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2016 MERCED COUNTY SCHOOLS

MERCED COUNTY OFFICE OF EDUCATION

MERCED COUNTY Steven E. Gomes, Ed.D. County Superintendent of Schools OFFICE OF EDUCATION

ANNUAL EDUCATION REPORT

Proudly Sponsored By

Bond Underwriters & Financial Advisors


MERCED COUNTY SCHOOLS SCHOOL DISTRICTS Merced Union High School District encompasses 8 districts

DELHI UNIFIED

HILMAR UNIFIED

SNELLING-MERCED FALLS

BALLICOCRESSEY

TURLOCK

HISTORY

MERCED RIVER

WINTON ELEMENTARY

LIVINGSTON UNION ELEENTARY

MERCED CITY ATWATER ELEMENTARY

PLANADA ELEMENTARY

MC SWAIN UNION ELEMENTARY

WEAVER UNION ELEMENTARY LE GRAND ELEMENTARY

GUSTINE UNIFIED PLAINSBURG UNION ELEMENTARY EL NIDO ELEMENTARY

Le Grand Union High School District encompasses 3 districts

LOS BANOS UNIFIED

DOS PALOSORO LOMA UNIFIED

Merced County schools were incorporated 160 years ago in 1856 when the first County Superintendent of Schools, William Nelson, petitioned the Board of Supervisors to divide the county into three school districts. The 1860 census reported a population of 1,141 in Merced County and in 1863, the Schools Superintendent reported an enrollment of 267 children and a county schools budget of $1,000. The first high school was established in 1895 with 27 students and two teachers under the administration of the County Board of Education. In 1897, a new high school was completed on the corner of 22nd and M Streets in Courthouse Square. Today, there are 20 school districts with their own Boards of Trustees and Superintendents serving more than 57,000 TK-12 students with Steve M. Tietjen, Ed.D., as the 29th County Superintendent of Schools.

MCOE owns and operates the outdoor school Camp Green Meadows, located in the small Sierra Nevada town of Fish Camp near Yosemite National Park. The Merced County Education Foundation is working with MCOE to garner community support and refurbish cabins, like the one pictured here. Learn more about fundraising efforts at Camp Green Meadows and the MCE Foundation on page 16.

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COVER PHOTOS: Clockwise from top left: Students in the GROW Language and Learning Program attend class several times a week with their parents; a student participates in the Lights On Afterschool parade in Downtown Merced; music educator Dawn Harms performs with the Merced Symphony at the annual Children’s Concert; and students at Gustine Elementary School use technology to work on a math assignment.

2016 MERCED COUNTY SCHOOLS ANNUAL EDUCATION REPORT


MESSAGE FROM THE SUPERINTENDENT

O

n behalf of the staff of the Merced County Office of Education, it is my pleasure to welcome you to the Annual Education Repor t.

MCOE CABINET Steve Tietjen Ed.D.

County Superintendent of Schools

Susan Coston

Assistant Superintendent Special Education

Christie Hendricks

Assistant Superintendent Early Education

Janet Riley

Assistant Superintendent Business Services

John Magneson

Assistant Superintendent Instructional Services

Eva Chavez

Assistant Superintendent Human Resources

Holly Newlon

Assistant Superintendent Career & Alternative Education For more information about this report’s sponsors, see page 15.

I am continuing the tradition introduced by Dr. Steve Gomes, Superintendent Emeritus of MCOE, in repor ting to the greater Merced County community about the state of our public schools. I am happy to repor t, the state of our schools is excellent. Teachers, suppor t staff and administrative staff work hard every day to be sure that all our students have the oppor tunity to succeed at the highest levels. I can say this because I have served in California public schools as a teacher, curriculum coordinator, principal, district office administrator and superintendent for 36 years in both Merced and Tulare Counties and I know how hard our public school staff works every day to keep our students safe and productive at school. Twenty-two of those years I have had the pleasure of serving the communities of Woodlake and Los Banos as District Superintendent. As I begin my tenure as Merced County Superintendent of Schools, I will continue the focus of our office on service to all students in order to ensure their success in attaining the American Dream of bettering the lives of each generation of students. In this year’s repor t, you will see information from the latest state data collection on test scores, graduation rates and other programs that illuminate how our students are excelling. I know that a tremendous amount of work is being done in all 20 school districts here in Merced County to implement the Local Control Accountability Plans (LCAP), which is the adopted school improvement plan that all local boards adopt along with their respective budgets each June. School districts throughout the County are in the process of collecting information from student achievement results, local citizens, parents and community members in order to better respond to the needs of their students. These plans are the place you as a

