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MAY 17, 2013

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

Editor’s note: Healthcare is a whole new ballgame with the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). How will healthcare providers be affected? What about patients? And how about employers who provide health coverage as an employee benefit? How will Medicare and Medicaid recipients be affected? Look to this column for the answers.

HEALTHCARE REFORM & YOU by Russell T. Head, CBC, CSA

WELLNESS & REFORM

I A.R. Johnson junior Basic Diagnostic students Autumn Aiello and Andrew Khayrullin perform fingerstick blood testing for glucose and total cholesterol on a student athlete.

School and Hospital Offer Cardiac Screening to Student Athletes W by Grace Schneider, A.R. Johnson Health Science and Engineering Magnet School Senior

ith the number of heart-related deaths of young U.S. athletes climbing over 110 a year, a sound form of screening prevention seems like a life-saving investment. This sentiment is shared by the students who filled A.R. Johnson Health Sciences and Engineering Magnet High School up to the rafters at 10:30 on a recent Saturday morning. Not only were these students from all different schools across the area, but they were all there by choice. This miracle can be credited to the 2nd Annual Free Cardiac Screening Event hosted by University Health Care Foundation and A.R. Johnson, bringing in more than 70 young athletes within the first two hours of the event. “I’m glad to see a good number of people this year. It’s twice as busy as last year,” observed A.R. Johnson principal, Dr. LaMonica Lewis. “I got screened last year, and I’d like to do it again.” Dr. Lynne Clarke, Health Science Department Chair at A.R. Johnson, assists the University Health Care Foundation with a family-oriented cardiac health festival each year called Cardio on the Canal. This year marks the second annual installment of both Cardio on the Canal and the free cardiac screening event; the two similarly flourished the second year after an unpredictable premiere. Pat Thomas, educator for Heart and Vascular Institute of University Health Care System and Augusta Technical College, is credited with the creation of the program. “This is my baby,” she said, holding her hands close to her heart. “I thought of this five years ago. I saw Dr. Clarke at Cardio on the Canal—it’s all about timing!—we talked about it, and here we are.” “The first year was quite challenging,” Thomas continued, “but I had an awesome team with Dr. Gwen Taylor and Dr. Lynne Clarke.” Dr. Taylor, Thomas explained, is the dean of Allied Health at Augusta Technical College. “We learn every time we do this. We just need to get the information into the parents’ hands.”

t is well known that a healthy employee is a productive employee. Many employers have gone to great lengths to provide wellness programs for their employees on both a mandated and a voluntary basis. Everything from diabetes, pregnancy and hypertension management to smoking cessation and weight loss programs are being Russell Head used. Will the efforts to lower health plan costs and help employees change habits and become healthier go by the wayside with Health Care Reform coming faster than most people realize? Probably not. In fact, some of the previous regulations issued through the HIPAA Act will be improved upon. The following ACA reforms are directed at promoting and improving workplace wellness programs. Wellness Incentive Increase – The current HIPAA regulations allow an employer’s wellness program to offer incentives up to 20% of the total cost of health coverage. Beginning January 1, 2014, that percentage will be raised to 30%. Additionally, an incentive up to 50% will be permitted for programs that prevent or reduce tobacco use. Employer Wellness Grants – A $200 million program for implementing

workplace wellness initiatives for 2011 through 2015 was created by ACA. Grants will be available for eligible employers who offer their employees a new workplace wellness program. Employers that are eligible are those with less than 100 employees who work more than 25 hours per week and did not have a wellness program in place prior to March 23, 2010, the date of the Affordable Care Act enactment. Technical Assistance – The Center for Disease Control (CDC) has been authorized by ACA to provide employers of any size with access to technical assistance, consultation, resources and other tools to help evaluate and monitor their wellness programs. The CDC was also directed to conduct a national survey to assess employment-based health programs. Information from the CDC on workplace health promotion can be found at www.cdc.gov. For further explanation of the PPACA provisions outlined in this article, please refer to the following resources: www.hhs.gov www.irs.gov www.healthcare.gov + Russell T. Head is a Partner and Chief Visionary Architect with Group & Benefits Consultants, Inc., Augusta’s largest, privately held employee benefits consulting firm. He can be reached at 706-733-3459 or rthead@gandbc.com. Visit Group & Benefits Consultants at www. groupandbenefits.com.

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MAY 17, 2013

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AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

OUR OPINION

My how times have changed

A

ll of us probably have “what is this world coming to?” moments fairly regularly these days. Such is the state of world affairs. Here at Medical Examiner world headquarters, we’ve had several of those moments in response to local events this year. It makes us think about what life was like a hundred years ago.

Lost & Found Earlier this year, a woman lost a ring said to be valued at $10,000 in the parking lot of the Grovetown Cracker Barrel. It was found by an attorney who reportedly had the ring appraised, but did not turn the ring in until she learned a warrant had been issued for her arrest. 1913 The loss of a $10,000 ring would be front page news. Whoever found it and returned it would probably get a parade. 2013 The general concensus in social media was “finders keepers, losers weepers.” Life is precious In another news event earlier this year, a man walked onto a bridge over Bobby Jones Expressway with the intention of ending his life by jumping, creating a massive traffic jam. 1913 People would be horrified at the prospect of a person

1913 / 2013 jumping to his death.

2013 The Facebook

community responded en masse in real time as the event unfolded: “Cops should push him.” “Does he need help deciding? I’ll help him over the edge.” “I missed my plane because of him.” “Can’t he just jump and get it over with?”

Stop in the name of the law Operation Rolling Thunder is an ongoing news story. The term describes an extended campaign of roadblocks designed to catch drunk drivers and unlicensed motorists, apprehend felons with outstanding warrants, and enforce seat belt laws. 1913 Police are almost universally viewed as a protective and beneficial force for law-abiding members of society. 2013 Letters to the Editor, Rants & Raves, Whine Line, and Facebook posts repeatedly describe Augusta as a “police state.” Some commenters vow they will no longer patronize

downtown restaurants and bars. The Augusta Chronicle interviews bar owners who report business is significantly down. Police report that dozens of wanted criminals and drunk drivers have been arrested. What’s going on? If you lost a $10,000 ring, how would you feel? If your son or father was threatening to commit suicide, what would be your hope from bystanders? If your daughter or wife was killed by a drunk driver, how would you feel about Operation Rolling Thunder? Superior Court Judge David Roper recently noted, “[Our] country has lost its moral compass. Conduct that for centuries, for millennia, was deemed immoral is now ok.” Superior Court Judge Danny Craig says law-abiding families are on a melting glacier. “I don’t know when they’re going to realize that their little glacier is melting,” he said. “but we’re headed toward something cataclysmic.” +

What’s your story? Nearly all of us — even doctors and nurses — are sometimes patients. Perhaps you were recently injured playing your favorite sport, or years ago you somehow got hurt without even leaving your favorite recliner. Maybe you were diagnosed with a dreaded disease, mugged in a dark and lonely parking lot, or you stubbed your toe in the safety of your own bedroom. On the other hand, perhaps you needed medical attention 5,000 miles from home. Whatever your medical experience, we’d like to hear your story for our Medicine in the First Person feature. It can be frightening or funny, ordinary or extraordinary, just a few paragraphs long or quite a lengthy tale, bylined or anonymous. We’ll publish your encounters with the medical profession as often as we receive them. + Send your submissions for Medicine in the First Person to the Augusta Medical Examiner via e-mail: info@AugustaRx.com or to PO Box 397, Augusta, GA 30903-0397. (The Medical Examiner reserves the right to accept, reject, or edit any submission at its sole discretion.)

