


DEPARTMENT STAFF

Police Officer Laura Naegele Serving Since 2010

Police Officer Cameron Husom Serving Since 2012

Police Officer David Vincent Serving Since 2013 4

Police Officer Cara Palmer Serving Since 2011

Police Officer Adam Taylor Serving Since 2012

Police Officer Aaron Simmons Serving Since 2012

Police Officer Vincent Rock Serving Since 2012

Police Officer Paul Hutchinson Serving Since 2013

Police Officer Dylan Rogers Serving Since 2013


DEPARTMENT STAFF

Community Service Officer Jamie Brokaw Serving Since 2009

Community Service Officer Charlie Yocum Serving Since 2009

Records Clerk Lisa Jacobs Serving Since 1991

Records Clerk Karen Gibson Serving Since 1993

Records Clerk Ronda Brumbaugh Serving Since 1999

Crossing Guard Doris Hillhouse Serving Since 2002

Crossing Guard Cynthia Knapp Serving Since 1997

Crossing Guard Dave Thomas Serving Since 2009 5


ORGANIZATIONAL CHART Chief of Police

Administrative Lieutenant

Captain (Patrol Commander) Investigative Sergeant Shift 1 Sergeant

Shift 2 Sergeant

Shift 3 Sergeant

Corporal

Corporal

Corporal

Patrol Officers (3)

Patrol Officers (4)

Patrol Officers (5)

Community Service Officers (2)

Detectives (3)

Records Clerks (3)

Relief Corporal

Property Clerk Crossing Guards (3)

Manpower Alocations

Traffic Officer

Traffic Officer

Administration Patrol

2

3

3

Investigation

2 Traffic

4 CSO

20

6

Records


ADMINISTRATION/ SUPERVISION The Administrative Unit of the Merriam Police Department is responsible for a variety of different and important functions of the department. There are three administrative officers: Chief Timothy Burnett, Lieutenant Michael Daniels, and Lieutenant Darren McLaughlin. These veteran officers have a combined total of over eighty years of police experience. CHIEF OF POLICE: Tim Burnett’s primary duty is the overall responsibility of the police department. He works as the liaison with all elected officials, community leaders and residents. He is in charge of the budget and all department spending. It is his job to manage department liability and risk management. He also makes the final decision concerning employee hiring, termination and discipline. Chief Burnett is on the Board of Directors for the Metro Squad and the 2nd Vice President of the FBI National Academy Associates in the Kansas/Western Missouri Chapter. INVESTIGATIONS COMMANDER: The Investigations Division is responsible for supervision of the Investigations Unit, Records Management, Property Room, and the Community Service Officers and School Crossing Guards. The training of all the officers from the Academy through the Field Training Program is accomplished in this division. During 2013 the Investigations Division was commanded by Lt. Darren McLaughlin. PATROL COMMANDER: Captain Mike Daniels is the commander of the Patrol Unit which is made up of the uniformed officers. Manpower allocation and scheduling are his primary responsibilities. He must be familiar with all the current laws as well as contemporary police tactics and operations. He is also responsible for investigating all citizen complaints on officers, internal investigations and all use of force incidents. Captain Daniels is also a staff officer (Officer-in-Charge) for the Metro Squad and a Lead Supervisor on the Johnson County Officer Involved Shooting Investigation Team.

Sergeant: There are four Sergeants consisting of Sgt. Todd Allen, Sgt. Troy Duvanel, Sgt. John Walton, and Sgt. Jason Reynolds. One Sergeant is assigned to each shift (days, evenings, and midnights) and is the overall supervisor for that patrol shift. The Sergeant oversees the handling of priority/critical calls, approves reports, ensures officers are performing their duties, completes officer performance evaluations, and handles immediate officer complaints among other numerous duties. One Sergeant is assigned to the Investigations Unit and is in charge of approving reports, case assignment and call-out, and the day-to-day supervision of the detectives.

Corporal: There are four Corporals consisting of Cpl. James Browning, Cpl. Jeremiah Waters, Cpl. Chris Brokaw, and Cpl. Phil Lewis. One Corporal is assigned to each shift (days, evenings, and midnights) and works under the direction of the Sergeant assigned to that shift. The fourth Corporal acts as a “relief” Corporal and may be assigned to various shifts to fill-in gaps in the schedule. The Corporals perform duties assigned by the Sergeant and act as the shift supervisor when the Sergeant is gone. Corporals also approve reports, oversee priority/critical calls, and monitor officer performance.

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ADMINISTRATION PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS: Another important function of the Administrative Unit is professional standards. This function is primarily the responsibility of the Division Commander, who conducts internal investigations of department personnel when necessary. The Division Commander is also responsible for ensuring that officers follow proper procedure and all department rules and regulations. There are four main aspects of police work that the Merriam Police Department tracks and investigates: officer complaints, vehicle pursuits, foot pursuits, and use of force incidents. OFFICER COMPLAINTS: When a citizen makes a complaint against an officer it is documented and investigated by the officer's supervisor. If the complaint is serious in nature or can not be resolved by the supervisor it is forwarded to the Patrol Commander for further investigation. Once the investigation is complete it is forwarded to the Police Chief as founded or unfounded. If the complaint is founded the Patrol Commander recommends the appropriate disciplinary action. During 2013 there were six official complaints that were investigated, three were unfounded and three were substantiated which resulted in corrective action. VEHICLE PURSUITS: The department has a very strict vehicle pursuit policy because of the dangers associated with this type of driving. When an officer engages in a pursuit the on-duty supervisor closely monitors this incident. The officer has the direct authority to discontinue a pursuit at any time or the supervisor may direct the officer to end the pursuit. All vehicle pursuits are investigated by the on-duty supervisor and reviewed by the Patrol Commander to ensure all policies and procedures were followed. There was one pursuit during 2013. FOOT PURSUITS: In 2002 a foot pursuit policy was created that strictly regulates police officer foot pursuits because they have proven to be a very high-risk activity for officers. This is due to the extreme physical exertion and unforeseen obstacles. In addition, most people running from the police are violent and combative when captured. Because of these reasons, each foot pursuit is carefully reviewed by the shift supervisor and the Patrol Commander to ensure all policies and procedures were followed. There were two foot pursuits in 2013. JUVENILE INTAKE AND ASSESSMENT CENTER (JIAC): JIAC processes juveniles that are runaways or who have committed criminal acts. In 2013 the Merriam Police Department took 15 juveniles charged with a crime to the Juvenile Intake and Assessment Center. An additional 6 juveniles were taken to JIAC who were runaways or CINC’s (Child in Need of Care). These numbers do not include juveniles arrested or taken into custody who were released to parents or guardians.

