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FOREST MANAGEMENT PLAN 2012 - 2021

MERCK FOREST AND FARMLAND CENTER www.merckforest.org 路 802.394.7836 路 PO Box 86 路 3270 Route 315 路 Rupert VT 05768


Merck Forest & Farmland Center  Forest Management Plan  2012‐2021 

  Cover Page    Property Owner: Merck Forest  Foundation, Inc      911 Address: 3270 Rt 315, PO Box 86 Rupert,VT 05768    Contact Information: 802‐394‐7836    Property Location: Rupert, Bennington County, Vermont    Plan Preparer: Jack O’Wril, MFFC Staff Forester    Merck Forest, 3270 Rt 315, PO Box 86 Rupert, VT 05768    Contact Information: info@merckforest.org    Total Property Size: 3164 acres  Acreage Covered in this Plan: 3097 acres (excludes farm)    Number of Stands:    Plan Start Date (pending approval): _____June 2012_____________________        Landowner Signature:  ____________________________________     Date: _____________                                              Tom Ward, Executive Director, MFFC        County Forester Signature: _________________________________   Date: _______________                                                        Chris Stone, County Forester                 


TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

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FOREST MANAGEMENT PLAN

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SECTION 1: FOREST MANAGEMENT OBJECTIVES SECTION 2: PROPERTY ADMINISTRATION SECTION 3: LANDSCAPE DESCRIPTION SECTION 4: RESOURCE ASSESSMENT SECTION 5: HARVEST SCHEDULE SECTION 6: ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND FOREST MONITORING SECTION 7: COMPARTMENT DESCRIPTIONS SECTION 8: STAND DESCRIPTIONS AND MANAGEMENT RECOMMENDATIONS SECTION 9: FOREST WORK SCHEDULE

5 9 10 11 18 19 20 25 26

COMPARMENTS - OVERVIEW

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COMPARTMENT 1 COMPARTMENT 2 COMPARTMENT 3 COMPARTMENT 4 COMPARTMENT 5 COMPARTMENT 6 COMPARTMENT 7 COMPARTMENT 8 COMPARTMENT 9 PLANTATIONS

37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46

COMPARMENTS – DETAILS

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COMPARTMENT 1 COMPARTMENT 2 COMPARTMENT 3 COMPARTMENT 4 COMPARTMENT 5 COMPARTMENT 6 COMPARTMENT 7 COMPARTMENT 8 COMPARTMENT 9

48 60 82 89 106 122 128 136 145

APPENDICES

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APPENDIX A APPENDIX B APPENDIX C APPENDIX D APPENDIX E APPENDIX F APPENDIX G APPENDIX H APPENDIX I APPENDIX J

151 153 155 156 166 167 172 173 174 175

REFERENCES

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Merck Forest Management Plan

Executive Summary    This document is the comprehensive forest management plan (FMP) for Merck Forest and  Farmland Center located in Rupert, Vermont, owned by the Merck Forest Foundation.  This document  outlines the management goals and activities that pertain to the forest on the property (i.e. forestland  and road system) that are located outside of the farm area.  This plan does not include plans for the  farm area, nor permanently maintained fields, a few of which are scattered throughout the property.  This document has been crafted to meet Natural Resource Conservation Service guidelines for  management plans, from which Merck will receive cost‐share funding for creating the plan.   Additionally, this plan meets the requirements set by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) and the  Forest Guild Model Forest Program.  Although Merck currently does not participate in either of these  programs, it should strongly consider doing so in the future.     This document builds on the work of Merck’s previous forest managers.  In writing this plan, the  forest ecosystem dynamics paradigm was used as the salient consideration to formulate management  decisions.  This is to say the impact of management activities on the ecosystem as a whole must be  considered in decision making.  Many activities will have effects (positive or negative) on different  aspects of a particular ecosystem; these impacts will influence the future use of the land and must be  considered.    Three main goals were set for the writing this FMP.  The first was that the property‐wide forest  inventory collect enough data to give an accurate measure of the forest’s current condition.  The second  goal was to analyze this data and design forest stand prescriptions that protect and enhance the forest’s  health, while meeting MFFC’s forest objectives (see Section 1 of the plan).  The third goal was to  streamline the overall management activities in such a way that makes carrying it out as simple as  possible.  Like it’s forest stands, MFFC is a dynamic organization.  The simpler the management strategy,  the easier it is to practice “excellent forestry”.      The management strategy is simple: focus on small portions of the entire property each year.   Some time ago, MFFC was delineated into nine compartments which range from about 300‐550 acres.   One compartment will be managed each year, for the next ten years.  (This will be true with only some  exception.  Compartment eight will be entered twice.  The two smallest compartments will be easily  managed, leaving time to “catch up” in other compartments in those years.)      The list of management tasks will be quite consistent from year to year.  During any given year,  Merck should plan to complete the following management activities:      

Mark and administer a timber sale  Maintain and update roads and bridges  Control invasive plants/monitor for invasive insects  Re‐delineate stand boundaries (more on this later)  Perform in‐house Timber Stand Improvement (TSI) treatments 

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Merck Forest Management Plan

 The following is a list of the overarching top priorities for the Merck’s forest management during these  next ten years:    1. Follow the Plan.  Over the next ten‐year management cycle some forest treatments will follow  this plan; others will not.  That’s okay.  Conditions will change and Merck’s forest manager must  be ready to adapt strategies to meet the Foundation’s overall goals.  Regardless of whether any  particular forest treatment follows this plan, it is imperative that all forest data is collected,  treatment areas are mapped and described, and all this information be carefully organized and  maintained as part of Merck’s Forest Management Database.     2. Control Invasive Species.  Merck Forest is not an island, entire of itself.  This is especially evident  when it comes to controlling invasive species.  The scale insect that has led to beach bark  disease affects nearly every stand on the property, and the Asian gypsy moth has devastated  some of Merck’s stands in the past.  The three current invasive insects that are knocking at  Merck’s doorstep are the emerald ash borer, the hemlock wooly adelgid, and to a lesser degree,  the Asian long‐horned beetle.  If and when these insects reach Bennington County, Merck will  need to collaborate with experts to determine the best path forward.      Invasive plants, on the other hand, are significantly more manageable if caught early and  managed aggressively.  Merck is lucky in that it is relatively free of these invaders.  For years  honeysuckle and barberry have quietly been hiding out in small patches throughout the forest.   If Merck acts now to treat these populations, it stands a chance of controlling them on into the  future.     Garlic mustard, on the other hand, appears to be the most recent invader.  It is known to spread  easily and rapidly, and it is doing just that at Merck.  While the honeysuckle and barberry are not  spreading rapidly and can wait to be treated, the garlic mustard is moving very fast.  Treating  this herbaceous plant right now is a top management priority.      3. Re‐Delineate Stand Boundaries.  The forest stands at Merck should be re‐delineated for two  very good reasons.  1. These boundaries were delineated 30 years ago and possibly longer.  In  the time since, lots of cultural treatments and natural disturbances have changed the stand  conditions.  New stand boundaries will lead to more accurate analysis of forest data and to  more appropriate treatments; and 2. By re‐delineating stands, and making them much larger,  we will be able to collect much better (more statistically accurate) forest data.  This is extremely  important; no forest manager at Merck will ever see an entire rotation from start to finish.  The  best we can do is keep excellent track of our work (see #1 “Follow the Plan”), and gathering data  that is statistically accurate and will therefore be as meaningful as is possible to future  managers.     

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Merck Forest Management Plan

As mentioned above, this endeavor can take place just a bit a time.  Each year a single  compartment can be re‐delineated.       4. Road Maintenance. From a timber management perspective, a forest stand’s potential value is  largely dependent on its accessibility.  Poor access means poor value.  From an ecological  perspective, roads that are poorly maintained cause water runoff problems such as soil erosion  and siltation of nearby streams.  Finally, from a ‘whole property management perspective’,  Merck’s staff uses these roads a lot (e.g. for cabin checks, hauling firewood, etc.), and so keeping  them well‐maintained will make the most of staff time and will save head‐aches down the  proverbial road.        Simply put, maintained roads are an essential part of good forest stewardship.  Besides this, it is  a good investment.  Roads that are kept up are far easier to repair when damage is done (e.g.  Irene).      Merck should plan to maintain a percentage of its road network each year; some of this work  can be completed in‐house, but the bulk of it should be carried out as part of regularly‐ scheduled timber sales.        5. Collaborate with Outside Partners.  As an organization, Merck would do well to collaborate  with a variety of partners on its forestry projects.  Currently we are partnering with Audubon  Vermont on the Foresters for the Birds (FFtB) Program, and with the State on a number of  projects.  Strengthening these ties is important to Merck’s forestry program, as is reaching out  to other partners.  The list of potential partners is very large, and should be explored during this  management cycle.          Note: The entire FMP can be read online at merckforest.org   

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Merck Forest & Farmland Center  Forest Management Plan  2012‐2021 

1. Forest Management Objectives  This plan draws from both traditional forest management concepts (i.e. Multiple‐use approach) and  more modern concepts (i.e. Ecosystem Management).  Both concepts are important and useful in  articulating goals.  Regardless of terminology, the forest ecosystem dynamics paradigm is used in  formulating all management decisions.  This is to say the impact of management activities on the  ecosystem as a whole—soil, water, flora, fauna, climate—must be strongly considered in decision‐ making.  These impacts—both positive, negative, and the large grey area in between—will influence the  future use of this forestland and must be the fundamental consideration when planning activities.  In  short, we can simply say that maintaining or enhancing forest health is the salient goal of all the forest  management at Merck.    Beyond maintaining forest health, it is Merck Forest’s objective to provide a number of valuable forest  products from its land. These products include: timber and fuelwood and the respective income  generated from such harvests; educational, research and demonstration opportunities for the public;  sap production; maintenance and creation of wildlife habitat; maintenance of recreational  opportunities; and the protection of historic and cultural resources.  The overarching goal at Merck  Forest is to set high forest management standards, based on well‐founded silvicultural and ecological  principles, and to serve as a place of demonstration to the general public.        1.1 Forest Health (Water, Soil, Flora, Fauna, Climate)  The maintenance of water and soil quality should take precedent during all management activities.     Water quality will be maintained through appropriately planned and executed road construction and  harvest operations.  Under no circumstances should future soil productivity be compromised.  All  management activities should follow the “Harvest Guidelines” outlined in Appendix A.    There is an opportunity to:  1. Protect or improve soil and water quality.  2. Implement both even‐aged and uneven‐aged silvicultural practices to meet the forest  objectives.  3. Create a mix of deciduous and coniferous forest stands of various types in stands that vary  in size, shape, age, height, and tree species composition.  4. Regenerating poorly stocked and low vigor stands that are declining in productivity to grow  new stands and sustain forest cover and timber production for the long‐term.  5. Increase collaborative efforts with forest health professionals.   6. Collaborate with researchers to design and carry out carbon storage studies; or simply allow  researchers to use Merck’s working forest for such studies.       

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Merck Forest & Farmland Center  Forest Management Plan  2012‐2021 

1.2 Demonstration/Education/Research  The central goal to all of Merck Forest’s activities (farm and forest) is to demonstrate the sustainable use  of its natural resources and to serve as a place where innovative practices and research can take place.      There is an opportunity to:  1. Provide a venue for field demonstration and tours of sustainable forest management that  can be open to students, forestry professionals, landowners, and the general public;  2. Collaborate with forestry professionals, organizations, companies, researchers and students  to carry out innovative research aimed at advancing the forestry profession (e.g. Foresters  for the Birds partnership with Audubon Vermont).  3. Provide a venue for students and the general public to learn about basic forest ecology,  management, and conservation principles.      1.3 Timber and Fuelwood Supply  Merck’s forestland will provide a sustained yield of sawtimber and fuelwood as the foundation of its  forest management strategy.  The foundation will use a small portion of the sawtimber for in‐house use,  which will mainly be from the softwood plantations.  The great majority of sawtimber removed from the  property will be sold and the income generated will be added to Merck’s operational account.  A  significant portion of the fuelwood removed each year will be used in‐house to heat the cabins, the VC,  caretaker’s cabin, and for use in our sugaring operation.  The remainder of fuelwood‐quality trees will  be sold for stumpage.    There is an opportunity to:  1. Demonstrate examples of sustainable timber harvests.  2. Harvest mature sawtimber to generate revenue.  3. Improve size and quality of sawtimber by reducing stand density, improving spacing and  retention of more desirable species.  4. Improve sawlog production and wood quality, and harvest fuelwood, by removing trees in  low quality stands afflicted with insect, disease and other damage to prevent the spread of  the damaging agent or to remove a species that may be a vector for insect spread.  5. Capture sawlog quality in mature and over mature trees before it is reduced or the trees  decline in value.  6. Regenerating poorly stocked and low vigor stands that are declining in productivity to grow  new stands and sustain forest cover and timber production for the long‐term.  7. Increase fuelwood production that can be used as a local alternative to fossil fuels.      1.4 Wildlife Habitat:  The majority of Merck Forest is currently used to provide wildlife habitat, and to grow timber and  fuelwood.  Merck’s wildlife habitat objectives are quite compatible with its timber and fuelwood  objectives.   We will use silvicultural practices to meet our wildlife habitat objectives over the next 10‐

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Merck Forest & Farmland Center  Forest Management Plan  2012‐2021 

year management cycle.  Timber harvesting will be the primary tool to achieve or work toward these  objectives.    As in the previous management cycle, Merck will continue to use Degraaf et al’s (2005) forest structure  recommendations as a guide to maximize the benefits of forest management to wildlife habitat.  (see  below)     

Composition

        Size‐class distribution     Regeneration  5‐15  Sapling‐Pole  30‐40  Sawtimber  40‐50  Large sawtimber/old forest  <10              Cover type distribution     Deciduous (non‐oak)     Short rotation  5‐15  Long rotation  20‐35  Hard mast‐oak  1‐5  Coniferous  35‐50        Non‐forest     Upland Openings  3‐5  wetlands  1‐3  DeGraaf et al. 2005 pp82      There is an opportunity to:    *See Appendix B “Wildlife Habitat Management Guidelines” for details.      1.5 Sap Production  Merck’s sugaring operation is an important component to the organization.  In 2011 a number of  investments were made to design a more efficient system that previously existed.  Despite the  inevitable natural variability of sap flow from season to season, it is not unreasonable to expect to  produce .25 gallons of syrup per tap with this new efficient system.  (See map in Appendix C.)    There is an opportunity to:  1. Demonstrate the collection of a non‐timber forest product (sap), and the creation of a  value‐added forest product (syrup, cream, etc.). 

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Merck Forest & Farmland Center  Forest Management Plan  2012‐2021 

2. Generate income through retail sales.  3. Expand the sugaring operation by creating a new sugarbush near Watruss Rd.     1.6 Recreation  Many visitors at Merck come to use the property for recreation—mainly for hiking—which has been one  of the objectives of the organization from its beginning.  Many of the aspects of attracting recreators to  the property lie outside the scope of this document.  However, while not all roads/trails are intended to  be used for recreation (ie temporary skid trails), the main roads used for forest management are the  same used for recreation.  These roads should be cleared and seeded after timber harvests.    There is an opportunity to:  1. Maintain roads as part of timber sales so that they can be enjoyed by hikers and skiers.   2. Use volunteers to perform basic road and trail maintenance.  This is especially important for  areas that are frequently used by visitors but will not be managed for some time.    1.7 Historic and Cultural Resource Protection  There is a great deal of evidence of Merck Forest’s predominantly agricultural past. There are a number  of old foundations, cellar holes, stone piles, and miles of stone walls. These resources should be  accurately mapped and protected to the extent possible during management activities.      There is an opportunity to:  1. Created a map of the cultural resources on the property.                                           

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Merck Forest & Farmland Center  Forest Management Plan  2012‐2021 

2. Property Administration  2.1 Legal Considerations  a. Conservation Easements  All of Compartment 9 has on it a conservation easement held by the New England Forestry Foundation  (Littleton, MA) (see document in Appendix D).  The easement is written such that forestry activities can  be carried out on the land, however, Merck must notify NEFF well before carrying out management  activities.  This document does not plan for any management activities in this area until 2019.  It  therefore makes sense to send NEFF a copy of this document, which would allow them ample time to  make a site visit prior to any treatments.  NEFF Contact:  Chris Prior, Forester/Easement Monitor  978‐952‐6856 x107    b. Rights‐Of‐Way  Merck Forest holds one known permanent Rights‐Of‐Way, which begins at Rt 315 and crosses Judy  Buechner’s Wind Gap Farm property, and ends at the Visitor’s Center.  c. Inholding  There is a single known inholding on the property, which is located in stand 2U (See Appendix E).  The  parcel is a triangular‐shaped, 4.8acre inholding and is owned by a Mr. or Ms. Carmody.  d. Other Noteworthy Issues  Along Merck’s southern border there is a cabin on the property, which has presumably been built and is  used by a neighbor.  The most recent tax map available shows that this neighboring parcel is owned by  “W. Matteson”.  The cabin is not new; it looks as if it has been there for at least 25 years, probably many  more.    2.2 Future Administrative Tasks  a. ROWs—Permanent and Temporary  I. Anthony ROW.  In order to carry out management within Compartment 1, a ROW needs to obtained  from a neighbor.  The best choice here, would be to obtain a permanent ROW over Garner Anthony’s  property.  This property is a small parcel (~5acres) with a logging road that runs from Watruss Rd right  through Merck Forest property.  Gaining this ROW should be considered a high priority.  II. Mattason ROW.   A ROW through this property would allow MFFC to access a number of stands (7B,  7D1, 7D2) in Compartment 7 without using a woods road on its property which is steep, and often quite  wet.  As mentioned above (2.2.d), there is a cabin on Merck Forests’ property located immediately  adjacent to the property boundary with Mattason.  Given all of this, a permanent ROW should be readily  attainable over the existing woods road which runs through Mattason’s property and onto Merck Forest  property.  Gaining this ROW is a low/moderate priority.  III. Zaplatel ROW.  Attaining a ROW over Zaplatel’s land will be necessary before treating Stand 2U,  lower 8B, and a number of stands in Compartment 9.  There are numerous woods roads linking Merck to  Roger’s Road through Zaplatel’s land.  Temporary ROWs should be obtained the year before harvests in  stand 9C in 2019, and 8B in 2021. 

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3. Landscape Description  3.1 Climate and Biophysical Region  Merck Forest is located in the Taconic Mountain Biophysical Region.  Merck Forest has predominantly  high elevation, moderate to steep sloped sites.  There is significant range in the quality of these sites— some have moist, nutrient‐rich soils; others have dry, shallow to bedrock, nutrient‐poor soils.    Most places within this region receive 40‐50 inches of rain, with the highest elevations receiving up to  60 inches.  Average July temperatures at moderate elevations are about 70 degrees (F), while average  January temperatures are 22 degrees (F).  Merck’s higher elevations likely have less than 100 days of  growing season; lower elevations may have up to 140 days.    3.2  (Brief) Historical Land Use  Merck Forest has a long and varied human history.  To read a general outline of the property’s history,  see Appendix F, “Land Use at Merck Forest: 1761‐Present”.  Today, the majority of Merck Forest’s  property is covered in approx. 70‐120 year old second growth, northern hardwood forest.  Most of these  stands began after heavy cutting or field/pasture abandonment. The height of land clearing in the area  was around 1840; over the next 100 years (1840‐1940), the main forest products which likely came off  of Merck’s property include softwood and hardwood timber, fuelwood and wood for charcoal  production.  In 1950, George Merck began managing the land to demonstrate sustainable forestry  practices and this has been the overarching land use ever since.    3.3 Adjacent Properties  a. Current Land Uses  The most current aerial photograph shows the majority of Merck Forest’s neighbors maintain their land  as forest. The most significant exception are the parcel’s owned by Judy Buechner—located mainly to  the north and east of Merck’s property; a significant proportion of her lands are maintained as hay  fields.   While there are more than twenty parcels that abut Merck’s property boundary, a handful of  landowners (Buechner, Zapletal, Hatch, The Great Retreat) own the majority of this land.    b. Neighbor Interaction  Merck Forest has enormous potential to collaborate with the many large landowners in the area;  however, there currently are currently no significant collaborative projects.  The most active neighbor  interaction is with Judy Buechner, who regularly manages her forest land and at times uses Merck Forest  roads as access timber harvests.     

       

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4. Resource Assessment  4.1 Soil Resource    The Common Soil Series, and Their Descriptions, of Merck Forest  The Dutchess series consists of very deep, well drained soils on glaciated uplands. They formed in loamy  glacial till. Permeability is moderate.  Slopes range from 0 to 70 percent.  Well drained. Permeability is  moderate.  Dutchess soils are level to very steep soils on glaciated uplands. They are on broad plains and  on the tops and side slopes of hills, ridges, knolls and mounds.  Slopes range from 0 to 70 percent. The  soils formed in loamy glacial till underlain by interbedded, folded phyllite and slate, schist, or shale.  The Pittstown series consists of moderately well drained soils formed in lodgement till derived mainly  from slate, phyllite, shale, and schist. These soils are very deep to bedrock and moderately deep to a  densic contact. They are nearly level through moderately steep soils on uplands. Slope ranges from 0  through 25 percent.  Pittstown soils are nearly level through moderately steep soils on glaciated  uplands. Slope ranges from 0 through 25 percent. The soils developed in loamy till derived principally  from dark phyllite, slate, or schist.  Moderately well drained. Surface runoff is medium.  The Berkshire series consists of very deep, well drained soils formed in till. They are on glaciated  uplands. Permeability is moderate or moderately rapid. Slope ranges from 3 to 75 percent. Berkshire  soils are gently sloping to very steep soils on glaciated uplands. Slope ranges from 3 to 75 percent. The  soils developed in till of late Wisconsin age, derived principally from acid, gray to black or olive mica  schist with some phyllite, granite and gneiss.  Well drained. Permeability is moderate or moderately  rapid.  The Taconic series consists of shallow, somewhat excessively drained soils formed in till. These soils are  on bedrock controlled, glacially modified hills, ridges and mountain sides. Bedrock is at a depth of 10 to  20 inches. Slope ranges from 3 to 80 percent.  Taconic soils are gently sloping to very steep on bedrock  controlled, glacially modified landforms. Slope ranges from 3 to 80 percent. The Taconic soils formed in  material derived mainly from strongly folded phyllite, schist, quartzite and slate.  Somewhat excessively  drained. Surface runoff is very low to high. Saturated hydraulic conductivity is moderately high or high.  The Macomber series consists of moderately deep, well drained soils formed in loamy till derived from  phyllite and slate. They are on glacially modified bedrock controlled landforms. Hard bedrock is at a  depth of 20 to 40 inches. Slope ranges from 3 to 80 percent. Macomber soils are on bedrock controlled,  glacially modified land forms where the till is derived mainly from strongly folded phyllite, schist,  quartzite, and slate. Slope ranges from 3 to 80 percent. Well drained. Runoff is medium to rapid.  (See soil series map in Appendix G.)    4.2 Water Resources  Merck Forest drains into two major watersheds.  The majority of the property drains into White Creek,  and a portion into Mill Creek; both of which are a part of the Greater Hudson River Watershed that  drains into the Long Island Sound in New York.  A small portion of the property (mostly within 

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compartment 2) drains into the Mettawee River, which eventually flows north and empties into the St.  Lawrence Seaway in Quebec.    However, the majority of streams, ponds, and vernal pools on the property are very small on account of  the property’s high elevation.  All of these water resources shall be protected during all management  activities.  This will require that roads be maintained diligently so as not to pollute these waterways;  bridges shall be put in place where appropriate; and buffers shall be added to protect streams, ponds,  and vernal pools during timber harvests.  The details of these buffers vary depending on the site  conditions, and can be found in the individual stand prescriptions.      4.3 Forest Resource—Inventory Methodology  The forest inventory was designed using a systematic grid, with sample points located roughly ten chains  apart.  The points were found using a handheld PDA with ArcPAD.   At each sample point, basal area,  volume, species composition, and a number of qualitative data were taken.  The statistical goal was to  sample to a level of precision such that with an 80% confidence level, our percent error was less than  25% for basal area.  This was attained for most of the stands.   It should be noted that our statistical  goals were not lofty—by any means—but they were realistic given the time available to cruise over 100  stands.  After the stands have been re‐deliniated, and made significantly larger, the numbers from the  next forest inventory (2022) should be statistically much better.        4.4 Forest Resource—Natural Community Types  Natural Community Variants (reference: Thompson, Sorenson 2005)  Northern Hardwood Forest.  This is the most abundant forest type at Merck, and throughout Vermont.   It is typified by sugar maple, American beech, and yellow birch.  Many of the natural communities on  this list are variations of the Northern Hardwood Forest community.  Examples of this forest type can be  found throughout the property.  Rich Northern Hardwood Forest.  This community type has soils that are enriched through colluvial  processes (downslope movement) or through mineral rich bedrock.  These are high productivity forests,  and can be found in pockets within the following stands: 1a,1G,1H,1I, 1J; 2A, 2J, 2R, 2U; 3C; 4A3, 4C, 4E;  5A2, 5C, 5J, 5M; 6B; 7C; 9D.  Red Spruce‐Northern Hardwood Forest.  This is a variable community that may result from locally  shallow soils, or from especially moist soils.  This community is often surrounded by northern hardwood  forest, and is in many ways related to that community.  At Merck this type can be found in stands 2E, 3B,  3BNP, 4G, 4MNP, 8F.  Hemlock Forest/Hemlock‐Northern Hardwood Forest.  These are two relatively rare natural  communities at Merck Forest.  However, there are two fine examples on the property:  Stand 2H and  Stand 4J. (2H has better evidence of Hemlock Forest community type; 4J is likely Hem‐Northern  Hardwood Forest.) 

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Mesic Red Oak‐Hardwood Forest.  These forests are similar to Northern Hardwood Forests, but have  significant amounts of red oak in the canopy.  This is a somewhat common forest type on the property,  and can be found in stands 6A, 5K, 5I, 4F, 4K.  Northern Hardwood Talus Woodland.  This natural community MAY exist in parts of Stand 7CNP.   The  area is very steep and very shallow to bedrock in places.  Mesic Maple‐Ash‐Hickory Forest.  This community shares much in common with Northern hardwood  Forests, but also contains significant numbers of Central Hardwood tree species.  Examples of this type  MAY be found in Stand 6E, which has some of the few hickories on the property (shagbark), but other  examples might be found in stands 6D, 4F and 4K.  Dry Oak Woodland.  These woodlands occur on south‐facing upper hill slopes.  Soils are acidic,  excessively drained silt loams with abundant rocky fragments.  The overstory oaks are short in stature,  and the crowns frequently appear gnarled.  The trees are farther apart than in typical forests, and the  canopy is more open.  These communities are mapped and discussed at length in Heather O’Wril’s “Dry  Oak Woodland Rapid Assessment” (see merckforest.org for full document)   See Stands 6C, 6D, and  6ANP, as well as 5BNP.  Dry Oak Forest.  Nearly identical to Dry Oak Woodlands in terms of species composition, but this  community type has somewhat less droughty soils.  At Merck, examples of Dry Oak Forest likely exists  near or around the examples of Dry Oak Woodland.  See Stands 6C, 6D, 6ANP, and 5BNP.  Dry Oak‐Hickory‐Hophornbeam Forest.  This community is somewhat more nutrient‐rich than Dry Oak  Forests, and Dry Oak Woodlands.  Stands where this type MAY exist are: 6C, 6D, 6ANP, 5BNP, 1ANP,  1ENP; 2CNP; 5N.  4.5 Forest Resource—Forest Health Threats  Forest health is a tricky issue because forest ecosystems are complex.  Weather patterns fluctuate and  native “pest” populations rise and fall. When serious health issues arise, it’s in Merck’s best interest to  consult the local, state and federal experts for insight and advice.  That said, arguably the biggest threat  to forest health at Merck comes from non‐native invaders.  The following is a list of the species that will  likely threaten forest health over the next ten years at Merck:  a. Beech‐Bark Disease affects most of the American beech on the property.  The scale insect which  causes the initial wound in beech trees in an invader, but has been around for many decades.   Merck is currently in the “Aftermath Forest” stage, meaning that it’s beech stands have already  experienced the first wave of beech mortality.  Most of its residual beech are defective and  declining, but some (few) large trees still exist and appear healthy.  Most of these have probably  not been infected by the scale, or the canker.  Or, they might have genetic resistance.  It will be  important for Merck to follow the most current guidelines to best manage it’s beech stands.  (Gen Tech NE‐331).  b. Asian gypsy moth.  Gypsy moth populations reached outbreak levels during the last  management cycle.  They commonly favor oak forests, but some forest notes suggest that 

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Merck’s sugarbush was impacted by this event.  Currently, gypsy moth populations appear to be  low on the property, but should be monitored regularly.  c. Emerald ash borer, Asian long‐horned beetle, and Hemlock wooly adelgid (EAB, ALB, and HWA)  These three invaders have not yet reached Merck Forest, but are making their way.  Asian long‐horned beetle poses the greatest threat since it can potentially ravage Merck’s  hardwood species.  However, it is currently quarantined in Massachusetts, and the populations  do not naturally spread very fast.    HWA is very close—in Windham County, and may reach Bennington county during this  management cycle.  While Merck has very few hemlock stands, we should track HWA’s spread  and manage our stands according to the latest guidelines.  (see Fifth Symposium on Hemlock  Woolly Adelgid in the Eastern United States—Asheville, NC, 2010).  EAB.  This species is close to Merck Forest (in eastern NY state), and will likely reach MFFC  during this management cycle.  Currently, there is no known control of this exotic species.  The  State has recently come out with management guidelines which encourage land managers to: 1.  Maintain ash as a forest component, 2. Promote a diversity of native tree species (where ash  exists as greater than 20% of basal area, reduce the ash component), 3. Do not panic and  liquidate all ash trees, 4. Monitor ash stands, 5. Educate the public about this issue.  (See “Ash  Management Guidance for Forest Managers”)  d. Honeysuckle and Barberry.  These two invasive plants have been on the property for some time  and are not spreading at an alarming rate.  They will, however, if left untreated.  Merck’s  invasive plant map should be regularly updated.  These species need to be treated PRIOR to any  forest treatment, and then monitored and very likely treated again afterwards.    e. Garlic mustard.  This plant has entered the property relatively recently, but is spreading fast.  It  spreads easily along roads and hiking trails, and can be found in small pockets along Old Town  Road.   Treating this plan is a TOP priority over the next ten years.   It is easy to locate (along the  road system), easy to identify, and easy to pull up.  The problem is that is spreads like wildfire,  and takes a continued effort to control.  The best way to do this would be to schedule one to  two weeks of manual control (“pulling”) every year over the next 7‐10 years.  (This is the  required minimum timeline since its seeds are viable up to 7 years.)   These work weeks are a  great way to involve volunteers, and can be managed by a staff member, or by an invasive plant  management consultant.  Regardless of how it is done, it must happen right away.      4.6 Forest Resource—Timber   The 2012 timber cruise shows that a number of stands are stocked full enough to warrant a thinning, or  regeneration harvest (ref: USFS NE‐603).  Some stands have trees afflicted with old age, insect, disease  or physical damage that would designate them as low timber quality stands.  Some stands—or portions  of stands— are now mature or overmature; and desired tree size, age and quality have been achieved,  or growth levels have dropped off.  These stands are now ready to be harvested and regenerated before  sawlog quality is reduced, or the trees decline in economic value and die.   

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See individual stand prescriptions for timber management details, and see Compartment Description  Section (below) for volume totals.     4.7 Rare, Threatened or Endangered Species   As of this writing, there are no known rare, threatened or endangered species on Merck Forest’s  property.      4.8 Access Roads  Woods roads exist throughout the property, and evidence of past logging can be seen everywhere.   (Details of past timber harvests are noted in each stand description section.)  The main access roads that  can be used by log trucks (without trailers) include Old Town Road, East Hollow Road, and part of  Antone Rd.  Old Town Road was maintained by the Town of Rupert up until the 1950’s; all other roads  were either created or repaired in the 1950’s by William Myers and Vernon Beebe for forest access and  fire control.  Since this time, they have been maintained on an as‐needed basis, usually along with  logging operations.      Old Town Road: OTR is largely is fine shape, which is essential for management since this is the  property’s main artery.  In the 1990’s, the lower portion of Old Town Road (intersection with East  Hollow down to the south gate) was repaired by Bruce Waite, and then again repaired in 2011, after  Tropical Storm Irene.  Current plans include adding a bridge over White Creek at it northern crossing.      OTR has a number of landings off of it.  The landing near OTR’s intersection with East Hollow Rd should  be ditched before its next use.      East Hollow Road:  This road is in fine condition.  It was seeded very well after its last use, and just some  basic maintenance during the next entry.       Gallop Road: Much of this road has not been used by vehicles in quite some time, but it is in generally  good shape.  Will need basic maintenance ( grade and add water diversion structures) during the next  entry.      Mitiguy Road: The stretch of this road that runs from the lower landing, up to where it intersects with  Howe Road is in poor condition.  Currently, this is a wet road without enough drainage structures.  It  should also be re‐crowned and graded.  Although the location of this road is not ideal, the choices are  limited in this area on account of the steep terrain.      Marquand Road:  Most of this road will not be used during the next management cycle, however, it will  need repairs similar to Mitiguy Rd.          Harwood Road (aka Discovery Rd):  Needs to be cleared of branches and brush, which is closing in the  road; and needs additional water structures.  Place additional conveyer belt water bars between the sap  house and the field.  (used belt material source:  www.ashmus.com)    

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Merck Forest & Farmland Center  Forest Management Plan  2012‐2021 

Harwood Road need repair throughout its length.      Stone Lot Rd: In fine shape.  Upper portion was maintained during 2011 harvest.    Kowenhoven Road:  The upper and lower portions of this road are in decent shape, and only need to be  cleared of blowdown.  This road is not normally used by vehicle traffic, but may be used increasingly to  access the leased sugarbush.   The middle portion of this road—the portion that runs down a very steep  slope in stand 4E—should be closed and revegetated.  The site is too steep, and unnecessary.   Perhaps a  small foot trail could connect these two.      Hatch Road: This road is somewhat steep, and needs repair since it will be used during this management  cycle.  The road needs to be cleared of brush in some places, re‐graded, possibly re‐crowned, and water  structures put into place.      Fisher and Graves Roads:  These both will need to be maintained during the next entry.  They are  located in an area with a lot of seeps; road drainage should be put into place accordingly and the road  may need to be re‐crowned so as to outslope.    Masters Mountain Road:  So long as this is a “Natural Area” this road is unnecessary.  Of course, it is a  popular hiking road and it needs a lot of basic clearing maintenance.    Lookout Road:  Lookout is very likely a popular hiking road and it will be used by vehicles during this  management cycle.  Overall, it is in good condition.      Hammond and Meyer Rd:  These both tend to be wet roads and could use more effective drainage  structures.      Wade Lot Road:  Wade Lot is very likely a popular hiking road, and it will be used by vehicles during this  management cycle.  Overall, it is in good condition.      Schenk Road: Schenk road sees much higher vehicle traffic now that the sugarbush is leased than it has  formerly.  The road was evaluated last fall, prior to much of the vehicle activity.  It was in fine condition  at the time, but should be re‐evaluated.    Clark’s Clearing Road:  There is a portion of Clark’s Clearing Road that seems to be located over a seep.   The area is steep and wet and very obviously should be retired, and re‐routed to a drier location.       Mt Antone Road: This road is high and dry, and overall in a fine condition.    McCormick Road: This road was used during the last management cycle, but will not be used during this  cycle.  Since it is likely a popular hiking road, it should be cleared of blowdown, and is in need of a simple  foot bridge at the stream crossing since the current bridge has fallen apart.  

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Merck Forest & Farmland Center  Forest Management Plan  2012‐2021 

4.9 Boundary Line Status  Merck Forest’s boundary line has not been re‐marked in many years.  While old yellow paint can be  found if one searches, it should be re‐painted during this management cycle.  This can be planned for all  in one season, or can be taken on in small pieces.  This would be a logical time to map the property  boundary and add this information to Merck’s GIS.     

                                                   

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Merck Forest & Farmland Center  Forest Management Plan  2012‐2021 

5. Harvest Schedule  5.1 Area Scheduling  Area scheduling is a forest management strategy that is “hands‐on, low‐tech, and provides safeguards  against under‐ or over‐cutting” (Leak, 2011).  It breaks a forest parcel into management units and  focuses a year’s management on that area.  In Merck’s case, each year the organization will focus its  forest management efforts on a single Compartment.  This management plan outlines treatment  recommendations for each stand within these Compartments, but it has been writing in a way that gives  flexibility to the forester carrying out these treatments, and the plan assumes that forest stands will be  re‐assessed prior to beginning any management activities.      Some time ago, MFFC was delineated into nine compartments which range from about 300‐550 acres.   One compartment will be managed each year, for the next ten years.  (This will be true with only some  exception.  Compartment eight will be entered twice.  The two smallest compartments will be easily  managed, leaving time to “catch up” in other compartments in those years.)    The list of management tasks will be quite consistent from year to year.  During any given year, Merck  should plan to complete the following management activities:      

Mark and administer a timber sale  Maintain and update roads and bridges  Control invasive plants/monitor for invasive insects  Re‐delineate stand boundaries   Perform in‐house Timber Stand Improvement (TSI) treatments 

5.2 Plantations  Merck’s plantations are all about 60 years old, and have a significant volume of sawtimber.  These  plantations should be thinned, and milled into dimensional lumber for in‐house use.  Harvests will need  to be scheduled ahead of time so that boards are able to be stored and dried properly.   

                 

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Merck Forest & Farmland Center  Forest Management Plan  2012‐2021 

6. Adaptive Management and Forest Monitoring  6.1 Plan Updates  The main forest management goal over this next management cycle is to document all activities on the  property.  The forest management plan documentation gives a baseline to measure against over the  following ten years.  If MFFC does not carry out a planned activity, it must be recorded in a way that will  be easily found and understood by future managers.  A simple “Change of Prescription” document has  been added to this plan, and can be found in excel form on the MFFC forestry computer (Desktop>2012  Forest Management Plan folder> Forms)  (See Appendix I).    6.2 Monitoring Forest Stand Dynamics  Continuous Forest Inventory (CFI):  Monitoring forest stand dynamics is a critical part to sustainable forest use, and should be a cornerstone  of Merck’s management strategy.  Many large landholders use a Continuous Forest Inventory (CFI)  system, with permanent plots that are monitored on a regular basis.  Merck should strongly consider  designing such a system during this management cycle.  In order for the data to be meaningful, the CFI  system should be simple, and measurements that are taken should be more or less foolproof.  For  example, tree diameters can be measured very accurately with a tape and with very little training, while  tree or log heights take a well‐trained eye to measure accurately.  (It would likely be sufficient to only  measure basal area, and diameters.  This would be quick and easy to do, and would generate very useful  data.)  After such a system is devised, the plots can be installed and measured over the following ten  years—covering one compartment per year.    Regeneration:  As many of the stands in Merck Forest are reaching maturity, learning how to most successfully  regenerate desired species becomes hugely important.  As a policy, Merck should do two things to  monitor regeneration success.  First, and most important, is to always map group selections and patch  cuts and save them to the organizations GIS.  Second is to install permanent plots within these gaps.   These plots should be installed right away so that we know, if you will, how the race began between the  understory species.  The permanent plots need not be too large, but they should produce seedling  counts (tallying ‘free to grow’ stems).    6.3 Climate Change   Climate change will play an important role in sculpting the way MFFC manages its forest resource.  The  two most useful things this organization can do in this regard is to 1. Stay current on the climate change  literature, and 2. Highlight the ways we are adapting to this change through outreach and  demonstration.  For detailed information and current guidelines, see “Forestry Adaptation and  Mitigation in the Changing Climate: A Forest Resource Manager’s Guide for the Northeastern US” (Gunn  et al).     

