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FLOWER JULY/AUGUST 2019

HOUSE l GARDEN l LIFESTYLE

CHIC Summer Parties A COLORFUL CHARLESTON SOIRÉE

Julia Reed Celebrates New Orleans COCKTAILS OVER MANHATTAN


Contents JULY/AUGUST 2019

flowermag.com

features

38

PEONY PARTY

A Charleston hostess kicks off peony season with a fiesta in celebration of friendship and her favorite flower

46

LIVING PLEIN AIR

With a bamboo-lined courtyard, a dreamy reflecting pool, and the wife’s own massive floral paintings, an Australian couple builds a home that merges inside and out

54

ROOFTOP REVERIE

A globe-trotting couple find each other, then find the perfect place to call home

60

DELIGHT IN DERBYSHIRE

Within the drama of Peak District National Park, legendary estates such as Chatsworth and Haddon Hall lure visitors to Derbyshire in England’s storied midsection.

70

JULIA REED CELEBRATES

With a brand-new book and business venture to her name, the acclaimed author and consummate entertainer is spicing things up with a pinch of humor and a dash of style

“Just living isn’t enough,” said the butterfly. “One must also have sunshine, freedom, and a little flower.” –HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN

76

MASTERS OF THE MADCAP

PHOTO BY ANNA NAPHTALI

John Loecke and Jason Oliver Nixon throw a casual summer party at home, where the palette is as energetic as the hosts, and prints, patterns, and pound-rescue pups reign supreme

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Contents JULY/AUGUST 2019

ARRANGE

27

flowermag.com

ENTERTAIN

34

AT THE TABLE

88

FLOWER HOUSE l GARDEN l LIFESTYLE

CHIC Summer Parties A COLORFUL CHARLESTON SOIRÉE

Julia Reed Celebrates New Orleans COCKTAILS OVER MANHATTAN

In Bloom

Fresh Style

In Every Issue

11

27

6

34

84 86 88

BOOKS A bouquet of botanically inspired mocktails; a painter’s perspective on private gardens around the world

16

MARKET Bright, crisp viburnum green; pagoda-inspired decor ON THE COVER Gin cocktails and flowers from the garden welcome guests to a summer party at the home of Jason Oliver Nixon and John Loecke, of the design and lifestyle brand Madcap Cottage. Photographed by Anna Naphtali.

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22

MEET Reed McIlvaine of the event firm Renny & Reed discusses the fine art of entertaining

ARRANGE For arrangements in vintage pieces, Destiny Pinson takes cues from a client’s Frenchinspired New Orleans home ENTERTAIN The mood was magic for an alfresco dinner in a rustic retooled potting shed in St. Simons Island, Georgia

WATERING CAN Thoughts from our editor-in-chief EVENTS SOURCES

AT THE TABLE A fresh take on chinoiserie

PHOTOS BY (LEFT TO RIGHT) SARA ESSEX BRADLEY, SUSAN SULLY, AND JEAN ALLSOPP

departments


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WATERING CAN

book events

—JAMES TAYLOR I’VE BEEN OUT OF SCHOOL FOR

almost 40 years, and I work year-round, yet I still perceive summertime as a season of respite and recreation, possessing a sense of leisure (real or imagined) that inspires the host or hostess in us all. Whether it’s the traditional Fourth of July gathering around the pool with barbecue and fireworks or an impromptu cold supper with neighbors on a Sunday evening, summer spells a slower pace, allowing for an ease of entertaining and gracious living that makes life richer and feeds our souls. For some inspiration along these lines: Julia Reed invites us to a deeply Southern supper at the

home of New Orleans friend Patrick Dunne—decorator and culinary antiques aficionado—then takes us on a culinary tour of her town, New Orleans. Next, there’s a fresh and frothy party with the Madcap Cottage boys starring their irresistible rescue pugs and featuring haute/humble wildflower arrangements in their kaleidoscopic house in High Point, North Carolina. Next Charleston, South Carolina, plays host to an alfresco feast featuring peonies of every stripe and dinner table details that dazzle. To top off our entertaining extravaganza, we’re “up on the roof” for a New York garden party high above the honking taxis and steamy sidewalks, hosted by jewelry power couple Gurhan and Fiona Tilley. Wherever you are and whatever you do this summer, we hope you gather and celebrate and try some new tricks gleaned from these pages.

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Book Hampton July 2 ATLANTA, GEORGIA

Ballard Designs July 10

AmericasMart July 11

ADAC in Bloom July 17 NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS

Nantucket By Design August 3 NEW YORK, NEW YORK

SDG,

NY NOW August 13

Margot Shaw

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Birmingham Botanical Gardens

Please send your comments, triumphs, challenges & questions to: wateringcan@flowermag.com or Letters to the Editor Flower magazine P.O. Box 530645 Birmingham, AL 35253

EAST HAMPTON, NEW YORK

August 28

Follow us Order your book at flowermagshop.com Get the Flower email newsletter! Sign up at flowermag.com/news

205-970-9775

PORTRAIT BY BETH HONTZAS. BOOK COVER PHOTO BY TRIA GIOVAN

“Summer’s here, I’m for that Got my rubber sandals Got my straw hat . . . It’s my favorite time of the year And I’m glad that it’s here.”


VOLUME 13, ISSUE 4

Margot Shaw FOUNDER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Alice Welsh Doyle MANAGING EDITOR Ellen S. Padgett CREATIVE DIRECTOR Amanda Smith Fowler STYLE EDITOR Kirk Reed Forrester ASSOCIATE EDITOR Kate Johnson PRODUCTION/COPY EDITOR Gregory Keyes INTEGRATED OPERATIONS MANAGER EDITOR-AT-LARGE

Karen Carroll CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Courtney Barnes Abby Braswell Marion Laffey Fox Tara Guérard Frances MacDougall Tovah Martin

Cathy Still McGowin Charlotte Moss Troy Rhone Matthew Robbins Margaret Zainey Roux Lydia Somerville

For editorial inquiries: editorial@flowermag.com

Julie Durkee PUBLISHER Jennel O’Brien DIRECTOR OF MARKETING Jessica Cohen MARKETING MANAGER Meme Everette INTERN ADVERTISING ACCOUNT MANAGERS

Kevin Blechman Wendy Ellis Sara D. Taylor For sales inquiries: sales@flowermag.com FLOWERMAG.COM

Terri Robertson DIGITAL MEDIA MANAGER BUSINESS OFFICE

Silvia Rider GENERAL MANAGER Patrick Toomey ACCOUNTANT Lisa Mitchell SENIOR MANAGER CUSTOMER SERVICE

For change of address and subscription inquiries: 877.400.3074 or flower@emailcustomerservice.com ADVISORY BOARD

Paula Crockard Winn Crockard Gavin Duke Gay Estes Katie Baker Lasker Maloy Love Mary Evelyn McKee Michael Mundy

Ben Page Angèle Parlange Renny Reynolds Scott Shepherd Remco van Vliet Evie Vare Carleton Varney Louise Wrinkle


In Bloom BOOKS

I

MARKET

I

MEET

From Garden To Glass

PHOTO COURTESY OF UNIVERSAL PUBLISHING. © FROM GARDEN TO GLASS: 80 BOTANICAL BEVERAGES MADE FROM THE FINEST FRUITS, CORDIALS, AND INFUSIONS BY DAVID HURST (UNIVERSE PUBLISHING, 2019)

A new book of botanically inspired drinks puts the moxie back in mocktails

“In addition to tasting magnif­ icent, [these drinks] are full of vitamins and other natural health benefits,” writes author and mixologist David Hurst.

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

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IN BLOOM

I books

CLOCKWISE FROM RIGHT:

W

HO AMONG US hasn’t sidled up to a bar at some point

in time during a pregnancy, before a big race, or simply in a stretch of clean living and asked the bartender, in a voice mixed with hope and hesitation, “Do you by chance have a mocktail?” (Well, we may not have used that word exactly, but you know what I mean.) Now, the lazy or unimaginative bartender will demur and slide over a sweaty club soda with a sad little anemic lime floating on top. But in this moment, the intrepid bartender sees opportunity and will answer the call to surprise and delight. Such a bartender is British drinks master David Hurst. “In my experience, creating well-balanced and tasty virgin cocktails has always taken far more ingenuity,” writes Hurst. “Nonalcoholic drinks have nothing to hide behind.” Here Hurst has some experience. For the 2012 London Olympics, he created 200 nonalcoholic cocktails to represent every participating country. In his new book, From Garden to Glass: 80 Botanical Beverages Made From the Finest Fruits, Cordials, and Infusions (Universe Publishing, 2019), Hurst continues to push for a more expansive view of what a drinks menu can be. His latest gives the bar’s normal cast of supporting actors a chance to shine and mixes in fruits, herbs, and spices to achieve absolutely sublime sipping. –Kirk Reed Forrester

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TROPICAL SPARKLE 3¼ ounces pineapple juice ¾ ounce lemon juice Juice from 1 lime wedge 3¼ ounces tonic water Pineapple wedge and leaf, to garnish 1. Pour the pineapple and lemon juices into

an ice-filled cocktail shaker. Squeeze in a little lime. Shake well. 2. Strain into an ice-filled highball glass. Top with tonic water. 3. Garnish with a pineapple wedge on the rim of the glass and float a leaf on the top of the drink. Add a twist

A shot of coconut rum is a great choice to pair with the pineapple flavor of this drink.