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BUDGET EXPENSE REPORT In 2013, the total police budget was $3,578,631.00. This amount includes all projected costs of personnel, contractual services, commodities and capital outlay purchases. Of the total budget, $3,212,796 is dedicated to employee salaries and benefits. During the 2013 budget year, the Merriam Police Department spent $3,192,460.00. Below is a breakdown of expenditures by major categories as of December 31st, 2013. Personnel: This budget item includes salaries, benefits, overtime costs, and other expenses. Budgeted– $3,212,796

Spent– $2,873,521

Percent of budget spent– 89.4%

Contractual Services: This budget item includes utilities, equipment rental and repair, custodial services, training expenses, vehicle repair, and building maintenance. Budgeted– $191,885

Spent– $175,481

Percent of budget spent– 91.5%

Supplies and Equipment: Included in this budget item is office equipment, police equipment and uniforms, and gas and oil. Budgeted– $173,950

Spent- $143,458

Percent of budget spent– 82.5%

At the end of 2013 the police department returned approximately $386171 to the general fund.

Five Year Budget Track $3,600,000 $3,550,000 $3,500,000 $3,450,000 $3,400,000 $3,350,000 $3,300,000 $3,250,000 $3,200,000 $3,150,000

2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

9


FORFEITURE REPORT According to K.S.A. 60-4117, law enforcement agencies are required to report the status of their Special Law Enforcement Trust Fund in an “annual report.” The report must include the type and approximate value of the forfeited property received, the amount of any forfeiture proceeds received, and how any of those proceeds were expended. In order to ensure that the Merriam Police Department stays in conformance with K.S.A. 60-4117, this section is included in all annual reports. Any questions concerning specific details should be directed to the City of Merriam’s Finance Department. DRUG FORFEITURE ACTIVITIES IN 2013: On January 1, 2013, there was approximately $35,143.35 in the Merriam Special Law Enforcement Trust Fund. Through the course of the year, the following receipts and expenses were made to this fund:

Receipts:  Tax Stamp receipts from the State of Kansas in 2013:  Forfeitures in 2013:  Interest earned on account in 2013: Total Receipts for 2013:

$4,498.13 $216.20 $114.37 $4,828.70

Expenses and Purchases  Prow Tow fees for towing a semi-tractor trailer:  Johnson County Key Services to make keys for the tractor trailer:  Taser Inc. for the purchase of new Tasers:  Chinook Medical Gear for the purchase of trauma Medical Kits for Patrol:  Donation to the Law Enforcement Memorial in Washington DC: Total Purchases and Expenses Paid in 2013:

$1,750.00 $25.00 $2,670.00 $1024.02 $1,000.00 $6,469.02

ACCOUNT CARRYOVER: As of 01/01/2014 = $33,503.03

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CRIMINAL ACTIVITY

A

Grid Map The blue lines mark the boundaries of the grids. Note: Grid “Q” is the Merriam City Hall Complex. *

B

U C T

D

P

E F

H

G

N

S

*

R O

M I

L

J K

Contact the Police Department for Crime Prevention Tips.

The Merriam Police Department has divided the city into grids. This allows us to track criminal activity and crime trends. The grids have been laid out to separate, as much as possible, residential from business areas. The chart below will give you information on the number of criminal reports taken in each grid. Persons Crimes include crimes like assault, battery, sex crimes, and other crimes that have people as victims. Burglaries/thefts include all burglaries to businesses, homes and cars, along with any theft. Auto Thefts include only stolen vehicles. Drug Crimes include all crimes involving controlled substances or drug paraphernalia. “Other” covers all crimes not listed in the previous categories. Grid

Burglaries/ Thefts

Auto Theft

Persons Drug Crime Crimes

A

30

9

26

4

19

B

33

7

52

7

44

C

41

5

16

7

8

D

6

2

23

4

19

E

24

2

8

0

12

F

7

0

4

2

1

G

7

2

0

10

4

H

8

0

4

0

4

I

17

4

4

1

9

J

28

3

23

1

8

K

27

0

11

15

4

L

40

3

17

5

16

M

7

0

1

3

4

N

35

3

26

2

15

O

11

2

8

0

2

P

23

1

6

11

18

Q

0

0

0

0

0

R

9

3

3

2

13

S

15

3

22

2

11

T

110

6

17

16

23

U

2

0

0

3

0

Other

11


REPORTED CRIME TYPE OF CRIME

TYPE OF CRIME

2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Aggravated Arson

2

0

0

0

0

Forgery

2

1

6

16

5

Arson

2

4

1

0

3

Furnishing Alcohol/Beer to Minor

2

1

0

2

0

Aggravated Assault

14

9

3

11

9

Gasoline Drive Off

0

0

1

1

3

Aggravated Battery

7

9

4

11

9

Habitual Traffic Violator

0

0

0

0

0

Aggravated Burglary

11

8

3

3

7

Harassment by Phone

19

25

13

19

17

Aggravated Sodomy

2

2

1

1

3

Murder / Manslaughter

2

2

0

1

0

Aggravated Indecent Liberties

5

8

3

6

8

Indecent Liberties with a Child

1

1

0

0

1

Aggravated Kidnapping

0

0

1

1

3

Indecent Solicitation of a Child

0

0

1

0

0

Aggravated Robbery

7

4

3

9

5

Identification Theft

13

12

11

20

0

Aggravated Sexual Battery

0

0

0

1

0

Intimidation of a Victim/Witness

0

0

1

1

3

Assault

2

2

6

8

6

Kidnapping

0

2

5

2

0

Attempted Murder

0

0

0

1

1

Lewd and Lascivious Behavior

1

0

3

5

3

Attempted Theft

6

9

4

4

9

Littering

1

1

1

1

5

Battery

114

91

109

153

145

Minor in Possession of Alcohol

5

10

2

3

5

Burglary to Auto

151

186

166

158

103

Obstructing Legal Process

13

15

13

5

15

Burglary to Business

27

17

20

11

16

Prescription Fraud

2

2

6

0

0

Burglary to Residence

43

50

29

39

43 Controlled Substance Possession

56

51

37

53

71

Burglary to Storage Area

3

8

8

0

11

Drug Paraphernalia Possession

13

19

19

9

20

Child In Need Of Care

27

31

22

24

31

Drug Possession / Intent of Sale

19

18

4

3

4

Child Abuse

0

3

2

4

1

Possession of Stolen Property

4

9

4

5

3

Computer Trespass

1

1

1

0

0

Possession of Tobacco/Minor

2

0

3

1

1

Counterfeiting

2

0

0

0

0

Prostitution

24

39

0

25

0

Criminal Damage - Felony

12

32

9

8

8

Rape

3

4

5

10

5

Criminal Damage - Misdemeanor

58

66

90

78

58

Robbery

3

4

3

2

2

Criminal Deprivation of Property

8

4

9

3

6

Sexual Battery

1

1

3

3

3

Criminal Discharge of a Weapon

1

0

1

2

0

Endangering a Child

-

-

-

1

Criminal Threats

12

14

13

20

14

Theft of Auto

49

65

68

68

48

Criminal Trespass

22

13

7

11

12

Theft of Auto (Attempted)