   

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Merck Forest & Farmland Center  Forest Management Plan  2012‐2021 

7. Compartment Descriptions  7.1 Compartment 1  This compartment abuts the farm, and surrounds the Visitors’ Center and parking lot, making it  the area most people see first when visiting Merck Forest.  This compartment has some of the  most valuable individual trees in the forest (some very high quality sugar maple in stand 1A),  and it also has a significant proportion of regenerating forest (1D, 1C).  The 1942 aerial photo  shows much of the land at lower elevation was cleared for agriculture at the time; this is  evidenced by the apple trees that can be found scattered about.    While there are some xeric soils (portions of stand 1M, 1E, 1A, 1H), the majority are mesic.  To  round out the mix, mill creek runs through this compartment.  Stands 1D, 1K, and parts of 1I  have hydric soils.      Stand 1D has a high percentage of white ash which seem to be affected by ash yellows.  While  many of the ash are affected and show signs of infection in their very light crown foliage,  however, not many have died.  These conditions, along with rich soils, have led to a  shelterwood effect where excellent growth of advanced regeneration (mostly sugar maple) can  be found.      The majority of the compartment has northern hardwood forest, along with some mixed forest  (northern hardwoods and red spruce) in stand 1B, and two oak stands (1E, 1M).  Aspen and  white birch are components of nearly all of these stands.    Total standing volumes for all natural stands include 719 Mbf of sawtimber, and 2,704 cords of  pulpwood.  The one plantation (1La) is of European Larch, and has 17 Mbf and 5 cords of  standing volume.      This stand is scheduled to be managed in 2018.      7.2 Compartment 2  This is a large compartment, comprising 348 acres.   It has a wide range of soil types and  topography ranging from Rich Northern Hardwood Forest on a gentle slope (2I), to a ridge top  with xeric soils and a beech and shrub early successional community (2S), and to a mature  hemlock forest growing on a very steep north‐facing slope.  The majority of soils are mesic, and  pockets of RNHF are found in a few stands in this compartment; very few pockets of hydric soils  have formed since much of the area is well‐drained.     

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Merck Forest & Farmland Center  Forest Management Plan  2012‐2021 

While mature forests cover the majority of this area, there is a large proportion of early  successional forest, which has resulted from three events: 1. A five acre patch cut in 2011 (2N);  2. A 55 acre shelterwood cut in ~2005 (2K, 2T, 2V); and a microburst windstorm (July 1999) that  affected about a third of the compartment.    This compartment is unique in that the entire area in within the Mettawee River Watershed,  which eventually flows north to the St. Lawrence.  Nearly all the rest of Merck forest lies within  the Hudson River Watershed, and flows south to Long Island Sound.      The total standing volume in this compartment is 571Mbf and 2149 cords.  This area is  scheduled to be managed in 2016.     7.3 Compartment 3  Compartment 3 was managed in 2012.  Stands 3C and 3D, the most productive stands in the  compartment, were treated at that time with a free thinning and a selection harvest  respectively.  After the harvest, Stand 3C was converted to a sugarbush.    No timber harvests are planned in this Compartment during this management cycle, however,  important understory treatments are needed.  Stands 3A, 3B, and part of 3E are located on  northeast slope of Spruce Peak (aka The Gallop), and have adequate levels of regeneration,  primarily red spruce and yellow birch, with some sugar maple.  The stands along the north  slope are a different story.  Stands 3C, 3D, and 3F have varied histories and composition.  All  three of these stands problems with interference species‐‐‐mostly striped maple.    This problem seems to have risen from the 1999 windstorm, which blew over parts of 3F and  3D, and the gaps were then filled in by striped maple.  These understories should be treated  with a simple mechanical cutting using a brush saw, which should allow desirable species to  begin to regenerate.    Stand 3C was not affected by the windstorm, but it is stocked largely with mature sugar maple  and has striped maple in the understory.   While the canopy will very likely be treated during  the next management cycle, it’s understory should be treated now.  This treatment will give  desirable species a head start—perhaps 10 years to become established—prior to treating the  canopy.    The total standing volume in this compartment is 338Mbf and 1244cords of pulpwood. This  compartment was managed in 2012, and will not be re‐entered during this management cycle,  besides non‐commercial treatments.         

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Merck Forest & Farmland Center  Forest Management Plan  2012‐2021 

7.4 Compartment 4  Compartment 4 is very large, 420 acres, and has access roads throughout.  About 100 of these  acres are used as a sugarbush (the other 100 acres are in Comp 5) which MFFC currently leases  to a neighbor.      The majority of the area is mature northern hardwood forest but also includes Rich NHWD  Forest (4A3, 4C)  mature oak forest (4F,4K), red spruce forest (4G), open field (4OP), and a  matrix of scrub/shrub forest (4N, 4B, 4I) which was a part of the “100 Acre Meadow”, has  numerous apple trees, stone walls and a few stone foundations, and is now reverting back to  forest.  Due to its agricultural past, these areas have some of the densest concentrations of  invasive plants on the property—honeysuckle and barberry.      This compartment drains into the north branch of White Creek; slopes are generally moderate  and soils are mesic, except on south‐facing slopes where they are xeric.    Total standing volumes for all natural stands include 1,207 Mbf of sawtimber, and 2,995 cords  of pulpwood.  There are two plantations—2Sp1 and 2Sp2.  2SP1 runs along Lodge Road and is  very small (~.2 acres) located near the cabin.  2SP2 is about 3 acres of immature spruce, and is  largely crowded out by hardwoods.  They each have approximately 2Mbf of sawtimber; 2SP2  also has 54 cords of pulpwood.        The portion of this compartment that is used as a sugarbush should be managed during the  next tubing replacement; the rest of the area will be managed in 2020.      7.5 Compartment 5  Compartment 5 is the largest at 680 acres, and has a very diverse management history.  About  100 acres are used as part of the leased sugarbush (the other 100 acres is located in  Compartment 4); The area west of Lookout Rd (about 60 acres) was designated a “Natural  Area” in 2002; Stand 5I received one of the largest and heaviest cuts on the property in some  time and now has about 35 acres of early successional forest.        Most of the compartment has mesic soils on moderate slopes, but it also includes a significant  portion of steep slopes with mesic to xeric soils.  The compartment includes Beebe Pond, Beebe  Creek, Birch Pond.  Stand 5E is the only area with hydric soils.      The 1942 aerial photo shows that portions of stands 5F, 5G, and 5K were open at that time.     

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Merck Forest & Farmland Center  Forest Management Plan  2012‐2021 

Total standing volumes for all natural stands include 1,207 Mbf of sawtimber, and 2,995 cords  of pulpwood.      There are eight plantations, which is the most by far of all compartments.  Many are listed as 2  acre plantations in the records, but are actually about 1 acre probably due to natural mortality  and in‐house use.  Combined, the plantations have 60Mbf and 17Mbf of white spruce and red  pine sawtimber respectively, along with 64 cords of pulp.       The portion of this compartment that is used as a sugarbush should be managed during the  next tubing replacement; the rest of the area will be managed in 2015.    7.6 Compartment 6  Compartment 6 has the most standing volume of sawtimber—both per acre, and total—of the  entire MFFC property.  The majority of this standing volume is red oak, sugar and red maple,  beech, white ash, with higher volumes of popple and white birch in Stand 6E.  The forest is  primarily even‐aged, and has only been entered occasionally for harvest.    The majority of this Compartment has been designated a “Natural Area” for at least the past 10  years, and possibly for as long as 30 years.  The details of this are unclear since the only  documentation that discusses this designation is the 2001 Management Plan (Olsen).  In that  plan, it says “Changes to this Natural Area policy can only be made by a passing motion with a  2/3 majority vote of the trustees in two consecutive years.”      The use of this area is entirely based on the objectives of the Merck Forest Foundation.  If the  area is to remain a designated Natural Area, the Foundation should articulate the reasoning  behind the designation, which will then guide management strategies and tactics.    Essentially, this compartment can be broken in three parts:   1. High elevation dry forest.  This covers much of the same area as Master Mountain Road,  and all the area around Mt Antone.  These forests are dry, have thin soils, produce poor  quality timber, and have very high recreational value.  2. Mid‐elevation slopes.  This covers the majority of stand 6B, 6A, and the lower elevation  of 6D.  This part has deeper soils than the ridgetops, and hold most of the high quality  standing timber in the compartment.  And at the same time, much of the area is located  on very steep ground, making entry difficult at best.  3. The last part is the low elevation forest, which is basically made up of Stand 6E.  This  area has younger forest, deeper soils, and is extremely accessible.  It also has some of  the highest aspen stocking on the property (something which will only be perpetuated 

23


Merck Forest & Farmland Center  Forest Management Plan  2012‐2021 

through regeneration harvests.  Almost half of this stand has been excluded from the  Natural Area (for unknown reasons).      The high elevation forest will not produce quality timber; the mid‐elevation forest will produce  excellent timber, particularly oak, but is largely located on very steep slopes.  The lower  elevation forest is different altogether.  It has only moderately sloping terrain; it has excellent  accessibility; and it has a large aspen component, which is lacking on the property, and will  require a timber harvest to regenerate.  For all these reasons, it is advised that the Executive  Director and the Board consider maintaining the Natural Area status of the upper elevations;  and exclude all of stand 6E from the Natural Area.      The total standing volume within this compartment is 1393Mbf sawtimber and 2990 cords of  pulp.   This area is scheduled to be managed in 2014.        7.7 Compartment 7  Compartment Seven is located south of Old Town Road, and consists of 307 acres of steep to  moderately steep land that drains directly into White Creek.  The entire compartment is north‐ facing and has predominantly mesic soils.  The area is predominantly Northern Hardwood  Forest, but also has some talus communities (7CNP), and signs of Rich NHWD Forest (7F).     Stands 7A, 7D2, and 7E were managed in the last 15 years.  Accessing the remaining area will be  a challenge; potential river crossings will need to be scouted in the western half of the  compartment.  The eastern half will be accessible once a bridge is constructed to link Old Town  Road to East Hollow Rd, which is scheduled for summer 2012.  Stand 7B may be accessed over  neighboring properties (see 2.2.a above).    The total standing volume within this compartment is 832Mbf sawtimber and 2710 cords of  pulp.   This area is scheduled to be managed in 2017.      7.8 Compartment 8    This Compartment is primarily made up of pole and sawtimber‐sized northern hardwood forest.   The Compartment has mostly hardwoods (sugar maple, ash, yellow and white birch, and red  oak) but one stand is predominantly softwood (8F is mostly red spruce), and another stand is  trending in this direction (8G has a strong red spruce understory).  The area has just about an  even mix of south, west and east‐facing slopes, and is bisected by the east branch of White 

24


Merck Forest & Farmland Center  Forest Management Plan  2012‐2021 

Creek.  This river, along with its feeder streams must be protected during management  activities.  Only a small percentage of the compartment has been managed in the last 30 years and the  stocking figures reflect this with basal areas typically above 100sqft.    MFFC will need to carry out a few tasks prior to entering these stands:  1. A permanent bridge should be constructed at the beginning of East Hollow Rd, which is  necessary to gain access to the entire Compartment.    2. East Hollow Road and Hatch Road will need its water structures to be cleared and  repaired, and Hatch will need to be graded (all this work can also be carried out by the  forest operator as part of the logging contract.)  3. MFFC needs to negotiate a temporary ROW with its neighbor Zaplatel to access 8B (and  2U, 9C, and 9E)    The total standing volume within this compartment is 742Mbf sawtimber and 3922 cords of  pulp.   This area is scheduled to be managed in 2013 and 2021.      7.9 Compartment 9  This compartment consists of 234 acres of high elevation northern hardwood forest.  Some   Soils are predominantly mesic, and slopes are moderate to steep—the steepest slopes  occurring in stand 9E and 9C.  This is an oddly shaped compartment, surrounded by neighboring  lands; some stands will require a ROW over neighboring lands before entry (see 2.2a above).     New England Forestry Foundation holds a conservation easement on the entire compartment  requiring Merck to submit harvest plans to NEFF before starting management activities.   Also, a  portion of the compartment lies above 2,500 ft, and will require an ACT 250 permit before  entering these areas.      The total standing volume within this compartment is 121Mbf sawtimber and  2,679cords of  pulp.   This area is scheduled to be managed in 2019.     

8. Stand Descriptions and Management Recommendations  See ƐĞĐƚŝŽŶƚŝƚůĞĚΗŽŵƉĂƌƚŵĞŶƚĞƚĂŝůƐΗ͘

    25


Merck Forest & Farmland Center  Forest Management Plan  2012‐2021 

9. Forest Work Schedule    2012/13   Compartment 8                       

1. Timber harvests  8E—Variable Retention Thinning  8G—Variable Retention Thinning  2. Invasive Plant Control  Current Compartment  8E, 8G (No known invasives. Treat if found before entering).  Work required in other compartments:    2A, 2N, 1F, 1J, 1K, 1L (garlic mustard)    4N (barberry)  Along East Hollow Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Old Town Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Mitiguay Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Marquand Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Feteroff and Burke Trail (garlic mustard)  3. Road Maintenance  a. Lower Old Town Rd   b. East Hollow Rd   c. Hatch Rd  d. Bridge Construction to access East Hollow Rd.  e. Add drainage to East Hollow/Old Town Rd Landing  4. Paint Property Boundary   a. Comp 8  b. Plus a portion of either Comp 2 or Comp 9 if possible.  5. Re‐delineate stand boundaries  a. Comp 8  6. Controlled Burn  a. Stand 5I  b. Stand 4F           

26


Merck Forest & Farmland Center  Forest Management Plan  2012‐2021 

2014   Compartment 6 

 

1.Timber harvests   6E—Single Tree Group Selection   5K—Single Tree Group Selection   ***this treatment was added because  compartment 6 is small, and 5K abuts 6E.  2. Invasive Plant Control  Current Compartment   6E, 5K (No known invasives. Treat if found before entering).  Work required in other compartments:   2A, 2N, 1F, 1J, 1K, 1L(garlic mustard)   4N (barberry)   Along East Hollow Rd (garlic mustard)   Along Old Town Rd (garlic mustard)   Along Mitiguay Rd (garlic mustard)   Along Marquand Rd (garlic mustard)   Along Feteroff and Burke Trail (garlic mustard)  3. Road Maintenance   Lower Old Town Rd    Lower Lookout Rd  4. Paint Property Boundary    Comp 6  5. Re‐delineate stand boundaries   Comp 6 

                         

27


Merck Forest & Farmland Center  Forest Management Plan  2012‐2021 

2015   Compartment 5 

 

1. Timber harvests   5A—Single Tree Group Selection   5B1—Single Tree Group Selection   5B2—Intermediate Treatment   5F—Single Tree Group Selection + Patch Cut   5G—Single Tree, Group Selection   5J—Single Tree, Group Selection  2. Invasive Plant Control  Current Compartment   Treat all stands prior to entering for timber harvest   Work required in other compartments:   2A, 2N, 1F, 1J, 1K, 1L (garlic mustard)   4N (barberry)   Along East Hollow Rd (garlic mustard)   Along Old Town Rd (garlic mustard)   Along Mitiguay Rd (garlic mustard)   Along Marquand Rd (garlic mustard)   Along Feteroff and Burke Trail (garlic mustard)  3. Road Maintenance   Lower Old Town Rd    Lower Clark’s Clearing   Wade Lot Rd  4. Paint Property Boundary    Comp 5  5. Re‐delineate stand boundaries   Comp 5 

             

28


Merck Forest & Farmland Center  Forest Management Plan  2012‐2021 

2016   Compartment 2                 

             

1. Timber harvests  2E—Single Tree and Group Selection  2F—Single Tree and Group Selection  2I—Variable retention thinning  2K—Overstory Removal (final shelterwood cut)  2N—Single Tree and Group Selection  2T—Overstory Removal (final shelterwood cut)  2V—Overstory Removal (final shelterwood cut)  2. Invasive Plant Control  Current Compartment  Treat all stands for invasive plants BEFORE entering.  2A and 2N have known patches of invasives  Work required in other compartments:    1F, 1J, 1K, 1L (garlic mustard)    4N (barberry)  Along East Hollow Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Old Town Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Mitiguay Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Marquand Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Feteroff and Burke Trail (garlic mustard)  3. Road Maintenance   Lower Stone Lot Rd   Marquand Rd   Mitiguay Rd   Howe Rd   Need to determine access for 2T and 2K  4. Paint Property Boundary    Comp 2  5. Re‐delineate stand boundaries   Comp 2  6. Controlled Burn   Stand 5I 

 

29


Merck Forest & Farmland Center  Forest Management Plan  2012‐2021 

2017   Compartment 7                       

1. Timber harvests  7B—Single Tree and Group Selection  7D1—Single Tree and Group Selection  2. Invasive Plant Control  Current Compartment  Treat all stands for invasive plants BEFORE entering.  Work required in other compartments:    2A, 2N, 1F, 1J, 1K, 1L (garlic mustard)    4N (barberry)  Along East Hollow Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Old Town Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Mitiguay Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Marquand Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Feteroff and Burke Trail (garlic mustard)  3. Road Maintenance   Lower Old Town Rd   Fisher Rd   Graves Rd  4. Paint Property Boundary    Comp 7  5. Re‐delineate stand boundaries   Comp 7 

                   

30


Merck Forest & Farmland Center  Forest Management Plan  2012‐2021 

2018   Compartment 1           

             

1. Timber harvests  1B—Free thinning  1D—Patch Cut  1E—Free thinning  1I—Free thinning  (Presumes Merck acquired a ROW over lands of Garner Anthony.)  1M—Single Tree Selection (Only after invasive plants have been controlled in  neighboring stands).  2. Sugarbush Conversion  1H—Consider developing a new sugarbush in this stand  3. TSI  1C—Understory treatment  4. Invasive Plant Control  Current Compartment  Treat all stands for invasive plants BEFORE entering.  1F, 1J, 1K, 1L have established invasive plant populations, and should be treated.  Work required in other compartments:    2A, 2N (garlic mustard)    4N (barberry)  Along East Hollow Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Old Town Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Mitiguay Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Marquand Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Feteroff and Burke Trail (garlic mustard)  5. Road Maintenance   Woods Road leading from Watruss to Merck Forest   McCormick Rd   Harwood/Discovery Rd   Northern portion of Old Town Rd  6. Paint Property Boundary    Comp 1  7. Re‐delineate stand boundaries   Comp 1 

   

31


Merck Forest & Farmland Center  Forest Management Plan  2012‐2021 

2019   Compartment 9                       

1. Timber harvests  9B—Single Tree and Group Selection  9C—Commercial Improvement Cut and Patch Cut  2. Invasive Plant Control  Current Compartment  Treat all stands for invasive plants BEFORE entering.  Work required in other compartments:    1J, 1K, 1F, 1L, 2A, 2N (garlic mustard)    4N (barberry)  Along East Hollow Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Old Town Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Mitiguay Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Marquand Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Feteroff and Burke Trail (garlic mustard)  3. Road Maintenance   East Hollow Rd   Lower Old Town Rd  4. Paint Property Boundary    Comp 9  5. Re‐delineate stand boundaries   Comp 9 

                     

32


Merck Forest & Farmland Center  Forest Management Plan  2012‐2021 

2020   Compartment 4                 

             

1. Timber harvests  4A1—Femelshlag (Forester for the Birds) and Patch Cut  4B—Single Tree and Group Selection  4D—Single Tree and Group Selection  4E—Single Tree and Group Selection  4F—Shelterwood, first entry (Presumes adequate levels of desirable advance  regeneration)  4H—Improvement Cut  4i—Group and Single Tree Selection  4K‐‐ Shelterwood, first entry (Presumes adequate levels of desirable advance  regeneration)  4L—Single Tree and Group Selection  4M—Single Tree and Group Selection  2. Invasive Plant Control  Current Compartment  Treat all stands for invasive plants BEFORE entering.  4N has patches of barberry, and must be treated.  Work required in other compartments:    1F,1J,1K,1L,2A, 2N (garlic mustard)    4N (barberry)  Along East Hollow Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Old Town Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Mitiguay Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Marquand Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Feteroff and Burke Trail (garlic mustard)  3. Road Maintenance  Old Town Road   Lower Gallop Rd  Lower Kowenhoven Rd  Lodge Rd  Hammond Rd  4. Re‐delineate stand boundaries   Comp 4 

 

33


Merck Forest & Farmland Center  Forest Management Plan  2012‐2021 

2021   Compartment 8                           

1. Timber harvests  8A—Single Tree and Group Selection  8B—Single Tree and Group Selection  8B1—Single Tree and Group Selection  8C—Single Tree and Group Selection  2. Invasive Plant Control  Current Compartment  Treat all stands for invasive plants BEFORE entering.  Work required in other compartments:    1J, 1K, 1F, 1L, 2A, 2N (garlic mustard)    4N (barberry)  Along East Hollow Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Old Town Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Mitiguay Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Marquand Rd (garlic mustard)  Along Feteroff and Burke Trail (garlic mustard)  3. Road Maintenance   East Hollow Rd   Lower Old Town Rd   Hatch Road  4. Re‐delineate stand boundaries   Comp 8  (only if this was not completed during 2012/2013 

                   

34


Merck Forest & Farmland Center  Forest Management Plan  2012‐2021 

20XX*   Sugarbush Management         

1. Timber harvests *Manage during regularly scheduled tubing replacement.  4D—Single Tree and Group Selection  4L—Single Tree and Group Selection  4M—Single Tree and Group Selection  5D—Free Thinning  5M—Single Tree and Group Selection  5N—Single Tree and Group Selection   

35


Compartments

d

2 R

oa

3

oa d

O

ld

To w

n

1

t Rd .

Loo k ou t R

Tow d l O

oa nR

d

E

H a st

o

R llow

d

8

9

d.

6

R oa d

k ou

5

Old Town

Loo

Sc h

e nc

kR

4

7 Legend Compartments

Primary woods roads

Secondary woods roads

0 0.1250.25

0.5

0.75

Miles 1

ÂŻ

36


360 acres

Compartment 1

Total Sawtimber

719.174 1.99770556

Total Cordwood

2704.7 7.51305556 stats--BA

Stand ID

BA

AGS

MSD

1A 1anp 1B 1C/Bsouth 1D 1E 1F 1G 1H 1I 1J 1K 1L 1M 1N 1O 1P

80

54

87 92 70 111 64 82 89 65 96 89 80 116

FSF stage

tpa

For Type

stocking

BA above B

Sawtimber

Cords

acres

10.95

111

B

10

3.5

4

59.5

208.25

63 56 27 91 24

10.26 7.05 7.4 8 6.34

146 293 213 286 251

A-B B B A B

17 22 0

2.48 1.01 0.38 2.08 0

7 11 9 15 6

44.7 12.9 35.9 23.9 14.9

49 62 10 36 42 50 52

11 9.61 10.2 10.5 8.6 12.8 10.91

25 25 25-mixed 25 25 55 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 55 25

B A-B B A-B A-B A-B A

12 19 -5 26

2.58 2.41 0.36 2.64 1.7 3.22 3.63

8 9 8 11 10 3 12

19.3 44.4 8.9 17.6 16.8 5.1 19.9

110.856 13.029 13.642 49.712 0 0 49.794 107.004 3.204 46.464 28.56 16.422 72.237

pole pole pole

112 155 88 142 191 83 168

-6

10 46

total saw total cords

stats--vol

points

Con Lvl

LCL

UCL

%e

CV

LCL

UCL

%e

CV

238

14

90

68

92

15

31

2888

3448

16

34

312.9 141.9 323.1 358.5 89.4 0 154.4 399.6 71.2 193.6 168 15.3 238.8

6 5 6 14 5

90 90 90 90 90

73 80 56 100 48

100 104 84 122 80

15 13 20 10 25

19 19 24 21 26

2092 0 -76 1291

2868 2352 647 2863

15 123 127 38

19 181 155 80

9 14 4 5 21 4 5

90 90 90 90 90 90 90

69 78 36 68 75 47 95

95 99 94 124 102 113 137

16 12 45 29 15 41 18

26 26 39 31 39 36 19

1993 1204 -477 952 1242 -680 318

3177 3620 1207 4321 2173 7133 6939

22 50 230 63 27 121 91

37 105 200 68 72 105 96

regen sap pole small saw mature OG

37


Compartment 2 Stand ID 2a 2b 2c 2cnp 2d

BA 87 68 88

AGS 44 32 48

MSD 10.77 11.15 8.48

2e 2f

93

36

10.07

100 111

68 75

8.53 8.4

tpa 126 93 193

571.159

Total Cordwood

2149.9

stocking A-B B A-B

BA above B 17 -2 18

Sawtimber 3.8 2.19 2.6

Cords 8 6 8

143

Forest Types 25 25 25 25 25

A-B

1.57

11

219 238

31 25

A-B A-B

23 0 41

acres 19.3 10.9 9.1 2.7 9.9

4.02 4.02

8 10

10.7 17.8

2g

25

2h

23 67 4

3.9

23

11

1.46

7

38.1 30.4

18 60 -7 25 -2 -10 -5 20

2.07 0.79 2.03 0.58 2.38 0.86 2.7 1.58

12 21 6 10 6 6 4 9

14.8 2.4 7.1 4.5 10.4 19 24 41.9

total saw 73.34 23.871 23.66 0 15.543 43.014 71.556 0 0 0 0 42.9 55.626 0 0 0 30.636 1.896 14.413 2.61 24.752 16.34 64.8 66.202

9.2

0

23.4 6.3 5.6 7.7

2i

137

110

7.95

348

25

A

2j 2k

74

34

10.82

101

25 25

B

2n 2o 2p 2q 2r 2s 2t 2u

88 160 63 95 68 60 65 90

72 140 29 20 52 16 40 41

8.55 5.88 10.27 7.43 11.76 7.83 8.26 9.62

192 789 92 270 82 155 141 156

55 31 25 25 25 25 25 25

A-B

2v

Total Sawtimber

B A B B b A-B

25

per acre

total cords 154.4 65.4 72.8 0 108.9 85.6 178 0 0 0 0 253 266.7 0 0 0 177.6 50.4 42.6 45 62.4 114 96 377.1 0

1.641261 Mbf/a

348 acres

6.177874 cords/a stats--BA points con lvl LCL 9 90 64 5 90 58 5 90 77

UCL 110 78 98

%e

CV 27 15 12

43 16 12

stats--vol LCL 1065 -78 -283

UCL 6527 4455 5473

%e 72 103 110

CV 116 110 117

6

90

73

113

21

26

613

2534

61

75

7 7

90 80

79 92

120 131

21 18

28 33

772 463

7266 7570

80 88

110 162

6

80

113

160

17

28

2038

5772

48

80

14

80

65

83

12

34

1.46

1958

34

94

5 1 7 4 5 5 4 12

80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80

72

104

18

26

779

3362

62

91

75 52 50

115 83 70

22 23 16

27 33 24

3 1683 51

1161 3081 1665

99 29 94

122 43 137

81

99

10

26

614

2538

61

155

For Type

38


Compartment 3 Stand ID 3a 3anp 3b 3bnp 3c 3c1 3d1 3d2 3d3 3e 3f

BA

AGS

MSD 8.36 8 7.58

tpa

90 80 80

34 20 31

198 198 211

88 110 94 113

73??? 87 79 90

10.52 8.72 8.9 10.5

124 238 189 177

97 72

43 40

8.5 9.56

206 130

Forest Types 25 25 30 27 27 25 25 25 25 25

stocking A B Q

BA above B 20 10 -20

Total Sawtimber

338.514

Total Cordwood

1244.8

Sawtimber Cords 2.19 8 1.45 7 1.03 11

B A A-B A

18 40 24 43

4.6 2.41 2.94 3.82

5 13 10 13

A B

27 2

0.63 1.37

13 7

acres 10.8 9.3 25.8 7.2 29.5 2.9 15.5 17.9 8.5 14.7 6.5

total saw 23.652 13.485 26.574 0 135.7 6.989 45.57 68.378 0 9.261 8.905

total cords 86.4 65.1 283.8 0 147.5 37.7 155 232.7 0 191.1 45.5

6

Con Lvl 80

stats--BA LCL 83

11

80

81

16 20 16 16

90 90 90 90

74 94 81 100

6 5

80 80

92 64

102 80

points

UCL

%e 97

CV

stats--vol LCL 1300

UCL 3078

7

12

97

9

21

497

100 125 107 125

15 14 14 11

34 36 37 27

3388 1733 2049 3106

5 10

8 15

42 780

%e

CV 40

67

1569

52

125

4595 3078 2937 4534

26 28 30 19

59 72 80 47

1225 1956

93 43

155 63

39


Compartment 4 Stand ID 4a1 4a2 4a3 4anp 4b 4c 4d 4e 4f 4g 4h 4i 4j 4k 4l 4m 4mnp 4n

BA 95 80 75 113 120

AGS 28 45 45 40 96

MSD 7.73 9.27 8.26 9.77 11.57

tpa 249 141 163 202 153

97 104

56 92

10.15 9.07

150 210

130 120 156 132 93

93 55 120 90 73

8.5 7.44 9.82 10.4 12.39

273 345 256 201 107

120

50

12.32

126

Forest Type 25 25 25 25 55 25 25 25 25 31 25 25 31-mixed 55 25 25 25 25

Total Sawtimber

1207.798

Total Cordwood

2995.5

Sawtimber 0.67 3.21 3.32 1.57 5.65

Cords 11 5 6 10 10

27 34

3.9 4.17

7 10

A-B A A A-B A-B

30 50 86 32

5.29 1 7.8 5.52 3.5

10 18 11 15 9

A

50

4.73

13

stocking A-B B B A A

BA above B 25 10 5 43

A-B A

acres 19 30.7 52.3 12.8 19.1 25.8 22.4 22.8 10.4 30.5 11.6 8.9 34.2 12.2 8.8 18.1 10.5 29.3

total saw total cords 12.73 209 98.547 153.5 173.636 313.8 20.096 128 107.915 191 0 0 87.36 156.8 95.076 228 0 0 161.345 305 11.6 208.8 69.42 97.9 188.784 513 42.7 109.8 0 0 0 0 0 0 138.589 380.9

8 4 4

con lvl 80 80 80

stats--BA LCL 81 53 60

UCL 113 106 90

5

80

93

6 5

80 80

8 4 5 8 3

4

points

12 33 21

24 41 25

stats--vol LCL 126 1860 38

UCL 1214 4560 6592

147

23

33

3902

83 73

110 135

15 30

24 44

80 80 80 80 80

115 85 116 112 68

145 155 196 152 118

12 29 26 15 26

80

97

142

19

%e

CV

%e 81 42 98

CV 162 52 121

7400

31

45

2290 2757

5505 5574

41 34

69 49

23 36 38 30 24

3831 226 4953 2848 2733

6747 1783 10638 8194 4270

27 77 36 48 22

55 95 53 96 20

23

3068

6395

35

43

40


Total Sawtimber

Compartment 5 Stand ID 5a1 5a2 5b1 5b2 5bnp 5c 5d 5e 5f 5g 5h 5i 5j 5k 5knp 5l 5m 5n

BA 90 70 115 80

AGS 72 10 70 30

MSD 12.7 11.28 9.9 10.5

tpa 96 94 186 115

110 100

60 67

10.3 11.3

169 135

180 107 135 **~10 100 115 73 92 103 115

120 84 115

10.5 8.67 8.5

274 222 286

83 82 17 60 70 25

12.6 12.19 8 10.6 11.8 6.8

105 131 170 129 120 375

2030.407

Total Cordwood F Type 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 55 25 25 31 55 25 25 25 25 25 25

stocking A-B B A-B B

BA above B 20 0 45 10

Sawtimber 4.95 1.07 3.04 1.03

Cords 5 10 13 10

A-B A-B

40 30

2.92 4.04

10 10

A-B A-B A-B

110 37 35

6.76 4.22 6.76

18 11 11

A-B A B A-B A-B A

30 45 3 22 33 45

5.29 6.15 1.12 3.23 4.8 1.57

5 8 5 6 10 12

4486.5 acres 36.5 5.4 15.1 26.3 27.2 81.6 6.8 29.8 52.8 49.1 12.3 52.6 48.8 64.5 18.5 17.4 24 7

total saw total cords 180.675 182.5 5.778 54 45.904 196.3 27.089 263 0 0 238.272 816 27.472 68 0 0 356.928 950.4 207.202 540.1 83.148 135.3 0 0 258.152 244 396.675 516 20.72 92.5 56.202 104.4 115.2 240 10.99 84

points

13

27

stats--vol LCL 3370

135 97

18 21

22 35

1818 35

96 79

124 121

13 21

29 20

80 80 80

163 89 126

197 125 143

9 17 6

80 80 80 80 80 80

83 94 57 76 94 87

116 135 89 107 112 142

16 18 22 17 9 24

8 2 4 6

con lvl 80 80 80 80

10 3

80 80

5 6 4 7 8 9 5 6 4

stats--BA LCL 78

UCL 102

95 63

%e

CV

UCL 6528

%e

CV 32

64

4266 2023

40 96

49 160

2100 1797

3735 6286

28 55

64 52

14 28 7

4489 2526 3998

9019 5913 9532

33 40 41

49 67 50

30 35 36 24 15 30

4245 4844 -238 2449 2624 565

6333 7456 2473 4005 7015 2569

20 21 121 24 45 64

36 42 196 35 76 79

Avg MHt

Vol/Tree

Saw DBH

10.12 11.3

94 124

14.42 15.8

8.33

82

14.8

41


Compartment 6 Stand ID 6a 6b 6c 6d 6e

BA

AGS

MSD

tpa

F Type

136

108

10.7

181

stocking 55 above A

95 125 87 108

65 45 26 75

14 8.94 7.4 8.34

84 240 250 242

55 55 55 25

A-B A A-B A

BA above B

Total Sawtimber

1393.269

Total Cordwood

2990.3

Sawtimber Cords 65 8.56 25 55 17 38

5.03 2.64 1.4 4.02

6 6 10 11 12

acres total saw total cords 79.3 678.808 475.8 0 0 30.5 153.415 183 55.3 145.992 553 79.1 110.74 870.1 75.7 304.314 908.4

5

con lvl 80

stats--BA LCL 106

UCL 165

4 4 3 15

80 80 80 80

59 97 74 103

131 153 99 113

points

%e

CV 22

32

38 22 14 5

47 27 13 14

Avg MHt 9.3

stats--vol LCL 5686

UCL 11423

3546 1035 -1179 3029

6510 4238 1396 5008

%e

CV 33

49

29 60 184 24

36 74 173 71

42


Compartment 7 Stand ID 7a 7b 7c 7cnp 7d1 7d2 7e 7f

BA

AGS

MSD

tpa

F. Type

78 116 102

42 94 69

8.94 8.52 11.15

152 259 131

113 70 80 120

77 55 56 97

8.91 10 9.2 9

232 117 158 227

25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25

stocking B A A-B A B B A

BA above B 8 46 32 43 10 50

Total Sawtimber

832.053

Total Cordwood

2710.6

Sawtimber Cords 2.33 8 2.67 15 4.88 8 3.1 3.01 2.17 5.98

15 8 10 10

acres total saw total cords 71.6 166.828 572.8 46.5 124.155 697.5 35.5 173.24 284 53.5 0 0 37.7 116.87 565.5 18.6 55.986 148.8 18.2 39.494 182 26 155.48 260

9 10 9

con lvl 80 80 80

stats--BA LCL 66 106 90

6 4 5 6

80 80 80 80

90 54 70 103

points

90 126 115

15 8.5 12

33 19 27

stats--vol LCL 1890 1939 3973

UCL 2762 3395 4883

137 86 90 137

21 23 12 14

35 29 18 23

1218 1132 764 4335

3099 3009 3573 7631

UCL

%e

CV

%e

CV 19 27 19

40 62 40

60 62 64 27

101 76 94 45

43


Compartment 8 Stand ID 8a 8b 8b1 8c1 8c 8d 8e 8f 8g

BA

AGS 100 105 117 100 102 82 129 132 113

MSD 56 43 43 60 57 42 106 124 85

tpa 8.18 8.8 8.6 7.9 7.88 8.64 8.17 6 7.65

F. Type 238 218 249 262 262 168 317 625 303

25 25 25 25 25 25 25 32 25

stocking A-B A-B A A-B A-B B A A A

BA above B 30 35 47 30 32 12 59 32 43

Total Sawtimber

742.97

Total Cordwood

3922.4

Sawtimber Cords 2.8 12 2.04 11 1.4 14 1.29 13 2.7 10 2.66 9 4.12 18 0.93 18 2.6 15

acres total saw total cords 10.2 28.56 122.4 77.8 158.712 855.8 42.5 59.5 595 10.1 13.029 131.3 53.1 143.37 531 31.5 83.79 283.5 37.5 154.5 675 11.3 10.509 203.4 35 91 525

points 5 13 13 6 12 9 7 5 9

con lvl 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80

stats--BA LCL 83 94 107 78 91 70 116 111 100

UCL 117 114 126 121 113 94 141 152 126

%e

CV 17 9 10 21 11 14 10 16 11

24 23 22 36 27 31 18 23 25

stats--vol LCL 1500 1214 1481 579 2701 1673 2738 -186 1714

UCL 4097 2866 2838 2007 3881 3642 5511 2045 3486

%e

CV

46 44 48 48 43 37 34 120 34

68 117 83 91 111 80 62 175 73

44


Compartment 9 Stand ID 9a 9b 9c 9d 9e

BA

AGS 75 108 96 80 71

MSD 10 43 16 28 23

tpa 6.58 7.95 6.83 9.62 7.28

F. Type 281 283 322 137 205

25 25 25 25 25

stocking B A A-B B B

BA above B 5 38 26 10 1

Total Sawtimber

121.859

Total Cordwood

2679.4

Sawtimber Cords 0.36 0.87 0.35 0.56 0.24

9 13 11 12 10

acres total saw total cords 14.5 5.22 130.5 67.8 58.986 881.4 56.7 19.845 623.7 46.9 26.264 562.8 48.1 11.544 481

points 4 8 5 8 7

con lvl 80 80 80 80 80

stats--BA LCL 59 94 90 63 61

UCL 91 120 102 97 82

%e

CV 21 12 6 21 15

26 24 9.3 42 27

stats--vol LCL -227 305 22 174 17

UCL 953 1439 683 949 471

%e 162 65 93 69 92

CV 200 130 137 138 171

45


Total Sawtimber Total Cordwood

Plantations Stand ID 1La 4sp2 5sp1 5sp2 5sp3 5sp4 5sp6 5sp7 5rp

BA

AGS

MSD

tpa

stocking

173 117

173 77

11.7 6.82

215 416

213 170 100 180 220 153

206 170 20 180 200 147

10.1 8.22 10 10.5 8.9 13.11

350 406 167 293 460 160

Sawtimber Cords 17.25 5 0.74 18 5 10 19.38 10 9.74 10 1.36 10 11.6 5 13.3 17 17.69 2

acres

total saw total cords 3

2.22

4.6

1

60.38 17

54

points 3 7

con lvl 80 80

3 2 2 1 2 3

80 80 80 80 80 80

stats--BA LCL 129 99

128

UCL 217 135

178

%e

CV 26 15

16

24 28

15

stats--vol LCL 11048 345

UCL 23458 1131

14500

15417

%e

CV 36 53

34 98

24246

25

23

19954

12

12

62 2

46


ad

Compartment One

To w

n

Ro

1L

Ol d

1M

1E 1OP

1K

3OP

1OP

1F 1D 1I

1J

1OP

3D2

1B

1H

3C1

3C 1C 4MNP 5RP

1A

4OP

5N

5M

4L

5D

0 0.05 0.1

0.2

0.3

Miles 0.4

5E

4SP2

Stand boundary4C

Primary woods roads

4D Secondary woods roads

4E 4H topo lines 20 ft

ÂŻ

4G

Legend

5OP 5C

4M

4A3

47


Stand 1A TOTALS 2011 Volume Overall Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

3.45Mbf 2 cords 4 cords 0

BA

tpa

MSD

80

111

10.95

44 10 24 2

40 25 43 3

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

Volume Sawtimber Volume 3.45 Mbf conf level 90% % error 16% CV 34 mean saw dbh 14.1 Avg MHt 9.9ft Vol/tree 87

80 54:26 90% 14% 31

# of points

14

BAF

20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Notes: Note: The timber quality of this stand ranges from poor to excellent. The pockets with excellent quality have some of the best sugar maple on the property (20+" veneer). These trees average 280bf/tree and about 1.5logs/tree.