community member can go to see what your local district is doing to implement the California State Standards in your local school. If you have questions about the LCAP, don’t hesitate to reach out to your local school principal or district superintendent, they will be happy to share their plans with you. In November, the voters of California stood behind public education by passing Propositions 51 and 55. Prop 51 will provide additional funding for school construction, something that many districts in our County will benefit from. Proposition 55 extended the income tax on the wealthiest Californians to help ensure that schools will not be the first cut in the next recession cycle. Since the implementation of the Local Control Funding Formula in 2013-14, State funding for schools has increased steadily year-over-year. Full implementation of the formula’s funding is expected in 2020-21. We are grateful for the suppor t we received from the voters this past fall, and as par t of our repor t this year we would like to share how our schools respond to our special needs students. About 10 percent of our students in Merced County are identified as having special needs. All districts as well as the county office of education share in the responsibility of educating these students. I am par ticularly proud of the kindness and compassion in the way these students with the greatest learning challenges are served by both district and county staff. As an educator with many years of experience working at all levels of our school system, I find that I still have lessons to learn about how hard our staff work as they serve our students. I hope you enjoy reading about our work, and the great work of community groups that suppor t special needs students.

Steve M. Tietjen, Ed.D. County Superintendent of Schools

2016 MERCED COUNTY SCHOOLS ANNUAL EDUCATION REPORT

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OUR SCHOOLS, OUR STUDENTS STUDENT ENROLLMENT 58,000

57,905 57,400

57,484 57,011

56,800 56,200

56,349

56,461

55,600 55,000

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

* 2016-17

Source: California Longitudinal Pupil Achievement Data System (CalPADS) * 2016-17 enrollment is a projection

While California experiences declining enrollment, Merced County enrollment continues to increase. The passage of Proposition 55 in 2016 extended taxes on high earners in California, helping to ensure public schools continue to receive increased funding. The major contributor of the increased funding is the governor’s continued commitment to fully implement the Local Control Funding Formula. Increased enrollment and continued suppor t from the state has led Merced County schools to experience steady revenue growth.

MERCED COUNTY SCHOOLS’ BUDGET 2010-17

$ 700,000,000 $ 650,000,000 $ 600,000,000 $ 550,000,000 $ 500,000,000 $ 450,000,000 $ 400,000,000 $ 350,000,000

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

Source: Merced County Office of Education

Totals include LCFF, revenue limit, federal, state and other local funding received through the general fund. Does not include MCOE funding.

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2016 MERCED COUNTY SCHOOLS ANNUAL EDUCATION REPORT


MERCED COUNTY STUDENTS STUDENT ETHNICITY 24% 17%

9%

7%

6% 3% 72%

Hispanic Other

6%

3%

White - Not of Hispanic Origin Black - Not of Hispanic Origin

MERCED COUNTY

Hispanic White - Not of Hispanic Origin Asian Other AsianBlack - Not of Hispanic Origin Hispanic Other

54%

25% 54% White - Not of Hispanic Origin Black - Not of Hispanic Origin

Asian

CALIFORNIA

Source: California Department of Education Data collected May, 2016

SCHOOL DISTRICTS

9%

School District

Enrollment

English Learners

Atwater ESD Ballico-Cressey ESD Delhi USD Dos Palos-Oro Loma JUSD El Nido ESD Gustine USD Hilmar USD Le Grand UESD Le Grand UHSD Livingston UESD Los Banos USD McSwain UESD Merced City SD Merced COE Merced River UESD Merced UHSD Plainsburg UESD Planada ESD Snelling-Merced Falls UESD Weaver USD Winton ESD

4,899 382 2,669 2,293 153 1,888 2,291 402 504 2,558 10,520 822 10,888 1,173 143 10,203 119 800 83 2,815 1,872

1,576 (32.2%) 143 (37.4%) 5% 1,185 (44.4%) 616 (26.9%) 109 (71.2%) 653 (34.6%) 561 (24.5%) 160 (39.8%) 119 (23.6%) 1,333 (52.1%) 3,030 (28.8%) 98 (11.9%) 2,885 (26.5%) 256 (21.8%) 59 (41.3%) 876 (8.6%) 10 (8.4%) 407 (50.9%) 29 (34.9%) 943 (33.5%) 949 (50.7%)

7%

Source: California Department of Education Data collected May, 2016

2016 MERCED COUNTY SCHOOLS ANNUAL EDUCATION REPORT

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VIRGINIA SMITH TRUST SCHOLARSHIP land that had sustained her family for almost a century be used to fund scholarships for “wor thy, deserving and needy students” who had attended a high school in Merced. In 2016, UC Merced, and the Virginia Smith Trust agreed to divide the 1,256CHAVEZ, CHAIRPERSON | TOM acreCHRIS tract of land into two separate parcels, one owned by the VST and one owned by UC Merced. The parcel of land, known as University Virginia Smith Community Nor th, is situated just south of the UC Merced campus on Nor th Lake Road. UC Merced owns the nor thernmost por tion of the land, which is being developed for the UC Merced 2020 Project. VST owns the southernmost portion and the parcels are approximately equal in size. This change allows VST to use its land for revenuegenerating purposes in support of its vital mission to provide scholarships to deserving college-bound students from the Merced area.