4

18

13

10

7

Criminal Use of a Financial Card

27

21

77

18

16

Theft - Felony

40

84

24

41

41

Criminal Use of a Weapon

3

5

1

4

3

Theft - Misdemeanor

229

200 234

242

250

Cruelty to Animals

4

5

8

12

6

Violation: Court Protection Order

8

5

14

4

15

Disorderly Conduct

21

49

40

36

49

Worthless Check

0

0

0

0

1

Escape From Custody

0

0

0

0

0

Stalking

0

1

2

2

1

Falsely Reporting a Crime

1

1

1

0

0

Other Crimes Not Listed Above

24

25

38

26

17

False Writing

9

3

6

0

3

Total Reported Crimes by Year:

2009: 1161 12

2010: 1300

2011: 1217

2012: 1120

2013: 1139


CRIME STATISTICS PART ONE CRIMES IN 2013: Each year we report Part One crimes to the Kansas Bureau of Investigations. Part One crimes are determined by the FBI and used throughout the country as a benchmark for crime statistics. We are required to keep statistics on these crimes by the federal government to assist in tracking crime trends. Since the mid-1800’s police departments have been judged by their crime statistics. When the statistics are lower, then the theory is that the police departments are more effective. In reality, there are many factors out of the police department’s control that can alter crime statistics from year to year. Common influencing factors include: a shift in economic conditions, weather, gang activity, new businesses, etc. Before determining the police department’s effectiveness, it is important to understand what factors were at play and how they affected the statistics. While a downturn in criminal activity is always preferable, it may or may not be a direct reflection on the police department. Likewise, an active police department using all the proper crime reduction measures may suffer an increase in reported crime. CRIME TRENDS: Part One crimes for the City of Merriam decreased in all but one category in 2013. The only increase was in burglaries while all persons crimes and all other property related crimes decreased.

10-Year Trends CRIME

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

MURDER

0

2

0

0

1

2

2

0

1

0

RAPE

3

8

13

6

6

4

4

5

10

5

ROBBERY

10

20

18

16

8

10

8

6

11

7

ASSAULTS

20

9

27

125*

122

137

111

122

183

169

BURGLARY

232

237

244

221

188

235

269

57**

53

77

THEFT

420

526

467

414

345

303

323

473

445

403

AUTO THEFT

97

90

100

103

60

49

65

81

68

55

ARSON

1

6

1

4

1

4

4

1

0

3

Total by Year

783

898

870

889

731

743

786

745

771

719

Explanations: * This category was previously labeled “Aggravated Assaults” and only captured limited Part One crime information. In 2007 we decided to include assaults and batteries which more accurately reflects the FBI definition. ** In 2011 we stopped including “Auto Burglary” in the burglary category and putting them instead in the Theft category to accurately reflect theft from a vehicle as defined by the Kansas Bureau of Investigation. .

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USE OF FORCE USE OF FORCE INCIDENTS All use of force incidents must be reported and are reviewed by the Patrol Commander. A specific report is used that details the circumstances that led up to the use of force, the amount of force used and the results. It is the responsibility of the Patrol Commander to evaluate each use of force used by an officer to make sure it was within department policy. Use of force reports are prepared each time an officer uses any type of force during an arrest or whenever an officer points a weapon at an individual and issues verbal commands. During 2013 there were 28 incidents where an officer deemed it necessary to use force to make an arrest. This number is the same as last year. The number of use of force incidents in Merriam is extremely low considering the number of arrests (1,200) the officers made during the year. Highlighted below is specific information related to the use of force incidents in 2013. Type of Force Used During 2013 Incidents     

Service weapon pointed at individual Taser device pointed at someone Taser device used on individual Empty hand control techniques used LVNR– Lateral Vascular Neck Restraint

Use of Force By Shift

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11 2 3 11 2


POLICE TRAINING The State of Kansas requires all police officers to complete a state sponsored police academy with a minimum of 560 hours of instruction. The Merriam Police Department also requires any new officer to complete a field training program consisting of 480 hours of additional instruction. Every certified officer is required to attend a minimum of 40 hours of training per year. Throughout 2013 the Merriam Police Department offered a variety of training classes for its officers and civilian staff to attend. Listed below are examples of some of those courses. Defensive Tactics:

Traffic Safety Training:

    

 Advanced Traffic Crash Investigation  Drug Impairment  Accident Investigation

Ground Fighting Use of Force Situational Weapon Retention OC Spray/ Gas Mask LVNR

Detective Training:          

Metro Squad Training Interviewing the Child Molester Death /Homicide Investigation Death Notification Training Gangs Forensic Photography Domestic Violence Sexual Assault Senior Abuse Cell Phone Investigation

Supervisor Training:           

Advanced Supervision and Management Advanced Incident Command System Social Intelligence Skills for LEO Managers Patrol Supervisor Response to Critical Incidents Leaders without Titles Motivational Management Creative Planning and Problem Solving Expanding Accountability in Law Enforcement Personal Strengths and Leadership Styles Effective Teaching and Training Techniques Surviving Today’s Law Enforcement Challenges

Patrol Training:  I-Leads Records Management System  DUI  Report Writing  Street Survival Course  Active Shooter  Excited Delirium  Taser  Emergency Vehicle Operation Course  Racial Profiling  Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs  Sovereign Citizens  Crime Prevention

Community Service Officer Training:    

Computer Training Animal Control Conference Use of Force Child Safety Seat Technician

Firearms Training:  Handgun Skills and Qualification  Rifle Skills & Qualification  Low Light Shooting Skills

Every Merriam police officer received on average 80 hours of training in 2013. (This does not include hours spent at the Police Academy and FTO training.) 15


PATROL DIVISION “To Protect and Serve” When most people think about the police they commonly visualize a uniformed officer who is assigned to patrol. It is the most visible unit of the police department. It is also the largest unit with twenty-two officers (76%) assigned from a total of twenty-nine. Their primary duties include responding to calls for service, patrolling the neighborhoods and business areas looking for criminal activity, stopping traffic violators and assisting the public as needed. In addition to routine patrol duties the officers spend many hours each year in District Court, Municipal Court, Driver’s License hearings, and attending training classes. The dedicated officers of the Patrol Division provide the primary function of the police department, as highlighted below through calls for service and self-initiated activity. CALLS FOR SERVICE: The primary duty of any police department is answering the public's calls for service (911 calls). A police officer must be ready to respond 24/7, 365 days a year. In 2013 the Merriam Police Department received 13,315 calls for service. The chart below represents a breakdown on the calls for service since 2004. Please note the fluctuation from year-to-year. Many factors affect the calls for service numbers and these factors may include, but are not limited to, crime rate/trends, changes in our response to certain calls for service (example: theft of gasoline, non -injury private property accidents), increase in retail businesses, inclement weather, road construction, etc. 2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

15,753

14,412

15,639

14,342

14,185

12,769

13,233

12,769

13,168

13,315

SELF-INITIATED ACTIVITY: After calls for service, the patrol officers spend the remainder of their time on self-initiated activity and routine patrol. Self-initiated activity includes, but is not limited to, traffic enforcement, business checks (convenience stores, banks, bars, etc.), building checks, occupied and unoccupied vehicle checks, pedestrian checks, park checks, motorist assists and surveillance of problem areas for criminal activity. During the year our officers were involved in approximately 21,490 self-initiated patrol incidents.

