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Melanie Viger Architecture Portfolio 2018


Table of Contents

Cirriculum Vitae 3 Photo Archive for Toronto 4 a romantic public space Grasshopper and Urbanity 20 an exercise in law Toronto’s Rail Deck Park 26 the absence of sound is critical to a sound sleep Urban Savannah 32 a grid communes with park land Photography 38 california and iceland


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Melanie Viger (647) 528-8436 melanie.viger@mail.utoronto.ca issuu.com/melanieviger

About

Research

I am an aspiring architect in who longs to build meaningful projects that enhance peoples’ lives and improve access to essential social services, education, health care and community networks. I am interested in working in underserved regions or areas recently affected by war fare or natural disaster in addition to working in my local region. I believe that architecture can empower people! My purpose is to prove it.

I have studied architecture’s role in memory, collective consciousness, monumentality, history, sense of place, and economics. Architecture is an irreplaceable part of identity. This is never truer than during a time of war and armed conflict in which architecture is destroyed or obliterated as a means of removing a people and their heritage. My specific areas of research include the destruction of Dubrovnik after the Serbian-led bombing in 1991, and Kosovo during the conflict of 1999.

Masters of Architecture, Ongoing

Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design, University of Toronto

Hon. B.A. in Architectural Studies, Design & Environmental Studies, 2016

Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design, University of Toronto

PROGRAM PROFICIENCY

Rhino, Grasshopper, V-ray, AutoCAD, InDesign, Illustrator, Photoshop

C U R R E N T TO P B O O K S

On Aggression by Konrad Lorenz Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari

E X T R A C U R R I C U L A R A C A D E M I C I N T E R E STS

Human and animal behaviour, psychology, neurobiology, effects of psychedelic drugs on brain plasticity, ecology, wilderness

Experience GRIT Lab

Research Assistant Vidya Anderson 647-502-6294 vidya.anderson@ontario.ca

summer 2017

P H I L I P B E E S L E Y A R C H I T E CT

February 2017

Reigo & Bauer Architects

summer 2016

Installation manufacture Gabriella Bevilacqua gbevilacqua@pbarch.ca

Personal Assistant Merike Bauer 416-533-3203 mail@reigoandbauer.com

G O O D F U Z Z K N I T W E A R C O M PA N Y Founder, Owner Melanie Viger

TO R O N TO H U M A N E S O C I E T Y Loving Volunteer

2017

2016 - present 3


Toronto Photo Archive: The Keep Comprehensive Studio // M. Arch II Instructor: Maria Denegri The City of Toronto Photo Archive is currently housed in a warehouse style building on the outskirts of the city, where photographs of Toronto over the last two centuries are stored in a climate controlled facility. To make Toronto’s history more accessible to the public, a “boutique” archive was conceived for the downtown core. This archive was to store fewer photos, but would engage the public through gallery exhibitions, lectures and events. The Keep is an introverted building, encouraging the movement of pedestrians around the block and into the embrace of the courtyard. The site is designed so that the courtyard welcomes visitors from Clarence Square park, and those coming from the street front may access the courtyard through a laneway off Spadina or along the stand of trees at the edge of the site on Front St. While the entrance from Clarence square is grand, the entrances from the street remain inconspicuous. The archive is an assembly of two primary volumetric masses which separate the public and private areas of the archive. A concrete bar extends along Front street, housing a café, auditorium and gallery space, while a perforated metal cube rises above the intersection of Front and Spadina. The concrete bar is open to the public and draws people into the building through the planted courtyard and café. The metal cube has restricted access as it contains the archive, labs and offices. The elevation of the metal cube gives the impression of inaccessibility to the public, similar to a keep within a fortress. Our design responds to the environment of the Front and Spadina intersection through its façade treatment and volumetric massing. The façade along Front St is 12m high pre-cast concrete panels, where the texture resembles tree trunks of species native to southern Ontario. The trees are lined up snugly against one another, like an impossibly dense forest, or a row of soldiers marching tightly in unison. Another element of our façade is the perforated metal panel wrapping around the archive volume on the corner of Front and Spadina. It’s height and location make it a beacon, or landmark, at this pedestrian heavy intersection. This volume is angled towards the future rail deck park (it’s optimistic about the future) and allows for views out of 49 Spadina’s south face. While the street-facing elements of our building have a confident and determined personality, the interior courtyard faces are softer, and carry 4

themselves with a quiet gracefulness. The glazed double height auditorium opens onto a café patio and welcomes the public to congregate on the concrete steps. The casual nature of the auditorium and planted courtyard draws people into the building from the surrounding park and pedestrian areas, and once people engage with the café and auditorium steps, they may wander into the gallery space and lobby of the archive, where a photo exhibition about Toronto’s heritage will be on display. The gallery occupies two levels, offering a flexible space for exhibits or events of various sizes; it is also a connective tissue between the public and privates areas of the building: on the west side of the gallery, the archives, labs and offices are housed within the metal volume.