PHOTOS BY (CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT) SHUSTIKOVA INESSA/SHUTTERSTOCK, ZIA SHUSHA/SHUTTERSTOCK, AND WESTEND61/GETTY IMAGES

A tray full of Tropical Sparkles look as good as they taste (recipe below) • An enticing array of Hurst’s concoctions, displayed in the garden • Glasses of Soda Daisy, a drink made with tonic, grenadine, lemon juice and soda, look festive with a strawberry garnish.


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IN BLOOM

I books

Into the Garden

O CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT:

Lunuganga, Bentota, Sri Lanka, 1992, gouache on paper, 21 x 27 inches, private collection • Tim and Christian’s Garden, Whalebone Cove, CT, 1992, gouache on paper, 14 x 11 inches, private collection • Kandy Botanical Gardens, Sri Lanka, 1991, gouache on paper, 14 x 11 inches, private collection

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VER THE LAST THREE DECADES,

artist Christian PeltenburgBrechneff has traveled the world going into private gardens with his canvas and brushes to paint what he sees. The act conjures thoughts of Monet in Giverny, working on his water lilies, though Brechneff’s style is more in line with van Gogh’s with his intense, vibrant use of line and color. Indeed designer Bunny Williams writes in the book’s foreword that when the artist was in Williams’s own garden painting, she “sometimes felt that Vincent van Gogh was looking over his shoulder and waving approval.” The most recent culmination of the artist’s travels is a new book, Into the Garden (G Arts, 2019), a collection of paintings from 28 gardens ranging from Sri Lanka and Greece to more local destinations like California and

Connecticut (where the painter has a home). While a botanist’s high-resolution camera could perhaps better capture the anatomy of a garden, and a landscape architect’s site drawings could more readily convey the overall design, what Peltenburg-Brechneff offers in his paintings is the experience of being in gardens—the texture, style, and mood of each place. On the Caribbean island of St. Martin, a garden set against distant aubergine mountains and a deep-blue ocean feels meditative and mysterious. In a Venetian courtyard, plants grow greedily and furiously in a decadent pile as if to keep from drowning. There’s a confident playfulness on display throughout, like watching a jazz pianist let loose on a keyboard. Readers will hope the artist isn’t finished going out on the road and into the garden just yet. –Kirk Reed Forrester For more information, see Sources, page 86

FROM INTO THE GARDEN BY CHRISTIAN PELTENBURG-BRECHNEFF COPYRIGHT © 2019, PUBLISHED BY G ARTS WWW.GLITTERATIEDITIONS.COM

In his new book, celebrated painter Christian Peltenburg-Brechneff offers his unique perspective of private gardens around the world


IN BLOOM

I market 1 3

2

OUR VIEWS ON HUES

Viburnum GREEN

3

Use this bright, crisp green to cool off during the dog days of summer

4

1. Belle de Nuit two-light wall sconce ($1,650) by Lladrรณ, lladro.com. 2. Annie Sloan with Charleston decorative paint set in Firle ($45), anniesloan.com. 3. Ikebana teacup ($56) by Medard de Noblat through DeVine Corporation, devinecorp.net for retailers. 4. Remy leather chair ($3,750) by CR Laine, crlaine.com. 5. Dew Drop stackable ring in peridot ($275) by Anzie, anzie.com. 6. Kimberly bench by Jan Showers for Kravet Furniture, kravet.com. 7. Granada planters (small $34, medium $49, large $73) by Campo de Fiori, campodefiori.com.

SHORT-LIVED SHADE The blooms on Chinese snowball viburnum start out lime green in spring before they turn white.

5 7

6

Produced by AMANDA SMITH FOWLER 16 |

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FLSOHWER OP •

••

•••

GARDENIAS FOR ANY OCCASION BY HIGH CAMP Cut-to-order gardenias shipped overnight directly from High Camp’s Farm on the California coast, the perfect gift, available year-round.

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IN BLOOM

I market 9

8

8. Clara Williams faceted peridot necklace ($1,995) with Italian glass Black Horses centerpiece (reversible to mother-of-pearl; $1,795), clarawilliams.com. 9. Vietri Artichokes green figural platter ($149), vietri.com. 10. Medium Graphic Green + White basket ($62) by

VIBRANT AND VERSATILE This green is one of nature’s neutrals and pairs beautifully with a variety of color schemes.

10

Mbare Home + Gift, mbare.com. 11. Sagano teapot ($687) by Pinto Paris through DeVine Corporation, devinecorp.net

11

for retailers. 12. Curated Bennett ottoman by Universal Furniture, universalfurniture.com. 13. Wrap object by SkLO, sklo.com. 14. 3853-01 chair in Marco Kiwi by LEE Industries, leeindustries. com. 15. Lettuce Ware candlesticks ($228/set of 2) by Dodie Thayer for Tory Burch, toryburch.com.

15

12

14

13

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E V E RY T R E E N E E D S A C H A M P I O N .


IN BLOOM

I market LEVELS OF MEANING Japanese pagodas often have five stories representing the five elements: earth, water, fire, wind, and air

1

8

7 6

HOT MOTIF

PAGODA This classic shape creates balance with its graceful repetition while adding dimension 1. L’Objet Pagoda place card holders ($250/set of 6), l-objet.com. 2. Embroidered Pagoda napkins ($59) from Ballard Designs,

2

ballarddesigns.com. 3. Taylor King Belgravia chair ($2,835), taylorking.com. 4. Mirror by Barclay Butera from Mirror Image Home, mirrorimagehome.com. 5. Alexa Pulitzer Pagoda stationery ($15/10 cards and envelopes), alexapulitzer.com. 6. Mottahedeh painted porcelain tulipières ($5,800/pair) from Chairish, chairish.com. 7. Fromental Singerie fabric in Barbary, fromental.co.uk. 8. Paloma Contreras Lyford Gold lantern ($1,095) for Williams Sonoma Home, williams-sonoma.com.

3 4

5

For bonus market picks, see Sources, page 86

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ONLY A CLICK AWAY

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Trending on flowermag.com— James Farmer

EVERYTHING YOU LOVE ABOUT FLOWER AND MORE AT YOUR FINGERTIPS—ANY TIME, ANY PLACE FLOWERMAG.COM

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IN BLOOM

I meet

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: A dramatic

The Man with the Plan

Reed McIlvaine, owner of the high-octane event firm Renny & Reed, discusses the fine art of entertaining and how he stays calm in a storm By KIRK REED FORRESTER

Flower: Reed, the last time you were in this magazine was 10 years ago! You joined your uncle [famous New York florist Renny Reynolds] in 2000, creating the firm Renny & Reed. You’ve been at the helm since 2004. Catch us up on what’s new. Reed McIlvaine: It’s been very busy! We’re currently celebrating our 10th year in the South Florida market and we’re busier than ever down here. The New York shop [which sells retail flowers and handles events] has basically been staying strong, while the Florida market [a retail store and Florida events arm] has been on a steady incline. What did the shift toward Florida mean for you personally? Until fairly 22 |

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recently my family had been living in Bedford, New York, where my wife and I were raising our two boys. But as our Florida office grew, I was going down for more and more meetings, and after a bunch of years of doing that, we decided to make a move down here in 2016. My boys are now 13 and 15, and we absolutely love it. My youngest is addicted to surfing, and we all love how the weather allows us to be in the boat and on the water year-round. What do you like best about producing events? Fortunately, I love the process, which is good because most

PHOTOS BY JULIE SKARRATT (TOP RIGHT) AND JOSE VILLA

arrangement with peonies by Renny & Reed • McIlvaine putting on the finishing touches before a party • A place setting at a recent party


IN BLOOM

I meet

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Floral flamingos add a jolt of color and a dash of

whimsy to a beachside soirée. • Tables strike a festive mood with fanciful arrangements of faux palm. • McIlvaine believes candles set the tone, as seen here leading into a garden courtyard. 24 |

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of the time is spent on the process. But my favorite parts are the very beginning and the very end. Talk more about that. The beginning is the creative part where I’ve met with the client and am brainstorming with our creative director. There’s a sense of excitement when an idea starts to click. And at the tail end, it’s when our team has lit the very last candle in a hotel ballroom and a server comes up to me and says, “I’ve worked here for 30 years and I’ve never seen it look this good.” Having produced so many events over so many years, you must have your share of crazy stories. We’ve experienced it all, and we always have a Plan B (and usually even a C and D). I always tell our team there’s a reason we’re so prepared with our proposal. Then we have extra bandwidth when the curveballs come. Most memorable curveballs? It’s not often I have to deal with erupting volcanoes, but in the spring of 2010, we were working on a large wedding on Jupiter Island [Florida], and days before the wedding, news came that a volcano in Iceland had erupted, and the smoke was causing all flights from Europe to be canceled. All our flowers were being flown over from Europe, so we had to scramble to get flowers from other suppliers.