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PATROL DIVISION

PATROL ACTIVITY: There are no two eight-hour patrol shifts that are the same. Officers must come to work prepared to handle many different types of calls and activities during their shift including: weather related events, traffic accidents, surveillance, responding to high stress calls (i.e., armed disturbances, armed robberies, domestic disturbances, etc.), investigating residential and business burglaries, felony and misdemeanor arrests, directing traffic and being involved in community meetings. In addition to these various types of calls they also must routinely complete reports to document the above activity. IMPORTANT PATROL FACTS FOR 2013: 

August was the busiest month in which we responded to 826 calls for service

Arrested 1,200 subjects for various crimes.

Wrote 2,311 police related reports.

Officers spent nearly 400 total hours in court related duties. There are four shifts staffed by the Patrol Division. Midnight Shift 11:00 P.M.– 7:00 A.M. Day Shift 7:00 A.M.— 3:00 P.M. Evening Shift 3:00 P.M.—11:00 P.M. Traffic Unit: Day or Evening Shifts as needed

17


PATROL: TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT Traffic enforcement has always been a large part of the everyday duties of a Merriam patrol officer. Statistics and studies have shown that in areas where there is more traffic enforcement, there are also fewer accidents. Studies have also been done that suggest that aggressive traffic enforcement in an area can reduce crime overall. High profile cases like the bombing of the Federal Building in Oklahoma City, have been solved by an officer making a routine traffic stop. In 2013, Merriam officers made 5,712 traffic stops, issued 4,602 moving violation tickets and 3,510 non-moving tickets (total numbers including the Traffic Unit). TRAFFIC STANDARDS: For the past ten years there has been a minimum traffic standard in existence. The standard for each patrol officer is to write two tickets per eight-hour shift. Traffic officers have a standard of one ticket per hour. Fifty percent of the tickets issued should be for moving-violations. This standard was adopted in conjunction with our community-policing philosophy. 2013 Traffic Citations D.U.I. Speeding Inattentive driving Traffic light Stop sign No insurance Seat belt Drivers license violations Expired/illegal tag Parking All others

109 2896 143 226 148 1579 657 744 579 50 1238

Court Statistics

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Total Filing:

8,913

8,913

8,163

7,841

8,369

$999,654

$1,162,087

$1,027,293

$948,323

$884,998

Fines Collected:

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TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT UNIT TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT UNIT (TEU) The Merriam Police Department’s Traffic Enforcement Unit is tasked with enforcing traffic laws within the city. Their efforts are concentrated in areas where there are a high number of accidents and traffic complaints. In addition, they participated in several saturation patrols for DUI and seatbelt enforcement. Listed below are the 2013 statistics for the two traffic enforcement officers:

TEU Traffic Statistic Totals for 2013:

Traffic Stops Moving Violations Non-Moving Violations Total Tickets Issued Driving Under the Influence Arrests Speeding Other Moving Violations Seat Belts Accident Reports Shifts Worked Miles Driven

1,093 871 878 1,749 14 572 299 168 134 199 11,767

2013 “Click it or Ticket” Campaign The STEP “Click it or Ticket” campaign ran from May 20th to June 2nd 2013. During those dates, the Merriam Police Dept. worked a total of 32 hours of overtime and wrote a total of 81 restraint tickets. Overtime costs were covered by a State of Kansas Grant.

The Traffic Enforcement Unit operates two radar equipped traffic speed trailers. These devices are placed in areas where there are traffic complaints or frequent accidents. The information is used to increase enforcement and determine the scope and time of day of the traffic problem. Citizens having a problem with speeders in their neighborhood should call the Patrol Commander’s office at 913-322-5560 and discuss the available options to resolve the problem.

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MOTOR VEHICLE CRASHES TOP TEN CRASH LOCATIONS IN MERRIAM FOR 2013 TOP CRASH LOCATIONS 

Shawnee Mission Parkway and I-35

68

 75th and I-35

40

 Johnson and I-35

36

 67th and I-35

26

 Shawnee

Mission Parkway and An-

tioch

17

 Shawnee Mission Parkway and Hadley

13

 Shawnee Mission Parkway and Mastin

12

 Shawnee Mission Parkway and Eby

9

 75th and E. Frontage

9

 Johnson and Eby

8

The section of Shawnee Mission Parkway that is in Merriam accounted for 23% of all accidents in 2013. The top 10 locations account for 45% of all accidents in Merriam in 2013.

Sometimes even tow trucks need a tow! Merriam PD pulling a tow truck out of a snow bank during the Snow Storm of February 2013. 20


MOTOR VEHICLE CRASHES One of the fundamental duties of any police department is to investigate motor vehicle accidents. The City of Merriam has 65 miles of roadway within its borders, including approximately 3 miles of interstate highway. According to data provided by the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT) the portion of Interstate 35, just north of 75 th Street, is the busiest section of highway in the State of Kansas. KDOT estimates that over 100,000 cars drive through the city each day. With the types of roadways that run through Merriam, coupled with the high number of businesses and general drive-through traffic, the problem of traffic control and accident investigation is a full-time challenge. A study conducted by the Kansas Department of Transportation indicated that the City of Merriam has the highest per capita accident rate of any city in the state. In 2002, the department began a more aggressive approach to traffic enforcement, which eventually led to the creation of our Traffic Enforcement Unit in 2005.

2013 CRASH FACTS 

There were 532 motor vehicle accidents reported to the Merriam Police Department in 2013 compared to 457 in 2012.

Of this total 123 of the accidents involved some level of personal injuries.

There were 347 accidents where damage was over $1,000.

There were 35 accidents which were determined to be alcoholrelated.

76 Hit-and-run accidents were reported and investigated in 2013.

There were 41 private property and 62 minor accident reports taken in Merriam.

