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MELISSA SMITH | PORTFOLIO


CONTENTS |


01 | resume 03 | references 05 | museum of sustainability 15 | adaptive reuse 29 | intergenerational living 41 | library pavilion 49 | urban station 57 | citizen's memorial 59 | personal projects


m633s966@ku.edu

RESUME |

(303) 587 - 1217

lawrence, ks

01 |


EDUCATION university of kansas | master of architecture | university honors | health & wellness | historic preservation | may 2021 littleton high school | CO | international baccalaureate diploma recipient | national honor society | may 2016

WORK EXPERIENCE hmn architects | architectural intern | january 2019 - current

construction documents | healthcare architecture | site visits | interiors & materials | VR models | drafting

schwerdt design group | architectural & marketing intern | may 2018 - december 2018

organized bluebeam lunch & learn | site visits | construction documents | designed marketing materials | charity work

ACHIEVEMENTS

PROFICIENCIES

leadership

Adaptive Re-Use in Europe: Class Rep

2019

modeling & Revit 3 years

Dean’s Advisory Board Sub-Committees

2019

rendering

Curriculum Committee Student Chair

2018

Lumion 1 year

Vice President of Architecture Student Council 2017 - 2019 service

KU Honors & Architecture Ambassador

2017 - present

150-hour Service Project

2015 - 2016

National Charity League

2011 - 2016

academics KU Undergraduate Research Symposium

2019

Dean’s Honor Roll 2016 - present Phi Kappa Phi Honors Society

2018 - present

awards

APA Tom Cory Scholarship

2019

Donald P. Ewart Traveling Scholarship

2019

TCAA Architecture/Design Scholarship

2019

KU Excellence Scholarship & Opporunity Grant 2016 - present study tours

Copenhagen, Denmark semester abroad

Dallas-Forth Worth Pritzker Laureate study tour 2018

Chicago Architecture & Acoustics study tour

2019

Rhinocerous

2 years

AutoCAD 1.5 years SketchUp 2.5 yeaers Unreal Engine

0.5 years

Enscape 0.5 years adobe suite Photoshop

3 years

InDesign 3 years

Illustrator 1 year PDF Viewer 6 years office

Mac Office Suite

Microsoft Office Suite

10+ years 7 years

Bluebeam 2 years language Spanish

10+ years

2016

FUN FACTS Member of Copenhagen Business School International Choir 2019 | SCUBA certified in Barbados 2018 | high school study trips to Germany & Costa Rica 2014 | hosted German & Costa Rican students 2015 | danced swing & Argentine tango 2016 - 2018


REFERENCES |

03 |


KAPILA SILVA, PH.D., AIA(SL) associate professor

university of kansas

1465 Jayhawk Blvd. | Lawrence, KS 66045 kapilads@ku.edu (785) 864 - 1150

KENT SPRECKELMEYER, D.ARCH, FAIA associate professor

university of kansas

1465 Jayhawk Blvd. | Lawrence, KS 66045 kents@ku.edu (785) 331-8309

MICHAEL HAMPTON, AIA senior project manager

schwerdt design group

2231 SW Wanamaker Rd | Topeka, KS 66614

mkh@sdgarch.com (785) 273 - 7540

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MUSEUM OF SUSTAINABILITY |

05 |

Desertification is a major problem affecting Texas and neighboring regions. Desertification is the process by which fertile land becomes barren desert, and is exacerbated by climate change, drought, deforestation, and bad agricultural practices. This became the topic for my Museum of Sustainability, which I’ve titled the Museum of Climate: Texas. This museum educates through didactic learning, by showing as well as telling. The goal of teaching by example permeated all decisions I made regarding this project, from materiality to fixtures, structure to plantings. Additionally, extra sustainable measures had to be taken to counteract the heat island effect caused by Museum Tower behind the site. To resolve such issues I chose to implement a green roof, singleaxis tracking solar panels, and an on-site generator to convert excess heat into electricity.