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The Medical Examiner’s mission: to provide information on topics of health and wellness of interest to general readers, to offer information to assist readers in wisely choosing their healthcare providers, and to serve as a central source of news within every part of the Augusta medical community. Submit editorial content to graphicadv@knology.net Direct editorial and advertising inquiries to: Daniel R. Pearson, Publisher & Editor E-mail: Dan@AugustaRx.com Augusta Medical Examiner photography: H + D Photography www.handdphoto.com AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER P.O. Box 397, Augusta, GA 30903-0397

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MAY 17, 2013

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

Hope IS Possible

My healthy lifestyle journal, Part One

Helen Blocker-Adams

A

pril 17, 2013 marked my first year anniversary on my healthy lifestyle journey. After my 5 o’clock workout that morning, I had a picture taken of me holding a blue jean skirt that I wore, quite frequently I might add, one year ago. I posted that picture on my Facebook page later that morning about 7 am. By 10 p.m. that night I had 77 comments and 585 LIKES. I was absolutely blown away. I had no idea that picture would attract so much attention. My weight loss specialist/ personal trainer, TJ Simmons of Champion Fitness & Nutrition, told me that people are starving for inspiration. The photo was inspiring and motivating to hundreds of people. And indeed that was my intent. I also run into many of my Augusta Medical Examiner readers who have followed columns where I have talked about my journey. Many have asked ‘what is my secret?’ so I wanted to share my story. In high school and college I

was always a size 10 – 12. I think most of us have heard that as we age, our body and metabolism changes. Things we ate when we were younger stick to our ribs longer now than when we were in our teens and twenties. As a result, the weight will build up. I didn’t work out during my earlier years. I had a sporadic walking routine and I’ve tried plenty of diets. I never tried any diet pills though. I’ve always been rather conscious of my weight and what I eat. Growing up, my mother prepared good and healthy food. Living overseas most of my formative years, I didn’t grow up on the typical “soul food” that many have become accustomed to living in the South. I was in my late 30s when the weight started to creep up. It was gradual so I didn’t pay much attention to it. When I shopped and had to purchase a larger size than last time, I shrugged it off. I lived my life, I worked, and stayed busy being involved and making a difference in the community. But suddenly one day I was buying size 20 clothes. I remember the first time I looked at the label and thought, “I never dreamed I would be wearing this size.” But I was. I’m not knocking people who wear that size. I just know that this was not my normal size, my BMI number was high and it was directly related to the weight gain. I have been to enough health fairs to know that. I believe most people know their own body.

Thank God I’ve never had major health problems, but my health screenings were starting to show higher numbers when my blood pressure was checked. I knew it was related to the weight gain. But I had no sense of urgency. I was in DENIAL. I felt fine. I was exercising (walking) sometimes, eating veggies and not that much red meat. One day, a friend gave me some tailored clothes she was no longer able to wear and when I looked at the size, some of them were size 22. And they fit. I was like “whoa.” This is definitely getting out of control. Wake up call! Around the same time I was getting frequent marketing promos from Champion Fitness & Nutrition on my Facebook page. Seems like I was getting them daily with a comment to stop by the gym and I could get a couple of complimentary sessions. Interesting. From time to time over the years I had considered the idea of having a personal trainer. With my busy schedule and the fact that I like discipline, order, and proper knowledge on a given subject, it became more and more appealing. So one day I took them up on the offer. I walked into their Washington Road location one Tuesday. I met the owner, TJ Simmons, we talked, I met some of his clients, and on my way out he said. “See you in the morning at 5:00!” I looked back and without hesitation I said okay. I’ve been going there on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 5 a.m. for a year now. On the first day I was given a health analysis through a series of questions and then started with my training. The weight loss/body toning approach, even though there are many others in the gym at the same time, is personalized and very effective. My program combines exercise, nutrition and supplements. My approach has included weight loss, strength training, body toning and cardio. The exercises impacted every part of my body. And I mean every part, including those I didn’t know I had. My fellow clients are very

helpful and encouraging because they know exactly what to expect. The camaraderie is exciting too. One of the first suggestions was to purchase epsom salt and soak in warm water every night for a week or two. That is excellent advice because every part of my body hurt for the first two weeks! On my first day I had to jump rope. When I got to 15 or so, I thought I was going to fall out. These days I’m doing 150+. Every exercise is done in 3 repetitions. For example, 20 of one routine, but it has to be done 3 times. In my early days, getting to 3 repetitions was EXTREMELY hard. I also walk/ jog at least three times a week in the evenings and Saturday mornings. TJ and his staff know their business very well and he knew what I needed to get the results I was looking for. One of the things he emphasizes is NOT to focus on the scales. We women love to base our weight loss success on what the scale says. But the scales are just as fickle as people can be. One day you have one number and then a week later, after you have done everything you’re supposed to do, and you get back on the scales and the number has gone

up. Uh oh.! That is when doubt and discouragement creep in. Instead, TJ says to focus on how you feel and how your clothes fit. I totally agree. In addition to the exercise routine, which is different each time, he provided a Nutritional Guide with food and menu recommendations. One of the things he said was to eat three meals a day and 3 snacks a day. Say what? There were plenty of days that, prior to starting my new lifestyle, eating breakfast and then not eating again for five or more hours was routine. I learned that your body needs regular meals to keep it metabolized. Almost like fuel for a car. When your body is not getting regular meals or snacks, it will simply store and conserve energy until you do decide to eat. Thus the fat piles up over the years. And that is partly what happened to me. That concept was the most profound knowledge I have gained throughout this process. Next issue: Part Two + Helen Blocker-Adams is Executive Director of the Southeast Enterprise Institute; mental health advocate; and youth advocate. You can reach her at hba@hbagroup-intl. com or visit her website at www. helenblockeradams.com

The real world doesn’t reward perfectionists. It rewards people who get things done.


MAY 17, 2013

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AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

WHAT EVERYBODY OUGHT TO KNOW

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ABOUT IMMUNITY TO DISASTER

odney had several women working in his office. They varied in age, size, shape, and race. Each had her own niche of functionality. He needed them more than they needed him. They were a team. Maggie stood out. She was pretty and hard working. Seldom, if ever, was she late. She exuded an unusual level of shyness that meshed well with proficiency. She had a shortcoming. She had settled for a husband, Sammy, who did not deserve her. She never said that (and maybe never even thought it), but Sammy felt deep down that Maggie was better than he deserved. With that dark paranoid thought lurking deep in his mind, Sammy harbored suspicions that she might be tempted by men more polished than he. Therein lay a smoldering problem festering to the surface. Maggie warned Rodney that her husband planned to pay Rodney a visit the next day regarding “what was going on at the office

with his wife.” He had done that before. The outcomes had not been good. Usually it began with a shouting match between Sammy and Maggie’s employer, and ended with Maggie reentering the job market amid multiple hurt feelings. Rodney wanted advice about how to fend off Sammy’s impending onslaught without losing Maggie as a valuable employee. I told him about the “burned out husband” syndrome, where a man marries a woman he perceives as too good for him and then spends the next three decades working two jobs to keep the wife in a style he normally could not afford. He is usually skinny, smokes, and drinks beer on the weekend to escape his perceived realities. He never complains outwardly or misses work. Then one sad day, he slips into exhaustion and falls apart, has COPD, goes on disability (which crushes him emotionally) and, within a

E

TH

Best couple years, dies. I have seen it much too often. Some such burned out husbands, on the way to their miserable end, suffer in silence. Others act out. Sammy seemed to be the latter. Rodney couldn’t afford an upheaval in his office. And he didn’t want rumors that he messed around with office girls swirling around town. His social and business standing could not withstand a public indictment of sexual harassment whether true or not. Clarence Thomas and Herman Cain came to mind. “I feel paranoid about all this,” Rodney lamented under a tired breath.