NOTE: The above statistics do not include accidents reported to KHP that occurred on I-35.

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INVESTIGATIONS ,n 2013, the Investigations Unit detectives were assigned 484 cases and solved 117 for a clearance rate of 24.1%. These cases included Attempted homicides, rapes, property crimes, financial crimes and other types of offenses. Merriam detectives were also involved with a Metro Squad investigation. Sgt. Duvanel and MPO Wes Waller assisted Platte County on a Metro Squad murder case in 2013.

Total Cases Assigned by Year

Type of Cases Assigned by Year

700

YEAR

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

600

Homicide

2

2

0

2

0

500

Burglary

46

43

29

50

61

Theft

95

101

106

114

95

False Writing Auto Theft Auto Burglary

2 20

1 27

22 38

16 65

6 30

49

49

45

47

20

Identity Theft

7

6

6

13

3

Robbery

11

6

6

11

6

Battery

33

30

17

41

26

*

*

22

62

49

Felony Sex Offenses

9

15

13

20

16

Criminal Damage

12

13

29

24

19

Criminal Threats

3

7

7

14

9

Phone Harassment

5

10

6

14

13

Unattended Death

14

14

9

17

25

Child Cases (CINC)

4

12

17

12

7

Kidnapping

0

2

6

4

2

Arson

1

0

0

0

1

Assault

1

5

3

9

7

Credit Card Fraud

8

4

40

5

4

All Others

43

111

94

86

85

TOTAL

365

458

509

626

484

400 # of Cases Assigned

300 200 100 0 2009 2010

2011 2012 2013

Battery/DV

* indicates these numbers are not available

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COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICER (CSO) The Community Service Officers are non-sworn members of the police department. Their job is to assist the public with various police-related functions that do not necessarily need to be performed by law enforcement officers. DUTIES: CSO’s are assigned to many different tasks. They are “jacks-of-all-trades.” They must be able to cover school crossings, perform records management functions, civilian fingerprinting, and routine walk-in reports. They are also act as the court bailiff. They can assist patrol with traffic control needs, motorist assistance, and other support functions. Their number one responsibility is animal control. This includes picking up strays, enforcing animal control ordinances, and helping control nuisance animals. Last year the Merriam Police Department impounded 100 stray animals, including 6 cats, 93 dogs and 1 pig. Owners claimed none of the impounded cats and 56 of the impounded dogs. The pig was adopted out to a new home. Please remember to have your pets licensed. Not only is it required by law, it will also help the police department to return your lost pet to you. Please call 913-322-5581 for information on registering your pets, or go to our website for additional information: WWW.Merriam.org/MPD. Go to Divisions (left side of page) and then to Animal Control

The following is a list of the CSO’s average calls/activities per month:  Answer 18 animal control calls.  Write 6 animal control related reports.  Confirm 4 warrants.  Serve 2 warrants.  Answer 55 phone calls.  Spend 26.25 hours per month on court related duties.  Take 2.4 walk-in police reports.  Perform 15 civilian fingerprint requests.  Performed 17 car seat checks.

“Petunia” the pig found in Merriam.

In addition to these activities, the CSO’s are also required to attend various training classes throughout the year. These include but are not limited to: Taser, CPR/AED, Animal Control Conference, handcuffing, and records management training.

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SUPPORT SERVICES EVIDENCE TECHNICIANS: The Merriam Police Department has officers who have received special training in evidence collection and processing. These trained technicians are assigned to the Patrol Division and are utilized while on duty. This has helped reduced overtime in 2013. These officers can also be called out on serious crimes to assist the detectives.

EVIDENCE MANAGEMENT: One of the community service officers is assigned to help manage the department’s recovered property and evidence. CSO Charlie Yocum is responsible for properly logging and storing all recovered property and evidence. He is also responsible for the safety and security of this evidence and must be available to respond to Municipal and District Court to testify concerning the evidentiary chain of custody. The property custodian is responsible for destroying evidence when it is no longer needed for court; disposing of other seized property by appropriate means or seeing that property is returned to the lawful owners. RECORDS MANAGEMENT: Our Records Unit is responsible for the handling of police records once taken by a police officer. These reports have to be verified, stored, and properly distributed to citizens, courts and other law enforcement agencies. Lisa Jacobs, Ronda Brumbaugh and Karen Gibson are currently assigned to our records unit. If you have any questions or need help call 913-322-5560. ALARM ORDINANCE: Each year hundreds of business, residential, and robbery alarms are received by the Merriam Police and Fire Departments. As a result a city ordinance was adopted that regulates these alarms. When too many alarms are received, the alarm owners can be fined. The purpose of the alarm ordinance is to make these alarm owners more responsible for their equipment. Invoices are sent out for those that have too many false alarms. The police department also works with the alarm owners to find ways to reduce the incidents of false alarms. When the program was started in 1999 we had 601 false alarms. In 2013 the number of false alarms were 174. The City of Merriam collected $3,000 in false alarm fines in 2013.

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SUPPORT SERVICES CROSSING GUARD UNIT: There are three school-crossing locations within the city. Part-time employees assist school children crossing the streets at these locations twice per day (one hour in the morning and one hour in the afternoon). This unit, supervised by Lt. McLaughlin, is responsible for child pedestrian safety. The crossing guards also assist the department during the Turkey Creek Festival. HOUSE WATCH PROGRAM: Each year, a number of vacationing Merriam residents will register their homes with the police department for extra patrol. The Merriam House Watch Program is a crime prevention program that is designed to reduce house burglaries and provide citizens with a sense of security while they are away from their homes. The citizen completes a simple form and officers spend designated times checking these residences while the owners are away. In 2013, 35 Merriam citizens took advantage of this program. Citizens may now complete a house watch form on-line by visiting the Merriam PD website at www.Merriam.org/MPD POLICE RIDE-ALONG PROGRAM: This is a community relations program that allows citizens to ride with a police officer during their normal shift. A citizen signs up to ride for two to eight hours on any shift they choose. They must complete a form that allows a records check to be conducted. The patrol shift supervisor coordinates with the citizen to schedule their ride-along visit. Persons under the age of 15 must have a responsible adult with them on the ride-along. In 2013, 20 citizens took the opportunity to ride with a MPD officer. CHILD SAFETY SEAT INSTALLATION: CSO’s Jaime Brokaw and Charlie Yocum are both trained and certified in the proper installation of child safety seats. Appointments can be made with either CSO and the service is free to Merriam residents and $35 for non-residents. Bring your vehicle and the car seat you wish to be installed to the Merriam Police station and they will ensure it is properly installed. The Merriam Police did 210 car seat checks or installations in 2013. ON-LINE REPORTING: The Merriam Police Department has an On-line reporting system. This is for minor crimes, suspicious activity, and house watch requests Citizens can report crimes at their convenience and helps to free up officers to respond to more serious calls. Last year we took 142 reports using this system saving roughly 213 man-hours. The on-line reporting can be found at www.merriam.org/MPD under the “File a Report” tab.