PHOTOS BY (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) REED MCILVAINE, KRYSTAL ZASKEY, AND PATRICIA LYONS

“When we were setting up in the tent for the wedding of Warren Buffett’s grandson near Omaha, we had to evacuate because baseball-sized hail was raining down from the sky.” —REED MCILVAINE


CLOCKWISE FROM FAR LEFT:

PHOTOS BY (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) KRYSTAL ZASKEY, CHRISTIAN OTH, JOSE VILLA, AND CHRISTIAN OATH

Baskets of yellow roses, daffodils, and citrus mix cheerfully with similarly hued glasses and linens at a recent party. • After the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, McIlvaine noticed a heightened desire for lush floral arches of flowers. • A gigantic pineapple of sunflowers and palms. • Whether in New York or South Florida, Renny & Reed is the go-to for top-tier event design.

I’m sure that wasn’t the only story where Mother Nature played the role of the spoiler. Right. Once when we were setting up in the tent for the wedding of Warren Buffett’s grandson near Omaha, we had to evacuate because baseball-sized hail was raining down from the sky. And I’ll never forget smiling to a mother of the bride as she got her hair done in Greenwich [Connecticut] when she asked how everything was coming along at the Belle Haven Club. I told her it was beautiful. In reality, the police had just given evacuation notices as Hurricane Irene was approaching. We moved the dinner from a tent outside to the ballroom inside, the party was magical, and everyone got home safely before Hurricane Irene showed up. I’m exhausted just listening to all that! I think of challenges as a natural part of a big production. No time to panic. Stay calm and problem-solve. This is our entertaining issue, and since you’re an entertaining expert, give us some insight. What do you think makes a party successful? It really is remembering the basics. Have lights on a dimmer, play great music, hand guests a drink as soon as they walk in the door, try to anticipate where people will have the best opportunity to talk. And candles. Candles everywhere! For more information, see Sources, page 86

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N E W! From

R I Z ZO

LIVING FLORAL

LI

NEW Y ORK

Entertaining and Decorating with Flowers

MARGOT SHAW Editor-in-Chief of Flower magazine Foreword by Charlotte Moss

ORDE R YO UR BOOK TODAY

f l ower m a gs h o p.co m


Fresh Style ARRANGE

I

ENTERTAIN

Produced by ALICE WELSH DOYLE

Photography by SARA ESSEX BRADLEY

Destiny Pinson

{of Doris Ione} The New Orleans floral designer loves making arrangements in antique and vintage containers, from the modest to the grand. She created several summer standouts using a favorite client’s home as a beautiful backdrop J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

| 27


FRESH STYLE

I arrange

Destiny’s inspiration I use a lot of whites and greens along with fresh herbs during summertime because they are so refreshing, but here I included coral pinks as well to add a cheerful note. I was also inspired by my client’s home, which is so elegant but with some unique and unexpected touches. These colors add to the ambience of the rooms without taking away from their muted, French attitude. Turn the page for step-by-step instructions. >

MATERIALS

Foraged greenery Mint sprigs ‘Coral Charm’ peonies ‘Clooney’ ranunculus David Austin ‘Patience’ roses

MATERIALS

Viburnum Mint Rosemary White ranunculus Pink ‘Clooney’ ranunculus Flannel flower

MATERIALS

Foraged greenery Mint White ranunculus Flannel flower David Austin ‘Patience’ roses White tulips Pink ‘Clooney’ ranunculus Rosemary

‘Ivory Bells’ fritillaria ‘Honeymoon’ tulip White tulips Flannel flower Viburnum Jasmine


MATERIALS

‘Coral Charm’ peonies Viburnum White tulips White ranunculus David Austin ‘Patience’ roses Foraged greenery Rosemary White roses


FRESH STYLE

I arrange

STEPS

3|

Add trimmed sprigs of mint throughout. They add texture and fragrance to the arrangement. Put some pieces on the sides, and then let others dance a little higher on top.

1|

Don’t shy away from a shallow container! Simply wad up a large piece of chicken wire and make a mound for the bottom (overlap the wire about three times). Then use florist tape to secure the wire, and add water.

4|

It’s time for the wow-factor flowers! The ‘Coral Charm’ peonies make such a statement that you only need a few. Use ones that are fully or almost fully opened. Place a pair close together for a strong impact.

5|

Add to the wow with pink ‘Clooney’ ranunculus. Place about five throughout, and keep the stems a little longer than the peonies for more movement in the arrangement.

It’s time for the wow-factor flowers! The ‘Coral Charm’ peonies make such a statement that you only need a few. —DESTINY PINSON

2|

Choose any greenery you have on hand to create the base for the arrangement. Keep adding pieces until you have covered the chicken wire completely. Put the pieces in at varying angles, making sure to have some drape over the edge of the bowl. 30 |

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6|

These David Austin ‘Patience’ roses have such wonderful open faces. Remove the leaves, trim, and add throughout, some lower and some more on top of the arrangement.


FRESH STYLE

I arrange

9|

Add floater flowers for an airy look. Group them at various heights on one side of the arrangement. These are flannel flowers, but if you can’t find those, other options are scabiosa, anemones, and lisianthus.

10 |

Fluffy viburnum helps to fill in any holes and adds texture. Cut the stems short, and place all through the arrangement.

11 |

Tuck fragrant pieces of jasmine along the edge, so they drape over the side for additional movement.

7|

More green hues come in with the fritillaria, which drapes nicely. Cluster them low and on one side of the arrangement for an asymmetric look.

8|

This ‘Honeymoon’ tulip is so lovely that even just one creates a moment in the arrangement. Give it a prominent place in the design.

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12 |

Finally, add a few white tulips. Pull the petals back to give them a more open look, and place them in a cluster to one side at the edge of the container so they hang down. For more information, see Sources, page 86


p resents

in bloom

JEFFREY BILHUBER INTERIOR DESIGN NEW YORK, NY

ERIC SMITH

ARCHITECT NEW YORK, NY

MARK SIKES

ENTERTAINING & DESIGN LOS ANGELES, CA

HOLLY CARLISLE FLORAL DESIGN BIRMINGHAM, AL

Designers to Watch Panel SALLY KING BENEDICT ARTIST

CANAAN MARSHALL FLORAL DESIGN

JENNY KEENAN

INTERIOR DESIGN

Join us for a day of style and design with lectures, book signings, floral demonstrations & more

JULY 17

Plus Pop-Up Shops

9:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. • Atlanta Decorative Arts Center Open to the public. Register at flowermag.com/adac sponsored by


FRESH STYLE

I entertain TOP: For this breezy guesthouse in St.

Simons Island, Georgia, architect John Shackelford combined West Indian elements such as a deep veranda with lattice columns and vernacular Coastal Georgia style. BOTTOM: Built of reclaimed brick, the adjoining potting shed resembles the ruins of an antique carriage house.

Island Folly

When friends hosted dinner in a rustic potting shed with twilight views of the marsh and an extravagant table, the mood was magic Written and photographed by SUSAN SULLY

M

IDSUMMER’S EVE has long

been a time for savoring the season’s bounty while celebrating the longest day of the year. For St. Simons Island, Georgia, residents Judy and Jack Powell, the date also happened to coincide with the completion of their new guesthouse and potting shed. “I thought it would be fun to mark the occasion by inviting guests over for drinks on the porch and then surprise them by serving dinner in the shed,” Judy said. A garden folly as well as a functional structure, the Powells’ shed looks inviting from the start. “When you drive up to the property, it resembles a carriage house,” says architect John Shackelford, whose inspiration for the design came from early Coastal Georgia architecture. Like a carriage house, the shed has an aligned pair of wide openings equipped with strap-hinge doors and windows with wrought-iron grates. Walls of reclaimed local brick, thickly slathered mortar, and tabby hark back to the handmade materials coastal settlers used for their houses and dependencies. Only the skylight hints of modern design. Neither architect nor client envisioned the shed as an entertaining destination, but its location steps away from the guesthouse kitchen, view of the marsh, and 34 |

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FRESH STYLE

I entertain THIS PAGE: With philodendron-leaf

place mats, candlesticks shaped like palm trees, and plates with garden motifs, the table reflects the lush natural setting. Old baskets, terra-cotta pots, tabby walls encrusted with crushed shell, and the wood top of a vintage architect’s desk add character.