Grow high quality sawtimber; convert to uneven-aged stand. Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

Stand density is not critically high. No planned management. Management Recommendations

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

NE-603

Cover Type size class Acres

Sugar Maple, northern hardwood sawtimber 25a (1A) 34a (1ANP)

Soils:

(near creek) Dutchess channery loam, 25-60% slope, very stony; (throughout) Macomber-Taconic complex, 25-60% slope, rocky; (up high) Taconic-macomber complex, 15-25% slope, very rocky

Access:

This stand should be accessed through Lands of Garner Anthony. A permanent, or temporary ROW should be negotiated. Woods roads will need to be cleared, graded, and water structures put in place. A second option would be to access the stand by way of the McCormick Road, in which case only a portion of the stand could be accessed.

Stocking and Site Quality

MSD Stems/Acre

B line. Stocking is adequate, with patches of large, full-crowned, mature sugar maple (20"dbh). II and III. Better site quality in east and down low; much drier and rockier up high and west, and along ridge.

Site

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a

10.95 11

Regeneration:

small pockets of mixed regen; some dense striped maple; some dense beech along ridge.

Stand Health:

Stand is in fine health.

species, size

insects, invasive plants, diseases

Stand History:

1992- single tree and small group selection (Laureau) removal of 36Mbf & 140 cords. Records indicate that nails were found in trees and job was halted. 1965- harvest (unknown details)

Natural Resource A stream runs through the north east portion of the stand and drains the hillside. Notes:

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource This stand has very high aesthetic value, since it is viewed from the Harwood Farm. This stand, along with stand 1G, has some very large, senesing sugar maple which were used as a small sugarbush according to old notes. There is also old wire fence running Notes: between some of these trees. viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

48


Stand 1B TOTALS 2011

BA

tpa

MSD

Overall

Volume 2.48

87

146

10.26

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

2.48 4 3

40 23 23

48 52 46

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

Volume Sawtimber Volume conf level % error CV mean saw dbh Avg MHt Vol/tree

87 63 80% 15% 18

# of points

Notes: Highly variable stand. north (top): fairly nice, young forest. High WB stocking, but also WA and small SM. south-treated (bottom pic): treated during last cycle; gaps have filled with striped maple; significant RS blowdown.

2.48 80% 15% 19 12.3 8 51

6

BAF

20 Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Grow high quality sawtimber; convert to uneven-aged stand. Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

Free Thinning: Management Recommendations North of McCormick: Free Thinning. Perform a commercial thinning, removing low quality stems, and mature birch and popple. Groups of mature, overmature or deformed stems can be removed if there is adequate regeneration beneth. Post treatment of interference species within the newly formed groups--striped maple and beech. South of McCormick: Cut striped maple which were released in groups during last entry. Cut during summer months.

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA

harvest schedule: 2018 Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity residual BA: 75-80 sqft/a Diameter Objectives: SM/WA: 20" dbh

RS/WB: 14" dbh

Silv. Guides:

NE-603

Cover Type size class Acres

SAF-25 (mixed) sawtimber 44.7

Soils:

(throughout)Dutchess Channery loam, 25-60%slopes, very stony; rocky;

Access:

This stand should be accessed through Lands of Garner Anthony. A permanent, or temporary ROW should be negotiated. Woods roads will need to be cleared, graded, and water structures put in place. A second option would be to access the stand by way of the McCormick Road, in which case only a portion of the stand could be accessed.

Macomber-Taconic Complex, 25-60% slope,

Stocking and Site Highly Variable. Two sections: 1.)south of McCormick Rd: treated during last 10 years; pockets of significant red spruce blowdown; this area is still understocked. 2.) north of mccormick road: fairly high stocking; high white Quality birch and white ash stocking. Site II. MSD Stems/Acre

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a

10.26 146

Regeneration:

Gaps above mccormick road have mostly filled in with striped maple.

Stand Health:

currently stand: adequately healthy. Red spruce may still be at risk of blowdown.

species, size

insects, invasive plants, diseases

Stand History:

In 1997 portion south and east of Mccormick trail was harvested (29mbf, 64c) using single tree and group selection (Calfee,Waite). At some point, this area was part of a wildlife habitat demonstration project. The wildlife habitat managemnt trail follows mccormick trail from OTR to a skidder road that forks off to the north, leading into stand 1l.

Natural Resource Portion of this stand was, in the past, managed as a wildlife habitat demonstration site, which was designed in cooperation with the ruffed grouse society and wild turkey federation, and the Dept of Fish and Wildlife. Notes:

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource The Mccormick trial is near the visitors center and is a high use trail, which is in reasonably good shape. This stand has very high aesthetic value since it can be seen from the farm. Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

49


Stand 1C TOTALS 2011

BA

tpa

MSD

Overall

1.05

92

293

8.38

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

Volume

1.05 8 3

16 40 36

14 88 191

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

# of points BAF

92 56 90% 13% 19

Volume Sawtimber Volume 1.05 conf level 90% % error 123% CV 181 mean saw dbh 14.2 Avg MHt 9.1 Vol/tree 76

Notes: This stand was thinned ~8 years ago. Removed many small groups. Understocked canopy. Understory mostly undesireables. Consider treating understory in gaps. Residual stocking is fair to good quality.

5 20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Grow high quality sawtimber; convert to uneven-aged stand. Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

No commercial activities planned this management cycle. InManagement Recommendations house understory treatment: This stand is not ready for a harvest. In 1997, the stand was treated with a selection method which was intended to regenerate a portion of the stand. Many of these gaps have filled in with striped maple. This is a problem for the future composition and productivity of the stand. While no timber harvests should take place in the stand, the understory should be treated (e.g. the striped maple must be treated in gaps, and throughout the stand) to the extent possible. Striped maple stems can be treated mechanically with a brush cutter or chemically with herbicide.

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type size class Acres

NE-603, Leak, William B. 2005. Effects of Small Patch Cutting on Sugar Maple Regeneration in New Hampshire Northern Hardwoods. Northern Journal of Applied Forestry. 22(1): 68-70.

25 sawtimber 12.9

Soils: Macomber-Taconic complex, 25-60 percent slopes, rocky Access:

This stand should be accessed through Lands of Garner Anthony. A permanent, or temporary ROW should be negotiated. Woods roads will need to be cleared, graded, and water structures put in place. A second option would be to access the stand by way of the McCormick Road. This option was used during the last entry. If later option, use Barn Cabins Landing.

Stocking and Site highly variable stocking; some areas have adequate stocking; pockets have very low stocking. Quality

MSD Stems/Acre

Site II.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a

8.38 293

Regeneration:

heavy striped maple regen filling in the gaps from the 1997 treatment.

Stand Health:

current stand: adequately healthy. Future stand: high UGS.

species, size

insects, invasive plants, diseases

Stand History:

1997 single tree and group selection (calfee, waite). Possible harvest ~ 1975?

Natural Resource variable stocking has created a mix of stand conditions, and a mix of wildlife habitats. Notes:

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource The Mccormick trial is near the visitors center and is a high use trail, which is in reasonably good shape. This stand has very high aesthetic value since it can be seen from the farm. Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

50


Stand 1D TOTALS 2011

BA

tpa

MSD

Overall

0.28

70*

213

7.4

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

Volume

0.28 4 5

7 20 40 3

8 44 159 1

0

Basal Area BA *70 AGS:UGS 27 conf level 90% % error 19% CV 24 *Basal area OUTSIDE patch cuts.

# of points BAF

Volume Sawtimber Volume 0.28 conf level 90% % error 126% CV 154 mean saw dbh 12 Avg MHt Vol/tree

Notes: The overstory ash in the southern portion of this stand are mostly small diameter poles and of low commercial value. These conditions are allowing lots of light to reach the understory, and it regenerating as sugar maple.

6 20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

Patch Cut. Over the past 10 years this stand has been managed as a wildlife habitat demonstration Management Recommendations site. There are still some acres which can be managed in this same way, mostly in eastern section of stand. However, the southern portion of the stand--which has declining ash--is regenerating nicely, and should not be clear cut (cutting all above-ground vegetation). Instead, it should recieve a series of overstory removals, with care taken to protect the understory. Harvest Schedule: 2018--harvest ~3-acre patch during winter months. Take care to protect sugar maple regeneration.

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

NE-603

Cover Type size class Acres

SAF-25 pole stand 35.9

Soils: 48C & 49D-----Pittstown loam, 8-25%, very stony Access:

This stand should be accessed through Harwood Road (aka Discovery Trail).

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Stocking and Site Highly variable. Northern 1/2 of stand has been patch cut and is now regenerating. Southern 1/2 of stand is adequately stocked according to charts, however, the white ash in the canopy are affected Quality by ash yellows. A great deal of light is reaching the forest floor spuring regeneration. Site II. Good quality soils, but much of the site is fairly wet. MSD 7.4 Stems/Acre 213

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a

Regeneration:

species, size

Old patch cut is regenerating a mix of tree species and lots of rhubus. The 2010 patch cut is not yet showing signs of regenerating tree species. The southern portion of the stand has very dense patches of sugar maple adv regen (3-10 feet tall), mostly due to declining ash.

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases This stand is afflicted with ash yellows. Stand History:

winter 2001-2002: Two 2-acre clearcuts in northeastern corner of stand, adjacent to the discovery trail and farm pasture (olsen, waite). Winter 2010: 2 acre cc south of pasture.

Natural Resource excellent early successional habitat. Most of this stand has highly erodible soils, along with many feeder streams which form Mill Creek. Treatments should take place during winter months to Notes: protect these soils, and protective strips should be added--which will make up a significant portion of the stand.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

Cultural Resource Discovery trail, and wildlife trail run through this stand. An ecological dig was carried out in the north-western portion of the stand. Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

51


Stand 1E TOTALS 2011

BA

tpa

MSD

Overall

2.08

111

286

7.97

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

Volume

2.08 12 3

27 64 20

24 204 58

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

Volume Sawtimber Volume 2.08 conf level 90% % error 37% CV 80 mean saw dbh 14.13 Avg MHt 9.6 Vol/tree 86

111 64 90% 10% 20

# of points

14

BAF

20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives: Present Stand Age/Cutting cycle: Rotation Age/Diameter Objective: Management Recommendations

Notes: Oak stand. A few small patch cuts have been carried out over the past 10 years to demonstrate wildlife habitat management.

Grow high quality sawtimber; grow high quality mast species; grow large trees.

Free Thinning. This stand is fully stocked and will benefit from a thinning. Conduct a crop tree crown thinning to release the best quality and most vigorous dominant and co-dominant stems, with preference to northern red oak. Remove approximately 30-35 square feet, which will leave approx 75 sqare feet of residual basal area. Continue to manage this stand for high mast yield by leaving large, mature oak (which will also contribute to the aesthetic value of the stand). Notes: This is a uniqe stand because it is the first that our visitors see of Merck Forest, since the parking lot, the visitor's center, and the first section to old town road is within its boundaries. The forest immediately surrounding these areas should be managed in a way that protects their aesthetic appeal. Slash should be moved away from Old Town Road, and from the Parking Lot.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Harvest Year: 2018 Residual Basal Area: 80sqft Residual stand will have crop trees that are evenly spaced and free of competition on at least two sides, often times on three sides. A protective strip, or buffer will be set around the visitor's center, parking lot, and Old Town road, so that trees will not be felled near these areas. Silv. Guides:

Ag Hdbk 355 (Central Hardwoods); Central Hardwood Notes 6.06; NA-TP-19-93

Cover Type size class Acres

55-northern red oak sawtimber 23.9

Soils: 44C-Dutchess Channery Loam; 42E-Macomber-Taconic Complex Access:

Stocking and Site Quality

MSD Stems/Acre

Access is through Harwood Road and Old Town Road.

A line. Fully stocked. Site II. This is a good quality site for northern red oak. Soils are relatively dry. Some sections have shallow soils with exposed bedrock.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a

7.97 286

Regeneration:

Mixed. Most of the understory in this stand is beech; patches of oak (not adv regen). There is one pach of oak which is regenerating from small cut stumps.

Stand Health:

Oak are in good overall health. The largest factor impacting their growth is from crown competition.

species, size

insects, invasive plants, diseases

Stand History:

1996--one acre clearcut in south central portion. 1997--trees surounding this cut were felled into openning to discourage deer brouse. Winter 2001-2002--one acre clearcut was established in central portion, north of Discovery Trail (Olsen,Waite). Red oak and red spruce were left uncut for mast and aesthetics. ~2003--some trees were girdled to encourage the growth of crop trees. This treatment did not cover more than 2 acres. ****In the last management cycle, this stand was part of a wildlife habitat demonstration plan. In the ensuing years the plan has been lost.

Natural Resource The oak in this stand, particularly large mature oak, are an exceptional source for mast on the property. Northeast portion of stand has been managed in the past "for mast production"; at this Notes: location there are large crowned, mature and overmature red oaks.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Stone walls throughout this stand. Discovery trail runs though this stand. Another, unnamed trail which runs through 1ENP has been neglected in recent years. It should be cleaned up since it takes Notes: hikers to an interested knob covered with large mature oak. A protective strip, of sorts, should be used around the parking lot, Old Town Road, and around the "Hope Tree", so that visitors can continue to use these without interference from the logging operation.

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

52


Stand 1F TOTALS 2011

BA

tpa

MSD

Overall

6

64

251

6.34

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

Volume

0 3 4

0 24 40

0 144 108

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

# of points BAF

64 24 90% 24% 26

Volume Sawtimber Volume na conf level % error CV mean saw dbh Avg MHt Vol/tree

90%

Notes: Old pasture; dense patches of honeysuckle and other shrubs; large patch of garlic mustard. Western portion of the stand is wellstocked with pole-sized sugar maple and ash.

5 20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives: Present Stand Age/Cutting cycle: Rotation Age/Diameter Objective: Management Recommendations

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

Invasive plant management 2012-2019--spring---hand pull or torch garlic mustard. Flag patches as they are found. Fall 2012-2019: Garlic mustard: use a backpack sprayer to apply 3% glyphosate solution in September. 2012 & 2013--Fall--Sept/Oct--Honeysuckle: In the fall, when native plants are losing their leaves, spray a 2% glyphosate or triclopyr solution on the entire leaf surface of the plpant. In order to avoid drift to native plants, spray on calm days. 2014: re-evalutate infestation. ******

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

ManagementGuide:

Vermont Chapter of The Nature Conservancy. "Invasive Plant Management Chemical Fact Sheet"

Cover Type size class Acres

25 sapling/pole 14.9

Soils:

42C: Macomber-taconic complex; 47E: Dutchess Channery Loam.

Access:

This stand should be accessed through Lands of Garner Anthony. A permanent, or temporary ROW should be negotiated.

Stocking and Site Quality

MSD Stems/Acre

overstory stocking is very patchy, and has a very high proportion of UGS. Some patches--which can be seen on aerial photo--are dense shrub thickets consisting mostlyof honeysuckle. Southwest half of stand is full of sugar maple saplings and poles. Site II. Northeast portion has poor, rocky soils; southwest portion is better quality. 6.34 251

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a

Regeneration:

no desireable regeneration was noted.

species, size

Stand Health:

Two invasive plants have occupied sites within this stand: honeysuckle, garlic mustard, and possibly barberry. This stand has the largest patch of garlic mustard on the property (~1/10acre), and a very dense honeysuckle thicket (~1acre).

insects, invasive plants, diseases

This stand was still used for pasture according to the 1942 aerial photo.

treatments, land use, disturbance

Stand History:

Natural Resource Notes:

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Remnants of an old sugarhouse are located in the south-central portion of the stand. Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

53


Stand 1H TOTALS 2011

BA

tpa

MSD

Overall

2.58

82

112

10.98

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

Volume

2.58 3 5

36 13 33

29 28 55

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

# of points BAF

Volume Sawtimber Volume 2.58 conf level 90% % error 23% CV 37 mean saw dbh 14.82 Avg MHt 9.25 Vol/tree 88

82 49 90% 16% 25

Notes: Very steep site. Access is across neighboring lands to the southwest. Would make a fine sugarbush.

9 20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives: Present Stand Age/Cutting cycle: Rotation Age/Diameter Objective:

sap production.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

Convert this stand to a sugarbush; no thinning necessary; run mainline down to Watruss Road. Management Recommendations

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type Size Class Acres

25 small sawtimber stand. 19.3

Soils: 42E-Macomber-Taconic complex. Access:

This stand should be accessed through Lands of Fram, or Buechner (Sharman). A temporary ROW should be negotiated. A second option would be to access the stand through Lands of Garner Anthony. Woods roads will need to be cleared, graded, and water structures put in place.

Stocking and Site B line. Stocking is adequate, although canopy is patchy. Quality

MSD Stems/Acre Regeneration:

Stand Health:

Site III. Extremely Steep and rocky.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a

82 112 Light distribution of regeneration throughout the stand. Striped maple, sugar maple, and ash were noted.

species, size

No forest health issues were noted during the inventory. insects, invasive plants, diseases

Stand History:

1996 Single Tree Group Selection harvest (Birdsall, Waite), removed 35Mbf and 76 cords. There is a note that this stand was formerly used as a sugarbush.

Natural Resource neighboring stand is infested with honeysuckle and garlic mustard. None found in this stand, but should be monitored. Notes:

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource rarely visited part of the forest. Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

54


Stand 1i TOTALS 2011

BA

tpa

MSD

Overall

2.41

89

155

9.61

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

Volume

2.41 5 3

33 29 21 6

32 78 41 4

1

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

Volume Sawtimber Volume 2.41 conf level 90% % error 50% CV 105 mean saw dbh 13.56 Avg MHt 8.6 Vol/tree 76

89 62 90% 12% 26

# of points

14

BAF

20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Notes: nice stand. Invasives have not entered this stand from 1F. Decent stocking.

produce high quality sawtimber; convert to uneven-age. Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

Any treatement in this stand must be preceded by gaining a temporary or, more ideally, a permanent Right-Of-Way over the lands of Garner Anthony. This ROW has been expercised in the past (1993). Free Thinning: Conduct a free thinning, leaving approximately 80sqft of basal area. Remove small gaps of poorly formed stems. Cut or crush all undesireable regeneration in gaps, and where feasible throughout the stand.

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Long-term goal is to establish an uneven-aged stand with a high percentage of sawtimber-sized trees. Diameter Objective for Sugar Maple: 20"+ 15 year cutting cycle schedule: 2018 Silv. Guides:

TNC publication: Managing Rich Northern Hardwood Forests (Taconics)

Cover Type size class Acres

25-with signs of Rich Northern Hardwood Forest small sawtimber 44.4

Soils:

49D--Pittstown Loam and 47E Dutchess Channery Loam down low; 42E Macomber-Taconic complex along ridge.

Access:

This stand should be accessed through Lands of Garner Anthony. A permanent, or temporary ROW should be negotiated.

Stocking and Site Quality

MSD Stems/Acre Regeneration:

Stand Health:

BA=89. Between A-B line. Decent stocking. Pole and small sawtimber stand. Good quality stems. Site I,III. Excellent site, with signs of enriched soils in parts of this stand. Poorer soils along ridge.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a

9.61 155 very little regeneration; stand is largely in stem exclusion phase.

species, size

stand is in good overall health. insects, invasive plants, diseases

Stand History:

1978- TSI carried out on 10-acres. 1991- TSI crop tree release conducted through most of the area.

Natural Resource a stream cuts through the northeast portion of the stand. Several seeps run throughout the eastern part of the stand. Notes:

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource An access road runs through this stand, goes through neighboring lands of Garner Anthony, and connects with Watruss road. This road is used by local hikers and hunters to access Merck, although Notes: it hasn't been maintained in ~15 years. viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

55


??

Stand 1J TOTALS 2011

BA

tpa

MSD

Overall

0.36

65

88

10.26

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

Volume

0.36 0 8

5 5 55

5 19 65

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

# of points BAF

Volume Sawtimber Volume 0.36 conf level 90% % error 230% CV 200 mean saw dbh 14 Avg MHt Vol/tree

65 10 90% 44% 38

Notes: nice young stand up high. Very high UGS, and brush down low.

4 20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives: Present Stand Age/Cutting cycle: Rotation Age/Diameter Objective: Management Recommendations

maintain apple tree resource; control invasive plants; produce quality sawtimber Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

This stand should be managed in conjunction with Stands 1K and 1F. These three stand have very high proportions of UGS, and should be regenerated by a series of patch cuts. Before this can take place, the garlic mustard and honeysuckle must be treated in the understory. 2012-2019--spring--hand pull or torch garlic mustard. Flag patches as they are found. Fall 2012-2019: Use a backpack sprayer to apply 3% glyphosate solution in September. 2012 & 2013--Fall--Sept/Oct--Honeysuckle: In the fall, when native plants are losing their leaves, spray a 2% glyphosate or triclopyr solution on the entire leaf surface of the plpant. In order to avoid drift to native plants, spray on calm days. 2014: re-evalutate infestation. 2014: prune and release apple trees. There are a fair number of apple trees in desperate need of pruning and release; conduct pruning during winter months. ******

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Management Guides:

Vermont Chapter of The Nature Conservancy. "Invasive Plant Management Chemical Fact Sheet"

Cover Type size class Acres

25 pole/small sawtimber 8.9

Soils: 47E--Dutchess Channery Loam. Access:

Stocking and Site Quality

MSD Stems/Acre

This stand should be accessed through Lands of Fram, or Buechner (Sharman). A temporary ROW should be negotiated. A second option would be to access the stand through Lands of Garner Anthony. Woods roads will need to be cleared, graded, and water structures put in place.

Overall, stand is adequately stocked, but it's proportion of AGS is extremely low. BA=65sqft/acre. AGS=10sqft/acre. Site Class II.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a

10.26 88

Regeneration:

light, scattered maple/ash regeneration.

Stand Health:

Some honeysuckle noted during the cruise. However, it's very likely to contain more invasive plants since it abutts a neighboring farm, has a skidder road running through it, and it is not fully stocked.

species, size

insects, invasive plants, diseases

Stand History:

Natural Resource Notes:

Western portion of this stand was open in 1942 aerial photo. 1996 single tree selection (Birdsall, Waite).

treatments, land use, disturbance

this stand has some old apple trees, which can be pruned and relseased. Very good grouse habitat.

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Old sugaring equipement was found in the northern portion of the stand. Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

56


Stand 1K TOTALS 2011

BA

tpa

MSD

Overall

2.64

96

142

10.54

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

Volume

2.64 1 10

28 8 60

26 35 81

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

# of points BAF

96 36 90% 29% 31

Volume Sawtimber Volume 2.64 conf level 90% % error 63% CV 67 mean saw dbh 14.06 Avg MHt Vol/tree

Notes: This stand abutts a neighboring residential property. It has high UGS; large patch of garlic mustard. Very interesting stand, with large white pine, and spruce coverd eskers. High recreation value.

5 20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives: Present Stand Age/Cutting cycle: Rotation Age/Diameter Objective: Management Recommendations

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

This stand should be managed in conjunction with Stands 1J and 1F. Although it has a high percentage of UGS, it is too heavily infested with invasive plants to justify a harvest. The invasive must be controlled first and foremost. 2012-2019-spring---hand pull or torch garlic mustard. Flag patches as they are found. Fall 2012-2019: Use a backpack sprayer to apply 3% glyphosate solution in September. 2012 & 2013--Fall--Sept/Oct--Honeysuckle: In the fall, when native plants are losing their leaves, spray a 2% glyphosate or triclopyr solution on the entire leaf surface of the plpant. In order to avoid drift to native plants, spray on calm days. 2014: re-evalutate infestation. ******

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Vermont Chapter of The Nature Conservancy. "Invasive Plant Management Chemical Fact Sheet"

Cover Type size class Acres

SAF-25 sawtimber 17.6

Soils: 49D--Pittstown Loam; Access:

Stocking and Site Quality

This stand should be accessed through Lands of Garner Anthony. A permanent, or temporary ROW should be negotiated.

BA=96. Very high proportion of UGS.

Site II. Some wetland soils down near creek.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a

MSD Stems/Acre Regeneration:

lacking adequate regeneration.

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases Invasive plants have invaded this site from neighboring lands. Sizable patch of garlic mustard (largest on property; ~400sqft); honeysuckle as well. Stand History:

This stand was all clear in the 1942 aerial photo, and has re-forested. Most of stands were opengrown, and of poor quality.

Natural Resource Stand has some of the few white pine on the property. It is located above a forested wetland, and itself contains two feeder streams which enter into Mill Creek. Protective strips should be created Notes: around these streams. (See Protective Strip Policy in Section

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource An old access road runs through through the property,which is used by neighbors and hunters to access the property. Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

57


Stand 1L TOTALS 2011

BA

tpa

MSD

Overall

1.71

89

191

8.62

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

Volume

1.71 4 6

23 19 44 3

22 46 121 1

0

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

# of points

21

BAF

20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Volume Sawtimber Volume 1.71 conf level 90% % error 27% CV 72 mean saw dbh 13.6 Avg MHt Vol/tree

89 42 90% 15% 40

Notes: Very mapley. Marking job planned to remove too much, and may allow invasives to spread.

produce quality sawtimber; maintain mast production; control invasive plants; perpetuate aspen component;

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

Invasive Plant Control: Before this stand is entered, the invasive plants must be controlled. 20122019--spring---hand pull or torch garlic mustard. Flag patches as they are found. Fall 20122019: Garlic mustard: use a backpack sprayer to apply 3% glyphosate solution in September. 2012 & 2013--Fall--Sept/Oct--Honeysuckle: In the fall, when native plants are losing their leaves, spray a 2% glyphosate or triclopyr solution on the entire leaf surface of the plant. In order to avoid drift to native plants, spray on calm days. 2014: re-evalutate infestation. 2019: (Only after invasive plants have been adequately controlled) Remove medium sized groups (3/4-1acre) to regenerate aspen; thin elsewhere (very lightly) to release oak, maple and ash; focus on removal of mature birch and aspen, and of poor qualty stems. Harvest must occur during winter months to avoid spreading invasive plant seed and material.

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Residual BA between groups: 80sqft Diameter Objectives: SM,WA=20"+ Harvest Schedule: 2018

Cutting Cycle: 15yrs.

Silv/Mgmt Guides:

Vermont Chapter of The Nature Conservancy. "Invasive Plant Management Chemical Fact Sheet"; NE603

Cover Type size class Acres

25 sawtimber 36.7

Soils: 47D--Dutchess Channery Loam. 42E Macomber-Taconic complex. Access:

Through Lands of Buechner (Wind Gap Farm or Croff Farm).

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a

Stocking and Site Quality

MSD Stems/Acre

Adequately stocked stand: BA=89, AGS=42. Canopy is patchy in the wet portion (northeast) but relatively uniform elsewhere. Birch and Aspen falling out of stand. Site Class II. Gentle Slope. 8.62 191

Regeneration:

thin understory; some striped maple, cherry, ash. Pockets of light beech. (all 3-7ft)

species, size

Stand Health:

some honeysuckle noted in wet portions of this stand; northeast section. White Birch and Popple are falling out of the stand. Significant patches of garlic mustard run along Fetterof Trail, and very likely along Burke Trail as well.

insects, invasive plants, diseases

1993 single tree selection harvest in southern half of stand. (Lareau, Waite).

treatments, land use, disturbance

Stand History:

Natural Resource seeps run through north east portion of this stand. Southern portion of stand has been managed in the past "for mast production"; at this location there are large crowned, mature and overmature red Notes: oaks. Heavy soil erosion along rt 315, and north boundary of stand.

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource This is an extremely high use area since it is located adjacent to the parking lot; Burke Trail runs through the stand. There is an trail that spurs off of Burke, and continues up a small knob, in Notes: desperate need of basic maintenance. viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

58


no picture

Stand 1M TOTALS 2011

BA

tpa

MSD

Overall

3.22

80

83

12.8

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

Volume

3.22 2 3

40 10 20 10

35 23 18 5

1

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

# of points BAF

Volume Sawtimber Volume 3.22 conf level 90% % error 121% CV 104 mean saw dbh 14.21 Avg MHt Vol/tree

80 50 90% 40% 35

Notes: A portion of this stand is located on a knob, which has large oak that are managed for mast production. The rest of the stand is located on the west side of this knob and has nice quality sugar maple and oak.

4 20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Produce sawtimber and mast.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

2019: (Only after invasive plants in neighboring 1L have been adequately controlled) Use Single Tree Management Recommendations and Group selection to begin regenerating the stand. Focus removal on mature, overmature, or trees with low vigor--however, be sure to leave top mast producers. Groups should be small (.1-1/2 acre), and because the stand is so small, there shall only be a few groups removed. Harvest must occur during winter months to avoid spreading invasive plant seed and material.

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Residual BA: 75-80sqft Diameter Objectives: SM,WA=20"+ Harvest Schedule: 2018

Cutting Cycle: 15yrs.

Silv. Guides:

NE-603

Cover Type size class Acres

55-Oak, with maple, beech, birch component large sawtimber 5.1

Soils: 42E--macomber-Taconic complex. Access:

Through Lands of Buechner (Wind Gap Farm or Croff Farm).

BA=80; adequately stocked, although oak are beginning to decline. Site III. Shallow soils.

Stocking and Site Quality

MSD Stems/Acre Regeneration:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a

12.8 83 some small (flattop) oak.

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases large, poorly formed red oak. Overall health is good. Stand History:

1993 single tree selectin harvest (Lareau, Waite).

Natural Resource This stand has many large red oak, an excellent source of mast. Notes:

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource The wildlife habitat interpretive trail leads from the VC parking lot and stand 1L through this area into Stand 1ENP. This stand has not been maintained and some basis upkeep is necessary. Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

59


Compartment Two 2A

2B 2CNP 2C 2D

2E 2N

2F

2SP1

2I

2O

2G

2P

2H

3OP

2J

3C

2T

2R

3E

2S

2K

3B

4MNP

4G

2Q

3F

3

2GNP

2

3D2 3C1

2HNP

Legend 2U

2V

4M

Stand boundary

Primary woods roads

Secondary woods roads

4

4C

0 0.05 0.1

topo lines 20 ft

3A 4A1

0.2

0.3

Miles 0.4

8

ÂŻ

8B

Compartments 60


picture

Stand 2a TOTALS 2011

BA

tpa

MSD

Overall

3.8

87

126

10.77

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

Volume

3.8 2 5

33 11 38 4

25 21 75 4

1

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

Sawtimber Volume Volume 3.8 mean saw dbh 15.07 Avg MHt 13.6 Vol/tree 150

87 44 conf level % error

90% 26%

CV

43

conf level % error CV

Notes:

90% 71% 116

Produce high quality sawtimber; develop/maintain an uneven-age structure.

lower portion # of points BAF

9 20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

upper portion

Produce high quality sawtimber; develop/maintain an uneven-age structure.

Stand density is not critically high, and no timber harvests are planned for this managment cycle. 2012-2019--spring---hand pull or torch garlic mustard. Flag patches as they are found. Fall 2012-2019: Use a backpack sprayer to apply 3% glyphosate solution in September. ******

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type Size class Acres

ne-603; Managing Rich Northern Hardwood Forests (TNC Vermont); Vermont Chapter of The Nature Conservancy. "Invasive Plant Management Chemical Fact Sheet"

SAF 25 Rich Northern Hardwood Forest sawtimber 19.3

Soils:

47D,47E Dutchess Channery Loam

Access:

Access is through Lands of Buechner, to route 315.

Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA=87sqft. Adequately stocked; denser stocking lower on the slope. (Between A and B line) Site Class I. Stand has pockets of Rich Northern Hardwood Forest.

some scattered small groups of RS, WP regen down low; up high, thick YB regen along and near the skid road.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ Minor Impact of garlic mustard: small pockets run along the lower skid road leading to Buechner's Property. Stand History:

1993--Individual tree selection (12Mbf; 24c) (Lareau, Waite). Individual tree selection (27Mbf, 35c) (Lareau, Waite).

1999--

A creek runs at the base of the hillside, and creates a natural barrier between route 315, and the Natural Resource majority of this stand. The slope down to this creek is quite steep, so all logging activities must give Notes: the creek an adequate buffer.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Notes:

This stand slopes north down to a small creek that runs over ledge, and has very high aesthetic value. In the future, hiking trails might be constructed to better use this stand for recreation. viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

61


picture

Stand 2b TOTALS 2011

BA

tpa

MSD

Overall

2.19

68

93

11.15

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

Volume

2.19 1 4

28 4 32 4

22 6 63 3

1

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

68 34 conf level % error CV

# of points BAF

90% 15% 16

Sawtimber Volume Volume 2.19 mean saw dbh 15.21 Avg MHt Vol/tree conf level % error CV

Notes:

90% 103% 109

5 20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Produce high quality sawtimber; develop/maintain an uneven-age structure.

No planned activity during this management cycle. Stand density is not critically high. ***re-examine this stand before treating surrounding stands. If appropriate, plan a harvest to remove high-risk stems.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

ne-603; Managing Rich Northern Hardwood Forests (TNC Vermont)

Cover Type Size class Acres

25--predominantly sugar maple; signs of Rich NHWD forest sawtimber 10.9

Soils:

42E and 43E. Taconic and Macomber Complex. Steep and Rocky.

Access:

Access is through Lands of Buechner, to route 315.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA= 68. B-line. Low stocking due to circa 1999 thinning, along with significant blowdown of red spruce. Site Class II. Some very dry soils up high.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

Mostly lacking in adequate regeneration. Dense YB has regenerated on the skid roads; elsewhere the understory is mostly striped maple.

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

Natural Resource Notes:

20 year old large stumps throughout.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

62


picture

Stand 2c TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

2.6 3 4

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

1

BA

tpa

MSD

88

193

8.48

32 16 36 4

27 34 132 1

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

88 48 conf level % error CV

90% 11% 12

# of points

Sawtimber Volume Volume 2.6 mean saw dbh 14.44 Avg MHt Vol/tree conf level % error CV

Notes:

90% 110% 117

5 diameter distribution

BAF

species pie chart

20 Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Produce high quality sawtimber; develop/maintain an uneven-age structure.

No activity planned during this entry. Stocking Is not critically high. (Treat during next management cycle, in conjunction with stand 2D.)

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

ne 603

Cover Type Size class Acres

SAF 25 small sawtimber 9.1

Soils:

47E. Dutchess channery loam, very steep, very rocky.

Access:

Access is through Lands of Buechner east of stand. There are existing skid roads that lead to a landing off of rt 315.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Between A and B line. Highly variable stocking. Some high quality SM, WA, RO in canopy. Site Class II, IV.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

Stand Health:

Very lilttle desirable regeneration. Patchy distribution of striped maple and beech.

species, size

stand is in fine health. insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

Natural Resource Notes:

2011--main skid road used by Lareau,Waite for harvest on Wind Gap Farm (2012). tree selection harvest.

2002. a single

noted multiple grouse during resource inventory. Also noted bear signs. Portions of the stand are very steep and inaccessible. **There is a skid road that runs very close to the small creek that runs through this stand. This skid road is far too close, and must be re-routed during next entry.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Notes:

Very interesting eratics near top of stand.

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

63


picture

Stand 2d TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

1.57 2 6

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

3

BA

tpa

MSD

93

143

10.07

23 13 40 17

16 34 83 9

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

Sawtimber Volume Volume 1.57 mean saw dbh 16.15 Avg MHt Vol/tree

93 36 conf level % error CV

90% 21% 26

# of points BAF

conf level % error CV

Notes: fairly steep; winter harvest. Mostly near-mature (~16") SM. Consider shelterwood during next entry.

90% 61% 74

6 20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Produce high quality sawtimber; develop/maintain an uneven-age structure.

No activity planned during this entry. Stocking Is not critically high. (Treat during next management cycle, in conjunction with stand 2C.) *****note: During next entry this stand will need to be regenerated. Currently, there is very little desireable regeneration in the understory, but a fairly even distribution of stiped maple. Just as in stand 3C, Merck should consider an in-house non-commercial treatment to the understory. An in house low thinning, even in a small portion of the stand, would give soem valuable insite about the site quality, and the stand's future ability to regenerate.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type Size class Acres

ne 603

SAF 25 9.9

Soils: 42E, 43E. Macomber and Taconic Complex. Very steep and rocky. Access:

Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

Stand Health:

Access is through Lands of Buechner east of stand. There are existing skid roads that lead to a landing off of rt 315.

Adequate. Between A-B. Site Class III.

Very lilttle desirable regeneration. Patchy distribution of striped maple and beech.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

stand is in fine health. Some evidence of maple sugar borer damage. insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

Natural Resource Notes:

2002 firewood harvest.

noted multiple grouse during resource inventory. Also noted bear signs. Portions of the stand are very steep and inaccessible.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Notes:

This is an interested, although largely unvisited part of the property.

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

64


picture

Stand 2e TOTALS 2011

BA

tpa

MSD

Overall

4.02

100

219

8.53

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

Volume

4.02 5 4

37 31 31

33 116 70

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

# of points

Sawtimber Volume Volume 4.02 mean saw dbh 14.22 Avg MHt Vol/tree

100 68 90% 20% 28

conf level % error CV

Notes: red spruce stand. Excessivly shallow soils. Steep; except on top of hill.

90% 80% 110

7 diameter distribution

BAF

species pie chart

20 Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Produce high quality sawtimber; develop/maintain an uneven-age structure.

Single Tree and Group Selection. Consider some single tree selection, but focus removal on group selection to avoid windthrow. Remove groups of mature, overmature, or deformed stems where there is advance regeneration beneth. Remove small groups (.1-1acre) of mature spruce and hardwoods. See Merck Forest Harvest Policy for aditional harvest guidelines.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba

Schedule for 20 year cutting cycle: 2016

Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA

The desired diameter growth for this stand is SM,YB,WA=16" RS=14"

Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Majority of this stand is inaccessible. Only treat accessible portion adjacent to stands 2N,2F. Residual BA between groups= ~80sqft/acre

Silv. Guides:

ne-603 mixwood; NA-TP-02-00

Cover Type Size class Acres

SAF 25/ SAF 31 10.7

Soils: 116F. Lyman-Tunbridge-Rock outcrop complex. Very steep. Very stony. Access:

Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

Access is over Lands of Buechner, to the east of this stand. Landing is on Buechner's land, near 315.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Adequate. Between A-B. site class III. Steep site (except top of hill); shallow soils, with exposed bedrock.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

Large, dense patches of RS regeneration up high. Fairly dense patches of RS regeneration elsewhere.