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2012

2014

DESERTIFICATION

CLIMATE ZONES

NARRATIVE STRATEGY

SITE & CONTEXT

APPLYING THE BAYS

Desertification is the rapid growth of arid regions usually caused by bad agricultural practices and drought.

Texas has five major climate zones ranging from quite arid to quite humid. Desertification is threatening the existence of those zones.

I will take each zone and demonstrate them as galleries in the museum. A special gallery will feature information on desertification.

For sustainability, the orientation and placement of the museum had to be considered. Additionally, with the Nasher Sculpture Center by Renzo Piano directly next door, the design had to be both impressive and thoughtful.

The galleries of the Nasher Sculpture Center are divided by 30’ bays. To nod to the Nasher without making an identical design, I applied those 30’ bays to my site.

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DESIGN CONCEPT

THE PROGRAM

THE WALLS

EGRESS

I turned the 30’ bays 90 degrees to make a 30’ x 30’ grid. Off that grid I designed six galleries, five for each climate zone and one for information pertaining specifically to desertification.

The sizing of the galleries altered slightly to accomodate the program. An admin wing (tan) and circulation corridor (green) were added to the rear of the museum.

The interior walls of the museum educate patrons through didactic learning. They are made of rammed earth and extend through each floor of the museum.

Egress occurs at each end of the circulation corridor (green). This corridor is what both unites and separates the private and public functions of the museum.

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GARAGE

LEVEL 1

01

05

06

07

11

12

15 14

02

16

17

18 19 1

FLORA ST. 01 02 03 04 05 06 07

service access/loading dock parking garage entry prep studio mechanical preservation studio storage staff/ADA parking garage

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11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

13

archive library admin offices entry to parking ramp kitchen staff courtyard temporary gallery cafe lobby gift shop

N. PEARL ST.

04

OLIVE ST.

03


LEVEL 2

21

ROOF

22

22

23

23

31 24

25

32 33

26

27

34 35

21 22 23 24 25 26 27

staff break classroom classroom storage auditorium admin offices open to staff courtyard below permanent galleries

31 32 33 34 35 36

36

single-axis tracking solar roof array egress path/corridor (similar all levels) open to courtyard below circulation core (similar all levels) walkable roof space native plantings

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1A

low-e laminated glass w/ steel structural frame rammed earth wall with concrete cap thermal break 1/2” concrete cladding weather barrier

1 C

rigid foam insulation 3/4” gyp bd sheathing attached w/ 8d nails 2x4 stud wall

1 A

4’x6’ concrete floor, 1” thick vapor barrier concrete placed into corrugated steel decking dropped ceiling held w/ screws in rawl plugs 1/2” white plaster 1’6” deep steel beam tied in rammed earth wall 1

1B

1/4” laminated glass between two pieces of 1” tempered glass

Callout A - Glass Roof 1" = 1'-0"

epoxy over concrete topping concrete placed into corrugated steel decking silicone sealant, rubber glazing strip, steel L angle frame 6”Wx5’L white oak flooring w/ adhesive underneath 1

1C

Callout E - Glass Floor 1" = 1'-0"

1

D

native texas plantings filter fabric over slotted stainless steel soil retention edge engineered soil filter fabric over molded sheet drainage panel water retention mat over 6” extruded hi-density polystyrene insul bd molded sheet drainage panel over root barrier and protection course hot fluid-applied waterproofing membrane 11 Ga Corten steel 4’x4’ flat 1” composite cement bd siding, 4’x8’ panels

1

Callout B - Corten Wall Top 1" = 1'-0"

1D

5” cotton batt insulation 11 Ga Corten steel flat, 4’x10’ white oak flooring w/ adhesive bolt thu steel C-channel 5” sound batt insulation steel tie steel frame fixed window epoxy over 6” interior concrete wall

11 | Callout C - Corten Wall Base 1 1" = 1'-0"

vapor barrier 4” exterior concrete wall, snap ties match Corten steel bolt locations

SECTION 1

1

B


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13 |


Rooftop

Galleries

Lobby

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ADAPTIVE REUSE |

15 |

The stunning, historic Kansas City Workhouse is in danger. A group of developers have bought the land on which the Workhouse and two other historic structures are located, and are in the process of getting the permits to tear the structures down. To both save a historic structure and make it viable in the modern day, I used the concept of Jazz music to design a workable area. The Workhouse is located within the historic 18th and Vine Jazz District of KC. Taking inspiration from Jazz, I designed spaces that were both unique and connected to sponsor greater community engagement and involvement, without gentrifying the area.