The garden is always an invitation to come and enjoy. It asks nothing of us but time to contemplate the beauty that is all around us in this world. It represents someone’s editing of nature, so that what is left is a refinement of the gardener’s choosing, a singular vision which the visitor is invited to share. —PARTY CO-HOST LINDA HEAGY cross-ventilation make it ideal for the purpose. It was Judy’s co-host, Linda Heagy, who came up with the idea of serving the dinner there. “With long sunsets and breezy evenings, the sea islands are ideal for dining outdoors,” observes Linda, who frequently hosts parties on her wide porch in neighboring Sea Island. “When you set a table outdoors, it’s pleasing to make it unexpectedly elegant, with silver, crystal, and china, but also to echo your natural surroundings.” The magical midsummer table setting began with place mats of philodendron leaves cut from the garden and laid directly on the wood surface of an old worktable. Their natural color contrasts with the shimmering bronze-doré trunks of palm tree–shaped candlesticks. Chargers and plates with pink-and-green borders of flowers and foliage echo the colors and shapes of informally massed arrangements of hydrangea, lotus, and snapdragons. “Combining indoor luxuries with a touch of the rustic and the gifts of nature is one of the best presents you can give your guests,” says Judy, whose plans for her shed have expanded beyond nursing houseplants and overwintering orchids. “There really isn’t any better dinner music than the sounds of swimming dolphins and the wind in the oaks.” To see more entertaining and decorating ideas, preorder a copy of Susan Sully’s Southern Hospitality at Home: The Art of Gracious Living (Rizzoli New York, 2019; publication date September 17, 2019). 36 |

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For more information, see Sources, page 86


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A Charleston hostess kicks off peony season with a fiesta in celebration of friendship and her favorite flower

PEONY PARTY

I


By MARGARET ZAINEY ROUX Photography by GAYLE BROOKER

I

IT ALL BEGAN WITH A DOG-EARED PAGE IN A

design book. A well-known Charleston hostess had admired the elegant garden party pictured, so she approached event designers Mary Ruth Miller and Heather Barrie of Gathering Events to help her host a party of her own. She didn't necessarily have a special occasion, holiday, or milestone, but she didn’t need one. Her gorgeous and meticulously tended garden was cause enough for celebration. Designed in 1947 in the style of renowned American landscape architect Loutrel Briggs,

ABOVE: Mary Ruth

the garden is a hybrid of European and Southern styles. The formal bed lines, lush shape, and balanced plantings of mature camellias, holly ferns, and agapanthus create cocoon-like privacy in the heart of Charleston’s historic district. At the center of the garden, a carpet of grass lays the foundation for alfresco fun. For the past 10 years, family and close friends have flocked to the urban oasis to kick off peony season in style. The name Peony Party was coined for the gathering of 60 as a nod to the hostess’ passion for the luscious blooms she

Miller (left) and Heather Barrie (center) of Gathering Events with the hostess. OPPOSITE: Miller designed arrangements for the indoor spaces too. This one contains ‘Coral Charm’ peonies, ranunculus, godetia, dichelostemma ‘Red Princess,’ huckleberry, holly fern, and philodendron.


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: The invitations

set the tone with pink calligraphy. • Margaritas and tequila shots with sangrita chasers • Guests in fiestainspired attire • Goat cheese and mushroom quesadillas OPPOSITE: A eye-catching array of fresh flowers and fruit leads guests to a table where maracas are labeled with seat assignments.

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grows at her country house in Maine. Since its inception, the décor, palette, and menu have been driven by exotic cultures. This year, inspired by their client’s recent trip to Mexico, Miller and Barrie conceived a sophisticated fiesta to celebrate the country’s bright colors and bold flavors. “Our goal was to create an intimate evening steeped in Spanish Colonial elegance,” Barrie says. “We achieved this by creating a setting that recalled the rustic romance found along the cobblestone streets of San Miguel de Allende versus the crowded beaches of Cancún. Instead of the usual go-tos, like ponchos,

piñatas, and paper flowers in primary colors, we incorporated artisan-made elements and fresh flowers and foliage in neutral tones and warm pastels that subtly evoke Mexican flair. From there, everything else seemed to fall perfectly into place.” At the start of the evening, wide-eyed guests were lured through a wrought iron garden gate by the sultry rhythm of classical Latin guitar music and tempting craft cocktails and hors d’oeuvres passed by servers wearing crisp white guayabera shirts and embroidered blouses. At dinnertime, instead of traditional


“The warm flicker of candlelight combined with layers of texture, mellow flavors add up to far more than just a pretty party. Together, they


music, sweet floral fragrances, and spicy create a complete sensory experience.” —EVENT DESIGNER MARY RUTH MILLER

ABOVE: Two varieties of plantains make a delicious table accent. BELOW: Handmade

Mexican fans with raffia tassels feature table numbers in peony-pink calligraphy. LEFT: Mature trees and lush greenery envelop the garden to impart a sense of intimacy and enchantment.

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“The neutral backdrop kept all eyes on the colorful peonies. After all, they’re the guests of honor.” —EVENT DESIGNER HEATHER BARRIE


escort cards, guests were given wooden maracas with copper tags directing them to tables marked with numbered paper fans handmade in Mexico. Natural oak farm tables and round skirted tables with crocheted overlays were set with gold-toned flatware, shimmery clear glass goblets, white porcelain plates, and fringed apricot napkins. Humble terra-cotta pots held a festive mix of parrot tulips, ranunculus, gloriosa lilies, asclepias ‘Beatrix,’ hellebores, viburnum and, of course, peonies. The feature flower was represented in nearly every variety, including ‘Command For more information, see Sources, page 86

Performance,’ ‘Coral Sunset,’ ‘Odile,’ ‘Paula Fay,’ ‘Pink Hawaiian Coral,’ and ‘Red Charm.’ “One of the things we love most about working with this client is that she truly trusts our vision,” Miller says. “Others might have snubbed the idea of using common terra-cotta garden pots for such extravagant arrangements, but she embraced it. The simplicity of the container and the complex mix of textures, colors, and forms of the flowers that spilled out of them presented a beautiful juxtaposition along with the rustic and refined styles and natural and luxe finishes we incorporated throughout the décor.”

Party guests dine on Latin-fusion fare beneath a canopy of antiqued mirror stars. OPPOSITE: Miller and Barrie love to mix metals, such as lustrous gold flatware, hammered copper napkin rings, and mercury glass votive holders.

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living PLEIN AIR With a bamboo-lined courtyard, a dreamy reflecting pool, and the wife’s own massive floral paintings, an Australian couple builds a home that merges inside and out By KAREN COTTON Photography by SIMON KENNY/LIVING INSIDE


Oversize sofas upholstered in Belgian linen are topped with cushions made by Marcella Kaspar from Japanese obi cloth and Indian silk saris. The painting by Kaspar, titled A Thousand Secrets, is oil on linen. OPPOSITE: The artist in her light-filled studio


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w

WHEN LOOKING FOR PROPERTY NEAR COOGEE,

ABOVE: With the

openness of the spaces, light is reflected back into the house. Neutral tones were used throughout to balance Kaspar’s strong artworks. RIGHT: A piece from Kaspar’s extensive collection of glass LEFT: The main living room is flanked by dual courtyards—on one side, the pool and lovely gnarly old frangipani, and on the other, a pond and garden planted with black bamboo.

Australia, Marcella Kaspar and her husband, Mark Cooper, had an advantage—she’s an artist and he’s a designer, so they could look beyond the obvious. “I grew up in Coogee not far from this property,” says Kaspar. “We were really lucky no one else besides us seemed that interested in it. We absolutely loved it and we could see the potential.” Working as a team, Kaspar and Cooper created a beautiful, unique new home based on the premise of five-star resort living. “We love the concept of the indoor and outdoor areas merging, so the house was oriented around a central courtyard with a pool,” says Kaspar. “This means the house is always cool in summer, and we enjoy the wonderful play of light as reflections from the water move through the interior spaces.”


“I am inspired by the colors and tones of flowers, especially peonies, and the colors of the house were inspired by the large painting I had in mind for the living room.” —MARCELLA KASPAR

ABOVE: The charcoal-

colored stucco finish was mixed to Kaspar’s specifications. The round marble-topped table was bought many years ago in Indonesia. The artist added green crystal drops to the vintage chandelier. RIGHT: The pendant light is by New Zealand designer David Trubridge. The kitchen table was originally an old Chinese door.

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Both work from home, so they wanted to create a space that is beautiful and inspirational. Having renovated previously, Kaspar and Cooper knew what they wanted in this house and were no-fuss in their approach. Clever design incorporates cross-ventilation as well as an open floor plan centered around a courtyard. Walls and floors were treated as canvases for Kaspar’s striking and dramatic artworks and the couple’s collection of eclectic furniture and decorative pieces. “One of the most important factors in designing the house was to make sure we had large walls to feature my artworks. We wanted to make sure that we could see the flower paintings from all different angles and from different areas,” says Kaspar. “It was important to include the colors of nature that show up in my largescale flower paintings. The couple chose rough-hewn granite tiles for the floors throughout the house and granite with a honed finish for the kitchen counter and backsplash. Walls were painted in cocooning charcoal tones, while a wax finish was used on the ceilings. Working with color every day in her work, Kaspar had the paint colors mixed to her specifications and loves the idea that they are unique to the space. “It’s also a great house for entertaining,” she adds. I especially love the house at night with candles and dimmed lighting and with the pool lit up.” Born in Prague, where she lived until she was 10 before moving to Australia, Kaspar admits to having a passion for vintage crystal and fine glass inspired by her grandparents and their extensive


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT:

“I love every part of the house and the different vignettes you get throughout,” says Kaspar. • Basil in a vintage glass container • Etched wineglasses in beautiful hues sit ready for guests. • Lounging mats receive shade from the abundant black bamboo. • “We love living amongst the courtyard gardens, and the elements of water and privacy are an essential part of the design,” says Kaspar. • Watery reflections create a magical effect against a wall. • A collection of green vintage glass vessels • A basket of brushes in Kaspar’s studio


collection. In her own home, colorful vintage glasses, Portuguese wine-bottle lamps, and decorative crystal chandeliers mingle with more contemporary timber-veneer pendant lights by New Zealand designer David Trubridge. Oversize sofas covered in Belgian linen are filled with throw pillows made by Kaspar from vintage Japanese obi cloth and Varanasi saris found on her travels. Perhaps the most prized possession is the 100-year-old frangipani tree that cost the couple a small fortune to have transported and craned onto the site after Cooper saw it while driving past an abandoned block in the southern suburbs. It took four men to dig it up and a year of tender loving care to see it get through the move and back to full health. Now the tree, like the home’s other inhabitants, enjoys the sublime serenity of courtyard living. CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: A Bernabei Freeman lace pendant hangs above the freestanding bath. • “We designed the house for privacy and inclusiveness,” says Kaspar. • A mother-of-pearl inlay chest of drawers is topped with small paintings by Kaspar in matching frames; the painting behind was a gift.