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ stand is in fine health. Stand History:

Evidence of blowdown (small events).

Natural Resource Notes:

Majority of this stand is very steep, and has very shallow soils. Avoid using equipment in these areas.

Cultural Resource Notes:

This is an interested, although largely unvisited part of the property.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

65


picture

Stand 2f TOTALS 2011

BA

tpa

MSD

Overall

4.02

111

238

8.44

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

Volume

4.02 5 5

49 26 37

40 81 117

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

# of points

Sawtimber Volume Volume 4.02 mean saw dbh 14.69 Avg MHt Vol/tree

111 75 90% 17% 32

conf level % error CV

Notes: stone wall with large oak running through this stand. Treat with 2i.

90% 88% 162

7 diameter distribution

BAF

species pie chart

20 Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Produce high quality sawtimber; develop/maintain an uneven-age structure.

Single Tree and Group Selection. Conduct small group selection harvest to release established acceptable seedlings/saplings/poles, with individual tree selection between. Groups can range from .1-1 acres, and can be focused around mature oak. As much beech and striped maple should be treated as is possible, and these must be treated within the groups. 100 ft buffer along creek in south (see Nat Res below). See Merck Forest Harvest Policy for general harvest guidelines.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions

Schedule for 20 year cutting cycle: 2016 (winter, or driest summer months) Avoid steep, south-west facing slopes.

Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA

Residual stand will have clusters of low-risk, high vigor trees with mid-sized openings scattered throughout, and will eventually lead to a multi-aged stand.

The desired diameter growth for this stand

Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

SM,AB,YB=20" RS,PB=14"

Residual BA= 80 ~sqft/acre between groups. Groups should account for no more than 15-20% of the total area. Silv. Guides:

ne 603; NA-TP-02-00

Cover Type Size class Acres Soils:

Access:

Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

Stand Health:

SAF 25 mostly beech, maple, oak small sawtimber 17.8 47E. Dutchess Channery loam. Steep. Stony;

43E Taconic-Macomber Complex. Very steep. Very rocky. dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Access is across Lands of Buechner.

Adequate. Between A-B. Generally a mix of NHW species. Stocking and quality is better in the western half of the stand. A stonewall with large open grown red oak dissects the property. Poor quality beech and birch exist mostly in the eastern half of the stand and at higher elevation. Site Class II, III.

good distribution of red spruce (2-7ft) through much of the stand, as well as some beech.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

BBD affects the majority of beech in this stand. insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

1993--Limited harvest.

Natural Resource Notes:

The southern portion of the stand borders a creek. A protective strip of approximately 100ft should be left along this portion in which only single tree selection harvesting (or light thinning) can occur so that breaks made in the canopy are minimal and a continuous cover is maintained. Forest equipment shall operate no closer than 50ft from the water's edge.

Cultural Resource Notes:

This stand has high recreational value. Group Selection should be focused away from Stone Lot Rd if possible.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

66


picture

Stand 2G TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

2.87 1 3

BA

tpa

MSD

53

44

14.15

27 7 20

14 15 15

Sawtimber Volume Volume 2.87 mean saw dbh 18.5 Avg MHt Vol/tree

53 34:20 80% 23% 21

# of points

conf level % error CV

Notes: lots of blowdown up high, in 2GNP.

80% 51% 48

3 diameter distribution

BAF

species pie chart

20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Allow natural develoopment; develop/maintain an uneven-age structure.

No activity planned. Allow natural development and consider designating it as a Natural Area. Management Recommendations

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

ne 603

Cover Type Size class Acres

SAF 25 sawtimber 23.4

Soils: 42E. Macomber-Taconic complex. Very steep. Rocky. Access:

Access is over Buechner's land to the east of this stand. A bridge will need to be used to cross the creek at the base of the stand.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Stocking and Site Site Class II,IV. Quality:

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

Regeneration:

species, size

pockets of yellow and white birch in gaps. Some dense pockets of striped maple.

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ Some evidence of further blowdown after the 1999 storm. Stand History:

portions of this stand were affected by the 1999 windstorm. 1993--a small portion at lower elevation was harvested. Single tree, Group Selection.

Natural Resource The northern portion of the stand borders a creek. A protective strip of approximately 100ft should be left along this portion in which only single tree selection harvesting (or light thinning) can occur Notes: so that breaks made in the canopy are minimal and a continuous cover is maintained. Forest equipment shall operate no closer than 50ft from the water's edge. Cultural Resource Notes:

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

Bear-scratched beech; fox hole; multiple grouse flushed during cruise.

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

67


picture

Stand 2H TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

6.2 3 1

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

# of points BAF

BA

tpa

MSD

100

96

12.6

73 20 7

45 46 5

100 93:7 90% 42% 40

Sawtimber Volume Volume 6.2 mean saw dbh 16.2 Avg MHt Vol/tree conf level % error CV

Notes: Some nice hemlock; steep and very rocky. Deer yard. 2HNP-blowdown galore. Wildlife tracks everywhere.

90% 14% 13

3 20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Maintain mature hemlock component; produce sawtimber if possible.

No activity planned. Allow natural development and consider designating it as a Natural Area.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

NE 603; Orwig, D. A., and D. Kittredge. 2005. Silvicultural Options for Managing Hemlock Forests Threatened by Hemlock Woolly Adelgid.

Cover Type Size class Acres

SAF 23 sawtimber 5.6

Soils: 43E. Taconic-Macomber complex. Very steep. Very rocky. Access:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index Access is over Buechner's land to the east of this stand. A bridge will need to be used to cross the creek at the base of the stand. Site Class II, IV.

Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

a mix of regeneration in the areas affected by the blowdown--mostly YB, striped maple, but along with some hemlock.

Stand Health:

Stand is in fine health. No sign of HWA.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

Natural Resource Notes:

Portions of this area were blown over during the July 8, 1999 windstorm.

treatments, land use, disturbance

Very steep slopes.

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Notes:

This stand is unique among Merck Forest stands, and has high recreation value. It also likely serves as a deer winter yard. viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

68


picture

Stand 2i TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

3.9 19 3

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

1

BA

tpa

MSD

137

348

7.95

37 73 17 10

37 232 76 4

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

Sawtimber Volume Volume 3.9 mean saw dbh 13.37 Avg MHt Vol/tree

137 100 conf level % error CV

90% 17% 28

# of points

conf level % error CV

Notes: majority of sawtimber is mature popple, birch and red maple.

90% 48% 79

6 diameter distribution

BAF

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

species pie chart

20

Produce high quality sawtimber; develop/maintain an uneven-age structure.

Variable-Retention Thinning. Thin thoughout the stand with variable retention by removing trees of low-vigor and poor quality, reducing crown cover to to about 80%. Focus removals on the least desireable competators (high risk, low vigor). Remove small (.1-.25a) groups only where canopy contains UGS and were desireable regeneration is established. 100ft buffer around creek in south (see Nat Res section below). See Harvest Policy for aditional harvest guidelines.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba

Residual stand will have clusters of low-risk, high vigor trees with mid-sized openings scattered throughout, and will eventually lead to a multi-aged stand.

Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA

The desired diameter growth for this stand is SM,WA=20" RS,PB=14"

Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Residual crown cover= 80% ,

Residual BA= ~80sqft/acre

Schedule for 20 year cutting cycle: Winter 2016 Silv. Guides:

ne-603

Cover Type Size class Acres

SAF 25 poletimber/small sawtimber 11

Soils: 47E. Dutchess channery loam. Steep. Very stony. Access:

Access is across Lands of Buechner.

Stocking and Site Fully Stocked. Stocking Level at A line. Site Class I. Quality:

Regeneration:

Little regneration. Some ash and maple (saplings); scattered striped maple.

Stand Health:

Some mature popple are beginning to scenese.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

no known history.

Natural Resource The southern portion of the stand borders a creek. A protective strip of approximately 100ft should be left along this portion in which only single tree selection harvesting (or light thinning) can occur Notes: so that breaks made in the canopy are minimal and a continuous cover is maintained. Forest equipment shall operate no closer than 50ft from the water's edge.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

Cultural Resource This stand has high recreational value. Group Selection should focuses in the center of the stand if possible (away from Stone Lot Rd, and Mitiguay Rd. Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

69


picture

Stand 2J TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

1.68 2 4 1

BA

tpa

MSD

75

108

10.3

23 13 28 11

19 32 49 7

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

75 36 conf level % error CV

90% 11% 32

Sawtimber Volume Volume 1.68 mean saw dbh 14.4 Avg MHt Vol/tree conf level % error CV

Notes:

90% 32% 93

must regenerate! how? Groups? Femelshlag? either way, understory treamtne is most important. road is located well, but needs repair before use. Cleared. Regrade. Drainage. # of points

15

BAF

20

diameter distribution

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

species pie chart

Produce high quality sawtimber; maintain an uneven-age structure;

No activities planning this management cycle. Allow to develop naturally.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

ne 603; Managing Rich Northern Hardwood forests (TNC Vermont)

Cover Type Size class Acres

SAF 25 38.1

Soils:

47E. Dutchess channery loam. Steep. Stony.

Access:

Access is through Lands of Buechner.

Stocking and Site B line. However, the resource inventory noted that a large portion of this stand is not minimally stocked, as it was significantly impacted by the 1999 windstorm. Site Class II. Quality:

Regeneration:

Stand Health:

Understory mainly consists of beech, striped maple, and rhubus down at lower elevation. Any silvicultural activity must include treatment of the existing understory.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

The majority of trees that withstood the storm damage seem to be in fine health. insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

Lots of blowdown from 1999 windstorm.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

Natural Resource Notes:

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Notes:

Blowdown has created open views.

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

70


picture

Stand 2K TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

1.13 1 1

BA

tpa

MSD

36

32

13.08

16 8 12

8 11 13

Sawtimber Volume Volume 1.13 mean saw dbh 16.35 Avg MHt Vol/tree

36 24:12 80% 31% 46

# of points

conf level % error CV

Notes:

80% 63% 93

5 diameter distribution

BAF

species pie chart

20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Produce high quality sawtimber; maintain even-age structure.

Final Shelterwood Removal Cut. Management Recommendations

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals.

Prior to this cut, 1. perform a regeneration survey to determine which areas of the stand should receive total overstory removal, and which areas should only receive partial removal. Overall, 1020sqft of the basal area should be left as reserves. 2. Also, careful layout of major skid trails is essential to minimize damage to advanced regeneration.

Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba

See Merck's Harvest Guidelines for further details on harvest objectives.

Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Harvest Schedule: Winter 2016 Find operator who can use a mix of directional felling, log-length skidding or forwarding, and the use to winches to carry out this operation. The western boundary of this stand borders a creek. No forest equipement should operate within 100 feet of this creek (except at designated crossings). Silv. Guides:

Cover Type Size class Acres

ne-603

SAF 25 seedling 30.4

Soils: 106E Berkshire fine sandy loam. 25 to 50% slope. Very stony. Access:

Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

It seems that the last harvest used Howe Rd to access this stand. If Howe rd is used in the next entry, it will require significant repair work. Consider making new skid road from 2K, through 2T, which will connect to existing road in the lowest elevation in stand 2S. This existing road connects to roads on neighboring lands (Zaplatel). Low, due to shelterwood treatment. BA is approximately 50sqft. Site Class II, III.

Adequate mix of desireable regeneration (mostly yellow birch; but equal mix of beech and striped maple.) 3-7 feet.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ This young stand is in fine health. Stand History:

2002 shelterwood cut (first entry)

Natural Resource Notes:

The western boundary of this stand borders a creek. No forest equipement should operate within 100 feet of this creek (except at designated crossings).

Cultural Resource Notes:

The higher elevation section of this stand borders Gallop road, and it gives hikers excellent view of the Mettowee Valley.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

71


picture

Stand 2n TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

BA

tpa

MSD

207

88

192

8.55

2.07 10 2

24 48 12 4

23 129 37 2

0

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

Sawtimber Volume Volume 2 mean saw dbh 13.68 Avg MHt 11.56 Vol/tree 89

88 72 conf level % error CV

# of points

80% 17% 25

conf level % error CV

Notes:

80% 62% 91

5 diameter distribution

BAF

species pie chart

20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Produce high quality sawtimber; develop/maintain an uneven-age structure. Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

Single Tree and Group Selection. Treat Eastern half of stand. Conduct small group selection harvest Management Recommendations to release established acceptable seedlings/saplings/poles, with individual tree selection between. Groups can range from .1-1 acres, and should be focused around mature oak. As much beech and striped maple should be treated as is possible, and these must be treated within the groups. See Merck Forest Harvest Policy for general harvest guidelines. Harvest Schedule: 2016

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals.

Invasive plant management 20122019--spring---hand pull or torch garlic mustard. Flag patches as they are found. Fall 2012-2019: Garlic mustard: use a backpack sprayer to apply 3% glyphosate solution in September. 2012 & 2013--Fall--Sept/Oct--Honeysuckle: In the fall, when native plants are losing their leaves, spray a 2% glyphosate or triclopyr solution on the entire leaf surface of the plpant. In order to avoid drift to native plants, spray on calm days. 2014: re-evalutate infestation.

Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba

Desired future conditions

Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA

Schedule for 15 year cutting cycle: (winter, or driest summer months) Residual stand will have greater proportion of low-risk, high vigor trees with small to mid-sized openings scattered throughout, and will eventually lead to a multi-aged stand. The desired diameter growth for this stand RO, SM,AB,YB=20" RS,PB=16"

Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Residual BA= 75 ~sqft/acre between groups. Groups should account for no more than 15% of the total area. Silv. Guides:

NE-603 ; NA-TP-02-00

Cover Type Size class Acres

SAF 25/55 NHWD, with strong oak component small sawtimber 14.8

Soils:

48D. Pittstown loam. 15-25% slopes.

Access:

Access is across Lands of Buechner.

Stocking and Site Adequate. Above B line (excluding patch cut). Quality:

Regeneration:

Large groups of red spruce in understory; beech and some groups of sugar maple (seedling,saplings).

Stand Health:

Western portion of stand was treated in 2011 (Patch cut and thinning). Medium sized pockets of honeysuckle were cut (2011) in treated portion of stand, and should be re-treated. Two small patches of garlic mustard was treated (2011) and should be re-treated.

Stand History:

2011--NRCS patch cut/ variable retention thinning (O'Wril, Russo) 2011--invasive plant treatment (mechanical pulling/cutting of honeysuckle). Garlic mustard was torched.

Natural Resource 2011 harvest was halted due to Tropical Storm Irene. Road was repaired following this event, and seeded. Notes:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource This stand has high recreation value. An interprative sign should be added to Stone Lot Rd, to highlight the significance of early successional habitat. Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

72


picture

Stand 2o TOTALS 2011

BA

tpa

MSD

Overall

0.79

160

789

5.88

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

Volume

0.79 19 2

20 120 20

37 605 147

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

90%

conf level % error CV

# of points BAF

Sawtimber Volume Volume 0.79 mean saw dbh Avg MHt Vol/tree

160 140:20

Notes:

90%

1 20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Produce high quality sawtimber; develop/maintain an uneven-age structure. Favor red spruce component.

No activity planned. Allow natural development of red spruce community. Management Recommendations

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type Size class Acres

ne-603

SAF 31 -- Red Spruce and NHWD poletimber 2.4

Soils: 47E. Dutchess channery loam. 25-60% slopes. Very stony. Access:

Stocking and Site Quality:

Access is across Lands of Buechner; or to the Farm Landing (on Stone Lot Rd).

Overstory is fully stocked. It is unclear if this is a plantation or natural stand, however, it is in stem exlcusion. site class II.

Regeneration:

very little regeneration throughout most of stand; some red spruce and birch is regenerating in gaps made during last entry.

Stand Health:

Neighboring stand has some garlic mustard; none noted in in 2O, but this should be monitored.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

2002 firewood harvest removed several small gaps.

Natural Resource Notes:

This stand is located very near two feeder streams; any future harvest should buffer these feeder streams.

Cultural Resource Notes:

This stand has high recreational value as it runs along Stone Lot Road.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

73


picture

Stand 2P TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

2.03 1 5

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

BA

tpa

MSD

63

92

10.27

26 3 34

23 5 64

Sawtimber Volume Volume 2.03 mean saw dbh 14.18 Avg MHt 10.45 Vol/tree 87.9

63 29:34 80% 33% 64

# of points

conf level % error CV

Notes:

80% 72% 132

7 diameter distribution

BAF

species pie chart

20 Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Produce high quality sawtimber; develop/maintain an uneven-age structure.

No planned commercial harvest this cycle. Consider small (in-house) firewood harvest to remove senesing UGS (maple and ash) where adv regeneration exists in understory; also conduct in-house understory treatment to remove dense patches of striped maple.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type Size class Acres

ne-603

SAF 25 sawtimber 7.1

Soils:

49D. Pittstown loam, 15-25%. Very stony.

Access:

Upper portion can be accessed via Gallop/Marquand. Lower portion can be accessed via Marquand Rd, and Lands of Buechner.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Adequate. B line. Site class II.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

Regeneration:

some desirable regeneration in blowdown area (5-10ft white ash, aspen, maple, yellow birch), along with pockets of striped maple.

species, size

Stand Health:

some evidence of sugar maple borer.

Stocking and Site Quality:

insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

southwest portion of this stand was affected by 1999 windstorm.

treatments, land use, disturbance

Natural Resource Notes:

The northern portion of the stand borders a creek. A protective strip of approximately 100ft should be left along this portion in which only single tree selection harvesting (or light thinning) can occur so that breaks made in the canopy are minimal and a continuous cover is maintained. Forest equipment shall operate no closer than 50ft from the water's edge.

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

Cultural Resource Notes:

This area abuts the farm, and is likely used by many visitors.

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

74


picture

Stand 2q TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

# of points

0.58 2 8

BA

tpa

MSD

95

270

7.43

10 10 75

10 17 243

Sawtimber Volume Volume 0.58 mean saw dbh 13.46 Avg MHt 7.68 Vol/tree 57

95 20:75 80% 21% 26

conf level % error CV

Notes: poor quality stand. Very low sawtimber value. Decent skid roads.

80% 99% 122

4 diameter distribution

BAF

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

species pie chart

20

Produce high quality sawtimber; develop/maintain an uneven-age structure.

No activity planned during this management cycle. This stand should be treated along with stands 2J and 2R.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions

Note: this stand is too small to warrant managing as an individual stand. It will likely be joined with a surrounding stand when stand boundaries are re-deliniated.

Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type Size class Acres

SAF 25 4.5

Soils: 116F. Lynman-Tunbridge-Rock outcrop complex. 25-70%. Very stony. Access:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Access is through Lands of Buechner. Stocking and Site Overall canopy stocking is dense (A line), but AGS stocking is inadequate (20 sqft). Mostly smaller diamter beech, yellow birch and white birch. Site Class III. Quality:

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

Regeneration:

species, size

dense patches of beech (3-7ft)

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ There are a significant number of sawlog-sized sugar maples with crowns that show signs of wind/ice damage, and are high risk. BBD abounds. Stand History:

treatments, land use, disturbance

Natural Resource Notes:

some steep slopes and shallow soils.

Cultural Resource Notes:

This stand is up high and has the potential to have high recreation value, if viewing points were cleared.

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

75


picture

Stand 2r TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

2.38 3 2

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

1

BA

tpa

MSD

68

82

11.76

32 20 12 4

24 46 10 1

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

Sawtimber Volume Volume 2.38 mean saw dbh 15.4 Avg MHt 9.6 Vol/tree

68 52:16 conf level % error CV

80% 22% 33

# of points

conf level % error CV

Notes:

80% 29% 42

5 species pie chart

BAF

20 Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Produce high quality sawtimber; maintain an uneven-age structure.

No activity planned during this management cycle. Stand density is not critically high.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type Size class Acres

NE 603

SAF 25-- predominantly SM, along with WA and beech; Patches of Rich NHWD Forest. sawtimber 10.4

Soils: 106E Berkshire fine sandy loam, 25-50%. Very stony. Access:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Access is through Lands of Buechner. Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

Canopy stocking is adequate (B line). Canopy is relatively homogenous, but has some fairly significant openings. Site II.

Understory is predominatly striped maple. However, there are pockets of sugar maple and yellow birch saplings.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ BBD present. Stand History:

Natural Resource Notes:

treatments, land use, disturbance

Parts of this stand are very wet, and unmaintained road is right near the creek in places. Much of this road is unusable and will require major improvement during prior to the next entry. There is a creek in the south end of the stand that runs over the road.

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

76


picture

Stand 2s TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

0.86 1 5

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

tpa

MSD

155

7.83

12 4 44

12 6 137

Sawtimber Volume Volume 0.86 mean saw dbh 13.3 Avg MHt 9.7 Vol/tree 69

60 16:44 80% 16% 23

# of points BAF

BA

60

conf level % error CV

Notes: Scrub shrub woods. Bear signs all over (eg beech marks, feed nests.) No timber. Sapling phase. Blowdown. Poor site.

80% 94% 137

5 20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Provide high quality wildlife habitat. Provide sawtimber/fuelwood.

No planned activity during this management cycle. Allow stand to develop.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type Size class Acres

ne-603

SAF 25 poletimber 19

Soils: 118D. Tunbridge-Lyman complex. 15-25%slopes. Very rocky. Access:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Access is through lands of Zaplatel. Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

Canopy is adequately stocked, although much of the growing stock is UGS. B line. Site Class III.

Beech exists in dense patches throughout the stand. There is also significant

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ BBD affect much of this stand. Stand History:

Natural Resource Notes:

Part of this stand was blowndown by the 1999 storm. A harvest occurred in the 1990s.

Two beech with recent bear-marks (and tracks) found along the ridgeline. (one of only two stands on property)

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource This stand is located along a narrow ridge with excellent views of Mettawee Valley; currently there is very poor recreational access to the area. Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

77


picture

Stand 2T TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

2.7 1 3

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

BA

tpa

MSD

65

141

8.26

35 5 25

32 8 101

Sawtimber Volume Volume 2.7 mean saw dbh 14.1 Avg MHt 10.35 Vol/tree 84

65 40:25 80% 31% 38

conf level % error CV

Notes:

80% 29% 35

# of points diameter distribution BAF

species pie chart

20 Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Produce high quality sawtimber; maintain even-age structure. Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

Final Shelterwood Removal Cut.

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Prior to this cut, 1. perform a regeneration survey to determine which areas of the stand should receive total overstory removal, and which areas should only receive partial removal. Overall, 10-20sqft of the basal area should be left as reserves. 2. Also, careful layout of major skid trails is essential to minimize damage to advanced regeneration.

Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA

See Merck's Harvest Guidelines for further details on harvest objectives.

Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity Harvest Schedule: Winter 2016 Find operator who can use a mix of directional felling, log-length skidding or forwarding, and the use to winches to carry out this operation.

Silv. Guides:

ne-603

Cover Type Size class Acres

SAF 25 seedling 24

Soils: 47E Dutchess channery loam, 25-60%. Very stony. Access:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index It seems that the last harvest used Howe Rd to access this stand. If Howe rd is used in the next entry, it will require significant repair work. Consider making new skid road from 2T, which will connect to existing road in the lowest elevation in stand 2S. This existing road connects to roads on neighboring lands (Zaplatel).

Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

Stand Health:

The canopy is minimally stocked (proceeding shelterwood cut), yet is near the B line. Site Class III.

Adequate mix of desireable regeneration (mostly yellow birch; but beech and striped maple are also established throughout the stand.) 3-7 feet.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

This young stand is in fine health. insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

Natural Resource Notes:

2002(?) initial seed cut of two stage shelterwood. 1999 blowdown affected much of this stand, but particularly in the northwest. 1990s harvest in southeast corner. 1950s(?) harvest.

Shallow soils, and ledge throughout stand.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Notes:

The eastern half of this stand is located near the top of a long ridge.

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

78


picture

Stand 2u TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

1.58 3 6 0

BA

tpa

MSD

90

156

9.62

23 18 45 3

20 53 81 3

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

Sawtimber Volume Volume 1.58 mean saw dbh 14.52 Avg MHt 8.4 Vol/tree 80

90 41:49 conf level % error CV

80% 10% 25

# of points

11

BAF

20

conf level % error CV

Notes:

80% 60% 155

diameter distribution

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Produce high quality sawtimber; develop/maintain an uneven-age structure.

species pie chart

This stand has an inholding located within its boundary. See map in Appendix E. Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

No activities scheduled. Stocking is not critically high. Management Recommendations

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type Size class Acres

ne 603

SAF 25 small sawtimber 41.9

Soils: 109E Tunbridge-Berkshire complex, 25-50% slopes. Rocky. Access:

Access is through Lands of Zaplatel.

Stocking and Site Stand is adequately stocked. Between A and B lines. Site class I. Quality:

Regeneration:

Mostly a light distribution of beech, maple and ash (seedling/saplings)

Stand Health:

Overall stand is in fine health. BBD and sugar maple borer damage was noted in the timber cruise.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

possibly affected from 1999 windstorm. Evidence of a 1995-1997 harvest.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

Natural Resource Notes:

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Notes:

This stand can be seen from the Mettawee Valley, and future harvest may impact the views from below.

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

79


picture

Stand 2v TOTALS 2011

Volume

BA

tpa

MSD

70

149

8.43

1.2

20

18

6

50

131

Overall Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

Sawtimber Volume Volume mean saw dbh Avg MHt Vol/tree

70 20:50

conf level % error CV

conf level % error CV

# of points BAF

Notes:

2 20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Produce high quality sawtimber; maintain even-age structure.

Final Shelterwood Removal Cut. Management Recommendations

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals.

Prior to this cut, 1. perform a regeneration survey to determine which areas of the stand should receive total overstory removal, and which areas should only receive partial removal. Overall, 1020sqft of the basal area should be left as reserves. 2. Also, careful layout of major skid trails is essential to minimize damage to advanced regeneration.

Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba

See Merck's Harvest Guidelines for further details on harvest objectives.

Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Harvest Schedule: Winter 2016 Find operator who can use a mix of directional felling, log-length skidding or forwarding, and the use to winches to carry out this operation.

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type Size class Acres

ne-603

SAF 25 seedling 9.2

Soils:

118D Tunbridge-Lyman complex. 15-25% slopes. Very rocky.

Access:

Access has been from Gallop Rd in the past. If Gallop rd is used in the next entry, it will require repair work. Consider making new skid road from 2K, through 2T, which will connect to existing road in the lowest elevation in stand 2S. This existing road connects to roads on neighboring lands (Zaplatel).

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Stocking and Site Canopy is minimally stocked proceeding shelterwood cut. Site Class II. Quality:

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

Regeneration:

species, size

Adequate mix of desireable regeneration (mostly yellow birch; but equal mix of beech and striped maple) 3-7 feet.

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ This young stand is in fine health. Stand History:

2002(?) initial seed cut of two stage shelterwood. Evidence of 1995-1997 harvest is spotty and less frequent in western section. 1950s(?) harvest.

Natural Resource Shallow soils, and ledge throughout stand. Notes:

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Notes:

The eastern half of this stand is located near the top of a long ridge.

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

80


picture

Stand 2op TOTALS 2011

Volume

BA

tpa

MSD

Overall Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

no data forest opening

Notes: semi open. Some large stems--mostly. Ash is invading. Honeysuckle in understory. Many UGS. Cellar hole.

# of points diameter distribution BAF

species pie chart

20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Maintain open condition; Maintain large, mast-producing trees.

1. treat invasives. 2. re-clear openning north of Mitiguay Rd. 2b. Clear brush from cellar opening 3. Management Recommendations North of Road---maintain as a permanent wildlife opening; South of Road--do not treat.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

Invasive plant management 2012-2019--spring---hand pull or torch garlic mustard. Flag patches as they are found. Fall 2012-2019: Garlic mustard: use a backpack sprayer to apply 3% glyphosate solution in September. 2012 & 2013--Fall--Sept/Oct--Honeysuckle: In the fall, when native plants are losing their leaves, spray a 2% glyphosate or triclopyr solution on the entire leaf surface of the plpant. In order to avoid drift to native plants, spray on calm days. 2014: re-evalutate infestation. ******

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Vermont Chapter of The Nature Conservancy. "Invasive Plant Management Chemical Fact Sheet"

Cover Type Size class Acres

saf 25 semi-open 2.5

Soils:

Dutchess Channery Loam.

Access:

Access is across Lands of Buechner.

Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

semi-open. Until recently, this area was maintained as a permanent opening.

honeysuckle and some spruce.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ Honeysuckle is quite dense north of the road, and should be controlled. Stand History:

treatments, land use, disturbance

Natural Resource Notes:

Maintaining this a as a permanent forest opening will provide habitat to a variety of wildlife and songbirds.

Cultural Resource Notes:

There is a hut for campers located south of the road. Recreation value in the area is high.

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

81


2I

Compartment Three

1E

2P

2H

3OP

1OP

2HNP

2J

1D

1

2G

1OP

3D2

1B

3F

3

2

3C1

2Q 2T 2R

1C

3E

3C

3BNP

3B

Old To

4MNP

4OP

4M

wn R o

2V

4L

4G

2U

ad 5E

5

4

2S

2K

3ANP 4ANP

4C

4SP2

3A

4A1

5OP

4A2

4H

Legend

4E

4D

4A3

Primary woods roads

Secondary woods roads

4K

8A

4F

0 0.040.08

0.16

4N

0.24

8B

Stand boundary8

Miles 0.32

ÂŻ

topo lines 20 ft

4ANP 8F

Compartments

9 82


picture

Stand 3A TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

2.19 1 8

Saw2mber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

BA

tpa

MSD

90

198

8.36

27 7 57

20 17 161

SawMmber  Volume Volume 2.19 mean  saw  dbh 15.3 Avg  MHt 10.1 Vol/tree 110

90 34:57

conf level %  error

80% 7%

CV

12

# of  points BAF

conf level %  error CV

Notes: very low  value  stand.    Poor  quality  site,  and  poorly  formed  trees.    High   eleva2on  (majority  above  2500c).Visible  from  the  Meeowee  Valley.    

80% 40% 67

6 20

Desired Future  Stand  CondiMon Long  Range  Silvicultural  Objec2ves:

Management RecommendaMons

Allow to  con2nue  to  develop  into  a  mixed   uneven-­‐aged  forest.

Allow natural  development  to  con2nue.    No  planned  treatment.

Recourse Concerns:  soil  erosion,  water  quality,  standing  2mber,  wtlands,  pests,  wildlife  habitat,  etc Short-­‐term  and  long  term  silvicultural  or  wildlife  goals. Desired  future  condi2ons Even-­‐age  mgmt:  present  age,  rota2on  age,  residual  ba Uneven-­‐age  mgmt:  desired  diameter,  cuTng  cycle,  residual  BA Later,  treatment  schedule:  stand,  year,  ac2vity

Silv. Guides:

ne-­‐603

Cover Type size  class: Acres

SAF 25 small  saw2mber 20.1

Soils:

109E. Tunbridge-­‐Berkshire  complex,  25-­‐50%  slopes.  Rocky.

Access:

Site Class  III,  IV.

Stocking and  Site   Quality

Regenera2on:

dry/wet, soil  depth,  Site  Index

patchy canopy  stocking;  short,  branchy  yellow  birch,  sugar  maple,  and  beech.    Many  scaeered  large  crowned,   seed-­‐producing  yellow  birch  lower  on  the  slope.    Mostly  beech  up  high.

uniform, light  distribu2on  of  beech  regenera2on.    Some  scaeered  hobblebush.

BA,  AGS:UGS,  MSD,  stems/a,  uniform?  Patchy?  Stra2fied?  

species, size

Stand Health: insects,  invasive  plants,  diseases,  level  of  impact/   BBD  affects  all  the  beech. Stand  History:

Evidence of  harves2ng  from  the  1950s?  And  1970s?

Natural Resource   Notes:

Hobblebush noted,  an  uncommon  occurance  on  Merck's  property.

Cultural Resource   Notes:

Barton Trail  runs  along  the  western  side  of  this  stand.

treatments, land  use,  disturbance

soil erosion,  water  quality,  plants/trees,  pests,  wildife  habitat,  rare/threatened  spp

fish and  game  exis2ng  habitat  and  poten2al

viewscapes, waterfalls,  scenic  areas,  recrea2on  and  aesthe2c  values

83


picture

Stand 3B TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

1.03 3 6

Saw2mber AGS UGS Cavity

0

BA

tpa

MSD

80

211

7.58

16 15 45 4

17 39 141 14

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

80 31:49 conf level %  error CV

80% 9% 21

# of  points

11

BAF

20

SawMmber  Volume Volume 1.03 mean  saw  dbh 13.2 Avg  MHt 7.86 Vol/tree 60 conf  level %  error CV

80% 51% 125

Notes: The por2on  boardering  2K  was  included  in  the  ~2005  shelterwood   cut.      Por2ons  of  this  stand  are  above  2500  h,  and  would  require  an   ACT  250  permit  to  harvest.

species pie  chart

Desired Future  Stand  CondiMon Long  Range  Silvicultural  Objec2ves:

Management RecommendaMons

Produce saw2mber  and  fuelwood;  promote   uneven-­‐aged  structure.

Allow natural  development  to  con2nue.    No  planned  treatment.

Recourse Concerns:  soil  erosion,  water  quality,  standing  2mber,  wtlands,  pests,  wildlife  habitat,  etc Short-­‐term  and  long  term  silvicultural  or  wildlife  goals. Desired  future  condi2ons Even-­‐age  mgmt:  present  age,  rota2on  age,  residual  ba Uneven-­‐age  mgmt:  desired  diameter,  cuTng  cycle,  residual  BA Later,  treatment  schedule:  stand,  year,  ac2vity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type size  class Acres

ne-­‐603

SAF-­‐ 30    Overstory=  WB,  YB,  RS       Pole2mber 25.8

Soils:

106E. Berkshire  fine  sandy  loam.  25-­‐50%  slopes.  Very  stony.

Access:

(Upper eleva2on  por2on)  Mi2guay  to  Gallop  to  Old  Town  Road.    Use  Barn  Cabins  Landing.              (Lower  eleva2on   por2on)  Mi2guay  down  to  Marquand  Rd,  and  across  Lands  of  Buechner.    This  op2on  is  best,  however,  it  will  require   extensive  road  repair  along  Mi2guay.    Conversely,  stand  can  be  accessed  through  2K,  however,  this  op2on  too,  will   require  extensive  road  repair  along  Mi2guay,  and  a  new  river  crossing  will  need  to  designed  and  installed.

dry/wet, soil  depth,  Site  Index

Overstory is  yellow  birch,  white  birch,  with  patches  of  red  spruce.    Most  of  stand  is  stra2fied,  with  red   spruce  occupying  the  midstory.    Site  Class  II,  IV.

BA,  AGS:UGS,  MSD,  stems/a,  uniform?  Patchy?  Stra2fied?  

Stocking and  Site   Quality

Regenera2on:

Stand Health:

Patchy distribu2on  of  red  spruce  3-­‐15h),  striped  maple,  yellow  birch,  and  sugar  maple  (5  feet)

species, size

Significant number  of  large,  senescing  yellow  birch.    Overall  stand  is  in  fine  health. insects,  invasive  plants,  diseases,  level  of  impact/  

2003-­‐-­‐about 2  acres  were  treated  in  conjuncture  with  shelterwood  treatment  is  stand  2K.                Evidence  of   harves2ng  from  the  1950s?  And  1970s?

treatments, land  use,  disturbance

Natural Resource   Notes:

Some very  good  early  successional  habitat  (shelterwood  area),  and  excellent  songbird  habitat  throughout   due  to  the  stra2fied  mixture.

soil erosion,  water  quality,  plants/trees,  pests,  wildife  habitat,  rare/threatened  spp

Cultural Resource   Notes:

High recrea2on  value  up  high  where  there  are  fine  views  of  Pawlet  and  beyond.

Stand History:

fish and  game  exis2ng  habitat  and  poten2al

viewscapes, waterfalls,  scenic  areas,  recrea2on  and  aesthe2c  values

84


picture

Stand 3C TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

4.6 3 2

Saw2mber AGS UGS Cavity

0

BA

tpa

MSD

85

124

10.52

49 21 12 1

37 62 25 0

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

SawMmber  Volume Volume 4.6 mean  saw  dbh 16 Avg  MHt 11 Vol/tree 125

85 69:15 conf level %  error CV

80% 15% 34

# of  points

16

BAF

20

conf level %  error CV

Desired Future  Stand  CondiMon Long  Range  Silvicultural  Objec2ves:

Management RecommendaMons

80% 26% 59

Notes: 3C &  3C1  have  been  combined.    Lower  por2on  (previously  3C1)  is  a   younger  group;  higher  eleva2on  of  stand  is  predominantly  older  sugar   maple.

Produce high  sap  yields;  produce   fuelwood  and  saw2mber

2013-­‐-­‐Treat a  por2on  of  the  understory  to  determine  its  effec2veness  at  regenera2ng  desirable  species.     Choose  an  area  (at  least  one  acre,  or  larger)  at  higher  eleva2on,  beneth  mature  sugar  maples.    Cut  all   undesirable  seedlings/saplings,  and  monitor  the  plot.    

Recourse Concerns:  soil  erosion,  water  quality,  standing  2mber,  wtlands,  pests,  wildlife  habitat,  etc Short-­‐term  and  long  term  silvicultural  or  wildlife  goals. Desired  future  condi2ons Even-­‐age  mgmt:  present  age,  rota2on  age,  residual  ba Uneven-­‐age  mgmt:  desired  diameter,  cuTng  cycle,  residual  BA Later,  treatment  schedule:  stand,  year,  ac2vity

Diameter Objec2ves:  none.    The  goal  here  is  to  maintain  a  healthy  stand  and  to  produce  sap. Harvest  Schedule:    This  stand  should  be  re-­‐entered  during  the  next  tubing  installa2on,  which  will  likely  be   in  2023. Silv.  Guides:

Cover Type size  class: Acres

SAF 25    some  Rich  Northern  Hardwood  Forest pole/saw2mber 32.5

Soils:

Access:

Stocking and  Site   Quality

Regenera2on:

Stand Health:

47E. Dutchess  Channer  loam,  25-­‐60%.  Very  stony.                                                                                                                                                                                                                 118E.  Tunbridge-­‐Lynman  compplex,  25-­‐60%  slopes.  Very  rocky. Site  Class  I  &  III.

dry/wet, soil  depth,  Site  Index

Above B  line.  88sqj/acre.    Site  Class  I  (down  low),  with  signs  of  nutrient  enrichment;  Site  Class  III  (up   high).

Some sugar  maple  poles  were  released  during  the  last  treatment  (down  low);    up  high,  where  is  it   significantly  drier,  there  are  dense  patches  of  striped  maple  (4-­‐20j)

BA,  AGS:UGS,  MSD,  stems/a,  uniform?  Patchy?  Stra2fied?  

species, size

There is  a  significant  number  of  maple  with  sugar  maple  borer  injuries. insects,  invasive  plants,  diseases,  level  of  impact/  

Stand History:

Winter 2012,  free  thinning  to  release  sugar  maple  poles  and  saw2mber  in  order  to  convert  the  stand  to  a   sugarbush.    The  treatment  covered  only  the  lower  eleva2on  por2on  of  the  stand,  and  removed  about   20sqj  of  basal  area  (see  harvest  summary  for  details).

Natural Resource   Notes:

Water bars  which  were  installed  during  the  2012  harvest  should  be  checked  and  maintained.    