Our Land, Our Ch BOARD OF TRUSTEE

Our Land, Our Children, Everyone’s Future

W

ith deep origins in the history of Merced County, the Virginia Smith Trust has strong roots in the past with a goal of helping future generations of Merced students achieve academic excellence. A scholarship available to students who spent at least three years at high schools in Merced, the Virginia Smith Trust has served more than 3,500 students and distributed nearly $4 million for these students upon entering an institute of higher education in California. The namesake of the scholarship, Virginia spent her life traveling and in service to others. When she died in 1971, Virginia Smith directed that the BOARD OF TRUSTEE

CHRIS CHAVEZ, CHAIRPERSON | TOM BATES, VICE CHAIRPERSON | DENNIS HANKS | FRED HONORE

ST 13T H ST R E E T | M E R C ED, C A 9 5 3 4 1 | 2 0 9.381.6600 | MCOE.O R G

In 2016, UC Merced and the Virginia Smith Trust agreed to split 1,256-acre tract of land just south of the campus. Income generated from the Trust’s portion of the land funds scholarships that help local students achieve their dreams of attending college, which is the mission of the trust.

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2016 MERCED COUNTY SCHOOLS ANNUAL EDUCATION REPORT

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STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT & ACCOUNTABILITY MERCED COUNTY PROJECT 10% A cooperative program in Merced County is inspiring eighth-graders to finish high school and pursue college or university study. Merced County Project 10% is a par tnership between UC Merced, the Merced County District Attorney’s Office and MCOE, with Merced College joining the program. According to the California Depar tment of Education, Merced County graduation rates have been on a steady uptick since Project 10% began, climbing nearly 3 percent to 87.2 percent since the program’s inception five years ago.

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he California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) is the state’s assessment system for students in grades 3–8 and grade 11. Replacing the previous accountability system, CAASPP results give a key measure of how well students are mastering academic standards in English language ar ts/literacy and mathematics. The skills called for by these standards — the ability to write clearly, think critically and solve problems — are critical to success in college and 21st century careers. Given online, the tests are computer-adaptive, allowing a more precise measurement of each student’s skills. Established on January 1, 2014, the CAASPP System replaced the Standardized Testing and Repor ting (STAR) Program, which became inoperative on July 1, 2013.

MERCED COUNTY HIGH SCHOOLS GRADUATION RATES SCHOOL DISTRICT

GRADUATION RATE

Delhi Unified

91.4%

Dos Palos-Oro Loma 
 Joint Unified

94.1%

Gustine Unified

97%

Hilmar Unified

96.4%

Le Grand Union High

76.4%

Los Banos Unified

94.5%

Merced Union High

90.3%

California Average

82.3% Source: California Department of Education Data collected December, 2015

CALIFORNIA ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT PERFORMANCE AND PROGRESS Standard Met Standard Exceeded ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS/LITERACY

Standard Met Standard Exceeded MATHEMATICS

80

80

70

70

60

60

50

50

15 %

40

40

12 % 30

12 %

13 % 27 %

20

19 %

9% 28 %

6% 27 %

7%

36 %

30 %

11% 30

27 % 20

20 %

8% 25 %

18 % 10

10 0

3rd Grade

4th Grade 5th Grade

Standard Met

7%

6th Grade 7th Grade

8th Grade 11th Grade

Standard Exceeded

All

0

7% 12 %

3rd Grade

4th Grade 5th Grade

8% 15 %

6% 15 %

6th Grade 7th Grade

8% 13 %

7%

17 %

16 %

8th Grade 11th Grade

All

Source: California Department of Education

80 70 2016 MERCED COUNTY SCHOOLS ANNUAL EDUCATION REPORT 60

5%

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OUR SCHOOL DISTRICTS MCSD TO OPEN STEAM CENTER The Merced City School District broke ground in October on a cutting edge STEAM Center next to Ada Givens Elementary. STEAM stands for science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics. This 5,460 square-foot facility will offer 21st century, hands-on learning experiences for all of the district’s students. It will also serve as a modern training space for teachers and provide new opportunities for community collaboration. The STEAM Center is scheduled to open in summer 2017.

HILMAR MARKETING DAY Nearly 200 Hilmar Middle School 7th graders learned how to offer cer tain products to a wide audience at the annual Market Day. About 50 different products were available for the school’s 580 students, parents and community members to purchase while students learned how to present products in an attractive manner. Students raised a record $4,989 during the 2016 Market Day.

MERCED WINS DECATHLON For the eighth year in a row, Merced High School took top honors at the Merced County Academic Decathlon. The 35th year of the competition in Merced County, students from 11 high schools competed at the decathlon in the areas of art, economics, language and literature, mathematics, music, social science and science. There are also communications tests, which include essay writing, the delivery of a prepared and impromptu speech, and an oral interview.