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“We love living amongst the courtyard gardens, and the elements of water and privacy are an essential part of the design.” —MARCELLA KASPAR

Kaspar’s Out of the Darkness painting hangs above the bed, where Chilli the Burmese cat enjoys the sun that filters through the French doors. The lamps are made from vintage Portuguese wine bottles, and the bedside tables are antique Chinese carved rosewood.


ROOFTOP REVERIE

A globe-trotting couple find each other, then find the perfect place to call home By KIRK REED FORRESTER Photography by TRIA GIOVAN


I BUY ALL MY PLANTS AT THE FARMERS MARKETS. I DON’T HAVE A SET PLAN WHEN I GO. I JUST BUY WHAT STRIKES MY FANCY. —FIONA TILLEY

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Y

YEARS AGO, IF YOU’D TOLD A YOUNG FIONA

Behind the beautiful table, a row of trees creates a screen and masks the wall. RIGHT: The view north looks toward midtown and the Empire State Building. PREVIOUS SPREAD: Tilley (right) makes the most of her space, separating areas into dining, lounging, and barstools with a view. Clustered containers envelop spaces and make the different areas feel distinct.

Tilley that in 2019 she would be a former Wall Street banker married to a Turkish jeweler and running the company that sells his designs, she might not have believed you. What she would have believed is that she would be the caretaker of a fabulous garden. For all her years as a world-traveling, hardcharging investment banker, gardening is a love that has never left her. “My mother is an avid gardener and my father studied horticulture,” she says. In fact, her last name is derived from “tiller of the soil,” the result of an ancestor who migrated from England to Australia and established one of the country’s first public gardens there. “Although I’m Australian, I’ve lived in the States for 33 years, so this is definitely home for me,” says Tilley, who moved to New York with J.P. Morgan after practicing law. Her husband, jewelry designer Gurhan, came to America 10 years later, and their courtship is as serendipitous as any romantic comedy. “I met Gurhan in 1995, when I was still a banker,” says Tilley. “I was on vacation with a girlfriend in a small coastal town in Turkey. Truthfully, I fell in love with Turkey before I fell in love with the jewelry before I fell in love with the jeweler,” she laughs. She spent the entire day in Gurhan’s store. “Something about his pieces really spoke to me,” she says. She asked the clerk if she could meet the designer. “Can I look him up?” she asked. No was the answer. “ ‘He’s a cranky old man, and he doesn’t speak English,’ the clerk said to me,” remembers Tilley. But the pleasantly persistent redhead didn’t give up. “A couple of weeks later I was in Istanbul, and I called on this supposed cranky old J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT:

The garden is filled with objects such as this one that the couple collect on their frequent trips around the world. • Inspired by the wildness of English gardens, Tilley’s containers are a mix of plants and have a casual, vibrant feel. • Greenery succeeds in hiding the roof’s industrial elements. • Lounge chairs face west, perfect for watching the sun set over the Hudson River. • A trellis of wisteria invites birds to stay awhile. • “I love blues and yellows,” says Tilley, who enjoys pops of color. • Tilley and Gurhan enjoying time in their favorite spot

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man. It was a rainy day, and I was there with my girlfriend. I remember two things. First of all, he spoke beautiful English. Second of all he wasn’t cranky. He was wonderfully welcoming and invited us to his home.” For Tilley it was love at first sight, “even though I didn’t believe in love at first sight,” she says. The pair stayed in touch by telephone for 16 months until Gurhan moved to New York. They were engaged soon after and married in 1999, the year Tilley left banking to run the business operations for Gurhan. In the wake of 9/11, when the couple set about looking for a new apartment, it had to meet three criteria: It had to be downtown (in a show of solidarity with the wounded part of their city), it had to have a view, and it had to have a garden. The West Village apartment they found had it all: a wonderful downtown feel, 360-degree views of the city, and an 1,800-square-foot roof perfect for a garden.

For more information, see Sources, page 84

Though the couple both love the garden, it is unquestionably Tilley’s oeuvre. “I do all the work up there,” she says proudly. “I love to get my hands dirty.” The result of her work is an eclectic, bohemian, magical space so lush it’s hard to remember that everything is in containers. She loves trees and has an array of willows, column oaks, birches, mulberries, poplars, and maples. A trellis laden with wisteria, along with clusters of annuals and perennials, attracts the locals. “The birds love the trees, and the butterflies love the flowers,” says Tilley. She appreciates the order and restraint of other gardens but isn’t drawn to that style. “I love the craziness of the English garden. I love mixing the colors,” she says. “I’m constantly trying new things and changing it up. “Gurhan is always saying to me, ‘You don’t have to redecorate the roof!’” she says. But, for a woman whose life has been so rewarded by being open to possibility, how can she resist?

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Delight in DERBYSHIRE

Within the drama of Peak District National Park, legendary estates such as Chatsworth and Haddon Hall lure visitors to Derbyshire in England’s storied midsection By MARION LAFFEY FOX


The austere stone façade of Haddon Hall ascends along a gravel path up a hill to its terraced, rose-filled gardens. The 3,800-acre estate includes parkland, a working farm, and 600 acres of woodland.


“Chatsworth was described in the 17th century as a jewel, and a jewel it remains, making neighboring Haddon Hall all the more remarkable,” says British garden scholar and author John Phibbs. “How can it be that two great ducal houses should be a stone’s throw from each other?” HADDON HALL Crenelated 12th-century Haddon Hall perches on thick ramparts anchored on a limestone outcropping above the River Wye. Dubbed “the most important English house to survive from the Middle Ages,” it lay dormant for 200 years, from the 1700s until the 1920s, when it was restored. Part of the duchy of Rutland, the 3,800-acre estate is owned by the present duke’s younger brother, Lord Edward Manners, who resides there with his young family. Today, happy shouts of energetic twin sons reverberate through passages, effectively erasing the Reformation’s darkness. But whispered tales recount the daring elopement of Dorothy Vernon, a Catholic, with Protestant Sir John Manners. Centuries later, their love story still resonates when one views the sweeping outdoor staircase that she 62 |

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supposedly used to escape from her disapproving father. St. Nicholas Chapel showcases restored frescoes concealed by whitewash during the Reformation, while the Long Gallery boasts intricate plasterwork. The glory of Haddon Hall, however, is in its gardens, where you can smell the roses that dominate terraced beds, cascade down ancient façades, and frame doorways in frothy blooms. This triumph of harmony and texture was orchestrated by landscape architect Arne Maynard, who led Haddon’s 2011 garden revival. With romance and respect for history as his mantra, Maynard was guided by photographs of the garden planted by Lord Manners’s grandmother in the 1920s. “Its softness and romance had disappeared, and I wanted to capture that again,” Maynard says.

PHOTOS (THIS SPREAD, PREVIOUS SPREAD, AND NEXT SPREAD) BY MARIANNE MAJERUS AND (ROSE DETAIL) COURTESY OF HADDON HALL

A display of Haddon Hall’s roses includes ‘Scepter d’Isle,’ which blooms continuously all summer, emitting a myrrh-like fragrance; ‘Mannington Mauve Rambler,’ a vigorous rambler covered in semidouble mauve flowers; and ‘Président de Sèze’ roses, compact and deeply scented roses with lilac-pink blooms.


CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT:

Haddon Hall’s topiaries add an almost Alice-inWonderland flavor to the gardens. • Sumptuous blooms of ‘Président de Sèze’ roses • Farmland with English Longhorn cattle along the River Wye • Close-up of magnificent David Austin English climbing rose ‘Crown Princess Margareta,’ distinguished by neatly formed apricot-hued rosettes and fruity fragrance.

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When you arrive at Haddon, you’re It appears very masculine in its nature. However, when experience its breathtaking femininity. It is


immediately struck by its formidable surrounds. you walk through the gardens, you unbelievably beautiful and romantic, a real place for reflection. —LADY EDWARD MANNERS

Thick masculine stone buttresses, softened by roses, clematis, and delphiniums, underscore the age of the Tudor building, which dates from the 11th century. Wide borders with topiaries and drifts of wildflowers make a dreamy setting for countless films, such as The Princess Bride and Jane Eyre.