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17 |

ENCLOSURE

HUMAN SCALE

The Kansas City Workhouse (left) was originally an L-shaped building. Off the back, I added an addition for extra art gallery space and shops, a walkway, and a water feature to the right to enclose the space.

While designing the water feature and steel trellis I paid close attention to human scale. I wanted this space to feel welcoming and comfortable, at any time of year.


VISUAL CONNECTION

COMMUNITY

The importance of connectivity, both in jazz music and in design, cannot be understated. As you move through each space and building, I emphasized a visual connection to neighboring spaces to encourage movement throughout and between the spaces.

The overall goal of my design was to provide spaces that would promote community engagement. For example, I designed the space above with small shops, a green space, and a small stage to enable activity at all times of day.

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RAILROAD

06 01

18

04

07 08

03 VINE ST.

04

09

10

10

10

18 10

11

14

05 02

14 13

E 21ST ST.

19 |

12

14

14 14 15

14

1


SITE

17

20

18

WOODLAND AVE.

19

18

21

14

4 14

14

14 14

14

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

outdoor space for community entrepreneurship center parking for community entrepreneurship center 50,000sf community entrepreneurship center existing historic structure turned community entrepreneurship center existing art school parking for Workhouse & shopping existing historic Kansas City Workhouse gallery addition to existing Workhouse sculpture courtyard shopping restaurant ADA & employee parking outside lobby for apartments apartment gym apartments, each with personal deck & green roof parking for apartment residents ADA & resident parking for resident pool / apartments outdoor stage shopping & food sales shopping / stage courtyard public park & skate park pool for apartment residents

21

14 16

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LEVEL 0

LEVEL 1

02 11 12

03 VINE ST.

01

11 04

05 14

18 16

19 17

01 02 03 04 05

entry to 50,000sf community entrepreneurship center stage underground performance venue storage cafe / bar

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11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

interactive education area workhouse lobby workhouse gallery space elevated walkway above cafe/bar gallery addition restaurant kitchen & storage shopping shop storage


LEVEL 2

13

21 15

24 18 19

18 19

18 22

19

23

25 21 22 23 24 25 26

26

upper deck of gallery addition - ADA exit out to shopping & outdoor stage restaurant deck upper restaurant seating ADA ramp / stair up to shopping & outdoor stage apartment ADA parking (ADA) pathway to individual apartments

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I wanted to maintain a similar material palette to the existing historic workhouse, and avoid excessive contrasting colors or textures. However, I also wanted to add modern touches to keep the design fresh and vibrant. To achieve this, I chose to use historic materials such as stone and iron, but in modern ways, such as the iron-work on the side of the restaurant (right). Additionally, to hint at the existing graffiti on the Workhouse - which will have to be cleaned - I though of commissioning local artists to do high-quality graffiti art on some of the structures.

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25 |


Visual connections are a necessity within this design, given its scale. In order to prompt people to move from one area to another, the public needs to be able to see where they came from and where they can go. The water feature across from the Workhouse (left) serves to direct the eye from one side of the complex to the other. The ramp-stair (below) directs people up to the shops in a more elegant way, while also allowing ADA accessiblity from multiple points on the site. These visual connections are where the principles of jazz came into play, each soloist (or structure) having its own identity, while also being connected to the whole.

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27 |


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INTERGENERATIONAL LIVING |

29 |

As the population of senior citizens continues to rise, we as architects are responsible for designing workable housing for them. Workable housing, in this case, is that which allows them to both connect with the community and maintain their independence. My solution loosly follows the model of Danish co-housing. With both a private home space and shared spaces, including a shared kitchen, rec room, and garden, this options provides the best of both worlds. Additionally, the community neighbors the Main St. of the town and will welcome both young singles and families and members of the older generation. The community will also sponsor community events such as picnics, indoor meals, and concerts to sponsor public engagement. This community also operates with a focus on sustainability, employing such measures as rain catchment units between the homes.