Cultural Resource   Notes:

Viewpoint Road  runs  through  a  por2on  of  this  stand.

treatments, land  use,  disturbance

soil erosion,  water  quality,  plants/trees,  pests,  wildife  habitat,  rare/threatened  spp

fish and  game  exis2ng  habitat  and  poten2al

viewscapes, waterfalls,  scenic  areas,  recrea2on  and  aesthe2c  values

85


picture

Stand 3D TOTALS 2011

*** Volume

BA

tpa

MSD

Overall

***

94

189

8.9

36 43 13 2

30 11 47 1

2.94 8 2

Saw3mber AGS UGS Cavity

0

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

94 79:15 conf level %  error CV

80% 14% 36

SawKmber  Volume Volume 2.94 mean  saw  dbh 14.5 Avg  MHt 10.12 Vol/tree 97 conf  level %  error CV

80% 30% 80

Notes: A por3on  of  this  stand  was  treated  during  the  winter  of  2011  as  part   of  the  Barn  Cabins  Timber  Sale.    That  por3on  is  mapped  in  Merck's   GIS.    A  2  acre  group  was  removed  to  release  spruce  regenera3on,   encourage  other  desireable  regenera3on,  and  to  create  early   successional  habitat.

***NOTE:  This  data  was  collected  prior  to  the  treatement  (2011),  and   should  be  updated.    

# of  points

21

BAF

20 Desired Future  Stand  CondiKon Long  Range  Silvicultural  Objec3ves:

Management RecommendaKons

Develop uneven-­‐age  structure;  perpetuate  early   successional  habitat.

2012-­‐-­‐cut striped  maple  in  teh  area  that  blew  down  in  1999.  (eastern  por3on  of  stand)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Recourse                                    Concerns:  soil  erosion,  water  quality,  standing  3mber,  wtlands,  pests,  wildlife  habitat,  etc 2012-­‐-­‐Place  permanent  plot  inside  2  acre  group  selec3on.    This  is  an  ideal  site  to  monitor  since  it  is   adjacent  to  the  farm.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          2012-­‐2022-­‐-­‐-­‐ Short-­‐term  and  long  term  silvicultural  or  wildlife  goals. monitor  success  of  regenera3on. Desired  future  condi3ons Even-­‐age  mgmt:  present  age,  rota3on  age,  residual  ba Uneven-­‐age  mgmt:  desired  diameter,  cuUng  cycle,  residual  BA CuUng  Cycle:  15  years.

Later, treatment  schedule:  stand,  year,  ac3vity

Diameter Objec3ves:  SM,WA=20"      RS,WB=14"

Harvest Schedule:  re-­‐enter  during  next  management  cycle Silv.  Guides:

NE-­‐603

Cover Type size  class: Acres

SAF 25 Small  saw3mber 41.9

Soils:

47E. Dutchess  channery  loam,  25-­‐60%  slopes.  Very  stony.

Access:

Accessed by  Old  Town  Road,  and  Gallop.    Use  Barn  Cabins  Landing.  

Stocking and  Site   Above  B  line.    Stocking  is  somewhat  patchy  due  to  the  site  history  (windstorm  blew  down  a  number  of   acres  in  eastern  sec3on).  Mostly  white  birch  and  ash  in  canopy,with  spruce;  maple  in  midstory,  with  more   Quality spruce.      Site  Class  I,II.

Regenera3on:

even distribu3on  of  maple  poles,  with  some  patches  of  yellow  birch  seedlings.    Even  distribu3on  of   striped  maple.    

Stand Health:

Stand Is  in  fine  health.

dry/wet, soil  depth,  Site  Index

BA,  AGS:UGS,  MSD,  stems/a,  uniform?  Patchy?  Stra3fied?  

species, size

insects, invasive  plants,  diseases,  level  of  impact/  

Stand History:

Natural Resource   Notes:

2012 free  thinning  (removed  mostly  mature  ash,  and  birch),  along  with  2  acre  patch  cut,  intended  to   regenerate  aspen  and  to  maintain  early  successional  habitat.          1999  storm  caused  blowdown  in  eastern   sec3on  of  stand.  

Water bars  which  were  installed  during  the  2012  harvest  should  be  checked  and  maintained.    

treatments, land  use,  disturbance

soil erosion,  water  quality,  plants/trees,  pests,  wildife  habitat,  rare/threatened  spp

fish and  game  exis3ng  habitat  and  poten3al Cultural  Resource   Viewpoint  Road  runs  through  a  por3on  of  this  stand. Notes: viewscapes,  waterfalls,  scenic  areas,  recrea3on  and  aesthe3c  values

86


picture

Stand 3E TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

0.63 6 6

Saw2mber AGS UGS Cavity

1

BA

tpa

MSD

97

206

8.53

10 33 43 10

9 95 101 2

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

SawMmber  Volume Volume 0.63 mean  saw  dbh 14.5 Avg  MHt 8.12 Vol/tree 72

97 43:54 conf level %  error CV

# of  points BAF

80% 5% 8

conf level %  error CV

Notes: This stand  is  similar  to  Stand  3B,  but  has  a  more  diverse  mix  of   overstory  species.    Low  saw2mber  value.

80% 93% 155

6 20

Desired Future  Stand  CondiMon Long  Range  Silvicultural  Objec2ves:

Management RecommendaMons

Produce fuelwood;  convert  to  uneven-­‐aged   structure;  promote  development  of  soewood   component.

No ac2vity  planned.    This  stand  is  too  small  to  warrant  a  harvest,  without  trea2ng  surrounding  stands.                                                                                                                                                                                              Recourse                                    C    oncerns:                                    s    oil            e    rosion,     water  quality,  standing  2mber,  wtlands,  pests,  wildlife  habitat,  etc (Next  Management  Cycle:  Small  group  selec2on  harvest.    Remove  small  to  medium  sized  groups  of  MOD   stems  only  where  there  is  sufficient  advanced  regenera2on  beneth  (par2cularly  favor  the  release  of  red   Short-­‐term  and  long  term  silvicultural  or  wildlife  goals. spruce).        Treat  in  conjunc2on  with  3B.    Exclude  the  highest  eleva2on  por2on  of  this  stand  (in  southwest   part  of  stand);  and  exclude  northern  por2on,  which  is  located  at  the  top  of  a  windy  knob.      The  area   Desired  future  condi2ons between  groups  can  be  treated  with  a  light  single  tree  selec2on.) Even-­‐age  mgmt:  present  age,  rota2on  age,  residual  ba Uneven-­‐age  mgmt:  desired  diameter,  cuTng  cycle,  residual  BA Later,  treatment  schedule:  stand,  year,  ac2vity

Diameter Objec2ve:  YB,SM,AB=16      RS,WB=12 Harvest  Schedule:  Next  management  cycle.        CuTng  Cycle:  20yrs Silv.  Guides:

Cover Type size  class: Acres

ne-­‐603 Northeast Forest  Regenera2on  Handbook

SAF 25 14.7

Soils:

106E. Berkshire  fine  sandy  loam,  25-­‐50%  slopes.  Very  stony.

Access:

Access via  Gallop  Rd.    Use  Barn  Cabin  Landing.

Stocking and  Site   Quality

Regenera2on:

Overstory AGS  stocking  is  adequate  for  a  poor  quality  site  (43sqe).    Overstory  is  mostly  yellow  birch  and   white  birch  and  sugar  maple,  with  groups  of  red  spruce.    Site  Class  III.    Lower  quality  site,  due  to  high   eleva2on.

Patchy distribu2on  of  red  spruce  3-­‐15e),  striped  maple,  beech,  with  some  yellow  birch,  and  few  sugar   maple  (5  feet)

dry/wet, soil  depth,  Site  Index

BA,  AGS:UGS,  MSD,  stems/a,  uniform?  Patchy?  Stra2fied?  

species, size

Stand Health: insects,  invasive  plants,  diseases,  level  of  impact/   Some  large,  senescing  yellow  birch.    Overall  stand  is  in  fine  health. Stand  History:

no known  management  history.

Natural Resource   Notes:

Some very  good  early  successional  habitat  (shelterwood  area),  and  excellent  songbird  habitat  throughout   due  to  the  stra2fied  mixture.

Cultural Resource   Notes:

High recrea2on  value  up  high  where  there  are  fine  views  of  Pawlet  and  beyond.

treatments, land  use,  disturbance

soil erosion,  water  quality,  plants/trees,  pests,  wildife  habitat,  rare/threatened  spp

fish and  game  exis2ng  habitat  and  poten2al

viewscapes, waterfalls,  scenic  areas,  recrea2on  and  aesthe2c  values

87


Stand 3F TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall Saw-mber AGS UGS Cavity

1.37 4 3 0

BA

tpa

MSD

72

130

9.5

20 20 28 4

18 42 67 2

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

SawMmber  Volume Volume 1.37 mean  saw  dbh 14.1 Avg  MHt 8.6 Vol/tree 76

72 40:32 conf level %  error CV

# of  points

80% 10% 15

conf level %  error CV

Notes:

80% 42% 63

5 diameter distribu-on

BAF

species pie  chart

20 Desired Future  Stand  CondiMon Long  Range  Silvicultural  Objec-ves:

Produce high  quality  saw-mber;  convert  to   uneven-­‐aged  structure.

No harvest  scheduled.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Management   RecommendaMons 2013    understory  treatement.      Use  a  brush  cuder  saw  to  knock  back  the  dense  striped  maple  layer  that  

Recourse Concerns:  soil  erosion,  water  quality,  standing  -mber,  wtlands,  pests,  wildlife  habitat,  etc

exists throughout  this  stand  in  order  to  begin  regenera-ng  with  desireable  species.    Focus  treatment   underneth  canopy  gaps  from  the  previous  windstorm  event.    Treat  en-re  stand  if  possible.

Short-­‐term and  long  term  silvicultural  or  wildlife  goals. Desired  future  condi-ons Even-­‐age  mgmt:  present  age,  rota-on  age,  residual  ba Uneven-­‐age  mgmt:  desired  diameter,  cuSng  cycle,  residual  BA Later,  treatment  schedule:  stand,  year,  ac-vity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type size  class: Acres

ne-­‐603 Northeast Forest  Regenera-on  Handbook

SAF 25 small  saw-mber 6.5

Soils:

118E. Tunbridge-­‐Lyman  complex,  25-­‐60%  slopes,  very  rocky.

Access:

Access via  Gallop  Rd.    Use  Barn  Cabins  Landing.

Stocking and  Site   Quality

Regenera-on:

Adequately stocked  (B  line).  Patchy  canopy  stocking  due  to  significant  blowdown  (possibly  1999  storm?)     Site  Class  II.

Dense striped  maple  throughout  the  stand.

dry/wet, soil  depth,  Site  Index

BA,  AGS:UGS,  MSD,  stems/a,  uniform?  Patchy?  Stra-fied?  

species, size

Stand Health: insects,  invasive  plants,  diseases,  level  of  impact/   Stand  is  in  fine  health;  residual  stocking  (following  windstorm  event)  appears  healthy  and  windfirm. Stand  History:

1999 Significant  windstorm  event  led  to  blowdown.            1960's  harvest.

Natural Resource   Notes:

While the  dense  striped  maple  layer  provides  good  quality  understory  structure,  it  should  be  removed,   and  replaced  with  similarly  good  quality  understory  structure  of  desirable  tree  species.

Cultural Resource   Notes:

Gallop road  runs  along  the  southern  edge  of  this  stand.

treatments, land  use,  disturbance

soil erosion,  water  quality,  plants/trees,  pests,  wildife  habitat,  rare/threatened  spp

fish and  game  exis-ng  habitat  and  poten-al

viewscapes, waterfalls,  scenic  areas,  recrea-on  and  aesthe-c  values

88


3D2

1C

1A

5N

5RP

Old To

Compartment Four

1

3E

3C

4OP

3BNP

3B

4MNP

3

4M

2K

wn R o

2

4L

4G

ad

5D

5E

3ANP 4ANP

4C

4SP2

2V

3A

4A1

5OP

4 5OP

4A3

4F

8A

4ANP

4K

5OP

4B

8F

4N

8B1

Ha t c h Rd

5A1

4I

8 Legend

8E

5B1

Stand boundary

Secondary 8C woods roads 8G

5B2

0.16

0.24

8OP

Primary woods roads

4J

0 0.040.08

8B

4E

4D

5

5A2

4A2

4H

Miles 0.32

ÂŻ

5SP4 7A

topo lines 20 ft

Compartments

8C1 89


picture

Stand 41A TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

BA

tpa

MSD

95

249

7.73

10 18 65 2

9 61 171 1

0.67 2 8

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

1

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

Sawtimber Volume Volume 0.67 mean saw dbh 14.5 Avg MHt 8.65 Vol/tree 77

95 28:67 conf level % error

80% 12%

CV

24

# of points

conf level % error CV

8

BAF 20 Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

80% 81% 162

Notes: Steep and rocky. Very low proportion AGS. Canopy is UGS poletimber and some large scenesing sugar maple. Midstory is heavily infested beech; high UGS. Midstory has some scattered patches of YB. Possibly manage for beech. Favor resistant beech.

convert to uneven-aged; Integrate songbird habitat management with sawtimber production.

1. Femelshlag (Expanding Gap Shelterwood). Groups should range between .25-1 acres, and should be focused on UGS, or high-risk stems, and ideally will be located where there is adv regeneration already present. Be sure to locate gaps near mature, seed-bearing, desirable stems. Careful skid road layout is essential. Gaps should be precisely mapped and clearly labelled in the GIS to aid planning for the next entry. Light thinning between the gaps is okay. Thinning should be to release large desirable seed-bearing trees from competition. Residual BA > 80 2. Patch Cut. As part of this treatment, remove approximately a 3-acre patch cut. Focus the patch on a part of the stand with very high proportion of UGS, and located on moderate slopes.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

Schedule for 20 year cutting cycle: 2020 Residual stand will have well distributed canopy gaps. Remaining canopy will be reduced, and will have a higher proportion of AGS. Financial note: this will be predominatly a fuelwood harvest. 20 year cutting cycle; maximum dbh 16" for maple; 12" for birch.

Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba

Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Access: Hammond Road to Lodge Rd. Use 100-Acre Meadow Landing. Post-treatment: conduct post-harvest TSI to remove striped maple and beech.

Silv. Guides:

VT-666 NE-603

Cover Type size class: Acres

SAF 25 pole/small sawtimber 19

Soils:

42E. Macomber-Taconic complex, 25-60% slopes. Rocky.

Access:

Site Class III, IV.

Stocking and Site Quality

Regeneration:

Stand Health:

Between A and B line. Very high proportion of UGS, mostly from BBD-aflicted beech.

Beech whips exist throughout. Patches of yellow birch and maple (3-15ft).

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Beech is heavily infected with BBD. insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

1979 harvest (Beattie, Smalley)

Natural Resource This is a high elevation site with relatively thin soils and should be treated during very dry or during frozen conditions. Portions of the stand have steep slopes, which are inoperable. Notes:

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential This stand is located at high elevation; the majority of 4A1 is below 2500 feet. Most of the NonCultural Resource productive portion of the site is above 2500 feet, and requires an ACT 250 permit before harvesting. Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

90


Stand 4A2 TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

3.21 1 3 1

BA

tpa

MSD

80

141

9.27

35 10 30 5

24 28 85 5

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

Sawtimber Volume Volume 3.21 mean saw dbh 16.25 Avg MHt 12.5 Vol/tree 134

80 45:35 conf level % error CV

80% 33% 40

# of points

conf level % error CV

Notes: last entered in 2005.

80% 40% 51

4

BAF 20 Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Develop/maintain an uneven-age structure; produce high quality sawtimber.

No activity planned

Management Recommendations

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type size class: Acres

ne 603

SAF 25 sawtimber 30.7

Soils: 42C, 42E. Macomber-Taconic complex, 8-60% slope. Rocky. Access:

Stocking and Site Quality

Regeneration:

Access is to 100 Acre Meadow Landing, via Lodge, and Myers Rd.

Above B line. Site Class II.

Dense patches of beech whips were released during the last entry. Yellow birch seedlings are mixed in, but it is not yet clear if the YB will be able to outcompete the beech.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ stand is in fine helath. Stand History:

2005 group and single tree selection. 1979 harvest (Beattie, Smalley).

Natural Resource BBD is found throughout the stand, and likely caused the heavy beech suckering we see there today. Notes:

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource This stand borders Hammond Rd, and Myers Rd. The majority of groups should be located away from these roads. Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

91


picture

Stand 4A3 TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

# of points

3.32 2 4

BA

tpa

MSD

75

163

8.26

30 15 30

23 52 89

Sawtimber Volume Volume 3.32 mean saw dbh 15.5 Avg MHt 16.5 Vol/tree 145

75 45:30 80% 20% 25

conf level % error CV

Notes:

80% 98% 121

4 diameter distribution

BAF

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

species pie chart

20

Develop/maintain an uneven-age structure; produce maple sap; produce sawtimber.

No activities planned during this management cycle.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

NE-603; Managing Rich Northern Hardwood Forests (TNC Vermont)

Cover Type size class: Acres

SAF 25 Rich NHWD Forest sawtimber 52.3

Soils: 49D. Pittstown loam, 15-25% slope. Very stony. Access:

Stocking and Site Quality

Regeneration:

Stand Health:

Access is to Old Town Road.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Adequately stocked stand (above B line); moderately patchy stocking due to last treatment. Site Class I.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

very little regeneration. Some patches of cherry seedlings, and some striped maple. some sugar maple and beech saplings.

species, size

BBD affects beech. Overall this is a very healthy stand with vigorous growing trees. insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

This stand has been entered four times in the last 50 years: 1961, 1967, 1979, and sometime between 2003-2008

Natural Resource A portion of this stand borders the east branch of White Creek. A protective strip of approximately 150ft should be left along this portion in which only single tree selection harvesting can occur so that breaks made in the Notes: canopy are minimal and a continuous cover is maintained. Forest equipment shall operate no closer than 100ft from the water's edge.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

Cultural Resource High quality stand; low recreation value due to sugaring operation/tubing. Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

92


picture

Stand 4B TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

5.65 6 4

BA

tpa

MSD

120

153

11.57

68 28 24

64 53 36

120 96:24 80% 22% 33

# of points

Sawtimber Volume Volume 5.65 mean saw dbh 13.8 Avg MHt 10.7 Vol/tree 88 conf level % error CV

Notes:

80% 30% 45

5 diameter distribution

BAF

species pie chart

20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Develop/maintain an uneven-age structure; produce maple sap; produce sawtimber.

Group and Single Tree Selection. Locate groups of high-risk, low value trees, and to avoid sensitive Management Recommendations sites. Harvest no more than 20% of stand in small to medium sized groups, most of which should

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

range between .25-.75acres . Leave ~90sqft/a between groups, including >35sqft/a sawtimber if possible. Recruit snags and DWD by girdling, or cutting and leaving worst quality large diameter trees. Retain large diameter, large crowned desireable species for seed source.

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba

Schedule for 20 year cutting cycle: 2020 Residual stand will have well distributed canopy gaps with release desireable adv regen. Remaining canopy will be reduced, and will have a higher proportion of AGS. Financial note: this will be predominatly a fuelwood harvest. 20 year cutting cycle; maximum dbh 16" for maple; 12" for birch. Invasive plant control. Invasives should be treated BEFORE entering this stand, and they should be monitored and possibly treated afterwards.

Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Post-treatment: conduct post-harvest TSI to remove striped maple and beech.

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type size class: Acres

NE-603

SAF 55 sawtimber 19.1

Soils: 47E. Dutchess channery loam, 25-60% slope. Very stony. Access:

Access is to Old Town Rd, via Gallop.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Stocking and Site Moderately uniform stocking (between A and B line). Good quality timber, especially considering site history (old pasture). Site Class II. Quality

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

Regeneration:

species, size

Stand Health:

patches of white ash, black cherry, sugar maple (seedling class).

Stand has some small patches of honeysuckle. insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

Old pature--previously a part of the 100 Acre Meadow.

Natural Resource Notes:

apple trees are scattered thoughout the stand.

Cultural Resource Notes:

Gallop Rd runs through this stand, which likely sees heavy use. Group removals should be located away from this road.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

93


***This stand was cruised during 2010, and the data was calculated in NED.

Stand 4C TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

BA

tpa

MSD

72

76

12.4

6.8

Basal Area BA

72

Sawtimber Volume Volume 6.8 Notes: This stand was entered sometime in the last 10 years, is adequately stocked, and will require no treatment during this cycle.

# of points

10

BAF

20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Develop/maintain an uneven-age structure; produce maple sap; produce sawtimber.

No activities planned during this management cycle. Management Recommendations

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type size class: Acres

ne 603; Managing Rich NHWD Forests (TNC Vermont)

SAF 25 Rich NHWD Forest sawtimber 25.8

Soils: 49C. Pittstown loam, 8-15% slopes, very stony. Access:

Use 100-acre meadow Landing. Access is to Old Town Rd, via Lodge Rd.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Stocking and Site Minimally stocked (C line). 94% sugar maple. Site Class I. Quality

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

Regeneration:

species, size

Very little regeneration. Some sugar maple, white ash saplings. Some black cherry adv regen.

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ Some small patches of invasive plants noted during inventory. Honeycuckle was most common, followed by a few small patches of barberry. some browse damage noted. Stand History:

This stand was treated in the last management cycle.

Natural Resource Notes:

This stand has a small man-made pond located in the north-eastern portion; and a creek runs from this pond south-west through the stand. Since this stand is located in a cove, it can be rather wet. The pond and streams should be buffered during any future activities (100+ft buffer).

Cultural Resource Notes:

Very high recreation value. Lodge, Hammond and Meyer Rd. all run through this stand.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

94


picture

Stand 4D TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

3.9 3 4

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

0

BA

tpa

MSD

97

150

10.15

43 13 33 7

32 29 87 2

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

Sawtimber Volume Volume 3.9 mean saw dbh 15.5 Avg MHt 12.3 Vol/tree 120

97 56:41 conf level % error CV

# of points

80% 14% 24

conf level % error CV

80% 41% 68

Notes: Good access to upper and lower portion of stand, however, upper road (gives access to east side) has tubing and mainline running across. Lower elevation (west side) is nice, old maple woods.

6 diameter distribution

BAF

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

species pie chart

20

Develop/maintain an uneven-age structure; produce maple sap; produce sawtimber.

Group and Single Tree Selection. Locate groups of high-risk, low value trees, and to avoid sensitive sites. Harvest no more than 20% of stand in small to medium sized groups, most of which should range between .25-.75acres . Leave ~80sqft/a between groups, including >35sqft/a sawtimber if possible. Recruit snags and DWD by girdling, or cutting and leaving worst quality large diameter trees. Retain large diameter, large crowned desireable species for seed source.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba

Schedule for 20 year cutting cycle: 2020 Residual stand will have well distributed canopy gaps with release desireable adv regen. Remaining canopy will be reduced, and will have a higher proportion of AGS. Financial note: this will be predominatly a fuelwood harvest. 20 year cutting cycle; target diameter: 20" for maple, ash, oak; 12" for birch.

Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Post-treatment: conduct post-harvest TSI to remove striped maple and beech.

Silv. Guides:

ne 603: managing rich northern hardwood forests (TNC Vermont)

Cover Type size class: Acres

SAF 25 sawtimber 22.4

Soils:

42E. Macomber-Taconic complex, 25-60% slopes, rocky.

Access:

Access is to Old Town Road.

Stocking and Site Quality

Regeneration:

Stand Health:

Stocking is moderately uniform, and adequately stocked (Between A-B line). Variable site conditions. Site Class II, III.

patchy distribution of sugar maple, with significant distribution of beech(seedlings and poles); and some scattered yellow birch.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

A few honeysuckle found. perenial canker found in patches. Some evidence of root rot. insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

This stand has been entered three times in last 50 years. Thinnings occurred in 2000, 1983, and in the 1950's.

treatments, land use, disturbance

Natural Resource Notes:

This stand has a small man-made pond located in the northern portion; and a creek runs from this pond through the northern portion of the stand. The pond and stream should be buffered during any future activities (100+ft buffer).

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

Cultural Resource Notes:

High recreation value--this stand runs along a low elevation ridge. Kowenhoven Rd runs through stand.

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

95


picture

Stand 4e TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

# of points

BA

tpa

MSD

104

210

9.07

52 40 12

60 105 45

4.17 9 1

Sawtimber Volume Volume 4.17 mean saw dbh 12.47 Avg MHt 12 Vol/tree 70

104 92:12 80% 29% 43

conf level % error CV

Notes:

80% 33% 49

5 diameter distribution

BAF 20 Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

species pie chart

Develop/maintain an uneven-age structure; produce high quality sawtimber; sap production.

Group and Single Tree Selection. Locate groups of high-risk, low value trees, and to avoid sensitive sites. Harvest no more than 20% of stand in small to medium sized groups, most of which should range between .25-.75acres . As much beech and striped maple should be treated as is possible, and these must be treated within the groups. See Merck Forest Harvest Policy for general harvest guidelines.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions

Schedule for 20 year cutting cycle: Winter 2020

Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba

Residual stand will have clusters of low-risk, high vigor trees with mid-sized openings scattered throughout, and will eventually lead to a multi-aged stand. The desired diameter growth for this stand

Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

SM,AB,YB=20" RS,PB=14"

Residual BA= ~75sqft/acre between groups. Groups should account for no more than 15-20% of the total area.

Silv. Guides:

NE 603;

Cover Type size class: Acres

SAF 25 mixed NHWD. pole/small sawtimber 22.8

Soils: 47E. Dutchess channery loam, 25-60, very stony. 42E. Macomber-Taconic complex 25-60%. Access:

Stocking and Site Quality

Regeneration:

Access is to Old Town Road, via lower Kowenhoven Rd. Use The Glen Landing. Upper portion can be accessed from upper Kowenhoven Rd.

Very good timber quality. Mixed site quality (some very good--northern portion--some poor-southwest, along ridge). (Between A and B line) Site Class II, III.

Some pockets of good quality, mixed NHWD seedling and saplings.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ Dense fern patches may interfere with regeneration. Stand History:

1980 (Smally, Beattie) harvest.

Natural Resource Notes:

Some erosion has occurred at the very steep portions of Kowenhoven.

Cultural Resource Notes:

Kowenhoven road is likely a heavily used road. The upper and lower portions of the road are stable and well-designed. However, there is a very steep section that links these two, which should be retired.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

96


picture

Stand 4f TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

4.86 3 2

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

0

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

133 113:20 conf level % error CV

# of points

80% 24% 23

BA

tpa

MSD

133

220

9.35

73 40 13 7

65 143 10 2 Sawtimber Volume Volume 4.86 mean saw dbh 14.3 Avg MHt Vol/tree conf level % error CV

Notes:

80% 96% 90

3 diameter distribution

BAF 20 Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

species pie chart

Develop/maintain an uneven-age structure; produce high quality sawtimber.

Controlled Burn. Perform a controlled burn (perhaps same year as burn in 5I). This burn should tamp back the dense beech whips that cover much of the stand.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals.

Treatment Year: ~2013 Desired future conditions Shelterwood--First Entry. This treatment is already marked (leave trees in BLUE). The treatment leaves approx 50 sqft/a basal area, most of which are wind-firm, large-crowned northern red oak.

Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA

Treatment Year: anytime after burn. Or 2020. Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type size class: Acres

USFS Silvics Manual; Loftis, DL "A Shelterwood Method for Regenerating Red Oak in the Southern Appalachians."

SAF 25 sawtimber 10.4

Soils: 42E. Macomber-Taconic complex, 25-60% slopes, rocky. Access:

Access is to the Glen Landing Area.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Relatively uniform stocking. Up high: canopy is a mix of mature red oak, and small sawtimber-sized beech and red maple. Lower: Canopy is made of large mature red oak; along with mature NHWD. (Above B line) Site Class II, III.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

Regeneration:

dense beech whips on some of the drier knobs. Small patch of red spruce regen. No oak adv regeneration.

species, size

Stand Health:

BBD affects the beech in this stand, which are largely further up the slope. Since the last thinning, water sprouts have formed on a number of the mature oak.

Stocking and Site Quality

insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

1980--harvest (smalley, beattie). 2000--thinning (Calfee, Michalski).

Natural Resource Notes:

A small creek runs through the east portion of this stand, which should be buffered during harvest activities (50+ft buffer).

Cultural Resource Notes:

This stand has somewhat high recreation value, since it is located near to The Glen picnic area. A small buffer (beauty stip), should be located around the Glen.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

97


picture

Stand 4g TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

5.29 5 4 1

BA

tpa

MSD

130

273

8.52

65 28 25 12

77 91 99 6

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

Sawtimber Volume Volume 5.29 mean saw dbh 12.25 Avg MHt 10.9 Vol/tree 68

130 93:37 conf level % error CV

80% 11% 23

# of points BAF

conf level % error CV

Notes: southern portion is hardwood forest, used as sugarbush. Northern 3/4 is mostly spruce.

80% 27% 55

8 20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Develop/maintain an uneven-age structure; produce maple sap; produce sawtimber.

no activities planned this management cycle. Management Recommendations

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

ne-603

Cover Type size class: Acres

SAF 25/ SAF 31 small sawtimber 30.5

Soils:

43E. Taconic-Macomber complex, 25-60% slopes. Very rocky.

Access:

Site Class III.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Stocking and Site Mixed stocking. Northern portion is mostly red spruce. Far southern portion has hardwoods. South and east portions appear to have been thinned in past 20 yrs. Quality

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

Regeneration:

species, size

patches of dense spruce seedlings.

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ overall stand is in fine health. Some dense patches of hay-scented fern. Stand History:

1993-- 1.5acre clearcut (Lareau, Waite).

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

Natural Resource Notes:

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Notes:

viewpoint trail runs through this stand.

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

98


picture

Stand 4h TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

1 6 12

BA

tpa

MSD

120

345

7.44

20 35 65

25 165 156

Sawtimber Volume Volume 1 mean saw dbh 12.22 Avg MHt 6.11 Vol/tree 40

120 55:65 80% 29% 36

# of points

conf level % error CV

Notes: Old pasture. Lots of UGS birch. Pockets of good AGS underneath.

80% 77% 95

4 species pie chart

BAF

20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Improvement Cut. Management Recommendations

Develop/maintain an uneven-age structure; produce maple sap; produce sawtimber.

Perform a firewood harvest, removing UGS where AGS can be released.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA

Residual BA >80sqft/acre.

Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Harvest Schedule: 2020. ***This treatment will likely be carried out in-house, and can occur any time during this management cycle.

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type size class: Acres

ne 603

SAF 25 poletimber 11.6

Soils: 47E. Dutchess channery loam, 25-60% slopes. Very stony. Access:

Use 100 acre Meadow Landing.

Stocking and Site This stand is old pasture; stocking is moderately uniform---large UGS in canopy, small diameter AGS and UGS beneth. (Between A and B line). Site Class II. Quality

Regeneration:

sugar maple/ ash saplings in some patches.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

This stand used to be a part of the "100 acre Meadow".

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

Natural Resource Notes:

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Notes:

At least one of the Birch Mainlines goes through this stand, and may have to be taken down before the firewood thinning. Also, there is an old SCA cabin (large outhouse??) located in the north east portion, near the meadow. viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

99


picture

Stand 4i TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

BA

tpa

MSD

156

256

9.82

92 28 36

83 90 83

7.8 5 6

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

# of points

156 120:36 80% 25% 37

Sawtimber Volume Volume 7.8 mean saw dbh 14.1 Avg MHt 11.5 Vol/tree 93 conf level % error CV

Notes:

80% 36% 53

5 diameter distribution

BAF 20 Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

species pie chart

Develop/maintain an uneven-age structure; produce high quality sawtimber.

Group and Single Tree Selection. Locate groups of high-risk, low value trees, and to avoid sensitive sites. Harvest no more than 20% of stand in small to medium sized groups, most of which should range between .25-.75acres .Leave ~100sqft/acre between groups, including >35sqft/a sawtimber. Recruit snags and DWD by girdling, or cutting and leaving worst quality large diameter trees. Retain large diameter, large crowned desireable species for seed source.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba

Schedule for 20 year cutting cycle: 2020 Residual stand will have well distributed canopy gaps with release desireable adv regen. Remaining canopy will be reduced, and will have a higher proportion of AGS.

Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

20 year cutting cycle; maximum dbh 20" for SM,YB,WA; 14" for birch, spruce. Invasive Plants. Treat invasives (honeysuckle) prior to harvest. Monitor afterwards. Post-treatment: consider conducting post-harvest TSI to remove striped maple and beech.

Silv. Guides:

ne 603

Cover Type size class: Acres

SAF 25 small sawtimber 8.9

Soils: 47E. Dutchess channery loam, 25-60% slopes, very stony. Access:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Use Old Town Rd/East Hollow Landing. Access is to Old Town Rd via Gallop, or East Hollow Rd. Stocking and Site Quality

Regeneration:

Fairly uniform, dense stocking. (A line) Site Class II.

some good quality sugar maple (saplings).

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ Some honeysuckle was noted. Scattered barberry was found in a nearby stand, and may exist in 4i as well. Stand History:

Natural Resource Notes:

Portions of this stand used to open, a part of the 100 Acre Meadow. 1999 Individual Tree Selection (Birdsall, Waite). Although there are no taps in this stand, it seems from the last management plan that it was their intent to convert the area to a sugarbush.

Small stream located in north of stand; stream should be buffered (150 feet) during harvest operations. Light thinning may take place inside the buffer, but equipement should go no closer than 100 feet to the water's edge.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

100


picture

Stand 4j TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

BA

tpa

MSD

132

201

10.4

55 35 40 2

45 106 47 2

5.52 6 8 1

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

Sawtimber Volume Volume 5.52 mean saw dbh 14.7 Avg MHt 13.7 Vol/tree 121

132 90:42 conf level % error CV

80% 15% 30

# of points

conf level % error CV

Notes:

80% 48% 96

8 diameter distribution

BAF 20 Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

species pie chart

Develop/maintain an uneven-age structure; produce high quality sawtimber.

No activities planned during this management cycle. Management Recommendations

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type size class: Acres Soils:

ne 603

SAF 25-mixed/ SAF 31 NHWD/Hemlock/Spruce sawtimber 34.2 47E. Dutchess channery loam 25-60% slopes. Very stony.

Access:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Access is to East Hollow Rd, and to the Old Town Rd/East Hollow Rd Landing. Stocking and Site Quality

Regeneration:

Adequately stocked mixed hardwood/softwood forest. Above B line. Site Class II.

light distribution of regeneration--spruce/hemlock/pine regen in openings.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ The stand has dense patches of hay-scented fern, which may interfere with regeneration. Stand History:

No known history.

Natural Resource This stand may serve as a deer wintering yard. Portions of the stand, especially near the river, have very steep slopes and should be avoided during the next entry. This will result in a large area (1/3 of Notes: stand) that will not be treated or entered.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

101


Stand 4k TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

3.5 5 4

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

# of points

BA

tpa

MSD

93

107

12.39

53 20 20

52 35 20

93 73:20 80% 26% 24

conf level % error CV

Notes: Details on this harvest can be found on the Forestry Computer at Merck. Desktop>>TimberSales>>OakSale

80% 22% 20

3

BAF 20 Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Sawtimber Volume Volume 3.5 mean saw dbh 13.5 Avg MHt 8 Vol/tree 67

Maintain oak component; produce high quality sawtimber.

Controlled Burn. Perform a controlled burn (perhaps same year as burn in 5I). This burn should tamp back the dense beech whips that cover much of the stand.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals.

Treatment Year: ~2013 Desired future conditions Shelterwood--First Entry. This treatment is already marked (leave trees in BLUE). The treatment leaves approx 50 sqft/a basal area, most of which are wind-firm, large-crowned northern red oak.

Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA

Treatment Year: anytime after burn. Or 2020. Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

USFS Silvics Manual; Loftis, DL "A Shelterwood Method for Regenerating Red Oak in the Southern Appalachians."

Cover Type size class: Acres

SAF 55 large sawtimber 12.2

Soils: 47D. Dutchess channery loam, 15-25% slopes, very stony. Access:

Access is to the Glen Landing Area.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Relatively uniform stocking. Up high: canopy is a mix of mature red oak, and small sawtimber-sized beech and red maple. Lower: Canopy is made of large mature red oak; along with mature NHWD. (Above B line) Site Class II, III.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

Regeneration:

dense beech whips.

species, size

Stand Health:

BBD affects the beech in this stand, which are largely further up the slope. Since the last thinning, water sprouts have formed on a number of the mature oak.

Stocking and Site Quality

insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

1980--norwest portion cut (smalley, beattie). 2000--south portion cut (Calfee, Michalski).

Natural Resource Notes:

This stand has a small man-made pond located in the eastern portion; and a creek runs from this pond south-west through the stand. The pond and stream should be buffered during any future activities (100+ft buffer).

Cultural Resource Notes:

This stand has high recreation value, since it is located adjacent to The Glen picnic area. A small buffer (beauty stip), should be located around the Glen.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

102


picture

Stand 4L TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

BA

tpa

MSD

120

140

11.3

33 13 67 7

14 29 94 2

1.86 2 7 0

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

Sawtimber Volume Volume 1.86 mean saw dbh 18 Avg MHt Vol/tree

120 20:100 conf level % error CV

# of points

80% 46% 44

conf level % error CV

Notes: very high % of UGS. Rocky site, but relatively flat. Patchy, understocked, with some grasses in the herb layer.

80% 31% 29

3 diameter distribution

BAF

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

species pie chart

20

Develop/maintain an uneven-age structure; produce maple sap; produce sawtimber.

Group and Single Tree Selection. Locate groups of high-risk, low value trees, and to avoid sensitive sites. Harvest no more than 20% of stand in small to medium sized groups, most of which should range between .25-.75acres . Leave ~90sqft/a between groups, including >35sqft/a sawtimber if possible. Recruit snags and DWD by girdling, or cutting and leaving worst quality large diameter trees. Retain large diameter, large crowned desireable species for seed source adjacent to groups, especially if groups have only limited adv regeneration (which will be typical, since this stand has little adv regen throughout).

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

Schedule for 20 year cutting cycle: 2020 Residual stand will have well distributed canopy gaps with release desireable adv regen. Remaining canopy will be reduced, and will have a higher proportion of AGS. Financial note: this will be predominatly a fuelwood harvest. 20 year cutting cycle; target diameter: 20" for maple, ash, oak; 12" for birch.

Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba

Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Post-treatment: monitor adv regen within groups. Consider TSI to release desireable regeneration from competing vegetation. Silv. Guides:

NE 603; NA-TP-02-00 Guidelines for Applying Group Selection Harvesting. (Lamson & Leak).

Cover Type size class: Acres

SAF 25 sawtimber 8.8

Soils: 42D. Macomber-Taconic complex, 15-25%slopes, rocky. Access:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Access is to the Lodge Meadow Landing, via Lodge Rd. Stocking and Site Quality

Regeneration:

Very high percentage of UGS. Many large, senescing sugar maple. Site Class III.

none. Some grasses and ferns noted.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ Many of the large sugar maple in the canopy are overmature, and in natural decline. Stand History:

A portion of this stand (southern) has been tapped for many years (old green tubing found).

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

Natural Resource Notes:

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Notes:

Locate groups away from Lodge Rd if possible.

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

103


picture

Stand 4m TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

BA

tpa

MSD

120

167

10.48

37 23 53 7

35 90 39 2

2.93 4 4 0

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

120 80:40 conf level % error CV

# of points

80% 35% 33

Sawtimber Volume Volume 2.93 mean saw dbh 15.3 Avg MHt Vol/tree conf level % error CV

Notes: Very dry, poor site up high. ACT 250 required for treating the north and east portion of stand.