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OFFICERS AT WORK—2013 Aggravated Endangering a Child – On January 16th, a 16 month old child was seen at Children’s Mercy for a check up. Suspicious bruising was noted and later exams discovered a skull fracture. The parents reported they had picked the child up from a home daycare provider in Merriam early because the provider claimed the child was sick. Further investigation by Det. Steve Wechsler revealed the child had fallen out of a high chair and the provider failed to notify the parents. The providers daycare was closed and the case against them is still pending. (Det. Steve Wechsler, Sgt. Troy Duvanel) Aggravated Assault- On February 16th, officers were dispatched to the area of 67 th St. and E. Frontage Rd. in reference to a rolling disturbance. It was reported that a subject driving a blue Chevrolet Trailblazer had pointed a gun at another motorist. Sgt. Walton responded to the area and observed the suspect vehicle driving west on 67th St. He was able to stop the vehicle, and with the assistance of Shawnee Police, conducted a high risk vehicle stop. During the course of the investigation it was determined that a road rage incident had occurred between the two vehicles and the driver of the Trailblazer had pointed at the other driver a large knife, a stun gun, and a silver pistol. The driver of the Trailblazer had a valid concealed carry permit and admitted to owning multiple weapons. He was arrested and charged with aggravated assault and criminal restraint. He later plead to the criminal restraint charges and was sentenced to twelve months probation. Sgt. Walton and Officer Taylor Aggravated Burglary– On March 9th, PO Filson, PO Magee, and Cpl Browning responded to a burglary in progress in the 6000 block of Knox. The victim called and stated someone broke into her home, and she believed it to be her former boyfriend. Officers arrived and located a broken basement window. PO Filson and Cpl Browning entered the residence and located the suspect hiding in the basement area. He was arrested and put in jail. (PO Jeff Magee, PO Tim Filson, Corporal James Browning) Suspicious Activity- On March 21st PO Magee and PO Herron responded to the area of 6341 Robin Hood Lane on a report of three armed subjects wearing camouflage walking in the woods. Both officers observed two subjects wearing camouflage standing at the back door of the house. One subject pointed a rifle at officers. Both PO Magee and PO Herron gave verbal commands to drop the weapon. While the weapon was pointed at PO Herron he noticed a small glint of orange on the barrel indicating it may not be a real gun. After numerous commands the subject finally dropped his weapon. Both subjects were handcuffed and the third subject was found inside the house. It was later determined the rifles were Airsoft guns and the subjects believed the officers were their opponents in a game they were playing. This incident made national headlines. (PO Jeff Magee, PO Corey Herron) Suicidal Subject- On March 31rst, officers were dispatched to a subject that was hanging on the outside of the fence on the bridge over the railroad tracks on 75 th St. When officers arrived, they found a distraught male that wanted to jump from the bridge. He was contacted and talked to for two hours before officers were able to convince him to come back on the correct side of the fence. He was taken to KU Medical Center for evaluation. (Cpl. Jeremiah Waters, Cpl. Chris Brokaw, MPO Nick Weiler, PO Adam Taylor, Overland Park Police, Shawnee Police) Theft Home Depot– On April 22nd Detective Steve Wechsler and Detective Wes Waller started to investigate a theft ring at Home Depot after an initial report of stealing. The suspect was switching barcodes and paying much lower prices on items and then returning them at their original price or selling them on-line. The investigation revealed this was a multi-state theft ring and involved several state, local, and federal agencies. Total loss is estimated at greater than $300,000.00. A suspect has been identified and federal charges are anticipated soon. (Det. Steve Wechsler, Det. Wes Waller) 26


OFFICERS AT WORK—2013 Aggravated Kidnapping, Aggravated Robbery, Aggravated Burglary– On May 31, officers were dispatched to the 9900 block of Calle Sombrio in reference to a theft that had just occurred. When they arrived, they were told that a female had just been attacked by an unknown male and had her purse taken. She told officers that she was letting her daughter into their apartment and turned around when the male charged at her and put his hand over mouth, pushing her into the apartment. She defended herself by biting the male. He let go and grabbed her purse and ran away. He later dropped it in the parking lot. The victim remembered a dark colored vehicle that was acting suspicious in the parking lot and gave officers the license plate. Officers were able to track the vehicle back to an address in the 6100 block of Knox. There they contacted a male that had injuries to his hand and the female driver of the vehicle. The male was identified by the victim and arrested and the female was arrested for assisting the male in getting away. The male later plead and was sentenced to nine and half years. (Sgt. Walton, MPO Sparks, MPO Weiler, Detective Wechsler, PO Taylor, PO Rock, PO Husom.) Theft -On June 9th, Officer Palmer took a report about a white male stealing shingles from the Home Depot. A witness gave her a vehicle description and license plate number. The following night, Officer Palmer observed a pickup truck driving northbound on I-35 that was grossly overloaded with roofing shingles. The truck matched the suspect description and the license plate matched what she had reported. Officer Palmer stopped the truck and contacted a 40year old male. After observing bolt cutters in the suspect’s truck, Cpl. Lewis had a hunch to check Shelter Distribution on Merriam Dr that sells roofing shingles. Cpl. Lewis found an unsecured gate and empty pallets of the same exact kind of shingles found on the truck. A chain link fence around the property had been cut open with bolt cutters. The suspect was arrested and interviewed by MPO Mullis. MPO Mullis was able to get the suspect to confess to stealing shingles from both Shelter Distribution and Home Depot. (Officers Cara Palmer, Seth Mullis, and Corporal Phil Lewis) Driving Under the Influence X2 - On August 13th, a subject wrecked his car and was caught driving under the influence twice in one day in Merriam. He had an accident in which he ran into a house in the 5900 block of Knox. He was intoxicated and arrested for driving under the influence. He went to the hospital for what he said was a reaction to medication so he was released to the hospital with charges pending. He was released from the hospital later that day and once he returned home he got back into a car and ran into his own house in the 9700 block of 60th St. He was arrested again and placed in jail. Both DUI cases are still pending. (PO Cara Palmer, PO David Vincent) Missing Person- On October 4th, the Merriam Police Department was notified of an abandoned semi and trailer after it was towed from K-Mart’s parking lot. The tow company was concerned because no one has claimed the semi or its load. Det. Wechsler, Det. Waller and Sgt. Duvanel attempted to locate the trucker. Although several leads have been developed, the location of the trucker and the reason for his disappearance are unknown. (Det. Steve Wechsler, Det. Wes Waller, Sgt. Duvanel) Attempted Murder- On October 5th, Officer Rock was doing a business check at a convenience store in the 6900 block of Antioch. A bloody female approached him asking for help. She had a severe laceration across her neck. It was later discovered several unknown subjects entered her house in the 8700 block of 70th St, beat her, cut her throat, stole items from her home and left her for dead. She has recovered from her injuries. Case is under investigation. (PO Vincent Rock, Det. Steve Wechsler, Det. Wes Waller, Sgt. Duvanel) 27