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31 |

SINGLE-FAMILY

DUPLEX

The design of the facade, made of a reclaimed wood rainscreen with small cutouts in front of a glass facade, stems from both a desire for privacy and a desire to see out. Parents can keep an eye on the street, but they also feel secure behind a wall.

The facade allows for occasional glimpses into the lives of the community members. Here, two duplex owners can be seen conversing before going into their separate homes.


COMMUNAL KITCHEN

COMMUNAL REC ROOM

The communal kitchen allows residents to cook and eat together. This creates a stronger bond between each resident and a chance to learn something new. The communal kitchen will be open to the public 3 times a week to engage the whole neighborhood.

The communal rec room is a slightly more private space, elevated above the kitchen. This space gives residents the chance to converse and get to know one another by talking, playing games, or watching films together.

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33 |

MASTER PLAN


SITE PLAN

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LEVEL 0

LEVEL 1

01

11

14

13

02

15

15

12

17 16

01 private basement (storage & rain catchment unit) 02 shared duplex basement (storage & rain catchment unit)

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11 12 13 14 15 16 17

single family unit (private entry, kitchen, dining, living) shared duplex entry base unit kitchen, dining, & living bathroom bedroom communal kitchen & dining shared outdoor space


LEVEL 2

DUPLEX SECTION

22

21 22

21 23

24

25

22

21

21

22

26

21 22 23 24 25 26

bedroom bathroom second floor family/entertaining space private entry upper unit kitchen, dining, & living communal rec room

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Community Rec Room

Private Residence Kitchen

39 |


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LIBRARY PAVILION |

41 |

This project, entitled Nesting, provides the library-goer with a sense of comfort. This pavilion-style library is situated in a park in Copenhagen, Denmark and is intended to be up for only one calendar year. The simple construction, made of only wood and glass, speaks to the temporality of the structure. The small forms and converging spaces encourage the library-goer to fully explore the offerings of the pavilion. The circular forms are inspired by the philosophy of the Rudolf Steiner schools (also known as Waldorf Schools). In these schools, circle motifs appear often, as children sit in circles, furniture is placed in circles, and images of circles cover the walls. Circles promote open-mindedness and inclusion, and this philosophy I wanted to bring into my design. Additionally, the glass used is a special brand of glass that diffuses light as it enters a building, softening shadow lines and decreasing glare. This is ideal for a library setting where the library-goer wants to read in peace, undisturbed by bright lights and sharp shadows.


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43 |

COMFORT

INSPIRATION

The comfort of the librarygoer was my primary goal. This led to my consideration of a nest as both the form and materiality of my library. I wanted the visitor to feel comfortable both exploring all spaces and sitting in a single space.

I chose a particular type of glass, Okalux glass, as one of my primary materials. I was inspired by the glass because it created beautiful light, but also appeared as an interesting form from which to base my design.


FORM

MATERIALITY

The circles within the Okalux glass inspired my design choice of circles for the form of my library. Upon further research I learned of the psychological benefits associated with circles from the Rudolf Steiner Schools.

The wooden slats surrounding each cylindrical space represents the sticks used to build a nest. This demonstrates the abstracted, modern form of a nest. The spacing between slats allows views to the outside, without allowing in excessive light.

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SITE ANALYSIS

45 |


The positioning of the structure on the site was determined by the current use of the site. After tracing common footpaths of the current users, including families with children, couples, people and their dogs, and older members of the community, vague pathways were created. Between those pathways is where I chose to put each of my small, interconnected structures so as to decrease disturbance of the current traffic flow. The materiality was inspired by the surroundings. I selected dark wood to contrast the lighter materials of the many surrounding buildings. However, the dark wood compliments the dark brick on the church that is central to the park space.