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“Just because you’re paranoid doesn’t mean the bastards aren’t out to get you.” My voice dripped with a mock philosophical slant. “You aren’t very reassuring. How do I handle this? How do I defend myself against Sammy?” Rodney asked. “You don’t. A gentleman does not defend himself.” “If I don’t, he might punch me in the nose. Or sue me. Or Lord knows what else.” “You miss the point. Don’t defend yourself. Defend Maggie.” “Maggie? How do I do that?” “Let Sammy start talking. Look him in the eye. Listen intently. At the first mention of anything even suggesting flirtation involving Maggie, abruptly interrupt with, ‘Are you crazy?!! If I even hinted something like that, Maggie would slap me into the middle of next week. You must be out of your mind to think Maggie would allow anything like that.’

“That way, you are removed from the equation. This interaction will refocus on the morals of Maggie (which you magnify) and Sammy’s insecurity (which you vilify).” Rodney went away secure in his new immunity to impending doom, knowing he and his team would be safe. Now, if we just had immunizations against some more disorders I can think of: Stupidity. Aggressive ignorance. Laziness. Terrorism. Federal regulations. The common cold. Armpit odor. Facial wrinkles. Hemorrhoids. Those are just a few things that I find to be a pain in the butt, literally and figuratively. Not every immunization involves a shot or being exposed to a bacterial or viral illness. You can immunize yourself against many problems, real and imaginary, if you don’t see yourself as the center of the world and think of those around you. + Bad Billy Laveau is a retired MD with a pointed sense of humor. Bad Billy speaks and entertains at public and private events for audiences not subject to cardiac seizure secondary to overwhelming laughter and glee BadBilly@knology.net or 706306-9397

+

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MAY 17, 2013

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

SCREENING… from page 2 Walking down the health science hallway at A.R. Johnson, one could see each classroom converted into a fully-functioning screening station, each designated for EKGs, cardiac ultrasounds, blood pressure and heart rhythm, blood sugar and cholesterol, body mass index, and oral health. Each station was operated by a team of students and instructors from A.R. Johnson, University Hospital, and Augusta Technical College. In all, there were more than 50 A.R. Johnson representatives, with around 25 from both University and Augusta Tech. The Career Technical Agriculture Education (CTAE) tracks are what make the youth from A.R. Johnson the perfect caliber of high school students to pull off an event such as this. Before they enter the school as freshmen, students must choose the track—either health sciences or engineering—that they will pursue. By sophomore year, those who chose health sciences have to choose again, this time between Basic Clinical Diagnostics and General Medicine. Basic Clinical Diagnostic students have the opportunity to earn two certifications: Certified Medical Laboratory Assistant and Certified Phlebotomy Technician. General Medicine students can earn certifications such as Certified Nursing Assistant, Patient Care Technician, First Responder, and starting next year, Surgical Technician. Narelis Acevedo, a senior on the Clinical Diagnostic track and a recently certified phlebotomy technician, took blood for the glucose and cholesterol testing station. “We learned capillary puncture in sophomore year,” she said, snapping on her blue latex gloves, “and now it’s coming in handy in a way that helps the community.” A.R. Johnson students on the health sciences track get most of their experience from their rotations at the local hospitals. Clinical Diagnostics students spend their senior year in different sites throughout Georgia Regents Health System, the teaching hospital down the street. Depending on the certifications they are preparing for, General Medicine students may rotate in Georgia Regents Health System and several other locations, including Georgia War Veterans Nursing Home, Richmond County Health Department, and University Hospital.

Dr. Mac Bowman from University Hospital discusses the results of a Cardiac Sonogram with the parent of a student athlete. (Photos courtesy of A.R. Johnson Health Science and Engineering Magnet School) Dr. Mac Andrew Bowman, MD, used his specialties of Cardiology, Internal Medicine, and Cardiovascular Disease as he worked the Ultrasound station. He’s been in practice for 30 years, and has had experiences with A.R. Johnson students in University for more than 10 years. “This is the second time we’ve worked with this program,” said Dr. Bowman. “It’s been great, it’s an outstanding facility. The A.R. Johnson students already know something about medical assessment and vital signs, they can get practice in a supervised environment, and so can our University students. And of course, these young, competing athletes can check their health.” These young, competing athletes come in all ages from all different schools in the area. One of the youngest students was 6-year-old Grace Edwards, who came with her 13-year-old big sister, Dominique,

who swims. Junior Austin Childers, a baseball and football player at Westside High School, said it was his coach who insisted he get screened. Eighth-grader Marlow Jones, a basketball, football, and baseball player at Jackson Middle School, quietly said, “My mom made me.” His somewhat reluctant response was enthusiastically followed up by the A.R. Johnson senior checking his cholesterol, Ty’Shae Wiley, “Because his mom loves him so much and just wants him to be healthy!” Wiley has the right idea. Andrea and Danny Bowles brought their two daughters, soccer players at Greenbrier High School, to the screening. Andrea Bowles reasoned, “The required sports physicals don’t include all of this. It’s important for kids who play out in the heat, like our girls do.” Travis and Katharine Doss, parents of a senior soccer player at Aquinas High School, said they heard about the screening from a flyer their son’s school handed out. “It’s definitely worth it,” Travis Doss said, before adding with a laugh, “I used to go to Johnson, and we always had to get our practice with needles on each other. I’m sure it’s nice for the students to practice on someone else for a change.” Along with working the screening stations, Augusta Technical College educators and students held visual presentations of the school’s programs. There were ten information tables set up, covering Surgical, Cardiovascular, and Radiologic, and Emergency Medical Technology, Dental and Medical Assisting, Practical and Associate Degree Nursing, Nutritional Information and Respiratory Care. Karen Walton, Program Director of Medical Assisting at Augusta Tech, sat at a table towards the front. “Last year was successful, and this year it’s good to see a lot of receptive students, eager to learn,” she said. “We’re targeting all students and participants. Even parents have asked a lot of questions.” Ask any organizer of the event, and they would tell you what a rousing success the program turned out to be, even only two hours after the start. “It’s the right thing, for the right reason, done the right way,” Dr. Bowman praised. “Good on all levels.” +

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MAY 17, 2013

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AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

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HAPPY DOCTOR? IT’S A COIN TOSS

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teaching all of the ethical and personal standards of care. These are very important. Besides, as some might argue, the 3rd and 4th years are completely devoted to time on the wards, actively engaging in the day-to-day duties of physicians. But the point remains. Something is wrong. The 3rd year consists of pre-set specialties, without much time to discover any other fields. For example, at MCG, we get one chance to see one alternative specialty for four weeks. Additionally, many fields are not available to be seen due to prerequisites that have to be met later in the year. Then, as 4th year commences, students almost immediately have to begin applying to programs for the field they wish to enter. There just isn’t any time. Therefore the improved needs to be made in the first two years. I hope the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME), the body that oversees the required curriculum for medical schools, steps in. Study after study shows that happier employees are better, more productive employees. Do a quick Google search. There are

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systems of the body. We learn about all the diseases this type of specialist and that type may treat. But we don’t see what the actual day-to-day job consists of. Often, one type of procedure or one single disease will constitute the vast majority of a physician’s time. It’s hard to gauge that in a classroom, though. This misperception certainly contributes to the problem. The fault must lie with the medical schools and the required curriculum. Like I said, I just finished the first two years. Seeing actual physicians interact with their patients made up less than 1% of that time. Any true “shadowing” was done completely voluntarily. With the already-existing stresses and time constraints of medical school, for many, these encounters totaled 0%. After extensively searching online, there do not appear to be shadowing requirements at many other schools either. I don’t entirely blame the schools. Most of them already work diligently to include all of the components into their curriculums that are required to maintain accreditation. Each includes clinical skills sessions. Most of these are, however, directed at improving a student’s interviewing skills, physical exam skills, and