OFFICERS AT WORK—2013 Aggravated Battery- On October 27th, officers were called to a residence in the 9000 block of 49th St., reference a disturbance. When officers arrived, the front door was open and there was a large amount of blood in the entryway. A female could be heard moaning from inside. She was located in a bedroom and was suffering from lacerations to her arm and face. She initially told officers she thought she had been shot in the face. The victim told officers she had been hanging out and drinking with friends inside her residence. Some kind of argument started and a female suspect attacked her with a broken bottle. The victim was treated at the hospital for numerous lacerations on her arms, hands, chest, and face. Detectives and the Johnson County Crime Lab investigated. (Officer Naegele and Sgt. Reynolds) Aggravated Robbery- On November 4th, officers were dispatched to Marshalls department store on an aggravated robbery that had just occurred. A female had approached the clerk, handed him a note saying she had a gun, and demanded the money from his register. He complied and she left the store. The very next night a department store in Shawnee was robbed by the same suspect. A phone call was received at the department later in the evening from a cousin of the suspect who wanted to get her stopped before someone got hurt. The case was investigated and the suspect was arrested before any further robberies had occurred. The case is still pending in district court. (Cpl. Jeremiah Waters, Cpl. Chris Brokaw, Sgt. Duvanel, PO Cameron Husom, PO Vincent Rock) Aggravated Burglary / Aggravated Kidnapping / Aggravated Robbery - On November 27th, a 61 year old male called police from the basement of his home in the 9500 block W 59 th Terr after hearing his 42 year old brother being beaten and robbed upstairs. Officers Palmer, Herron, Naegele, and Sgt. Reynolds responded to the call. Sgt. Reynolds and MPO Herron went to the back door of the residence and were met by a 25 year old male covered in blood wearing a black mask over his face. The man was arrested at the scene. The 42 year old male victim was found lying on the kitchen floor bloody and beaten. His hands and feet were bound with duct tape. He claimed he was attacked with a bat and stun gun by the male arrested at the scene The victim said a second male suspect was also involved but had fled prior to officer’s arrival. The victim was acquainted with the suspects and believed they were after money in his safe. The suspect is currently in jail awaiting trail. Detectives and the Johnson County Crime Lab responded to investigate. (Sgt. Jason Reynolds, PO Cara Palmer, PO Laura Naegele, MPO Corey Herron, Sgt. Jason Reynolds, Detective Steve Wechsler, Det. Wes Waller, Sgt. Troy Duvanel) Lewd and Lascivious Behavior– On December 9th, officers took a report from a postal employee. The postal employee was delivering mail at the Kings Cove Apartment complex and was approached by a male at the mailboxes. The suspect asked the postal employee if she was done delivering the mail. The postal employee told the male that she was and that she was about to start delivering packages and asked if he was expecting a package. The male told the postal employee yes and the employee went to the mail truck to check. The male gave her a name and she began to check for a package. The male then told the postal employee that he already had a package. When the postal employee turned around, the male had his genitals exposed. The male then ran towards one of the apartment buildings. The suspect was later identified and confessed to the incident. (PO Adam Taylor, Detective Steve Wechsler)

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COMMUNITY SERVICE CRIME PREVENTION: The department’s crime prevention specialist, Police Officer Tim Filson, manages a program that encourages people to have their home or business checked in an effort to protect them from criminal activity. An appointment is set up with Officer Filson and he meets with the resident, business owner or manager, and makes a full assessment of the building. A report of his findings is provided with suggestions for improvement. There is no fee for this valuable service. FINGERPRINT SERVICES: The Merriam Police Department provides fingerprint services during normal business hours. Many times a year, individuals need their fingerprints taken for financial bonds, the insurance industry or any other reason. We will provide this service by appointment by calling 913-3225560 to set up a time. There is a $35 fee for this service. NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH AND NATIONAL NIGHT OUT AGAINST CRIME: The Merriam Police Department believes crime prevention is a team effort. We encourage cooperation between the police and citizens. The National Night Out Against Crime is a national effort to get the citizens and their police departments together to discuss crime problems and most importantly solutions. In 2013 we held a National Night Out Against Crime and Open House at the Merriam Police Department. The event included a question and answer period, division demonstrations, barbeque (cooked by Merriam Police Officers) and a Taser demonstration.

29


COMMUNITY SERVICE VOLUNTEER CHAPLAIN PROGRAM: Chaplain Charles Boyce volunteers his time to assist our officers. He provides support to grieving family members at accident and crime scenes. In addition to these critical duties, he offers spiritual guidance to police employees and routinely rides with the officers during their patrol shifts. Charles is a youth minister, a Merriam resident, and a martial arts instructor with a 4th degree black belt in Tsuruoka Karate. POLICE OFFICER VOLUNTEERISM: Chaplain The Merriam Police Department has been involved in the Law Enforcement Charles Boyce Torch Run since 1982. The Torch Run started in Wichita, Kansas and now has Serving Since 2005 participants in all 50 states, Canada, Europe, Africa, China and Japan. The Merriam Police Department participates in events like the Polar Plunge, Cops on Top at Krispy Kreme, Popcorn Standoff at Cinemark, and the Torch Run itself throughout the year, to raise money and awareness for Special Olympics. In 2013, the Kansas City Polar Plunge raised over $72,000.

30


CITIZEN VOLUNTEERS The police department has several volunteers who help out with a variety of projects. We have citizen volunteers who help in records, and assist with DUI check points and other city events. We wish to thank all of our volunteers for the hard work they put in.

Child fingerprinting

Turkey Creek Festival DUI check lane

Maddi Stock started volunteering in 2013. She works as a civilian employee with the Johnson County Sheriffs Office at the Gardner Jail. Thank you Maddi for all your time volunteering here at the Merriam Police Department.

INTERN PROGRAM: The Merriam Police Department offers non-paid internships to college students who are seeking degrees in Criminal Justice. These students get the full experience of working in a police department. They work in all areas of the department. They help with data collection, statistical analysis, and general station duties. They observe the investigations and patrol functions by riding with the officers as they do their jobs. Any students interested in this opportunity should contact the Merriam Police Department. We had the pleasure of working with one Intern during 2013: Sean Wilkes, from Johnson County Community College.