RIVERA EXPANDS TO P-8 The Merced City School District celebrated the dedication of its newest campus, Rivera Elementary School, in May of 2016. It was built adjacent to Rivera Middle School using voter-approved Measure S and Measure M funds. Students in the northwest area of Merced now have a preschool-8th grade complex within walking distance of their homes. The new addition also created enough space for all 6th graders in MCSD to attend one of the district’s 14 elementary schools.

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2016 MERCED COUNTY SCHOOLS ANNUAL EDUCATION REPORT


OUR SCHOOL DISTRICTS MUHSD EARNS GREEN RIBBON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson visited Yosemite High students to award the school the Gold Level of the California Green Ribbon Schools Award, which honors schools that conserve resources while promoting environmental literacy. Students in Kahri Boykin’s green technology and energy conservation course at Yosemite learned to install solar panels in partnership with GRID Alternatives, a nonprofit that works with volunteers and job trainees to provide solar power and energy efficiency to low-income families. The continuation school, operated by the Merced Union High School District, is the only one to earn this accolade in California.

LE GRAND WINS ART CONTEST Guillermo Flores’ painting of a person scaling a series of steps leading up to a door marked “Success” will be seen all over the state. As one of 10 winners in a statewide art contest, the Le Grand High School graduate’s future may be intertwined with motivating others with his drawing skill. Flores received a $250 scholarship in a contest cosponsored by the Association of California School Administrators. His picture will be part of note cards and calendars distributed statewide by ACSA, which represents school executives throughout California.

WEAVER HOLDS WELLNESS FAIR Farmdale Elementary School in the Weaver Union School District held an all-afternoon Wellness Fair with representatives from a number of public and private organizations on hand to advocate healthy lifestyles for students, staff and parents. The event complements the district’s wellness policy. Exhibits focused on healthy eating, recycling and physical activity. County public health representatives called attention to their programs and on-site classes on diabetes management, chronic disease management, workshops to relieve stress, nutrition and tobacco cessation.

2016 MERCED COUNTY SCHOOLS ANNUAL EDUCATION REPORT

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SPECIAL EDUCATION

hands-on activities and Students with special needs learn in a variety of ways, through technology, (IEPs). IEPs are the Plans on Educati individual teacher support as identified in their Individualized teachers and families. the from input the framework for a child’s education program developed with

Home visits by physical therapists f nurture the development of play sk

Special Students A

fundamental par t of public education is to serve all students regardless of ability. Students with special needs require services for conditions that range from very mild to more significant. MCOE’s Special Education Depar tment’s focus is to serve about 5,000 students throughout the county at schools sites and in their homes. With more than 70 special day classes for students from bir th to age 22, the program caters to students with the most significant cognitive, emotional and behavioral needs. MCOE also provides related services to students in all school districts in Merced County and works with a variety of other organizations to accomplish this. From occupational therapy, services for students who have visual or hearing impairments, are emotionally disturbed, medically fragile or have other disabilities, MCOE ensures that this student population has the care and attention needed to help them be successful.

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2016 MERCED COUNTY SCHOOLS ANNUAL EDUCATION REPORT


SPECIAL EDUCATION

from the GROW Program help families kills and strength for their physical needs.

s

The Peer Assisted Learning Specialist (PALS) program at Merced High School put students from regular edu s cation classes into classroo ms with students with spe needs where they ser ve as cial mentors and tutors. Support from outside organizations greatly increases the success and happiness of students with special needs. The Merced Elks Lodge #1240 hosts several events for students and adults throughout the year, including Challenged Bingo where everyone is a winner. Other organizations like, the Kiwanis Club host students at Kiddieland and a local sports car club hosts a variety of engaging classroom events. The Gustine Knights of Columbus provides funds for indoor sensory room and outdoor playground equipment.

The Challenged Family Resource Center supports families in several ways. Challenged works with other agencies in the community to improve children’s growth and development and operates a center in downtown Merced where support and play groups meet and offers resources like computers, teaching materials, books and toys. In addition, Challenged has students working in real-world jobs and operates a thrift store at 1260 Broadway Blvd in Atwater. The thrift store is always looking for donations of gently worn women and children clothes and household furnishings that are in good condition.

2016 MERCED COUNTY SCHOOLS ANNUAL EDUCATION REPORT

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SPECIAL EDUCATION SCHELBY SCHOOL Schelby School has served students with disabilities in Merced County since 1980. Named after former County Superintendent of Schools Floyd A. Schelby, the school is located in the outskir ts of Livingston. Classes are organized according to age, severity of the disability and other factors. Decisions on eligibility are based on medical, educational, psychological and behavioral information. For more information about Schelby School, call (209) 394-1800.