Ohio Ave.

his past fall, I was fortunate enough to make the trek back to the old alma mater in Athens and talk to the American Medical Student Association chapter there alongside a fellow medical student. For those who may not know, AMSA, as it’s called, is basically a way for pre-medical students to show their interest in medicine and hear some hopefully helpful advice along the way. We started at 6:30 pm. By 6:47, an attendee who happened to be a friend of my sister, had sent her the following message: “Your brother is speaking at my AMSA meeting and he’s scaring the crap out of me.” What was so bad? Well, my friend and I opened with the same thing I advise any student who’s thinking about medicine—don’t do it unless you’re sure. Medical school is hard. Residency is hard. Working as a physician is hard. There is a mile-long list of wrong reasons that people use to go into the field. However, the statistics I suspect scared the attendee the most are the same ones that scare me. It’s a small list of numbers published each year by Medscape in their Physician Compensation Report. No, it’s not the salary I hone in on. It’s a single slide towards the middle: Amount of physicians that report they would choose a career in medicine again if given the chance: 54%. Those that would choose the same specialty again: 41%. It’s the latter figure I’d like to discuss now. As I write this, I’m officially done with my first two years of medical school. I still have to pass the first of my national medical licensing exams, but I’m done with classes and tests within the classroom at MCG. That’s halfway done for those keeping score at home. In just six short months, we will be asked to declare our intended specialty. Yet the majority of 2nd year students still don’t know what specialty they wish to pursue. Even at this late juncture, many don’t have a clue. I think it’s because we don’t know what doctors do. Yes, we learn about all the

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+8

P harmacy 411

OUR NEWSSTANDS Medical locations: • Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Ctr, 15th St., Main Entrance • Dept. of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Uptown Div., Wrightsboro Rd., main lobby • Doctors Hospital, 3651 Wheeler Rd, ER Lobby Entrance • Doctors Hospital, 3651 Wheeler Rd, Employee Entrance (near the Joseph M. Still Burn Center entrance) • Eisenhower Hospital, Main Entrance, Fort Gordon • George C. Wilson Drive (by medical center Waffle House and mail boxes) • GHSU Hospital, 1120 15th Street, South & West Entrances • GHSU Medical Office Building, Harper Street, Main Entrance • GHSU Medical Office Building, Harper Street, Parking Deck entrance • GHSU Hospital, Emergency Room, Harper Street, Main Entrance • GHSU Children’s Medical Center, Harper Street, Main Lobby • GHSU, Laney-Walker Boulevard transit stop, Augusta • Select Specialty Hospital, Walton Way, Main entrance lobby • Trinity Hospital, Wrightsboro Road, main lobby by elevators • Trinity Hospital Home Health, Daniel Village, main lobby • University Health Federal Credit Union/ University Hospital Human Resources, 1402 Walton Way, Main Lobby • University Hospital, 1350 Walton Way, Emergency Room lobby area • University Hospital, 1350 Walton Way, Outside Brown & Radiology/Day Surgery • University Hospital - Columbia County, 465 N. Belair Road, Main Lobby • University Hospital Prompt Care, 3121 Peach Orchard Road, Augusta

Around town: • Barney’s Pharmacy, 2604 Peach Orchard Rd. • Birth Control Source, 1944 Walton Way • ASU Student Bookstore • Blue Sky Kitchen, 990 Broad Street • Columbia County Library, main branch lobby, Ronald Reagan Drive, Evans • Enterprise Mill (North Tower), 1450 Greene Street, Augusta • Daniel Village Barber Shop, Wrightsboro Road at Ohio Ave. • Hartley’s Uniforms, 1010 Druid Park Ave, Augusta • International Uniforms, 1216 Broad Street, Augusta • Marshall Family Y, Belair Rd, Evans • Mellow Mushroom, 12th and Broad Streets, Augusta • Southside Family Y, Tobacco Road, Augusta • Surrey Center, Surrey Center Pharmacy, Highland Avenue, Augusta • Top-Notch Car Wash, 512 N. Belair Road, Evans • Wild Wing Cafe, 3035 Washington Road, Augusta

Plus... 500+ doctors offices throughout the area for staff and waiting rooms, as well as nurses stations and waiting rooms of area hospitals.

MAY 17, 2013

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

Very little if anything about healthcare is inexpensive, and that includes medicine. Tiny pills can command large prices. Over-the-counter medications may be less expensive, but are they also less effective? Find the answers to lots of your drug store questions in this column written by Augusta pharmacists Chris and Lee Davidson exclusively for the Medical Examiner.

I HAVE A BLOOD SUGAR MONITOR. NOW WHAT?

T

here are many monitors to test blood glucose or blood sugar available. Most diabetics have one they either purchased or were given to test their blood sugar at home and on the go. The fact that there are many meters causes much confusion about which type of strip you need to purchase and why there are different shaped lancets to stick your finger. After all any lancet will do, right? Not necessarily. Let’s start by going through the different manufacturers. Then we will get into different meters put out by the same manufacturer. And we will end with rules about how and when to test your blood sugar. The primary brand name meter manufacturers are Accu-Chek, One Touch, Bayer, Freestyle, Medisense and Abbott. There are also several store brand meters marketed by Home Diagnostics, Diagnostic Devices, GE and others. It’s easy to see that confusion about what goes with what can arise in a skinny minute. Each meter has one strip that it can use and read correctly. For example, Abbott makes the Freestyle and Freestyle Lite lines of meters. A Freestyle meter cannot use a Freestyle Lite strip. That’s a picky little detail that users cannot

overlook. And it gets even pickier when you realize that a Freestyle meter has a unique lancet that fits in it, and it only. The easy part is that the Freestyle monitor’s lancet is also named Freestyle. This may the only case where it works out that easy for you. Luckily there are generic lancet devices, and generic lancets that fit most, but not all, lancet devices. Now let’s go through a few of the brand name meters and their test strips. Accu-Chek still makes several strips for their older meters that have since been discontinued. These are the Active and the Advantage (the newest strip is the Comfort Curve) meters. Their current meter line includes the Aviva (which uses single Aviva strips inserted into the meter), the Compact (uses a drum of seventeen Compact strips), the Nano and the Voicemate. Depending on the type and age of meters from Accu-Chek, you may have a Softclix lancet device (it uses individual Softclix lancets) or a Multiclix lancet device (uses a drum of six Multiclix lancets). The one lancet versus multiple lancets option is repeated across all the brands of meters. Ask your pharmacist for help selecting a strip and lancet combination, but

remember many meters look alike and looking at the pictures on the store shelf can be confusing. Take your meter and lancet device into the store and ask for supplies for “this meter and lancet device” and show the pharmacist your kit. Even though meters are basically doing the same job they always have done, there have been numerous improvements over the years and the meter that is best for you will depend on multiple factors. So your friend’s meter may not be best for you. It will certainly work for you, but there may be a better choice. I will talk in the next article about selecting a meter designed for you because I have run out of space in this article. In closing I’d like to take just a minute to discuss when to test for the beginner. Ask

your doctor or pharmacist how many times a day you should be testing. Non-insulin dependent diabetics that do not have fluctuating blood sugars probably will be testing once a day. Diabetics controlled with insulin may test a minimum of three to four times daily. People on an insulin pump or with widely fluctuating sugar readings may test six to ten times daily as prescribed by your physician. The fasting blood sugar reading is first thing in the morning before the first food of the day. This is the most important blood sugar reading you will track. Even if only taking your blood sugar once daily try to vary your blood glucose testing times so you get a picture of how your sugar levels run throughout the day. Fasting should be your primary focus if testing only once a day but a couple of times per week test before or two hours after a meal just to cover all bases. We will discuss this more next issue. + Written for the Medical Examiner by Augusta pharmacists Chris and Lee Davidson (cjdlpdrph@bellsouth.net ) Questions about this article or suggestions for future columns can be sent to us at cjdlpdrph@bellsouth.net

Who do you think should be Augusta’s

DOCTOR OF THE YEAR? VOTE

We’re looking for your input. Is your doctor an exceptional caregiver? Give us details! Please write today to our mail or email address on page 3.

