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KATHLEEN HANNA ON FEMINISM X PUNK

JOHN PAUL GAULTIER’S FASHION WORLD

CLASS OF 2013

DC’S DIY BANDS: COLLAPSER, KILL LINCOLN, PRIESTS, BOARDROOM HEROES

CLASH OF THE TARTANS HERITAGE PRINTS

A UTILITARIAN UPRISING


KATHLEEN HANNA ON FEMINISM X PUNK

JOHN PAUL GAULTIER’S FASHION WORLD

CLASS OF 2013

DC’S DIY BANDS: COLLAPSER, KILL LINCOLN, PRIESTS, BOARDROOM HEROES

CLASH OF THE TARTANS HERITAGE PRINTS

A UTILITARIAN UPRISING


THE PUNK ISSUE

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MEETS OBSESSION MAGAZINE ISSUE NO. 4 DECEMBER 2O13


Clash of the Tartans

08

The Style Dialogues

10

Spikes, Studs and Leather

13

Fashion Diversions

14

About a Grrrl

18

A Female Fueled Playlist

22

Xtreme Beauty

24

Beauty Bitch!

FASHION: Heritage prints trend report

FASHION: Our best tips for rocking a professional look

FASHION: 5 ways you can’t be tamed for the holidays

TO DO: John Paul Gaultier’s Fashion World

R PAGE 14

INSIDE ISSUE

07

INTERVIEW: Kathleen Hanna on feminism x punk

MUSIC: Women in punk

BEAUTY: Haircare tips from the experts

4 | Meets Obsession Magazine  The Punk Issue

Céline Fall 2013

BEAUTY: Eye-Popping Products to Give You Extra Edge


Beyond Obsessed!  MeetsObsession.com

S T Y L E

CLASH OF THE TARTANS R PAGE 07

MASTHEAD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jacqueline Law

FASHION & BEAUTY Fashion Director

Jenny McFarlane Managing Beauty Editor

Susan Linney Writer

Lindsey Hascher Writer

Kat HernandezLinares Writer

Bridget Marowski

A&E Writer

Patricia Callahan Writer

Israel Daramola Writer

Sarah Marloff Writer

Saron Olkaba

COVER CREDITS photography

Katherine Gaines/ AmbientEye Photography stylist

Anna DeMeo makeup

Anna DeMeo hair

Julie Ruckman model

Lauren B location

Premonition Studios © 2013 Meets Obsession LLC. All RIGHTS RESERVED. Meets Obsession magazine is printed in the U.S.A. Visit us online at: meetsobsession.com

Writer

Maggie Stamets

ADMIN

R PAGE 13

Visual Design Associate

Victoria Tran

A&E + Music Promotions and Marketing Mgr.

Joshua Feldman Advertising Director

Lisa Nobles

ads@meetsobsession.com Meets Obsession Media LLC editor@meetsobsessionmagazine.com

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A Utilitarian Uprising

44

Class of 2013

62

A Punk Rock Movie Marathon

66

Punk-Covered Classics

R PAGE 44

FASHION EDITORIAL

MUSIC: DC’s best in punk

R PAGE 62

INSIDE ISSUE

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FILM: Must-watch film

MUSIC: A collection of songs to add to your playlist

6 | Meets Obsession Magazine  The Punk Issue

R PAGE 26


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8 | Meets Obsession Magazine ď ľ The Punk Issue

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SPIKES, STUDS AND LEATHER:

WAYS YOU CAN’T BE TAMED FOR THE HOLIDAYS

B to ack so ok t in M me o t a pa of t he M y, ce Written by Lindsey Hascher rty he et leb loo be for rit ks st l “P ies, to oo un m he ks k: C od lp tha h els yo t n ao , a u s ig s t nd tay ht, o C fas fie her out hio rce e a ure n d for re f .” In esi the our sp gne ho comired rs lid p by ay let s. e

Tight budget? Easy. Recycle something you already own or pick one item to spice up any outfit. And for those of you willing with an unlimited budget, check out our splurge look; there are some items you will die for. Don’t forget to include a rich, deep lip color; think fuchsia or burgundy. For those averted to lipstick, a dark smoky eye is a must. Who says you have to be tame? left to right: Nina Dobrev in Monique Lhuillier, Sienna Miller in Burberry, Emma Watson in Prabal Gurung

10 | Meets Obsession Magazine  The Punk Issue


Beyond Obsessed!  MeetsObsession.com

do a safety dance

DRESS: ZARA, $100, ZARA.COM EARRING: TOM BINNS, $599, FARFETCH.COM SHOES: VERSUS, $590, NET-A-PORTER.COM RING: HOUSE OF HARLOW, $53, METROPARKUSA.COM

go for pops of purple

DRESS: ZARA, $139, ZARA.COM EARRING: DANNIJO, $305, DANNIJO.COM SHOES: BURBERRY, $498, NET-A-PORTER. COM JACKET: VIVIENNE WESTWOOD, $671, FARFETCH.COM LIPSTICK: URBAN DECAY, $22, BEAUTY.COM, BAG: SANDRA CADAVID, $375, BOTICCA.COM

wear heavy metals

DRESS: RIVER ISLAND, $98, RIVERISLAND.COM EARRING: KRYSTAL, $45, ASOS.COM SHOES: SCHUTZ BRENAE, $150, PIPERLIME.GAP.COM LIPSTICK: NARS, $26, NET-A-PORTER.COM BAG: $130, JIGSAW-ONLINE.COM

fringe it out

DRESS: MOLLY BRACKEN, $75, YOOX.COM EARRING: MAX AND CHLOE, $27, MAXANDCHLOE.COM SHOES: ZARA, $100, ZARA.COM BAG: ZARA, $60, ZARA.COM

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splurge!

DRESS: KARL LAGERFELD , $370, NET-A-PORTER.COM JACKET: ACNE, $1,898, BOUTIQUE1.COM EARRING: MICHAEL KORS, $55, COUTURE.ZAPPOS.COM SHOES: GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI, $1310, GIUSEPPEZANOTTIDESIGN.COM

12 | Meets Obsession Magazine  The Punk Issue


Beyond Obsessed!  MeetsObsession.com

N O I H FAS

S N O I S r E V World I D ashion r’s F

ltie u a G l u Jean Pa The highly anticipated exhibit The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk made its East Coast debut at the Brooklyn Museum in New York this past October. The exhibit includes over 140 of his haute couture creations, as well as photographs and items from his collaborations within the film and music industries. The exhibit also features animated mannequins, some of which take on Gaultier’s likeness. Gaultier began his career as an assistant to the legendary Pierre Cardin in Paris. He quickly established himself as a rebel in the fashion industry and became known for his bold designs that often provided social commentary. Gaultier is a master of crafting designs that are simultaneously beautiful and provocative. The exhibit is split into six different themes, each focusing on a different phase of Gaultier’s career which spans 30 years. Punk Cancan is a nod to the British era of the 1960s and it includes mannequins wearing mohawks, biker jackets and plenty of tartan. Gaultier’s attention to detail is magnificent and his designs include expertly embellished and studded creations from his very first collection “Punks” from 1977. The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From

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the Sidewalk to the Catwalk will be on exhibit through February 23, 2014 at the Brooklyn Museum located at 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, New York. For more information, please visit: brooklynmuseum.org. ................................................................ Right Image: Paolo Roversi (Italian, b. 1947). Tanel Bedrossiantz, 1992. Digital print, 15 x 12 in. (38.3 x 30.8 cm). Jean Paul Gaultier’s “Barbès” women’s ready-to-wear fall-winter collection of 1984–85. © Paolo Roversi Top Image: “Apparitions” gown from Jean Paul Gaultier’s “Virgins (or Madonnas)” women’s haute couture spring-summer collection of 2007. “Celestial” print satin strapless sheath; bustier-style top with “hologram” embroidery, bows; ivory silk tulle overskirt; “hologram,” ivory lace veil. © Patrice Stable/Jean Paul Gaultier Left Image: A design from Jean Paul Gaultier’s “French Cancan” women’s ready-to-wear fall-winter collection of 1991–92, as seen at his thirtieth anniversary retrospective runway show, October 2006. © Patrice Stable/Jean Paul Gaultier Bottom Image: A design from Jean Paul Gaultier’s “French Cancan” women’s ready-to-wear fall-winter collection of 1991–92, as seen at his thirtieth anniversary retrospective runway show, October 2006. © Patrice Stable/Jean Paul Gaultier


ABOUT A

GRRRL Kathleen Hanna, the subject of the new documentary “The Punk Singer,” on feminism x punk Written by Sarah Marloff

PHOTO: COURTESY OF ALIYA NAUMOFF


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Beyond Obsessed!  MeetsObsession.com “Feminism is a hate movement.” This phrase is the third most searched term on Google, starting with “Feminism is a…” Nearing 2014, there are enough people out there that believe the feminist movement, or gender equality, is about hate. Frequently, we as a country pat our backs and say, “Hey, we’ve come a long way.” But if that is true – how far have we come since 1990? The year Tobi Vail, Kati Wilcox, and Kathleen Hanna joined forces as Bikini Kill, an Olympia, Washington-based band whose mission was to build a space for women in punk rock culture. In fact, if Kathleen Hanna had to sum up her 23-year music and activist career in five words, she would say, “Feminist theory meets punk rock.” But like so many other -isms, sometimes it’s hard to give a precise definition of what exactly feminism means. And as evidenced by Google, the term is often misconstrued, raising the question: what is feminism?

ment of the 90s, and the later electroclash band Le Tigre never faltered under public scrutiny. In the former, she created and enforced a “girls to the front” rule at shows, demanding men move to the back to allow the women, both on stage and off, a safe place to enjoy the music.

album from the interior of her bedroom, under the alias Julie Ruin. “In 1998, back before the Internet, there was this secret creativity burgeoning in girls’ bedrooms that never saw the light of day,” says Hanna of what she calls “bedroom culture.”

Hanna, along with Vail and Wilcox, and later with Le Tigre’s Johanna Fateman and JD Samson, never lost sight of her morals.

“I was afraid everyone would hate Julie Ruin, but I knew for this one project that I made in my bedroom – I recorded the vocals in my closest – there were a thousand more just like it that would never be shared.”

Now, after over five years of near radio silence from Hanna, she’s back. Her new band The Julie Ruin went on its first national tour this summer, and “The Punk Singer,” a documentary on Hanna directed by Sini Anderson, was released this month.

The opposite happened. According to “The Punk Singer,” Hanna’s husband, Beastie Boy Adam Horovitz, believes it was one of the first recordings that truly sounded like Hanna.

I was afraid everyone would hate Julie Ruin, but I knew for this one project that I made in my bedroom – I recorded the vocals in my closest – there were a thousand more just like it that would never be shared.

“I think it means fighting to end the oppression for all people,” Hanna told Meets Obsession. “For me it starts with challenging the binary definitions of male and female. That dichotomy is too extreme and too oppressive. But the only way to end sexism is to challenge everything at the same time. It’s not just white women climbing up the equality ladder. We have to confront racism head on, and homophobia is also connected to sexism. It focuses so much on hating the feminine, and if we don’t end homophobia, or racism then we don’t end sexism.” Hanna has been dubbed a pioneer of riot grrrl, a co-creator of grrrl power, long before the Spice Girls ever zigazig ha’d, and a feminist icon. Her bands Bikini Kill, which kick started the riot grrrl move-

And while The Julie Ruin isn’t aiming to hit the same political buttons of Hanna’s earlier work, she’s still just as passionate today as she was two decades ago. “I want to support the work of other feminist artists,” explains Hanna of her current goals. “Everything I’ve done is possible because of the feminists who’ve come before me and those who were working alongside me. And now I have a bunch of younger girls – Grimes, Dum Dum Girls – who are inspiring me as well – that’s such a great thing.” If The Julie Ruin sounds familiar, it’s because Hanna recycled it from an earlier solo project of hers. As Bikini Kill was slowly starting to break apart, Hanna recorded her first electro

16 | Meets Obsession Magazine  The Punk Issue

“While I was in Bikini Kill I thought of myself as a female performance artist playing the part of a girl in a band,” says Hanna, who credits feminist performance artist Karen Finley as a key influencer in her career, as well as her life. “It took a lot of moxie and gumption to release Julie Ruin, but I wanted to put something out that sounded raw – so that people wouldn’t throw away the art they created.”

Coincidentally, Dum Dum Girls also began with a bedroom recording. As Hanna, a modern-day women’s rights activist, recognizes the women who came before her, as well as the women she has worked alongside, who has left the biggest impression on her? Along with Finley, Hanna notes author and social activist Bell Hooks, whose writing “changed my life,” and Kathy Acker, who told her to start a band. “I wrote an intro to one of Karen [Finley]’s books, I’ve hung out with her, and I still look up to her,” explains Hanna, who has also worked closely with other icons such as Kurt Cobain and Joan Jett. “By now I’ve worked with Joan Jett


PHOTO: COURTESY OF ALLISON MICHAEL ORENSTEIN

for so long that I look up to her, like a slightly older sister, but I don’t idolize her anymore. It’s been nice to no longer have idols [and] just have mentors.” But don’t misunderstand her - she still gets star struck. “I ran into one artist at a party and had a nervous breakdown. I’ve been obsessed with her for 15 years and I didn’t know I was going to meet her. I cried,” says Hanna humbly. “Everyone still has those people and – I don’t want to brag – but when people come up to me and say ‘you changed my life’ or ‘you helped me through my adolescence,’ ‘you turned me on to feminism.’ It’s the biggest form of flattery. I love that I am that person to somebody.”

When all is said and done, Hanna hopes that she has encouraged people to look at the history of activism, the roots of racism, and the methods of unionizing. “I really hope I brought people to women’s studies and encouraged them to read their own histories,” she adds.

don’t want them to mess up your sound on stage. And sometimes that means kissing someone’s ass even if they treat you like shit,” says Hanna, speaking from personal experience that, for her and the rest of the Riot Grrrl bands, resulted in a media blackout during the 90s.

And for those women in feminist (punk) bands following in Hanna’s footsteps, she offers a few words of advice.

“Avoid reading your press or comments on the Internet. Just remember, the most important thing is your art.” n

“Follow the trail of bread crumbs in your own head. There’s always bullshit work that goes along with it – rude, offensive journalists who are going to write about what you look like and not what you sound like – and you just need to smile at them and be nice, because you

The Punk Singer opens in select theaters on Friday, December 13.

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A FEMALE FUELED ROCK PLAYLIST Written by Tricia Callahan

18 | Meets Obsession Magazine ď ľ The Punk Issue


Beyond Obsessed!  MeetsObsession.com

F

emales are the truth behind punk rock. Behind every Kurt Cobain is the ex-girlfriend who scribbled “Smells like Teen Spirit” on his high school bedroom wall. Being a girl in a punk rock scene can be daunting. Being an opinionated, over-thetop, screechy, powerful female can equal one big bitch to the masses. But behind what might be discredited as juvenile aggression is a female who has a message. For our punk issue, it would be a clear crime not to praise women in punk. So let’s push our way right through the mosh pit, shall we? 19


CHERRY BOMB THE RUNAWAYS

For its time, Cherry Bomb was the raunchiest, barely legal “come hither” the world had ever seen. Calling out shameless ownership to their sexuality, “Hello daddy, hello mom, I’m your ch-ch-ch-ch Cherry Bomb,” these fearless girls came together for a brilliant moment before it fell apart - but not without leaving gems and superstars in its wake.

HELL ON WHEELS HORSES BETTY BLOWTORCH

Guitar-driven badass band Betty Blowtorch offers a track that you make you want to drink whiskey (straight from the bottle). Forming in 1998, with three original members of Butt Trumpet, Hell on Wheels evokes a bar band biker feeling that is hard to recapture. Lead singer Bianca Halsted tragically passed away in a car crash in 2001 in New Orleans, but her memory lives on in her female-propelled albums.

DECEPTACON LE TIGRE

This is one of the most dancy tracks on the list. The fun claps and the chorus offer a sing-song melody: “Who took the bomp from the bompalompalomp?/Who took the ram from the ramalamadingdong?” Who would’ve thought the song is about a girl rejecting a guy who thinks he’s cool because he has a van and a couple of shitty songs with his band?

PATTI SMITH

Patti Smith is the quintessential female of punk rock stemming from the NYC punk movement in 1975. This lanky lady churns out one of her famous tracks, “Horses,” with a dark storytelling voice that stands in front of a galloping beat. Fearless and famous Patti Smith is a poet of punk

SKINNY

THE DOLLYROTS

This band started with two friends in Florida and relocated to their new hometown in Los Angeles in 2002. Kelly Ogdan is the lead singer and bass guitarist while Luis Cabezas plays lead guitar. They have written three albums together and are soon to release their fourth. “Skinny” is an older track off “Eat My Heart Out.” As the title “Skinny” would suggest, this song is about the unfair standards women have to live up to in the U.S. and how they can lead to eating disorders.

WHO INVITED THE YOUNG CRAZED PEELING YOU THE DISTILLERS

The aesthetic of Brody Dalle goes without saying she embraces punk fully, which is why she is so adored. The Australian native used her distinct brass voice and guitar-playing skills to keep the band alive through the revolving door of members. “The Young Crazed Peeling” is a track off of their 2002 album “Sing Sing Sing Death House.” The song is a confessional in which Brody explains where she’s from and how things might have been tough growing up, but she doesn’t take life for granted, knowing she has everything that she needs.

20 | Meets Obsession Magazine  The Punk Issue

THE DONNAS

The Donnas got together in the early 90s but are popularly known for their album “Spend the Night,” which was released in 2002. “Who Invited You” stood beside tracks like “Take it Off, Dirty Denim” and “Take me to the Backseat.” The obvious theme was females taking control of not only their personal lives but their sex lives as well. “Who Invited You” is a little bit more about rejection: “We don’t care if you think our party’s cool/because we do/and we don’t care if you have more fun at Sunday school cause who invited you?” You don’t have to be a man to be a bouncer - kick them out and grab their beer as they leave.


Beyond Obsessed!  MeetsObsession.com

VIOLET HOLE

Courtney Love is, for better or worse, the queen of grunge with an accessible sound and undeniable song writing skills. “Violet” peaked at No. 24 on Billboards’ Modern Rock tracks in 1994 after being released as the third single from “Live Through This.” Courtney made it clear that the lyrical content was about ex-boyfriend and Smashing Pumpkin front man Billy Corgan. But on a universal level, “Violet” is about the frustrations of a relationship and how the vulnerability can strip us of everything: “Go on take everything/Take everything/I want you to.”

BAD REPUTATION JOAN JETT

Other people write songs, but Joan Jett writes anthems. She is the definition of tough and the longevity of her career and her popularity make that clear. An executive producer for the movie “The Runaways,” Jett continues to tour, not to mention she provided commentary in Sini Anderson’s “The Punk Singer,” a documentary about Kathleen Hanna. “Bad Reputation” is a timeless song that reminds women everywhere to stay unapologetically true to themselves. There are all sorts of ways women get bad reputations and Joan Jett simply lets the listener know that she doesn’t give a damn.

NEW RADIO BIKINI KILL

Refreshingly honest, Bikini Kill led the largest feminist punk rock movement, Riot Grrrl, to date. It was songs like “New Radio” that encouraged females to act out in a boys-rule-the-universe world. Lead vocalist Kathleen Hanna implores “Turn that song down/Turn the static up.” Bikini Kill, a fairly secretive band that declined talking to the press on most occasions, let the music speak for itself.

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Treme Beauty

EYE-POPPING PRODUCTS TO GIVE YOU EXTRA EDGE Written by Susan Linney

You can’t pull off a truly punk rock look without adding some amazing makeup. But that doesn’t mean your face has to become the focal point of your overall style. Hints of edge added by a bold lip color, a shocking eye shadow shade or a high-impact blush can go a long way toward amping up an extreme outfit. Here are eight beauty products we love that will help kick your style up to an 11.

Shu-Uemura Rainbow Sensation Premium False Eyelashes If you’re looking to add even more extreme oomph to your eyelashes, Shu Uemura’s rainbow falsies are definitely the way to go. Designed by Kakuyasu Uchiide, the brand’s artistic director, the colorful, geometric pattern rests right on your eye line, so it looks as if you’re sporting an incredibly precise multicolor liner, along with super extreme lashes that won’t quit. sephora.com $28

Yves Saint Laurent Mascara Volume Effet Faux Cils Shocking in Deep Black Extreme lashes are easy to achieve with YSL’s volumizing mascara that takes each lash to gorgeous excess. The formula contains pro-vitamin V5, which creates even coats that produce a wonderfully sexy wet look. It also comes in three other shades — Black Bronze, Sea Black and Cherry Black — if you want to bat those lashes with an added hint of color. sephora.com $30

22 | Meets Obsession Magazine  The Punk Issue


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Obsessive Compulsive Cosmetics Lip Tar All Star Mini x 4 Set OCC Cosmetics is most definitely one of the best brands out there when it comes to outrageous, eye-popping color. Their highly pigmented Lip Tars, which are made for color blending and building, are musts for achieving an extreme look, and this set, available exclusively at Sephora, contains four mini tubes of OCC’s most popular shades.

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Deborah Lippman Glitter and Be Gay Nail Polish The canary yellow base is infused with gorgeous, glam glitter, making this polish a musthave sparkling shade for the holidays. It also screams extreme — if you want your nails to take center stage, look no further. We also recommend Lippman’s Cleopatra in New York ($19), which gives a similar edgy effect with its studded, gold-on-black glitter look.

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ion, the and condit sh a w I r e ft a when I blow dry my hair ng product h: w li c y lo it b st B r I g r ty n e u v si a e u e like conditione when Dear B mpoo and ell. I do not itioner. But a d sm sh dI n n o y -y c ra m ry d b f d n o r a w drye mpoo e smell air/blow a lo h th b f sh r o in y o d ta m in sh f re k o I ru a b ell is, how can atter what placed with I love the sm ant to know d it doesn’t seem to m one and re g w I is t a ll h e NYC .W sm an help lovely - Debbie B., g and fine, at doesn’t n th ! lo lp so e is , H ir ir a a t. h c h ta out my it out? My ed smell in fter I blow g, just-wash in z a m a in my hair a t a an’t keep th use. I just c

Hi Debbie: I’m afraid I have some bad news for you. According to our experts, you’re probably not going to be able to retain that smell you love 100%. “Perfumes in shampoos and conditioners are used to make the products smell while you’re using them,” says NYC hairstylist Andrew Fitzsimons. “They usually don’t remain very long after heat styling.” In addition, “you are going to lose fragrance when you blow dry your hair no matter what,” says Sam Brocato, hairdresser and CEO of Sam Brocato Salon, “because heat diffuses and vaporizes fragrance molecules. They begin to evaporate immediately once the hair starts being dried.”

We know you don’t like using styling products, but you really should be using some kind of heat protectant spray before you blow dry. “Chances are,” Brocato says, “if you are experiencing an overwhelming ‘hair’ smell, you might be burning or overheating it.” It’s really important to keep your hair healthy and protect it from damage (or else you won’t have any left to smell!), which is why a protectant spray is so important. Brocato recommends his own Cloud 9 Hotshapes Spray. I use TRESemmé’s Heat Tamer Spray, which is lightly scented, inexpensive, and very effective. However, there are some things you can do to try to keep that scent you love alive. Does the brand have a leave-in conditioner? If so, try adding some before you blow

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dry, which will definitely add fragrance to your strands. (Don’t use the regular conditioner, however, which will only weigh your hair down and leave it feeling oily.) Angelo David, stylist and owner of the Angelo David Salon, suggests shampooing your hair twice, and letting the lather from the second shampoo sit on your hair for about five minutes. Giving the shampoo a chance to really absorb might help your hair retain some of the scent you love. Rinse, then condition as usual. David also stresses the importance of always shampooing your hair twice —”otherwise, it doesn’t truly get 100% clean,” he maintains. “I see so many clients make this mistake, but in order to get rid of all the build-up


! h c t i B ty u a Be o o p m a My Sh

Cloud 9 Line, sambrocatosalon.com

and residue in your hair, so that your conditioner and styling products will work properly, two shampoos is a must.” Think about it—that’s what they always do at the salon, right? If the double shampoo doesn’t keep your keep beloved fragrance intact, Debbie, you may want to try David’s own VOL hair care line, which is perfect for fine hair, and contains a volumizing spray and leave-in conditioner, both of which leave a light, clean scent—one that might be a good replacement for your current fave. One final option: air-drying your hair for as long as possible before you blow it out. “If you shower in the morning,” Brocato suggests, “do your makeup first, eat your breakfast, and then blow out your hair,

? y r D w o l B I r e t f A

VOL Hair Care Line, angelodavid.com

which should leave some of your shampoo and conditioner scent intact.” But if you don’t have time for air-drying (and really, who does?), Fitzsimons suggests using a dry conditioner spray after you blow dry, to infuse your hair with scent as well as give it some extra moisture. He recommends Oribe’s Dry Conditioner Spray, which he says “smells amazing and adds luster and shine to the hair without weighing it down. It’s unique to most leave-in conditioners as it is dry, plus it smells lovely.” Additionally, when you do blow dry, you want to use as little heat as possible. And because of your fine hair, you should always use a very low setting, and should steer clear of ceramic driers. “They intensify the heating element in the blow

Oribe’s Dry Conditioner Spray, oribe.com

dryer,” Brocato explains. This could be adding to that “hair” smell you’re complaining about. So really, the key is to minimize heat as much as possible. “Always remember to hold your dryer at least 8-10 inches from your scalp,” Brocato stresses, “and always keep that dryer moving!” Good luck, Debbie! If that brand you love has a leave-in conditioner, that’s probably your best bet. Otherwise, you may need to stick to air-drying, or move on to another scent for your strands. Have a bitch of a beauty problem? Tell us about it! Email us at: thebeautybitch@meetsobsession.com

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UPRISING photography

KATHERINE GAINES/ AMBIENTEYE PHOTOGRAPHY stylist

ANNA DEMEO makeup

ANNA DEMEO hair

JULIE RUCKMAN model

LAUREN B location

PREMONITION STUDIOS

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HAND ACCESSORY: BRIGHTSIDE BOUTIQUE | EPAULETS: PEEKO APPAREL


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SHOES: JEFFREY CAMPBELL | GLOVES: URBAN OUTFITTERS


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DRESS: URBAN OUTFITTERS | NECKLACE: ART WITH LATEX


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HOODIE: OVATE


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SHIRT: LUCIE


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SHOES: CHARLOTTE RUSSE | TOP AND ARM BAND: PLASTIC VISCERA


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SHOES: CHARLOTTE RUSSE | TOP AND ARM BAND: PLASTIC VISCERA


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CLASS OF 2013 DC’S BEST IN PUNK

Written by Tricia Callahan

For some, it’s an enigma: loud, crass, tastelessly tasteful, and all things anti-authority and anti-establishment. Not easily defined, punk gained ground in a 70s England, when music, DIY fashion and anarchy defined a generation. Propelled, by hardcore punk band Bad Brains and Ian MacKaye, who owns DC-bred record label Dischord, the relationship between Washington, DC and punk - particularly hardcore and the straight-edge movement - is closer than you might imagine. In the 80s, MacKaye gave birth to the straight-edge movement through his band Minor Threat. Born out of frustration of the Reagan/Thatcher years, a laundry list of well-known and respected bands started in garages across the capital, straight-edge or otherwise. Back then, punk music was mostly a DIY cause; bands would make their own records, do their own marketing through zines, and distribute their own music. There were no major music labels. There was no money to be made and no one was looking for fame. Punk music was created by dedicated, passionate kids - mostly playing gigs for friends in basements and garages - because they had something important to say. Their music was confrontational, gritty, hard, loud and fast. Today, not much has changed. Meet DC’s Punk Class of 2013.

PHOTO TOP LEFT TO BOTTOM LEFT: COLLAPSER BY DARQUE ROOM IMAGES, COLLAPSER BY DARQUE ROOM IMAGES, KILL LINCOLN BY WOOLIF FOTOG


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COLLAPSER

PUNK CLASS OF 2013 MOST LIKELY TO PACK A PUNCH IN A SHORT AMOUNT OF TIME Collapser identifies itself as a “whiskey-tinged rock-n-roll punk” band and it’s easy to see why. Irish punk vocals with a layered sound that pays homage to many different influences of punk subgenres makes for a unique listen. This trio named their EP “Direction/Location” after a song that they recorded in a bathroom in DC. The uncut recording offers a raw moment in a band’s history that few are willing to share these days. When asked what three words that would describe the band, front man Ryan Ford replied, “Drunk. Loving. Apologies.” This sounds like a cycle you have in every relationship, and with such a real, gritty sound, it’s easy to see why he picked these words.

Ours is an era of fragmentation, with experiences and content designed for niche audiences that never before had a voice, largely a result of the proliferation of the internet. Given these new avenues for creativity, i think there’s a paradigm shift surrounding the whole idea of a scene. Regardless of this division and my attempts at using words i barely understand, local scenes certainly still thrive, which is a testament to the power of what it is they stand for. - RYAN FORD/COLLAPSER


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Never underestimate the power of an arm-inarm sing along with your best friends.

PHOTO: DARQUE ROOM IMAGES


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KILL LINCOLN PUNK CLASS OF 2013 BEST BREAKOUT BAND OF 2013 Everything that current radio is missing, Kill Lincoln has; palpable energy that jams like Operation Ivy, vocals like a good old NOFX track, and, quite frankly, would only be comparable to ska on steroids. Signed with Jump Start Records, Kill Lincoln is a seven-person army with an arsenal of horns, guitars, and noise at a double heartbeat pace. With the release of their new album “That’s Cool… in a totally negative and destructive way,” Kill Lincoln is dead set on having a coast-to-coast tour, which is why they have successfully set up a kick starter to fund their ambitions.

Our group of friends in DC and Baltimore are really incredible - they don’t just love going to see music, but they’re putting on their own shows, playing in kick ass bands, organizing events to raise awareness and money for causes, and just being generally awesome people. The DIY ethic is stronger here than anywhere I’ve ever seen it. - MIKE SOSINSKI/KILL LINCOLN


PHOTO: WOOLIF FOTOG


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We all draw on a lot of different influences, which really helps our sound stay fresh. Some of my biggest influences include The Mighty Mighty Bosstones, Less Than Jake, Kid Dynamite, The Suicide Machines, Lifetime, Anthrax, and Municipal Waste.

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PRIESTS

PUNK CLASS OF 2013 BEST FEMALE-FRONTED DIY GARAGE PUNK BAND IN DC Although no one in this band is ordained, they continue to carry strong messages through their roaring punk sound. Playing recently at the Black Cat and having a number of tour dates in NYC, it seems we’re not the only ones who have become fans. Recorded and mixed by DC-based Swim Two Birds Studio, their latest album effort “Tape Two” offers a bit of variety from the others on this list. With a sound that’s reminiscent of early punk all-girl bands like The Slits and X-Ray Spex, Priests’ album flips from tracks like the angsty, surf-rock-tinged “Leave Me Alone” to “USA,” a politically fueled spoken narrative set to the background of instrumentals. Priests are totally proud to be a female-centric band, but after speaking with them, it’s clear that there is much more to these leading ladies (and one gent) of rock.

We were inspired to make music together because we were almost bored senseless with our lives and it seemed like a good way to mix it up a little, try something new. - PRIESTS


PHOTO: AMY BREESMAN


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BOARDROOM HEROES PUNK CLASS OF 2013

MOST LIKELY TO END UP ON A THPS (TONY HAWK PRO SKATER) SOUNDTRACK Signed with Sinking Ship Records, Boardroom Heroes, a strong foundation of experienced musicians, might bring back memories of 80s band Anti-Flag. With catchy songs that lyrically carry an emotional weight, Boardroom Heroes’ punchy approach helps us think about the world in a different way and, maybe, in a more enlightened perspective. Songs like “Tomorrow Came Early” are a sincere reflection of time passing without change or progress and, instead, just regret.

I don’t think a person who actually goes to shows, knows people in bands, or spends any time in a music scene can honestly say that what made punk exciting to a bygone generation has faded completely. There’s been an evolution in sound, style, and other markers of scene culture that are more or less important. But there’s definitely something still alive in this music. - ANDRE PAGLIARINI/ BOARDROOM HEROES


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My first taste of punk music came in 1999, when I was about 10 years old and listened to a Blink 182 record. Certainly the most sugary of punk bands; nonetheless, it was incredible to hear at 10 and it did what it was supposed to do: it started me on a journey to discovering more punk music. Soon I was getting into all sorts of different punk scenes and flavors and, even when I wasn’t listening to punk music, the punk attitude was shaping my attitude and my influences. Some of the best reflections of punk music’s influence can be found in film. From documentaries to comedies to art films, punk has been displayed onscreen in a multitude of ways—some more effectively than others. The musical stepchild spawned from a generation of lost, disillusioned and ignored children became the tastemakers for an aesthetic that was equal parts gritty, dreamy, wandering and dirty. Punk, above all things, was about expression — pure, unadulterated creation — and a number of films and filmmakers have tried to capture that same intense level of expression. Below is a list of films that show off the punk lifestyle deliberately or inherently within their stories. Some are documentaries about these hectic times and aftermaths, while others are films that have taken the punk aesthetic as their canvas in which to create their stories about outliers and loners. This is the ultimate movie marathon for the punk fans and loyalists alike.

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Sid & Nancy (1981) Alex Cox’s film is about the tumultuous, chaotic relationship between the Sex Pistols’ bassist Sid Vicious and his girlfriend Nancy Spungen and the mystery surrounding her death. Starring Gary Oldman and Chloe Webb, the film does its best to capture the craziness and intense story of drug-abusing punk rockers in love to mostly good effect, while never trying to imply more about the story than what is already known to us.

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Blank City (2010) Blank City chronicles the “No Wave” cinema movement. Spawned out of the punk generation in New York in the late 70s, a new legion of do-it-yourselfers took what money they had and made films, art and music. Blank City gives insight into that world and what that time in New York was like.

Rock ‘N’ Roll High School (1979) For a little more fun, the musical comedy Rock ‘N’ Roll High Schoolmanages to show a sillier side to the punk scene. Arguably the punk rock Footloose, RRHS tells the tale of Riff Randell, her obsession with the Ramones, and a principal desperately trying to stop this silly music from corrupting the students. The fact that the film features the Ramones makes it a worthwhile watch.

Repo Man (1984) Speaking of Alex Co x, his 1984 Repo Man film , is a thrill ing and fu , science fi nny ction film placed in 80s LA p the unk scen e. With E Estevez s milio tarring as Otto slacker wit h a bad att Maddox, a itud follows his journey dis e, the film covering th crazy sup ernatural e events ta place in th king e city whil e taking p his new life art in as a Repo Man.

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Taxi Driver (1976) While not necessarily about punk or the punk culture, it’s pretty clear that the aesthetic is all over this film. Robert DeNiro’s Travis Bickle is a lonely, disillusioned and overlooked young man reacting to an ugly city full of crime and filth. The grittiness, aggression and emotion are all on full display and color a world that corrupts a man until he loses it and takes his grievances out on society. You can’t get much more punk rock than that.

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Punk music has been around since the 70s; however, with each new generation, a new sound evolves. Borrowing from the older generations, as well as creating new, never-heard-before sounds of their own, punk artists are drawing from past and present to create new sub-genres of punk music. If you’ve ever asked yourself what a Rod Stewart song would sound like a little faster, a bit dirtier and definitely louder, you’ll want to read further to see our favorite collection of songs that received the punk makeover treatment. Each of our picks has mixed punk with vastly different genres to create a wholly new song with a delightful twist. 66 | Meets Obsession Magazine  The Punk Art Issue Issue

Child of the 80s Let’s face it; the 80s were the epitome of creative expression. From the way teens dressed, danced and did their hair, to popular music, everything was bursting with energy. And if John Hughes’s movies have taught us anything, it is that the music sets the mood to any occasion. These covers add a little something special to these classic 80s hits that will take you back to a time of boys holding boom boxes over their heads, riding off into the sunset on lawn mowers and hot guys waiting outside the


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Your Dad’s Faves There are some songs that are burned into our brains after a childhood filled with a soundtrack of classic rock circa 1960. These songs have been reimagined by punk artists in a way that fuses the music of two generations. Although your dad might not appreciate these aggressive covers, any child of the pop-punk era will find these songs a refreshing take on

Songs

1. Summer of 69 - MxPx 2. So Happy Together - New Found Glory 3. What A Wonderful World - The Ramones 4. Can’t Take My Eyes Off of You - Muse 5. Roxanne - Fall Out Boy 6. Mr. Jones - Hidden In Plain View

Parts Reggae and One Part Punk

Songs 1. Reel Big Fish - Take on Me 2. So They Say - Forever Young 3. Spoken - Time After Time

Punk and Reggae: Two genres that seem as mismatched as peanut butter and Oreos, but an equally delicious combination. These two covers still have that unmistakable Reggae beat that makes us want to ight up while lying on the beach with an “in-your-face” attitude. It is no easy task to take two well-known reggae songs and give them a punk makeover, especially without corrupting the original work, by giving typically mellow songs a more hyped-up punk vibe.

Songs

1. Spunge - No Woman No Cry 2. Dead Kennedys - I Fought the Law

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