YOU CAN HELP AS A SURROGATE PARENT

T

here is a growing need for surrogate parents to intercede on behalf of Merced County’s students with special needs. MCOE is looking to recruit at least 10 surrogate parents for the volunteer role. Surrogate parents take par t in parent-teacher conferences involving special education children from 3 to 18 years old. They can be involved in decisions about educational placement for special needs children and can advocate to have them evaluated for possible referral to specialized programs. Surrogate parents get involved if children are in group homes, their parents cannot be found or have given up their educational rights, are incarcerated or have abandoned the youngsters. Surrogate parents can be assigned to students in public and private schools. Possible surrogate parents go through a threeto six-hour training session provided by MCOE. Surrogate parents meet at least once with a child before they are assigned and either par ty can opt out of the yearlong agreement. Surrogate parents have developed long-lasting relationships with the children they have served and it is ideal for retirees or those looking to give back to the community. Surrogate parents can represent more than one child and one surrogate might have as many as five children they are helping.

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Those prohibited from being surrogate parents are local school employees such as teachers or principals, or those with perceived conflicts of interest in the case. A relative caretaker, foster parent, cour t-appointed special advocate, foster care provider, retired teacher, social worker or probation officers are eligible. Surrogate parent responsibilities include ensuring a student is enrolled in and attending school, ensuring a student is in the appropriate school program and receiving necessary educational services and suppor t. Those interested in becoming surrogate parents may contact MCOE coordinator Maria DuranBarajas at 381-6670, extension 4612, or email her at mbarajas@mcoe.org.

2016 MERCED COUNTY SCHOOLS ANNUAL EDUCATION REPORT


SPECIAL EDUCATION SPECIAL EDUCATION STUDENTS BY DISABILITY 13%

12%

16%

7%

3%

16%

12%

50%

MERCED COUNTY

6%

22%

3%

SpeciďŹ c Learning Disability Emotional Disturbance Speech or Language Impairment Autism Other Intellectual Disability (formerly Mental Retardation)

11% 15% 3% 12% 9% 49% 39%

CALIFORNIA Source: California Department of Education Data collected December, 2015

MCOE SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES Adapted Physical Education For students who require developmental or corrective instruction and who cannot safely or successfully participate in the general physical education program.

Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing The program provides appropriate educational opportunities for children with a hearing impairment from infancy to 22 years old.

Early Childhood Special Education These programs include GROW, Ready Set Go! and serve infants and young children with disabilities in their homes and at schools.

Orthopedic Handicap Program Students with orthopedic handicaps have needs based on the nature and severity of their impairments and often attend regular classes in their local school districts.

Psychological Services School psychologist services involve assessment and counseling and are critical for the placement of students in Special Education classes, programs and services.

School Health Services MCOE provides nursing services for all special day classes. Nurses specialize in school health care and serve as a health provider and as a health educator.

Severely Disabled Special Classes for the Severely Disabled are available around Merced County. These classes are integrated into the community and included at regular school sites.

Transition Services All MCOE special education students are eligible for services, including career exploration activities, job search skills and job shadowing activities, among others.

For more information about the programs listed above and other Special Education programs offered by MCOE and other school districts in Merced County, call (209) 381-6711 or visit www.mcoe.org/deptprog/SPED

2016 MERCED COUNTY SCHOOLS ANNUAL EDUCATION REPORT

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EDUCATIONAL PARTNERSHIPS CHILDREN’S OPERA AT UCM Thousands of Merced County students are introduced to the wonders of opera every spring during the annual Children’s Opera series at UC Merced. Sponsored by Merced County Office of Education, Ar ts UC Merced, the Betty Scalice Foundation and private donations, the 2016 production of “W.O.O.S.H.! (Web of Opera Super Heroes),” gave about 3,500 students the oppor tunity to see a live opera at the research university’s Lakireddy Auditorium. Aimed at ages 3 to 12, the production taught students about courage and teamwork. Teachers are provided with companion curriculum kits for each opera.

EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION For a decade, MCOE and Educational Employees Credit Union have recognized Excellence in Education in Merced County. The program, which is open to all school districts in Merced County, honors both teachers and other school employees at a public event at the Merced Theatre. The 2016 winner of School Employee of the Year is Delhi Unified School District’s Charlotte Okamura. Top honors for teaching went to Nancy Xiong from the Merced City School District.

CHARLOTTE OKAMURA Paraprofessional School Employee of the Year Delhi Unified School District

NANCY XIONG Preschool Teacher Teacher of the Year Merced City School District

DINNER WITH A SCIENTIST More than 200 6th through 9th grade students broke bread with scientists in the annual Dinner With A Scientist at El Capitan High School. The event gives the young prospective scientists an oppor tunity to interact with and learn from real scientists from a variety of fields of study during dinner. Each table is assigned at least one scientist representing local organizations, such as The Fresno Zoo, Dust Bowl Brewing Company, Hilmar Cheese, Foster Farms, Merced College, UC Merced and Merced Police Depar tment, to name a few.

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2016 MERCED COUNTY SCHOOLS ANNUAL EDUCATION REPORT


EDUCATIONAL PARTNERSHIPS CHILDREN’S CONCERT Every winter, the Merced Symphony performs for more than 3,000 elementary students at Pacheco High School in Los Banos and at the Merced Theatre. A collaboration between MCOE, the Merced County Education Foundation, the Merced Symphony Association and various community par tners, the performance introduces students to classical music in a fun and interactive format. Music educator and violinist Dawn Harm, pictured here, uses several characters to show students different styles of music.