VOTE


MAY 17, 2013

9+

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

WIDE-EYED‌ from page 7 plenty of studies. Directing these future physicians to a field that they will truly enjoy will certainly impact the situation positively and improve our healthcare system. Let’s require students to go and see different fields, particularly ones they think they’re interested in and ones

that they won’t see later on. We could find the right fit for more students. Who knows, maybe we could get specialty satisfaction levels as high as 50%‌ + Ross Everett is a 2nd year medical student at the Medical College of Georgia. He grew up in Buford,

Georgia and graduated from the University of Georgia in 2011. In addition to his coursework, he is interested in health policy, health systems and health management. Please contact him at wideeyedwhitecoat@gmail. com and “Like� him on Facebook at Wide-Eyed White Coat.



A mortgage created exclusively for licensed medical physicians. It’s just what the doctor ordered. $W6XQ7UXVW0RUWJDJH,QFZHDSSODXGWKHGHGLFDWLRQRI\RXUFOLHQWVZKRZRUNLQWKHÀHOGRIPHGLFLQH7RVKRZRXU DSSUHFLDWLRQZH¡YHFUHDWHGWKH'RFWRU/RDQ3URJUDP1 ZLWKVSHFLDOPRUWJDJHÀQDQFLQJIRUSXUFKDVHVDQGUHÀQDQFHV  ‡)RUOLFHQVHGPHGLFDOSK\VLFLDQVZKRKDYHFRPSOHWHGWKHLUUHVLGHQF\ZLWKLQWKHODVW1\HDUV    8SWR1ÀQDQFLQJ2,3IRUORDQDPRXQWVXSWR, VXEMHFWWRVWDWHOLPLWDWLRQV

0D[LPXPORDQDPRXQWRI1PLOOLRQ  ‡)RU5HVLGHQWV,,QWHUQVDQG)HOORZV    8SWR1ÀQDQFLQJ2,3 VXEMHFWWRVWDWHOLPLWDWLRQV

   0D[LPXPORDQDPRXQWRI1,  ‡1RPRUWJDJHLQVXUDQFH   ‡)L[HGUDWHDQGDGMXVWDEOHUDWH loans ‡ &oPSHWLWLYH SULFLnJ anG sSHFLal UHlaWLonsKLS GLsFoXnWs )RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQFDOOWRGD\

-RKQ%DLUG/RDQ2IĂ€FHU 6XQ7UXVW0RUWJDJH,QF  MRKQEDLUG#VXQWUXVWFRP ZZZVXQWUXVWPRUWJDJHFRPMEDLUG 10/65

1 Available only in AL, AR, DE, FL, GA, MD, MS, NC, SC, TN, VA, WV, DC and select counties in NJ and PA to Residents, Interns, Fellows, Doctors of Osteopathy (DO) or licensed medical physicians that have completed their residency within the last 10 years. 2 Borrowers should note that 100% mortgage financing will result in no property equity until such time as the loan principal is paid down through regular mortgage payments and/or the property value appreciates. Additionally, if property values decline you could owe more than your property’s value. 3 A down payment may be required if the property is located in a declining market. 4 Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM) products have interest rates that may increase after consummation. The information contained herein is intended as informational material for the sole and exclusive use of the business entities to which it was distributed and is subject to change without written notice. Equal Housing Lender. SunTrust Mortgage, Inc., 901 Semmes Avenue, Richmond, VA 23224, NMLS # 2915, is licensed by the Department of Corporations under the California Residential Mortgage Lending Act; is an Illinois Residential Mortgage Licensee; is a Lender in Massachusetts having Mortgage Lender license #s ML1216, ML0133, ML1432, ML1914, ML1913, ML1815, ML2411, ML1214, ML2442, ML2491, and ML2538; is licensed by the New Hampshire Banking Department; is licensed by the New Jersey Department of Banking and Insurance, toll free 1-800-330-4684; is a licensed lender in Rhode Island; and is doing business in Arizona as Crestar Mortgage, 7250 N. 16th Street, Ste. 100, Phoenix, AZ 85020. Š2012 SunTrust Banks, Inc. SunTrust and SunTrust Mortgage are federally registered service marks of SunTrust Banks, Inc. REV082712HJ-R STMR1068

To WILD WING CAFE TOP NOTCH CAR WASH SCRUBS OF EVANS and HEALTH CENTER CREDIT UNION The prize sponsors of the Mystery Word Contest.

OUR NEXT ISSUE : JUNE 7 We publish every 1st and 3rd Friday.


+ 10

MAY 17, 2013

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

Research proves positive effects of music by Kathy Crist

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Scientific researchers and music therapy professionals across the globe are continuing to discover how listening to music positively affects cognitive, physical and emotional health. Following are some ways music positively impacts the health of seniors and others: • Decreases anxiety and soothes pain. A 2011 Crist report of cancer patients shows that musical interventions calm patients from operating rooms to family clinics. • Reduces stress. A comprehensive review of 400 research papers on music’s neurochemistry found that music reduces stress levels. Listening to and playing music significantly lowers the stress hormone cortisol, which also is known for weight gain. • Lowers blood pressure and boosts heart health. Listening to joyful music helps blood flow through blood vessels. In a University of Maryland Medical Center study, the diameter of blood vessels expanded by 26 percent when a person listened to happy music and constricted by 6 percent when a person listened to anxiety-triggering music. • Boosts the immune system. Music is shown to increase helpful antibodies, particularly immunoglobulin A, and supports cells that attack bacteria and germs invading the body. • Lifts mood and decreases depression. Both singing and listening to music increase endorphins, which boost feelings of happiness and pleasure. • Aids memory. Listening to music triggers the release of the brain’s neurotransmitter, dopamine, which aids cognition, voluntary movement, working memory and sleep. Stanford University researchers conducted brain scans that showed classical music helps the mind sharpen focus and sort information. Whether it’s classical, country, ragtime or rock ‘n’ roll, music can help aging loved ones recover from illness or injury, improve their mood and recall past events. Any well-qualified home health agency will continually strive to improve the quality of life for its clients: caregivers should engage clients in activities including going for walks, working a puzzle, playing cards, listening to music, going out to lunch or simply letting the client reminisce about their life. + Right at Home is dedicated to helping caregivers and those needing care by providing private-duty care giving services. Right at Home serves Aiken and surrounding areas in the CSRA. If you have further concerns about caring for a loved one, please contact us at 803-648-7616 or on the web at www.rightathome.net/csra.

is now



+

  ®

• Specialty Pharmacy • Home Infusion Ser vices • IV Nursing

Try our Pot Head Blend Drug of Choice Brand Coffee is available at Inner Bean on Davis Road.