His intended palette of pale pinks, blues, and creams evolved as stiff hybrids were replaced by favorite roses, delphiniums, lilies, fruit trees, topiaries, and native Derbyshire orchids. Beyond the terraces, meadow-style planting attracts wildlife and butterflies. An Elizabethan knot garden displays plants popular 400 years ago, along with medicinal plants and those once used for dying cloth. “The gardens now have a freshness, referencing an Elizabethan past but retaining a contemporary feel,” says Maynard. Recently, Lady Edward Manners reflected on the joys of living here. “With Haddon Hall’s heritage status, it is our job to maintain and preserve this wonderful building for current and future generations to enjoy. Every owner of Haddon has loved gardening and left their indelible mark on this very special landscape, and we plan to do the same.” CHATSWORTH At first glance, Chatsworth House appears as a misty mirage, mirrored in the River Derwent, which bisects its 1,000-acre park. Aristocratic and aloof, the Elizabethan house is flanked by stables, greenhouses, gardens, grottoes, and mazes. A squat moated tower named Queen Mary’s Bower is a reminder that Mary Queen of Scots was once held there in the 1570s. With its powerful persona, the main house teases with

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architecture that celebrates greatness. Despite centuries of tinkering by 12 Dukes of Devonshire, Chatsworth maintains its stately presence. The landscape high notes, developed by Capability Brown in the 18th century and Joseph Paxton in the 19th, delight with tranquil vistas, studded with bridges, hidden follies, and water features. The Emperor’s Fountain jettisons 300 feet into the air, and the Cascade tumbles 200 feet over a series of 24 irregularly positioned stone steps, emitting different sounds at each landing. Over a million annual visitors stroll footpaths or ride around on a tractor-pulled train, exploring dozens of horticultural treasures, including the Arboretum of mighty specimen trees. The 1st Duke’s Greenhouse and Canal reference the distant past, while Azalea Dell and the Rose Garden were created in the 1930s, and the Cottage Garden, in 1989. Inside, more than 30 rooms are on display, showcasing antiques and restored masterpieces by Van Dyck, Reynolds, Sargent, and Rembrandt, as well as contemporary artists such as Lucien Freud and David Nash. Today, the owners of both Chatsworth and Haddon Hall offer workshops, tours, and special exhibitions each season, enticing visitors to linger in Derbyshire. Book rooms in one of the superb country inns and cottages on or near the properties, and indulge in your good fortune. Continued on next spread

For more information, see Sources, page 86

PHOTOS (THIS SPREAD AND NEXT SPREAD) COURTESY OF CHATSWORTH HOUSE

The 1st Duke’s greenhouse at Chatsworth, originally built in the 1690s when the garden was at its most formal, is one of the most important 17th-century greenhouses in England. Also called orangeries, they were used to overwinter citrus plants.


CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT:

The carefully manicured serpentine hedges were created in 1953. • Inside the Greenhouse • Joseph Paxton designed the Emperor Fountain to impress Tsar Nicholas during his highly anticipated 1844 visit. The tsar never came, but the 300-foot fountain still bears his name. • The Broad Walk culminates in an urn created in 1820 by Jeffry Wyatville. • The famous Cascade was first created in the 1690s but took on its present wider and longer form in 1708, when Cascade House, designed by Thomas Archer, dominated the scene.


CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT:

The Maze, planted in 1962 with 1,209 English yews on the site of Paxton’s enormous 1840s Great Conservatory, is a favorite of visitors. • The magnificent Stables were built in the mid1700s according to James Paine’s designs. • The Trout Stream gurgles along moss-andlichen-covered rocks and banks in the Arboretum Walk.

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WHERE TO STAY

Lucky travelers to this beautiful corner of Derbyshire in the Peak District National Park have several well-appointed hotels and cottages to choose from, all within easy proximity of both estates. THE CAVENDISH HOTEL, a rambling stone building in the stylish village of Baslow, looks out on the countryside toward Chatsworth’s Hunting Tower. A pleasant stroll through the park’s open fields takes you to the main house, perched at the edge of the Chatsworth estate. Filled with original antiques intermingled with contemporary pieces and artworks plucked from the family’s collections, the rooms feature huge fireplaces. The tweed-jacketed staff can arrange cycling in the Peak District. CHATSWORTH HOLIDAY COTTAGES, located on the estate, offer a variety of private options, such as the 16th-century Hunting Tower, which sits over an escarpment 400 feet above Chatsworth House at the edge of Stand Wood. This fascinating vertical pile, completed in 1582 for Bess of Hardwick, may have been a banqueting or summer house but was also used by ladies to observe the working hounds in the park below. The tall, eerie-looking building with a spiral staircase sleeps four. The one-story Russian Cottage feels equally fairy-tale. Snuggled on a secluded road beyond Bluebell Woods, the charming building was inspired by a model of a Russian Farmhouse sent to the 6th Duke after the tsar canceled a visit to the estate.

Near Haddon Hall, at THE PEACOCK AT ROWSLEY, Lord and Lady Edward Manners offer 15 beautifully appointed rooms and an award-winning restaurant. The 17th-century building has been a hotel since the 1830s—it’s pet-friendly, and sporting options, including fly-fishing on the River Derwent and Derbyshire Wye, can be arranged. Arne Maynard designed the picturesque riverfront garden. THE DEVONSHIRE ARMS AT BEELEY is an 18th-century coaching inn once favored by Charles Dickens. Still popular with those who love its cozy bar and modern Brasserie decorated by the duchess herself, it is known for its locally sourced fare, including English cheeses, Derbyshire lamb, and Wye Valley asparagus. Fourteen comfortable bedrooms make it a perfect pausing destination. FISCHER’S BASLOW HALL is a boutique country-house hotel on the edge of the Chatsworth estate. Perched on the picturesque village of Baslow, the elegant manor offers 11 bedrooms and an award-winning restaurant specializing in local products such as Derbyshire pork, lamb, venison, and native fish with vegetables from the kitchen garden. Even if you are staying elsewhere, be sure to have a meal here during your visit.

The Case, designed by Paxton in 1838 to protect tender plants such as figs and peaches, is a dominant feature of the estate. It evolves as a glorious set of interconnected glass and filigree buildings of varying heights.

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Julia Reed and interior designer and writer Patrick Dunne sit beneath a Directoire papier peint screen in the dining room of his town home in the Faubourg Marigny.


Julia Reed

CELEBRATES With a brand-new book and business venture to her name, the acclaimed author and consummate entertainer is spicing things up with a pinch of humor and a dash of style

F

lower: Tell us about your upbringing in the Mississippi Delta and your many homes-away-from-home thereafter. Julia Reed: I grew up in Greenville, Mississippi, a small but surprisingly cosmopolitan town smack in the middle of the Delta. When I was 16, I left to attend boarding school and college in Washington, D.C., then stuck around to work at Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report. Then I had a newspaper job in Winter Park, Florida, where I was a reporter for the Orlando Sentinel. Needless to say, the magazine world lured me back, so I took a job at Vogue in New York, where I stayed for 20 years. During that time, I visited New Orleans frequently. It was during one of those trips

that I heard myself announce—at about 3 o’clock in the morning—that I was making a temporary move there to cover a scandalous gubernatorial race. It was a good idea, and I did it, but I had absolutely no plans to do it until that moment. By the time the election was over in 1991, I’d been seduced by the city. I never really left New Orleans, although I retained my Upper East Side apartment. I finally sold it in 2005 and officially made New Orleans my home. I hear you now have a second home back in the Delta and that it’s quite a place! That’s right! Ever since I left the Delta, I fantasized about having my own place there some day. When my parents moved out of my childhood home a few years ago, I begged them to keep the lot behind it so I could build on it.

Photography by PAUL COSTELLO


ABOVE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP:

Hydrangeas plucked from the garden at Dunne’s country house • “I chose this particular shade of pink to flatter the complexions of the ladies at the table,” Dunne says. • The heirloom silver place plates are from Dunne’s mother. The French porcelain features the cornflower, Marie Antoinette’s favorite flower. OPPOSITE: “When having grand a dinner party, I always like to have one grand arrangement—but I place it away from the table,” Dunne says. 72 |

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James Carter, a close friend and an amazingly talented architect, designed the house on a legal pad while we were eating dinner and downing martinis. Basically, it’s a light-filled pavilion with a wing on each side. I call it The Folly because it fits both definitions of the word. The first being “an unusual or fancy building built in a garden for decoration or amusement,” and the second being “a foolish act or idea.” Turns out, building it wasn’t so foolish after all. It’s among the best things I’ve ever done, and I go as often as I can. You’re so passionate about your adopted hometown. Your new book, Julia Reed’s New Orleans, has even been described as a love letter to the city. Tell us about “your” New Orleans. Growing up, my family made frequent treks there to eat and play, so in my young mind it became this exotic destination. We’d hit up the seafood dives, and we’d always go to Galatoire’s. In my teens, New Orleans became less of a magical place and more of a place where you could get up to no good. As soon as I was old enough to drive, I loaded up a car full of friends and headed down to the Superdome to see The Rolling Stones. And I told you how I landed there in my 20s. What keeps me loving this place is that no matter how long I live here, there will always be nooks and crannies to discover, dark bars to get up to no good in, and loads of oysters on the half shell to chase with a cold beer. Your original recipes have been said to impress some of the city’s best chefs. What’s your secret? You give me far too much credit. Nothing is ever really original. Most of my recipes are just my takes on Creole mainstays, sometimes with a bit of classic French thrown in. You’ll find that some of my recipes are inspired by offerings from the city’s great palaces of Creole cuisine like Galatoire’s and Antoine’s. Speaking of recipes, we love floral “recipes” here at Flower magazine. Can you share one of your own? I love to mash a colorful mix


“When having a grand dinner party, I always like to have one grand arrangement—but I place it away from the table.” —PATRICK DUNNE


For details, see Sources, page 86. For the recipe for Meringue Shells with Coffee Ice Cream and Orange-Chocolate Sauce, visit flowermag.com.