80% 69% 65

3 diameter distribution

BAF 20 Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

species pie chart

Develop/maintain an uneven-age structure; produce high quality sawtimber.

Group and Single Tree Selection. Locate groups of high-risk, low value trees, and to avoid sensitive sites. Harvest no more than 20% of stand in small to medium sized groups, most of which should range between .25-.75acres . Leave ~90sqft/a between groups, including >35sqft/a sawtimber if possible. Recruit snags and DWD by girdling, or cutting and leaving worst quality large diameter trees. Retain large diameter, large crowned desireable species for seed source adjacent to groups, especially if groups have only limited adv regeneration (which will be typical, since this stand has little adv regen throughout).

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

Schedule for 20 year cutting cycle: 2020 Residual stand will have well distributed canopy gaps with release desireable adv regen. Remaining canopy will be reduced, and will have a higher proportion of AGS. Financial note: this will be predominatly a fuelwood harvest. 20 year cutting cycle; target diameter: 20" for maple, ash, oak; 12" for birch.

Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba

Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Post-treatment: monitor adv regen within groups. Consider TSI to release desireable regeneration from competing vegetation. Silv. Guides:

NE 603; NA-TP-02-00 Guidelines for Applying Group Selection Harvesting. (Lamson & Leak).

Cover Type size class: Acres

SAF 25 sawtimber 18.1

Soils: 42D. Macomber-Taconic complex, 15-25% slopes, rocky. Access:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Access is to the Lodge Meadow Landing, via Lodge Rd. Stocking and Site Quality

Regeneration:

Mostly sugar maple and beech. Understocked with high density of snags. Canopy does have some quality yellow birch which are mostly free to grow. Stand is somewhat stratefied, with patches of red spruce in the midstory. Site Class III and IV. Very dry, thin soils up high. Decent quality further down slope.

none. Some grasses and ferns noted.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ There are dense pockets of hay-scented fern. Stand History:

Natural Resource Notes:

1970s spruce salvage harvest from blowdown. 1993 single tree selction (Laureau, Waite).

The north and east portion of this stand are above 2500 feet elevation, and would require an ACT 250 permit before harvesting.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

104


picture

Stand 4n TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

4.73 1 12

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

# of points

120 50:70 80% 19% 23

BA

tpa

MSD

120

126

12.3

45 5 70

31 8 88

Sawtimber Volume Volume 4.7 mean saw dbh 16.25 Avg MHt 14.7 Vol/tree 154 conf level % error CV

Notes: Old agricultural land. Formerly part of "100 acre meadow"

80% 35% 43

4 diameter distribution

BAF 20 Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

species pie chart

Develop/maintain an uneven-age structure; maintain apple tree component; minimize spread of invasive plants.

Invasive plant management 2012-2019---hand pull or torch barberry. Flag patches as they are found. Fall 2012-2019: barberry: use a backpack sprayer to apply 3% glyphosate solution in September. 2012 & 2013--Fall--Sept/Oct--Honeysuckle: In the fall, when native plants are losing their leaves, spray a 2% glyphosate or triclopyr solution on the entire leaf surface of the plpant. In order to avoid drift to native plants, spray on calm days. 2014: re-evalutate infestation. ******

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA

Soft Mast Management 2020, or any year during current management cycle: Release apple trees during winter months.

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type size class: Acres

Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

ne 603; BMPs for the Prevention and Treament of Terrestrial Invasive Plants in Vermont Woodlands.

SAF 25--mixed stand sawtimber 29.3

Soils: 47D. Dutchess channery loam, 15-25% slopes. Access:

Stocking and Site Quality

Regeneration:

Access is to Old Town Road, via Gallop Rd.

Patchy stocking; fairly dense stocking in northern half of stand; significant gaps in southern half. Above B line (mixed forest stocking guide). Site Class II.

Mix of regeneration, largely white ash, and black cherry (seedlings/saplings)

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ Dense pockets of honeysuckle; smaller patches of barberry. Do not treat canopy until invasive plants have been controlled. Stand History:

Part of the old "100 acre meadow". Apple trees released ~ 1990. 1999 single tree selection harvest (Birdsall, Waite).

treatments, land use, disturbance

Natural Resource Notes:

This stand has a small man-made pond located in the northern portion; and a creek runs from this pond through the stand. The pond and stream should be buffered during any future activities (150ft buffer).

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

Cultural Resource Notes:

Old pasture, with lots of agricultural relics--stonewalls, stone piles, etc.

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

105


1I

1H

Compartment1 Five

3D2

1C

1B

1A

3E

3C

4M

4OP

5N 5M

3

4L

5D

4G 4A1

4C 5E

4A2

4H

4

4E

4D

4A3

5C 4F

5A2 6ANP

5SP1

5J1

5

6A

5F

5J

4B

5B1

8E

8

4J

5J2

5L

4N

4I

5OP

8C

8G 5B2

6

5BNP 5K

6C

4K

5A1

5OP

3B

4MNP

6B

5KNP

7A

5G

5K1 5I

7E

5H

7 6E

5INP

7D1

7F 7CNP

7C

0 0.050.1

0.2

0.3

Miles 0.4

ÂŻ

Legend Stand boundary

Primary woods roads

7D2

Secondary woods roads 7B

topo lines 20 ft

Compartments 106


picture

Stand 5A (1&2) TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

4.95 2 2

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

1

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

80% 13%

CV

26

# of points BAF

MSD

96

12.72

90 23 22 2

conf level % error CV

Notes:

80% 31% 63

8 20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

tpa

60 12 15 2

Sawtimber Volume Volume 4.95 mean saw dbh 14.7 Avg MHt 10.4 Vol/tree 99

90 72:18 conf level % error

BA

90

Develop/maintain an uneven-age structure; produce maple sap; produce sawtimber.

Single Tree and Group Selection. Conduct small group selection harvest to release established acceptable seedlings/saplings/poles, with individual tree selection between. Groups can range from .1-.25 acres, where there is desireable regeneration. Groups should be between .25-.75 where desireable regeneration stocking is low. undesireables must be treated within gaps, and should be treated thgouhout if possible. Focus removal on UGS and culls. *** See Merck Forest Harvest Policy for general harvest guidelines. Schedule for 15-20 year cutting cycle: Winter 2015

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba

Residual stand will have clusters of low-risk, high vigor trees with mid-sized openings scattered throughout, and will eventually lead to a multi-aged stand.

Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

The desired diameter growth for this stand

SM,WA,YB=20" PB=14"

Residual BA between groups: 85sqft/acre. Groups should make up no more than 15% of stand area.

Silv. Guides:

NE 603; NA-TP-02-00 Guidelines for Applying Group Selection Harvesting. (Lamson & Leak).

Cover Type size class Acres

SAF 25 sawtimber Total Area: 41.9 acres (A1) 36.5 + (A2) 5.4

Soils: 47E. Dutchess channery loam, 25-60% slopes, very stony. Access:

Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

Use The Glen Landing Area. Access is to Old Town Rd, via lower Clark's Clearing Rd.

Beech, Red Maple (along with sugar maple). 5A1=High standing volume. Between A, B line. 5A2=little standing volume. B line. Site Class II.

mix of beech, birch, and rhubus, especially where gaps were created during last entry.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ Patches of honeysuckle in 5A2. Stand History:

Natural Resource Notes:

Evidence of harvest from 20 years ago, when there was a fairly heavy cut. 5A2 is an old clearing.

5A2 is a wet site with many seeps.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

107


MSD

9.88

Stand 5b1 TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

3.04 6 7

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

0

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

115 70:45 conf level % error CV

# of points BAF

80% 17% 21

BA

tpa

115

186

40 30 40 5

39 71 75 1 Sawtimber Volume Volume 3.04 mean saw dbh 13.7 Avg MHt 10.38 Vol/tree 78 conf level % error CV

80% 40% 49

4 20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives: Develop/maintain an uneven-age structure; sap production.

Management Recommendations

Single Tree and Group Selection. Conduct small group selection harvest to release established acceptable seedlings/saplings/poles, with individual tree selection between. Groups can range from .1-.25 acres, where there is desireable regeneration. Groups should be between .25-.75 where desireable regeneration stocking is low. undesireables must be treated within gaps, and should be treated thgouhout if possible. Focus removal on UGS and culls. *** See Merck Forest Harvest Policy for general harvest guidelines.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba

Schedule for 15-20 year cutting cycle: *** Perform thinning during next sugarbush tubing change. Residual stand will have clusters of low-risk, high vigor trees with mid-sized openings scattered throughout, and will eventually lead to a multi-aged stand.

Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

The desired diameter growth for this stand

SM,WA,YB=20" PB=14"

Residual BA between groups: 85sqft/acre. Groups should make up no more than 15% of stand area.

Silv. Guides:

ne-603;NA-TP-02-00 Guidelines for Applying Group Selection Harvesting. (Lamson & Leak).

Cover Type size class Acres

SAF 25 sawtimber 15.1

Soils: 47E. Dutchess channery loam, 25-60%. Access:

Access is to Old Town Rd. Use East Hollow Rd/Old Town Rd Landing.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

5B1--Approaching A line. Canopy mostly beech, red maple, sugar maple; with some birch and popple. 5B2--B line. Very high proportion of UGS (one of lowest value stands on property. Site Class II, IV.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

Regeneration:

Gaps created during last entry have adequate numbers of free to grow desireables--mostly yellow birch seedlings--along with dense beech whips.

species, size

Stand Health:

5B2--some honeysuckle noted on inventory, but not much.

Stocking and Site Quality:

insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

5B1-- 1999h harvest in southern portion. 5B2--Last treatment focused on southern portion of stand, and lead to relatively open conditions in a few patches, where sawtimber has begun to epicormic sprout.

Natural Resource Notes:

West, and southwest portion of the stand is very steep, and inoperable.

Cultural Resource Notes:

Part of these stands are used in the Dunc's Sugarbush.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

108


picture

Stand 5b2 TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

1.03 2 8

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

0

BA

tpa

MSD

80

115

10.47

17 13 43 7

16 25 72 2

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

Sawtimber Volume Volume 1 mean saw dbh 13.6 Avg MHt 7.8 Vol/tree 63

80 30:50 conf level % error CV

80% 21% 35

# of points BAF

conf level % error CV

Notes: very high proportion of UGS (one of lowest value stands on property. Rocky, though operable.

80% 96% 160

6 20

Long-range silvicultural objectives: Integrate timber production and songbird habitat.

Management Recommendations

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

Mixed Intermediate Treatments. Use combination of free thinning with liberation cuttings, cleaning, and weedings to treat groups of trees within the stand. Focus removal on defective, high-risk, and low-value trees especially to release an understory of more desirable speices. Favor most vigorous, best-formed dominant and co-dominatly individuals.

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba

Schedule for 15-20 year cutting cycle: 2015 Residual stand will have clusters of low-risk, high vigor trees with various-sized openings scattered throughout, and will eventually lead to a multi-aged stand. The desired diameter growth for this stand is SM,WA,RO=18" PB=12" Residual crown cover= 80% ,

Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Residual BA= ~80sqft/acre

A large portion of this stand is steep and inoperable.

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type size class Acres

NE-603 VT-666

SAF 25 understory re-initiation 26.3

Soils:

47E. Dutchess channery loam, 25-60%.

Access:

Site Class II, with some very productive soils near White Creek.

Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Very high percentage of UGS (30sqft). Lower stocking in southern corner, where there are some sawlog sized oak, which have water sprouts.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

even distribution of beech, striped maple; along with some yellow birch; some rhubus in south of stand.

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ some honeysuckle noted on inventory, but not much. Stand History:

Natural Resource Notes:

Last treatment focused on southern portion of stand, and lead to relatively open conditions in a few patches, where sawtimber has begun to epicormic sprout.

White Creek runs through this stand; forest equipment use within the riparian zone should be limited to designated river crossings. Equipemtn should not be operated within about 100 feet of the water.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Notes:

this stand can be seen from Old Town Road. Care should be taken to maintain the aesthetic value of that portion of road. viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

109


picture

Stand 5c TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

2.92 4 6

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

# of points

tpa

MSD

169

10.33

38 22 50

33 45 90

Sawtimber Volume Volume 2.92 mean saw dbh 14.35 Avg MHt 9.9 Vol/tree 87

110 60:50 80% 12% 28

conf level % error CV

Notes: Diverse stand. Mostly beech, but with patches of good quality sugar maple. Steep site.

80% 28% 64

10

BAF 20 Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

BA

110

Develop/maintain an uneven-age structure; produce high quality sawtimber.

No management activites planned this cycle.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

NE 603: Managing Rich Northern Hardwood Forests (TNC Vermont)

Cover Type size class Acres

SAF 25 sawtimber 81.6

Soils: 109E. Tunbridge-Berkshire complex, 25-50% slope, rocky. 42D, Macomber-Taconic complex. Access:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index Access is to the Glen Landing Area, via Shenck Rd and Clark's Clearing and Old Town Rd.

Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

Between A and B line (closer to A). Canopy stocking is mostly sugar maple, with dense pockets of beech (sawtimber, saplings, seedlings). Signs of Rich Northern Hardwood, especially in coves. Site Class I, III.

not much regeneration. Some striped maple, some beech; very few desireables.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: Nice site; stand in fine health.

Stand History:

Treated in 2001; and before that the 1960's.

Natural Resource Notes:

very little mid- and understory structure.

Cultural Resource Notes:

This stand borders Schenk Road, which is likely a heavy use area. It also contains the Lourie Trail, and a large portion of Antone Road. During treatments, groups should be selected away from these trails if feasible.

insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

110


picture

Stand 5d TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

# of points BAF

BA

tpa

MSD

100

135

11.33

47 20 33

39 42 54

4.04 4 6

Sawtimber Volume Volume 4 mean saw dbh 14.5 Avg MHt 10.9 Vol/tree 103

100 67:33 80% 21% 20

conf level % error CV

80% 55% 52

3 20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Notes: nice stand. Pole and small sawlog, mostly sugar maple. All maples are tapped. Silv trail.

Develop/maintain an uneven-age structure; produce maple sap; produce sawtimber.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

Free Thinning. Release high quality, high vigor stems. Focus removal of diseased, damaged, and low vigor stems.

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals.

Treatment Schedule: Perform thinning during next sugarbush tubing change.

Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba

This will be a firewood thinning.

Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Residual BA: 80sqft/a

Focus removal of damaged, diseased, or low vigor stems of all species. NE 603;

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type size class Acres

SAF 25 small sawtimber 6.8

Soils: 49C, Pittstown loam, 8-15% slopes, very stony. Access:

Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

Access is to The Glen Landing, via Clark's Clearing Rd.

Fairly uniform stocking; Between A, B line. Site Class I.

Mix of sugar maple and striped maple saplings thoughout the stand.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ stand is in fine health. Stand History:

1999-2000 Harvest (north portion). Probably old pasture land.

Natural Resource A portion of this stand borders the east branch of White Creek. A protective strip of approximately 150ft should be left along this portion in which only single tree selection harvesting can occur so that breaks made in the Notes: canopy are minimal and a continuous cover is maintained. Forest equipment shall operate no closer than 100ft from the water's edge. Cultural Resource Notes:

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

Silviculture Trail runs through this stand.

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

111


picture

Stand 5e TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

BA

tpa

MSD

120

265

9

4

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

# of points

Sawtimber Volume Volume 4 mean saw dbh Avg MHt Vol/tree

90%

conf level % error CV

Notes: last entry removed groups, resulting in rhubus and striped maple. Wet site.

90%

3 diameter distribution

BAF

species pie chart

20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Develop/maintain an uneven-age structure; produce high quality sawtimber.

no management planned during this cycle.

Management Recommendations

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

NE-603; Managing Rich Northern Hardwood Forests (TNC Vermont);NA-TP-02-00 Guidelines for Applying Group Selection Harvesting. (Lamson & Leak).

Cover Type size class Acres

SAF 55 sawtimber 29.8

Soils:

49C. Pittstown loam. 8-15 slopes, very stony.

Access:

Site Class I.

Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Excellent site with relatively dense stocking. (Between A, B line)

some groups of white ash, and sugar maple seedlings and saplings.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ Stand is in fine health. Stand History:

1942 aerial photo shows that a portion of the stand was still open at that time.

Natural Resource Notes:

A feeder stream runs through this stand. A protective strip of approximately 100ft should be left along this portion in which only single tree selection harvesting can occur so that breaks made in the canopy are minimal and a continuous cover is maintained. Forest equipment shall operate no closer than 50ft from the water's edge.

Cultural Resource Notes:

Very high recreation value. This stand runs along Old Town Rd.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

112


picture

Stand 5f TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

# of points

BA

tpa

MSD

180

274

12.55

76 44 60

72 111 91

6.7 8 10

180 120:60 80% 9% 13

Sawtimber Volume Volume 6.7 mean saw dbh 13.8 Avg MHt 11.5 Vol/tree 94 conf level % error CV

Notes: Very high stocking.

80% 33% 49

5 species pie chart

BAF

20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Develop/maintain an uneven-age structure; produce high quality sawtimber.

1. Single Tree and Group Selection. Conduct group selection harvest to release established acceptable seedlings/saplings/poles, with individual tree selection between. Groups can range from .1-1 acres. Focus on reducing proportion of UGS 2. Patch Cut. Perform a patch cut in eastern portion of stand in order to harvest mature aspen, and to regenerate. See Merck Forest Harvest Policy for general harvest guidelines. Schedule for 15-20 year cutting cycle: 2015

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

Scheduling Note: The Patch Cut should be conducted during the frozen winter months, to ensure a better root suckering response from the aspen. The desired diameter goal for this stand SM**,WA=20" PB=14";

Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba

Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Residual BA between groups: 100+sqft/acre. Remove no more that 1/3 the basal area. Groups should make up no more than 15% of stand area. Silv. Guides:

NE-603; NA-TP-02-00 Guidelines for Applying Group Selection Harvesting. (Lamson & Leak).

Cover Type size class Acres

SAF 25 sawtimber 52.8

Soils: 42C. Macomber-Taconic complex, 8-15% slopes. Access:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Access is to Old Town Rd, via Wade Lot Rd. Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

Above A line. Fully stocked. Canopy is mostly white birch, and sugar maple. Site Class II.

pockets of ash and maple saplings and poles.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: Overall, stand is in fine health. Honeysuckle was found in pockets, mostly near 5OP.

Stand History:

Portions of this stand were open in 1942.

Natural Resource Notes:

There are some apple trees in the stand, that should be pruned during winter months.

Cultural Resource Notes:

There is a man-made pond; lots of stonewalls, stone piles, and wire fence. Very high recreational value.

insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

113


picture

Stand 5g TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

4.22 7 4

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

# of points

107 84:23 80% 17% 28

BA

tpa

MSD

107

222

8.67

47 37 23

43 139 41

Sawtimber Volume Volume 4.22 mean saw dbh 14 Avg MHt 12 Vol/tree 99 conf level % error CV

Notes: nice skid trail running up along creek. Good spp mix, even hemlock.

80% 40% 66

6 diameter distribution

BAF

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

species pie chart

20

Develop/maintain an uneven-age structure; produce high quality sawtimber.

Single Tree and Group Selection. Conduct small group selection harvest to release established acceptable seedlings/saplings/poles, with individual tree selection between. Groups can range from .1-.25 acres, where there is desireable regeneration. Groups should be between .25-.75 where desireable regeneration stocking is low. undesireables must be treated within gaps, and should be treated thgouhout if possible. Focus removal on UGS and culls. *** See Merck Forest Harvest Policy for general harvest guidelines. Schedule for 15-20 year cutting cycle: 2015

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA

The desired diameter goal for this stand

SM,WA, YB=20" PB=14";

Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Treatment Area: Treat the portion that was not enterned during the last management cycle. Residual BA between groups: 100sqft/acre. Remove no more that 1/3 the basal area. Groups should make up no more than 15% of stand area. Silv. Guides:

NE-603; NA-TP-02-00 Guidelines for Applying Group Selection Harvesting. (Lamson & Leak).

Cover Type size class Acres

SAF 25 poles/small sawtimber 49.1

Soils: 42C. Macomber-taconic complex, 8-15% slopes, rocky. Access:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Access is to Old Town Rd, via Wade Lot Rd. Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

Stocking is between A and B line. Good species mix, even including hemlock. Site Class II.

dense red spruce regeneration (especially along creek, west side of stand). Northern half of stand has even distribution of rhubus, birch and hardhack in the understory.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ Some honeysuckle was found. Stand History:

The northern portion (east of the road) was thinned during the last management cycle.

Natural Resource Notes:

The old skid road that runs along the western boundary of this stand is deeply eroded and should be avoided.

Cultural Resource Notes:

cellar hole next to Old Town Road, and adjacent to White Creek sustained damage from Irene.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

114


picture

Stand 5h TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

6.76 8 3

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

135 115:20 80% 6% 7

# of points

BA

tpa

MSD

135

286

8.5

65 50 20

54 196 36

Sawtimber Volume Volume 6.76 mean saw dbh 14.8 Avg MHt 15.2 Vol/tree 126 conf level % error CV

Notes: High and dry. Very nice site by the creek; much poorer up high.

80% 40% 50

4 diameter distribution

BAF

species pie chart

20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Develop/maintain an uneven-age structure; produce quality sawtimber; maintain red spruce component.

No activity planned this management cycle.

Management Recommendations

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type size class Acres

ne-603

SAF 31/25-mixed poles/small saw. 12.3

Soils: 47E. Dutchess channery loam, 25-60% slopes, very stony. Access:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Site Class II. Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

Between A and B line. Canopy is predominatly spruce, birch and beech; however, the stand contains a large mix of species.

abundant spruce and beech regen thoughout.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ BBD affects the majority of beech in the stand. Stand History:

Natural Resource Notes:

1985 harvest (Winship) of red spruce for in-house use.

Skid road that runs paralel to creek has eroded and should not be used.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

115


picture

Stand 5i TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

BA

tpa

MSD

15

9

11

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

# of points

Sawtimber Volume Volume mean saw dbh Avg MHt Vol/tree

15 90%

conf level % error CV

90%

Notes: 5INP does not look NP (above). Looks quite productive, just steep. Consider re-listing. ****These pictures are from 5INP. Stand 5i received a shelterwood/seedtree regeneration cut in 2007.

2 diameter distribution

BAF

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

species pie chart

20

even-aged management; maintain oak component; produce high quality sawtimber.

Controlled Burn. Coordinate with NRCS to conduct a burn on the entire stand--both treated area and untreated area. Oak Planting. After first burn, consider an oak planting.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba

Management Schedule: 2013, 2016 Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Site Preperation (before burn). Protect residual oak trees by removing slash from their base. Clear slash from an area ~ 7-10 ft around residuals. This clearing can occur any time before the harvest.

Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

***Note: The majority of work toward planning this burn has been completed with NRCS. However, Merck must remain in close contact with NRCS ahead of the burn to make sure all paperwork and other preparations are complete.******

Silv. Guides:

USFS Silvics Manual--Quercus rubra L.;

Cover Type size class Acres

SAF 55 seedling 52.6

Soils:

47E. Dutchess channery loam, 25-60 % slopes, very stony. 43E, Taconic-macomber complex 25-60% slopes, very rocky.

Access:

Access is to Old Town Rd.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Stocking and Site About 5-20% canopy cover. Residuals mostly red oak, many of which have water sprouts; also, there are smaller diameter sugar maple and red spruce residuals. Site Class II, III. Quality:

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

Regeneration:

species, size

Free-to-grow regeneration is made up of beech, birch, and aspen. Some oak exist, though their numbers are very limited.

Stand Health: Overall, this seedling stand is in fine health.

Stand History:

1999--10 acre controlled burn. Notes from post-burn survey say this successfully tamped back the number and vigor of beech whips.

Natural Resource Notes:

good early successional habitat.

Cultural Resource Notes:

5i is not often visited by hikers; The non-productive area has very high recreation value since Lookout Rd and Lookout point are located within this portion of 5i.

insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

116


picture

Stand 5j TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

BA

tpa

MSD

100

105

12.6

66 17 14 3

56 37 11 1

5.29 3 2 0

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

100 83 conf level % error CV

# of points BAF

80% 16% 30

conf level % error CV

Notes:

80% 19% 36

7 20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Sawtimber Volume Volume 5.3 mean saw dbh 14.4 Avg MHt 10.12 Vol/tree 93

Develop/maintain an uneven-age structure; produce high quality sawtimber.

Single Tree and Group Selection. Conduct small group selection harvest to release established acceptable seedlings/saplings/poles, with individual tree selection between. Groups can range from .1-.25 acres, where there is desireable regeneration. Groups should be between .25-.75 where desireable regeneration stocking is low. undesireables must be treated within gaps, and should be treated thgouhout if possible. Focus removal on UGS and culls. *** See Merck Forest Harvest Policy for general harvest guidelines. Schedule for 15-20 year cutting cycle: Winter 2015

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba

Residual stand will have clusters of low-risk, high vigor trees with mid-sized openings scattered throughout, and will eventually lead to a multi-aged stand.

Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

The desired diameter growth for this stand

SM,WA,YB=20" PB=14"

Residual BA between groups: 80sqft/acre. Groups should make up no more than 15% of stand area.

Silv. Guides:

NE-603; NA-TP-02-00 Guidelines for Applying Group Selection Harvesting. (Lamson & Leak).

Cover Type size class Acres

SAF 25 sawtimber 48.8

Soils:

47E. Dutchess channery loam, 25-60% slopes, very stony.

Access:

Access is to Old Town Rd. Since the stream crossing from this stand, over to Wade Lot Rd is a challenging spot, operator can use the road which runs through the eastern portion of stand 5I.

Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

Stocking is between A, B line. Site Class II.

pockets of sugar maple/beech/ash saplings/poles.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ no health problems. Stand History:

~20year old stumps were found. No recorded history.

Natural Resource This area has a number of feeder streams and seeps. Both of which should be given adequate buffer (~100ft) where the canopy is only minimally thinned. Equipemnt should not operate within 50 ft of Notes: these.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Notes:

A foot path from Beebee Pond Shelter crosses a foot bridge southwest of the spruce plantation, then leads uphill across Buechner Rd to Masters' Moutnain Rd, and the summit of Mt Antone. viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

117


picture

Stand 5k TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

# of points

BA

tpa

MSD

115

131

12.2

70 12 32

50 25 56

6.15 2 6

Sawtimber Volume Volume 6.15 mean saw dbh 15.8 Avg MHt 11.3 Vol/tree 123

115 82:32 80% 17% 35

conf level % error CV

Notes: ** "All portions of 5K west of Lookout Rd were designated as part of the Natural Area in April 2002."

80% 21% 42

8 diameter distribution

BAF

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

species pie chart

20

Develop/maintain an uneven-age structure; produce high quality sawtimber.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

***Unless the Natural Area boundaries are changed by the Board of Trustees, the following prescription is for the area EAST of Lookout Rd. Single Tree and Group Selection. Conduct small group selection harvest to release established acceptable seedlings/saplings/poles, with individual tree selection between. Groups can range from .1-.25 acres, where there is desireable regeneration. Groups should be between .25-.75 where desireable regeneration stocking is low. undesireables must be treated within gaps, and should be treated thgouhout if possible. Focus removal on UGS and culls. *** See Merck Forest Harvest Policy for general harvest guidelines. Residual stand will have clusters of low-risk, high vigor trees with mid-sized openings scattered throughout, and will eventually lead to a multi-aged stand. The desired diameter growth for this stand

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

SM,WA,RO=20" PB=14"

Residual BA between groups: 85sqft/acre. Groups should make up no more than 15% of stand area.

Silv. Guides:

NE 603; NA-TP-02-00 Guidelines for Applying Group Selection Harvesting. (Lamson & Leak).

Cover Type size class Acres Soils:

SAF 25 sawtimber 64.5 + 18.5 (NP) 47D. Dutchess channery loam, 15-25% slopes, very stony. 42E, Macomber-Taconic complex, 25-60% slopes, rocky.

Access:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Access is to Old Town Rd, via Lookout Rd. Stocking and Site Quality:

Stocking is between the A and B line. This stand is fairly patchy; with some patches of large culls, and other of a mix of AGS and fine sawtimber. Site Class II &III.

Regeneration:

Some patches of fine adv regeneration (SM, WA) (saplings/poles). Pockets of beech whips.

Stand Health:

Stand is in fine health.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

1995 harvest (Lareau, Waite)

Natural Resource Notes:

This stand has a large proportion of good quality mast trees. Many large diameter, full crowned red oak, especially at higher elevations. A significant number of these should be left during the next treatment.

Cultural Resource Notes:

This stand has very high recreation value, since Lookout Rd runs though it.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

118


picture

Stand 5l TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

3.23 2 3 1

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

92 60:32 conf level % error CV

80% 17% 24

# of points

BA

tpa

MSD

92

129

10.57

48 12 28 4

40 43 47 1 Sawtimber Volume Volume 3.23 mean saw dbh 14.8 Avg MHt 8.3 Vol/tree 81 conf level % error CV

Notes: ***All of this stand was "designated as part of the Natural Area in April 2002."

80% 24% 35

5 diameter distribution

BAF

species pie chart

20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Develop/maintain an uneven-age structure; allow natural communtiy development.

No management activity planned.

Management Recommendations

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type size class Acres

none

SAF 25 sawtimber 17.4

Soils: 47E, Dutchess channery loam. 25-60% slopes. Very stony Access:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Access is to Old Town Rd, via Lookout. Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

This stand is adequately stocked with a mix of NHWD spp. (Above B line) Site Class II.

Some patches of beech and striped maple seedlings/saplings.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ No problems noted. Stand History:

This stand was harvested in 1995 (Lareau, Waite).

Natural Resource Notes:

Birdsall Brook runs through this stand, and should be propertly buffered during any future forest activity.

Cultural Resource Notes:

This stand abutts a small streatch of Lookout Rd.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

119


picture

Stand 5m TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

4.82 4 5

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

1

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

103 70:34 conf level % error CV

# of points

80% 9% 14

BA

tpa

MSD

103

120

11.78

50 20 27 7

30 42 46 2 Sawtimber Volume Volume 4.82 mean saw dbh 17 Avg MHt 11.5 Vol/tree 161 conf level % error CV

Notes: mature stand with large sawtimber, mostly sugar maple. Excellent timber--especially down low.. All sugar maple are tapped.

80% 45% 75

6 diameter distribution

BAF

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

species pie chart

20

Develop/maintain an uneven-age structure; produce maple sap; produce sawtimber.

Single Tree and Group Selection. Conduct small group selection harvest to release established acceptable seedlings/saplings/poles, with individual tree selection between. Groups can range from .1-.25 acres, where there is desireable regeneration. Groups should be between .25-.75 where desireable regeneration stocking is low. undesireables must be treated within gaps, and should be treated thgouhout if possible. Focus removal on UGS and culls. *** See Merck Forest Harvest Policy for general harvest guidelines. Schedule for 15-20 year cutting cycle: Perform thinning during next sugarbush tubing change. Conduct treatment during frozen or very dry conditions.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA

Seeps should be flagged and not entered during forest operations. The desired diameter goal for this stand

SM**,WA,YB=20" PB=14";

Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

**Desired Diameter Goal Note: Since this stand is used as a sugarbush, sugar maple that have reached the diameter objective (20"), but that still show vigorous growth, should be left, and grown to a larger diameter. Residual BA between groups: 85sqft/acre. Groups should make up no more than 15% of stand area. Silv. Guides:

NE-603; Managing Rich Northern Hardwoods (TNC Vermont)

Cover Type size class Acres

SAF 25, with some Rich NHWD Forest sawtimber 24

Soils: 118D, Tunbridge-Lyman complex, 15-25% slopes, very rocky. Access:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index Access is to the Glen Landing Area, via Clark's Clearing and Old Town Rd.

Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

Very good quality timber down low; much poorer quality timber up higher where the site is quite dry. Site Class II, III.

pockets of dense beech--mostly on convex slopes. Some good quality sugar maple saplings.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ Stand is in fine health; sugar maple borer damage was noted. The upper elevation of this stand may have been impacted by the 2010 late spring frost. Stand History:

Tubing was installed around 2007.

Natural Resource Notes:

A feeder stream runs through this stand. A protective strip of approximately 100ft should be left along this portion in which only single tree selection harvesting can occur so that breaks made in the canopy are minimal and a continuous cover is maintained. Forest equipment shall operate no closer than 50ft from the water's edge.

Cultural Resource Notes:

Good recreational value--Silviculture trail runs through stand. Antone Rd runs along the northwest portion of stand. The last management plan called for making significant repairs to the very steep, eroding portion of Clark's Clearing Rd. This portion should be closed and rerouted during the next forest operation.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

120


picture

Stand 5N TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

1.57 1 10 1

BA

tpa

MSD

115

375

6.8

20 5 85 5

18 9 346 2

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

115 25:90 conf level % error CV

# of points

80% 24% 29

Sawtimber Volume Volume 1.6 mean saw dbh 14 Avg MHt 10 Vol/tree 87 conf level % error CV

Notes: High and dry. Portion of the stand is tapped (Aines). Overstory mostly large senescing BM. Mid-story is mostly hophornbean, along with some maple. Old pasture? Grasses below.

80% 64% 79

4 diameter distribution

BAF

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

species pie chart

20

Develop/maintain an uneven-age structure; produce high quality sawtimber.

Single Tree and Group Selection. Conduct small group selection harvest to release established acceptable seedlings/saplings/poles, with individual tree selection between. Groups can range from .1-.25 acres, where there is desireable regeneration. Groups should be between .25-.75 where desireable regeneration stocking is low. undesireables must be treated within gaps, and should be treated thgouhout if possible. Focus removal on UGS and culls. *** See Merck Forest Harvest Policy for general harvest guidelines. Schedule for 15-20 year cutting cycle: Perform thinning during next sugarbush tubing change. Treat in concert with stand 5M.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA

The desired diameter goal for this stand

SM**,WA,YB=18"

Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

**Desired Diameter Goal Note: Since this stand is used as a sugarbush, sugar maple that have reached the diameter objective (20"), but that still show vigorous growth, should be left, and grown to a larger diameter. Residual BA between groups: 85sqft/acre. Groups should make up no more than 15% of stand area. Silv. Guides:

NE-603

Cover Type size class Acres

SAF 25 poles/sawtimber 7

Soils:

42C Macomber-Taconic complex, 8-15% slopes, rocky.

Access:

Access is to Antone, or Old Town Rd.

Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

The canopy is largely mature sugar maple, along with other NHWD spp, and Red Oak; midstory is largely hophornbeam. (Between A, B line). Site Class III.

very little desirable regeneration.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ old stand, in need of regeneration. Stand History:

no recorded history.

Natural Resource Notes:

Adequate number of snags and future snags. Some large, mast producing red oak.

Cultural Resource Notes:

Much of this stand runs along Antone road.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

121


Compartment Six

5C

5OP

5OP

6ANP

5SP1

5OP

5J1 5J 6A

5

6B

6C

5F 5J2

5L

5K

5KNP 5K1 5I

6 6D

6E

6OP

5INP

6AP

7F

7 7CNP

7C

7CNP

Legend Stand boundary

Primary woods roads

Secondary woods roads topo lines 20 ft

Compartments

0 0.05 0.1

0.2

0.3

Miles 0.4

ÂŻ

122


picture

Stand 6a TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

8.56 2 4

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

BA

tpa

MSD

136

181

10.69

96 12 28

66 30 85

Sawtimber Volume Volume 8.56 mean saw dbh 16 Avg MHt 10.6 Vol/tree 130

136 108:28

conf level % error

80% 21%

CV

31

# of points

conf level % error CV

Notes:

80% 33% 49

5 species pie chart

BAF

20

Long Term Objectives: Allow natural development of forest ecosystem.

Management Recommendations

Designated Natural Area. No treatment scheduled.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type size class: Acres

SAF 55 sawtimber 79.3

Soils:

47E, Dutchess Channery Loam, 25-60% slopes, very stony.

Access:

Accessed via junction of Lookout Road and Buechner Road.

Stocking and Site Fully stocked (A line). This stand has the highest sawtimber volume per acre on the property (8+Mbf/acre). Patchy site quality--some is very good Site Class II, other areas have poor, shallow Quality: soils Site Class III or IV.

Regeneration:

mostly beech whips.

Stand Health:

Some evidence of red oak borer, but overall stand is in fine health.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

1995 harvest (Lareau, Waite) on east side of stream. 1967 "log only" harvest (Kraeling-logger)

treatments, land use, disturbance

Natural Resource Notes:

Excellent hard and soft mast species (oak and beech/red maple). Lacking early successional habitat.

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

Cultural Resource Notes:

VINS has survey plots in this stand for neo-tropical bird montioring.

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

123


picture

Stand 6b TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

5 1 5

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

0

BA

tpa

MSD

95

84

13.98

60 5 25 5

44 8 31 1

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

Sawtimber Volume Volume 5 mean saw dbh 15.6 Avg MHt 11 Vol/tree 113

95 65:30 conf level % error CV

# of points

80% 37% 46

conf level % error CV

Notes:

80% 29% 36

4 diameter distribution

BAF

species pie chart

20

Long Term Objectives: Allow natural development of forest ecosystem.

Management Recommendations

Designated Natural Area. No treatment scheduled.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type size class: Acres

SAF 55 Red Oak large sawtimber 30.5

Soils: 47E, Dutchess Channery Loam, 25-60% slopes, very stony. Access:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Accessed via skid road running through stand 6E, on to Old Town Road. Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

Between B and A line. This stand has very high sawtimber stocking, and very large volumes/acre (5Mbf/acre). Nice quality site (east portion. Western portion has extremely thin soils). Site Class II, IV.

beech whips.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ Some evidence of red oak borer, but overall stand is in fine health. Stand History:

1967 "log only" harvest.

Natural Resource Notes:

Excellent hard and soft mast species (oak and beech/red maple). Lacking early successional habitat.

Cultural Resource Notes:

VINS has survey plots in this stand for neo-tropical bird montioring.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

124


picture

Stand 6c TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

2.64 1 8

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

1

BA

tpa

MSD

125

240

8.94

40 5 75 5

38 8 193 2

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

Sawtimber Volume Volume 2.64 mean saw dbh 13.8 Avg MHt 8.1 Vol/tree 70

125 45:80 conf level % error CV

# of points

80% 22% 27

conf level % error CV

Notes:

80% 60% 74

4 diameter distribution

BAF

species pie chart

20

Long Term Objectives: Allow natural development of forest ecosystem.

Management Recommendations

Designated Natural Area. No treatment scheduled.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type size class: Acres

SAF 55 Includes large "Dry Oak Woodland" Natrual Community sawtimber 55.3

Soils: 43E, Taconic-Macober complex, 25-60% Slopes. Very rocky. Access:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

No access to the majority of this stand. Master's mountain accesses the highest point. Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

Fully stocked (A line). Mostly oak canopy, along with maple and beech. Some excellent quality standing timber; also large patch of "Dry Oak Woodland" located along south-eastern ridge (quite large, ~1+acre). Site class III. Some exceedingly shallow soils. Also, ridge in north section has patches of "Dry Oak Woodland".

light, even distribution of beech.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ Stand is in fine health. Stand History:

possibly a harvest in 1963??

Natural Resource Notes:

Very shallow to bedrock along ridges. Fairly shallow soils elsewhere. Lacking early successional habitat.

Cultural Resource Notes:

High recreation potential on account of Master's Mountain Road, the large oaks, and warm southern exposure. VINS has survey plots in this stand for neo-tropical bird montioring.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

125


picture

Stand 6d TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

# of points

4.23 3 7

BA

tpa

MSD

117

241

8.75

49 20 49

44 64 133

Sawtimber Volume Volume 4.23 mean saw dbh 14.2 Avg MHt 11.6 Vol/tree 96

117 79:49 80% 14% 26

conf level % error CV

Notes: Dry site; beech, red maple, and oak. Only two chestnut oak found on the property located in this stand.

80% 50% 92

7 species pie chart

BAF

20

Long Term Objectives: Allow natural development of forest ecosystem.

Designated Natural Area. No treatment scheduled. Management Recommendations

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type size class: Acres

SAF 55--Oak, beech/red maple sawtimber 79.1

Soils:

47E, Dutchess Channery loam, 25-60% slopes, very stony. 42E, Macomber-Taconic complex, 25-60% slopes, rocky.

Access:

Master's mountain Road.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Stocking and Site fully stocked. A line. Canopy is mostly oak (eastern half of stand), and beech/red maple (west). Site Class II-IV. Exceedingly dry soils on this sunny southern steep slope (also scenic!). Slopes are up to Quality: 50%; soils are shallow and rocky.

Regeneration:

Light distribution of sugar maple regeneration (5-15ft); dense patches of hophornbeam

Stand Health:

Stand is in fine overall health;

(5-15ft)

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

Natural Resource Notes:

1979 TSI may have been carried out. pature at that time.

1942 aerial photo shows that portions of this stand were still

Deeply eroded skid roads suggest poor road design and possibly highly erodible soils.Lacking early successional habitat.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource unusual stand. Interesting creek, with small falls. The only chestnut oaks (2 found during inventory) can be found here. VINS has survey plots in this stand for neo-tropical bird montioring. Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

126


picture

Stand 6e TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

4 6 6

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

108 75:33 80% 4% 13

# of points

15

BAF

20

BA

tpa

MSD

108

242

8.34

43 32 33

35 116 90

Sawtimber Volume Volume 4 mean saw dbh 14.8 Avg MHt 11.3 Vol/tree 116 conf level % error CV

80% 24% 71

Notes: Mature aspen throughout the stand (18"+). Relatively uniform stand with aspen/white birch, and some red oak in the canopy; beech, maple in the midstory. Beech in the understory. About half of this stand lies within the designated Natural area.

species pie chart

Long-Term Silv Objectives: produce high quality sawtimber and fuelwood; perpetuate aspen and oak component.

Management Recommendations

Commercial Thinning with Group Selection. Focus removal on mature or deformed white birch and aspen. Leave large red oak as source of seed for reproduction and mast for wildlife. Focus group removals around aspen to stimulate root suckering. Because this stand has direct southern exposure, groups can be as small as .5 acres. Harvest during winter months to avoid damaging aspen root systems. Post-Treatment (Following Year): Treat undesirable species within groups--beech, striped maple, hophornbeam. ***Special Note: At the time of this writing, the northern half of Stand 6E is still designated as a Natural Area. If this designation is upheld, only treat the area within 150 yards of Old Town Road (approximately 30 acres).

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Residual Basal Area: 80-85sqft/acre Harvest Year: 2014 Cutting Cycle: 15 years Diameter Objectives: Bigtooth Aspen=18" White Birch=14" Red Oak=20"

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type size class: Acres

NE-603

SAF 25 NHWD with large aspen component sawtimber 75.7

Soils:

48D, Pittstown loam, 15-25% slopes. 47D, Dutchess Channery Loam, 15-25% slopes, very stony.

Access:

Access is via Old Town Road. Use South Gate Landing (parking area).

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Between A, Bline. Approaching A line. Canopy is uniform, and made up of mature popple, along with white birch, red oak. Midstory = beech and maple. A pocket of mature SM in northwest corner of stand. ***note: this stand has the largest concentration of mature aspen on the property. Site Class I.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

Regeneration:

uniformly scattered beech (various sizes). Pockets of hophornbeam.

species, size

Stand Health:

Stand is in fine health. The adjacent road, Old Town Road, has small patches of garlic mustard nearby, which must be treated.

Stocking and Site Quality:

insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

1975--possible TSI treatment.

Natural Resource Notes:

This stand has a significant number of large mast producing red oak; Some of the large mature white birch and aspen should be left as wildlife trees.

Cultural Resource Notes:

The lower portion of Master's Mountain Road runs through this stand. A starting point to the trail must be re-located, as Dale Aines' sap house is blocking the existing starting point (he had permission to do this). A new start to the trail should be constructed as part of the harvest, possibly starting at the parking lot.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

127


1

Compartment Seven

5M

5D 5E

4H

5C 5A2

6ANP

5

6A

4F

4

5OP

5F

5J

4K

6B

6

5K

5B1

8E 4J

5KNP

6D

5I

6E

5INP 7F

7CNP

8

8G

5BNP

5G

5K1

4N

4I

5B2 6C

4A3

4B

5J2

5L

4E

5A1

5SP1

5J1

4A2

4D

5OP

7A 7E

5H

7D1

4A1

4C

7

7D2 7B

7CNP

7C

Legend Stand boundary

Primary woods roads

Secondary woods roads topo lines 20 ft

Compartments

00.050.1

0.2

0.3

Miles 0.4

ÂŻ

128


picture

Stand 7a TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

2.33 3 5

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

0

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

78 42 conf level % error

80% 15%

CV

32

# of points BAF

tpa

MSD

152

8.94

29 13 33 2

25 34 91 1 Sawtimber Volume Volume 2.33 mean saw dbh 14.3 Avg MHt Vol/tree conf level % error CV

80% 18% 40

Notes:

Thinned around 2003, along with 7E and 7B. Gullies have formed on these highly erodable soils, although not directly as a result of the previous treatment.

9 20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

BA

78

Produce high qulity sawtimber; convert to uneven-age structure. Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

No activies planned for the current management cycle.

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type size class Acres

ne 603; Managing Rich Northern Hardwood forests (TNC Vermont)

SAF 25--some Rich NHWD forest pole/ small sawtimber 71.6

Soils:

49D, Pittstown loam, 15-25 % slopes, very stony.

Access:

Access is to Old Town/ East Hollow Landing via Fisher Road.

Overstory Stocking Canopy is adequately stocked (B line). Site Class I. and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

dense patches of beech seedlings, as well as a mix of other NHWD spp. (most notably ash, sugar maple, and yellow birch).

Stand Health:

Significant gullies have formed from soil erosion. Gullies can clearly be seem on aerial photo, and should be protected with buffers during future opertions. Some water run-off damage was noted along the skid roads in the southern portion of the stand. Drainage will need to be improved prior to, or during the next entry.

Stand History:

Natural Resource Notes:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

2003--single tree and group selection harvest. 1991 harvest (Lareau, Cannon) 1984 harvest in western portion along Graves Rd (Winship, Cannon, Lewis). 1965-67 paper birch harvest.

treatments, land use, disturbance

Deep gullies have formed and significant soil erosion has occurred. The damage does not appear to be recent, and it looks as though the last timber sale in this stand avoided these areas. There is an old horse pond/fire pond located in this stand.

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

Cultural Resource Notes:

wet and rocky. Low recreation value. However, the lower portion of this stand is visible from East Hollow Rd.

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

129


picture

Stand 7b TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

2.67 11 4

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

0

BA

tpa

MSD

116

259

8.52

38 56 20 2

37 172 48 2

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

Sawtimber Volume Volume 2.67 mean saw dbh 13.54 Avg MHt Vol/tree

116 94 conf level % error CV

80% 8% 19

# of points

10

BAF

20

conf level % error CV

Notes: Excellent site. Signs of rich northern hardwood forest. Stand Condition 1.

FFtB

80% 27% 62

species pie chart

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Produce high qulity sawtimber; manage for uneven-age structure.

Single Tree and Group Selection. Conduct small group selection harvest to release established acceptable seedlings/saplings/poles, with individual tree selection between. Groups can range from .1-1 acres, with the majority ranging from .25-.75acres. As much beech and striped maple should be treated as is possible, and these must be treated within the groups. See Merck Forest Harvest Policy for general harvest guidelines.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions

Schedule for 20 year cutting cycle: 2017

Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba

Residual stand will have clusters of low-risk, high vigor trees with mid-sized openings scattered throughout, and will eventually lead to a multi-aged stand. The desired diameter growth for this stand SM,AB,YB=20" RS,PB=14"

Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Residual BA= 80 ~sqft/acre between groups. Groups should account for no more than 15-20% of the total area.

Silv. Guides:

ne 603; Managing Rich Northern Hardwood forests (TNC Vermont)

Cover Type size class. Acres

SAF 25 evidence of Rich NHWD Forest pole/small saw. 46.5

Soils: 47E, Dutchess channery loam, 25-60% slopes, very stony. Access:

Overstory Stocking and Site Quality:

In the past access has been to Old Town/ East Hollow Landing via Graves Road. However, this road (Graves) is generally wet from a number of seeps. An alternative is to gain a ROW across Lands of Mattason.

High stocking (approaching A line); pole and small sawtimber with scattered large diameter white ash. Fairly uniform stand. Site Class I.

Regeneration:

Pockets of birch, maple, ash regeneration (seedling and pole). Scattered beech seedlings throughout (less than many stands on the property).

Stand Health:

diverse mix of species;

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

1942--partially open.

1960 white birch harvest. 1981 maple/oak harvest (Smalley, Lewis).

Natural Resource Notes:

Portions of Graves Rd show signs of soil erosion, which is a problem because of the numerous seeps which run across it; road repair is needed.

Cultural Resource Notes:

This is a not-often visited corner of the property.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

130


picture

Stand 7c TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

4.88 4 4

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

0

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

102 69 conf level % error CV

# of points BAF

80% 12% 26

tpa

MSD

131

11.15

51 18 27 7

43 38 47 4 Sawtimber Volume Volume 4.88 mean saw dbh 14.66 Avg MHt Vol/tree conf level % error CV

80% 18% 40

Notes: Most diverse mix of hardwoods on the property. One of few stands on the property with black birch sawtimber. Old, yellow boundary paint noted. This stand is smaller than it is currently mapped (re-mapping is required), and only approximately 20 acres is accessible. (7CNP needs to be expanded.)

9 20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

BA

102

Produce high qulity sawtimber; maintain uneven-age structure. Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

No planned treatment during this management cycle. Reassess this stand during the next management cycle, and treat along with stand 7F.

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

ne 603; Managing Rich Northern Hardwood forests (TNC Vermont)

Cover Type size class Acres

SAF 25 Evidence of Rich NHWD forest sawtimber 35.5

Soils:

47E, Dutchess channery loam 25-60% slopes.

Access:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index Past access has been via Old Town Road. A temporary skidder bridge will need to be used to access the sidder road south of White Creek, which leads to stand 7C. After TS Irene, this may not be the best location for accessing the stand; consider relocating skidder roads.

Overstory Stocking and Site Quality:

Most diverse mix of hardwoods on the property. Canopy has black, yellow, and white birches; beech; sugar and red maple; white ash; red oak; red spruce. (between A-B line.) Site Class II.

Regeneration:

Thick yellow birch regeneration, but mostly along old skid roads. musclewood and elderberry noted. Striped maple exists throughout stand.

Stand Health:

Stand is in fine health; upper section (along property boundary) has some of the best quality beech on the property, with little evidence of BBD.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

1994 single tree/group selection (Lareau, Waite). 1960 harvest.

treatments, land use, disturbance

Natural Resource Notes:

This stand has very highly erodible soils, as evidenced by the gullys that have formed. Management should be limited around this lower area (near creek); soils at the higher elevations are more stable, however, a significant proportion of the stand has very steep and rocky terrain which is inaccessible.

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

Cultural Resource Notes:

Portions of this area are unique to the property. The north slope of haystack mt. is very steep, rocky, some talus, and could be the location of an excellent hiking trail.

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

131


picture

Stand 7d1 TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

3.1 8 7

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

0

BA

tpa

MSD

113

232

8.91

40 37 33 3

39 102 86 5

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

Sawtimber Volume Volume 3.1 mean saw dbh 13.67 Avg MHt Vol/tree

113 77 conf level % error CV

# of points BAF

80% 20% 34

conf level % error CV

6 20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

80% 60% 101

Notes: nice stand. Good spp mix. Good stocking, relatively flat, good road system. Add bridge to cross WC. Possibly seek temp ROW from neighbor. Neighbor's cabin on Merck Property.

Produce high qulity sawtimber; convert to uneven-age structure.

Single Tree and Group Selection. Conduct small group selection harvest to release established acceptable seedlings/saplings/poles, with individual tree selection between. Groups can range from .1-1 acres, with the majority ranging from .25-.75acres. As much beech and striped maple should be treated as is possible, and these must be treated within the groups. See Merck Forest Harvest Policy for general harvest guidelines.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions

Schedule for 20 year cutting cycle: 2017 (winter, or driest summer months)

Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba

Residual stand will have clusters of low-risk, high vigor trees with mid-sized openings scattered throughout, and will eventually lead to a multi-aged stand. The desired diameter growth for this stand SM,AB,YB=20" RS,PB=14"

Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Residual BA= 80 ~sqft/acre between groups. Groups should account for no more than 15-20% of the total area.

Silv. Guides:

ne 603; Managing Rich Northern Hardwood forests (TNC Vermont)

Cover Type size class Acres

SAF 25 Evidence of Rich NHWD forest pole/ small sawtimber 37.7

Soils: 47E. Dutchess channery loam, 25-60% slopes, very stony. Access:

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index Access is to Old Town/East Hollow Landing via Fisher Road. Conversely, there is a skidder road that runs northwest down to White Creek, and may have been crossed with a temporary bridge in the past; this may be a more viable option and should be explored.

Overstory Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

Stand Health:

Fully stocked (A line). Dense stocking of sugar maple. Site Class I and II.

light distribution of striped maple, ash, beech and maple seedlings.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

stand is in fine health. insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

part of this stand was marked (red) for a thinning, but the treatment was never carried out.

Natural Resource Notes:

A portion of this stand borders the east branch of White Creek. A protective strip of approximately 150ft should be left along this portion in which only single tree selection harvesting can occur so that breaks made in the canopy are minimal and a continuous cover is maintained. Forest equipment shall operate no closer than 100ft from the water's edge.

Cultural Resource Notes:

This stand has high aesthetic and recreational value, since it is viewed (across white creek) by any visitor who enters through the south gate.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

132


picture

Stand 7d2 TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

# of points BAF

BA

tpa

MSD

3

70

117

10

3.01 5 3

30 25 15

60 65 26

70 55 80% 23% 28

conf level % error CV

80% 62% 76

Notes: A portion of this stand was treated during the last cutting cycle. The access road is quite wet from a number of seeps, and should be used only when frozen, or during the driest months.

4 20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Sawtimber Volume Volume 3.01 mean saw dbh 14.5 Avg MHt Vol/tree

Produce high qulity sawtimber; convert to uneven-age structure.

No activies planned for the current management cycle.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

ne 603; Managing Rich Northern Hardwood forests (TNC Vermont)

Cover Type size class Acres

SAF 25 Evidence of Rich NHWD forest pole/ small sawtimber 18.6

Soils:

49D, Pittstown loam, 15-25% slopes, very stony.

Access:

Access is to Old Town/East Hollow Landing, and requires installation of a bridge across the North Branch of White Creek.

Overstory Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

Adequate (B line). In places, stocking is quite low (50sqft).

The understory has dense rhubus in treated patches; undesirable species were not treated during last entry, resulting in a pockets of released striped maple.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ stand is in fine health. Few signs of residual damage from last harvest. Stand History:

Natural Resource Notes:

cut recently. 2003--Fiarly heavy crown thinning; treatment left high number of good qualilty 15 and 16" sugar maple sawtimber trees. Enough of the overstory was removed to stimulate interference spp--mostly rhubus. 1984 selective cut of maple and ash (Winship, Lewis/Cannon); 1966-68 paper birch harvest.

Generally a wet stand. A few seeps exist thoughout.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

133


picture

Stand 7e TOTALS 2011

BA

tpa

MSD

Overall

2.17

80

158

9.2

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

Volume

2.17 6 4

28 28 24

25 62 71

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

# of points

Sawtimber Volume Volume 2.17 mean saw dbh 14.2 Avg MHt Vol/tree

80 56 80% 12% 17

conf level % error CV

80% 64% 94

Notes: Stand is "one big seep". The enire stand is wet and rocky; the lower slopes are steep, while upper slopes are moderate. Upper portion thinned ~2003. cluster of large, straight white pine.

5 species pie chart

BAF

20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Produce high qulity sawtimber; maintain uneven-age structure.

No activies planned for the current management cycle.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

ne 603; Managing Rich Northern Hardwood forests (TNC Vermont)

Cover Type size class Acres

SAF 25 Evidence of Rich NHWD forest pole/ small sawtimber 18.2

Soils:

49D, Pittstown loam, 15-25% slopes, very stony.

Access:

Access is to Old Town/East Hollow Landing, and requires installation of a bridge across the North Branch of White Creek. The westerly access road is quite wet from a number of seeps, and should only be used when frozen, or during the driest months.

Overstory Stocking and Site Quality:

Regeneration:

Stand Health:

Patchy. Adequately stocked (B-line). Contains a cluster of good timber quality white pine.

sparse. Some red spruce; some yellow birch. Thick patches of rhubus.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand is in fine health. insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

Natural Resource Notes:

Overstory was treated circa 2003. Canopy was thinned; good mix of size and species left as residuals. 1991 harvest (Lareau, Cannon)

A portion of this stand borders the east branch of White Creek. A protective strip of approximately 150ft should be left along this portion in which only single tree selection harvesting can occur so that breaks made in the canopy are minimal and a continuous cover is maintained. Forest equipment shall operate no closer than 100ft from the water's edge.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

Cultural Resource Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

134


picture

Stand 7f TOTALS 2011

BA

tpa

MSD

Overall

Volume 5.98

120

227

9.01

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

5.98 7 3

60 37 20 3

47 95 85 1

0

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

Sawtimber Volume Volume 5.98 mean saw dbh 15 Avg MHt Vol/tree

120 97 conf level % error CV

80% 14% 23

# of points BAF

conf level % error CV

Notes:

80% 27% 45

6 20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Produce high qulity sawtimber; convert to uneven-age structure. Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

No planned treatment during this management cycle. While stocking is considerably high, much of this stand lies within a riparian zone, where stocking should remain high by removing a very limited amount of volume at each entry. Also, this stand should only be entered in conjunction with Stand 7C, which does not have enough stocking to necessitate a harvest.

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type size class Acres

ne 603; Managing Rich Northern Hardwood forests (TNC Vermont)

SAF 25 -- Rich NHWD forest small sawtimber 26

Soils:

47C, Dutchess channery loam, 8-15% slopes, very stony.

Access:

Past access has been via Old Town Road. A temporary skidder bridge will need to be used to access the sidder road south of White Creek, which leads to stand 7C. After TS Irene, this may not be the best location for accessing the stand; consider relocating skidder roads.

Overstory Stocking and Fully stocked (A line). Excellent site, with high stocking. Site Class I. Site Quality:

Regeneration:

Scattered white ash, sugar maple, beech, and striped maple.

Stand Health:

no immediate threats.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

1994 single tree selection (Lareau, Waite). ~1960 harvest.

A portion of this stand borders the east branch of White Creek. A protective strip of approximately 150ft should Natural Resource Notes: be left along this portion in which only single tree selection harvesting can occur so that breaks made in the canopy are minimal and a continuous cover is maintained. Forest equipment shall operate no closer than 100ft from the water's edge.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

This stand has high aesthetic and recreational value, since it is viewed (across white creek) by any Cultural Resource Notes: visitor who enters through the south gate. viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

135


4L

4M

2K

2V

Compartment Eight 3 4G

3A

4C

2

4A1

4A2

4

2U

8B

4A3

4E

4ANP 4B

8A 9A

8F

4N

8B1

8

4I

9C

8E

8OP

9B

8C 8G

9

8C1 8D

7A

7 Legend Stand boundary

Primary woods roads

Secondary woods roads topo lines 20 ft

Compartments

0 0.05 0.1

0.2

0.3

Miles 0.4

ÂŻ

136


picture

Stand 8A TOTALS 2011

BA

tpa

MSD

Overall

Volume 2.8

100

238

8.18

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

2.8 5 7

32 24 40 4

28 78 130 2

0

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

Sawtimber Volume Volume 2.8

100 56 LCL 83 mean UCL 116

LCL

1500

UCL

4097

mean saw dbh Avg MHt Vol/tree

14.5

conf level

80%

conf level

80%

% error CV

16% 24

% error CV

46% 67

# of points BAF

Notes: nice little stand. Variable stocking. "better than data shows". Decent skid road up east side.

5 20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Produce quality sawtimber; convert to uneven-aged. Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

Single Tree and Group Selection. Conduct small group selection harvest to release established acceptable seedlings/saplings/poles, with individual tree selection between. Groups can range from .1-1 acres--with the majority ranging from .25-.75a. As much beech and striped maple should be treated as is possible, and these must be treated within the groups. See Merck Forest Harvest Policy for general harvest guidelines.

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba

Schedule for 20 year cutting cycle: Winter 2021 Residual stand will have clusters of low-risk, high vigor trees with mid-sized openings scattered throughout, and will eventually lead to a multi-aged stand. The desired diameter growth for this stand SM,AB,YB=20" RS,PB=14"

Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Residual BA= 80 ~sqft/acre between groups. Groups should account for no more than 15-20% of the total area (1.5-2 acres).

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type Size Class Acres

NE-603

25 pole/small sawtimber 10.2 acres

Soils: 47E, Dutchess Channery Loam, 25-60% slope, very stony. Access

Access is from Old Town Road to East Hollow Rd to Hatch Rd. Use East Hollow Road Landing. Bridge will need to be installed during the summer/fall of 2012 to access this area. Improve Hatch Road drainage and grade with dozer.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Between B,A lines (100sqft), but stocking is variable. Site Class II.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

Regeneration:

uniform distrbution of beech and striped maple (4-15ft). Some pockets of yellow birch.

species, size

Stand Health:

Beech is heavily affected by BBD.

Overstory Stocking and Site Quality

insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

1962 harvest (Smalley, Beattie); summer 1975 harvest (Smalley, student crew); winter 1977 harvest (Smalley, Beattie).

treatments, land use, disturbance

Natural Resource Notes:

A portion of this stand borders the east branch of White Creek. A protective strip of approximately 100ft should be left along this portion in which only light thinning or selection harvesting can occur so that breaks made in the canopy are minimal and a continuous cover is maintained. Forest equipment shall operate no closer than 50ft from the water's edge.

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

Cultural Resource Notes:

Hatch road runs through this stand.

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

137


picture

Stand 8B TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

2.04 2 8

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

1

BA

tpa

MSD

105

218

8.8

28 15 55 6

24 44 144 6

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

105 43 LCL 94 mean UCL 114

Sawtimber Volume Volume 2.04 LCL

1214

UCL

2866

mean saw dbh Avg MHt Vol/tree

14.33

conf level

80%

conf level

80%

% error CV

8% 23

% error CV

44% 117

# of points

13

BAF

20

Notes: Very nice stand. Site Class II. Good species mix. Good spacing. Flat in some areas. Beech understory will require treatment. MFFC should obtain a temporary ROW to access this stand from Zaplatel. Northwest corner above 2500ft, and would require ACT 250 permit.

species pie chart

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives: Produce quality sawtimber.

Management Recommendations

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

Single Tree and Group Selection. Conduct small group selection harvest to release established acceptable seedlings/saplings/poles, with individual tree selection between. Groups can range from .1-1 acres--with the majority of groups ranging from .25-.75acres--and should be located were there is a consentration of mature, overmature, deformed (MOD) stems and where there is desireable regeneration. As much beech and striped maple should be treated as is possible, and these must be treated within the groups. These interference species should be monitored in the following years. See Merck Forest Harvest Policy for general harvest guidelines. Schedule for 20 year cutting cycle: 2021 Residual stand will have a greater percentage of low-risk, high vigor trees with small to mid-sized openings scattered throughout, and will eventually lead to a multi-aged stand. The desired diameter growth for this stand SM,AB,YB=20" RS,PB=14"

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Residual BA= 80 -85sqft/acre between groups. Groups should account for no more than 15-20% of the total area (1.5-2 acres).

Silv. Guides:

NE-603

Cover Type Size Class Acres

77.8 acres

Soils:

Access:

25 small sawtimber

118D, Turnbridge-Berkshire complex, 8-15 % slopes, rocky. 42D, Macomber-Taconic complex, 15-25% slopes, rocky. Access is through lands of Zaplatel. A temorary ROW must be obtained. If a ROW is not possible, then the stand can be accessed by East Hollow Rd to Hatch Rd. Use East Hollow Road Landing. Bridge will need to be installed to access this area.

Overstory Stocking High. Approaching A line. AGS is adequate (43sqft). Site Class II,III. Fine site at lower elevation, and along benches. Poor quality at high elevation, which has very high proprtion of beech infested with BBD. and Site Quality

Regeneration:

fairly uniform distrbution of beech and striped maple (4-15ft). Some pockets of yellow birch.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ Beech is heavily affected by BBD. Stand History:

1962 harvest (Smalley, Beattie); summer 1975 harvest (Smalley, student crew); winter 1977 harvest (Smalley, Beattie).

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

Natural Resource Notes:

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Notes:

some large eratics exist in this stand--which are visually interesting and rare on Merck's property.

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

138


picture

Stand 8B1 TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

2.16 4 10

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

0

BA

tpa

MSD

117

249

8.6

26 17 71 3

20 72 180 1

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

Sawtimber Volume Volume 2.16

117 43 LCL 107 mean UCL 126

LCL

1481

UCL

2838

conf level

80%

conf level

80%

% error CV

10% 22

% error CV

48% 83

# of points

13

BAF

20 Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Notes:

mean saw dbh 14.84 Avg MHt Vol/tree

produce high quality timber

Single Tree and Group Selection. Conduct small group selection harvest to release established acceptable seedlings/saplings/poles, with individual tree selection between. The majority of groups should range from .25-.75 acres, and should be located were there is a consentration of mature, overmature, deformed (MOD) stems and where there is desireable regeneration. As much beech and striped maple should be treated as is possible, and these must be treated within the groups. These interference species should be monitored in the following years. See Merck Forest Harvest Policy for general harvest guidelines.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

Residual stand will have a greater percentage of low-risk, high vigor trees with small to mid-sized openings scattered throughout, and will eventually lead to a multi-aged stand. The desired diameter growth for this stand SM,AB,YB=20" RS,PB=14"

Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba

Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Residual BA= 80 -85sqft/acre between groups. Groups should account for no more than 15-20% of the total area (1.5-2 acres).

Schedule for 20 year cutting cycle: 2021 Silv. Guides:

NE-603

Cover Type Size Class Acres

25 sawtimber 42.5 acres

Soils:

Access:

47E, Dutchess channery loam, 25-60%slope, very stony. 109E, Turnbridge-Berkshire complex, 25-50 %slopes, rocky. Access is from Old Town Road, and East Hollow Rd. Use East Hollow Road Landing. Bridge will need to be installed during the summer/fall of 2012 to gain access to East Hollow rd. A portable skidder bridge can be used for second crossing. Use Hatch Road Landing. Improve hatch Road drainage and grade with dozer.

Overstory Stocking Adequately stocked (between A, B line) Reasonably uniform stand. Upper elevation is a poorer site quality; better site and better standing timber at lower elevation. Site class II. Western aspect. and Site Quality

Regeneration:

Very little regeneration noted.

Stand Health:

This stand is in overall fine health.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

Natural Resource Notes:

Harvest 1962, summer/fall (Smalley, student crew). 1977 (Smalley, Beattie). Southern portion was treated in 1996 (Calfee, Waite).

treatments, land use, disturbance

A portion of this stand borders east branch of White Creek. A protective strip of approximately 100ft should be left along this portion in which only light thinning or selection harvesting can occur so that breaks made in the canopy are minimal. Forest equipment shall operate no closer than 50ft from water's edge.

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

Cultural Resource Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

139


winter 2022 picture

Stand 8C, 8C1 2011

Volume

BA

tpa

MSD

Species popple cherry

Overall

1.75Mbf

100

307

7.31

red maple

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

1.75Mbf 5 cords 7 cords

22 31 47

21 120 165

TOTALS

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

100 53:47

UCL 109 mean 100 LCL 91 conf level % error CV

UCL LCL

2500 1000

13.7 1 log

conf level % error CV

81 80% 42% 91

Notes: Low Quality Pole/small sawtimber stand. Strange site. Seems to have eskers throughout, with many creeks running in valleys. Soils are deep and gravelly. Fair amount of water running through, but creeks are well-defined--easily crossed with skidder bridge. 8C1 is very similar to 8C. 8C1 abutts creek. Sections of this stand have been open in the past. They are now labeled as 8OP on map. Some very nice, mature, red oak.

% of BA diameter distribution 20

Management Recommendations

popple

9

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

6.7 11.1 26.7 8.9 8.9 33.3

Sawtimber Volume Volume 1.75

80% 9% 20

BAF

2.2 2.2

red oak sugar maple white ash white birch yellow birch

mean saw dbh Avg MHt Vol/tree

# of points

%BA

Produce quality sawtimber, and convert stand to uneven-aged.

species pie chart

red maple red oak

white birch

sugar maple

BA 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 16 18

cherry

yellow birch

white ash

Diameter

13 7 20 11 7 9 4 11 7 4 4 2

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

Single Tree and Group Selection. Remove groups (.25-.75) of mature, overmature, or deformed stems whereever there is advance regeneration beneth. Groups should cover no more than 12 acres, but will likely cover much less area. Focus the single tree removal on poor quality, or senesing stems, particularly those of white birch, red maple and popple. Striped maple which has taken over forest gaps created during the last entry will need to be treated--crushed or cut--and should be monitored afterwards. See Merck Forest Harvest Policy for aditional harvest guidelines.

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA

Residual stand will have clusters of low-risk, high vigor trees with mid-sized openings scattered throughout, and will eventually lead to a multi-aged stand. The desired diameter growth for this stand is SM,YB,WA=20" PB=14"

Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Residual crown cover= 80% , Residual BA between groups= ~80-85sqft/acre

Schedule for 20 year cutting cycle: 2021 Silv. Guides:

NE-603

Cover Type Size Class Acres

SAF 25: sugar maple-beech-yellow birch pole/small saw 63.4 acres

Soils:

47D, Dutchess channery loam, 15-25%, very stony.

Access:

Access is from Old Town Road, and East Hollow Rd. Use East Hollow Road Landing. Bridge will need to be installed during the summer/fall of 2012 to gain access to East Hollow rd. A portable skidder bridge can be used for second crossing. Use Hatch Rd Landing.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Low Quality pole stand. Approaching A Line. Nice red oak sawtimber in western portion of stand. Eastern half fo stand was more heavily cut during last entry. Site Class II. Somewhat wet in western portion of stand.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

Regeneration:

Light regeneration, except where small gaps were made. Seemed to have cut out hitches of oak. Heavy striped maple in these groups. Some medium size patches of RS, YB.

species, size

Stand Health:

Lots of poorly formed stems, particularly yellow birch.

Overstory Stocking and Site Quality

insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

Stand histories include total volumes taken from this stand, and surrounding stand. 1962---110Mbf. 1963--13Mbf. summer 1975---72Mbf (Smalley). winter/spring 1977 (Smalley, Beattie).

treatments, land use, disturbance

Natural Resource Notes:

A portion of this stand borders the east branch of White Creek. A protective strip of approximately 100ft should be left along this portion in which only light thinning or selection harvesting can occur so that breaks made in the canopy are minimal and a continuous cover is maintained. Forest equipment shall operate no closer than 50ft from the water's edge.

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

Cultural Resource Notes:

Southwest potion of stand has area which looks like it once held a foundation.

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

140


picture

Stand 8D TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

2.66 2 6

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

1

BA

tpa

MSD

82

168

8.64

33 9 38 2

29 17 119 2

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

82 41 LCL 70 mean UCL 94

Sawtimber Volume Volume 2.66 LCL

1672

UCL

mean saw dbh Avg MHt Vol/tree

conf level

80%

conf level

80%

% error CV

14% 31

% error CV

37% 79

# of points

Notes:

3642

14.31

9

BAF

20 Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

develop quality sawtimber; begin conversion to an uneven-aged stand in next entry. No management activities planned during this cycle.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

NE-603

Cover Type Size Class Acres

25 pole/small saw 31.5 acres

Soils:

47E, Dutchess Channery loam, 15-25% slopes, very stony.

Access:

Access is from Old Town Road, and East Hollow Rd. Use East Hollow Road Landing. Bridge will need to be installed during the summer/fall of 2012 to gain access to East Hollow rd. A portable skidder bridge can be used for second crossing. Use Hatch Rd Landing.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Site Class II. The stand is not fully stocked (B line); crowns are generally free to grow.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

Regeneration:

pockets of yellow birch and red spruce (3-15ft); even, light distribution of beech whips and striped maple.

species, size

Stand Health:

One barberry bush noted (flagged). BBD aflicting some beech. Few snags/cavity trees/and DWD noted. Pockets of hay-scented fern.

Overstory Stocking and Site Quality

insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

Natural Resource Notes:

Harvest in 1965. Then a harvest in 1996, which released pole-sized tree and created openings to begin regenerating stand. (Calfee, Waite)

A portion of this stand borders small feeder creeks. A protective strip of approximately 100ft should be left along this portion in which only light thinning or selection harvesting can occur so that breaks made in the canopy are minimal and a continuous cover is maintained. Forest equipment shall operate no closer than 50ft from the water's edge. Bear sighting: During the inventory, a large bear was seen in this stand rummaging through the duff litter underneth a large beech, probably collecting nuts.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

Cultural Resource Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

141


picture

Stand 8E TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

4.12 14 4

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

BA

tpa

MSD

129

317

8.17

49 57 23

50 178 89

Sawtimber Volume Volume 4.12

129 106

LCL

LCL 116 mean UCL 140

UCL

mean saw dbh Avg MHt Vol/tree

2738 5511

13.33

conf level

80%

conf level

80%

% error CV

9% 17

% error CV

33% 61

# of points

Notes: nice, high stocking. Pole and sawtimber. High AGS. Only partially treated during last entry.

diameter distribution BAF

Produce high quality timber products, fuelwood, and wildlife habitat, particularly for migratory songbirds.

7 species pie chart

20 Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Produce high quality timber products, fuelwood, and wildlife habitat, particularly for migratory songbirds.

Variable-Retention Thinning. Treat western half of this stand only. Treat in conjunction with thinning in Stand 8G. Thin thoughout the stand with variable retention by removing trees of low-vigor and poor quality, reducing crown cover to to about 80%. Focus removals on the least desireable competators (high risk, low vigor). Remove small (.1-.25a) groups only where canopy contains MOD trees and were desireable regeneration is established. Retain some hardwood (or popple) cavity trees >9"dbh, as well as future cavity trees. Recruit snags by girdling some poor quality dominants. Cut and leave worst quality dominants to increase amount of DWD. See Merck Forest Harvest Policy for aditional harvest guidelines.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

Residual stand will have clusters of low-risk, high vigor trees with mid-sized openings scattered throughout, and will eventually lead to a multi-aged stand. The desired diameter growth for this stand is SM,WA=20" RS,PB=14"

Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA

Residual crown cover= 80% ,

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba

Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Residual BA= ~80sqft/acre

Schedule for 20 year cutting cycle: Winter 2013; 2033 Silv. Guides:

Cover Type Size Class Acres

NE-603

25 pole/small sawtimber 37.5 acres

Soils:

47E, Dutchess Channery Loam, 15-25% & 25-50%.

Access:

Access is from Old Town Road to East Hollow Rd to Hatch Rd. Use East Hollow Road Landing. Bridge will need to be installed during the summer/fall of 2012 to access this area.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Overstory Stocking and Full. A line. High overall and AGS stocking. The western portion has uniform stocking; less so in the eastern half of the stand. Site Class II. Site Quality

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

Regeneration:

species, size

very little regeneration noted in the western half of the stand. In the eastern half (the portion treated in 1977), there is a light distribution of beech whips. In the 1 acre patch cut, there is dense beech whips, with some yellow birch that has begun to overtop the beech.

Stand Health: insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/ Lacking large snags. Light infestation of BBD. Birch Stand History:

The 1942 aerial photo shows this stands as semi-open pasture, reverting to forest. Since then there have been two recorded harvests in the stand: 1977 (Smalley, Beattie) cut in the southeast portion; 1998 (Birdsall, Waite) carried out a 1 acre patch cut, removing 16.6 mbf, 74 cords. It appears as though this last entry also treated the southeastern half of the stand.

A portion of this stand borders the east branch of White Creek. A protective strip of approximately 100ft Natural Resource Notes: should be left along this portion in which only light thinning or selection harvesting can occur so that breaks made in the canopy are minimal and a continuous cover is maintained. Forest equipment shall operate no closer than 50ft from the water's edge. Cultural Resource Notes:

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

Although Hatch Road is not as well used as are the areas around the farm, it is used by hikers and will be better utilized once a permanent bridge is installed. East Hollow Road runs through a portion of the stand, and aesthetics should be considered when selecting groups for removal. viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

142


picture

Stand 8F TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

0.93 17 1

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

BA

tpa

MSD

132

625

6.01

16 108 8

17 558 50

Sawtimber Volume Volume 0.93

132 124

LCL 111 mean UCL 152

LCL

0

UCL

2045

conf level

80%

conf level

80%

% error CV

15% 22

% error CV

120% 175

# of points BAF

Notes: spruce stand. Poor site, with marginal soils.

mean saw dbh 13.14 Avg MHt Vol/tree

5 20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

maintain spruce stand, as it is underrepresented on property.

No Planned activity during this harvest cycle.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type Size Class Acres Soils:

Access:

NE-603

32 pole; stem exclusion 11.3 acres 47E, (low)Dutchess Channery Loam 25-60%; 43E, (high) Taconic-Macomber complex, 25-60%, very rocky. Access is from Old Town Road to East Hollow Rd, to Hatch Rd. Use East Hollow Road Landing. Bridge will need to be installed to access this area in the future.

Overstory Stocking adequately stocked, between A and B line (mixedwood). Canopy is a mix of red spruce and white and Site Quality birch. Site Class III> this is a steep and rocky site, with marginal soils

Regeneration:

Stand Health:

Pockets of red spruce (below the predominatly red spruce canopy).

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

No problems related to insects or disease, or to invasive plants. insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

Natural Resource Notes:

This stand was possibly cut during 1979.

This is an unusual stand on the property; it is a relatively low elevation spruce stand. The dense spruce, along with its minor oak component, makes good wildlife habitat and should be perpetuated.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

143


picture

Stand 8G TOTALS 2011

BA

tpa

MSD

Overall

Volume 2.6

113

303

7.65

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

2.6 10 5

29 56 27 2

27 178 98 1

0

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

Sawtimber Volume Volume 2.6

113 85

LCL

LCL 100 mean UCL 126

UCL

mean saw dbh Avg MHt Vol/tree

1714 3486

conf level

80%

conf level

80%

% error CV

11% 25

% error CV

34% 73

# of points

Notes: East Hollow Rd Landing

13.86

9 species pie chart

BAF

20 Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Produce high quality timber products, fuelwood, and wildlife habitat, particularly for migratory songbirds.