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READ THE MEDICAL EXAMINER — AND MUCH MORE — AT THE MEDICAL EXAMINER BLOG (www.AugustaRx.com/news)

Same phone numbers! Same convenient location! 3630 Wheeler Road • Augusta, Georgia phone: 706.447.4343 • tollfree: 877.436.4584

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From hospital to home, quality of care continues


MAY 17, 2013

From THE Bookshelf

The blog spot — Posted April 16, 2013 at digitaldoorway.blogspot.com

HEROES, COURAGE, TRAUMA AND RECOVERY Yesterday, April 15th, 2013, two explosions rocked the Boston Marathon as runners and their supporters gathered in the afternoon near the finish line. As the race was winding down, the sense of celebration was palpable in the air, only to be replaced by shock and panic as a scene including dozens of injured and three dead emerged through the smoke. None of us want to live our lives in fear of terrorism or unexpected trauma, yet in the reality of life in the 21st century, we are periodically reminded of our vulnerability. And while millions in places like the West Bank, Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq and Israel live with the threat (and occurrence) of such violence on a regular basis, those of us within the borders of North America have been more inured to mass shootings than bombings over the last decade. Oklahoma City, Atlanta and the events of September 11th, 2001 still remain a part of the collective American zeitgeist, although we have, as of late, been more keenly focused on mass shootings like Aurora, Colorado and Newtown, Connecticut. It’s particularly tragic that parents of the slain children in Newtown, Connecticut were being honored as VIPs at the marathon, and they now have the misfortune to have witnessed yet another tragedy that must only add insult to their previously sustained psycho-emotional injuries. And the fact that an eightyear-old child died in one of the explosions only makes the situation even more poignantly lamentable. What moves me greatly about what happened yesterday in Boston are the ways in which people dive in head first when the need arises. In eyewitness accounts, articles, photographs and videos, we see again and again how laypeople and uniformed professionals alike pitched in together to clear the debris, gain access to the victims, comfort the injured, and tend to the fallen. Reports show that off-duty first responders, police, firefighters, nurses, doctors, surgeons, therapists, counselors and others rushed both to the disaster area and to their respective workplaces, with some hospitals witnessing rapid increases of available staff by up to 500% within an hour of the explosions. People pull together so quickly in times of crisis, and I have tears in my eyes as I imagine the suffering of the injured, the confusion of those impacted by the chaos, as well as the heroism of those who rushed to help without regard for their own safety or the potential of further explosions. I would hope that, when necessary, I would respond in exactly the same way in which so many brave individuals responded yesterday in downtown Boston. Human suffering is a universal experience, as is humans’ innate desire to help others and relieve their suffering. The traumatic events of April 15th will not be forgotten quickly. Even as we search for answers and someone to punish for this nefarious act, I also hope that these sorts of collective experiences can increase our compassion for those who suffer similar violence and trauma around the world on a daily basis. Suffering unites us all, as does compassion. Let us glean from this event what lessons we can, and become even stronger voices for peace, love, courage, heroism, resilience and wisdom. +

“ I hope I would respond in the same way ”

Editor’s note: An extensive gallery of images from the Boston Marathon bombings is linked from the Medical Examiner blog. Visit www.augustarx.com/news/?p=2531

11 +

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

Don’t let your fear of what could happen make nothing happen.

In a perfect world, nobody would need this book. Alas, that perfect world is not this one, at least not yet. We have more problems than even a mathematician could count, and few if any of them have clear solutions. Can you end unemployment? Unlock the cure for cancer or solve the mysteries of the aging process? Figure out how to get people to use their blinkers? See what we mean? And yet into the realm of problems without solutions enters Augusten Burroughs. No stranger to many readers, Burroughs has led a difficult life, so difficult that he’s made millions of dollars writing about how tough it’s been. That’s not to say life hasn’t been a real life hell for him. His family life put the dys in dysfunctional. He was abandoned by his mother at an early age and, while he wasn’t raised by wolves, he might as well have been. His best-selling autobiographical memoir of his squalid childhood, Running With Scissors, is usually described in reviews as a “harrowing” tale. He followed up that success with Dry: A Memoir, recounting his stay in America’s most

frumpy and depraved alcohol rehab facility. To this point in his literary career, Burroughs has liberally laced his sordid confessions with humor. It takes real talent to live the life he has and write about it with such humor. But that was then. This Is How. And This Is How is exactly what its title advertises: self-help. Or to quote directly: “help for the self.” Yes, in its entirety here’s the title (it’s a little small to read above): This Is How: Proven Aid in Overcoming Shyness, Molestation, Fatness, Spinsterhood, Grief, Disease, Lushery, Decrepitude & More. For Young and Old Alike. Let’s face facts. Some of these issues are really, really difficult

to handle. And they aren’t problems that come and go in a few days, or within a week or two. They can follow us around for an entire lifetime if we don’t learn to face them and stare them down. Several years ago much criticism met the news that Jane Fonda had been named to spearhead a Georgia initiative to reduce our teen pregnancy rates. At the time, we wondered about the uproar. Would a nun, for example, be a believable and realistic advocate for celibacy? Or would someone who had made mistakes and learned from them be more relevant? In a similar vein, a guy who has really gotten his hands dirty so far in life seems a lot more qualified to write a book like this than someone who lives in an ivory tower. + This Is How: Proven Aid in Overcoming Shyness, Molestation, Fatness, Spinsterhood, Grief, Disease, Lushery, Decrepitude & More. For Young and Old Alike by Augusten Burroughs, 240 pages, published May 8, 2012 by St. Martin’s Press This review appeared in a previous Examiner issue.

the

First, do no arm What, yet another Medical Examiner typo? Not this time. It turns out that the arm as the preferred site for injecting childhood vaccines may be one of those “because that’s the way we’ve always done it” things. A study released early this year of more than a million children who were given DTaP (diphtheria, tetanus and pertusis) vaccines by injection found that administering the shot in the thigh resulted in about half the risk of the same shot in the upper arm. The study, published in January in the journal Pediatrics, found little or no benefit to thigh shots for other vaccinations, such as influenza or hepatitis A. Researchers theorize that the larger mass of the thigh muscle allows for enhanced diffusion of any inflammation that occurs. Knowing pain Members of the US military are experiencing “injuries

Clipping File

among the most painful known to medicine,” said speakers at this past weekend’s American Pain Society annual scientific meeting. Thanks to better body armor and rapid medevacs, service members are routinely surviving injuries that would have been fatal as recently as the first Gulf War. The flip side of that coin is being alive to experience painful treatment, especially severe burns that body armor cannot protect against. Not only is the wound itself painful, but months of daily treatments — washings, debridement, dressing changes and skin graft surgeries — spell an agonizing recovery. Opiods, long a mainstay of pain treatment, increase the risk of respiratory side effects and addiction. Physicians and researchers affiliated with the Dept. of Defense are experimenting with

the analgesic tramadol and an injectable agent, resiniferitoxin (RTX), to temporarily deactivate nerve endings. Drug-free BP improvements There are a number of nondrug measures that can help lower blood pressure, reports Consumer Reports in commenting on a review of studies by the American Heart Association. The strongest evidence was for exercise, including brisk walking and strength or resistance training. You say you’re not up for lifting weights or brisk walking? The study also found a surprisingly high benefit — a 10 percent drop in blood pressure after 4 weeks — from hand exercises, using one of the squeezer things you see here. Naturally, it would be wise to consult your doctor before beginning any program of strenuous exercise or discontinuing any medication. +


+ 12

MAY 17, 2013

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

THE EXAMiNERS +

by Dan Pearson

What’s this about you moving That’s right. It should be quite an adventure. away?

I got a job as a nurse What’s the deal? in Central America.

That is crazy. Where exactly?

Nebraska

The Mystery Word for this issue: OINSTUCLOIP

© 2013 Daniel Pearson All rights reserved.

EXAMINER CROSSWORD

PUZZLE ACROSS 1. ____ Park neighborhood 5. Throat dangler 10. Daytime TV’s Kelly 14. Indefinite time (British spelling) 15. Savannah is one 16. Periods of history 17. Rave partner 18. Local de facto county seat 19. Lepidopterous insect 20. In proportion 22. Former Augusta mayor 24. Forward surge 25. Diarist Anais 26. Chapter of the Koran 28. Ferry leader 32. Gordon’s beginning 35. Masters month 37. Mr. Ballesteros 38. Elizabethan follower 39. Type of ball 40. Cover 41. Applaud 43. Contractions 45. Retired auto line 46. Augusta street 48. Hawaiian goose 50. Golfer Ernie 51. Cartoon inspector 55. ______ racing 59. Conference 60. Capital of Yemen 61. Singer Billy 63. Ask 64. Wife of a rajah 65. Sleight of hand 66. ____ Corner 67. Fwd. movement 68. Deep, lustrous black 69. For fear that

BY

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33

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44 48

50

45

58

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61

62

64

65

66

67

68

69

63

— Author unknown

by Daniel R. Pearson © 2013 All rights reserved

by Daniel R. Pearson © 2013 All rights reserved. Built in part with software from www.crauswords.com

DOWN 1. One of Chico’s brothers 2. Long 3. Organ _______ 4. Give to; charge with 5. Bladder exit tube 6. Brawny rival 7. Univ. conceived by Thomas Jefferson 8. _____-Lease 9. ________ Oak (at ASU) 10. Sends back into custody 11. Press 12. ____ de foie gras 13. Wan 21. Successor to AC 23. French wine 27. _____ Score for newborns 28. Paul ______ Theater 29. Telfair auditorium 30. Ardent 31. Clarets 32. Indispotable truth 33. Look at amorously

’ E D O S S M A F A T S E S N E T H A R E E N E T H I M E N T K E N E I R Y H E V W E O D Y O

49 51

57

Click on “Reader Contests”

40

47

56

VISIT WWW.AUGUSTARX.COM TO ENTER!

QUOTATION PUZZLE 29

39

41

All Mystery Word finders will be eligible to win by random drawing. We’ll announce the winner in our next issue!

13

23

36

38

55

12

25 26

32

11

Simply unscramble the letters, then begin exploring our ads. When you find the correctly spelled word hidden in one of our ads — enter at AugustaRx.com

34. McCoy’s first name? 36. Chafe 42. Monetary unit of Germany 43. Supple 44. Mall 45. Describing a boy’s sexual attraction to his mother 47. Malt beverage 49. Vietnam, for short 52. Garden ornament 53. Relaxes 54. Senator Lott 55. Large roughly triangular musical instrument 56. 6th month of the Jewish calendar 57. City in W. Nevada 58. Strike breaker 59. To make the sign of the cross 62. Self-esteem

DIRECTIONS: Recreate a timeless nugget of wisdom by using the letters in each vertical column to fill the boxes above them. Once any letter is used, cross it out in the lower half of the puzzle. Letters may only be used once. Black squares indicate spaces between words, and words may extend onto a second line. Solution on page 14.

E

1 2 7

X A M I N E R

4 7

3

S

6 2 5 4 8 6 1 2 3 5 3 4 8 5 6 1 8

U D O K U

1 7

6

by Daniel R. Pearson © 2013 All rights reserved. Built with software from www.crauswords.com

Solution p. 14

DIRECTIONS: Every line, vertical and horizontal, and all nine 9-square boxes must each contain the numbers 1 though 9. Solution on page 14.

Use the letters provided at bottom to create words to solve the puzzle. All the listed letters following 1 are the 1st letters of each word; the letters following 2 are 2nd letters of each word, and so on. Try solving words with letter clues and entering unique and minimal choice letters (such as 5 thru 9 in this puzzle). A sample is shown. Solution on page 14.

L 1 2 3 4 1

2

3

4

N 2 3

1 5

6

7

O P 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 N 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

F 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

1 2 3 4 T D 1 2 3 1 2 3 4

1 2 3 4

1.SSFFFFAATYR 2.RNNUUHEEEAO 3.PICDDISEEEU 4.EEELLLCYR 5.NERN 6.DIET 7.ODFS 8.UR

SAMPLE:

1. ILB 2. SLO 3. VI 4. NE 5. D =

L 1

O 2

V 3

E 4

I 1

S 2

B 1

9.L

L 2

I 3

N 4

D 5

by Daniel R. Pearson © 2013 All rights reserved

WORDS NUMBER

1

THE MYSTERY WORD


MAY 17, 2013

THE BEST MEDICINE do 25 cents each next week.” “You’re crazy if you think we’re going to waste our time for that kind of money,” the ringleader says, “We quit.” Doctor to patient: “I have good news and bad news. The good news is that you’re not a hypochondriac.” On the last day of school, a kindergarten teacher was receiving gifts from her pupils. The florist’s son handed her a box. She shook n old man finally lets his kids convince it, held it over her head, and said, “I bet I him to move into a retirement home after know what it is - flowers!” years of living alone. The only place with space “That’s right!” said the boy, “but how did available was next door to an elementary school. you know?” Early in the morning each day on the way to “Just a wild guess,” she said. school, the same two young boys come by with The next pupil was the candy store owner’s sticks and beat on the mailbox in front of the daughter. The teacher held her gift overhead, retirement home. It makes a huge racket and the shook it and said, “I bet I can guess what it is nursing home residents hate it. They try calling - a box of candy!” the school, but the school says there’s nothing “That’s right! But how did you know?” they can do since it’s off school property. asked the girl. Finally, the old man has had enough. He “Just a lucky guess,” said the teacher. decides to talk to the boys face to face. He catches The next gift was from the liquor store them one morning by the mailbox and says, “You owner’s son. The teacher held the bag over guys are doing a great job on this mailbox. It’s a her head and noticed that it was dripping. lot of fun for me to watch the other residents get She touched a drop of the leakage with her so angry, so if you promise to keep doing this, I’ll finger and tasted it. give you each a dollar a day.” “Is it wine?” she asked. After paying for the first week, the man says, “No,” the boy replied. “Listen boys, I’m on a fixed income. Between the The teacher repeated the process, tasting recession and paying to rent my room here, I can more of the drippings. only afford 50 cents from now on.” The kids are “Is it champagne?” she asked. disappointed, but they agree to keep it up. “No,” the boy replied. At the end of week two, the old man pays up The teacher then said, “I give up. What is but says, “Sorry guys, but I haven’t gotten my it?” check yet this month. I’m only going to be able to The boy replied, “A puppy!” +

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The Patient’s Perspective by Marcia Ribble

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his spring, hot and cold have been battling for supremacy. We’ve had an abundance of cold and rain, but the usual springtime heat wave passed us by this year. There was a brief hot and cold rollercoaster through the entire month of February, and we learned to keep our umbrellas handy with over 10 inches of rain challenging last year’s drought conditions. Luckily, we had been so dry that we had little flooding, just lots of puddles. The puddles reminded me of the Christmas when my son Frank created a perfectly short fishing pole for Lee, who was only three. Frank attached a bobber to the line so Lee could cast the line and reel it back in without causing injuries to himself or others. Any time of year when there were puddles after a rain, Lee would put on his clothes and tell me, “I’m going outside to fish.” And he did fish, for hours at a time. Quietly, patiently, he would stand there, never complaining when he didn’t catch a single fish day after day, month after month. But by the time he was four, his line got a hook and a worm to go with the bobber, and he caught his first trout on a stream in Michigan, the Au Sable. Many patients are similarly able to live out lives that might, for others, be fraught with frustration, resentment, and anger. These patients are capable of optimism and relentless forward movement despite serious medical issues they are living with. That is one of the joys of working with senior citizens. People occasionally believe that hanging out with seniors, all one hears are a series of medical complaints. And many seniors do have a variety of medical issues they must deal with on a regular basis. But, like Lee, they rarely make those problems the basis for their