ABOUT OUR SPONSORS

Bond Underwriters & Financial Advisors

Stifel Nicolaus & Company is the leading underwriter of municipal bonds for California K-12 school districts, selling more school bonds issued in 2016 than any other firm. We assist school districts with general obligation bonds (for district-wide elections and school facilities improvement districts), bond anticipation notes, cer tificates of par ticipation and leases, community facilities district special tax bonds, tax and revenue anticipation notes and the refinancing and restructuring of previously-issued bonds.

As of September 30, 2016, Educational Employees Credit Union is the 69th largest credit union in the U.S., the 13th largest in California, and the largest locally-based credit union in the central San Joaquin Valley. As of December 31, 2016, the credit union has more than 261,000 members and over $2.7 billion in assets. EECU has branches in Fresno, Clovis, Hanford, Madera, Merced, Reedley, Selma, Tulare and Visalia. Merced School Employees Federal Credit Union is the hometown credit union, where you always see a familiar face and you feel like family. We have proudly served our educational community and their families for over 60 years. Designed with you in mind, we’re a full service financial institution with a wide variety of products and services. We offer everything a bank does from savings and checking accounts, to credit cards and auto loans with everything in between! At MSEFCU, we not only take care of all your banking needs, but we exist to serve our members. Check out all the benefits of membership and experience the MSEFCU difference! Headquar tered in Vacaville, Travis Credit Union is a not-for-profit, cooperative financial institution serving those who live or work in Solano, Yolo, Sacramento, Placer, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Napa, Contra Costa, Alameda, Sonoma, Colusa and Merced Counties. Currently, Travis Credit Union is the 17th largest credit union in California, with more than 187,000 members and over $2.7 billion in assets.

2016 MERCED COUNTY SCHOOLS ANNUAL EDUCATION REPORT

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MERCED COUNTY EDUCATION FOUNDATION

MC E Merced

County

Education

F O U N DAT I O N

Sign up for our quar terly newsletter and receive information about Foundation events and activities. Together, we can make a difference for Merced County students! Contact: (209) 381-6602 www.mcoe.org/foundation

RETURN TO CAMP GREEN MEADOWS

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IA buses arrived at Camp Green Meadows last September and dropped off a group that would relive some of their most treasured times from elementary school. The Return to Camp Green Meadows fundraiser, which was hosted by the Merced County Education Foundation and held at the outdoor school in Fish Camp near Yosemite National Park, drew a crowd of more than 100 guests for dinner, guided tours and a sing-along. Camp Green Meadows has served tens of thousands of students from throughout Central California in the past half-century. While many 6th grade students are looking forward to their stay at Green Meadows this school year, the camp soldiers on with somewhat primitive facilities that need upgrading to serve new generations of students. That’s why a $150,000 fundraising drive was launched as par t of a $400,000 plan to renovate the nurse’s station. A renovated nurse’s station will provide easier access for wheelchairs, enhance space for students who become ill, need first aid or are on monitored medication during their stay. During the fundraiser, contributions totaled more than $40,000 from private donations, service clubs and financial institutions. Checks were presented to the Merced County Education Foundation board at the event. James & Janell White donated $1,000, Nor th Merced Rotary donated $1,000, Educational Employees Credit Union donated $3,000, Merced Elks Lodge #1240 donated $1,000, Rob and Andrea Baptie/the HateDust Project had the largest single donation at $10,200. There was also a surprise donation from Doug Fluetsch and family with a 3-year commitment of $7,500 and from Jim Cunningham for the same 3-year commitment of $7,500. Other individuals and organizations that donated to the Return to Camp Green Meadows fundraiser : Dustbowl Brewing Company, Tinetti Realty Group, Image Masters, JTS Modular, Inc., VIA Trailways, Hilltop Ranch, Inc., Jim Cunningham, Joseph Gallo Farms and Charlie Galatro.

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Merced County Education Foundation PO Box 1 Merced CA 95341

VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS Visual and performing arts activities increase students’ confidence and self esteem, encouraging them to express their thoughts and feelings. Through the Summer Performing Ar ts Program, more than 100 students learned all aspects of assembling a live stage play, gaining global, health and environmental awareness and valuable life skills that transfer to other subject areas. Through the MCE Foundation’s suppor t of visual and performing arts activities, more than 3,000 Merced County students enjoyed their first live orchestra.

FOSTER YOUTH Frequent changes of homes and schools have a detrimental effect on foster youth, especially their academic performance and future success. The MCE Foundation assists the Merced County Human Services Agency in sending Merced County middle school foster youth to spend one week at Camp Green Meadows. This provides experiences for foster youth to learn and build on their academics, social skills and self esteem.