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LEVEL 1.5 01

LEVEL 1

LEVEL 2 02

C

08

01 03

10 04 05

B

06

09

07

A

SECTION A

47 |

SECTION B

SECTION C

11


01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11

children’s area readers’ area book exchange agora toilet literary cafe storytelling area roof terrace storage writers’ area reflection area

Book Exchange Shelf

Reader’s Area

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URBAN STATION |

49 |

This project, located in Wyandotte County, KS, is unique not only because it was a design-build project done almost entirely by university-age aspiring architects, but also because it is in a stuggling area of town. Working on this project struck me because there were multiple times throughout the semester where we would be working on the project, tearing things down, building things up, and people on the streets would not only glance our way but would, stop, stare, point, and even ask questions. One woman said this was the first new thing she had seen in the area in 10 years. This showed me how much architecture, even small architecture, can mean to a community. We were tasked with turning an old gas station into a new community hub for Friday morning coffee and after-school activities. To do so, we had to rip out the old garage door and replace it an accessible and indentifying main entry. Although we all worked as a team on every aspect of the project, my main responsibility was designing and constructing the wooden window frames.


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SCOPE OF WORK Our task was to help our client turn this old gas station into a vibrant community center. To do this we set out to redesign the main entry, something the city could connect with.

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INITIAL DESIGN CONCEPTS We began by visiting the site several times, then drawing up concept after concept. The above is one of mine, illustrating the need for shading on the western facade as well as the concept of separating the frames of the louvers from those of the windows to improve work-flow.


INITIAL DESIGN CONCEPTS This concept illustrates the desire to include natural elements within the urban context, making the entrance appear more lively and welcoming.

INITIAL DESIGN CONCEPTS This concept shows a new way of considering glazing pieces. Because our glass was all to be donated, we had to work with existing shapes, making them fit for our design and making our design fit for the existing sizes.

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THE SEATING We did numerous studies of the seating around us to determine which styles best suited our purposes. We went through several iterations of our chosen style, comparing materiality, color, comfort, and scale.

53 |

THE WINDOW-WALL In addition to adapting our design to use entirely donated glass pieces, we designed and fabricated the reclaimed lumber mullions supporting the windows. This involed much detailed documentation and careful construction.

THE DOOR The door, like the window-wall, is also made of pieces of reclaimed lumber stiched together. The idea for the reclaimed lumber came


from an existing table at the station. Although reclaimed lumber is inexpensive, we certainly found ourselves paying for it in time and labor.

THE LOUVERS We tested various materials, levels of perforation, angles, structures, and shapes to land on our final product. All steel cutting and welding was done by members of our studio in our shop.

THE ENCLOSURE To give the station the identity it needed, we cut the name ‘Urban Station’ out of one of the panels of our steel shading structure. When the light shines through it, the name is reflected on the building itself.

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CITIZEN'S MEMORIAL |

57 |

During my internship at HMN Architects I spent a good deal of time working on the expansion of Citizen’s Memorial Hospital. This hospital, located in Missouri, needed to grow significantly to be able to support the growing population and needs of its location. They intended to add a brand new emergency department expansion and patient tower. In addition to working on schematic design and construction document phases, I also helped to design the facade of the building. The facade colors on the patient tower were inspired by the colors found in male peacock feathers, because across the street from the hospital many wild peacocks roam freely. Through many interactions, we worked through various design concepts to find one that best suited the aesthetic of the hospital and client.


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PERSONAL PROJECTS |

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In my free time I like to keep my mind active by drawing, building, and painting. The following are some of the works I’ve completed throuh the years. Some come from art classes taken just for fun, others come from “Ink-Tober” (the premise being to draw in ink every day during the month of October), and others were simply completed for fun or because I saw a need. I hope to always be able to use art and design to keep my skills sharp.


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| THANK YOU

Profile for Melissa Smith

Architectural Portfolio by Melissa Smith  

This is a collection of my work from my past three years at the University of Kansas, as well as my experience at internships and work produ...

Architectural Portfolio by Melissa Smith  

This is a collection of my work from my past three years at the University of Kansas, as well as my experience at internships and work produ...

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