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CITIZEN’S POLICE ACADEMY In 2008, the Merriam Police Department introduced our first Citizen’s Police Academy. Since then we have found this program to very beneficial to the citizens, the officers and the department. The citizens get a “first hand” look at what a police officer does on a daily basis. The police officers get a chance to learn what the citizens know about law enforcement, which will help them to understand why certain things happen the way they do. The classes are based off the job of a Merriam Police Officer. The citizens are given the opportunity to participate in as much of the training as they feel comfortable.

These classes consisted of more than just watching videos and listening to lectures. Over half of the classes were actual hands-on training. The students went to the firearms range to shoot handguns and even fully automatic rifles. They learned and practiced defensive tactics and some even braved getting a shock from a Taser. In addition to all the classes, and probably the most informative, the students were able to ride with a police officer during an actual police shift. This gave them a better perspective on what they had learned and exactly how it is applied.

Dear Lieutenant Darren McLaughlin, I had my ride-a-long the night of Saturday Nov 23 and wanted to let you know how it went. I showed up just before 11pm not really sure if I wanted to do it and told myself I would only stay a couple hours. I stayed till 4am and only stopped because I was so tired. I had a blast to say the least! I showed up and wasn't sure where to go so I went around back to find Officer Cara Palmer getting her car ready. She was so kind and said I could ride with her. She seemed almost excited to have a ride along. I really appreciated her enthusiasm and her genuine willingness to let me ride along. The passion for her job and the team work really made my experience so fun! In your classes you talked about the love and passion you had for being on the streets. I didn't truly and fully understand what you meant until I saw it in Office Palmer and the other officers that were working that night. (Officer Naegele, Officer Simmons, and Corporal Lewis) What a great team! I truly had a wonderful time and saw the passion and professionalism these officers have with their job. It was wonderful to see. I look forward to my next ride along in 6 months. Both my wife, Natalie and I thank you so much for the opportunity to attend the Merriam Citizen's Academy classes. I was an honor being a part of that. It was amazing to see the passion you have for your job and to see a glimpse of what you and all the officers do to keep this community safe. Sincerely, Ryan Anderson

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CITIZEN’S POLICE ACADEMY The 2013 Citizens Police Academy classes started on September 11, 2013 and ran through November 13, 2013. Each of the Tuesday night sessions lasted for three hours. The following is a list of classes:               

Domestic Violence Use of Force Taser Firearms Defensive Tactics DUI Enforcement Police Equipment Basic Patrol Procedures Traffic Stops Radar/Lidar Search and Seizure Investigations Court Tour of the Johnson County Jail Tour of Johnson County Communications Center

2013 Graduates From left to right, back to front: Johnathan Englander, Ryan Anderson , Theresa Oliver, Rick Pitman , Judy Johnson ,Andy Otto , Scott Stannard, Jeff Fenton, Stephanie Englander, Natalie Anderson, Jason Silvers, Juel Rice , Carol Lawrence, Shirley Worley

For more information or to sign up go to www.merriam.org/MPD 33


CITIZEN FEEDBACK Dear Tim, (Chief Burnett) I wanted to let you know that on December 31 officers came to our home to get us a message concerning a family emergency. My husband’s brother had been killed in an accident in Lawrence and they were trying to reach us. Our nephew had called the PD and gave a message to call him with a phone #, since he couldn’t reach us. When we arrived at home, the officers were parked across the street and approached us to relay the message. We had already spoken to another sibling and knew what this was about- and when we told the officer about it he was so kind and compassionate. He asked if there was anything he could do- and offered to have patrols watch our house as went to Lawrence for the evening. I believe his name was Taylor, although I could be wrong- we were kind of distracted at the time. But if you can check on your records to find out who it was, I would appreciate it if you would tell him how kind we thoughtful he was. He was a great representative for the police department and the city. Thank you, Pat and Nancy Wyle

On January 9th, 2013, PO Eickhoff responded to an unattended death call in Merriam. Mr. Jim Lepisto sent a message to the Chief of Police expressing his gratitude for the professionalism and caring that PO Eickhoff demonstrated during this time of grief for their family. His actions are a credit to him and the Merriam Police Department. Keep up the great work!

Dr. Mr. Waller (Detective Wes Waller): On June 28th, you were at my house working hard on my brother Kevin Boesche, who had a heart attack. I’m writing to say thank you for each of your efforts. They really made a difference that day. As hard as it was for us, there were things that had to be done, questions that had to be answered and procedures met. You all did your job and you did it with compassion. Kathy Boesche

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NEW OFFICERS Officers Hired in 2013 David Vincent was hired March 25th, 2013. He has a Bachelor Degree from Washburn University in Criminal Justice.

Paul Hutchinson was hired June 19th, 2013. He served in the US Marine Corps for 9 years.

Dylan Rogers was hired June 19th, 2013. He came to us from the City of Merraim Public Works Department. He has a Bachelor degree from KU.

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Proudly Serving Since 1951

Retired Members of the Merriam Police Department Serving 10 or More Years: Years of Service

Police Officer Larry Birt Chief William Lietzke Sergeant Dan Kellerman Police Officer Charles Yocum Sergeant Albert Jones Sergeant Randy Davis Chief Kenneth Sissom Sergeant Robert Smith Sergeant Winfield (Syd) Tubbs Sergeant Jerry Bybee Chief James Browning Captain Gene Nicholson

March 1988 December 1979 January 1984 July 1977 May 1983 January 1981 January 1979 June 1977 August 1979 October 1963 November 1979 June 1969

July 2012 December 2011 June 2011 February 2009 December 2008 February 2007 December 2005 November 2002 September 1997 March 1992 June 1992 1984

24 32 27 32 25 26 26 25 18 29 12 23

Chiefs of Police Through the Years: Chief Tim Burnett Chief Bill Lietzke Chief Kenneth Sissom Chief James Browning Chief Donald Lemos Chief Douglas M. Haynes Chief Joseph “Mike” Donahue Chief Jack Dodson Chief Jack R. Sherman Chief Perry Sarver

2012 - Present 2006 - 2011 1992 - 2005 Currently Merriam’s Mayor! 1979 -1992 1977 -1979 1966 -1977 1962 -1966 1965 Chief’s salary was $650 per month! 1956 -1962 1955 -1956 1953 -1955

For more detailed history please view our website: www.merriam.org\MPD

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The Merriam Police Department

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Proudly Serving Since 1951

Merriam Police Department 9010 W 62nd St. Merriam, KS 66202 (913) 322-5560

Profile for City of Merriam, Kansas

Merriam Police Department 2013 Annual Report  

Since 1992, the Chief of Police has created an annual report which is presented to the city council and the mayor. The annual report provide...

Merriam Police Department 2013 Annual Report  

Since 1992, the Chief of Police has created an annual report which is presented to the city council and the mayor. The annual report provide...