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



(surrounded by towers) at Spadina and Front streets, with a heritage building at its Northwest corner

(the public block of the building) maintains an opaque & agressive street elevation, opening itself up only to the interior court





(the archive pivots at the corner) to allow light into, and views out of the

(sitting above the rest of the building) signifying elevated importance of program within

views of the future raildeck park from within

 (the archive volume weighs the building down) by one storey implying the gravity of program within. the resultant Spadina elevation is lower and more pedestrian friendly

 (sits between the towers to the south) and containing a large aperture, taking advantage of the small amount of sunlight reaching the site. intersection with the rest of the building implies integrated program,

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

                               

                               

                     

                    

      

      

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A

B feature stair A public space

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A

C private space


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LATERAL LOAD RESISTING SYSTEM A SHEAR WALLS FLANKING THE AUDITORIUM B ELEVATOR/FIRE STAIR CORE

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Auditorium Volume Detail sections 1:20

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The fins are tied to the W section that braces the metal cube. A thermal break is acheived through a fibreglass Schรถck connectio

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A Z-girt connects the belly metal panel to the fins. Since this passes thorugh insulation, a thermal break is acheived through a fibreglass Z-girt

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Transom windows allow for passive ventilation

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The concrete ledge and floor slab are connecte with rebar

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The OWSJs support corrugated metal deck topped with OSB Vapour barrier 100mm slag insulation Roofing membrane metal panel for ~style~

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Roofing assembly:

To acheive adequate stiffness for the 6m accordion doors, the top of the frame is braced with an HSS steel section with structural silicone bead

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The vertical mullions are structural steel

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Ball bearing detail for accordion doors

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Archive Volume, East side Detail sections 1:50

 flashing 

white stone ballast rooft membrane 2x90mm rigid insulation air/vapour barriers wood sheathing metal deck w-section beam

W-section beam

steel stud framing 13mm gypsum ceiling 13mm gypsum wallboard 250mm steel stud wall w/ batt insulation steel column behind 19mm sheathing air/vapour barriers 90mm rigid insulation thermally broken z-girt 25mm airspace 3mm steel cladding outriggers to z-girt 3mm perforated screen

 HSS column behind triple glazed curtain wall steel fastened to vertical mullions structural frame + 3mm perforated screen



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structural mullion to HSS column flashing 13mm gypsum wallboard steel stud wall w/ batt insulation 19mm sheathing air/vapour barriers 90mm rigid insulation roof membrane

metal deck on OWSJ 19mm sheathing air/vapour barrier 90mm rigid insulation roof membrane filter fabric growing medium


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Model photos top: sketch model illustrating contrasting material palette bottom: concrete panel facade resembles tree trunks, while the perforated metal screen shines above.

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Renders top: a view of the south facade, where the auditorium juts over the street. And a cafe! bottom: the accordion doors of the auditorium open onto the courtyard patio.

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Grasshopper & Urbanity Computing // M. Arch II Instructor: Ultan Byrne This project explored how a few simple parameters (laws) could influence how a collection of objects (buildings) are arranged within a boundary, and how their characteristics change in relation to the boundary. This is partly a study of zoning implications and bylaws and their effect on the form of the urban environment, and partly a study of architecture influencing urbanity (as the nature and feeling of urban space; as brewing a “citified� public; as urbanism taken to the extreme). Just as a few laws can have far-reaching and unexpected effects, and thus are under constant revision, formal restrictions on architecture can create unexpected (or unwanted) effects within an urban setting and can evolve with changing attitudes or desires of the public. There are two central parts to this imagined urban environment: landscape and building. The

landscape is contained within set site boundaries and is dictated to be hilly, where the height, intensity, density and breadth of the hills can be manipulated by a series of controls in Grasshopper. For example, the hills may be dense and mountainous in the centre of the site and peter out to gentle slopes near the boundary (where a sidewalk or access point may be imagined). The series of renders done for this project are set in a Martian wasteland, for fun. But, one can see how a small set of tyrannical rules would make for a stiff, unwelcoming, and alienating society–a dictatorship in which the architect is the ruler. The accompanying commentary reflects this sense of devestation when leftover architecture is the poetry of loss. The drama exhibited is representative of my wary regard for tech and coding in architecture as not only wondrous and amazing but also a force that distances us from our humanity.

16 buildings within this site boundary number of buildings assigned by type /.5 residential /.25 office /.25 commercial

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landscape parameter 02: hills are pushed away from site boundary, peaking at the centre of the site boundary

left: pixelation size decreases as proximity to site boundary -or- building footprint increases right: pixelation is homogeneous when no boundary is near building heights are randomized

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loping hills and a gentle breeze at twilight

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at the end of the earth

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didn’t you have crazy dreams as a child, where are they now