Variable-Retention Thinning. Thin thoughout the stand with variable retention by removing trees of lowvigor and poor quality, reducing crown cover to to about 80%. Focus removals on the least desireable competators (high risk, low vigor), especially within the lower crown classes. Remove small (.1-.25a) groups only where canopy contains UGS and were desireable regeneration is established. Retain some hardwood (or popple) cavity trees >9"dbh, as well as future cavity trees. Recruit snags by girdling some poor quality dominants. Cut and leave worst quality dominants to increase amount of DWD. See Merck Forest Harvest Policy for aditional harvest guidelines.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

Residual stand will have clusters of low-risk, high vigor trees with mid-sized openings scattered throughout, and will eventually lead to a multi-aged stand. The desired diameter growth for this stand is SM,WA=20" RS,PB=14"

Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA

Residual crown cover= 80% ,

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba

Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Residual BA= ~80sqft/acre

Schedule for 20 year cutting cycle: Winter 2013; Silv. Guides:

Cover Type Size Class Acres

VT-666 NE-603

25-mixed northern hardwood pole/small sawtimber 35.0 acres

Soils:

49D Pittstown loam 15-25%. 47E, Dutchess-Channery Loam 25-60%.

Access:

Access is from Old Town Road, and East Hollow Rd. Use East Hollow Road Landing. Bridge will need to be installed during the summer/fall of 2012 to access this area.

Overstory Stocking and Site Quality

Regeneration:

Stand Health:

Approaching A line. Relatively uniform and stratified stand (spruce and beech dominate understory. Site Class II. Productive site; the stand has southern exposure, which may lead to droughty conditions.

uniform distribution of red spruce (2-10ft)

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Stand is in fine health; no invasives; beech is only minorly aflicted with BBD. Contains nice mix of snags and cavity trees and DWD of various sizes. insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

The only previous harvest took place in 1979. The 1942 photo shows portion os this area as semi-open.

Natural Resource Notes:

A portion of this stand borders the east branch of White Creek. A protective strip of approximately 100ft should be left along this portion in which only light thinning or selection harvesting can occur so that breaks made in the canopy are minimal and a continuous cover is maintained. Forest equipment shall operate no closer than 50ft from the water's edge.

Cultural Resource Notes:

Although East Hollow Road is not as well used as are the areas around the farm, it is used by hikers and will be better utilized once a permanent bridge is installed. East Hollow Road runs through a portion of the stand, and aesthetics should be considered when selecting groups for removal.

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential

viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

144


2K 2V

2

3

Compartment Nine

2U

3A

8B

8A 9A 8B1

8

9C

8C

9B 9E

8C1

9

8D 9D

Legend Stand boundary

Primary woods roads

Secondary woods roads topo lines 20 ft

Compartments

0 0.050.1

0.2

0.3

Miles 0.4

ÂŻ

145


picture

Stand 9A TOTALS 2011

BA

tpa

MSD

Overall

0.36

75

281

6.58

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

Volume

0.36 1 8

5 5 65

5 25 250

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

75 10

conf level % error

80% 20%

CV

25

# of points

Sawtimber Volume Volume 0.36 mean saw dbh 13 Avg MHt Vol/tree conf level % error CV

Notes: Poor site, up high. Mostly UGS, lots of small diameter beech UGS.

80% 162% 200

4 diameter distribution

BAF

species pie chart

20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Produce high quality sawtimber; develop/maintain an uneven-age structure.

No activities planned for this management cycle. Management Recommendations

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type size class Acres

ne 603

25 mostly beech poletimber 14.5

Soils:

109E, Tunbridge-Berkshire complex, 25-50% slopes, rocky.

Access:

Access is to East Hollow Landing, via Hatch Rd.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Overstory Stocking B-line, however, AGS is extremely low (10sqft). Site Class III-IV. and Site Class:

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

Regeneration:

beech whips exist throughout, with some pockets of YB seedling/saplings.

species, size

Stand Health:

BBD affects much of this stand, which is predominantly beech. insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

This entire Compartment was previously owned and managed by Rogers Hollow Associates. Evidence of a harvest from the mid 1990s. This area has a conservation easement on it, requiring Merck to submit harvest plans to New England Forestry Foundation. This Compartment was not entered during the last management cycle.

Natural Resource This stand is on a ridgeline, and much of it is around 2000ft in elevation. Soils are Notes:

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource This ridgeline can be seen from the Mettawee Valley, and from Dorset. Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

146


picture

Stand 9B TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

0.87 5 8

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

0

BA

tpa

MSD

108

283

7.95

15 28 62 2

17 92 171 4

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

Sawtimber Volume Volume 0.87 mean saw dbh 12.8 Avg MHt Vol/tree

108 43 conf level % error CV

90% 12% 24

# of points

conf level % error CV

Notes:

80% 65% 130

8 diameter distribution

BAF

species pie chart

20 Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Produce high quality sawtimber; develop/maintain an uneven-age structure. Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc

Single Tree and Group Selection. Remove groups (.25-.75acres) of mature, overmature, or deformed stems whereever there is advance regeneration beneth. Groups should cover no more than 15-20% of stand, but will likely cover much less area. Focus the single tree removal on poor quality, or senesing stems. Beech whips will need to be treated--crushed, cut--and should be monitored afterwards. See Merck Forest Harvest Policy for aditional harvest guidelines.

Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA

Residual stand will have greater proportion of low-risk, high vigor trees with mid-sized gaps scattered throughout, and will eventually lead to a multi-aged stand.

Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

The desired diameter growth for this stand is SM,YB,WA,AB=18" PB=12" Residual crown cover= 80% , Residual BA between groups= ~80sqft/acre Schedule for 20 year cutting cycle: 2019 Silv. Guides:

Cover Type size class Acres

ne 603

25 pole/small saw 67.8

Soils:

109E, Tunbridge-Berkshire complex, 25-50% slopes, rocky.

Access:

Access is to East Hollow Landing, via skid road through stand 8C.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Overstory is mostly beech, along with sugar maple and yellow birch. Fully stocked (A line). Site Class II-II.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

Overstory Stocking and Site Class:

Regeneration:

Stand Health:

beech whips exist throughout, with some pockets of YB seedling/saplings.

species, size

BBD affects much of this stand, which is predominantly beech. insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

Natural Resource Notes:

This entire Compartment was previously owned and managed by Rogers Hollow Associates. Evidence of a harvest from the mid 1990s. This area has a conservation easement on it, requiring Merck to submit harvest plans to New England Forestry Foundation. This Compartment was not entered during the last management cycle.

treatments, land use, disturbance

This stand is on a ridgeline, and a portion of it exists above 2500ft in elevation. Soils are thin along the ridge.

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Notes:

This ridgeline can be seen from the Mettawee Valley, and from Dorset. ATV use was noted from the previous timber cruise (1999), but was not seen in 2012. viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

147


Stand 9C TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

0.35 1 10

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity Basal Area BA AGS:UGS conf level % error CV

BA

tpa

MSD

96

322

6.83

8 8 80

8 16 298

Sawtimber Volume Volume 0.35 mean saw dbh 13.44 Avg MHt Vol/tree

96 16 80% 6% 9.3

# of points

conf level % error CV

Notes:

80% 93% 137

5 species pie chart

BAF

20 Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Produce high quality sawtimber; develop/maintain an uneven-age structure.

1. Commercial Improvement Cut. (**Treat portion adjacent to Stand 9B.**) Develop marking guide to remove poor quality canopy stems as individuals or groups.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals.

Residual stand will have higher proportion of AGS in canopy, and will have newly-formed gaps in canopy to either release adv regen, or allow desireable regeneration to establish.

Desired future conditions

The desired diameter growth for this stand is SM,YB,WA,AB=18" PB=12"

Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba

Residual BA ~70sqft/acre

Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

2. Patch Cut. Remove approximately a 3-acre patch as part of this commercial improvement cut. Focus on area with highest proportion of UGS and where slopes are only moderate.

Schedule for 20 year cutting cycle: 2019 Silv. Guides:

Cover Type size class Acres

ne 603

25 poletimber 56.7

Soils: 109E, Tunbridge-Berkshire complex, 25-50% slopes, rocky. Access:

Overstory Stocking and Site Class:

Ridgeline: access is to East Hollow Landing, via skid roads in 9B and 8C.

Adequately stocked (Between A-B line). Overstory is made up of predominantly poorly formed beech and birch poletimber, along with some maple. Site Class II-III.

Regeneration:

beech whips exist throughout.

Stand Health:

BBD affects much of this stand, which is predominantly beech.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

Natural Resource Notes:

This entire Compartment was previously owned and managed by Rogers Hollow Associates. Evidence of a harvest from the mid 1990s. This area has a conservation easement on it, requiring Merck to submit harvest plans to New England Forestry Foundation. This Compartment was not entered during the last management cycle.

treatments, land use, disturbance

This stand is on a ridgeline, and much of it is around 2000ft in elevation. Soils are

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource This ridgeline can be seen from the Mettawee Valley, and from Dorset. Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

148


picture

Stand 9D TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

0.56 3 7

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

1

BA

tpa

MSD

80

135

9.62

8 20 48 5

6 44 83 1

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

80 28 conf level % error CV

80% 21% 42

# of points

Sawtimber Volume Volume 0.56 mean saw dbh 14.29 Avg MHt Vol/tree conf level % error CV

Notes:

80% 69% 138

8 diameter distribution

BAF

species pie chart

20 Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Produce high quality sawtimber; develop/maintain an uneven-age structure.

No activities planned for this management cycle.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type size class Acres

ne 603

25 poles/small sawtimber 46.9

Soils:

109E, Tunbridge-Berkshire complex, 25-50% slopes, rocky. slopes, very stony.

Access:

Southern portion--access is over neighboring lands (Buechner?), down to East Hollow Landing. Northern portion--access is through landds of Zaplatel.

Overstory Stocking and Site Class:

Regeneration:

Stand Health:

47E, Dutchess channery laom, 25-60%

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

Adequately stocked (B line), overall, although many sections are minimally stocked. Site Class II.

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

Large patches of YB seedling/saplings throughout the stand. Many of these patches are free to grow.

species, size

Some sections fo skid road are washed out, and will need repair during next entry. insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

Natural Resource Notes:

This entire Compartment was previously owned and managed by Rogers Hollow Associates. Evidence of a harvest from the mid 1990s. This area has a conservation easement on it, requiring Merck to submit harvest plans to New England Forestry Foundation. This Compartment was not entered during the last management cycle.

treatments, land use, disturbance

This stand is on a ridgeline, and much of it is around 2000ft in elevation (some of it approaches 2500).

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource Notes:

This ridgeline can be seen from the Mettawee Valley, and from Dorset. Signs of ATV use exist on the main woods road through this stand. viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

149


picture

Stand 9E TOTALS 2011

Volume

Overall

0.24 3 6

Sawtimber AGS UGS Cavity

1

BA

tpa

MSD

71

205

7.28

6 17 43 6

7 71 124 3

Basal Area BA AGS:UGS

71 23 conf level % error CV

80% 14% 27

# of points

Sawtimber Volume Volume 0.24 mean saw dbh 12 Avg MHt Vol/tree conf level % error CV

Notes:

80% 92% 170

7 species pie chart

BAF

20

Desired Future Stand Condition Long Range Silvicultural Objectives:

Management Recommendations

Produce high quality sawtimber; develop/maintain an uneven-age structure.

No activities planned for this management cycle.

Recourse Concerns: soil erosion, water quality, standing timber, wtlands, pests, wildlife habitat, etc Short-term and long term silvicultural or wildlife goals. Desired future conditions Even-age mgmt: present age, rotation age, residual ba Uneven-age mgmt: desired diameter, cutting cycle, residual BA Later, treatment schedule: stand, year, activity

Silv. Guides:

Cover Type size class Acres

ne 603

25 poles/small sawtimber 48.1

Soils:

112E, Rawsonville-Hogback complex, 25-60% slopes, very rocky.

Access:

Western portion--access is over neighboring lands to the west(Buechner), down to East Hollow Landing. Eastern portion--access is through lands of Zaplatel.

Overstory Stocking and Site Class:

Regeneration:

Stand Health:

Adequately stocked (B line), overall, although many sections are minimally stocked. Site Class II-III.

Large patches of YB and striped maple seedling/saplings throughout the stand. Many of these patches are free to grow.

dry/wet, soil depth, Site Index

BA, AGS:UGS, MSD, stems/a, uniform? Patchy? Stratified?

species, size

Some sections fo skid road are washed out, and will need repair during next entry. insects, invasive plants, diseases, level of impact/

Stand History:

This entire Compartment was previously owned and managed by Rogers Hollow Associates. Evidence of a harvest from the mid 1990s. This area has a conservation easement on it, requiring Merck to submit harvest plans to New England Forestry Foundation. This Compartment was not entered during the last management cycle. 1999 harvest (Calfee, Waite)

Natural Resource This stand is on a ridgeline, and much of it is around 2000ft in elevation. Higher elevations exceed 2500 feet in elevation, which would require an ACT 250 permit prior to entering this section. Notes:

treatments, land use, disturbance

soil erosion, water quality, plants/trees, pests, wildife habitat, rare/threatened spp

fish and game existing habitat and potential Cultural Resource This ridgeline can be seen from the Mettawee Valley, and from Dorset. Notes: viewscapes, waterfalls, scenic areas, recreation and aesthetic values

150


Appendix A.  Forest Harvest Guidelines  (reference: Vermont Family Forests)    1. Legacy Tree Benchmark:  a. There are a minimum of three vigorous, wind‐firm legacy trees per acre measuring over  19 inches diameter at breast height (dbh).    2. Tree Species Richness Benchmark:  a. Native tree species richness is maintined when pre‐and post‐treatment levels are  compared.    3. Snag & Cavity Trees Benchmark:   a. There are a minimum of four large, secure cavity or snag trees per acre with one  exceeding 21” dbh and four exceeding 15”.    4. Access Roads Benchmark:  a. Erosion control structures such as water bars, broad‐based dips, and turn‐ups are  properly installed on all forwarding paths and skid trails at intervals according to Table 1  of the Vermont AMPs.    5. Log Landing Benchmark:  a. Log landings are located on nearly level, stable ground, kept out of protective strips, and  graded to prevent soil erosion and stream sedimentation.    6. Stream Crossing Benchmark:  a. Streams are crossed with bridges or culverts that are properly sized according to Table 2  of the Vermont AMPs and carefully installed perpendicular to the stream.    7. Large DWD Benchmark:  a. Minimum of four downed trees 16+ foot long logs per acre on average, with one  exceeding 21” dbh and four exceeding 15”dbh.    8. Small Woody Debris Benchmark:  a. All leaves, needles, and tree limbs less than 3 inches in diameter are left in or close to  the place where they were felled.    9. Stream Protective Strip Benchmark: 

151


a. All streams are bordered by protective strips that exeed the minimum widths listed in  Table 4 of the Vermont AMPs, have little or no bare mineral soil or ground disturbance,  and have at least 70% crown closure.    10. Stream Condition Benchmark:  a. All streams and other bodies of water are kept free of logging slash, debris, and waste.    11. Ecologically Sensitive Areas Benchmark:  a. Sensitive areas such as rare upland forest communities and forest wetlands are properly  buffered.    12. Non‐native Invasive Tree and Shrub species Benchmark:  a. Invasive tree and shrub species are absent.     

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APPENDIX B ‐ Wildlife Habitat     Composition and Age Class structure of Ecosystems  The largest impact this management cycle can have to wildlife on the property is by ensuring that a  diversity of composition, structure, and function of forest stands is maintained or enhanced.   Simply  put, Merck needs to manage its forest stands so that they are ecologically healthy and diverse.    There is an opportunity to:    Aspen Habitat  Aspen can occur in pure stands, and as a component of stands located in scattered small clones.  Aspen  clones in other habitats can be managed over time and expanded to create larger aspen habitat area.       While there are currently no aspen habitat stands at merck forest, there are scattered small clones  within stands which can be managed and expanded to provide for the species that prefer these habitats.    If mature aspen clones are not managed, the clones can become less productive and die, removing this  habitat feature from the landscape.  Providing age and structural diversity of aspn clones and stands can  increase available wildlife habitat within the property.  Management will likely increase the abundance  of aspn within stands rather than convert them to pure aspen habitat.    There is an opportunity to:  1. Create new early‐successional aspen habitat by removing groups around mature aspen  clones.  2. Expand aspen component by expanding some clones through management.      Oak Habitat  Management to improve oak habitat includes regenerating oak and oak‐hardwood stands to allow oak  seedlings to get established in high levels of light, and releasing established oak saplings and small trees  from over‐topping vegetation.    There is an opportunity to:  1. Increase the abundance of oak in stands that have an oak component by releasing them  from copeting vegetation.  2. Regenerate oak and oak‐hardwood stands to create new stands of oak.    Deer Wintering Areas  To enhance wintering habitat for white‐tailed deer, Merck can retain and encourage vegetative  conditions for both shelter and browse.  Wintering habitat for deer will be emphasized within or near  deer wintering areas, and permanent upland wildlife openings containing grasses, forbs, and shrubs can  provide forage in early spring. 

153


Permanent Upland Openings  Permanent upland openings provide important early‐successional wildlife habitat, ranging from grass‐ forb meadows to openings with young, shrub‐scrub, woody vegetation.  Without early‐successional  habitat ike that provided by permanent upland openings, the diversity and quality of wildlife habitat in  the project area would decrease.    Permanent upland openings complement the temporary openings of silvicultural regeneration  treatements in mature forest stands.    There is an opportunity to:  1. Restore, enlarge, and enhance existing upland openings to provide early‐successional  habitat for wildlife.  2. Create new permanent openings in the project areas to provide additional early‐ successional habitat to meet forest habitat composition objectives.  3. Create some permanent openings to be managed for late‐stage early‐successional habitat  with older age classes of vegetation (5‐20 years).    Apple Tree Management  Individual apple trees and remnant orchards are an important source of wildlife food and are historic  features of Merck Forest.  As the forest matures around the apple trees, other etree species encroach  upon and shad apple trees, rendering them less productive in the reduced light of the understory and  lead to eventual death.  By removing over‐topping trees immediately around them, the apple trees  show better growth and fruit production.    There is an opportunity to:  1. Release apple trees sot that these historic features continue to provide food for wildlife.  2. Prune apple trees to enhance soft mast production, providing and increased food source for  wildlife species.  3. Pile material cut to release and prune apple trees to enhance habitat for small mammals  and amphibians.    Historic Structure Habitat  There are many historic sites including rock walls, building foundations, and wells at Merck.  These sites  are often located in small‐ or medium‐size openings and some include other habitat features such as  small ponds, wetlands, or apple trees.  These features provide unique wildlife habitat providing nesting  shelter or travel ways for small mammals, reptiles, and amphibians.    There is an opportunity to:  1. Maintain historic structures and improve the wildlife habitats they provide.  2. Place removed material in a way to provide nesting, foraging, and travel habitat for small  mammals, reptiles, and amphibians. 

154


Appendix C: Sugarbush Boundaries

up

d

Old Tow

R

Visitor's Center

Sap House

ne Sto

Lot

Rd. Ma

a rqu

n

d dR

.

Stone Lot

Gallop Rd.

Merck Forest Locus Map

Spruce Peak

mo

Rd .

to

n

Tr ai l

nR d.

ho

ve

Merck_boundary

nd

Ba r

Hatc h

SH RBU

Ha m

. Rd

Rd.

Old Town Road

e

Lodge

U GA S SED A E L

Legend

dg

op

n

d. eR

wn Old To

:

to An

Lo

ll Ga

NEW

SU

US. H B R Rd GA

Trail

R

o tM r e

in ta n u

nR d.

This map outlines the boundaries of the leased sugarbush, as well as the potential boundary for a new sugarbush. Leased sugarbush: 200 acres New sugarbush: 40 acres

Ko u

we n

Sugarbush Antone Mtn Other Main Roads

Leased Sugarbush

Master Mtn 1893'

Ea

South Entrance

= !

0

Haystack Mtn

w ol l o st H

. Rd

0.125

0.25

0.5 Miles Burnt Hill 2482'

Spatial Refernce System: UTM Zone 18N (Meters) Datum NAD1983 155 Map produced by: MFFC June 20, 2011


APPENDIX D

156


157


158


159


160


161


162


163


164


165


Appendix E Carmody Property Map -- Approximate Boundary -- ~4.8acres

Ga

llo

pR

d

Ha

tc h a Tr

Inholding

il

Old Town Road 90

45

0

90 Meters

Legend Carmody Property

Roads/Trails/Skid Roads

Merck Property Boundary

166


APPENDIX F

Historical Land Use at The Merck Forest and Farmland Center Charles V. Cogbill May 2004 The nature of the land at Merck Forest today represents the result of centuries of natural changes overlaid by generations of human activities. The simplified view is that this 3000 acre forest was a consolidation of three old declining farms in the 1940s, now in 200 residual acres of fields and pastures as a demonstration farm, and the remaining 93% of the land covered by second growth woodland. Lost in this story are the specifics of what nameless people did, when, where, how much, and perhaps why. A few clues to the answers remain in place names such as the Stone Lot, The Gallop (hill on Gallup Rd.), the Wade Lot and Road, and Clark Hollow, all of which bespeak the family names of earlier inhabitants. More directly, the “Harwood Farm”, one of the three original parcels, still has descendents maintaining contact with Merck Forest. Older residents also remember sheep being pastured on the “Sheldon Farm” and hay harvested on the “Young Farm” in the 1920s. Importantly, one can still find numerous stone walls roughly in eight clusters, some 14 cellar holes, and various even-aged second growth forests scattered around the property documenting earlier agricultural activity. Apparently missing are any unquestionably old forest remnants which have escaped past logging activities and perhaps indicate original conditions. Obviously what we now know about this land is the only partially buried details of lives from yet unknown previous users and managers. At every turn the land speaks: What happened here? Is this the result of land use history? Who lived and worked here? When did this change? How do we find out? While as a forest ecologist I am primarily interested in the natural condition of the forested landscape, the profound human influence on the forests of New England suggests a different perspective when approaching the landscape history of places like the Merck Forest. Using contemporary written records and the study of human activities to understand the past uses of the land is a relatively new discipline in North America, called historical ecology. Combining the environmental and biological records gleaned from field studies with the cultural record is a contemporary and wide-ranging documentation that is truly an “eyewitness” of past conditions. Using this basis, one can study changes in land use over time and analyze the specific effects that humans have had on the vegetation, soils, and forests. With its intense and changing land use through settlement, clearing, cultivation, pasturing, logging, farm abandonment, and woodland management since the 1780s, the Merck Forest is an ideal location for application of the historical ecology methodology. In addition to deriving a baseline of land use conditions from different periods, this study serves as a case study of land use history and provides specific historic resources to managers and educators at this site. Over the past three years I have been researching the land use history of the Merck Forest and Farmland Foundation land. This article summarizes the effort to collate ownership and land use documents and addresses the themes of human influences on the hilly Taconic farmland of southwestern Vermont.

167


The first step in this approach was studying the relationship of humans to the land by creating a detailed ownership chain derived from over 1250 property transfers abstracted from the Rupert Land Records. The initially rather dry and esoteric deed chronology effectively puts ownership, residence, vocational activities, and land production into a spatial and temporal perspective. The mapping of the ownership parcels through time forms a spatial framework of the primary users of the land and incidentally records much of the economic, cultural, and geographic lives of these residents for over 200 years. A great help in the organizing this mosaic of parcels are extant maps (draft listers/surveyor Plan for Rupert, 1896 USGS topographic), gazetteers (Childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1881Gazetteer), cadastral surveys (especially Beers 1869 Atlas and Rice & Haywardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1856 Atlas), and despite rumors of its theft, early Proprietorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; survey records (Rupert Town Office). The property transferred (including farms, mills, houses, shops, barns, timber and water rights, as well as land) and boundary descriptions (including trees, large stones, stonewalls, and fences) in the deeds themselves are the source for much of the specific land use information. Moreover, since the owners at any time are now known, their activities are keyed to primary land use documentation contained in decadal U.S. Census Agricultural and Manufacturers Schedules for 1850 to 1880 and property inventories in Probate Records (Bennington Probate Court- northern District). Ancillary information contained in genealogies, town histories, and family/business papers flesh out the activities of the known residents on specific parcels. So far the emphasis has been on documenting the history of early ownership and land divisions and the agricultural activities of the 19th century rather than the better documented, and markedly more familiar, activities of the 20th century. Next steps in the study will incorporate on the ground reconnaissance. Field verification together with further oral histories of former owners, older residents, and informants (some already done, especially by the Vermont Folklife Center), forestry, archeological, and site surveys (some already done by the Merck Forest forest managers and consultants, Chris Olsen and Alan Calfee), and ecological research on the current vegetation (much done by Kerry Woods at Bennington College) must be done before the full history of this site is revealed. One immediate goal is combining all available land use information within a Geographic Information System (GIS). Preliminary ArcView layers of forest types, roads, foundations, and stonewalls have already been compiled (Jim Henderson, Bennington County Regional Commission and consulting forester Chris Olson). An ArcView layer of land ownership and linkage to the associated Excel databases of the 1250 deeds with property descriptions and transactions and of agriculture census data has already been accomplished by this project. Summary of Merck Forest Land Use What follows is a chronological presentation of the dominant land use activities on Merck Forest. This history is split into seven periods which represent major differences in the dominant use. This overview is keyed to a graphic summary on cadastral maps (see sidebar illustrations) which indicate patterns and ownership of parcels in eight time layers from first land division for settlement in the 1780s to just before reassembly into a single ownership in 1950. The narrative also previews some themes and provides data supporting the interpretations of the human influences.

168


Presettlement Period (1761-1788) Rupert was granted by the Governor of the Colony of New Hampshire to 64 Proprietors in 1761. Early land divisions split Rupert into a diffuse crazy quilt of surveys and pitches of "shares" rather than a geographically coherent array of many nearby towns. After 1765, the 1st and 2nd lotting divisions of the town resulted in European settlement on the prime farmlands on floodplains of the Mettowee River of East Rupert and the White Creek Flats of Mill Brook in West Rupert. Starting in 1785, the backlands on Merck Forest were granted by the Proprietors to individuals, predominantly in the 5th and 6th divisions. Based on 241 trees cited in presettlement surveys, forests over all of Rupert, consisted of a mixture of types dominated by beech (61% of early survey witness trees), maple (27%), and oak (2.5%). There was a minor component of other species such as birches, elms, basswood, hickory, spruce, poplar, hardhack, and pegwood, but no pine nor hemlock were recorded in the early town surveys. The original woods of Merck Forest were completely forested and dominated by much the same hardwood species found there today, including a scattering of oak, but significantly had more spruce than other areas of the town. Settlement and Small Farm Period (1788-1820) The first farm properties on Merck land were settled in Clark Hollow (from the Sugar House and south to the slopes of Haystack) by an closely intermarried group of Yankee immigrants. Andrew Clark from Pelham, Massachusetts settled first in 1788 and by 1790 there were about six separate small farm properties in the Hollow. Also there was a small mill established immediately to the south in Kent Hollow (established by Samuel Kent in 1782) and by 1796 another mill above the current village of East Rupert, both of which which were providing sawn boards for buildings and local milling of grains. In 1791, a road was built from Kent Hollow to Clark Hollow and soon after the Draper Rd or later Convis Road reached from west of the “Gap” into the northwestern section of Merck Forest. Within the next decade at least three more farms were established at the periphery of the original Clark Hollow, and three new settlers were established in the northern half of the property. Thus within 15 years of first settlement there was a well established farm neighborhood community of at least a dozen selfsustaining farms within Merck Forest. Interestingly the current stone walls and cellar holes are closely associated with these early property boundaries and farmstead locations. Consolidation Farming Period (1820- 1850) The first established farms were generally not maintained within the same family, but bought by later settlers, often offspring of other Rupert residents. Following this pattern, the Harwood family (who originally emigrated from Bennington in 1787) expanded a series of farm properties in the “Gap” and created a farm for Joseph Harwood in 1830. In addition, the new owners such as the James Weed (with his father and brothers) and Bernice Raymond were accumulating large blocks of mountain land. Judging from the later land divisions and “pitching” (surveying one’s own vacant land), the upland surrounding the farms wasn’t utilized until the 1830s when it was being converted to pastures and woodlots. This was part of a trend to gradually consolidate the farms into larger properties and by 1850 the number of farms had declined to only five,

169


whose boundaries remained relatively constant for the next hundred years. These farms supported some cultivation of crops and dairy (butter and cheese) production, but the dominant occupation was sheep pasture with nearly 800 sheep maintained over the Merck property by 1850. In addition the two local sawmills were owned by local farmers and in 1850 Elishu Flowerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mill in Kent Hollow was cutting 80 M board feet of boards while John Harwoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mill to the north was cutting 130 M board feet of spruce logs to make boards, clapboards and joists.

Diversified Farming Period (1850 -1880) The greatest farm production was reached in about 1870 when 60% of all Merck land was cleared in five or six farms (see census sidebar table). There was a gradually decreasing number of sheep pastured down to about 100 animals in 1880. Compensating, however, was greatly increased dairy production and more crops produced, increasing gradually with oats and corn for cattle and potatoes and maple sugar (up to 2000 pounds each year) for human consumption. Much of the milk from over 100 cows was used in the manufacture of nearly 16,000 pounds of cheese at the local cheese factory. Several of these farms were run by tenant farmers while the owners were businessmen involved in other businesses (for example Bernice Raymond was a banker in Manchester, W. Clemons co-owned a cheese factory in Rupert and possibly a counterfeit currency press!, and the Flower family owned the saw mill in Kent Hollow). The surrounding woodlands were increasingly used for logging as the single local mill in Kent Hollow was cutting 150 M to 200 M board feet through the period. Expanding Woodlands Period (1880-1920) As the farming economy wound down, the ownership pattern stabilized with a pattern of three large holdings. Although some farming continued on the same five basic farms until the 1920s, decline was rapid with pastures reforesting, rapidly decreasing the open land, and the town road through the property was abandoned. There was increasing turnover of ownership, and when Joseph M. Harwood died in 1933, land owners were no longer resident on the land. Local timber barons such as S.H. Dole and Arthur Bonneville owned thousands of acres of timberland to the south of Merck Forest and were running their own large sawmill processing local timber supplies. Logging Period (1920-1950) The switch to using the land for its timber resources continued as the Young farm was sold to the West Rupert Timber Company in 1907, and then owned by a series of timber companies until 1938. Similarly the Sheldon farm was sold in 1920 to Thomas Hunter the proprietor of the old Bonneville Sawmill. The harvests were apparently regular, with woods roads threading through the second growth forests on old pastureland and into the uncut timber on the old woodlands beyond the formerly cleared land. A few open pastures were maintained where the most long-lasting farming had been practiced. Demonstration and Education Period (1950-present)

170


Starting in the 1940s, George Merck started the acquisition of the three parcels which make up the heart of Merck Forest. These were transferred to the Merck Forest and Farmland Foundation in 1950. With the later addition of surrounding adjacent parcels, the Merck Forest came under consistent management for the first time since 1785.

Insights on Merck Forest Use The story of Merck Forest is indeed a wonderful case study of agricultural history of hill farming in the Taconics. The back valley, Clark Hollow, was settled fairly early (1788) and maintained a remarkably large number of small farms (12) which quickly spread onto the surrounding slopes. Evidently most of the archeological remains on the property date from this early period of small farm occupation. In contrast to the Hollow farms at the southern end, the classic upland Harwood Farm (1830-1924), at the northern end of the Merck Forest, was essentially a later expansion of the family’s holdings. It was successfully maintained by 5 generations of Harwoods and lasted longer than most other hill farms in the town. Interestingly the Harwood farm was not the chief farm of the family nor the dominant farm on the property until near the end of its existance. With business diversification through the 1800s, the farms switched their emphasis from sheep to cheese and finally milk, and by the turn of the 19th century had declined to only adjuncts of larger businesses and run by tenant farmers. The woodlands on the higher hills, such as those on Master Mountain and Burnt Hill, were acquired later as part of larger “farm” holdings, but never really farmed. In contrast to the intensively farmed land, these “backlots” were not settled or walled, but was used primarily for logging after the middle of the 19th century. Interestingly, the place names given properties (Wade lot (1817-1828), Gallop Lot (8 months in 1819), Stone Lot (1865-68), Young Farm (1879-1907), Sheldon Farm (1902-1920)) are generally shortterm ephemeral or recent owners. Apparently names of the first owners, long-term residents, or large-scale owners do not provide distinctive, unambiguous names. Although the general outlines of the history of the Merck Forest is emerging, there is still more work to pursue. In addition to unraveling some difficult ownership knots and tracking obscure parcel ownership, much of the peripheral woodland have not yet been searched either in archives or in the field. The next phase of this project is to complete the title work and begin to align the documentary and on-site layers into a single narrative. For example it will be informative to associate the placement of cellar holes with the actual owner on specific farmsteads, to derive the exact alignment of stone walls with property boundaries of specific fields, or to confirm association of forest stands with specific fields or dates of abandonment. Particularly exciting will be the search for the cellar holes of Thad Remington and J. Slater on the property which have building locations cited in deeds, but as yet not found on the ground. All of this will flesh out the interpretation of the current use of the forest as well as provide a revealing, complete and usable history of the Merck Forest beyond the rather trite “three old declining farms”.

171


Merck Forest Soil Type Map (showing soil types and stand boundaries) **This map is an NRCS requirement, and is not intended for use as a practical management tool. Managers should consult the soils discussion of the management plan, and of each stand description.

APPENDIX G

Legend

Soil Types

111E

12F

163

38A

42F

49D

69A

86B

MUSYM

112E

130D

21

3B

43D

50B

70A

88

<all other values>

112D

106C

116F

106D 106E

108C 108D 109C 109D 109E 10D 10E

111C 111D

118C 118D 118E 11C 11F

122B 125E

128C 128E

129D 129F

130C 130E

131D 131E 13B

13D 13E

148B

148C 148D 149C 149D 152

177

3A

21A

43C

3C

23A

43E

3D

24

25B

40C

26A

40D

28

41C

28A

41D

29A

41E

2D

42C

2E

42D

34A

42E

97C

85E

67D

49C

97B

85D

67C

48D

97A

85C

67B

48C

96F

85B

66C

48B

95E

84D

66B

47E

95D

84C

66A

47D

95

84B

65E

47C

94D

72A

61B

47B

9

71B

52B

44D

87B

71A

52A

44C

40B

69B

51B

44B

3E

24A

50A

97D

86

68A

2A

98E

86A

W

2B

2D

1L

2E 2I

1E 1F 1H

3OP

1D

1I

1B

2J

5M

4E

5C 5A1

6A 6C 6D

6B

4I

5F

5J

4J 5B2

5K

5G 5I 5H

6E

7E

7D1 7CNP

7C

ÂŻ

0

2U

4C 5E

6ANP

2K 2S

3B

1A

2G

2T

3E

3C

3D2

2F

1,0502,100

4A3

4B 4N

8B

4A2 8A 8B1

8E 8G

8C

9A

9B

9C

8D

9E 9D

7A

7B

4,200

6,300

Feet 8,400

172


APPENDIX H

Invasive Plants garlic mustard (mostly along roads) honeysuckle (within stands, and around farm) barberry (light invasion.)

2A

2B

2D

nR oa

d

1L

To w

2E

Ol d

2N

1E 1F

1OP

1D

1I

1A

4G

5M

4C

Roa d

5E

nc k

6ANP

6A 6CGate 6B South

5J 5L

4J

5K

8E 8G

9A

8B1 9B

8C

9C

8D

9D

7A

5G 5I

2U

8B

8A 8F

4N

4I

5B2

6E

ÂŻ

4B

5B1

2V

4A1

4A3

4F

5F

2S

4A2

4E

5A1

6D

7E

5H

7D2 7D1

7C

4D

Sch e

5C

2T 2K

3B

4M

4OP

2G

2R

3E

3C

1C

2F

2J

3D2

1B

1H

3OP

2I

7B

7CNP

0

0.15 0.3

0.6

0.9

Miles 1.2

Spring 2012 173


Appendix I  ‐  Prescription Change Form  This form can be found on Merck’s Forestry Computer under:  Desktop >> 2012 Forest Management Plan >> Forms >>  Presription_Change_Form.xls 

Prescription Change Form

Stand

TOTALS

2011 Overall Sawtimber

Volume

BA

tpa

MSD

Forester:

AGS UGS Cavity

Date: # of points BAF

Field Notes/Rational for Recommendation 

New Treatment

Silv. Guides:

174


APPENDIX J

Merck Forest: Foresters for the Birds Demonstration Sites Stand Condition 1 Stand 8G High stocking pole/small sawtimber stand, good quality 35 acres

Ol d

Stand Condititon 2 Stand 4A1 High stocking pole/small sawtimber stand, poor quality 19 acres

To w

n

Ro a

d

Ro a

d

Visitor's Center

Ol d

To w

n

Stand Condition 3 Stand 5B2 Sawtimber stand, somewhat poor quality, variable stocking 26 acres

w Old To n Roa Ko u

we n

Sch e

ho

ve

nc k

nR oa

Ro ad

d

d

4A1

ut

Old Town Road

oko . Rd

Ea

Loo . Rd

ÂŻ

l Ho st

lo

w

8G

t kou

South Gate

n Tow Old

Hatch Rd

Lo

5B2

Rd

a Ro

d Ol

d

0 0.125 0.25

w To

n

a Ro

d

0.5

0.75

Miles 1

Spring 2012 175


Forest Management Guides:  NE‐603 Silvicultural Guide for Northern Hardwood Types in the Northeast (revised) 1987.  Leak,  Solomon, Debald.  NE‐332 Uneven‐aged management of northern hardwoods in new England.  1975. Leak & Filip.  VT‐666  Integrating Timber/Songbird Habitat Mgmt  Managing Rich Northern Hardwood Forest for Ecological Values and Timber Production.   Recommendations for Landowners in the Taconic Mountains.  The Nature Conservancy.  VT ANR Management Guidelines for Optimizing Mast Yield  NA‐T_‐03‐06   USDA Forest Service: Northeast Forest Regeneration Handbook.  (Ward et al. 2006)  NA‐TP‐02‐00  Guidelines for Applying Group Selection Harvesting. (Lamson & Leak).  Good Forestry in the Granite State (2010). Recommended Voluntary Forest Management Practices for  New Hampshire.  Gen. Tech. Rep. NE‐331  Beech Bark Disease: Proceedings of the Beech Bark Disease Sumposium.   (Evans, Celia A., Lucas, Jennifer A. and Twery, Mark J. 2005.)  Manomet Study: Forestry Adaptation and Mitigation in the Changing Climate: A Forest Resource  Manager’s Guide for the Northeastern US (Gunn et al).    Agricultural Handbook 355. Even‐aged silviculture for upland central hardwoods.  Roach, Gingrich (1968)  Central Hardwood Notes. Thinning Even‐aged, upland Oak Stands. North Central Forest Experiment  Station 6.06  Gottschalk, 1995.   Using Silviculture to Improve Health in Northern Conifer and Easter Hardwood  Forests.  USFS, Northeast Forest Experiment Station, Morgantown, WV.  Leak, William B. 2011. Estimating allowable-cut by area-scheduling. Res. Note NRS-115. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station. 4 p. 

Leak, 2005, Effects of small patch cutting on sugar maple regeneration in new Hampshire northern  hardwoods.   Leak, William B. 2003. Best density and structure for uneven-aged northern hardwood management in New England. Northern Journal of Applied Forestry. 20(1): 43-44. 

Leak, 2003. Regeneration of patch harvests in even‐aged northern hardwoods in new England.   

176

Merck Forest and Farmland Center's Forest Management Plan  

Forest Management Plan written by Jack O'Wril in 2012. Ten year plan ranges from 2012-2021, and the document is a guide and a resource to ho...

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