BELOW, LEFT TO RIGHT: Reed’s Meringue Shells with Coffee Ice Cream

and Orange-Chocolate Sauce were inspired by the desserts at two iconic New Orleans restaurants, Antoine’s and Galatoire’s. • Crawfish Cardinale Tarts are served on an Old Sheffield tray. OPPOSITE: “I’m house proud enough to keep them polished,” Dunne says of his collection of antique copper pots. “It’s a sin of vanity, I’m sure.”

Crawfish Cardinale Tarts MAKES 24 HORS D’OEUVRES

Crawfish Cardinale, a creamy, Cognac-tinged concoction, is a staple at Antoine’s, where it is served in a ramekin. Emeril Lagasse and John Folse serve theirs as an appetizer or main course in puff pastry patty shells. For this party, I passed around a tinier taste of the rich crawfish in hors d’oeuvre–size puff pastry shells straight out of the freezer case. ¼ cup (½ stick) butter ½ cup minced shallots 2 teaspoons minced garlic 2 tablespoons seafood stock 2 tablespoons tomato paste 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour 2 cups heavy cream

of roses, peonies, and ranunculus into wine rinsers. Mine are antique and made from heavy cut glass, but we’ve designed reproductions for Reed Smythe & Company, the home and garden line I recently launched with my good friend and fellow Delta native, Keith Meacham. Congratulations on the new line! Given that you’re such an avid hostess, tell us about some of the entertaining pieces. We’ve got really great glassware and barware—highball glasses, votives, bottle openers, and ice buckets, plus a bar table and those wine rinsers. One of my favorite things is this gorgeous silver catfish jigger. Everything you need to stock the bar—except the liquor, of course. Since the words “bar” and “party” are practically synonymous in New Orleans, tell us about the first party you hosted in town. I rented the third floor of this enormous house on Royal Street for a year or so. It was this incredibly romantic space with crumbling plaster walls and 15-foot ceilings, so you could see straight across the Mississippi River from the balcony. I had almost no furniture, which made it feel even bigger during crowded parties. Once, I had a big shindig for my friend Hamish Bowles from Vogue. My upstairs neighbor was a bass player, so he got some buddies together to play jazz. Like I always do, I made a big pile of Crabmeat Maison. The highlight of the night was when the table caught fire. I had stupidly draped some tall candelabras with Spanish moss, and the table went up in flames. We put it out and no one flinched—it was just a moment of excitement. I always say every good party needs an element of danger. That would have been a nightmare for most of us! Moving on to happier thoughts, tell me about your “dream” party. I am lucky enough to have dream parties all the time. For me, that can mean a few friends around the table for a simple Sunday supper or a lavish holiday dinner or a full-on shindig with music and dancing. I think anytime you can break bread in pretty surroundings with people you love, it’s a dream party.

2 tablespoons Cognac or brandy 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 pound crawfish tails 2 dozen mini pastry shells (I most often use Athens brand phyllo shells, which are ready to use straight out of the freezer, or Siljans crispy shells.) Melt the butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Lower heat and add shallots and garlic, stirring often to make sure the garlic does not burn, and cook until soft, 8 to 10 minutes. Stir in the stock and tomato paste, and cook 1 minute. Sprinkle in flour and cook 2 minutes, stirring constantly. Add cream, Cognac, lemon juice, salt, and cayenne. Blend well and cook about 5 minutes, until a thickish, sauce-like consistency is achieved, stirring frequently. Add the crawfish tails and cook until the tails are hot, 2 to 3 minutes more. Remove mixture from heat and taste for seasonings. Spoon into the shells and serve immediately.

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MASTERS of the MADCAP JOHN LOECKE and JASON OLIVER NIXON

throw a casual summer party at home, where the palette is as energetic as the hosts, and prints, patterns, and pound-rescue pups reign supreme

By KAREN CARROLL

Photography by ANNA NAPHTALI


Jason Oliver Nixon (left) and John Loecke, the duo behind the design and lifestyle brand Madcap Cottage, share a love for exuberant pattern, rich color, flowers of all sorts, and rescue dogs. All flourish happily in the 1930s-era home they call The House of Bedlam.


O ON A STEAMY SATURDAY IN HIGH

Point, North Carolina, the air feels just right for stirring up a late-afternoon summer storm, the kind that locals welcome for the relief it gives from the heat and the revival it brings to lawns wilted from too much sun and too little water. Welcome, that is, until Mother Nature becomes

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an unruly guest who crashes a party, like the one that John Loecke and Jason Oliver Nixon, the masterminds behind the design and lifestyle brand Madcap Cottage, have planned in their garden today. Visions of friends strolling their almost three-acre property with highballs and hors d’oeuvres in hand will have

to wait for another time. The men, always quick on their feet, shift gears and move the festivities inside their 1930s-era Regency Revival home, which they’ve dubbed The House of Bedlam. While Loecke makes a few lastminute floral arrangements from an armful of zinnias he brought in just before the rain, Nixon mixes pitchers of refreshing libations and turns up a little Blossom Dearie on the sound system. As friends start to wander in—it’s a casual, come-and-go sort of affair—the party begins. A garden of delights of the interior variety awaits exploration in rooms that seem transported out of an eccentric English country manor, with a riotous fusion of color, florals, geometrics, and textures enveloping almost every surface, be it the tented ceiling, chintz sofa, or decorative mural. With a name like House of Bedlam, one certainly wishes the walls could join in the lively conversation already underway. And in a sense they do, speaking of Loecke and Nixon’s passion for vintage prints purchased on eBay, historical design references gleaned from treks around the globe, and their pack of rescue dogs named Weenie, Jasper, Amy Petunia, and Cecil, who scamper underfoot and whose likenesses playfully appear in the custom chinoiserie wallpaper in the living room. Eclectic art and antiques picked up at markets and auctions mingle with collections amassed along the way—layers that seem to belie the fact that the couple has been here only a few years. “We like a house to have a sense of personal history and look as if it has evolved over time,” says Loecke. “Good decoration always


TOP LEFT AND RIGHT: The weather outside may be gray, but indoors every room is abloom with botanically inspired

patterns, many designed by the homeowners themselves, including fabrics for Robert Allen in the sunroom, and trays from Port 68 that hold hors d’oeuvres such as tomato tarts. ABOVE RIGHT: Although there is no seated dinner at this gathering, the dining room’s confection of color draws guests in like candy. ABOVE LEFT AND OPPOSITE: Gin Bramble cocktails, alongside an urn of flowers brought in from the garden, offer a cheerful welcome in the foyer. J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

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TOP LEFT: Loecke tweaks a floral arrangement in the living room. TOP RIGHT AND OPPOSITE: Platters placed around the

house invite guests to wander and discover rooms such as the cozy space Nixon and Loecke call the opium den—no illegal substances to be found, of course, but the designers’ uninhibited mix of color and pattern provides plenty of visual stimulation. ABOVE: Friend and caterer Anna Everidge Thrower brings her own magic to the event, creating fare that is colorful, eye-catching, and tasty, like the zucchini roll-ups with goat cheese. 80 |

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“When we entertain, nothing is sacred, nothing is fussy, and it’s a mix of high and low. Nobody wants to be in an ivory tower where they fear they’ll be banished if they spill something.” —JASON OLIVER NIXON

provides clues as to who lives there.” After two decades in New York, where Loecke and Nixon became serial movers, renovators, and decorators (including a historic schoolhouse in the Catskills that inspired the brand’s moniker), these former magazine editors turned interior designers looked south in search of a less-frenzied, 82 |

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hospitable place where they could focus on expanding their business in new ways. They had both attended many a High Point furniture market, and the city’s cadre of craftspeople and makers, as well as its laid-back sensibility, proved alluring. After a lightning-fast weekend spent with a real estate agent,

they found the place where they could put down some permanent roots. “We’re probably not the neighbors who can lend you a cup of sugar, but we always have a cup of bourbon on hand,” says Nixon, with a laugh. Now, the house serves as a calling card come to life and a laboratory for all that the Madcap Cottage brand embodies: an intrepid joie de vivre; a skillful blend of high style with down-toearth accessibility (much of the furniture, fabrics, and accessories that Loecke and Nixon design can be found through retail rather than trade-only showrooms), and a sense that nothing about life or decorating should be taken too seriously. Case in point: their new collection of hand-hooked rugs for Momeni includes a selection of Madcap-worthy bon mots such as “Children are wonderful, but dogs don’t have to go to college.” “We’re all about the idea of fun, spirit, and whimsy. Bring the adventure home, and leave your cares at the front door,” says Nixon. Come rain or come shine, that perfectly sums up their philosophy, whether it’s in the way they entertain the friends they gather today, or in the products they design for the rest of us. It’s a Madcap Cottage world, and Loecke and Nixon hope we’ll all soon be living in it.