2016 MERCED COUNTY SCHOOLS ANNUAL EDUCATION REPORT


MCOE PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS EARLY EDUCATION ONE-STOP SHOP GRAND OPENING The Merced County Office of Education’s Early Education Department consolidated services at a new facility on Wardrobe Avenue in October. The Early Education Department employs nearly 300 full-time staff that serve more than 1,700 children and families per month via the ACCESS program, where they can get assistance in paying for child care. In addition, more than 1,000 children ages 0-5 and families participate in the Head Start, Early Head Start, and Early Head Start Child Care Partnership programs operated by the department.

LIGHTS ON AFTERSCHOOL MCOE partners with several other organizations to host the annual Lights On Afterschool event in Downtown Merced. The event celebrates after school learning programs that keep kids safe, inspire them to learn and help working families. Lights On Afterschool features student performances, informational booths, games, prizes and a costume contest. The event also highlights the importance of early education with a parade featuring some of our youngest students.

CAREER INDUSTRY DAY About 1,400 sophomores from Merced County high schools explore multiple career paths at the annual Career Industry Day at the Merced County Fairgrounds. With nearly 150 exhibitors representing California’s 15 industry sectors, students learn about agriculture, ar t, business, education, engineering, fashion, health science and marketing among many others. New in 2016, the Merced County Sheriff ’s Office featured 16 careers in law enforcement. The event is organized by MCOE’s Regional Occupational Program/Career and Technical Education.

2016 MERCED COUNTY SCHOOLS ANNUAL EDUCATION REPORT

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MCOE DEPARTMENTS & PROGRAMS BUSINESS SERVICES

(209) 381-6736

The Business Services department provides accounting, budgeting, information technology, a full-service printshop, purchasing and facility development, which includes construction services to various MCOE programs. Business Services also oversees maintenance and operation support for many county sites, including maintenance of a large vehicle fleet. Additionally, business advisory, financial services, technology services and payroll processing services are provided to the 20 school districts in Merced County, as well as the responsibilities of fiscal oversight through the AB1200 process. With the advent of LCFF, the Business Department, in conjunction with the Educational Services Department, has been directed by the State to review and approve the LCAP of the school districts within the county.

CAREER & ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION The Career and Alternative Education Depar tment operates schools and programs in service to students and school districts with the vision of Inspiring Students . . . Changing Lives! Merced Scholars Char ter School provides middle and high school students a non-classroom based, personalized learning model of education; Valley Community and Cour t Schools provide an alternative education program for K-12 students; the Regional Occupational Program (ROP) provides career-technical training courses and services to high school and adult students; the EMPOWER Program prepares students for college and career ; the California Student Oppor tunity and Access Program (Cal-SOAP) improves the flow of information about postsecondary education/financial aid and raises achievement levels of targeted students through collegiate academies established on high school campuses; the Foster Youth Services Coordinating Program pro-

EARLY EDUCATION

(209) 381-6607

vides suppor t services to foster children between the ages of 4-21 and provides professional development and training to school districts and other foster youth service providers to coordinate instruction, counseling, tutoring, mentoring, vocational training, emancipation services, training for independent living, and other related services.

(209) 381-6794

The Early Education Depar tment provides leadership and professional development oppor tunities, and operates programs that ensure quality early education services to our community. Programs include Early Head Star t, Head Star t and the Early Head Star t-Child Care Par tnership grant, Child Care Resource and Referral services which assists families in locating licensed child care, Child Care Subsidy Payment services; helping families pay for child care, the California Preschool Instructional Network (CPIN), the Family Resource Council and Parenting Center, Caring Kids, Abriendo Puer tas, the Local Child Care and Development Planning Council, and workforce development services for early education professionals and the Preschools SHINE program which focuses on decreasing childhood obesity. The Early Education Depar tment implements the Quality Rating and Improvement System (QRIS)/Race To The Top-Early Learning Challenge grant called Quality Counts!

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2016 MERCED COUNTY SCHOOLS ANNUAL EDUCATION REPORT


MCOE DEPARTMENTS & PROGRAMS HUMAN RESOURCES

(209) 381-6627

Human Resources staff administers personnel and payroll functions for more than 1,300 Merced County Office of Education employees. These functions include employee recruitment and selection, employment related counseling, leadership development, workers compensation, health benefits, maintenance of employment records as well as negotiating, implementing and administering collective bargaining agreements for represented staff. Human Resources staff also coordinates compensation and benefits for internal staff. The Human Resources department provides fingerprinting services, credentialing advice and credential monitoring for all school districts in Merced County. In addition, the department maintains the countywide substitute teacher list.