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Talk is cheap. Not talking can be deadly.

conversations. They find the world to still an interesting place to be in. Throughout the entire year he was three, Lee didn’t catch a single fish. After all, he did fish in a puddle. He took the time instead to look at the clouds, imagining the shapes were dogs, clown and bears. He imagined the fish he would catch, the magic of the way they so cleverly hid from him. He noticed the snow melting, the dandelions growing and flowering, and the birds flying and stopping to catch a bug. That was the year his vocabulary blossomed and he learned the names of fish, birds, and flowers. Although some slow down or quit, most seniors never lose their curiosity and never stop asking questions and learning. My new piece of information this week is that I don’t have to take the mandatory distributions from my 401K until 2014, after I’ve become 70 and ½ years old. We’re watching carefully these days to see how our Social Security and Medicare will be affected by the sequester and by the new health care rules being implemented. +

Marcia Ribble received her PhD in English at Michigan State and recently retired from the University of Cincinnati where she taught composition. She taught writing at the college level and loves giving voice to people who have been silenced. She is now teaching again at Virginia College in Augusta. She can be reached with comments, suggestions, etc., at marciaribble@hotmail.com.

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MAY 17, 2013

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

THE MYSTERY SOLVED The Mystery Word in our last issue was: INJECTION

...cleverly hidden right in the middle of the page 7 ad for SUNTRUST MORTGAGE Congratulations to BARBARA POWELL, who scores a $20 Wild Wing Cafe gift certificate, a $40 Scrubs of Evans gift card, two free movie passes courtesy of Health Center Credit Union, a free Top Notch Car Wash gift card, and for coffee drinkers, a jar of Drug of Choice gourmet coffee. Win this stuff! The new Mystery Word is on p. 12. Start looking!

The Celebrated MYSTERY WORD CONTEST ...wherein we hide (with fiendish cleverness) a simple word. All you have to do is unscramble the word (found on page 12), then be the first to find it concealed within one of our ads. Click in to the contest link at www.AugustaRx.com and enter. If we pick you in our random drawing of correct entries you’ll score our goodie package: gift certificates from Wild Wing Cafe, Top Notch Car Wash, and movie passes from Health Center Credit Union! SEVEN SIMPLE RULES: 1. Unscramble and find the designated word hidden within one of the ads in this issue. 2. Visit the Reader Contests page at www.AugustaRx.com. 3. Tell us what you found and where you found it. 4. If you’re right and you’re the one we pick at random, you win. (WInners within the past six months are ineligible.) 5. Prizes awarded to winners may vary from issue to issue. 6. A photo ID may be required to claim some prizes. 7. Other entrants may win a lesser prize at the sole discretion of the publisher.

The new scrambled Mystery Word is found on page 12

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covered patio, $125,000. 706-799-0394

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SERVICES

TOWNHOME Great location, everything new, 2 master suites, sunroom, all appliances. $98,000 (706) 504-4023

HOUSE CLEANING Want someone to clean your home the way you would if you had the time? I take the time to make sure nothing is overlooked and clean as if it were my personal home. Call 706.833.9787

TOWNHOME 3 bedroom, 3 full bath townhome. 2 master suites, like new, end unit with extra parking, single garage,

BIBLE BY PHONE - Free daily Bible readings; for Spiritual Encouragement and Growth. Call 706-855-WORD (9673)

FULL-SERVICE MOVER Anthony’s Professional Moving, 28 years serving the CSRA moving hospital equipment, offices, homes, apartments, etc. Estimates are FREE. Call 706.860.3726 or 706.814.8141 NOTICE! ATTENTION! If any current or past employer has failed to pay you min. wage or time and a half overtime pay, you may be entitled to an order from US Federal Court awarding you twice the amount of your unpaid wages plus atty. fees. For info, call Arthur H. Shealy, Attorney at Law, 803-278-5149, 1010 Plantation Rd, North Augusta SC 29841. You may be entitled to a similar award for unpaid wages if your employer required you to perform duties during your lunch hour, before clocking in, or after clocking out. LAWN SERVICE Commercial, residential. Call Vince: (704) 490-1005

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MAY 17, 2013

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AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

Don’t Lick the Beaters and other interesting food facts

by dietetic interns with University Hospital’s Augusta Area Dietetic Internship Program

BEANS, BEANS, GOOD FOR THE HEART...

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K, OK, so it’s not the greatest saying. My mom certainly would have washed my mouth out with soap if I said the rest of the rhyme. But the truth of the matter is we actually know beans are good for our hearts. When we think healthy foods, generally what comes to mind are whole grains, salads, baked or broiled chicken (not red meats), salad, and vegetables like broccoli. But what about the BEANS? Beans are probably one of the most ignored nutritious foods. Beans are more than just a meat substitute. They are inexpensive, versatile, and have some of the best health benefits around. The problem is Americans are not utilizing these healthy pods as recommended. In fact, the recommended guideline (1-3 cups per week) is triple the amount Americans are currently consuming per week. Why the push for more beans? A few reasons. First, the obvious: fiber. Study after study has shown the lack of fiber in our diets (we average about 15 grams per day but the recommendations are 25-35 grams per day). I know people worry about having a little extra gas when eating more beans and fiber, but these symptoms decrease as your body adjusts to eating more. Just take it easy and make sure you are drinking plenty of water with those beans. The benefits of meeting the fiber recommendations help with preventing many diseases, including diabetes, different types of cancers (such as colon cancer) and

CSRA Parkinson Support Group Meeting What: A caregiver panel featuring representatives from differing agencies will provide a brief overview of their services and then entertain questions from the group. MAY The agencies include 1) in-home care, 2) day care, 3) assisted living, and 4) nursing home services.

TUESDAY

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When:

Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 6:00pm

Where:

St. John Towers dining room 724 Greene Street Augusta, GA

Contact: Eva Erwin (706) 364-1662 Note: can decrease the probability of developing irritable bowel syndrome, Crohn’s Disease, and diverticulitis. And beans, as the ditty goes, are indeed “good for the heart.” Also, due to their fiber content, beans provide a full feeling even after eating a modest amount, and that helps to prevent overeating. People whose diets meet the daily recommendations for fiber are usually found to have more normal weights with smaller waist lines than people who do not meet the recommendations. Another great reason to eat beans: high bean intake also helps decrease saturated fat levels in the body, the kind of fat that builds up plaque in the arteries. Interesting enough, cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death in USA. Beans are one part of the antidote: they help decrease the probability of developing a blockage, a heart attack, or stroke. Beans also contain phytochemicals, antioxidants that remove free radicals from the body, resulting in less cancer development in all parts of the body.

This event is free and open to the public.

Look for easy ways to add beans daily into your meals. Just one cup of cooked beans provides about 12 grams of fiber. Remember beans are a protein substitute for meats, so try substituting some beans for that chicken or beef. Other suggestions would be to add black beans to tacos, or use creamy hummus (chickpeas and olive oil puree) on whole grain crackers or in a wrap. Sprinkle some pinto beans into a salad. Even consider a “black bean brownie” as a dessert (delicious!) There are so many different types of beans, so experiment and see which ones you like. What we’ve learned is true! Beans are unbelievably healthful in preventing medical diseases, they help our waste lines, and they keep us full. And they are inexpensive. The first saying is right: beans are good for your heart! But here is a better rhyme: “The more you eat, the better you feel, so eat your beans at every meal!” + — Anna Hudson University Hospital Dietetic Intern

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AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

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MAY 17, 2013


Medical Examiner