For more information, see Sources, page 86


THERE’S A METHOD TO THE

MADCAP PARTY VIBE

Easy, relaxed, no pretense. “Feel free to kick off your shoes, and dogs and kids are always welcome,” says Nixon. DRESS CODE

Come as you are—colorful and comfortable. “In New York we’d go to a party and everyone would be in black,” says Nixon. “Southerners wear pink, orange, and yellow; the women love their floral dresses, and the men sometimes have critters on their pants.” BLOOMS FOR ROOMS

“We look to the garden for bright, happy flowers such as zinnias and dahlias and mix with traipsing vines—a sort of Constance Spry moment,” says Loecke. TASTY BITES

Southern favorites a little gussied up. Think pimento cheese and red peppers on pumpernickel toast, and zucchini roll-ups with goat cheese and matchstick vegetables. “Everything is easy to pick up,” says Nixon. CRAFTY COCKTAILS

“Our house cocktail is a Gin Rickey, but we switch it up a bit for a party,” says Loecke. Today they serve Gin Brambles (gin, lemon juice, simple syrup, blackberry liqueur) and Lavender Lemonade (vodka, lemonade, lavender simple syrup, prosecco). PARTY PLAYLIST

“We start with jazz, and as night falls we kick things up a notch—Blossom Dearie and Nina Simone segue into Roxy Music,” says Nixon. “We have a disco ball that spins in the basement, so the party often ends up down there.” PARTING WISDOM

“Be confident and relax,” says Loecke. “And if something doesn’t turn out as planned, open more liquor and order a pizza. No one will notice the gaffe.”

THIS PAGE: Elements of the day include (clockwise from top left) seasonal canapés such as toast with sweet-pea spread and

radishes, casual conversation, sparkling lavender lemonade, a taste of something sweet in ribbon shortbread, ladies in floral dresses, and dogs underfoot. OPPOSITE: W. C. Fields’ line about never working with children or animals definitely doesn’t apply in The House of Bedlam, where Loecke and Nixon’s beloved one-eyed pug, Amy Petunia, makes sure to greet even the littlest guest. J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

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events

1. THE HOUSTON DESIGN CENTER

The second annual Design in Bloom with Flower Magazine took place at The Houston Design Center in conjunction with Texas Design Week. The event welcomed an illustrious lineup of talent, including renowned interior designer Bunny Williams, award-winning architect Jeffrey Dungan, garden and lifestyle expert P. Allen Smith, and floral designer Ariella Chezar. The day included individual design lectures, book signings, and a floral demonstration, as well as a pop-up shop with London-based Halcyon Days.

FLOWER

ON THE ROAD 3. FLOWERSCHOOL NEW YORK

FlowerSchool New York hosted a cocktail party to celebrate the launch of Living Floral. Tastemakers of the flower community and master florists, including Lewis Miller and Remco van Vliet, attended.

4. CURREY & COMPANY

2. CHARLOTTE MOSS RECEPTION

Interior designer Charlotte Moss held a private reception and dinner in New York City to celebrate Flower Editorin-Chief Margot Shaw’s new book, Living Floral. Notable attendees included Martha Stewart, Kevin Sharkey, Alex Papachristidis, and Gil Schafer.

Currey & Company hosted a Living Floral book signing party in their showroom during spring market at High Point. Among the guests were interior designers Barry Dixon and Meg Braff.

1. (left to right) Designer Bunny Williams and floral designer Ariella Chezar; architect Jeffrey Dungan; Phoebe Tudor of Houston, and garden and lifestyle expert P. Allen Smith 2. Martha Stewart, Flower Editor-in-Chief Margot Shaw, and Kevin Sharkey, SVP at Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia 3. Floral designer Lewis Miller and FlowerSchool New York founder Eileen Johnson 4. Shaw and designer Meg Braff

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Sources

Where to find what’s in this issue Prices are subject to change. Any items not listed are unknown. IN BLOOM

PAGES 11–14, BOOKS: From Garden to Glass: 80 Botanical Beverages Made From the Finest Fruits, Cordials, and Infusions by David Hurst (Universe Publishing, 2019), $23, amazon.com. Into the Garden by Christian PeltenbergBrechneff, foreword by Bunny Williams (G Arts, 2019), $35, barnesandnoble.com. PAGES 22–25, MEET: Reed McIlvaine of Renny & Reed Flowers and Events, New York, 212.288.7000; Palm Beach, 561.776.1122, rennyandreed.com.

FRESH STYLE

PAGES 27–32, ARRANGE: Floral design by Destiny Pinson of Doris Ione, 504.509.1060, dorisione.com. PAGES 34–36, ENTERTAIN: Susan Sully, 843.906.3521, susansully.com; book, Southern Hospitality at Home by Susan Sully (Rizzoli New York, 2019; publication date September 17, 2019), $45, barnesandnoble.com.

PEONY PARTY

PAGES 38–45: Event and floral design by Mary Ruth Miller and Heather Barrie

of Gathering Events, 843.723.3387, gatheringevents.com; catering by Callie White of Callie’s Kitchen, 843.830.2805, callie@calliebiscuits. com; photography by Gayle Brooker Photography, 843.901.9195, gayle brooker.com; invitations by Dulles Designs, 843.513.8146, dullesdesigns. com; calligraphy by Elizabeth Porcher Jones, 843.209.7545; elizabeth porcherjones.com.

LIVING PLEIN AIR

PAGES 46–53: Marcella Kaspar Art, Australia, marcellakasparart.com; m-kaspar@bigpond.net.au; Instagram @marcellakasparart.

ROOFTOP REVERIE

PAGES 54–59: Jewelry by Gurhan, gurhan.com.

DELIGHT IN DERBYSHIRE

PAGES 60–69: Estates: Chatsworth House, chatsworth.org. Haddon Hall, haddonhall.co.uk. PAGE 69: Where to Stay: The Cavendish Hotel,

cavendishbaslow.co.uk; Chatsworth House Holiday Cottages, chatsworth cottages.co.uk; The Peacock at Rowsley, thepeacockatrowsley.com; The Devonshire Arms, devonshire beeley.co.uk; Fischer’s Baslow Hall, fischers-baslowhall.co.uk.

JULIA REED CELEBRATES

PAGES 70–75: Book, Julia Reed’s New Orleans: Food, Fun, and Field Trips for Letting the Good Times Roll by Julia Reed; photography by Paul Costello (Rizzoli New York, 2019), $50, barnes andnoble.com.

MASTERS OF THE MADCAP

PAGES 76–83: Catering by Anna Everidge Thrower of G’ Anna Inc., 336.306.2157; select accessories, fabrics, and décor by Madcap Cottage, 917.675.4004, madcapcottage.com. PAGE 79: Serving tray by Madcap Cottage for Port 68, port68.com for similar. PAGE 80: Living room chair fabric, Mill Reef in Rhubarb from Madcap Cottage.

market bonus

From left: Elizabeth Locke lemon citrine and peridot brooch ($9,275), at Elizabeth Locke Jewels, 968 Madison Ave., New York, NY, 212.744.7878 • Garden Folly hand-painted fabric by Michael Devine, michaeldevineltd.com • Of Rare Origin Pagoda jade and white agate earrings, $1,075, ofrareorigin.com

VOLUME 13, ISSUE 4. Flower magazine, ISSN 1941-4714, is a bimonthly publication of Peony Publishing, LLC, located at 3020 Pump House Road, Birmingham, AL 35243. Periodicals postage is paid at Birmingham, AL, and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to Flower magazine, P.O. Box 433327, Palm Coast, FL 32164. For subscription inquiries and customer service, please call 877.400.3074. All unsolicited materials will not be returned. Printed in the U.S.A.

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considered objects for an artful life. 281 rele street, birmingham @amano_bham


At the Table

Produced and styled by AMANDA SMITH FOWLER

A Touch of Chinoiserie

Wisteria Trumpet ($175) and Fern Posy vases ($125) by William Yeoward Crystal through Hudson-Poole Fine Jewelers, hudsonpoole .com. Chinoiserie teapot ($836), creamer ($393), and sugar bowl ($418) by Pinto Paris through DeVine Corporation, devinecorp.net for retailers. Barcelona wineglass ($268) by Varga through Gracious Style, graciousstyle.com. Pallas iced tea by Waterford Crystal (pattern discontinued; check Replacements, Ltd., replacements.com). Meissen Oriental Flowers Rose teacup and saucer through Scully & Scully, scullyandscully.com. Silk Ribbon dessert plate and charger by Herend, herendusa.com. Pink Lace dinner plate ($60) by Mottahedeh, mottahedeh.com. Healdsburg Collection napkin by Julia B., juliab.com. Towle King Richard 4-piece place setting ($219) and Broadway Silversmiths Pierced Basket Weave napkin ring ($129), both from Beverly Bremer Silver Shop, beverlybremer.com. Celeste fabric in Lilac by Raoul Textiles through John Rosselli & Associates, johnrosselli.com.

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PHOTO BY JEAN ALLSOPP

Try bringing a bold color to your table. Staying true to classic motifs, these vivid pinks are balanced by crisp whites and cool blues


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