__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

UL SUCCESSF T S IR F ’S SIT-IN AMERICA COUNTER H C N U L ED STUDENT-L

WRITTEN BY PRISCA BARNES ILLUSTRATED BY PRISCELLA BROWN 1


People, Pride, and Promise: The Story of the Dockum Sit-In Copyright Š 2020 by Storytime Village, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the publisher, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews and certain other noncommercial uses permitted by copyright law. For permission requests, write to the publisher, at the address below. Story by Prisca Barnes. Illustrated by Priscella Brown. Book design and layout by Gina Laiso. International Standard Book Number: 978-0-578-73907-6 Library of Congress Control Number: 2020915572 Printed in the United States of America. Published by Storytime Village, Inc. P.O. Box 21104 Wichita, KS 67208 www.storytimevillage.org

2


Dedicated to all of my loved ones, especially my beloved parents, the late Bishop Jesse L. Barnes and Lady Sandra Barnes This story was inspired by the young and courageous “Freedom Fighters� of the Dockum Drugstore sit-in. Youth with a purpose, their story of resilience, courage and endurance continues to motivate us all! ~ Prisca Barnes

1


2


Years ago, in the United States, there were laws that separated people based on the color of their skin. Black people weren’t allowed to sit at the front of buses. They weren’t allowed to use the same restrooms or buildings that White people used. And they weren’t allowed to eat at restaurants where White people ate. This was called segregation. In order to speak out against the unfairness of segregation, many brave people participated in sit-ins. You may have heard of sit-ins in the South. During these peaceful protests, Black people sat at counters in restaurants that only served Whites. They refused to leave when owners tried to kick them out, and they kept sitting even when White people spit at them or hit them. These sit-ins helped change the country and stop segregation. But what you may not know is that this courageous act also took place in the heart of the nation—in Kansas. And since you’ve probably never heard about the Dockum sit-in, I’m going to tell you all about it.

3


This is me, Ron Walters. Back in 1958. That’s where we’ll begin.

4


Let me tell you a story of a people with pride and promise.

This is a story of

hope.

5


What does

hope

look like?

Hope looks like a necktie-wearing, briefcase-toting, bright and determined college student named Ron Walters. Ron dreamed of living in a place where he was treated fairly and equally.

6


7

Profile for Mennonite Press Inc

People, Pride, and Promise - The Story of the Dockum Sit-In  

Ron Walters has a dream of living in a place where he is treated fairly and equally. But in 1950s Wichita, he can’t even eat at a lunch coun...

People, Pride, and Promise - The Story of the Dockum Sit-In  

Ron Walters has a dream of living in a place where he is treated fairly and equally. But in 1950s Wichita, he can’t even eat at a lunch coun...

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded