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ISSUE 32 February / March 2011 Circulation: 115,471

Peter Andre - win tickets Page 7

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February/March 2011

Contacting Medway Council On the internet: Visit www.medway.gov.uk By phone: Call 333333 for enquiries about waste, recycling, roads, traffic management, public transport, green spaces and environmental health (Monday to Friday from 8am to 8pm and Saturday from 9am to 1pm). Phone 332222 for council tax and benefit enquiries. Phone 306000 for all other services. Minicom: 01634 333111 or TextRelay: 18001 01634 333333 By letter: Gun Wharf, Dock Road, Chatham, ME4 4TR We have Contact Points providing local access to council services: ● Chatham Riverside One, Dock Road, Chatham, ME4 4SL Monday to Thursday: 8.30am to 5.15pm, Friday: 8.30am to 4.45pm ●

Gillingham Gillingham Library, High Street, Gillingham, ME7 1BG

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday: 9am to 5pm, Tuesday: 10am to 5pm, Saturday: 9am to 1pm ●

Rainham 1 - 3 Station Road, Rainham, ME8 7RS

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday: 9am to 5pm, Wednesday: 9am to 7.30pm, Saturday: 9am to 1pm ●

Rochester Rochester Library, Eastgate, Rochester, ME1 1EW

Monday to Friday: 9am to 5pm, Saturday: 10am to 1pm ●

Strood Clocktower, Civic Centre, Strood, ME2 4AU

Monday to Thursday: 8.30am to 5.15pm, Friday: 8.30am to 4.45pm, Saturday: 9am to 1pm

Rainham and Strood Contact Points also include Kent Police services ADVERTISEMENT

Call: 01634 848441 for a no obligation appointment Offices in: Gillingham, Sittingbourne and Whitstable

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February/March 2011

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Helping during these tough times We all know this is a difficult time and Medway, as well as the wider area of Kent, has not been overlooked by the national recession. Along with the austerity measures brought about through funding cuts, these are issues that affect the whole area. Looking through this edition of Medway Matters, you will see some of the things that Medway Council does to try and redress the balance. For instance, on page 8, it is good to read that the Innovation Centre Medway (ICM) is now more than 80 per cent full. Despite the economic downturn, firms have moved to the council-run high-tech facility and are creating high quality jobs. The story of businessman David Summers is a case in point. His firm had to leave the area in the 1990s due to a lack of good quality office space. Now he has moved the headquarters of his firm – which carries out property surveys for companies in the high-tech sector – to the ICM, next to Rochester airport, where he is providing high-speed broadband connections, state of the art servers and other kinds of technical support. This is good news for Medway and, hopefully, it will inspire other entrepreneurs to follow suit. In addition, the council provides business start-up grants and loans, which you can read about on page 13. The grants have helped 30 businesses start trading in the last year, while the loans have helped around 175 firms and created 900 jobs. Despite these examples, the recession will still bring tough times. And cuts to government funding mean that there is less money for major infrastructure projects.That is why the council believes its bid to become a city is so important. It will provide “a golden opportunity” to market the area to investors. Other towns that have become cities report international firms moving in and creating jobs as well as an increase in tourism and the income it brings. You can read more about the city bid on pages 10 and 11. Medway’s bid has to be in by the end of May and while, of course, it is not a guaranteed winner, it has a good chance of beating the competition and gaining the title. As you can see, Medway may not be out of the woods as far as the John Staples, economy is concerned, but there are many things going on aimed at Editor preparing this area – and its residents – for a brighter future.

INSIDE Funding shortfall Government grant cut is worse than expected Page 6 Castle concerts Win tickets to see Peter Andre perform at Rochester Castle Page 7 Colour coding Dividing household waste for recycling Page 12 Helping firms Loans and grants help new businesses Page 13 Caring nature Ending loneliness and boredom in care homes Page 18 What’s On A selection of upcoming events in Medway Page 28 Cover picture: Peter Andre © Can Associates Limited

Year of the Rabbit: Join in celebrations for the Chinese New Year Page 5 Ironclad: A £15million film based on the 13th century siege of Rochester Castle is set for cinema release nationwide Page 9

All lit up: Illuminating the Naval War Memorial and Fort Amherst Page 14

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Up to their tricks: BMX bikers and boarders try out new skate park Page 19

Town and country: A five-mile urban and rural community trail opens Page 25

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Councillor Phil Filmer Medway Council’s Portfolio Holder for Front Line Services

Councillor Mike O’Brien Medway Council’s Portfolio Holder for Community Safety and Enforcement

What do you do and what are you responsible for at the council?

What do you do and what are you responsible for at the council?

As well as being a councillor representing the Hoo Peninsula, I am responsible for the council’s Front Line Services. Each time you drive in Medway, use one of our car parks or put your recycling out for collection, you are using one of these services.

I have represented Rainham Central since 2007 and I’m the Cabinet Member responsible for Community Safety and Enforcement, working in partnership with the police, fire services and other agencies, to make Medway a safe place to live and work

What does your portfolio do to improve the lives of people in Medway? From your weekly bin collection to resurfacing roads and cleaning the streets, my team is here to ensure that Medway remains a clean and safe place to live and travel. We have a continuing programme of highway improvements and we are not only keeping the weekly bin collection but our recycling and composting rates have risen to around 36 per cent of Medway’s household waste. I consider ensuring that our children get to school safely is a priority. We have 42 Walking Bus routes with about 765 children taking part, and our Walk on Wednesdays initiative that attracts 5,400 young people. We’ve expanded the yellow bus [subsidised school travel] scheme to the Hoo Peninsula and provide a half price bus scheme for students up to the age of 18, and the Villager, a rural community transport scheme.

What are you most proud of during your time as portfolio holder? I am very proud of the improvements we’ve made in road safety. In the past year these have included a 20mph zone, a puffin crossing on the A2 and safety cameras. For the third year in a row, the government have put Medway in the top 10 for road safety. Our safety measures and campaigns have contributed to reducing the number of deaths and serious injuries on Medway’s roads.

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What does your portfolio do to improve the lives of people in Medway? We have a strong record in making Medway safe, with community officers in our 22 wards tackling issues such as antisocial behaviour, littering and stray dogs. By supporting the SOS bus and street pastors, we are helping to make our towns safer in the evenings so that people can take advantage of the fantastic restaurants and nightlife. Our excellent Trading Standards department helps to protect consumers and businesses and checks that people are obeying the law, while the Environmental Health team ensures that food outlets are hygienic and safe. Keeping the streets and green spaces clean is one of my priorities. The rapid action graffiti team has cleaned 1,330 sites in the past year. To help us in making Medway a better place, I’d encourage residents to report incidents of graffiti and flytipping to Customer First on 333333.

What are you most proud of during your time as portfolio holder? I am proud of all we are doing to make Medway green, clean and safe, and, in particular, the Schools and Community Together (SACT) scheme. This forum gives students an opportunity to gain an insight into the impact of social behaviour that causes problems for other people.

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Welcome to the Year of the Rabbit The Chinese New Year celebrations in Chatham will be launched in spectacular style on Saturday, 5 February. To celebrate the Year of the Rabbit, entertainment will take place in Chatham High Street from 11.30am until 2pm, with dancers in colourful Chinese costumes, including the Medway Lion Team, Shi Kon Martial Arts Team and Dance Alley Dancers. High Street stalls will be selling food, Chinese gifts and New Year calendars. There will also be a children’s roundabout. The celebrations continue later in the month with the Medway Chinese New Year Parade on Sunday, 13 February. The procession starts at noon in Military Road and winds through the town to the eastern end of Chatham High Street. It will feature Chinese dragons, Chinese lion and unicorn dancers and more than 150 people in Chinese costume. The Mayor and Mayoress of Medway, Cllr David Brake and Mrs Carmita Brake will lead the parade, along with mayors from across the south east.

To round off this year’s events, the parade will be followed by The Wonderful China Show at The Central Theatre, Chatham, at 2.30pm. The show has displays of dragon dancing, lion dancing, martial arts, traditional Chinese folk dancing, the Dance Alley Dancers in traditional Chinese costume, Chinese pop music and traditional musicians. Tickets cost £7.50, concessions £5.50 and are available from the box office on 338338. For more details or to book tickets online visit www.whatsonmedway.gov.uk.

Care card makes it easier to pay for support A card that is a secure and convenient way of receiving social care direct payments is being launched in April. direct payment. The card can The Medway Card is an easier be used over the internet, by way for people to pay for their phone or face-to-face. support. It is a preloaded Visa As it is a chip and PIN card, card that can be used without it offers more security than having to open a separate using cash or personal bank account. cheques. And it will provide a Medway Council puts the solution if the national direct payments on to the proposal goes ahead to card instead of paying it into phase out cheques by 2018. a bank account. The cardholder will receive a Then the holder can use it monthly statement and the wherever a Visa card is accepted and to pay care providers or a personal assistant. It has been developed in a partnership between the council and the Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) and provides the cardholder with flexibility, choice and control of how they use their social care

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balance can be checked by phone, at a cash machine or on the internet. The Medway Card is optional, but people who are entitled to one should contact their self-directed support co-ordinator who will visit them at home to discuss the benefits and to offer them help with completing the application form. About 600 people in Medway who receive direct payments from the council for their community support and activities are eligible to apply for the card now. Cllr Tom Mason, the council’s Portfolio Holder

for Adult Services, said: “The Medway Card is going to be very helpful for social care service users. Not only does it make payments easier, but also it gives the holder greater independence and control of their finances. “Having a card eliminates the need for a separate bank account, enables the holder to keep an up to date record of transactions and does away with the need for them to withdraw large amounts of cash from the bank or to write and post cheques.” For further information phone 331093, contact a self-directed support co-ordinator or visit www.medway.gov.uk/ medwaycard.

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Whitehall funding falls short Pay freezes and job cuts as council battles to bridge £23.5m gap Medway Council’s government grant for the next financial year is even less than expected – despite the council attempting to predict a worst-case scenario over Whitehall cuts. Ministers said the reduced funding would be a 3.6 per cent cut in Medway’s spending power, but that no council would see a drop greater than 8.9 per cent. However, Medway Council’s officers have worked through the figures provided and discovered a larger cut of 11.9 per cent in grant funding from the government. This is far greater than the average for all councils in England of 9.9 per cent and more than the 11.4 per cent average for unitary councils outside of London.

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The new figures were worked out by Medway Council following the government’s announcement in December of all council grant funding for 2011-12. This leaves Medway with a £23.5million funding gap for the 2011-12 financial year. This is how much it will need to save to balance its budget. The council had predicted a funding gap of £19.5million. The government has stated that any council whose spending power drops by more than 8.9 per cent – a new method of measurement

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brought in by the government this year – will receive a top up. And 36 councils in England will receive this, such as Liverpool, which will get an extra £15.5million, and Manchester, which will get a further £13.3million. But Medway Council – despite seeing an 11.9 per cent drop in real funding – will receive no additional payment under this new formula. The council’s budgets were already tight, as it receives one of the lowest government grants of any unitary authority. Medway Council has been working to see where it can make reductions while protecting its vital front line services such as social care, highways, refuse collection and other valued areas, especially services for the vulnerable. And the council’s cabinet instructed officers to consult on team restructures, which will lead to job cuts. Directors and Assistant Directors have been looking at reducing budgets by 25 per cent over four years and the Better for Less initiative, which looks at how the council can provide better services to meet customers needs and where efficiencies can be made, is continuing. In addition, the council has frozen pay, cut jobs last June and is closing its regeneration arm – Medway Renaissance – with the loss of 18 jobs.

Government grants in areas such as transport, skills training and migration will cease. The cabinet will set a budget for the new financial year during February and it will go to the full council for approval on Thursday, 24 February. Cllr Alan Jarrett, Deputy Leader and Portfolio Holder for Finance, said: “Medway has traditionally received less funding than similar sized authorities, but through hard work and determination we have consistently been judged as providing good value for money. “We knew from our forecast

‘We will see cuts of nearly 12 per cent’ that we would have to make difficult decisions in order to provide the vital services our residents expect while saving money. “The fact that the government is giving us even less, and considerably below that which many other councils are receiving, is going to make balancing our budget even more difficult. “I find the smoke and mirrors way the government has attempted to make it look like Medway is only losing around four per cent, when in reality it will see cuts of nearly 12 per cent next year, particularly unpalatable.”

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Show of Hands and Carthy for Sweeps The award winning folk acts, the Eliza Carthy Band and Show of Hands will headline this year’s Rochester Sweeps Festival. Carthy will perform at the castle gardens marquee on Saturday, 30 April at 7.30pm along with her father, Martin. Twice nominated for a Mercury award, she has received three nominations for the 2011 BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards being held on Monday, 7 February. Show of Hands will appear at the marquee on Sunday, 1 May, at 7.30pm. They have a large Kent following and won best duo at last year’s Folk Awards. The couple, Phil Beer and Steve Knightley, have played three sell-out concerts at the Royal Albert Hall. Tickets for each concert cost £18 and are available from the usual ticket outlets (see opposite) or online at www.whatsonmedway.co.uk. The Sweeps Festival, now in its 31st year, runs from Saturday, 30 April to Monday, 2 May, and is the largest celebration of Morris dancing in the country.

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February/March 2011

Win tickets for Peter Andre Peter Andre will be playing a sell-out concert at Rochester Castle this summer but five lucky Medway Matters readers could each win a pair of tickets to be there. Andre performs at the annual Medway Council organised series of concerts on Thursday, 14 July, hot on the heels of the release of his latest album Accelerate. Tickets at £32.50 are available by calling in person at The Central Theatre or The Brook Theatre box offices in Chatham, Medway Visitor Information Centre, 95 High Street, Rochester, by phone on 338338 or online at www.castleconcerts.co.uk. Andre's performance is one of four major summer concerts that will be held over consecutive nights in the castle gardens. The Royal Philharmonic Proms Orchestra will appear for the Castle Proms on the final night, Saturday, 16 July, with support from the Hertfordshire Choral Society. Tickets, at £29.50, are the same price as last year. Full details of all the concerts can be found at www.castleconcerts.co.uk. In addition, the fourth Under Siege free concert featuring young local talent will be held at the castle on Sunday, 17 July.

How to enter To be in with a chance of winning tickets tell us the name of Andre’s latest album. Send your answer along with your name and contact details (phone number, email and/or postal address) to: Peter Andre, Medway Matters, Medway Council, Gun Wharf, Dock Road, Chatham ME4 4TR, or email medway.matters@medway.gov.uk, subject ‘Peter Andre’. The closing date is 5pm on Friday, 25 March, and the winners will be the first five selected from all entries.

Photo: Can Associates Limited

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The Editor’s decision is final. For competition rules visit www.medway.gov.uk/rules.

Doorstep library deliveries are vital link for housebound A dedicated group of volunteers is improving the lives of housebound people and carers throughout Medway by taking library services to their homes. The home delivery service provides large and standard print books, talking books, jigsaws, DVDs and music CDs for people who are unable to get to their local library. The 27 regular volunteer drivers visit about 130 homes at least once a month. They are an important social link for many people who are housebound and unable to get out much. This may be because they have caring responsibilities, a disability, are elderly or infirm. One woman said: “I have always been an avid reader but I’m unable to walk to the library. Now I look forward to some good reading and seeing a friendly face every month.” People can apply for a home delivery by contacting any

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Medway library. A note is taken of their likes and dislikes, favourite subjects and authors and they can request certain books or ask for a choice tailored to their profile. Some users who can get to a library during the summer just ask for a home delivery during the winter months. Mac Cain, one of the volunteer drivers, said: “I get satisfaction knowing that I’m able to help people continue with their reading.” Cllr Howard Doe, Medway Council’s Portfolio Holder for Community Services, said: “The people who use this service value it enormously for the contribution it makes to their quality of life. The social and literary enjoyment they get from it is in part due to the helpful staff and the dedication of the volunteer couriers who help to run the service.” For more information phone 337340 or email gillingham.library@medway.gov.uk.

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February/March 2011

Centre for creative talent Firms with creative and original ideas, attracted by the unique facilities offered by the Innovation Centre Medway (ICM), are moving to the area and creating jobs. The ICM, on Maidstone Road, Chatham, is more than 80 per cent full and has 44 firms that employ about 120 people. The three-storey building offers a range of facilities for high-tech innovative businesses, including a dual redundant 100 megabits per second (Mbps) internet connection, server hosting for off-site clients, 150 parking spaces, reception facilities and a 75-seat conference centre. An on-site team of business advisers

offer tenants their expertise from PR and marketing advice to guidance on product development and legal and accountancy issues. The centre is attracting and retaining companies such as marketing firms, software companies, website developers and financial services businesses. Not so long ago these firms might have opted for locations away from Medway. Medway Council’s Portfolio Holder for

Strategic Development and Economic Growth, Cllr Jane Chitty, said: “We are constantly looking at ways to attract new businesses to the area and to keep local talent here in Medway. “The Innovation Centre is all about the future and is fast becoming a hub where forward thinking businesses of the 21st century can grow.” For more information phone the Innovation Centre on 887282 or email info@innovationcentremedway.co.uk.

Firm born in back bedroom returns home in style In 1993, at the age of 20, David Summers was a fledgling businessman running a telecommunications support firm from a back bedroom of his semi-detached home. He expanded quickly, opening offices in Maidstone, Edinburgh and Belfast, and employing 53 people. Now he has returned to his roots by relocating his headquarters to the top floor of Medway Council’s Innovation Centre. He says the centre provides the best high-tech facilities in Kent, and he believes these will help him expand further and create jobs for local people. Mr Summers, 37, had been working for a mobile phone company when he set up Harlequin Ltd in Coniston Close, Gillingham. The firm carries out property surveys for companies in the technology sector. Its clients include 02, Orange and Vodafone and the firm recently won a contract helping British Telecom roll out broadband across the UK. His offices are still operating in Edinburgh and Belfast. Mr Summers (right) moved his headquarters to Maidstone in 1995 because, at the time, he could not find suitable premises in Medway for his growing firm.

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Now the Innovation Centre Medway meets his demand for bigger office space in a place with high-tech facilities to service his growing client base. “The Innovation Centre offers the best broadband facilities in Kent. The facilities are unrivalled,” he said.

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ochester Castle will star on cinema screens across the country in March when it takes centre stage in the £15million action thriller Ironclad. The film, which has already received excellent pre-release reviews within the industry, is described as a medieval Magnificent Seven that promises wham-bam action, epic emotion and gore. Released by Warner Bros UK on Friday, 4 March, Ironclad (Cert 15) is based on the two month siege of Rochester Castle in 1215, probably one of the most prominent dates in the area’s history. The film stars Paul Giamatti as the despised King John, the American actress Kate Mara (Brokeback Mountain), Maidstone -born Mackenzie Crook (The Office), James Purefoy, Charles Dance, Brian Cox, James Flemyng and Sir Derek Jacobi. A replica of the 13th century castle was built at Dragon Studios in Rhondda Cynon Taf, south Wales, where the whole film was shot. Produced by Mythic Entertainment’s Rick Benattar and Andrew Curtis, and directed by Jonathan English (A Good Woman), Ironclad is the largest independent production filmed in Wales. But it was hit by the global banking crisis and has had to overcome more obstacles than most independent films. Curtis described its finances as “more complex than a London Underground map”. Cinemas in Medway are proposing to screen the film soon after its release.

© 2010 Runnymede Productions Ltd

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It is 1215 and King John is forced by rebellious barons to put his seal on the Magna Carta, upholding the rights of free men, but within months he reneges on his pledge. He assembles a mercenary army intending to exert bloody revenge on those who defied him. The mighty Rochester Castle, held by a group of Knights Templar, bars his way and becomes a symbol of the rebels’ struggle for justice and freedom. King John breaches the castle by undermining the south east tower, using the fat from 40 pigs to set fire to pit props.

n Overlooking Rochester Castle in a scene from Ironclad

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February/March 2011

City status victory will help market Medway to investors A successful city bid next year would help market Medway to investors, both nationally and internationally. As the government invites bids by Friday, 27 May, for the competition to award city status during the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee next year, Medway Council has announced that it will put forward a unique application to transform Medway’s five towns and rural areas into one city. The town that wins the competition will be declared a city by the Queen in 2012. The Medway area forms the largest conurbation in the south east of England outside London with a population of nearly 260,000. The bid application will note that Medway has all the key credentials of a city. These include four universities, a cathedral, two castles, unrivalled heritage including a world-famous historic dockyard and superb transport and trade links to the capital and continent. Next year Medway will celebrate the 200th anniversary of

Charles Dickens’ birth, the bicentenary of the Royal Engineers in Medway, and the Olympic and Paralympic Games. Hopefully, the year will also see Medway submit its dossier for the Historic Dockyard and its Defences to be nominated as a World Heritage Site. This rich heritage, including the cathedral, castles and military history, allied to a great future as a university, cultural, sporting and tourism destination, gives Medway an outstanding chance of success. A recent survey shows that 67 per cent of people in Medway actively support the area’s bid, as do the KM Group, BAE Systems, Arriva, mhs homes, Ward Homes, Peel Ports, Medway’s four universities, Kent County Council and every Kent district. While other towns will be competing for city status in 2012, Medway’s bid is strengthened by its combination of five towns – Chatham, Gillingham, Rainham, Rochester and Strood – each bringing its own distinct identity. Each town, of course, would retain its individual identity within the city. For more details about the city status competition visit www.culture.gov.uk/ what_we_do/honours/7610.aspx.

Support Medway’s city bid www.cityofmedway.org

‘We have all the key city credentials’ “We believe that we have the strongest possible case,” said Cllr Rodney Chambers, the Leader of Medway Council. “Medway has all the key city credentials. It has a population of nearly 260,000, four universities, a famous cathedral, a Football League club, superb transport and trade links, the historic dockyard, a £6billion programme of regeneration, rural areas and a great river setting. “But it is not the buildings that make Medway, it is the people. “We are a city, in all but name. And it is the people of Medway – our strong, diverse and talented community – who will champion our city credentials. “The people are the driving force of Medway, and they deserve the recognition this honour would bestow. “If we can gain city status during the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee year this would help us to fully market what this area has to offer. “We fully believe that, with the squeeze on the public sector purse and the downturn in grants from central government, gaining city status would present us with a golden opportunity to secure yet more investment from the private sector. “There is every reason for Medway to go for it.”

© D Heathfield

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February/March 2011

Colourful way to recycle An expansion of Medway’s kerbside collection service means residents can now recycle more household waste than ever. Over the past few months several changes have been introduced and more than three quarters of residents are now regularly recycling. With a simple colour code, the blue reusable bags are for paper and cardboard while the white bags take glass bottles, jars, cans, clean tin foil, empty aerosols and household packaging such as plastic bottles, yoghurt pots and margarine tubs. The brown wheelie bins are for food and garden waste. Anything else can be put in a black plastic sack.

Extra blue and white sacks are available at contact points and libraries, or residents can use carrier bags and boxes if their containers are full. Cllr Phil Filmer, the Portfolio Holder for Frontline Services, said: “I thank Medway’s residents for adapting to the slight changes brought in. “Separating the paper from other recyclable material increases its value. This, of course, allows us to use this money to maintain other important council services that we provide for residents. Recycling is also much better for the environment.”

Why put food waste in my brown bin? n Food from the brown bins is converted into compost by a natural process. The majority of the produce is then spread on local farms as a fertiliser. n Food waste put in black bin liners is not recycled. n The cost of composting food waste is about 30 per cent less than if it is put in a black sack. n Animals have difficulty getting to food in a bin, but can rip open a black sack. n Food can be wrapped in paper or in compostable caddie liners to prevent any odours or spillage.

Why separate paper/card? n Paper and card makes up about 70 per cent by weight of household recycling. n Separated paper is worth £500,000 a year. n If it is mixed with other recyclables it has to go through a costly mechanical process to separate it. n Paper and card that is collected separately does not have to go through a sorting process, has a better value on UK markets.

Why issue reusable bags? n There was a need for two new containers – one for paper and card and the other for mixed recycling. n The paper and card has to be free from any other material, including plastic bags. n Issuing reusable bags rather than single use throw away ones will save about £170,000 a year.

Why not a wheeled bin for recycling? n Wheeled bins would have been the most expensive option, would not suit many properties and the service would still need two containers.

Why not weekly recycling? n It would require a lot more lorries and would have added £1.2million a year to the cost of the contract.

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February/March 2011

Grants boost for new firms and jobs Businesses in Medway are reaping the benefits of Medway Council’s loans and grants scheme, which gives them financial help to set up their firms and grow despite the recession. The Partners for Growth initiative offers interest free loans and start-up grants to small and medium sized businesses, helping them to develop and create jobs. The loan scheme typically lends up to £15,000 to approved businesses and repayments don’t start for six months. The loans, which can be used to pay for equipment, staff training or new technology, have helped around 175 businesses in Medway, creating more than 900 jobs. In just over a year, the start-up grant scheme has helped establish more than 30 businesses, creating at least 30 local jobs. Applicants for a loan or grant should contact the council’s accredited business advisers, who will assess the idea and put together a viable business plan. The council’s Portfolio Holder for Strategic Development and Economic Growth Cllr Jane Chitty said: “The council is committed to helping businesses in the area pursue their goals and create employment. These schemes underline this commitment and we are beginning to see positive results, with jobs secured, new roles being created and firms bucking the economic trend.” For more information phone the council’s Economic Development Team on 338138, email business.support@medway.gov.uk or visit www.medway.gov.uk/business.aspx.

Loan backs eco-friendly towels Fabricsmart, based at the Innovation Centre Medway, received £15,000 from the council’s Partners for Growth loan scheme to help it expand. The firm, run by entrepreneur Rob Cooper, specialises in developing eco-friendly disposable products for the beauty industry. Its latest innovation, the Scrummi, a range of biodegradable towels, is used in more than 300 beauty salons, spas, hairdressers and sports centres across the country. “Our unique product helps salons and spas reduce their environmental impact while making savings on having to wash towels. With the interest free loan we can market this product and employ more staff to help develop our products and ensure our growth,” Mr Cooper said. Fabricsmart: 821609, visit www.fabricsmart.co.uk or email info@fabricsmart.co.uk.

Jobless driver tends the gardens Martin Rider’s business is growing since he used his £1,000 business grant to move into gardening. He struggled to find work after being made redundant from his delivery driver job in 2009, but applied for a grant that helped him buy a van and tools and provided him with valuable business advice and training. He now has 30 customers. The father of five, from Rainham, said: “Going it alone was daunting, I’d been unemployed for a while so money was tight and the grant was really valuable.” Marty Gardening: 07717 501425.

Cash puts business on the move Prestige Mobility took to the road thanks to a £1,000 start-up grant from the council. Jeffrey Prestige, 61, from Wilson Avenue, Rochester, uses a specially adapted vehicle with a chair lift to transport people who are in wheelchairs. The former engineer set up his business after experiencing difficulty transporting his wheelchair bound father. He said: “The grant scheme offered training courses on the fundamentals of managing a business and I’d recommend it.” Prestige Mobility: 07704 404043.

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Memorial throws new light on Chatham’s heritage It’s been a beacon on the Medway skyline for 87 years and now Chatham Naval War Memorial shines brightly over the town every night, lit by low energy bulbs. The illumination of Fort Amherst and the memorial to almost 19,000 sailors from both World Wars who have no known grave is part of the continuing work to revitalise the Great Lines Heritage Park. It is linked to the World Heritage Site bid for Chatham Dockyard and its Defences. The fort and memorial are lit every evening. Six areas of the Napoleonic fort are lit, including the Barrier Ditch, the Cave Yard, Prince William’s bastion and the front of Belvedere. The overground areas of the

250-year-old fort will be open to the public free of charge once the improvement work is completed in a few months. The Friends of the Great Lines Heritage Park, a community group that intends to raise awareness about the park and help to keep it clean and tidy, has an open meeting at Brompton Academy on Thursday, 3 March, at 7pm. Cllr Rodney Chambers, the Leader of Medway Council, said: “Fort Amherst has played a significant part in our area’s illustrious naval history and the

Naval War Memorial commemorates the lives of Royal Naval personnel who gave their lives for this country. “I am very proud that we now light up the fort and the memorial so that residents and visitors are reminded of their importance.” For more details about the Heritage Park or the Friends visit www.glhp.co.uk, email nicola.moy@medway.gov.uk or phone 334319. The Friends receives support from the Medway Urban Parks and Green Spaces Forum. For more information about this voluntary body visit www.mupgsf.btck.co.uk or phone 319461.

n The Government has received Medway’s application to join the list of UK World Heritage Sites. A strong case has been made for Chatham Dockyard and its Defences to be the UK’s 2012 nomination.

Your rubbish can be child’s play With a little imagination and creativity, paper and fabrics can be valuable items for children to use in crafts and play. And households across Medway are being asked to donate useful materials to the Scrap Store that can be used by people working with young children. Materials such as clean fabrics, unused card and paper, wool, beads, old Christmas decorations, CDs and anything that is suitable for children’s use are needed for the store, the only one in Medway. Curtains can be cut up and used to make dressing up

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clothes, covers for den making and story sacks, while paper can be used for drawing, painting, book making and many other activities. The store, in Bligh Way, Strood, alongside Bligh Junior School, is run by the Early n In a scrap: Mark Holmes from the Early Years Services Years and Childcare Minimisation Team for its help the store has seen donations Professional Development in reducing the amount of from residents and businesses Centre and has been a great unnecessary waste being sent and voluntary organisations success since it launched a to landfill. such as the Women’s Institute. year ago. But it needs a To make a donation or for The scheme is backed by constant supply of materials to more details phone 331488. Medway Council’s Waste continue. Over the past year,

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February/March 2011

Dated schools get £15m makeover Seven primary schools in Medway are to be rebuilt or modernised during the next year at a cost of nearly £15million with most of the work expected to start this summer. The school buildings at All Faiths', Strood; Napier, Gillingham; Oaklands, Chatham; Thames View, Gillingham; Lordswood, Chatham; Twydall and Walderslade will all be improved. Construction of the new Walderslade primary school began in the autumn and the building is due to open in September. The new and modernised schools will help towards raising standards and results for children and young people in Medway. The schools were given £14.9million from Medway Council’s 2010-11 Primary Capital Programme budget after being earmarked as the buildings most in need of improvement. The council’s Portfolio Holder for Children’s Services Cllr Les Wicks said:

“Some of these buildings are unsuitable, outdated and cramped. By prioritising the schemes we can create the best learning environments, while making the best use of the funding available to us.” Annie Campbell, the headteacher of Lordswood School, said: “Our buildings are 45 years old and as learning becomes more interactive and flexible, the classrooms are sometimes cramped and difficult to work in.” The infant and junior schools amalgamated in September and the builders, who are ready to move on to the site, should have the work finished by November. “The new buildings will not only mean that we are located within one building, but pupils will be able to enjoy learning in

n Looking at plans for Lordswood School an open plan space more akin to the style of secondary schools. That will allow them to get used to independent learning,” Mrs Campbell added. “This is an exciting time for everyone at the school. It gives us the opportunity to provide our pupils with a new and exciting environment that children will be able to enjoy for many years to come.” Children of different age groups will be able to learn together in large, open plan classrooms. The rooms will be divided into zones giving children the opportunity to be more independent and interactive as they learn. The areas will include a computer zone with laptops, and a library zone.

n Construction lesson: Annie Campbell with pupils at Lordswood School

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Bad parkers caught out

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ore pictures have been released showing drivers who have illegally parked without thinking whether doing so is dangerous or inconsiderate to others. A small minority of drivers in Medway are putting other road users and pedestrians in danger and are causing road hold-ups. And Medway Council, which has launched a campaign for sensible parking, says that anyone who parks illegally runs the risk of receiving a fine. These images, taken by one of the council’s CCTV cars, show the kind of parking that enforcement officers regularly encounter. The top picture shows a number of cars caught in traffic because of cars illegally double parked on a busy street, while the other shows a Mini-Cooper parked across double yellow lines and a pavement, which has forced a pedestrian to walk in the road. Cllr Phil Filmer, the Portfolio Holder for Frontline Services, said: “A few selfish, thoughtless people can make it dangerous and difficult for others. Anyone who parks illegally in Medway, no matter who they are, runs the risk of getting fined. “Hundreds of people a year ask us to put yellow lines in their streets to stop inconsiderate and illegal parking and we get dozens of calls a month from residents asking us to send the CCTV car to their street because of problems.” Medway CCTV car operators work under strict guidelines and do not have any targets or receive extra payment for booking motorists. Any complaints should be made to the council’s parking services on 333333. All complaints are looked into.

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February/March 2011

Legal cases Man forged wife’s signature to apply for £12,000 loans A fraudster passed off his new partner as his estranged wife in an attempt to claim £12,000 from Medway Council for home improvements. David Green, 58, persuaded his partner to go with him to the council offices posing as his wife, Josephine Green. He also forged his wife’s signature on application forms for a heating grant and a loan for other work at their former marital home in Jasper Avenue, Rochester, Medway Magistrates heard. But housing staff became suspicious and investigated the claim. They also found that Green had been falsely claiming council tax benefit and a single person discount after failing to notify them that his new partner had been living with him for three years. It meant that Green benefited by £1,632, which he has had to pay back. His attempted loan and grant fraud would have cost the council’s taxpayers £11,812. Green, of Danson Drive, Hoo Marina Park, admitted forgery and tax offences at Medway Magistrates’ Court. He was sentenced to a Community Order for 12 months and must carry out 80 hours of unpaid work. He was also ordered to pay council costs of £200. Cllr Alan Jarrett, the council’s Portfolio Holder for Finance, said: “We are determined to stop people defrauding the taxpayers of Medway. I applaud the council’s benefits investigation team for helping to bring Green to justice.”

Builder admits fly-tipping A builder who failed to make the proper checks when disposing of waste now has a criminal record after materials dumped in Rainham were traced back to him. Medway Council’s environmental enforcement team linked rubbish dumped in a field off Meresborough Road, Rainham, with Michael King. King, 46, said he paid an unknown man £120 to take it away but had failed to check the man’s waste carrier’s licence or to insist on a transfer note, Medway magistrates heard. King, of Prescott Avenue, Petts Wood, Orpington, pleaded guilty to illegally disposing of controlled waste and was fined £500. He was ordered to pay £200 costs and a £15 victim surcharge.

Cigarette costs man £340 A man has been ordered by a court to pay £340 for dropping a cigarette butt in Chatham town centre. Andrew Baker, 31, of Luton Road, Chatham, failed to pay the £80 fixed penalty notice for littering and was found guilty in his absence at Medway Magistrates’ Court where he was fined £175 and ordered to pay £150 in costs as a well as a £15 victims surcharge. Clearing 2,200 tonnes of litter, including cigarette butts and food wrappers, from pavements and parks costs Medway taxpayers £2.8million a year.

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Complete the Countdown Challenge for charity Learning, exercising and helping a good cause are all combined in the Olympic Countdown Challenge being held to raise money for the British Heart Foundation. The fundraising day will give people the opportunity to learn and take part in at least six different forms of exercise under the supervision of an experienced and professional specialist. The activities include yoga, circuit

training and different forms of dance. The event on Saturday, 5 March, is being held at the Adult Learning Centre in Green Street, Gillingham ME7 5TJ, from 10am until 2pm. An enrolment fee of £5 is the donation to charity but participants are being encouraged to obtain sponsorship to improve the success of the exercise charity event. The one-day session is a combination

Impartial advice offers to take stress out of money problems In the current economic climate it is easy to get into difficulties and become worried about home finances. Citizens Advice Bureau offers free and impartial advice to people who need help with debt or other money problems. Its advice on relieving the stress over financial matters includes: ●

Listing all debts to ensure priority debts are identified.

Making sure important bills are paid first – such as rent/mortgage, gas/electric, council tax, court fines and TV licence.

Making a weekly or monthly budget and sticking to it – this should include things such as food, petrol, travel expenses. Then working out how much debt can be paid off.

Start a savings account for Christmas – it may seem a long way off but it will be useful in December.

Open all letters received and act immediately if repaying money owed is a problem.

Talking to any individuals who are owed money and making them a repayment offer. If they won’t accept the offer, don’t give up. Do not feel pressured into making larger, unaffordable payments because this will create more problems.

Anyone who needs help with debt problems can contact Citizens Advice Bureau by phoning 888182 between 9.30am and 4.30pm Monday to Friday; write to 5a New Road Avenue, Chatham ME4 6BB; email advicemedwaycab@hotmail.co.uk or visit CAB at the above address from 9am Monday to Friday. Help is also available on the website www.adviceguide.org.uk.

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of lots of exercises, but it is up to the individual how many exercises they take. However, their workout could last for three hours. Places for the Olympic Countdown Challenge must be booked in advance by phoning 338400. Medway Adult and Community Learning Service holds a wide range of exercise classes. For a directory of classes visit www.medway.gov.uk/adultlearning.

Fighting computer data fraud Computer data checks that allow potentially fraudulent claims and payments to be spotted and investigated are being conducted on Medway Council records. These could relate to housing benefits, parking permits, insurance claimants, taxi and alcohol licences, supported care home residents, council tax and other matters. The data is shared by organisations to help prevent and detect fraud that could cost council taxpayers’ money. It is part of the Audit Commission’s 2010-11 National Fraud Initiative, which involves sharing information with other publicfunded organisations in order to weed out fraudsters. The Audit Commission is responsible for carrying out data matching exercises by checking the computer records held by one body – such as the council – against those of the same or other organisation to confirm that the information is consistent. The data and code of practice can be found at www.audit-commission.gov.uk/nfi.

Starting family history research People starting research into their family tree can get free help from members of Kent Family History Society at sessions on Wednesday, 9 and Wednesday, 16 February, from 2.30pm until 4pm. Places must be booked for the events at Medway Archive and Local Studies Centre, Clocktower building, Strood. Phone 332714 or visit www.facebook.com/ medwayarchives for details.

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£8m care home opens with an alternate philosophy The first residents have moved into an £8million residential home caring for people with dementia. Amherst Court, Chatham, is a purpose built development designed and equipped to provide a safe, stimulating environment for 112 people with dementia. Set in its own grounds and run by Avante Care and Support, it was designed with the “Eden Alternative” in mind. The Eden Alternative is a new philosophy that aims to tackle loneliness, helplessness and boredom in older people by putting the emphasis on spontaneity, companionship and variety. Medway Council owns the site in Palmerston Road, previously occupied by the Churchlands Residential Care Home, and has granted a long lease to Avante Partnership, one of the largest social care providers in the region. Built in just 18 months by Denne Construction, the home’s 112 en-suite bedrooms are divided into six suites, each containing a lounge area and dining room, which gives a more intimate and

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homely feel. Additional communal areas such as a café, hair salon, music and games room provide opportunities for people to take part in stimulating and interesting activities.

‘It has a great family feeling’ The daughter of a resident Cllr Tom Mason, the council’s Portfolio Holder for Adult Services, said: “The redevelopment of this home is wonderful. The council identified the need for extra dementia care in the area and through our partnership with Avante Care and Support we have been able to provide this in a modern setting.” For more information phone 01795 597431, email enquiries@avante caresupport.org.uk or visit www.avantepartnership.org.uk.

Café is the hub The hub of Amherst Court is the Calypso café, which is in the main reception area and is always busy. It is open to non-residents and families, who say it is an ideal area for meeting their relative. “When we come to see mum we all enjoy going to the café and having a panini. Mum likes to see us somewhere other than in her room all the time,” said one relative. “It is really nice because mum feels that she has had an outing. “The home has a great family feeling. The transition for our mum was seamless and she loves her room.” Another woman using the café said: “I like the fact that the home is secure. We enjoy using this area because it’s like going to a hotel café. Dad likes it.” The son of a prospective resident said: “On walking around, the day centre is a great idea and the people using it can use the hairdresser and the café area. It’s well thought out and inviting.”

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Skate and wh eel park gets off the grou nd Young BMX bikers, in-lin e skaters an are masterin d skateboard g their tricks ers a t Co ze nton Skate P where they ark, have been m aking full use specialist are of the a since it op ened. The facility, beh ind Spla shes Leisure in Cozenton Centre, Park, Rainh am, has been following co cr eated nsultations with residen ts and young people who gave their v ie w s and ideas for its desig n. The park’s unique desig n uses concr poured dire ete ctly on site (r a th er than pre-fabricate d units) allo wing for mo scope and in re novation. There is als o a seating and hangou The skate p t area. ark was built a ft e r Medway C was awarded ouncil £178,000 to provide play Medway th fa ci lities in rough the B ig Lottery Fu nd.

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Jude Frankum, 14

Photographs: praxisdesign.co.uk

C a p s t o n e e x t e n d s it s t r a il s

New sports and activity trails are attracting more walkers, joggers, cyclists and horse ride rs to Capstone Country Park following a £135,000 transfo rmation of the 280-acre site . Medway’s largest green spa ce, in Capstone Road, Gillingham, is used by 300,00 0 visitors a year. It now has a new mountain bike track, cro ss-country horse jumps and walking, jogging and cycling trails. An extra mile of horse tracks with eight cross-country jumps have been installed, exp anding the park’s existing bridal ways to 3.5 miles. The grass cycling trails include 1.5km, 2.5km and 5km marked grass routes plus a tou gher 3.5km mountain bike track with free ride platforms. And there are four walking and

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running routes, covering 1.5k m, 3km, 5km and 10km, plus an eightpiece outdoor fitness trim trai l. The Deputy Leader of Medway Council, Cllr Alan Jarrett, said: “Th is investment opens up this park to new visitors, as well as encouraging people of all ages to get fit and active by exploring our natural landscape.” For more information phone 338191 between 10am and 4.30pm or visit ww w.medw ay.gov.uk.

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d n e t x e n a c p e t s ll a m s e n O s e id r t s y h lt a e h e g r la to Increasing numbers of people in Medway are taking small but significant steps towards a healthier lifestyle encouraged by the A Better Medway campaign. More than 1,000 people who live or work in the area have made a pledge to improve their lives since the campaign was launched a year ago. The changes they are making can be as simple as ensuring they find the time to unwind from the pressures of daily life or joining a walking group. The campaign encourages people to make positive lifestyle changes by letting them know what advice and local support services are available. It covers eating healthily, getting active, stopping smoking, drinking sensibly and managing stress. For more information visit www.abettermedway.co.uk. An online version of Medway Cooks! Recipe Collection is available to anyone who wants to cook healthier meals at home or who would like inspiration for recipe ideas. The collection contains 30 simple recipes, including a selection of entries from Medway residents, and it shows that healthy eating can be simple, tasty and doesn’t have to cost a fortune.

The five ways to well-being have been identified by national research as things people can do to help themselves feel better and protect them against anxiety and depression. They are:

1 - connecting with other people 2 - being active – taking part in an activity that is enjoyable and at a suitable level of fitness

3 - taking notice of the world and one’s feelings 4 - keep learning – it can build confidence as well as being fun

5 - giving – doing something nice for someone, volunteering or joining a community group

For people who enjoy walking but don’t like going by themselves or prefer the company of others, they can get information about Medway Health walks by phoning 331371 or sending an email to walking@medway.gov.uk.

Anyone who has an original recipe that they’d like to share with others should email it to change4life@medway.gov.uk to be considered. Also online is information about five ways to well-being, which, if built into daily life, can help people get through difficult times, and get more out of life when things are going well.

Achieving goals Voluntary and community groups across Medway have been applying for grants ranging from £500 to £5,000 in their work towards encouraging healthier communities. This includes advising people on eating healthily, getting active, drinking sensibly or managing stress. Although the deadline for applications has expired, more

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than 30 grants have been awarded during the past year to help a diverse range of projects, from the creation of a community produce garden to yoga sessions for isolated elderly people. Living a healthy, balanced life is a goal most people aspire to. Finding a way that works best, by taking small, manageable steps can make a big difference to a person’s health and happiness.

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Chris Collins, the BBC’s gardening expert, writes a regular column for Medway Matters

Winter fails to freeze out preparations for spring It’s that time of year when only the hardiest of gardeners are likely to be working outdoors but there are plenty of things people can be getting on with. Now is the time to chit early potatoes. Chit? It just means encouraging seed potatoes to sprout before planting them about six weeks later. Put them “blunt” end up in trays or egg boxes in a place where they will catch some light. They will be ready to plant when the shoots are between 1.5cm and 2.5cm (0.5in-1in) long. It is also time to sow brassicas (broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage and cauliflower) in greenhouses or cold frames, although carrots can be sown into open ground. Mulching beds and borders, and the top of containers, will help protect plants from frost, while birds will appreciate people putting out food and water. Break ice on small ponds and try to avoid stepping onto a frozen lawn; feet will crush the grass. Spiking, or aerating, a lawn will help water to drain. Finally, if it is too cold to get outdoors, you could clean and oil garden machinery and tools in the garage or shed. Sponsored by Southern Water

Seasonal sense • Clear any remaining dead leaves from the garden, particularly those caught in the crown of plants • Cover rhubarb plants to force growth, and plant soft fruit such as blackberry and gooseberry • Sow sweet peas under glass or in a propagator • Order summer flowering bulbs • Apply organic fertilisers such as bone meal or fish blood bone to the soil and around trees and shrubs

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Making the punishment fit the crime Medway residents will have more of a say in deciding what kind of community work offenders will carry out as part of their punishment. As part of a community sentence, offenders can be ordered to carry out up to 300 hours of unpaid work - known as Community Payback. They have to work on local projects and neighbourhood improvements. An agreement between Kent Probation and the Medway Community Safety Partnership will help provide a scheme that gives residents more say in setting project priorities. Individuals and forums such as Neighbourhood Panel meetings, environmental audits and police surgeries will help decide the jobs they would like offenders to tackle. Community Payback makes an offender give back something to the community for their crime. Projects can include removing graffiti, picking up litter, repairing and decorating community centres, clearing undergrowth from paths and other public areas and working on environmental projects. Offenders have to wear bright orange high-visibility jackets marked “Community Payback”. Stuart Cullen, Kent

Probation's Community Payback Manager, said it was a tough and visible punishment of offenders that responded to the priorities of the community. Cllr Mike O’Brien, Medway Council’s Portfolio Holder for Community Safety and Enforcement and vice-chair of Medway CSP, said: “Community Payback pays a vital role not only in seeing justice done but also as a way of benefiting the community. This will not replace the council’s work in keeping streets and parks clear of litter but it will be a welcome addition.” In Medway, 2,700 offenders carried out nearly 24,500 hours of work between April and September last year. To nominate a Community Payback project email csu@medway.gov.uk or visit the Kent Payback time Probation website at in the snow www.kentprobation.org.

www.medwaycsp.co.uk

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NHS Medway plans and pays for NHS healthcare for everyone who lives in Medway. We aim to ensure the right services are there when you need them.

Help your health service care Helen Buckingham, the Acting Chief Executive of NHS Medway, takes a look at the service and suggests how, with everyone’s help, it can improve care without raising costs Boys and girls born in Medway this year can look forward to a longer lifespan than any previous generation. Life-changing operations that used to require people to stay in hospital for several days – such as cataracts and gallbladder removal – are now routinely available as day surgery. Every year new drugs become available to improve survival rates and the quality of life for seriously ill patients. These are successes that touch the lives of us all. But they come with a price tag. The NHS budget has been protected from the cuts in public spending by the Government, but there is little extra money to meet the increased demands that arise as people, thankfully, live longer with the help of advances in medicine. This means that those of us who manage health services are looking at how we can do things better, smarter and differently to meet those needs while freeing up money to meet the increasing demand. Often, care that is better for patients is actually cheaper. For example, in the past few months, NHS Medway has introduced a new service for sudden eye problems. Seven high street opticians in Medway are now accredited to deal with problems such as pain, blurred vision or dry eyes, so people can be treated locally instead of having to go to Maidstone Hospital. More than 85 per cent of people get their problem sorted with one local appointment, saving the NHS an estimated £275,000 a year. We understand that health problems can be frightening and that, at some point, patients or their family may want to phone 999 for an ambulance. However, often it’s

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n Helen Buckingham

best to treat patients in their home for illnesses that are not life threatening. Paramedic practitioners working for South East Coast Ambulance Service NHS Trust (SECAmb) can assess and treat at home many patients with less serious conditions or refer patients to other healthcare professionals, such as MedOCC, Medway’s on call GP and nurse service. A visit or phone call from a MedOCC doctor, an appointment at one of MedOCC’s clinics, or referral to a Medway Community Healthcare service can resolve the majority of problems in a way that is more convenient for patients, who are often elderly, and their carers, than being rushed to the emergency department. We expect these two initiatives to save more than £150,000 a year initially, which will increase over time. But it is not all up to the NHS. Everyone has a responsibility to use NHS services wisely so that care is there when patients need it.

n The poster campaign encouraging people to use NHS services responsibly

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Got a query or need information about a Medway health service?

NHS Medway Patient Advice and Liaison Service

Phone NHS Direct at any time if you are ill or injured and unsure what to do next, or to find a local service and its opening hours – such as a pharmacy, GP surgery or clinic. NHS Direct can answer questions and give advice. Phone 0845 4647 or visit www.nhs.uk.

PALS is a friendly and professional NHS service offering support, advice and guidance about medical and health related issues for Medway residents. Phone 0800 014 1641 or email pals@medwaypct.nhs.uk.

for you ‘Everyone has a part to play’

Choosing the healthy options raises standards 1 Look after your personal health Being active, maintaining a healthy weight, and not smoking will help you stay well by reducing your risk of serious illnesses such as heart disease, cancer, dementia and diabetes. Details of services in Medway to help people quit smoking, eat healthily, get active, drink sensibly and manage stress are at www.abettermedway.co.uk. 2 Use the services to keep yourself well Take up offers of screening, immunisation or an NHS Health Check. The NHS provides them to help reduce the risk of serious illness or to detect it at an early stage when people can receive the most effective treatment and with greatest success. 3 Keep your personal details up to date It is vital to be registered with a GP (family doctor) to receive the full range of healthcare services. Visit www.medwaypct.nhs.uk/ yourhealth for how to register. Tell your GP and any clinics you attend if you move home. Clinics also need to know if you change your GP practice. 4 Don’t waste a space Always turn up for a NHS appointment or phone to cancel one in plenty of time if you can’t make it. Missed appointments cost the NHS in Medway more than £1million a year and waste slots that other people need. 5 Take care with medication If anyone is taking two or more types of tablets and you’re not sure why, you should talk to your pharmacist. There might be a different way to take the tablets or they might no longer be needed. Repeat prescriptions should be ordered in plenty of time, particularly when you’re going on holiday and before bank holidays. Old or unused tablets should be taken to the pharmacy rather than thrown into a bin. 6 Treating minor illnesses Most common illnesses, such as colds, flu and tummy bugs, are best treated at home. They cannot be cured by antibiotics. Buy over the counter medication – a pharmacist will give

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advice if you’re not sure – and stay at home. Drink plenty of water in small sips. If you are worse after a few days or are not improving, contact your GP. 7 Stop illnesses spreading Hands should be washed often and well. You should be rigorous about hygiene, and sneeze or cough into a tissue, throw it away and wash hands. It is not a good idea to visit hospital or care homes if you feel unwell – a mild infection might be dangerous to vulnerable patients. 8 Ask for advice The website www.nhs.uk and NHS Direct on 0845 46 47 can help with health worries and concerns. If you are not sure whether you need to see a doctor, you can talk through the problem with NHS Direct. 9 Seek help when it’s needed When you need to see a doctor, make an appointment with your GP practice. If it is urgent, explain why and the practice will try to fit you in. If they can’t, you can be referred to Medway On Call Care (MedOCC) or you can go to the walk-in centre at 547-553 Canterbury Street, Gillingham. Urgent medical help out of hours, in the evenings and at weekends or bank holidays is available by phoning MedOCC direct on 891855. 10 Keep emergency services free for those who really need them The emergency department at Medway Maritime Hospital, and the ambulance service, are there to treat serious and life-threatening illness and injury – for example, heavy blood loss, loss of consciousness, difficulty breathing or poisoning. People are seen at the emergency department in strict order of need. Those who have minor problems will have to wait until more serious cases are dealt with. These services should not be used unless it is really necessary. For more information visit www.medwaypct.nhs.uk/choosewell. NHS Medway would like to know your ideas about how the local service can improve care and save money. Email

itsyournhsmedway@nhs.net or phone 335173.

www.medway.gov.uk

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February/March 2011

New developer for Riverside homes

Hyde Housing, one of the largest housing associations in the south east, is working with Medway Council to develop the first phase of the Rochester Riverside regeneration site. The housing group will build the first three residential blocks at the southern (Chatham) end of the site. Most of the new homes will be for shared ownership and rent. Hyde approached the council after the deadline for Crest Nicholson to build homes on Rochester Riverside expired. The Leader of Medway Council Cllr Rodney Chambers said: “The proposal that we’re developing with Hyde means construction could start in September. I’m delighted that we’ve attracted the interest of such an impressive developer.” The scheme is backed by a £4.6million grant for affordable housing from the Homes and Communities Agency.

Mike Finch, Principal Development Manager at Hyde, said: “We are committed to providing local people with high quality, affordable houses in communities they are proud to call home. “We are looking forward to working closely with the council to provide the homes that Medway residents need.” The 75-acre Rochester Riverside site, owned by the council and the South East England Development Agency (SEEDA), has outline planning permission for 2,000 homes, hotels, shops, offices, bars and restaurants, two public parks and a primary school. Meanwhile, construction of the £5million Waterfront bus station on Globe Lane, Chatham, is progressing well and will be fully operational in the summer. For the latest information on the project visit www.medway.gov.uk/chathamfuture. And the £2.5million improvements to Corporation Street, Rochester, are due to finish in March.

Information at the heart of communities

Volunteers who can inspire young people

More community information centres are opening in Medway following the success of a pilot scheme in Twydall, Gillingham. The move is in response to residents saying that they wanted somewhere local to get information about public services provided by Medway Council and its partners. People visiting the centres can find out about housing, employment and training, health, community safety, benefits, education, transport, leisure events and youth services. The Twydall information centre opened at Twydall Library last September, and two other centres opened in January at Woodside Community Centre, Strood, and White Road Community Centre, Chatham. Two more will follow in the All Saints and Brook-Lines neighbourhoods in Chatham before the end of March. The centres provide information leaflets and brochures, wall displays and a direct phone line to the council’s Customer First. There is a room where people can meet an advisor for a private appointment about services such as housing and health. Cllr Jane Chitty, the council’s Portfolio Holder for Strategic Development and Economic Growth, said: “This important initiative has been generated and supported by residents who have taken part in bringing services closer to the community. It benefits people who otherwise might feel isolated.”

Most people get satisfaction from being able to pass on a skill, especially to someone younger. And more than 100 adults in Medway regularly help with sports coaching, creative arts, vehicle maintenance, camp crafts, DIY skills, cooking and many other activities run by Medway Youth Service. These volunteers are active in youth centres, outdoor education, holiday provision and street-based work. They help on short-term projects or attend youth centres and projects on a regular basis.

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‘It’s not about doing a good deed - I enjoy it’ Anyone who feels that they might be able to inspire a young person or can teach them something is welcome to offer their services. One volunteer said: “It’s fun. Young people have an amazing sense of humour and when they are passionate about something they really do give it their all. “The feeling I get from doing voluntary work is not a sense of having done a good deed, but simply that I have enjoyed it. It’s almost as though the young people are doing me a voluntary service.” To find out more about offering help email youth.enquiries@medway.gov.uk or phone 332286.

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February/March 2011

Trail provides link for community pride A five-mile urban and rural trail has opened taking walkers through Strood and Frindsbury to link up with countryside paths in the Medway Gap between the M2 and M20. The route of the Strood Community Trail, which starts near Knights Place recreation ground, is marked by signs bearing the cross of the Knights Templar and passes the historic Temple Manor. The idea was launched last February as a volunteer community project by local groups keen that people should be able to walk and explore the area and see how varied it is. “We wanted to let people see that there is a better side to Strood and to take a pride in their community,” said Rita Hunt, the chairman of the community trail committee. The trail is financed by the Heritage Lottery Fund, provided through the Valley of Visions project, and follows pavements,

Shops card has its rewards Shoppers in Medway are benefiting from the special offers and discounts being giving to holders of a free Medway City Card. The card, which is accepted in shops and restaurants across Medway, rewards people for shopping locally and helps make their money go further. It also helps to support local businesses. The deals include discounts of up to 20 per cent, buy one get one free promotions and exclusive special offers. Some offers may be for a limited time. Among the businesses currently offering discounts are: BSM, Confucius Chinese Restaurant, the Crown in Rochester, Echoes Gyms, Just Cuts Butchers, Medway Diamond House, Orchard Windows (Kent), PDQ Secretarial Services, Radiance Hair and Beauty, Rochester Castle and Varley Electrical. More are listed on the website. People can apply for a card online at www.medwaycitycard.co.uk or by completing an application form available at libraries, leisure centres and contact points.

Serving You

open spaces and footpaths through Strood, Frindsbury, Broomhill and Rede Common. Unemployed people helped with clearance work as part of a governmentfunded scheme and children have designed mosaics for the paths, based on the local wildlife, landscape and heritage. The Strood trail links with paths in Cuxton, Halling, Snodland, Aylesford, Wouldham and Burham, enabling people to explore the entire length of the Medway Valley. Cllr Howard Doe, Medway Council’s Portfolio Holder for Community Services, said: “This is a real community project. It shows what can be done when people have a shared ambition.” A leaflet giving details of the route is available from libraries and contact points.

Help shape tomorrow through the census All households in Medway, and nationally, will need to complete a census questionnaire on Sunday, 27 March. The population census is carried out every 10 years across England and Wales by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). The results help the government and local authorities to plan the services and resources people need, such as transport, housing, healthcare and education. The amount of money Medway Council will receive for these services over the next 10 years will be directly influenced by statistics from the census. The questionnaires will arrive by post and this census will be the first to offer households the choice of completing the form online or returning it by post. Answers will be in confidence and will only be used to produce statistics. ONS will not share the information with other government departments or organisations. For more information visit www.census.gov.uk.

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February/March 2011

ADVERTISEMENT

NHS Foundation Trust

News from your local hospital

How everyone can avoid spreading winter virus Commonly known as the winter vomiting bug, Norovirus is a highly infectious virus which causes diarrhoea and vomiting. Most people catch it during the winter months, but it can occur at any time of year and it is estimated that between 600,000 and one million people in the UK are infected by it every year. The symptoms of Norovirus include nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea and in some cases fever, headache, stomach cramps and aching limbs. Symptoms can last for 12 to 60 hours, but most people recover within two days. Linda Dempster, Head of Infection Control, said: “Norovirus is incredibly contagious and poses a great threat to the health of people who are already very ill. “In the majority of cases, no specific treatment is required, apart from letting the virus and its symptoms take its course. People should ensure they maintain their fluid intake – this is particularly important with the very young or the elderly. If the symptoms persist, the patient becomes dehydrated or has an underlying medical condition and should contact their GP or call NHS Direct on 0845 4647 for advice.”

What is Norovirus? l

Norovirus is one of a group of viruses that are the most common cause of stomach bugs in England and Wales. It is common between November and April and is also called the winter vomiting virus. l Symptoms usually begin around 12 to 48 hours after the person becomes infected and it can last for 12 to 60 hours. It starts with the sudden onset of nausea followed by projectile vomiting and/or watery diarrhoea. l There is no specific treatment for Norovirus apart from letting the virus and its symptoms take their course. Everyone can help restrict the spread of Norovirus by washing their hands before preparing food or eating food; after handling raw meat; using the toilet; changing a nappy; touching rubbish bins; using cleaning cloths; playing with pets; emptying litter trays; working in the garden; cleaning up blood or vomit.

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News from your local hospital Mealtime volunteers Quieter saw puts children at ease It is believed that four in 10 people over the age of 65 are malnourished when they are admitted to hospital. In response, Medway NHS Foundation Trust has recruited volunteers to assist elderly patients at meal times. Glyn Scott, Nutrition Nurse Specialist at the trust, said: “In order to get better and strong, it’s important that patients eat well and eat things they like. This is why we’ve recruited a team of volunteers to make sure that patients get the help they sometimes need. “All our volunteers have been fully trained in how to feed patients, the mechanics of swallowing and how to spot malnourishment. They help with the tea rounds, find out what kinds of food the patients like, help them fill in their menu card and assist them at meal times. “The response from patients and their families has been really positive. We’re hoping to introduce it on more wards in the near future.”

NHS Foundation Trust

Medway NHS Foundation Trust has become the first trust in the south east to use a specialised cast saw for children who need to have a plaster cast removed from a broken limb. The saw is quieter and smaller than a traditional cast saw which can make patients nervous and scared of their treatment when there is no need to be. The saw is also ideal for removing casts from patients with learning disabilities. Traditional cast saws can be quite large and noisy when cutting through the layers, making the removal of a cast not always a happy experience for children. John McLaughlin, Orthotics Clinical Lead, said: “We do find that lots of children are scared of the big cast saws and the noise makes them very nervous. “These saws are also very cumbersome because they are attached to a unit the size of a Henry vaccum cleaner. But the new paediatric cast saw is hand held and battery operated and is easier to manoeuvre around the limb. It is much better for our patients.”

n Michael Carlton, the

paediatric plaster theatre lead, removes a cast.

Working together for a better future Medway is a foundation trust, which means that, unlike other NHS trusts which are only accountable to government, it is also accountable to its members – the public and its staff. This means that the people using the hospital, not just those working in it, have a greater say in its running and the type of services it offers. Trust governor Pam Gibbon, said: “As a member you can influence the development of the trust through the Council of Governors. The governors are your link with the trust. Tell us about the good things you experience and the things you’d like to change and we'll pass on your message. This way, the trust can develop in line with your expectations and needs.” The trust hosts regular members’ meetings where concerns

Serving You

can be aired, opinions shared and ideas put forward. As a result of these meetings the trust began a series of successful events last year called Medicine for Members. Talks were given by consultants on specific medical conditions, offering advice and information and an update on improvements in treatment. The trust will be running another series of events this year – the dates will be available on www.medway.nhs.uk. People don’t have to be members to attend, but it’s easier to have their say and to find out about future events if they are. Being a member is free and they can have as much or as little involvement as they like. Some 10,000 people in Medway have signed up. Contact the membership office on 825292 to register over the phone, or sign up online at www.medway.nhs.uk.

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February/March 2011

T H E C O U N C I L M AG A Z I N E F O R E V E RYO N E I N M E D WAY

W H AT ’ S O N ? W H AT ’ S O N ? W H AT ’ S O N ? W H AT ’ S O N ? W H AT ’ S O N ? Exhibition Thursday, 24 February until Tuesday, 12 April

Wingets at work and play Medway Archive and Local Studies Centre, Clocktower building, Strood Free

Brimstone and Treacle Medway Little Theatre, 256 High Street, Rochester ME1 1HY Tickets £7 (£6 members); £4.50 (Monday) Box office: 400322 or visit www.mlt.org.uk.

Art Monday, 14 February until Thursday, 31 March

Art in the Dockyard Exhibition by local amateur and professional artists No1 Smithery Gallery, The Historic Dockyard Chatham ME4 4TZ Phone 823807 or visit www.thedockyard.co.uk.

Talk Wednesday, 16 February 8pm

Exploring Battlefields in Kent Wigmore Library, 208 Fairview Avenue, Gillingham ME8 0PX Tickets: £3.50 (booking advised) Phone 235576 or visit www.whatsonmedway.co.uk.

Rainham Radio Rally

Music Saturday, 5 March 7.30pm

Charity Ball Saturday, 19 March 6.30pm-1am

The City of Rochester Symphony Orchestra

Una Noche de Flamenco

The Central Theatre, Chatham ME4 4AS Tickets: £9-£14 Box office: 338338 or visit www.crso.org.uk.

The Mayor of Medway’s Charity Ball Corn Exchange, Rochester ME1 1LX Three-course dinner with a Spanish flavour Tickets: £35 Phone 332404 or email mayor@medway.gov.uk.

Dance Thursday, 17 March 8pm

St Patrick’s Night Party ADVERTISEMENT

Shopping Sunday, 20 February and Sunday, 20 March 9am-1pm

Sun, 20 Feb 7.30pm

Steve Harley

Farmers’ Market Corporation Street car park, Rochester ME1 1NN Phone 338155 or visit www.rochesterfarmers market.co.uk. Sunday, 27 March British Summer Time begins. Clocks go forward one hour.

Contacting Medway Matters Medway Matters, Communications and Marketing, Medway Council, Gun Wharf, Dock Road, Chatham ME4 4TR Email medway.matters @medway.gov.uk Written and designed by Medway Council's Communications and Marketing Team. Distributed by Royal Mail door-to-door service.

The McManigan Academy of Irish Dancers The Brook Theatre, Old Town Hall, Chatham ME4 4SE Tickets: £8 (£7 mailing list members) Phone 338338 or visit www.whatsonmedway.co.uk.

Rainham School for Girls, Derwent Way ME8 0BX Phone 07717 678795 or email trev@wig1.co.uk.

Phone 332714 or visit www.facebook.com/ medwayarchives. Drama Thursday, 10 until Saturday, 19 February (excluding Sunday) 7.30pm

Radio Saturday, 27 February 10am

W H AT ’ S O N ?

All phone numbers should be prefixed with 01634 unless stated.

MAKE IT

The Cockney Rebel legend performs an acoustic set, featuring hits including Mr Soft, Judy Teen and Make Me Smile (Come Up and See Me).

Andy and Mike’s Big Box of Bananas CBeebies presenter Andy Day and his partner-in-crime present a chaotic, hilarious stage show for children.

YOURS

Available in other formats and languages. Phone 333333

THIS SPRING

The next edition of Medway Matters will be published in April.

For tickets, more information and this season’s full line-up

There is a range of advertising opportunities in Medway Matters. For more information, including rates and copy deadlines, visit www.medway.gov.uk/medwaymatters or email medway.matters@medway.gov.uk.

Sat, 26 Feb 2.30pm

Fri, 4 Mar 7.30pm An Evening with

Rick Wakeman Join Rick and his piano for a one-off night of music and tales, from a career spanning over four decades.

Fri, 11 Mar 7.30pm

Colin Fry The People’s Medium

01634 338338

Witness the new show from one of Britain’s most popular mediums.

www.thecentraltheatre.co.uk

For a full list of the latest events and entertainments in Medway, visit

www.whatsonmedway.co.uk 28

www.medway.gov.uk

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February/March 2011

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Day marks century of women’s achievements

International Wo men’s Day 2011

The centenary of International Women's Day will be marked in Medway on Saturday, 5 March. It is a day of celebration for the achievements of women past, present and future. Women of all ages, backgrounds and lifestyles in Medway are invited to join in the event, which has been celebrated locally since 2007. But it is not an exclusively women’s event – men and children are welcome to attend. This year will focus on the changes in local women's lives over the past 100 years. In a special social history event in the Pembroke Building at the University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime, women from different generations and walks of life will talk about their interesting and humorous experiences. There will be workshops, natural therapies, stalls and entertainment. The event starts at 11am and entry is free, although there is a small charge for some activities.

Tribute to the Unknown Warrior

Do something funny for money You could be ’aving a laff on Red Nose Day when people across Medway will be organising silly events and rattling buckets to raise money for people in Africa and the UK, who face injustice or live in abject poverty. The nationwide fundraising event on Friday, 18 March, organised by Comic Relief, is where everyone is encouraged to cast aside their inhibitions, put on a red nose and do something silly to raise money. The event will culminate in a night of comedy and moving documentary films on BBC One. For more details and fundraising ideas visit www.rednoseday.com.

Serving You

An exhibition about the Unknown Warrior is at the Royal Engineers Museum, Gillingham, until the end of February. The exhibition tells the story of the honoured soldier and other soldiers killed during the First World War, including two from Chatham. It features a shipwright from Chatham Dockyard, a private of the Royal Marine Light Infantry, Chatham Brigade, and a six-foot high stained glass window, showing the return to England of the unknown soldier in 1920. Pupils from All Saints Primary School, Chatham, helped with the

On Tuesday, 8 March, hundreds of IWD events will be held around the world, ranging from informal gatherings to largescale organised events. They will celebrate the contribution that every woman and girl makes and recognise the struggles that many still face. For more information visit www.medwayiwd.co.uk or email medwayiwd@googlemail.com. project. The exhibition is included in the museum’s regular admission price. For more details phone 822839, visit www.remuseum.org.uk or email mail@re-museum.co.uk.

Descendent helps chalet appeal Gerald Dickens, the great, great grandson of Charles Dickens, is helping the £100,000 appeal to restore the Dickens Swiss chalet at Eastgate House, Rochester. He will be taking a lighthearted look at the writer and presenting a one-man version of Nicholas Nickleby at 7.30pm on Friday, 11 February, at the

Britannia Theatre, Dickens World, Chatham ME5 4LL. Tickets are £10. Phone 890421 for more details. To donate, cheques payable to The Rochester and Chatham Dickens Fellowship (Chalet Appeal) should be sent to 27 Amethyst Avenue, Chatham ME5 9TX.

School’s campaign comes into bloom Pupils from Fort Pitt Grammar School, Chatham, are watching out for the flowering soon of 1,000 purple crocuses in the school grounds. They planted the bulbs in November after teaming up with Chatham Rotary Club as part of the Rotary’s national campaign to eradicate polio. The colour denotes the purple dye used to mark a child’s finger when they have been immunised against the disease. Nationally more than five million purple crocus bulbs were planted at the end of last year.

www.medway.gov.uk

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ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Medway needs foster carers Medway Council is looking for people who can give time, energy and commitment to adopting a child.

Pass it on

We need families for all ages of children but especially for older children and those from black and ethnic minorities. Please call 01634 335676 to discuss our next open evening or visit www.medway.gov.uk/adoption We need local people to look after local children in many situations; a caring home can make all the difference. If you are looking to develop a career in childcare and think you can make a difference to a child’s life, please get in touch.

Phone: 01634 335713 Email: stephanie.norman@medway.gov.uk Visit: www.medway.gov.uk/fostering

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FEBRUARY 1 7pm Employment Matters Committee MR2 2 7pm Standards Committee MR2 4 9.30am Licensing Hearing Panel – Sub-Committee of LSC MR2 8 6pm International Relations Committee MR2 9 8.45am School Transport and Curriculum Appeals Committee MR 9 10 6.30pm Regeneration, Community and Culture OSC MR 2 11 2pm Licensing Sub-Committee of LSC MR13 15 9.30am Licensing Hearing Panel – Sub-Committee of LSC MR2 3pm Cabinet MR2 16 7pm Planning Committee MR2 24 7pm Council SGC MARCH 1 6.30pm Children and Young People OSC MR2 3 7pm Council SGC 4 9.30am Licensing Hearing Panel – Sub-Committee of LSC MR9 8 3pm Cabinet MR2 9 7pm Planning Committee MR2 15 9.30am Licensing Hearing Panel – Sub-Committee of LSC MR13 5pm Health and Adult Social Care OSC MR2 16 8.45am School Transport and Curriculum Appeals Committee MR 8 7pm Employment Matters Committee MR2 22 6.30pm Business Support OSC MR2 23 7pm Standards Committee MR2 24 7pm Council SGC 29 3pm Cabinet; 7pm Audit Committee MR2 30 7pm Planning MR2 31 6.30pm Regeneration, Community and Culture OSC MR 2 You are advised to check the details by phoning 306000, emailing democratic.services@medway.gov.uk or visiting www.medway.gov.uk.

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Medway M ATT E R S

Conservative Labour Liberal Democrat Independent Group Other independent

Contact your councillor LUTON AND WAYFIELD

CHATHAM CENTRAL PAUL GODWIN Lab c/o PA to the Labour Group Leader, Gun Wharf, Dock Road, Chatham, ME4 4TR Phone: 865944

TASHI TAMANG BHUTIA Con 34 Maidstone Road, Chatham, ME4 6DG Phone: 07882 368919

VINCE MAPLE Lab 13a Waghorn Street, Chatham, ME4 5LT Phone: 07981 661451

TONY GOULDEN Ind Group 37 Raleigh Close, Chatham, ME5 7SB Phone: 302538

JULIE SHAW Lab 79 Downsview, Chatham, ME5 0AL Phone: 813647

VAL GOULDEN Ind Group 37 Raleigh Close, Chatham, ME5 7SB Phone: 302538

CUXTON AND HALLING RAYMOND MAISEY Con 106 Charles Drive, Cuxton, ME2 1DU Phone: 727126 GILLINGHAM NORTH MAUREEN RUPAREL Lib Dem 4 Westerham Close, Gillingham, ME8 6LP Phone: 303498 ANDY STAMP Ind Group 50 Grange Road, Gillingham, ME7 2PU Phone: 07736 327002 CATHY SUTTON Lib Dem c/o Medway Council, Gun Wharf, Dock Road, Chatham, ME4 4TR Phone: 07964 406541 GILLINGHAM SOUTH GEOFF JUBY Lib Dem 16 Franklin Road, Gillingham, ME7 4DF Phone: 576675 SHEILA KEARNEY Lib Dem 112 Nelson Road, Gillingham, ME7 4LL Phone: 576838 STEPHEN KEARNEY Lib Dem 112 Nelson Road, Gillingham, ME7 4LL Phone: 576838 HEMPSTEAD AND WIGMORE DIANE CHAMBERS Con 6 Mansion Row, Brompton, Gillingham, ME7 5SE Phone: 842913 RODNEY CHAMBERS Con 6 Mansion Row, Brompton, Gillingham, ME7 5SE Phone: 842913 LORDSWOOD AND CAPSTONE ALAN JARRETT Con 43 Ballens Road, Lordswood, Chatham, ME5 8NT Phone: 684640 DAVID WILDEY Con 627 Lordswood Lane, Lordswood, Chatham, ME5 8QY Phone: 863416

February/March 2011

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PENINSULA JANICE BAMBER Con 5 Aveling Close, Hoo, Rochester, ME3 9BZ Phone: 252394 KEN BAMBER Con 5 Aveling Close, Hoo, Rochester, ME3 9BZ Phone: 252394 PHIL FILMER Con Bridgewater House, Parbrook Road, High Halstow, Rochester, ME3 8QG Phone: 254196 PRINCES PARK MATT BRIGHT Con 85 Highgrove Road, Walderslade, Chatham, ME5 7SF Phone: 321265 PAT GULVIN (MRS) Con 30 Glamis Close, Chatham, ME5 7QQ Phone: 670853 RAINHAM CENTRAL REHMAN CHISHTI Con 30 Shakespeare Road, Gillingham, ME7 5QN Phone: 324849 BARRY KEMP Con 18 Herbert Road, Rainham, ME8 9BZ Phone: 365231 MIKE O’BRIEN Con Redlands, 70 Herbert Road, Rainham, ME8 9DA Phone: 377950 RAINHAM NORTH DAVID CARR Con 68 Kingsway, Gillingham, ME7 3AU Phone: 853366 VAUGHAN HEWETT Con 47 Marshall Road, Rainham, ME8 0AP Phone: 07932 195683 RAINHAM SOUTH HOWARD DOE Con The Warren, 21 Style Close, Rainham, ME8 9LS Phone: 366419

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33 10 7 4 1

lf you want more information phone member services on 332732 or email members@medway.gov.uk ROY HUNTER Con 358 Hempstead Road, Hempstead, Gillingham, ME7 3QJ Phone: 364767 DAVID ROYLE Con 7 Watermeadow Close, Hempstead, Gillingham, ME7 3QF Phone: 377254 RIVER JOHN JONES Lab 16 Prospect Row, Brompton, Gillingham, ME7 5AL Phone: 07886 601 725

STROOD RURAL PETER HICKS Con 14 High Street, Upper Upnor, Rochester, ME2 4XG Phone: 715097 TOM MASON Con 1 Leeds House, Cypress Court, Frindsbury Extra, Rochester, ME2 4PU Phone: 727301 LES WICKS Con Westcourt Farm, Salt Lane, Cliffe, Rochester, ME3 7ST Phone: 220347

CRAIG MACKINLAY Con 8 Manor Road, Chatham, ME4 6AG Phone: 841108 ROCHESTER EAST NICK BOWLER Lab 93 Haig Avenue, Rochester, ME1 2RY Phone: 07793 806011

STROOD SOUTH RICHARD ANDREWS Con 27 Hoo Common, Chattenden, Rochester, ME3 8LT Phone: 252892 JOHN AVEY Con 13 Elaine Court, Elaine Avenue, Strood, Rochester, ME2 2YR Phone: 711268

TERESA MURRAY Lab 318 City Way, Rochester, ME1 2BL Phone: 409486

SUSAN HAYDOCK Con 46 Trevale Road, Rochester, ME1 3PA Phone: 811172

ROCHESTER SOUTH AND HORSTED

TWYDALL

NICHOLAS BRICE Ind c/o Medway Council, Gun Wharf, Dock Road, Chatham, ME4 4TR Phone: c/o 332245

DORTE GILRY Lab 26 Twydall Lane, Gillingham, ME8 6HX Phone: 386662

TREVOR CLARKE Con 19 Wemmick Close, Cloisterham Park, Rochester, ME1 2DL Phone: 409932

GLYN GRIFFITHS Lab 105 First Avenue, Gillingham, ME7 2LF Phone: 352734

SYLVIA GRIFFIN Con 12 Beaulieu Rise, Rochester, ME1 2PQ Phone: 404139 ROCHESTER WEST

WALDERSLADE

TED BAKER Con 11 Watts Avenue, Rochester, ME1 1RX Phone: 847415 MARK RECKLESS Con Senlac House, Gundulph Square, Rochester, ME1 1QD Phone: 406536 STROOD NORTH JANE CHITTY Con c/o Medway Council, Gun Wharf, Dock Road, Chatham, ME4 4TR Phone: 07930 236228 JANE ETHERIDGE Con 48 Watling Street, Strood, ME2 3NY Phone: 711003 STEPHEN HUBBARD Lab 94 Jersey Road, Strood, Rochester, ME2 3PD Phone: 712129

PAUL HARRIOTT Lab 26 Twydall Lane, Gillingham, ME8 6HX Phone: 233833

DAVID BRAKE Con Sherwood House, 29 Robin Hood Lane, Walderslade, Chatham, ME5 9NS Phone: 668649 IAN BURT Ind Group 13 Oakhurst Close, Walderslade, Chatham, ME5 9AN Phone: 863760 WATLING HERBERT CRACK Lib Dem 25 Arthur Road, Rainham, ME8 9BT Phone: 231229 DIANA SMITH Lib Dem 269 Napier Road, Gillingham, ME7 4LY Phone: 575192

www.medway.gov.uk

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Medway Matters - February/March 2011 edition  

The latest edition of Medway Council's magazine in digitial brochure format.