EDUCATIONAL SERVICES

(209) 381-6634

Educational Services delivers support services based on researched-based practices and data-informed decision making to meet the challenges of the adopted California State Standards and the aligned assessment system. Educational Services is currently composed of three programs: District Support Services, Student Programs and Migrant Education. The following are some of services delivered to districts and schools in our county: ASSETS-After School Program, Camp Green Meadows Outdoor School, Merced Educational Television (METV), Media & Technology services, Teacher Induction Program (TIP), ADMIN KEYS Credential Program, the North Valley Leadership Institute, STEM and Special Events, which operates the Academic Decathlon among many other student events. The department also leads the Merced County’s Seal of Multilingual Proficiency and oversees approval of our school districts’ Local Control and Accountability Plans (LCAP). Educational Services offers professional development and technical assistance to all 20 school districts, bringing experts and best practices to the field to support Merced County educators.

SPECIAL EDUCATION

(209) 381-6711

Special Education provides a wide range of services for children and young adults with special needs. Ranging in age from newborn to 22 years, these young people need special education for disabilities. They are served in a variety of places: homes, local schools and schools with specialized classes. Services are available to students that reside in Merced County. Services include special classes for students with significant disabilities, the deaf and hard of hearing program, the emotional disturbance program, adaptive physical education services, occupational and physical therapy, the visually impaired program, the orthopedically impaired program, early start infant care, the early intervention autism program, speech and language development, nursing and health assistance, school psychologist and staff development.

The Merced County Special Education Local Plan Area (SELPA) ensures that quality special education programs and services are available throughout the region. The SELPA provides staff development, information systems technology and technical assistance, transition planning support, education related mental health services, among other services.

2016 MERCED COUNTY SCHOOLS ANNUAL EDUCATION REPORT

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2016 MERCED COUNTY SCHOOLS ANNUAL EDUCATION REPORT County Superintendent of Schools Steve M. Tietjen, Ed.D

Merced County Office of Education

632 W. 13th Street, Merced CA 95341 • www.mcoe.org

County Board of Education Chris Chavez

Tom Bates

MCOE MISSION

Fred Honoré

Dennis Hanks

Stan Mollart

OVERARCHING STRATEGIC GOALS

• Annually, all staff will report improved communication, morale, trust, The mission of Merced County Office of Education, as and accountability within MCOE. the educational leader of the Central Valley and trusted • All clients will report that MCOE has provided innovative and high community partner, is to transform education and inspire quality programs that resulted in increased learning. personal, social, and academic achievement of students • Clients will report that MCOE has promoted a college-going through collaborative partnerships, accountable leaderculture and meaningful career pathways; the number of Merced County students enrolling and succeeding in institutions of higher ship and innovative, high quality programs and services. education increased annually.

MCOE Schools

School District

Superintendent

Phone

Atwater Valley Community School­­ 1800 Matthews Ave., Atwater (209) 381-4550

Atwater ESD Ballico-Cressey ESD Delhi USD Dos Palos-Oro Loma JUSD El Nido ESD Gustine USD Hilmar USD Le Grand UESD Le Grand UHSD Livingston UESD Los Banos USD McSwain UESD Merced City SD Merced COE Merced River UESD Merced UHSD Plainsburg UESD Planada ESD Snelling-Merced Falls UESD Weaver USD Winton ESD

Sandra Schiber, Ed.D. Bryan Ballenger Adolfo Melara, Ed.D. William Spalding Rae Ann Jimenez Bill Morones Isabel Cabral-Johnson Rosina Hur tado Donna Alley Andres Zamora, Ed.D. Dean Bubar (Interim) Helio Brasil, Ed.D. RoseMary Parga-Duran, Ed.D. Steve Tietjen, Ed.D. Richard Lopez Alan Peterson Kristi Kingston Jose Gonzalez Alison Kahl John Curry Randall Heller

357-6100 632-5371 656-2000 392-0200 385-8420 854-3784 667-5701 389-4515 389-9403 394-5400 826-3801 354-2700 385-6600 381-6600 358-5679 325-2000 389-4707 382-0756 563-6414 723-7606 357-6175

Los Banos Valley Community School­­ 715 West H St., Los Banos (209) 827-5600 Merced Valley Community School­­ 1850 Wardrobe Ave., Merced (209) 381-4500 Floyd A. Schelby School 6738 N. Sultana Dr., Livingston (209) 394-1800 Merced Scholars Charter School 808 W. 16th St., Merced (209) 381-5165 Green Meadows Outdoor School 77798 White Chief MT. Rd., Fish Camp (559) 642-0122 Merced County Juvenile Court School 2840 W. Sandy Mush Rd., Merced (209) 381-1414 We welcome your questions, comments and feedback. Please email us at info@mcoe.org. Content organization, photography and design by MCOE Media & Communications Manager Nathan Quevedo Additional photography by Nathan Gomes and Dylan McMullen

Publication and Repor t Announcement Activities Proudly Sponsored By

Bond Underwriters & Financial Advisors MERCED COUNTY OFFICE OF EDUCATION Steve M. Tietjen, Ed.D., County Superintendent of Schools

2016 Merced County Schools Annual Education Report  

The 2016 Merced County Schools Annual Education Report, sponsored by Stifel, a municipal finance group, Educational Employees Credit Union,...

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