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Toronto’s Rail Deck Park SUPERSTUDIO // M. Arch II Coordinator: Richard Sommer Instructor: Petros Babasikas The site for the Toronto’s future Rail Deck Park is a dense urban area rich with the everday happenings of a lively city. For residents of the area, noise pollution is a persistent issue. For this charette, I propose: how can we design for sound in an urban setting? Instead of making aesthetics the main attraction, why not make comfort and sensorial experience a priority? The central tenets of this design are joy, spirituality, and wildness. Urban design made for both exploration and contemplation. Some areas are left unplanned, where paths may take shape or new uses may be found. Here, the colour-coded catalogue corresponds to hatches in the plan where each colour represents a sound-zone, from the hums and honks of the rush hour traffic on Bathurst and Spadina, to the muted zone of pedestrians transitioning into quieter spaces in which they can hear each other, to the near-silence of a sound-insulated space. Each of these zones carries

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with it so many variables—speed of transit, human agitation, number and variety of wildlife—but here the focus is merely on varying activities that can be plugged in, so to speak, to a grid that accommodates and celebrates a variety of experiences. We can imagine the rest: slowing down, hearing the water and trees move with the breeze, or wandering along a path to end up somewhere without an end, where one may pause. Or perhaps there is a gathering, or celebration. A great wall is formed in part from the shelter of the buildings themselves and in part by simple garden walls of varying height upon which to sit or peek over. Where the wall overlooks the railway, and along Front St, a two storey collonade in created. The function of the wall is to deflect and absorb sound, while providing different ways to interact with the site as a permeable threshold, look out, shelter, shade-provider, privacy screen, home for ivy vines or morning glory.


a trail may be paved, stones, gravel, or dirt

where two walls meet; enclaves

shell “ears�

automation, or the disembodied!

a copse of trees

a thing a sculpture a gathering

an amphitheatre, for fun

another entrance, but the other side (!)

a grotto in which to be lost

tulips, lupines, lavender

an entrance; transition

market!

a butterfly house, for beauty (and monarchs are in trouble)

a sea

a thing a sculpture a gathering

transit!

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Wellness centre // Butterfly House

Commercial

Silence

Hums and chats

Grass land

Offices // Institutional

Residential

Whispery Quiet

Hustle!

Wall of varying height


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Urban Savannah SUPERSTUDIO // M. Arch II Coordinator: Richard Sommer Instructor: Petros Babasikas A case study of early Savannah, Georgia was conducted to understand the implications of the gridded block formation structure of the city. The resulting urban fabric creates neighbourhood units contained by residential properties, while public life takes place within the neighbourhood centre. Commercial and public buildings surround a centre green space, some of which have survived in modern Savannah. Savannah’s rigid grid organization allows for avenues of transit that are unobstructed as they lead cargo, wares and people directly to the port on the Savannah River. Due to the tumultuous history of the region in the 18th and 19th centuries (the settling of the Americas and the Civil War), a fortified wall surrounded the city. Beyond the wall sprawled farm land owned by Savannah residents, a clear separation between rural and urban. In SUPERSTUDIO the Savannah grid is transposed to a Toronto site, where the relationship between the rural and urban is more permeable and accessible, while the neighbourhood unit remains intact.

Savannah in 1734. The settlement began as nine block units, or wards, which were replicated as the town grew. Savannah is strategically located along a major waterway, making it ideal for tranist of goods and people as well as military manoeuvres. Public domain archival image.

Residential Civic Commercial

left: The blocks were known as “wards” and usually named after a single landowner, public figure or military official. Main avenues were lined with residential properties while commerce took place mainly within the neighbourhood block. right: Savannah in the 18th century. The settlement was surrounded by a fortified wall, beyond which were parcels of farmland owned by residents. Transit arteries lead directly from farm land to the port on the Savannah River. 32


The Organizing Grid The grid is created from the alignment of the main streets on either side of the site. The fission in the middle occurrs where the opposing grids do not align. The grid is 30m x 30m. The site is anonymous, somewhere in Toronto.

The Block Formation Two block sizes are created from the grid. The smaller are mainly residential, similar to the original Savannah block, while the larger blocks are more heavily commercial and institutinal. The pedestrian reigns.

The Landscape A Grasshopper-generated landscape fills the rest of the site area. Hills and valleys create a rich landscape for exploring, cultivating, wandering, getting a bit lost, and contemplating the surrounding urban context. A path winds through the topography, looping and connecting the blocks to each other and the urban fabric.

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`

Here ye resides

Here ye performs commerce

Here ye performs civic duties

Here ye may work

Aye, a sweet refreshment // the watering hole

Designated bird nesting areas // the village green

Where you bled your knee as a child // hardscaping

Loping hills and a gentle breeze at sunset // oak pine park land White pine, black oak, black ash, honeylocust

A trail is sometimes unmarked

Setbacks // no construction within 10 m of rail 35 Retaining walls


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With photography I aim to convey the cinematic drama of the land while exploring the connotations imbued within place, and sense of place. Here are a few selected photographs from California, a memory, and Iceland, a mystery.

Three Rivers, CA Clovis, CA Montaña de Oro, CA Borgarbyggð, Iceland Buðir, Iceland Snæfellsjökull Glacier, Iceland Somewhere on the highway to Buðir

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Melanie Viger, aspiring architect melanie.viger@mail.utoronto.com 48

Melanie Viger, Architecture Portfolio 2018  
Melanie Viger, Architecture Portfolio 2018  
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